The Opus

By Consequence Podcast Network

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kjlgstp
 Nov 28, 2018
host's voice is boring and doesn't come through very well, sound like she's reading copy

Description

Consequence of Sound and Sony bring you an exploration of legendary albums and their ongoing legacy. Join host Andy Bothwell as he examines how masterpieces continue to evolve: shaping lives, shaking rafters, and ingraining itself into our culture. Maybe you’re a longtime fan who wants to go deeper. Maybe you’re a first-time listener curious to hear more – either way, you’re in the right place.


Episode Date
Whitney Houston: Behold, the Everlasting Star!
2157

We are living in Andy Warhol's vision of the future. It’s a time when anyone can TikTok their way to 15 minutes of fame, only to disappear 15 seconds later. But there’s a strange effect to all these stars and this new galaxy: We’re all so siloed as fans that it’s easy to forget there was once a time when stars could outlast the universe.

One such star is Whitney Houston.

As The Opus winds down its journey through the diva's blockbuster debut, host Andy Bothwell speaks with rapper Dessa and writers Hanif Abdurraqib, Myles Johnson, and Sasha Geffen about what Whitney Houston meant to the world.

Together, they discuss how Houston impacted such a wide and diverse range of communities and cultures, and later marvel at the strength she exhibited while facing insurmountable pressures and exorbitant demands.

Stream Whitney Houston via all major streaming services or enter to win a copy of Vinyl Me, Please’s 35th anniversary Whitney Houston box set.

Jun 18, 2020
Whitney Houston: The Science Behind the Voice
2253

There's something mystifying about powerful voices. Sure, everyone can open their mouth and sing, but when we watch a force like Whitney Houston do so, it's abundantly clear there's a vast divide between her and us mere mortals.

But we take such voices for granted, often celebrating their talent by simply listening. What we don't appreciate is the work it takes to get there, the work it takes to maintain such power, and the true musicianship behind every note.

As The Opus continues its journey into Whitney Houston, host Andy Bothwell learns about the training and athleticism behind a voice like Houston by speaking with singer Bartees Strange and opera singer Dr. Donna Mitchell-Cox.

Later, Dessa (of Doomtree Records) breaks down the science behind Houston's voice, while CNN's own Brandon Tensley explains the unexplainable -- specifically, why her voice impacts us in ways we can't always understand.

Stream Whitney Houston via all major streaming services or enter to win a copy of Vinyl Me, Please’s 35th anniversary Whitney Houston box set.

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Jun 04, 2020
Whitney Houston: Whitney's Billboard Run Contains Multitudes
1988

It's hard to underestimate Whitney Houston’s stardom.

For better and for worse, the world knows so much more about the late diva than we do about most artists from her era. Houston's meteoric rise would eventually place her own personal life under a microscope, and it's the tragic details that all too often overshadow her unparalleled legacy and groundbreaking influence.

Looking back, though, Whitney Houston wasn't just a pop star. She wasn't just an incredible voice. No, she was a trail blazer, the first of her kind, who opened the door for so many artists to follow. For its highly anticipated 10th season, The Opus plans to trace those footsteps, and put a spotlight on the star that was born with 1985's Whitney Houston.

Join host Andy Bothwell as he talks with music writer and chart historian Chris Molanphy about the records Houston broke with her self-titled debut. Then listen as writers Britt Julious, Brandon Tensley, and musicians Sophia Eris and Bartees Strange explain how Houston's position on the Billboard charts meant so much more than just record sales.

May 28, 2020
The Infamous: Mobb Deep Crafted Their Own Language
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For decades now, rap and hip-hop has been the most fertile soil for slang and new language across pop culture. But when looking back on Mobb Deep, the duo didn't just have their own slang, they had their own language.

In this bonus episode of The Opus, host Andy Bothwell breaks down the history of "The Dun Language" with rappers Slug (of Atmosphere) and Evidence (of Dilated Peoples), who discuss the influence that language has played on their own work.

Shortly after, we'll hear from original member Havoc, legendary hip-hop photographer Chi Modu, and The Infamous executive producer Schott Free, who shed a light on the oft-elusive, secret third member of Mobb Deep.

In celebration of its 25th anniversary, stream Mobb Deep's The Infamous – 25th Anniversary Expanded Edition via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win a copy of The Infamous on vinyl -- signed by rapper Havoc himself.

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May 14, 2020
The Infamous: Experience Outweighs Practice
2458

The world seems to have gone mad since the release of Malcolm Gladwell's The Outliers. Thanks to his 2008 best-selling book, everyone seems to think that all you need is 10,000 hours of practice to achieve greatness. While that may work on a skill or a craft, the rules go out the window when it comes to art.

Prodigy and Havoc certainly put a lot of hours into making beats and rapping before they made The Infamous, but there are other powerful forces that truly shaped them into becoming artists. After all, 10,000 hours will only take you so far, and much of that greatness depends on perspective and experience.

In this season's final episode, host Andy Bothwell is joined once again by Mobb Deep’s Havoc who breaks down the experiences that helped shape the duo. What's more, rappers Brother Ali and Don Will, in addition to writers Jeff Weiss and Mosi Reeves, also weigh in on how the late Prodigy was able to channel his own trauma into something the world had never seen before.

In celebration of its 25th anniversary, stream Mobb Deep's The Infamous – 25th Anniversary Expanded Edition via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win a copy of The Infamous on vinyl -- signed by rapper Havoc himself.

May 07, 2020
The Infamous: Finding Success By Learning From Failure
2502

The mid-90's produced a crowded field chock full of brilliant rap records. With debuts from Nas, Wu-Tang Clan, and Jay-Z, artists really needed to bring their A-game if they were going to try and stand out. Mobb Deep could have easily been lost in the ether, especially given the mixed reception towards their debut album, Juvenile Hell.

Instead, like so many of the artists we've covered in The Opus -- Miles Davis, Simon & Garfunkel, Ozzy Osbourne, the list goes on -- Mobb Deep leaned on that failure to chase their own success. Because without the bitterness of defeat, Prodigy & Havoc may have never been driven to evolve into the powerhouse that created The Infamous.

Join host Andy Bothwell as he speaks with Havoc and Executive Producer/A&R's Matt Life about the setbacks the duo faced and how they overcame them. We'll also hear from CSU-Long Beach professor and music journalist Oliver Wang about the story behind the song that changed it all for Mobb Deep, in addition to Evidence of Dilated Peoples and both Slug and Ant of Atmosphere on what sets The Infamous apart from the other titans of the genre.

Apr 30, 2020
The Infamous: Mobb Deep's Commitment to the Truth
1972

Rap in the modern age is drowned in theater. Today, the lines between reality and fiction are often so blurred that it's tough to tell what's fact or fiction. Ironically, the old adage of "keepin' it real" was tossed around too lightly amidst the Golden Age of Hip-Hop.

One exception to that rule was Mobb Deep. A quarter century ago, Havoc and Prodigy helped ignite the East Coast hip-hop renaissance with their sophomore album, The Infamous, which held up a dark, gritty, realistic mirror to their particular world.

Using their lyrics like a photojournalist might use their camera, the duo brought listeners into their often haunting and impoverished corner of Queens. Add in the powerfully sparse, jagged production, and you have a record that changed the perception of hardcore rap forever.

For its ninth season, The Opus heads to Queens to discuss the landmark album. Join host Andy Bothwell as he gets the street-level facts from Havoc (the surviving member of Mobb Deep) and Infamous Executive Producer/A&R Schott Free. He also hears some insights from syndicated radio host Headkrack, rapper and Paid Dues curator Murs, and Pitchfork writer Paul Thompson.

Together, they discuss how Mobb Deep's journalistic devotion to spitting the truth raised the bar to an impossible standard that even the greatest rappers of their day could never match.

In celebration of its 25th anniversary, stream a legacy edition of Mobb Deep's The Infamous via all major streaming services.

Apr 24, 2020
Bitches Brew: Breaking Down the Album Artwork
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In many ways, an album's physical packaging is a dying art form in the modern era of streaming services. Instead of picking up a record, we scroll through them, searching for light amidst a seemingly infinite sea of digital album covers. With that in mind, there's never been a greater need for eye-catching album covers in the history of the medium.

Bitches Brew is one such record, only the artwork serves a much greater role. It's not just an avatar for the album, or a marketing tool for the label, but a physical continuation of its themes. It accentuates and visualizes the very philosophies being observed by Miles Davis within the seminal album. It's an extension of the album, if you will.

In this special bonus episode of The Opus, host Andy Bothwell is joined by painter/illustrator Michael Gaughan and photographer Cameron Wittig. Together, they break down the details of the album artwork for Bitches Brew -- both inside and out. So, for one last time, pull up a chair, and listen above.

In celebration of its 50th anniversary, stream a legacy edition of Bitches Brew via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win the massive 43-CD The Genius of Miles Davis box set, which includes the four-disc The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions.

Apr 09, 2020
Bitches Brew: Breaking Down the Album Artwork
00:21:04

In many ways, an album's physical packaging is a dying art form in the modern era of streaming services. Instead of picking up a record, we scroll through them, searching for light amidst a seemingly infinite sea of digital album covers. With that in mind, there's never been a greater need for eye-catching album covers in the history of the medium.


Bitches Brew is one such record, only the artwork serves a much greater role. It's not just an avatar for the album, or a marketing tool for the label, but a physical continuation of its themes. It accentuates and visualizes the very philosophies being observed by Miles Davis within the seminal album. It's an extension of the album, if you will.


In this special bonus episode of The Opus, host Andy Bothwell is joined by painter/illustrator Michael Gaughan and photographer Cameron Wittig. Together, they break down the details of the album artwork for Bitches Brew -- both inside and out. So, for one last time, pull up a chair, and listen above.


In celebration of its 50th anniversary, stream a legacy edition of Bitches Brew via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win the massive 43-CD The Genius of Miles Davis box set, which includes the four-disc The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Apr 09, 2020
Bitches Brew: The Expanding Universe of Miles Davis
2181

A good album leaves a mark on you, but traditionally, that impact lasts as long as the album itself. It starts, you hear a bunch of great songs you love, and then it's over. Maybe it put you in a better mood? Or perhaps it even gave you some time to think about things? Whatever the case, when the record stops, all too often the influence goes along with it.


What makes an album like Bitches Brew so special is that the influence doesn’t die when you pick the needle up. Instead, it continues to expand out infinitely in all directions. An album like this is more than just a collection of great songs, it's a whole universe of influence, one that continues to grow and shape culture, even decades after its release.


Join host Andy Bothwell in Columbia's Studio B, where he wraps up Season 8 of The Opus alongside journalist and engineer from ThePudding.com, Matt Daniels; Techno musician Black Asteroid; Jazz innovators The Bad Plus; and touring machine Andy Frasco of Andy Frasco and the UN. Together, they explore the ever-expanding universe of Miles Davis.


In celebration of its 50th anniversary, stream a legacy edition of Bitches Brew via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win the massive 43-CD The Genius of Miles Davis box set, which includes the four-disc The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Apr 02, 2020
Bitches Brew: The Indefinable Greatness of Miles Davis
2402

Fifty years later, there's something about Bitches Brew that still feels strange, wild, and unfamiliar. There's a magic in Miles Davis' cauldron that binds the ingredients to create a potion that is somehow greater than the sum of its exceptional parts. There's an almost indefinable something that somehow elevates the album to new heights -- and that mystery ingredient is what makes the brew so special. Today, The Opus attempts to chase that "something" in the second part of its Bitches Brew season.


Join host Andy Bothwell in Columbia's Studio B, where he presides over an equally talented crew that includes: musician and professor Mark Gould (Julliard/New York Trumpet Ensemble); bassist and composer Ben Williams (Kamasi Washington/Pat Metheny); Sound on Sound columnist and author of Miles Beyond: Electric Explorations of Miles Davis 1967-1991 Paul Tingen; Brainfeeder artist and Berklee School of music Faculty Daedelus; and composer and author of 33 1/3: Bitches Brew George Grella.


Together they dive deep into Miles Davis' stellar supporting cast and band, discuss the role of producer Teo Macero, and how it all winds up back at the man this season is all above. So, once again, pull up a chair, make yourself another drink, and listen above.


In celebration of its 50th anniversary, stream a legacy edition of Bitches Brew via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win the massive 43-CD The Genius of Miles Davis box set, which includes the four-disc The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Mar 26, 2020
Bitches Brew: The Importance of Challenging Music
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Jazz can often be seen as a genre that challenges listeners, but one of the greatest jazz records of all time -- Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew -- was born out a need to challenge the genre, to push back on the establishment, and to break down old conventions and notions about what jazz could be.


Davis saw the future of music coming fast, and it was in funk and rock. If he didn’t catch up, he and jazz would get left in the dust. What resulted from this future forward approach would not only change the genre, but launch Davis from the dark basements of jazz fame to the main stages of stardom.


This season, The Opus has booked some time at Columbia's Studio B, where host Andy Bothwell has dialed things back to August 1969. His first night's guests include: Deantoni Parks (The Mars Volta/Technoself), Daedelus (Brainfeeder/Berklee College of Music), Loren Schoenberg (Julliard/National Museum Of Jazz), and writer George Grella.


Together, they discuss the importance of challenging music like Bitches Brew and detail how this Grammy-winning album shook up the world of jazz and brought a legend into the mainstream. So, pull up a chair, make yourself a drink, and listen above.


In celebration of its 50th anniversary, stream a legacy edition of Bitches Brew via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win the massive 43-CD The Genius of Miles Davis box set, which includes the four-disc The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Mar 19, 2020
Bridge Over Troubled Water: The Sounds of the Influenced [Bonus]
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The Opus has yet to leave the Bridge.


Although Bridge Over Troubled Water was the swan song of Simon & Garfunkel, it was really only the beginning of their enduring legacy. Since then, countless musicians and artists alike have followed in their footsteps to myriad results. In this surprise, bonus episode of Season 7, host Andy Bothwell speaks to a trio of eclectic musicians who have all crossed the proverbial bridge.


First up is David Draiman of Disturbed, who discusses the band's unlikely cover of "Sound Of Silence". Next is CJ Camerieri of Y Music/Bon Iver, who happened to perform "The Boxer" with Paul Simon on the night Muhammed Ali died. And finally Har Mar Superstar shares how his "cover" of "Bridge Over Troubled Water" got him banned for life from the Steele County Fair in Owatonna, Minnesota.


In celebration of the album's 50th anniversary, stream a selection of Simon & Garfunkel's best tracks via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win a vinyl bundle featuring the duo's entire collaborative discography.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Mar 05, 2020
Bridge Over Troubled Water: The Importance of Creative Conflict
1858

The Opus has reached the end of the Bridge.


A lot is made of the fact that Bridge Over Troubled Water was Simon & Garfunkel’s final album. Even 50 years later, fans and historians see the album as the end of the era, when it's so much more than that.


Bridge Over Troubled Water wasn’t the end of a road, but a mile marker on a very long highway, full of surprising and exciting twists and turns. It's a portrait not of conflict, but a crucible of honest creative confrontation.


On the Season 7 finale of The Opus, host Andy Bothwell speaks to musicians Nick Thorburn (Islands/Unicorns) and Mattiel on the importance of creative conflict, in addition to CJ Camerieri (Y Music/Bon Iver) on what it's like to be in the studio with Paul Simon.


He also speaks with writer Jordon Hoffman (The Guardian/Vanity Fair) and Jay Sweet (Newport Folk Fest) about the impact of Bridge Over Troubled Water at the time of its release, and the way it has shaped American culture ever since.


In celebration of the album's 50th anniversary, stream a selection of Simon & Garfunkel's best tracks via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win a vinyl bundle featuring the duo's entire collaborative discography.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Feb 27, 2020
Bridge Over Troubled Water: The Bridge to Beyoncé
1905

The Opus is halfway across the Bridge.


What does Alex Jones, Beyoncé's Lemonade, and Simon and Garfunkel have in common? More than you think! In 1969, the two bards were asked to make a TV special to debut 1970's Bridge over Troubled Water. Rather than opting for the traditional approach -- think: Elvis Presley's 1968 comeback special -- they created a visual album. Ring a bell?


Songs Of America, directed by Charles Grodin (yes, that Charles Grodin), was an experimental, non-linear, collage of live footage, behind-the-scenes shots, and proto-music videos set to news footage from the turbulent 60's. The result cost them their lead sponsor, pissed off a million Americans, and even lead to death threats if you can believe that.


Host Andy Bothwell speaks to culture reporter Steve Marsh (GQ/Esquire/Pitchfork) on what caused this film to illicit such a strong reaction from America. He also connects with Bon Iver's design team and video directors Eric Carlson and Aaron Anderson, who weighin on the through-lines between their work and this 50-year-old TV special.


In celebration of the album's 50th anniversary, stream a selection of Simon & Garfunkel's best tracks via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win a vinyl bundle featuring the duo's entire collaborative discography.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Feb 20, 2020
Bridge Over Troubled Water: Sailing with Simon and Garfunkel
1927

The Opus is crossing a bridge into its seventh season.


All good things come to an end, and that is certainly the case for Simon and Garfunkel. With 1970's Bridge Over Troubled Water, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel sewed a button to their timeless collaboration. At the time, though, the album wasn't exactly the ideal swan song for critics, who were mixed on the release, contending that the collection of songs didn't live up to its predecessor, 1968's Bookends.


History prevailed, though. Bridge Over Troubled Water went on to win Album of the Year at the 1971 Grammys, taking home both Record and Song of the Year for its title track. What's more, the album went on to become one of the highest-selling albums of all time. Since then, tracks like "The Only Living Boy in New York", "Baby Driver", and "Cecilia" have all become permanent fixtures in pop culture.


That was then and this is now. In the season seven premiere of The Opus, host Andy Bothwell traces the footsteps of the two bards, even visiting the locations where they recorded. In fact, you'll hear the very halls that helped raise their voices into the heavens. What's more, Bothwell will peel back the immaculate production of the album's most eclectic tracks. It's an aural journey of the senses.


Fortunately, he's not the only living boy on this episode. Joining Bothwell is an assembly of guests that include Nicholas Thorburn of The Unicorns and Islands; recording engineer and Tape Op founder Larry Crane; and hip-hop musician and Anticon co-founder Yoni Wolf of Why?. Together, they chart the album's rampant influences and deduce that everyone's ripped off "Cecilia".


So, get your plane right on time, and climb aboard.


In celebration of the album's 50th anniversary, stream a selection of Simon & Garfunkel's best tracks via all major streaming services. You can also enter to win a vinyl bundle featuring the duo's entire collaborative discography.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Feb 13, 2020
London Calling: Radio Clash's Timeless Transmissions
1934

The Opus has one more lesson about The Clash.


The same curiosity that drove the English rockers to discover new genres of music also drove them to understand and empathize with the struggles going on far from their homes. That call for political action, of course, is all over London Calling -- right down to its title.


Yet the reason why generation after generation continues to answer their call stems from the songwriting itself. These aren't just any ol' political anthems; they're catchy rock songs, the likes of which have crossed borders and cultures for decades.


In the third and final episode of our London Calling series, host Andy Bothwell attempts to explain these cross-cultural transmissions. Once more, he's aided by a rotating panel of guests, specifically Spoon’s Britt Daniel, Killing Joke’s Jaz Coleman, AJJ’s Sean Bonette and Ben Gallaty, Worriers’ Lauren Denitzio, Let Fury Have the Hour author Antonio D'Ambrosio, journalist Robert Evans, and filmmaker Joseph Patel.


In celebration of the 40th anniversary of London Calling, revisit a selection of The Clash’s best tracks via all major streaming services, and enter to win a Fender Player Precision Bass just like the one Paul Simonon played.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Dec 19, 2019
London Calling: Clash of the Cultures
1876

The Opus can't fail with The Clash.


The diversity of influences on London Calling go way beyond reggae and dub. In fact, they go deeper than the music itself. This is an album that gets its hands dirty by digging right into the culture that wound up influencing the four English rockers.


Is this cultural appropriation? If not, how did they manage to pull it off? And what can musicians today learn from their approach to making music? The Opus attempts to answer these questions as it continues to unpack the iconic double album.


In the second episode of our London Calling series, host Andy Bothwell is joined by Spoon's Britt Daniel, Texas country legend Joe Ely, Houston rapper Fat Tony, South Florida Genreless musician Yeek, British LGBTQ activist and Big Joanie drummer Cardine Taylor-Stone, Head of Design for MOMA PS1 Vance Wallenstein, and filmmaker Joseph Patel.


What are you waiting for? Join 'em aboard this train in vain above.


In celebration of the 40th anniversary of London Calling, revisit a selection of The Clash’s best tracks via all major streaming services, and enter to win both the 40th anniversary London Calling Scrapbook and Super Bundle.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Dec 12, 2019
London Calling: The Clash's Great Rebellion
1695

The Opus is getting lost in the supermarket for its sixth season.


The Clash were at a crossroads in 1979. The first wave of punk rock ended a year prior when the Sex Pistols called it quits, leaving the movement to explore new avenues, from New Wave to hardcore, and the band to wonder, What are we gonna do now?


The answer was London Calling. As Margaret Thatcher continued to remake Britain by looking into the past, so did The Clash, and the English rockers opened up all the rock 'n' roll doors their fellow punk colleagues had slammed over the last decade.


They brushed up on their history, they let their sound travel overseas, they started writing narratives. By doing so, they defied any kind of label for themselves, starting a rebellion in the process, and one that The Opus plans to follow.


In the first episode of our London Calling series, host Andy Bothwell is joined by Lee "Scratch" Perry, Against Me!’s Laura Jane Grace, L7’s Donita Sparks, writer Dan Reilly (Rolling Stone/Spin/Entertainment Weekly), and filmmaker Joseph Patel (Vice/MTV Docs).


Together, they discuss how London Calling didn't need to be punk to prove how punk it was, how it didn't need to be a giant arena record to prove how much it rocked, and how it managed to introduce all kinds of culture with zero pretension.


So, hop in their brand new Cadillac and listen now.


In celebration of the 40th anniversary of London Calling, revisit a selection of The Clash’s best tracks via all major streaming services, and enter to win both the 40th anniversary London Calling Scrapbook and Super Bundle.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Dec 05, 2019
Welcome to The Opus - Season 6: The Clash's London Calling
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Consequence of Sound and Sony are proud to present the sixth season of The Opus. Past seasons have explored the legacy of iconic albums by Bob Dylan (Blood on the Tracks), The Jimi Hendrix Experience (Electric Ladyland), Jeff Buckley (Grace), Willie Nelson (Red Headed Stranger), and Ozzy Osbourne (Blizzard of Ozz). This time, we're answering the cry of the only band that matters, The Clash, and their landmark release London Calling. Host Andy Bothwell, a.k.a. Astronautalis, will begin picking up the pieces of the Paul Simonon's bass when episode one arrives December 5th.


The band was in uncertain territory leading into London Calling. After parting ways with their former manager and being forced to relocate to a new rehearsal space, lead songwriters Mick Jones and Joe Strummer were hit with a year-long bout of writer's block. Even on their previous record, they'd begun veering away from the punk they'd helped popularize towards more rock 'n roll sounds. By embracing styles as varied as ska, rockabilly, and pop, they were able to not only shake off their doldrums, but shake up punk rock at large.


"London Calling, is perhaps, the greatest record, from one my favorite bands of all time," says Bothwell. "To say that I am excited about covering this one, would be an ABSURD understatement!  This record didn’t just change how punk sounded, it totally redefined who was punk, what punk looked like, and blew my little American mind the first time I heard it in my brother’s room back in the 80’s!"


The Opus: London Calling premieres December 5th, and you can subscribe now. To prepare for the new season, stream a selection of The Clash's top tracks via all major streaming services.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Dec 03, 2019
Blizzard of Ozz: The People vs. Ozzy Osbourne
1867

The Opus is out of the Blizzard and on Capitol Hill.


Long before he was a teddy bear on reality TV, Ozzy Osbourne was seen as a demon through the eyes of many Americans. In fact, throughout the '80s, the Prince of Darkness was the subject of two separate court cases involving his music.


Both "Suicide Solution" and "Mr. Crowley" drew ire from parents and politicians, who were no doubt fueled by the fear and rage of America's rampant Satanic Panic. This brought Ozzy into the sights of Tipper Gore and her Parents Music Resource Center.


Host Andy Bothwell concludes his journey through 1980's Blizzard of Ozz by heading to America's capital with a team of experts. Today, he's joined by legendary pop culture writer Chuck Klosterman and The Columbine Effect author Beth Winegarner.


Together, they discuss how Ozzy's battles during this time shaped first amendment rights for artists forever, how the war against censorship continues with social media, and how science sides with the holistic qualities of heavy metal.


Next year marks the 40th anniversary of Ozzy Osbourne’s groundbreaking debut album, Blizzard of Oz. To celebrate, you can preview or stream music from Ozzy Osbourne here. Bonus: We’re also giving away his new career-spanning vinyl box set, See You on the Other Side.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Nov 07, 2019
Blizzard of Ozz: The Unexpected Influence of Ozzy Osbourne
1530

The Opus is in the thick of the Blizzard now.


Tracing the influence of Ozzy Osbourne leads to some strange and wonderful places -- far beyond the confines of hard rock. From sports arenas to new hip-hop anthems, the Prince of Darkness has a reach that knows no limits.


Host Andy Bothwell continues his journey through 1980's Blizzard of Ozz, but he's not alone. Today, he's joined by a motley crew that includes guitar god Zakk Wylde, musician Steve Brodsky (formerly of Converge), Portland Mercury writer Robert Ham, and, yes, Minor League Baseball executive Fillup Guiry.


Together, they discuss how Blizzard of Ozz was a gateway drug into metal, how all great grunge musicians were 16 when it dropped, and how it wound up on the mixing boards for the likes of Post Malone, Trick Daddy, and Lil Jon.


Next year marks the 40th anniversary of Ozzy Osbourne’s groundbreaking debut album, Blizzard of Oz. To celebrate, you can preview or stream music from Ozzy Osbourne here. Bonus: We’re also giving away his new career-spanning vinyl box set, See You on the Other Side.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Oct 31, 2019
Blizzard of Ozz: The Prince of Darkness Finds Unlikely Shelter
1521

Warning: The Opus is about to get loud.


Ozzy Osbourne wasn't always The Prince of Darkness. It was a long and twisted journey in the lead-up to his 1980 solo debut, Blizzard of Ozz, one that found the legendary singer banished, wrecked, and lost without any sense of purpose. He was a broken man.


Yet he was hardly abandoned. After being pulled back to life by his future life partner Sharon Arden, Osbourne found himself amidst an unlikely redemption story in his post-Black Sabbath life. That story is where this season of The Opus begins.


In the first episode of our Blizzard of Ozz series, host Andy Bothwell is joined by legendary guitarist Zakk Wylde, who's performed alongside Osbourne since 1987, in addition to heavy metal writer Joseph Schafer, who has served as curator for NW Terrorfest.


Together, they chart how Osbourne went from toiling away in Los Angeles' Le Park Suite Hotel to finding the classical complexity of Randy Rhoads' guitar work to ultimately creating the blueprint for the future of heavy metal. Again, things are gonna get loud.


So, put on those headphones, throw up the horns, and listen below.


Next year marks the 40th anniversary of Ozzy Osbourne’s groundbreaking debut album, Blizzard of Oz. To celebrate, you can preview or stream music from Ozzy Osbourne here. Bonus: We’re also giving away his new career-spanning vinyl box set, See You on the Other Side.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Oct 24, 2019
Welcome to The Opus - Season 5: Ozzy Osbourne's Blizzard of Ozz
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The Opus is back for a fifth season from Consequence of Sound and Sony. After exploring the legacies of classic records from Bob Dylan (Blood on the Tracks), The Jimi Hendrix Experience (Electric Ladyland), Jeff Buckley (Grace), and Willie Nelson (Red Headed Stranger), we’re bundling up to enter the storm that is Ozzy Osbourne’s debut solo record, Blizzard of Ozz. Host Andy Bothwell, a.k.a. Astronautalis, will begin to traverse the frozen tundra of metal when episode one drops on October 24th.


After being fired from Black Sabbath in 1979, Osbourne feared his career was over. However, with the help of his future wife, Sharon Arden, and the work of guitarist Randy Rhoads, he saw a second chance to become a heavy metal icon. Blizzard of Ozz blew in like a cold wind of change that would shift not just Osbourne’s life, but the genre as a whole, thanks to hit singles “Crazy Train” and “Mr. Crowley”. Over three episodes, a number of musicians, artists, authors, and metal heads will delve into how the record changed Ozzy’s world and continues to impact music today.


Bothwell returns to host the series to guide us through the Blizzard. “I didn’t grow up on Ozzy, I knew the hits, but I had never gone any deeper than that on Blizzard Of Ozz,” Bothwell admits. “But, after researching for this next season of The Opus, I have become a TOTAL fan! I finally understand why metal heads worship this record, and I fully accept and acknowledge Ozzy Osbourne as the Godfather of Metal, and the one true Prince of Darkness!”


The Opus: Blizzard of Ozz premieres October 24th, and you can subscribe now. To prepare for the new season, stream a selection of Ozzy Osbourne’s top tracks via all major streaming services.

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Oct 22, 2019
Red Headed Stranger: The Wonderful World of Willie
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The Opus is moseying on outta Texas.


Wild horses, weed at the White House, the war in Iraq, and the weird web that ties the world of Willie Nelson’s Red Headed Stranger together. The record that gave Willie his stardom has continued to shape and change the world long after its release.


At a time when the world seems to be pulling itself apart, Willie Nelson continues to be a tie that binds—even the most disparate elements. In the Season 4 finale of The Opus, we take a walk in Willie’s boots, and bask in the glorious world he has created since Red Headed Stranger.


Host Andy Bothwell, joined by Nathanial Rateliff of Nathanial Rateliff and the Night Sweats, Jack Torrey of The Cactus Blossoms, Carla Bozulich of The Geraldine Fibbers, and Dan Solomon of Texas Monthly Magazine, takes you inside Willie’s world, and shows you just how singular it is.


Next year marks the 45th anniversary of Willie Nelson’s breakthrough country outlaw album, Red Headed Stranger. To celebrate, you can preview or stream music from Willie Nelson here. Bonus: We’re giving away a 14-LP Willie Nelson vinyl prize pack!

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Oct 03, 2019
Red Headed Stranger: Betting It All on Being Different
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The Opus is still in Texas.


Red Headed Stranger launched an improbable career, created a genre, and changed the world forever. In this installment of The Opus, we get a first-hand look at the massive, culture-shifting changes that came from one pivot, one moment, one record, one man’s faith in his own work.


Host Andy Bothwell, along with legendary Texas historian Joe Nick Patoski, takes you through the most pivotal time in Willie Nelson’s life, and just how close we came to never knowing Willie at all.


Next year marks the 45th anniversary of Willie Nelson’s breakthrough country outlaw album, Red Headed Stranger. To celebrate, you can preview or stream music from Willie Nelson here. Bonus: We’re giving away a 14-LP Willie Nelson vinyl prize pack!

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Sep 26, 2019
Red Headed Stranger: Willie Nelson's Outlaw Rebirth
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The Opus is heading to Texas.


Willie Nelson has reached that true iconic status in American culture that very few people ever manage to achieve, especially while they're still alive and working. But perhaps the avatar of Willie now looms so large, that we, as a culture, have forgotten all of the brilliant art and work that laid the foundation to support this musical colossus?


Sure, you know the hits, but, once Willie hit his stride, he didn’t just write great songs, he made great albums. Albums that changed country music, albums that changed the American cultural landscape forever. In season four of The Opus, we take a deep dive into the album that changed it all for Wille Nelson: his 1975 cinematic masterpiece, Red Headed Stranger.


In this season's first episode, host Andy Bothwell is joined by legendary Texas historian Joe Nick Patoski and music writer Rebecca Bengal to discuss the significance of this album and how it went on to shape said American icon.

Join us below.


Next year marks the 45th anniversary of Willie Nelson’s breakthrough country outlaw album, Red Headed Stranger. To celebrate, you can preview or stream music from Willie Nelson here. Bonus: We’re giving away a 14-LP Willie Nelson vinyl prize pack!

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Sep 19, 2019
Welcome to The Opus - Season 4: Willie Nelson's Red Headed Stranger
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Consequence of Sound and Sony have teamed up once again to bring you the fourth season of The Opus, a podcast that examines the evolving legacy of music’s most iconic albums. Beginning September 19th, the series will head South as it revisits one of country's most beloved albums, Willie Nelson’s Red Headed Stranger, with new host Andy Bothwell, aka Astronautalis.


Next year sees Nelson's 18th studio record turn 45, making this the perfect time to revisit the classic LP. Given more creative freedom over his music thanks to a new contract and a new label, Nelson returned to the concept album form with Red Headed Stranger. Weaving covers of old standards in with poetic, stripped down originals, he created an outlaw country tale that transcended its genre into the mainstream consciousness. Over three episodes, The Opus will dig into what the record meant then and how it has impacted music now.


Taking listeners through this tour of the album's legacy will be Bothwell, The Opus’ new permanent host. “Every great record has an infinite number of stories to tell, not just from when it was recorded, or when it was released, but for all time, as the music continues to reach and impact new people," says the alternative hip-hop artist. "I am so excited to join forces with Sony Music and Consequence of Sound to dive deep into some of the greatest records of all time, and share their stories with everyone."


The Opus: Red Headed Stranger premieres September 19th.

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Sep 13, 2019
Grace: Keeping Jeff Buckley's Legacy Alive
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The Opus completes its journey with the late Jeff Buckley.


Jeff Buckley hasn't been alive for 22 years, and yet, he has consistently put out "new" music.


Fans can thank Mary Guibert for that. She's head executive of Buckley's estate — and also his mother. Stepping in quickly after his untimely death, she's kept Buckley's voice and vision alive all these years. It's not an easy job — after all, she had to convince seasoned label heads to take her seriously, compartmentalize her grief as a mother to act as an executive, and choose what things are shared with the world and what stays private. 


In the season three finale of The Opus, host Carrie Courogen is joined by Guibert, as well as Rolling Stone critic David Browne, to discuss their roles, together and individually, in doing the delicate and difficult work of keeping Buckley's legacy alive. 


To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Grace, Jeff Buckley’s proper studio catalogue will be re-released and packaged with rare recordings and bonus international material. The sets drop on August 23rd via Columbia and Sony Legacy. Purchase a set now or stream them via Apple Music | Spotify | Amazon.

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Aug 29, 2019
Grace: Buckley and Grace After Death
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The Opus continues its season surrounding the late Jeff Buckley.


Posthumous fame and legacy have been contentious subjects for decades. An early or sudden death, as in Buckley's case, can sometimes create a mythology around the artist that leaves audiences with difficult questions to ask:


How do we listen to Grace — Buckley’s only finished studio album — differently with the knowledge of his death? How do we ethically proceed with lingering unfinished material in the aftermath of such a tragedy? And do posthumous releases help us understand an artist more, or do they lend to the mythology? While Buckley the person is no longer alive, through his art, his voice continues to flourish and inspire.


Host Carrie Courogen is joined by critics Daphne A. Brooks, David Browne, Annie Zaleski, and musician Warren Zanes to talk about how Buckley’s tragic death, and everything that came after, casts a long shadow over the way we listen to Grace today. 


To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Grace, Jeff Buckley’s proper studio catalogue will be re-released and packaged with rare recordings and bonus international material. The sets drop on August 23rd via Columbia and Sony Legacy. Purchase a set now or stream them via Apple Music | Spotify | Amazon.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Aug 22, 2019
Grace: Post-Gender, Post-Genre: The Voice of Jeff Buckley
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The Opus returns to dig into the mythos of the late Jeff Buckley.


In his time, Buckley rose to fame amidst the prime of '90s masculine alt-rock. And yet, his first and only studio album, 1994's Grace, defies all the trappings of its era.


His embracement of femininity and vulnerability made him post-genre before it was the norm. While that inability to be pigeonholed set him apart from his rock peers, it also begged the question: "What do we do with this?"


Host Carrie Courogen is joined by musicians Lzzy Hale and Myles Kennedy, along with critics Daphne A. Brooks and Annie Zaleski to unpack how Buckley's defiance of genre and gender norms alike led his music to endure 25 years later.


To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Grace, Jeff Buckley’s proper studio catalogue will be re-released and packaged with rare recordings and bonus international material. The sets drop on August 23rd via Columbia and Sony Legacy. Purchase a set now or stream them via Apple Music | Spotify | Amazon.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
Aug 15, 2019
Welcome to The Opus - Season 3: Jeff Buckley's Grace
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Consequence of Sound and Sony have teamed up once again to bring you the third season of The Opus, a podcast that examines the evolving legacy of music’s most iconic albums. The series returns with new host Carrie Courogen to dig into the depths of Jeff Buckley’s only full-length record, Grace.


Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, Grace remains as vital and powerful as it was when first released back in 1994. Over the course of three episodes, The Opus takes listeners through the years since, exploring how Buckley’s singular vulnerability and tragic death have impacted the way we perceive his greatest work. Through discussions with critics, artists, musicians, scholars, and other personalities, The Opus will present an unparalleled look at the magic and mastery of Grace.


The Opus: Grace premieres August 15th.

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Aug 13, 2019
Electric Ladyland: The Enduring Legacy of Hendrix
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Decades after his tragic death in 1970, Jimi Hendrix continues to inspire countless souls. From the elusive Hendrix chord to deluxe box sets, the singer and guitarist's legacy is long out of his hands, part of a much larger lexicon of followers, be it elders of yesteryear or newcomers who weren't even around for the '90s. In our final episode revolving around Hendrix and Electric Ladyland, host Ernest Wilkins attempts to answer, "Why?"


It's a tough question, sure, but Ernest isn't alone for the trip. He's joined by another legend himself in Megadeth's Dave Mustaine, who will soon embark on the Experience Hendrix tour, in addition to poet and author Hanif Abdurraqib, whose book of essays, They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us, topped year-end lists by Buzzfeed, Esquire, NPR, Oprah Magazine, and The Chicago Tribune.

Jan 31, 2019
Electric Ladyland: The Cinematic Immortality of Hendrix
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From Easy Rider to Forrest Gump and Wayne's World to Woodstock, the legacy of Jimi Hendrix has certainly been aided by the eternal power of cinema. Host Ernest Wilkins is joined by musician and actor Mykele Deville, Daily Grindhouse editor Mike Vanderbilt, and Consequence of Sound Editor-in-Chief Michael Roffman to trace back the lineage of the legend on celluloid.


However, that lineage is parallel to a long standing relationship with pop music and film, one that may have been exacerbated by the late axeman himself. To find out, the four step out to enjoy a 30,000 foot view and discuss the larger cultural impact of music in film and how Hendrix’s music itself is interwoven into American culture through iconic movie moments.

 

Jan 24, 2019
Electric Ladyland: The Studio Wizardry of Hendrix
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A hodge-podge of jam sessions and extended blues homages could have easily transformed into a bloated mess. Instead, the ambling attempt to make the “Earth Space Music” of Electric Ladyland became the stuff of legend. Host Ernest Wilkins is joined by music writer Dan Epstein to discuss Hendrix’s production style and the sometimes quite peculiar techniques the maestro used in the studio.


And what a studio it was! The Record Plant was founded to ensure Hendrix's complete control over the record, allowing for parties that became immortalized on wax and painstaking perfectionism. This episode highlights early takes and demos from those sessions and inspiring insights into the fluid and fascinating ways that Jimi Hendrix let his creativity soar.

Jan 17, 2019
Electric Ladyland: The Deification of Jimi Hendrix
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The Opus returns to journey deep into the uncanny realm of The Jimi Hendrix Experience's Electric Ladyland.


Hendrix's unique, genre-shaping career, coupled with his untimely death, has placed him in a state of rock and roll ubiquity. He’s everywhere - but between the over-saturation of his biggest songs and the over-simplification of his legend, time has masked the finer details of his story and sound.


In this introductory episode host Ernest Wilkins is joined by rock critics Corbin Reiff and Dan Hyman to unpack the mythology surrounding Electric Ladyland and the man himself - the brilliant, the deified, Jimi Hendrix.

Jan 10, 2019
Welcome to The Opus - Season 2: The Jimi Hendrix Experience's Electric Ladyland
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Consequence of Sound and Sony bring you an exploration of legendary albums and their ongoing legacy. Join host Ernest Wilkins as he explores how this music continues to evolve: shaping lives, shaking rafters, and ingraining itself into our culture. Maybe you’re a longtime fan who wants to go deeper. Maybe you’re a first-time listener and you’re curious to hear more - either way, you’re in the right place.

Jan 08, 2019
Blood on the Tracks: How Dylan Birthed Bootleg Culture
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From The Basement Tapes to the mythical sessions that would become the just released More Blood, More Tracks collection - bootlegs of Bob Dylan's music are central to not just his story, but the music industry at large. Host Paula Mejia is joined by three critics, record collectors, and Dylan fans: Jesse Jarnow, Alison Fensterstock, and More Blood, More Tracks liner notes author, Jeff Slate to distinctive bootleg culture that’s thrived alongside Dylan’s studio recordings, shed some light on the myths surrounding this record, and exploring how Dylan keeps reinventing these songs in the present.

Dec 07, 2018
Blood on the Tracks: Evaluating Dylan's Cinematic Legacy
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Nov 30, 2018
Blood on the Tracks: Evaluating Dylan's Cinematic Legacy
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Our debut season of The Opus continues to dissect Bob Dylan's Blood on the Tracks, exploring how the legendary album and its ongoing legacy has sharpened lives, shaken rafters, and ingrained themselves into our culture


Host Paula Mejía is joined by two whip-smart film critics, Monica Castillo and Jordan Hoffman to unpack Dylan’s life on the silver screen - from DA Pennebaker’s Don’t Look Back to Luca Guadagnino’s forthcoming Blood on the Tracks adaptation. They explore the highs and lows of Dylan's performances, how his persona has been rendered in cinema, the pervasive use of his music in film, and the fragmented biography presented in Todd Haynes’ I’m Not There.

Nov 30, 2018
Blood on the Tracks: Beth Orton and Kevin Morby on Dylan's Songwriting Process
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Nov 23, 2018
Blood on the Tracks: Beth Orton and Kevin Morby on Dylan's Songwriting Process
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Our debut season of The Opus continues to dissect Bob Dylan's Blood on the Tracks, exploring how the legendary album and its ongoing legacy has sharpened lives, shaken rafters, and ingrained themselves into our culture


For the second episode of the season, two extraordinary songwriters and musicians, Beth Orton and Kevin Morby, join host Paula Mejía to unpack Dylan’s singular lyricism, the magic of being let into the recording process through the More Blood, More Tracks sessions, and the stories of love and rupture that these songs tell.

Nov 23, 2018
Blood on the Tracks: Canonizing Bob Dylan's Human Opus
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Nov 16, 2018
Blood on the Tracks: Canonizing Bob Dylan's Human Opus
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Presenting The Opus: an exploration of legendary albums and their ongoing legacy - beginning with Bob Dylan's 1975 record Blood on the Tracks; the gold standard of sharp, heart-wrenching songwriting, that spawned classics like “Tangled Up in Blue”.


Join host Paula Mejia and a roster of critics, artists, filmmakers, and scholars as they examine how this masterpiece has continued to evolve.To begin the dialogue of this season, and the series at large, Mejia is joined by Jill Sternheimer, the Director of Public Programming at Lincoln Center and Ann Powers, NPR Music’s critic and correspondent. Together they decode the notion of an "opus" in popular music and share personal reflections on Dylan’s songwriting, his legacy, and canon.


Maybe you’re a longtime fan who wants to go deeper. Maybe you’re a first-time listener curious to hear more – either way, you’re in the right place.

Nov 16, 2018
Welcome to The Opus - Season 1: Bob Dylan's Blood on the Tracks
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Consequence of Sound and Sony bring you an exploration of legendary albums and their ongoing legacy. Join host Paula Mejia as she explores how this music continues to evolve: shaping lives, shaking rafters, and ingraining itself into our culture. Maybe you’re a longtime fan who wants to go deeper. Maybe you’re a first-time listener and you’re curious to hear more - either way, you’re in the right place.

Nov 12, 2018