History of Voting

By One Nation Every Vote

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Description

Stories from historians and voting experts about the history of voting and how it shaped American democracy.

Episode Date
Episode 8: Voting today and tomorrow
23:46

Prof. Martha Kropf of UNC-Charlotte talks about contemporary issues with voting and where we might go from here.

Nov 02, 2018
Episode 7: Native American voting rights
18:31

Prof. Paul Rosier of Villanova University talks about the long struggles for Native Americans to access the ballot and the obstacles that still exist.

Oct 30, 2018
Episode 6: The Civil Rights Era
25:08

Prof. Brett Gadsden of Northwestern University talks about the foundations of the Civil Rights Era, when voting was both a goal to achieve and the means by which to achieve it.

Oct 18, 2018
Episode 5: Women's suffrage
24:03

Prof. Lisa Tetrault of Carnegie Mellon talks about how women won the right to vote and why the fight for the ballot didn't stop with the 19th Amendment.

Oct 04, 2018
Episode 4: The Progressive Era
24:21

The late 19th century saw a movement to root out political corruption and enhance the power of the individual voter. It also saw the start of the largest decline in voter turnout in the country's history. Professor Emeritus Shelton Stromquist of the University of Iowa explains how this happened.

Sep 27, 2018
Episode 3: Reconstruction
33:12

Prof Kate Masur of Northwestern University discusses the impact of Reconstruction on the story of voting in America.

Sep 21, 2018
Episode 2: Jacksonian Era
21:44

Professor Harry Watson of UNC-Chapel Hill talks about what really made the 1820s-1840s a time of record-breaking turnout in American elections.

Sep 14, 2018
Episode 1: Early America
21:04

Professor Ed Countryman of Southern Methodist University joins the pod to talk about how voting mattered (or didn't) in the colonial era, during the Revolution, and in the years following. 

Sep 06, 2018