Brief History Podcast

By Andrew Knight

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Brief History - History behind the headlines. Comprehensively packaged in under a hour, perfect for the commute home, on your lunch break or in your precious spare time. Hosted by Andrew Knight @ajknight31 and sound by Harry Edmondson. @bhistorypodcast

Episode Date
FIFA World Cup
2312
The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia. The current format of the competition involves a qualification phase, which currently takes place over the preceding three years, to determine which teams qualify for the tournament phase, which is often called the World Cup Finals. After this, 32 teams, including the automatically qualifying host nation(s), compete in the tournament phase for the title at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about a month. The 21 World Cup tournaments have been won by eight national teams. Brazil have won five times, and they are the only team to have played in every tournament. The other World Cup winners are Germany and Italy, with four titles each; Argentina, France and inaugural winner Uruguay, with two titles each; and England and Spain with one title each. The World Cup is the most prestigious association football tournament in the world, as well as the most widely viewed and followed sporting event in the world, exceeding even the Olympic Games; the cumulative audience of all matches of the 2006 World Cup was estimated to be 26.29 billion with an estimated 715.1 million people watching the final match, a ninth of the entire population of the planet.[1][2][3][4] 17 countries have hosted the World Cup. Brazil, France, Italy, Germany and Mexico have each hosted twice, while Uruguay, Switzerland, Sweden, Chile, England, Argentina, Spain, the United States, Japan and South Korea (jointly), South Africa and Russia have each hosted once. Qatar are planned as hosts of the 2022 finals, and 2026 will be a joint hosted finals between Canada, the United States and Mexico, which will give Mexico the distinction of being the first country to have hosted games in three different finals. The Brief History Podcast, given you history behind the headline, under a hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resources https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/FIFA_World_Cup https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_FIFA_World_Cup https://www.fifa.com/worldcup/
Jul 17, 2018
President Trump The Baby Snatcher
1988
Since early May, 2,342 children have been separated from their parents after crossing the Southern U.S. border, according to the Department of Homeland Security, as part of a new immigration strategy by the Trump administration that has prompted widespread outcry. On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order reversing his policy of separating families — and replacing it with a policy of detaining entire families together, including children, but ignoring legal time limits on the detention of minors. The history of immigration to the United States details the movement of people to the United States starting with the first European settlements from around 1600. Beginning around this time, British and other Europeans settled primarily on the east coast. Later Africans were imported as slaves. The United States experienced successive waves of immigration, particularly from Europe. Immigrants sometimes paid the cost of transoceanic transportation by becoming indentured servants after their arrival in the New World. Later, immigration rules became more restrictive; the ending of numerical restrictions occurred in 1965. Recently, cheap air travel has increased immigration from Asia and Latin America. Attitudes towards new immigrants have cycled between favorable and hostile since the 1790s. Leading to Trump, The Wall and Mexico The Brief History Podcast, given you history behind the headline, under a hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_immigration_to_the_United_States https://www.npr.org/2018/06/19/621065383/what-we-know-family-separation-and-zero-tolerance-at-the-border?t=1531166077795 Barkan, Elliott Robert. And Still They Come: Immigrants and American Society, 1920 to the 1990s (1996), by leading historian Barkan, Elliott Robert, ed. A Nation of Peoples: A Sourcebook on America's Multicultural Heritage (1999), 600 pp; essays by scholars on 27 groups Barone, Michael. The New Americans: How the Melting Pot Can Work Again (2006) Bayor, Ronald H., ed. The Oxford Handbook of American Immigration and Ethnicity (2015) Bodnar, John. The Transplanted: A History of Immigrants in Urban America (1985) Dassanowsky, Robert, and Jeffrey Lehman, eds. Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America (2nd ed. 3 vol 2000), anthropological approach to 150 culture groups; 1974 pp Gjerde, Jon, ed. Major Problems in American Immigration and Ethnic History (1998) primary sources and excerpts from scholars. Levinson, David and Melvin Ember, eds. American Immigrant Cultures 2 vol (1997) covers all major and minor groups Meier, Matt S. and Gutierrez, Margo, eds. The Mexican American Experience: An Encyclopedia (2003) (ISBN 0-313-31643-0) Steidl, Annemarie et al. From a Multiethnic Empire to a Nation of Nations: Austro-Hungarian Migrants in the US, 1870–1940 (Innsbruck: Studien Verlag, 2017). 354 pp. Thernstrom, Stephan, ed. Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups (1980) (ISBN 0-674-37512-2), the standard reference, covering all major groups and most minor groups online Yans-McLaughlin, Virginia ed. Immigration Reconsidered: History, Sociology, and Politics (1990) Recent migrations Borjas, George J. "Does Immigration Grease the Wheels of the Labor Market?" Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, 2001 Hernández, Kelly Lytle. "The Crimes and Consequences of Illegal Immigration: A Cross-Border Examination of Operation Wetback, 1943 to 1954," Western Historical Quarterly, 37 (Winter 2006), 421–44. Kemp, Paul. Goodbye Canada? (2003), from Canada to U.S. Khadria, Binod. The Migration of Knowledge Workers: Second-Generation Effects of India's Brain Drain, (2000)
Jul 09, 2018
History of US Immigration, The Wall and Trump's Border Control
3179
The history of immigration to the United States details the movement of people to the United States starting with the first European settlements from around 1600. Beginning around this time, British and other Europeans settled primarily on the east coast. Later Africans were imported as slaves. The United States experienced successive waves of immigration, particularly from Europe. Immigrants sometimes paid the cost of transoceanic transportation by becoming indentured servants after their arrival in the New World. Later, immigration rules became more restrictive; the ending of numerical restrictions occurred in 1965. Recently, cheap air travel has increased immigration from Asia and Latin America. Attitudes towards new immigrants have cycled between favorable and hostile since the 1790s. Leading to Trump, The Wall and Mexico The Brief History Podcast, given you history behind the headline, under a hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_immigration_to_the_United_States Barkan, Elliott Robert. And Still They Come: Immigrants and American Society, 1920 to the 1990s (1996), by leading historian Barkan, Elliott Robert, ed. A Nation of Peoples: A Sourcebook on America's Multicultural Heritage (1999), 600 pp; essays by scholars on 27 groups Barone, Michael. The New Americans: How the Melting Pot Can Work Again (2006) Bayor, Ronald H., ed. The Oxford Handbook of American Immigration and Ethnicity (2015) Bodnar, John. The Transplanted: A History of Immigrants in Urban America (1985) Dassanowsky, Robert, and Jeffrey Lehman, eds. Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America (2nd ed. 3 vol 2000), anthropological approach to 150 culture groups; 1974 pp Gjerde, Jon, ed. Major Problems in American Immigration and Ethnic History (1998) primary sources and excerpts from scholars. Levinson, David and Melvin Ember, eds. American Immigrant Cultures 2 vol (1997) covers all major and minor groups Meier, Matt S. and Gutierrez, Margo, eds. The Mexican American Experience: An Encyclopedia (2003) (ISBN 0-313-31643-0) Steidl, Annemarie et al. From a Multiethnic Empire to a Nation of Nations: Austro-Hungarian Migrants in the US, 1870–1940 (Innsbruck: Studien Verlag, 2017). 354 pp. Thernstrom, Stephan, ed. Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups (1980) (ISBN 0-674-37512-2), the standard reference, covering all major groups and most minor groups online Yans-McLaughlin, Virginia ed. Immigration Reconsidered: History, Sociology, and Politics (1990) Recent migrations Borjas, George J. "Does Immigration Grease the Wheels of the Labor Market?" Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, 2001 Hernández, Kelly Lytle. "The Crimes and Consequences of Illegal Immigration: A Cross-Border Examination of Operation Wetback, 1943 to 1954," Western Historical Quarterly, 37 (Winter 2006), 421–44. Kemp, Paul. Goodbye Canada? (2003), from Canada to U.S. Khadria, Binod. The Migration of Knowledge Workers: Second-Generation Effects of India's Brain Drain, (2000) Mullan, Fitzhugh. "The Metrics of the Physician Brain Drain." New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 353:1810–18 October 27, 2005 Number 17 Odem, Mary and William Brown. Living Across Borders: Guatemala Migrants in the U.S. South Southern Spaces, 2011. Palmer, Ransford W. In Search of a Better Life: Perspectives on Migration from the Caribbean Praeger, 1990. Skeldon, Ronald, and Wang Gungwu; Reluctant Exiles? Migration from Hong Kong and the New Overseas Chinese 1994. Smith, Michael Peter, and Adrian Favell. The Human Face of Global Mobility: International Highly Skilled Migration in Europe, North America and the
Jul 02, 2018
Palestine - Israel Conflict
2276
Ethnic Cleansing, Genocide or War Crimes committed by both sides.? All discussed in this episode. The Israeli–Palestinian conflict (Hebrew: הסכסוך הישראלי-פלסטיני‎, translit. Ha'Sikhsukh Ha'Yisraeli-Falestini; Arabic: النزاع-الفلسطيني الإسرائيلي‎, translit. al-Niza'a al-Filastini-al-Israili) is the ongoing struggle between Israelis and Palestinians that began in the mid-20th century.[3] The origins to the conflict can be traced back to Jewish immigration, and sectarian conflict in Mandatory Palestine between Jews and Arabs.[4] It has been referred to as the world's "most intractable conflict", with the ongoing Israeli occupation of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip reaching 51 years.[5][6][7] Despite a long-term peace process and the general reconciliation of Israel with Egypt and Jordan, Israelis and Palestinians have failed to reach a final peace agreement. The key issues are: mutual recognition, borders, security, water rights, control of Jerusalem, Israeli settlements,[8] Palestinian freedom of movement,[9] and Palestinian right of return. The violence of the conflict, in a region rich in sites of historic, cultural and religious interest worldwide, has been the object of numerous international conferences dealing with historic rights, security issues and human rights, and has been a factor hampering tourism in and general access to areas that are hotly contested.[10] Many attempts have been made to broker a two-state solution, involving the creation of an independent Palestinian state alongside the State of Israel (after Israel's establishment in 1948). In 2007, the majority of both Israelis and Palestinians, according to a number of polls, preferred the two-state solution over any other solution as a means of resolving the conflict.[11] Moreover, a majority of Jews see the Palestinians' demand for an independent state as just, and thinks Israel can agree to the establishment of such a state.[12] The majority of Palestinians and Israelis in the West Bank and Gaza Strip have expressed a preference for a two-state solution.[13][14][unreliable source?] Mutual distrust and significant disagreements are deep over basic issues, as is the reciprocal scepticism about the other side's commitment to upholding obligations in an eventual agreement.[15] Within Israeli and Palestinian society, the conflict generates a wide variety of views and opinions. This highlights the deep divisions which exist not only between Israelis and Palestinians, but also within each society. A hallmark of the conflict has been the level of violence witnessed for virtually its entire duration. Fighting has been conducted by regular armies, paramilitary groups, terror cells, and individuals. Casualties have not been restricted to the military, with a large number of fatalities in civilian population on both sides. There are prominent international actors involved in the conflict. The two parties engaged in direct negotiation are the Israeli government, currently led by Benjamin Netanyahu, and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), currently headed by Mahmoud Abbas. The official negotiations are mediated by an international contingent known as the Quartet on the Middle East (the Quartet) represented by a special envoy, that consists of the United States, Russia, the European Union, and the United Nations. The Arab League is another important actor, which has proposed an alternative peace plan. Egypt, a founding member of the Arab League, has historically been a key participant. Jordan, having relinquished its claim to the West Bank in 1988 and holding a special role in the Muslim Holy shrines in Jerusalem, has also been a key participant. Since 2006, the Palestinian side has been fractured by conflict between the two major factions: Fatah, the traditionally dominant party, and its later electoral challenger, Hamas. After Hamas's electoral victory in 2006, the Quartet conditioned future foreign assistance to the Palestinian National A
May 22, 2018
Announcement
170
Announcement The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
May 15, 2018
The Korean War
3090
The Korean War 25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953) was a war between North Korea (with the support of China and the Soviet Union) and South Korea (with the principal support of the United States). The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea following a series of clashes along the border. The United Nations, with the United States as the principal force, came to the aid of South Korea. China came to the aid of North Korea, and the Soviet Union also gave some assistance to the North. ---------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_War Cumings, B (2011). The Korean War: A history. New York: Modern Library. Kraus, Daniel (2013). The Korean War. Booklist. Warner, G. (1980). The Korean War. International Affairs. Appleman, Roy E (1998) [1961]. South to the Naktong, North to the Yalu. United States Army Center of Military History. pp. 3, 15, 381, 545, 771, 719. ISBN 0160019184. Barnouin, Barbara; Yu, Changgeng (2006). Zhou Enlai: A Political Life. Hong Kong: Chinese University Press. ISBN 9629962802. Becker, Jasper (2005). Rogue Regime: Kim Jong Il and the Looming Threat of North Korea. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 019517044X. Blair, Clay (2003). The Forgotten War: America in Korea, 1950–1953. Naval Institute Press. Chen, Jian (1994). China's Road to the Korean War: The Making of the Sino-American Confrontation. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 978-0231100250. Cumings, Bruce (2005). Korea's Place in the Sun : A Modern History. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN 0393327027. Cumings, Bruce (1981). "3, 4". Origins of the Korean War. Princeton University Press. ISBN 8976966120. Dear, Ian; Foot, M.R.D. (1995). The Oxford Companion to World War II. Oxford, NY: Oxford University Press. p. 516. ISBN 0198662254. Goulden, Joseph C (1983). Korea: The Untold Story of the War. New York: McGraw-Hill. p. 17. ISBN 0070235805. Halberstam, David (2007). The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War. New York: Hyperion. ISBN 978-1401300524. Hermes, Walter G. (1992), Truce Tent and Fighting Front, Washington, DC: Center of Military History, United States Army, ISBN 0160359570 Jager, Sheila Miyoshi (2013). Brothers at War – The Unending Conflict in Korea. London: Profile Books. ISBN 978-1846680670. Kim, Yǒng-jin (1973). Major Powers and Korea. Silver Spring, MD: Research Institute on Korean Affairs. OCLC 251811671. Malkasian, Carter (2001). The Korean War, 1950–1953. Essential Histories. London; Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn. ISBN 1579583644. Millett, Allan R. (2007). The Korean War: The Essential Bibliography. The Essential Bibliography Series. Dulles, VA: Potomac Books Inc. ISBN 978-1574889765. Mossman, Billy C. (1990). Ebb and Flow, November 1950 – July 1951. United States Army in the Korean War. 5. Washington, DC: Center of Military History, United States Army. OCLC 16764325. Perrett, Bryan (1987). Soviet Armour Since 1945. London: Blandford. ISBN 0713717351. Ravino, Jerry; Carty, Jack (2003). Flame Dragons of the Korean War. Paducah, KY: Turner. Rees, David (1964). Korea: The Limited War. New York: St Martin's. OCLC 1078693. Rivera, Gilberto (3 May 2016). Puerto Rican Bloodshed on The 38th Parallel: U.S. Army Against Puerto Ricans Inside the Korean War. p. 24. ISBN 978-1539098942. Stein, R. Conrad (1994). The Korean War: "The Forgotten War". Hillside, NJ: Enslow Publishers. ISBN 0894905260. Stokesbury, James L (1990). A Short History of the Korean War. New York: Harper Perennial. ISBN 0688095135. Stueck, William W. (1995), The Korea
May 08, 2018
The Douma Chemical Attack
1700
Dogma Chemical Attack Special The Syrian Civil War (Arabic: الحرب الأهلية السورية‎, Al-ḥarb al-ʼahliyyah as-sūriyyah) is an ongoing multi-sided armed conflict in Syria fought primarily between the Ba'athist Syrian Arab Republic led by President Bashar al-Assad, along with its allies, and various forces opposing both the government and each other in varying constellations. The unrest in Syria, part of a wider wave of 2011 Arab Spring protests, grew out of discontent with the Assad government and escalated to an armed conflict after protests calling for his removal were violently suppressed. The war is being fought by several factions: the Syrian government and its international allies, a loose alliance of Sunni Arabrebel groups (including the Free Syrian Army), the majority-Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), Salafi jihadist groups (including al-Nusra Front), and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), with a number of countries in the region and beyond being either directly involved, or providing support to one or another faction. Iran, Russia, and Hezbollah support the Syrian government militarily, with Russia conducting air operations since September 2015. On the other hand, the U.S.-led international coalition established in 2014 with a declared purpose of countering ISIL, have conducted airstrikes against ISIL in Syria as well as against government and pro-government targets. Turkey on the other hand has become deeply involved since 2016 and beyond actively supporting the Syrian opposition, occupied large swathes of Northern Syria. International organizations have accused the Syrian government, ISIL, and Syria rebel groups of severe human rights violations, and of many massacres. The conflict has caused a major refugee crisis. Over the course of the war a number of peace initiatives have been launched, including the March 2017 Geneva peace talks on Syria led by the United Nations, but fighting continues. ---------------------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Reesources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_Civil_War Hinnebusch, Raymond (2012). "Syria: From 'Authoritarian Upgrading' to Revolution?". International Affairs. 88 (1): 95–113. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2346.2012.01059.x. International Crisis Group (13 July 2011). "Popular Protest in North Africa and the Middle East (VII): The Syrian Regimes Slow-Motion Suicide" (PDF). Middle East/North Africa Report N°109. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 July 2011. Retrieved 22 July 2011. Landis, Joshua (2012). "The Syrian Uprising of 2011: Why the Asad Regime Is Likely to Survive to 2013". Middle East Policy. 19 (1): 72–84. doi:10.1111/j.1475-4967.2012.00524.x. Lawson, Fred Haley, ed. (1 February 2010). Demystifying Syria. Saqi. ISBN 978-0-86356-654-7. Rashdan, Abdelrahman. Syrians Crushed in a Complex International Game. OnIslam.net. 21 March 2012. Retrieved 28 May 2012. Van Dam, Nikolaos (15 July 2011). The Struggle for Power in Syria: Politics and Society under Asad and the Ba'ath Party. I. B. Tauris. ISBN 1-84885-760-8. van Dam, Nikolaos (2017). Destroying a Nation: The Civil War in Syria. I.B. Tauris. ISBN 978-1-78672-248-5. Malek, Alia (2017). The Home That Was Our Country: A Memoir of Syria. PublicAffairs. ISBN 978-1-56858-532-1. Pearlman, Wendy (2017). We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria. HarperCollins. ISBN 978-0-06-265445-8. Wright, Robin (2008). Dreams and Shadows: The Future of the Middle East. New York: Penguin Press. pp. 212–261. ISBN 1-59420-111-0. Ziadeh, Radwan (2011). Power and Policy in Syria: Intelligence Services, Forei
Apr 30, 2018
The Syrian Civil War Part 2
2512
The Syrian Civil War (Arabic: الحرب الأهلية السورية‎, Al-ḥarb al-ʼahliyyah as-sūriyyah) is an ongoing multi-sided armed conflict in Syria fought primarily between the Ba'athist Syrian Arab Republic led by President Bashar al-Assad, along with its allies, and various forces opposing both the government and each other in varying constellations. The unrest in Syria, part of a wider wave of 2011 Arab Spring protests, grew out of discontent with the Assad government and escalated to an armed conflict after protests calling for his removal were violently suppressed. The war is being fought by several factions: the Syrian government and its international allies, a loose alliance of Sunni Arabrebel groups (including the Free Syrian Army), the majority-Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), Salafi jihadist groups (including al-Nusra Front), and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), with a number of countries in the region and beyond being either directly involved, or providing support to one or another faction. Iran, Russia, and Hezbollah support the Syrian government militarily, with Russia conducting air operations since September 2015. On the other hand, the U.S.-led international coalition established in 2014 with a declared purpose of countering ISIL, have conducted airstrikes against ISIL in Syria as well as against government and pro-government targets. Turkey on the other hand has become deeply involved since 2016 and beyond actively supporting the Syrian opposition, occupied large swathes of Northern Syria. International organizations have accused the Syrian government, ISIL, and Syria rebel groups of severe human rights violations, and of many massacres. The conflict has caused a major refugee crisis. Over the course of the war a number of peace initiatives have been launched, including the March 2017 Geneva peace talks on Syria led by the United Nations, but fighting continues. ---------------------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Reesources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_Civil_War Hinnebusch, Raymond (2012). "Syria: From 'Authoritarian Upgrading' to Revolution?". International Affairs. 88 (1): 95–113. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2346.2012.01059.x. International Crisis Group (13 July 2011). "Popular Protest in North Africa and the Middle East (VII): The Syrian Regimes Slow-Motion Suicide" (PDF). Middle East/North Africa Report N°109. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 July 2011. Retrieved 22 July 2011. Landis, Joshua (2012). "The Syrian Uprising of 2011: Why the Asad Regime Is Likely to Survive to 2013". Middle East Policy. 19 (1): 72–84. doi:10.1111/j.1475-4967.2012.00524.x. Lawson, Fred Haley, ed. (1 February 2010). Demystifying Syria. Saqi. ISBN 978-0-86356-654-7. Rashdan, Abdelrahman. Syrians Crushed in a Complex International Game. OnIslam.net. 21 March 2012. Retrieved 28 May 2012. Van Dam, Nikolaos (15 July 2011). The Struggle for Power in Syria: Politics and Society under Asad and the Ba'ath Party. I. B. Tauris. ISBN 1-84885-760-8. van Dam, Nikolaos (2017). Destroying a Nation: The Civil War in Syria. I.B. Tauris. ISBN 978-1-78672-248-5. Malek, Alia (2017). The Home That Was Our Country: A Memoir of Syria. PublicAffairs. ISBN 978-1-56858-532-1. Pearlman, Wendy (2017). We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria. HarperCollins. ISBN 978-0-06-265445-8. Wright, Robin (2008). Dreams and Shadows: The Future of the Middle East. New York: Penguin Press. pp. 212–261. ISBN 1-59420-111-0. Ziadeh, Radwan (2011). Power and Policy in Syria: Intelligence Services, Forei
Apr 23, 2018
The Syrian Civil War Part 1
2920
The Syrian Civil War (Arabic: الحرب الأهلية السورية‎, Al-ḥarb al-ʼahliyyah as-sūriyyah) is an ongoing multi-sided armed conflict in Syria fought primarily between the Ba'athist Syrian Arab Republic led by President Bashar al-Assad, along with its allies, and various forces opposing both the government and each other in varying constellations. The unrest in Syria, part of a wider wave of 2011 Arab Spring protests, grew out of discontent with the Assad government and escalated to an armed conflict after protests calling for his removal were violently suppressed. The war is being fought by several factions: the Syrian government and its international allies, a loose alliance of Sunni Arabrebel groups (including the Free Syrian Army), the majority-Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), Salafi jihadist groups (including al-Nusra Front), and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), with a number of countries in the region and beyond being either directly involved, or providing support to one or another faction. Iran, Russia, and Hezbollah support the Syrian government militarily, with Russia conducting air operations since September 2015. On the other hand, the U.S.-led international coalition established in 2014 with a declared purpose of countering ISIL, have conducted airstrikes against ISIL in Syria as well as against government and pro-government targets. Turkey on the other hand has become deeply involved since 2016 and beyond actively supporting the Syrian opposition, occupied large swathes of Northern Syria. International organizations have accused the Syrian government, ISIL, and Syria rebel groups of severe human rights violations, and of many massacres. The conflict has caused a major refugee crisis. Over the course of the war a number of peace initiatives have been launched, including the March 2017 Geneva peace talks on Syria led by the United Nations, but fighting continues. ---------------------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Reesources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_Civil_War Hinnebusch, Raymond (2012). "Syria: From 'Authoritarian Upgrading' to Revolution?". International Affairs. 88 (1): 95–113. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2346.2012.01059.x. International Crisis Group (13 July 2011). "Popular Protest in North Africa and the Middle East (VII): The Syrian Regimes Slow-Motion Suicide" (PDF). Middle East/North Africa Report N°109. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 July 2011. Retrieved 22 July 2011. Landis, Joshua (2012). "The Syrian Uprising of 2011: Why the Asad Regime Is Likely to Survive to 2013". Middle East Policy. 19 (1): 72–84. doi:10.1111/j.1475-4967.2012.00524.x. Lawson, Fred Haley, ed. (1 February 2010). Demystifying Syria. Saqi. ISBN 978-0-86356-654-7. Rashdan, Abdelrahman. Syrians Crushed in a Complex International Game. OnIslam.net. 21 March 2012. Retrieved 28 May 2012. Van Dam, Nikolaos (15 July 2011). The Struggle for Power in Syria: Politics and Society under Asad and the Ba'ath Party. I. B. Tauris. ISBN 1-84885-760-8. van Dam, Nikolaos (2017). Destroying a Nation: The Civil War in Syria. I.B. Tauris. ISBN 978-1-78672-248-5. Malek, Alia (2017). The Home That Was Our Country: A Memoir of Syria. PublicAffairs. ISBN 978-1-56858-532-1. Pearlman, Wendy (2017). We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled: Voices from Syria. HarperCollins. ISBN 978-0-06-265445-8. Wright, Robin (2008). Dreams and Shadows: The Future of the Middle East. New York: Penguin Press. pp. 212–261. ISBN 1-59420-111-0. Ziadeh, Radwan (2011). Power and Policy in Syria: Intelligence Services, Forei
Apr 16, 2018
The SAS
2324
The Special Air Service was a unit of the British Army during the Second World War that was formed in July 1941 by David Stirling and originally called "L" Detachment, Special Air Service Brigade—the "L" designation and Air Service name being a tie-in to a British disinformation campaign, trying to deceive the Axis into thinking there was a paratrooper regiment with numerous units operating in the area (the real SAS would "prove" to the Axis that the fake one existed). It was conceived as a commando force to operate behind enemy lines in the North African Campaign and initially consisted of five officers and 60 other ranks. Its first mission, in November 1941, was a parachute drop in support of the Operation Crusader offensive. Due to German resistance and adverse weather conditions, the mission was a disaster; 22 men, a third of the unit, were killed or captured. Its second mission was a major success. Transported by the Long Range Desert Group, it attacked three airfields in Libya, destroying 60 aircraft with the loss of 2 men and 3 jeeps. In September 1942, it was renamed 1st SAS, consisting at that time of four British squadrons, one Free French, one Greek, and the Folboat Section. ------------------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Air_Service Adams, James (1987). Secret Armies. Hutchinson. ISBN 0-553-28162-3. Breuer, William B. (2001). Daring missions of World War II. John Wiley and Sons. ISBN 978-0-471-40419-4. Chant, Christopher (1988). The Handbook of British Regiments. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-00241-9. Davis, Brian Leigh (1983). British Army Uniforms and Insignia of World War Two. Arms and Armour Press. ISBN 0-85368-609-2. de B. Taillon, J. Paul (2000). The evolution of Special Forces in Counter-Terrorism, The British and American Experiences. Greenwood. ISBN 0-275-96922-3. Edgeworth, Anthony; De St. Jorre, John (1981). The Guards. Ridge Press/Crown Publishers. ISBN 0-517-54376-1. Geraghty, Tony (1980). Who Dares Wins: The Story of the Special Air Service, 1950–1980. Book Club Association. ISBN 085368457X. Griffin, P.D (2006). Encyclopedia of Modern British Army Regiments. Sutton Publishing. ISBN 0-7509-3929-X. Fremont-Barnes, Gregory (2009). Who Dares Wins — The SAS and the Iranian Embassy Siege 1980. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1-84603-395-0. Haskew, Michael E (2007). Encyclopaedia of Elite Forces in the Second World War. Pen and Sword. ISBN 978-1-84415-577-4. Kemp, Anthony (1993). The SAS at War 1941–1945. Signet. ISBN 0451174569. Molinari, Andrea (2007). Desert Raiders: Axis and Allied Special Forces 1940–43. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84603-006-2. Morgan, Mike (2000). Daggers Drawn: Second World War heroes of the SAS and SBS. Sutton. ISBN 0-7509-2509-4. Otway, Lieutenant-Colonel T.B.H (1990). The Second World War 1939–1945 Army – Airborne Forces. Imperial War Museum. ISBN 0-901627-57-7. Ryan, Chris (2009). Fight to Win. Century. ISBN 978-1-84605-666-6. Scholey, Pete; Forsyth, Frederick (2008). Who Dares Wins: Special Forces Heroes of the SAS. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1-84603-311-X. Shortt, James; McBride, Angus (1981). The Special Air Service. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 0-85045-396-8. Silvestri, Enzo (2008). Thief in the Night. Lulu.com. ISBN 0-9798164-8-3. Stevens, Gordon (2005). The Originals — The Secret History of the Birth of the SAS in Their Own Words. Ebury Press. ISBN 978-0-09-190177-6. Thompson, Leroy (1994). SAS: Great Britain's Elite Special Air Service. Zenith Imprint. ISBN 0-87938-940-0.
Apr 09, 2018
The Spanish - American War
3377
The Spanish–American War (Spanish: Guerra hispano-americana or Guerra hispano-estadounidense; Filipino: Digmaang Espanyol-Amerikano) was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War. The main issue was Cuban independence. Revolts had been occurring for some years in Cuba against Spanish rule. The U.S. later backed these revolts upon entering the Spanish–American War. There had been war scares before, as in the Virginius Affair in 1873, but in the late 1890s, U.S. public opinion was agitated by anti-Spanish propaganda led by newspaper publishers such as Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst which used yellow journalism to call for war. The business community across the United States had just recovered from a deep depression and feared that a war would reverse the gains. It lobbied vigorously against going to war. The United States Navy armoured cruiser Maine had mysteriously sunk in Havana Harbor; political pressures from the Democratic Party pushed the administration of Republican President William McKinley into a war that he had wished to avoid. President McKinley signed a joint Congressional resolution demanding Spanish withdrawal and authorizing the President to use military force to help Cuba gain independence on April 20, 1898. In response, Spain severed diplomatic relations with the United States on April 21. On the same day, the U.S. Navy began a blockade of Cuba. On April 23, Spain stated that it would declare war if the U.S. forces invaded its territory. On April 25, Congress declared that a state of war between the U.S. and Spain had de facto existed since April 21, the day the blockade of Cuba had begun. The United States sent an ultimatum to Spain demanding that it surrender control of Cuba, but due to Spain not replying soon enough, the United States assumed Spain had ignored the ultimatum and continued to occupy Cuba. The ten-week war was fought in both the Caribbean and the Pacific. As the American agitators for war well knew, U.S. naval power proved decisive, allowing expeditionary forces to disembark in Cuba against a Spanish garrison already facing nationwide Cuban insurgent attacks and further wasted by yellow fever. American, Cuban, and Philippine forces obtained the surrender of Santiago de Cuba and Manila despite the good performance of some Spanish infantry units and fierce fighting for positions such as San Juan Hill. Madrid sued for peace after two obsolete Spanish squadrons sunk in Santiago de Cuba and Manila Bay and a third, more modern fleet was recalled home to protect the Spanish coasts. The result was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, negotiated on terms favorable to the U.S. which allowed it temporary control of Cuba and ceded ownership of Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippine islands. The cession of the Philippines involved payment of $20 million ($588,320,000 today) to Spain by the U.S. to cover infrastructure owned by Spain. The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and Follow us and like on socials. It really does make a massive difference: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Host and Producer - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Sound - Harry Edmondson Resources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish%E2%80%93American_War Auxier, George W. "The propaganda activities of the Cuban Junta in precipitating the Spanish-American War, 1895-1898." Hispanic American Historical Review 19.3 (1939): 286–305. online Auxier, George W. "The Cuban question as reflected in the editorial columns of Middle West
Apr 03, 2018
The Boxer Rebellion
3194
The Boxer Rebellion (拳亂), Boxer Uprising or Yihetuan Movement (義和團運動) was a violent anti-foreign, anti-colonial, and anti-Christian uprising that took place in China between 1899 and 1901, toward the end of the Qing dynasty. It was initiated by the Militia United in Righteousness (Yihetuan), known in English as the "Boxers", for many of their members had been practitioners of Chinese martial arts, also referred to in the west as "Chinese Boxing." They were motivated by proto-nationalist sentiments, and by opposition to Western colonialism and the Christian missionary activity that was associated with it. The uprising took place against a background that included severe drought and disruption caused by the growth of foreign spheres of influence. After several months of growing violence, in Shandong and the North China plain, against the both foreign and Christian presence in June 1900, Boxer fighters, convinced they were invulnerable to foreign weapons, converged on Beijing with the slogan "Support the Qing government and exterminate the foreigners." Foreigners and Chinese Christians sought refuge in the Legation Quarter. In response to reports of an armed invasion to lift the siege, the initially hesitant Empress Dowager Cixi supported the Boxers and on June 21 issued an Imperial Decree declaring war on the foreign powers. Diplomats, foreign civilians and soldiers as well as Chinese Christians in the Legation Quarter were placed under siege by the Imperial Army of China and the Boxers for 55 days. Chinese officialdom was split between those supporting the Boxers and those favoring conciliation, led by Prince Qing. The supreme commander of the Chinese forces, the Manchu General Ronglu (Junglu), later claimed that he acted to protect the besieged foreigners. The Eight-Nation Alliance, after being initially turned back, brought 20,000 armed troops to China, defeated the Imperial Army, and arrived at Peking on August 14, relieving the siege of the Legations. Uncontrolled plunder of the capital and the surrounding countryside ensued, along with the summary execution of those suspected of being Boxers. The Boxer Protocol of 7 September 1901 provided for the execution of government officials who had supported the Boxers, provisions for foreign troops to be stationed in Beijing, and 450 million taels of silver—approximately $10 billion at 2018 silver prices and more than the government's annual tax revenue—to be paid as indemnity over the course of the next thirty-nine years to the eight nations involved. The Empress Dowager then sponsored a set of institutional and fiscal changes in an attempt to save the Dynasty by reforming it, but reform occurred too slowly to avert its inevitable end. The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and Follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight11 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boxer_Rebellion General accounts and analysis In addition to the books listed under References, general accounts can be found in such textbooks as Jonathan Spence, In Search of Modern China, pp. 230–235; Keith Schoppa, Revolution and Its Past, pp. 118–123; and Immanuel Hsu, Ch 16, "The Boxer Uprising", in The Rise of Modern China (1990). Robert A. Bickers and R. G. Tiedemann, eds., The Boxers, China, and the World. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2007. ISBN 978-0-7425-5394-1. Robert A. Bickers, The Scramble for China: Foreign Devils in the Qing Empire, 1800–1914 (London: Allen Lane, 2011). David D. Buck, "Recent Studies of the Boxer Movement", Chinese Studies in History 20 (1987). Introduction to a special issue of the journal devoted to translations of recent research on the Boxers in the People's Republic. Purcell, Vic
Mar 26, 2018
The Armenian Genocide Part 2
2781
The Armenian Genocide (Hayots tseghaspanutyun), also known as the Armenian Holocaust, was the Ottoman government's systematic extermination of 1.5 million Armenians, mostly citizens within the Ottoman Empire and its successor state, the Republic of Turkey. The starting date is conventionally held to be 24 April 1915, the day that Ottoman authorities rounded up, arrested, and deported from Constantinople (now Istanbul) to the region of Ankara 235 to 270 Armenian intellectuals and community leaders, the majority of whom were eventually murdered. The genocide was carried out during and after World War I and implemented in two phases—the wholesale killing of the able-bodied male population through massacre and subjection of army conscripts to forced labour, followed by the deportation of women, children, the elderly, and the infirm on death marches leading to the Syrian Desert. Driven forward by military escorts, the deportees were deprived of food and water and subjected to periodic robbery, rape, and massacre. Other ethnic groups were similarly targeted for extermination in the Assyrian genocide and the Greek genocide, and their treatment is considered by some historians to be part of the same genocidal policy. Most Armenian diaspora communities around the world came into being as a direct result of the genocide. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Genocide https://www.history.com/topics/armenian-genocide Historical overviews Akçam, Taner. A Shameful Act: The Armenian Genocide and the Question of Turkish Responsibility. New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007. Akçam, Taner (2012). The Young Turks' Crime Against Humanity: The Armenian Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing in the Ottoman Empire. Princeton University Press. Balakian, Peter. The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response. New York: HarperCollins, 2003. ISBN 0-06-019840-0 Bloxham, Donald. The Great Game of Genocide: Imperialism, Nationalism, and the Destruction of the Ottoman Armenians. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. ISBN 0-19-927356-1 Dadrian, Vahakn (1995). The History of the Armenian Genocide: Ethnic Conflict from the Balkans to Anatolia to the Caucasus. Oxford: Berghahn Books. ISBN 978-1-57181-666-5. Dadrian, Vahakn. Warrant for Genocide: Key Elements of Turko-Armenian Conflict. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Transaction Publishers, 2003. ISBN 1-56000-389-8 De Waal, Thomas (2015). Great Catastrophe : Armenians and Turks in the Shadow of Genocide. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-935069-8. Kévorkian, Raymond. The Armenian Genocide: A Complete History. London: I.B. Tauris, 2011. ISBN 978-0-85771-930-0 Suny, Ronald Grigor. "They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else": A History of the Armenian Genocide. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2015. ISBN 978-0-691-14730-7 Üngör, Uğur Ümit; Polatel, Mehmet (2011). Confiscation and destruction: The Young Turk Seizure of Armenian Property. New York: e Continuum International Publishing Group. ISBN 978-1-4411-3578-0. Specific issues and comparative studies Bobelian, Michael. Children of Armenia: A Forgotten Genocide and the Century-Long Struggle for Justice. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2009. Bonello, Giovanni (2008). Histories of Malta - Confessions and Transgressions, Vol.9. Fondazzjoni Patrimonju Malti. ISBN 978-99932-7-224-3. Dadrian, Vahakn. "Genocide as a Problem of National and International Law: The World War I Armenian Case and its Contemporary Legal Ramifications", Yale Journal of International Law, Volume 14, Number 2, 1989. Dadrian, Vahakn. Key Elements in the Turkish Denial of the Armenian Genocide. Toronto: Zoryan Institute, 1999. Dadrian, Vahakn. "
Mar 19, 2018
The Armenian Genocide Part 1
2511
The Armenian Genocide (Hayots tseghaspanutyun), also known as the Armenian Holocaust, was the Ottoman government's systematic extermination of 1.5 million Armenians, mostly citizens within the Ottoman Empire and its successor state, the Republic of Turkey. The starting date is conventionally held to be 24 April 1915, the day that Ottoman authorities rounded up, arrested, and deported from Constantinople (now Istanbul) to the region of Ankara 235 to 270 Armenian intellectuals and community leaders, the majority of whom were eventually murdered. The genocide was carried out during and after World War I and implemented in two phases—the wholesale killing of the able-bodied male population through massacre and subjection of army conscripts to forced labour, followed by the deportation of women, children, the elderly, and the infirm on death marches leading to the Syrian Desert. Driven forward by military escorts, the deportees were deprived of food and water and subjected to periodic robbery, rape, and massacre. Other ethnic groups were similarly targeted for extermination in the Assyrian genocide and the Greek genocide, and their treatment is considered by some historians to be part of the same genocidal policy. Most Armenian diaspora communities around the world came into being as a direct result of the genocide. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Host and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Genocide https://www.history.com/topics/armenian-genocide Historical overviews Akçam, Taner. A Shameful Act: The Armenian Genocide and the Question of Turkish Responsibility. New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007. Akçam, Taner (2012). The Young Turks' Crime Against Humanity: The Armenian Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing in the Ottoman Empire. Princeton University Press. Balakian, Peter. The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America's Response. New York: HarperCollins, 2003. ISBN 0-06-019840-0 Bloxham, Donald. The Great Game of Genocide: Imperialism, Nationalism, and the Destruction of the Ottoman Armenians. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. ISBN 0-19-927356-1 Dadrian, Vahakn (1995). The History of the Armenian Genocide: Ethnic Conflict from the Balkans to Anatolia to the Caucasus. Oxford: Berghahn Books. ISBN 978-1-57181-666-5. Dadrian, Vahakn. Warrant for Genocide: Key Elements of Turko-Armenian Conflict. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Transaction Publishers, 2003. ISBN 1-56000-389-8 De Waal, Thomas (2015). Great Catastrophe : Armenians and Turks in the Shadow of Genocide. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-935069-8. Kévorkian, Raymond. The Armenian Genocide: A Complete History. London: I.B. Tauris, 2011. ISBN 978-0-85771-930-0 Suny, Ronald Grigor. "They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else": A History of the Armenian Genocide. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2015. ISBN 978-0-691-14730-7 Üngör, Uğur Ümit; Polatel, Mehmet (2011). Confiscation and destruction: The Young Turk Seizure of Armenian Property. New York: e Continuum International Publishing Group. ISBN 978-1-4411-3578-0. Specific issues and comparative studies Bobelian, Michael. Children of Armenia: A Forgotten Genocide and the Century-Long Struggle for Justice. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2009. Bonello, Giovanni (2008). Histories of Malta - Confessions and Transgressions, Vol.9. Fondazzjoni Patrimonju Malti. ISBN 978-99932-7-224-3. Dadrian, Vahakn. "Genocide as a Problem of National and International Law: The World War I Armenian Case and its Contemporary Legal Ramifications", Yale Journal of International Law, Volume 14, Number 2, 1989. Dadrian, Vahakn. Key Elements in the Turkish Denial of the Armenian Genocide. Toronto: Zoryan Institute, 1999. Dadrian, Vahak
Mar 13, 2018
The Indian Mutiny Part 2
2703
The Indian Rebellion of 1857 began as a mutiny of sepoys of the East India Company's army on 10 May 1857, in the town of Meerut, and soon escalated into other mutinies and civilian rebellions largely in the upper Gangetic plain and central India, with the major hostilities confined to present-day Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, northern Madhya Pradesh, and the Delhi region. The rebellion posed a considerable threat to Company power in that region, and was contained only with the fall of Gwalior on 20 June 1858. The rebellion is also known as the India's First War of Independence, the Great Rebellion, the Indian Mutiny, the Revolt of 1857, the Uprising of 1857, the Sepoy Rebellion, and the Sepoy Mutiny. The Mutiny was a result of various grievances. However the flashpoint was reached when the soldiers were asked to bite off the paper cartridges for their rifles which were greased with animal fat namely beef and pork. This was, and is, against the religious beliefs of Hindus and Muslims. Other regions of Company-controlled India – such as Bengal, the Bombay Presidency, and the Madras Presidency remained largely calm. In Punjab, the Sikh princes backed the Company by providing soldiers and support. The large princely states of Hyderabad, Mysore, Travancore, and Kashmir, as well as the smaller ones of Rajputana, did not join the rebellion. In some regions, such as Oudh, the rebellion took on the attributes of a patriotic revolt against European presence. Maratha leaders, such as the Lakshmibai, the Rani of Jhansi, became folk heroes in the nationalist movement in India half a century later; however, they themselves "generated no coherent ideology" for a new order. qaThe rebellion led to the dissolution of the East India Company in 1858. It also led the British to reorganize the army, the financial system and the administration in India. India was thereafter directly governed by the crown as the new British Raj. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: Twitter @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Narrator and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resourses https://itunes.apple.com/lu/book/indian-mutiny-brief-history/id649526129?mt=11 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Rebellion_of_1857 Alavi, Seema (1996), The Sepoys and the Company: Tradition and Transition 1770–1830, Oxford University Press, p. 340, ISBN 0-19-563484-5. Anderson, Clare (2007), Indian Uprising of 1857–8: Prisons, Prisoners and Rebellion, New York: Anthem Press, p. 217, ISBN 978-1-84331-249-9. Bandyopadhyay, Sekhara (2004), From Plassey to Partition: A History of Modern India, New Delhi: Orient Longman, p. 523, ISBN 81-250-2596-0. Bayly, Christopher Alan (1988), Indian Society and the Making of the British Empire, Cambridge University Press, p. 230, ISBN 0-521-25092-7. Bayly, Christopher Alan (2000), Empire and Information: Intelligence Gathering and Social Communication in India, c 1780–1870, Cambridge University Press, p. 412, ISBN 0-521-57085-9. Bose, Sugata; Jalal, Ayesha (2004), Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy (2nd ed.), London: Routledge, p. 253, ISBN 0-415-30787-2. Brown, Judith M. (1994), Modern India: The Origins of an Asian Democracy (2nd ed.), Oxford University Press, p. 480, ISBN 0-19-873113-2. Greenwood, Adrian (2015), Victoria's Scottish Lion: The Life of Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde, UK: History Press, p. 496, ISBN 0-75095-685-2. Harris, John (2001), The Indian Mutiny, Ware: Wordsworth Editions, p. 205, ISBN 1-84022-232-8. Hibbert, Christopher (1980), The Great Mutiny: India 1857, London: Allen Lane, p. 472, ISBN 0-14-004752-2. Jain, Meenakshi (2010), Parallel Pathways: Essays On Hindu-Muslim Relations ( 1707-1857), Delhi: Konark, ISBN 978-8122007831. Judd, Denis (2004), The Lion and the Tiger: The Rise and Fall of t
Feb 25, 2018
The Indian Mutiny Part 1
3316
The Indian Rebellion of 1857 began as a mutiny of sepoys of the East India Company's army on 10 May 1857, in the town of Meerut, and soon escalated into other mutinies and civilian rebellions largely in the upper Gangetic plain and central India, with the major hostilities confined to present-day Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, northern Madhya Pradesh, and the Delhi region. The rebellion posed a considerable threat to Company power in that region, and was contained only with the fall of Gwalior on 20 June 1858. The rebellion is also known as the India's First War of Independence, the Great Rebellion, the Indian Mutiny, the Revolt of 1857, the Uprising of 1857, the Sepoy Rebellion, and the Sepoy Mutiny. The Mutiny was a result of various grievances. However the flashpoint was reached when the soldiers were asked to bite off the paper cartridges for their rifles which were greased with animal fat namely beef and pork. This was, and is, against the religious beliefs of Hindus and Muslims. Other regions of Company-controlled India – such as Bengal, the Bombay Presidency, and the Madras Presidency remained largely calm. In Punjab, the Sikh princes backed the Company by providing soldiers and support. The large princely states of Hyderabad, Mysore, Travancore, and Kashmir, as well as the smaller ones of Rajputana, did not join the rebellion. In some regions, such as Oudh, the rebellion took on the attributes of a patriotic revolt against European presence. Maratha leaders, such as the Lakshmibai, the Rani of Jhansi, became folk heroes in the nationalist movement in India half a century later; however, they themselves "generated no coherent ideology" for a new order. qaThe rebellion led to the dissolution of the East India Company in 1858. It also led the British to reorganize the army, the financial system and the administration in India. India was thereafter directly governed by the crown as the new British Raj. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: Twitter @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Narrator and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resourses https://itunes.apple.com/lu/book/indian-mutiny-brief-history/id649526129?mt=11 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Rebellion_of_1857 Alavi, Seema (1996), The Sepoys and the Company: Tradition and Transition 1770–1830, Oxford University Press, p. 340, ISBN 0-19-563484-5. Anderson, Clare (2007), Indian Uprising of 1857–8: Prisons, Prisoners and Rebellion, New York: Anthem Press, p. 217, ISBN 978-1-84331-249-9. Bandyopadhyay, Sekhara (2004), From Plassey to Partition: A History of Modern India, New Delhi: Orient Longman, p. 523, ISBN 81-250-2596-0. Bayly, Christopher Alan (1988), Indian Society and the Making of the British Empire, Cambridge University Press, p. 230, ISBN 0-521-25092-7. Bayly, Christopher Alan (2000), Empire and Information: Intelligence Gathering and Social Communication in India, c 1780–1870, Cambridge University Press, p. 412, ISBN 0-521-57085-9. Bose, Sugata; Jalal, Ayesha (2004), Modern South Asia: History, Culture, Political Economy (2nd ed.), London: Routledge, p. 253, ISBN 0-415-30787-2. Brown, Judith M. (1994), Modern India: The Origins of an Asian Democracy (2nd ed.), Oxford University Press, p. 480, ISBN 0-19-873113-2. Greenwood, Adrian (2015), Victoria's Scottish Lion: The Life of Colin Campbell, Lord Clyde, UK: History Press, p. 496, ISBN 0-75095-685-2. Harris, John (2001), The Indian Mutiny, Ware: Wordsworth Editions, p. 205, ISBN 1-84022-232-8. Hibbert, Christopher (1980), The Great Mutiny: India 1857, London: Allen Lane, p. 472, ISBN 0-14-004752-2. Jain, Meenakshi (2010), Parallel Pathways: Essays On Hindu-Muslim Relations ( 1707-1857), Delhi: Konark, ISBN 978-8122007831. Judd, Denis (2004), The Lion and the Tiger: The Rise and Fall of t
Feb 16, 2018
Announcement
34
Episode 3 Announcement
Feb 12, 2018
The Zulu Wars
2583
The Anglo – Zulu wars, a clash between the might of the British Empire with the African Zulu Kingdom, began in 1879. In 1874, Sir Henry Bartle Frere was appointed High Commissioner for Southern Africa. His mission was to bring the various African kingdoms, tribal areas, and Boer Republics together under British rule, modelled after the policy which brought the various states within Canada together under one political and military control. He was opposed by several forces, mainly the various independent Boer states, and the Zulu Kingdom, with its vast army. In order to bring the region and its tribes together under as part of the British Empire, Frere decided to go to war with the Zulu Kingdom. Working on his own, without the backing of his government, Frere issued an ultimatum to the Zulu King Cetshwayo on 11 December 1878. The demands proved impossible to comply with, and war was declared. The British forces, led by Lord Chelmsford, invaded Zululand. Many battles ensued, including a stunning Zulu victory at Isandlwana, and the near-collapse of the garrison at Rorke’s Drift. However, in the end, the British were triumphant. The Zulu Nation would no longer be independent. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: Twitter @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Narrator and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resources https://www.amazon.co.uk/Zulu-Wars-Brief-History-ebook/dp/B00B7PLZYM/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1531564395&sr=1-1&keywords=zulu+wars+andrew+knight https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/the-zulu-wars-a-brief-history/id649574595?mt=11 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglo-Zulu_War Archer, Christon I.; Ferris, John R.; Herwig, Holger H.; Travers, Timothy H. E. (2008). World History of Warfare. University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 978-0-8032-1941-0. Barthorp, Michael (2002). The Zulu War: Isandhlwana to Ulundi. Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 0-304-36270-0. Bourquin, S. (1978). "The Zulu military organization and the challenge of 1879". Military History Journal. 4 (4). Brookes, Edgar H; Webb, Colin de B. (1965). A History of Natal. Brooklyn: University of Natal Press. ISBN 0-86980-579-7. Colenso, Frances E. (1880). History of the Zulu War and Its Origin. Assisted by Edward Durnford. London: Chapman & Hall. David, Saul (February 2009). "The Forgotten Battles of the Zulu War". BBC History Magazine. 10 (2). pp. 26–33. Dutton, Roy (2010). Forgotten Heroes: Zulu & Basuto Wars including Complete Medal Roll. Infodial. ISBN 978-0-9556554-4-9. French, Gerald (2014) [1939]. Lord Chelmsford and the Zulu War. London: John Lane, The Bodley Head. ISBN 978-1-4738-3510-8. Giliomee, Hermann Buhr; Mbenga, Bernard (2007). New History of South Africa. Tafelberg. ISBN 978-0-624-04359-1. Gump, James O. (1996). The Dust Rose Like Smoke: The Subjugation of the Zulu and the Sioux. Bison Books. ISBN 0-8032-7059-3. Guy, Jeff (1994). The Destruction of the Zulu Kingdom: The Civil War in Zululand, 1879–1884. University of Natal Press. ISBN 978-0-86980-892-4. Knight, Ian (1995). Brave Men's Blood: The Epic of the Zulu War, 1879. Pen & Sword Military Classics. ISBN 978-1-84415-212-4. Knight, Ian (1996). Rorke's Drift, 1879: 'pinned Like Rats in a Hole'. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-1-85532-506-7. Knight, Ian (2003). The Zulu War 1879. Osprey. ISBN 978-1-84176-612-6. Knight, Ian (2005). British Fortifications in Zululand 1879. Osprey. ISBN 978-1-84176-829-8. Knight, Ian; Castle, Ian (1999). British Army: Zulu War to the Boer War. Brassey's UK. ISBN 978-1-85753-284-5. Laband, John; Knight, Ian (1996). The Anglo-Zulu War. Stroud: Sutton. ISBN 0-86985-829-7. Laband, John (2009). Historical Dictionary of the Zulu Wars. Scarecrow. ISBN 978-0-8108-6300-2. Lock, Ron; Quantrill, Peter (2002). Zulu Victory: The Epic of Isandlwana and the Co
Jan 16, 2018
The Boer Wars
2878
The Anglo-Boer Wars will introduce you to, one of the most fascinating Victorian Wars of the British Empire. A bite size comprehensive account of the two Anglo-Boer Wars fought between 1880-1881 and 1899-1902. A gripping tale of one of the bloodiest and expensive wars for over a century, which pitted the two Boer Republics of South Africa against the might of the British Empire. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: Twitter @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Narrator and Author - Andrew Knight @ajknight31 Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson Resources https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/the-boer-wars-a-brief-history/id562782550?mt=11 https://www.amazon.co.uk/Boer-Wars-Brief-History-ebook/dp/B0091WPV98/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 Berger, Carl (1970). The Sense of Power; Studies in the Ideas of Canadian Imperialism,: 1867–1914. University of Toronto Press. pp. 233–34. ISBN 978-0-8020-6113-3. Bester, R. (1994). Boer Rifles and Carbines of the Anglo-Boer Warb. Bloemfontein: War Museum of the Boer Republics. Blake, Albert (2010). Boereverraaier. Tafelberg. p. 46. "Case Name: Anglo-Boer: Britain's Vietnam (1899–1902)". American University of Washington D.C Trade Environment projects. Archived from the original on 27 October 2016. Retrieved 21 July 2016. Desai, Ashwin; Vahed, Goolem (2015). The South African Gandhi: Stretcher-bearer of Empire. Stanford University Press. "Miscellaneous information: Cost of the war". AngloBoerWar.com. 2015. Retrieved 12 September 2015.[unreliable source?] Chase, Sean (4 November 2012). "Dragoons remember the heroes of Leliefontein". Daily Observer. Daily Mail (5810). 16 November 1914. pp. 4 ff. ISSN 0307-7578. Missing or empty |title= (help) Duffy, Michael (22 August 2009). "Sam Hughes Biography". firstworldwar.com.[unreliable source?] Cameron, Trewhella, ed. (1986). An Illustrated History of South Africa. Johannesburg,: Jonathan Ball. p. 207. Cartwright, A. P (1964). The Dynamite Company. Cape Town: Purnell & Sons. Davis, Richard Harding (1900). With Both Armies In South Africa. Charles Scribner Sons. p. 34, fn. 59. "South African War (British-South African history)". Encyclopedia Britannica. Britannica.com. 31 March 2011. Retrieved 23 July 2013. "Caring for the soldiers health". Nash's war manual. London: Eveleigh Nash. 1914. p. 309. Farwell, Byron (March 1976). "Taking Sides in the Boer War". American Heritage Magazine. 20 (3). ISSN 0002-8738. Archived from the original on 7 January 2009. Ferguson, Niall (2002). Empire: The Rise and Demise of the British World Order and the Lessons for Global Power. Basic Books. p. 235. Grundlingh, Albert (1980). "Collaborators in Boer Society". In Warwick, P. The South African War. London. pp. 258–78. Granatstein, J.L. (2010). The Oxford Companion to Canadian Military History. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-543088-2. Grattan, Robert (2009). "The Entente in World War I: a case study in strategy formulation in an alliance". Journal of Management History. 15 (2): 147–58. Gronum, M.A. (1977). Die ontplooiing van die Engelse Oorlog 1899–1900. Tafelberg. Haydon, A.P. (1964). "South Australia's first war". Australian Historical Studies. 11 (42). Hayes, Matthew Horace (1902). Horses on board ship: a guide to their management. London: Hurst and Blackett. pp. 213–14. Inglis, Brian (1974). Roger Casement. London: Coronet Books. pp. 53–55. Jeffery, Keith (2000). "The Irish Soldier in the Boer War". In Gooch, John. The Boer War. London: Cass. p. 145. cites Jacson, M. (1908). "II". The Record of a Regiment of the Line. Hutchinson & Company. p. 88. ISBN 1-4264-9111-5. Jones, Maurig (1996). "Blockhouses of the Boer War". Colonial Conquest, magweb. Archived from the original on 13 May 2008. Retrieved 10 May 2008. Jones, Huw M. (October 1999). Neutrality compromised: Swaziland and th
Jan 01, 2018