The Tapes Archive

By Alan Berry

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A podcast that unearths never-before-heard conversations with world-class musicians and comedians.

Episode Date
#035 Kurtis Blow interview from 1997
00:23:20

A never before published interview with Kurtis Blow from 1997


In the interview, Blow talks about:

- Whether he thinks God cares about pop music

- How he had it all and now has nothing

- What hip-hop fans should go back and listen to

- How early hip-hop had a code of ethics not to use swear words

- Why he got out of the music business

- How he foresaw how big hip-hop would get

- The language of a rap

- Why rap artist don’t typically have long careers

- Why white America has gravitated toward rap

- The first time rap was used for a commercial

- How Don Cornelius, host of Soul Train, broke Kurtis’ heart

- If he became the overlord of music, what the first thing he’d change would be


In this episode, we have hip-hop pioneer Kurtis Blow. At the time of this interview in 1997, Blow was 38 years old and was promoting his three-CD compilation, “The History of Rap.” In the interview, Kurtis talks about how Don Cornelius, host of Soul Train, broke his heart; what hip-hop fans should go back and listen to; and how he foresaw how big rap music would become.

 

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Aug 05, 2020
#034 Lars Ulrich (Metallica) interview from 1997
00:23:27

A never before published interview with Lars Ulrich (Metallica) from 1997

In the interview, Ulrich talks about:

- Pat Boone’s version of “Enter Sandman”

- Metallica’s songwriting process

- How the internet can be a “frightening instrument.”

- Being on the Ferrall on the Bench show and whether he and Scott Ferrall are friends

- What motivates him

- The challenges of touring with a huge stage

- The cover art for “Load”

- The weirdest encounter he has ever had with a fan

- Whether he’s enjoying himself on tour

- How he’s looking forward to “some of that horseradish down at the old St. Elmo’s joint” (an Indianapolis insider tidbit)


In this episode, we have Metallica’s co-founder and drummer Lars Ulrich. At the time of this interview in 1997, Ulrich was 34 years old and was promoting the band’s concert date in Indianapolis. In the interview, Lars talks about Metallica’s songwriting process, the weirdest encounter he has ever had with a fan, what motivates him, and how the internet can be a “frightening instrument.”

 

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Jul 22, 2020
#033 David Crosby interview from 1998
00:19:11

A never before published interview with David Crosby from 1998

In the interview, Crosby talks about:

- Meeting his son after 30 years

- Writing and playing music with his newly found son

- How he is the happiest “walrus” you’d meet

- Why his son is a better musician than he is

- His feelings toward The Doors’ Jim Morrison

- Mistakes he has made in life

- The story behind his new record label, Samson Music

- How he doesn’t make music for the money

- How Music of Bulgaria is the best record no has heard


In this episode, we have singer-songwriter David Crosby. At the time of this interview in 1998, Crosby was 56 years old and was promoting his tour with his new band, CPR. In the interview, Crosby talks about mistakes he’s made in his life, how he connected for the first time with his 30-year old musician and bandmate son, and how he is the happiest “walrus” you’d meet.

 

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Jul 15, 2020
#032 Ringo Starr (The Beatles) interview from 1992
00:07:14

A never before published interview with Ringo Starr (The Beatles) from 1992


In this episode, we’re celebrating the 80th birthday of Ringo Starr by playing Marc’s interview with the Beatles’ drummer from 1992. At the time of this interview, Ringo was 52 and was on tour with his All-Starr Band. Back in those days, Ringo would do five-minute interviews, so this conversation is much shorter than normal. So let’s skip our normal preamble and get right to the interview.

 

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Jul 06, 2020
#031 Robby Krieger (The Doors) interview from 1991.
00:16:40

A never before published interview with Robbie Krieger (The Doors) from 1991.

In the interview, Krieger talks about:

- Going all-instrumental without Jim Morrison

-What he thought about Oliver Stone’s movie “The Doors”

- Why keyboardist Ray Manzarek wanted nothing to do with the film

- The truth about The Doors

- What it was like making records after Morrison died

- Whether he feels the Doors have come to symbolize the ’60s

- How the music of today compares with the music of the ’60s

- How Jim Morrison should be remembered


In this episode, we have The Doors’ guitarist, Robby Krieger. At the time of this interview in 1991, Krieger was 45 years old and was promoting his own band, The Robby Krieger Band. In the interview, Krieger talks about his thoughts on Oliver Stone’s movie “The Doors,” why Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek wanted nothing to do with the film, and how thinks Jim Morrison should be remembered.




 

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Jul 01, 2020
#030 Ray Manzarek (The Doors) interview from 1998
00:23:18

A never before published interview with Ray Manzarek from 1998.

In the interview, Manzarek talks about:

  • The death of Jim Morrison
  • Whether he feels that he lives in Morrison’s shadow
  • Whether Morrison is in heaven or hell
  • Whether Iggy Pop was considered to replace Morrison
  • The early days of touring with the Doors
  • How he wants to inform the youth about the ‘60s
  • His belief in an ancient Egyptian religion
  • His thoughts on The Who
  • Whether it was difficult playing bass parts on the keyboard
  • His feelings about Oliver Stone’s movie about the Doors
  • If it’s better to burn out or to rust
  • His dislike of David Crosby
  • His connection to The Knack
 

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Jun 24, 2020
#029 Tracy Morgan Interview from 2007
00:16:47

A never before published interview with Tracy Morgan from 2007.

In the interview, Morgan talks about:

  • His new movie with Ice Cube
  • If Tracy Jordan and Tracy Morgan are the same person
  • The dynamics of 30 Rock
  • Whether he was happy with the 30 Rock episode where Jordan was shown to be illiterate
  • His famous family members
  • Working with white writers
  • If he feels stereotyped

In this episode, we have Emmy-nominated comedian Tracy Morgan. At the time of this interview in 2007, Morgan was 39 years old and was promoting the TV show 30 Rock and his upcoming movie "First Sunday." In the interview, Morgan talks about the dynamics of 30 Rock, working with white writers, how Tracy Jordan and Tracy Morgan are two different people, and his famous family members.

 

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Jun 17, 2020
#028 Peter Buck (R.E.M.) 1989
00:33:58

A never before published interview with Peter Buck (R.E.M.) 1989


In the interview, Buck talks about:

  • Is R.E.M. commercial or inaccessible
  • If the album Green is supposed to be uplifting
  • Why he is angrier than ever
  • His love for Lou Reed
  • The misunderstanding of Bruce Springsteen’s “Born in the USA”
  • The trappings of success
  • The early days in R.E.M.
  • State of radio at the time
  • How R.E.M. picks where to record
  • Why Athens, Georgia, was a hotbed for bands at the time
  • Paying cash for a new Jeep


In this episode, we have R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck. At the time of this interview in 1989, Buck was 33 years old and was starting to tour for the band’s sixth album, “Green.” In the interview, Buck talks about the early days of R.E.M., his love for Lou Reed, the trappings of success, and whether R.E.M.’s music is commercial or inaccessible.

 

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May 27, 2020
#027 Keith Emerson (Emerson/Lake/Palmer) 1992
00:21:12

A never before published interview with Keith Emerson from 1992


- In the interview Emerson talks about:

- How technology has changed the way he plays

- If it felt right getting back together with ELP

- How the reunion came to be

- Why he thinks he was overlooked as a solo artist

- The stigma attached to keyboardist

- How ELP pioneered the classical rock movement

- If he felt competitive with other contemporary keyboardists

- How he felt that ELP was not a rock band

- How ELP came to play Pictures at an Exhibition

- His thoughts on rap music


In this episode, we have arguably the best keyboardist in rock music history, Keith Emerson. At the time of this interview in 1992, Emerson was 48 years old and was embarking on a reunion tour with his old bandmates, Greg Lake and Carl Palmer. In the interview, Keith talks about how Emerson, Lake, and Palmer came to play Pictures at an Exhibition, the stigma of being a keyboardist, and his belief that ELP was not a rock band.

 

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May 20, 2020
#026 Little Richard 2000
00:17:55

A never before published interview with Little Richard from the year 2000


In the interview Little Richard talks about:

- Who he really wanted to play him in the movie

- His desire that you understanding him

- Why he wore make-up

- If he considers himself gay

- Whether he ever wore a bra

- How he was the first African American to be on white radio

- What’s accurate and not accurate in the movie

- How his Daddy beat him

- And more...


In this episode, we have one of the pioneers of rock and roll--the recently departed Little Richard. At the time of this interview in the year 2000, Richard was 67 years old and was promoting the TV movie based on his life called “Little Richard.” In the interview, Richard talks about why he wore make-up, if he considers himself gay, how he was the first African American to be on white radio, and how he discovered the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix and, The Rolling Stones

 

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May 10, 2020
#025 Ozzy Osbourne 1997
00:19:35

A never before published interview with Ozzy Osbourne 1997.


In the interview Ozzy talks about:

  • His love for his fans
  • The legacy of Ozzfest
  • How the Sabbath reunion came to pass
  • Why Bill Ward was not included on the tour
  • His thoughts on Marilyn Manson
  • His record label Ozz Records
  • Best Buy and censorship
  • Being in Howard Stern’s movie


In this episode, we have The Prince of Darkness, Ozzy Osbourne. At the time of this interview in 1997, Osbourne was 49 years old and was promoting his multi-band tour Ozzfest. In the interview, Ozzy talks about his love for his fans, how the Sabbath reunion came to be, Marilyn Manson, and the legacy of Ozzfest.


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This episode is brought to you by the award-winning true-crime documentary Dead Man's Line.

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Apr 29, 2020
#024 Les Claypool (Primus) 1994
00:25:27

A never before published interview with Primus' Les Claypool 1994.


In the interview Claypool talks about:

  • Why Rush and Primus makes for a good concert
  • The hardest bass line for him when he first started
  • What made him wanna play bass
  • His bass technique 
  • Headling Lollapalooza 
  • Pork Soda
  • Best Buy and Primus
  • His record label Prawn Song Records

In this episode, we have Primus’s frontman and bassist, Les Claypool. At the time of this interview in 1994, Claypool was 31 years old and was promoting his band’s fourth album Pork Soda. In the interview, Les talks about what made him wanna play the bass, headling Lollapalooza, the parallels of Rush and Primus, and his record label.


For transcripts to this episode

This episode is brought to you by the award-winning true-crime documentary Dead Man's Line.

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Apr 22, 2020
#023 Kurt Vonnegut 2000
00:49:50

A never before published interview with America author Kurt Vonnegut from 2000.


In the interview Vonnegut talks about:

- If technological progress has been good.

- His love for the ACLU.

- Posting the ten commandments in schools.

- If he believes in God.

- His affection for Indianapolis.

- Being captured by the Germans in WWII.


In this episode, we have American Author Kurt Vonnegut. At the time of this interview, Vonnegut was 77 years old and was in Indianapolis for an ACLU fundraising event. In this wide-ranging interview, Vonnegut talks about freedom of speech and censorship, civil rights and war, God and religion, ethical suicide parlors and dying.


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This episode is brought to you by the award-winning true-crime documentary Dead Man's Line.

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Apr 15, 2020
#022 John Prine 1997
00:20:02

A never before published interview with John Prine from 1997.


In the interview Prine talks about:

  • His record label, “Oh Boy”
  • Why his songs have “simple messages”
  • How at the time of the interview he was in such a good place that he’ll “probably be writing all zippity-doo-da songs”
  • John Mellencamp and other Indiana connections
  • His yet-to-be-made duet album
  • Touring smaller venues
  • And more...

In this episode, we have the great singer-songwriter, John Prine. At the time of this interview in 1997, Prine was 50 years old and was out on tour with Los Lobos. In the interview, Prine talks about his record label, Oh Boy, his Indiana connections, touring, and his yet-to-be-made duet album.



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Apr 08, 2020
#021 John Entwistle (The Who) 1996
00:21:37

A never before published interview with John Entwistle, bassist for The Who, from 1996.


In this episode, we have Thunderfingers himself, John Entwistle. At the time of this interview in 1996, Entwistle was 51 years old and was out on his fourth solo tour. In the interview, Entwistle talks about why he picked up the bass, his sometimes forgotten contributions to the Who’s music, and surprisingly how his hearing loss wasn’t from live performances with the Who.


In the interview Entwistle talks about:

  • Why he picked up the bass
  • His sometimes forgotten contributions to The Who’s music
  • How he made his first bass
  • How he mistakenly developed his bass-playing style
  • If he admires any other bass players
  • His thoughts on Tommy the broadway show
  • What he thinks about the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
  • The backstory of his hearing problem (It wasn’t from concerts)
  • He indulges Marc and states five of his best songs
  • His cartoon character art


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Apr 01, 2020
#020 Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi 1978
00:30:53

In this episode, we have an interview you might have heard before but probably not. In the crate of Marc's tapes are some unmarked interviews that Marc did not do. One of those tapes has an interview with Dan Ackroyd and John Belushi from 1978. I couldn't find the interview anywhere online, so I thought "this is too good not to be heard" and decided to make it public. 


At the time of this interview, Aykroyd was 26 years old, and Belushi was 29. In the interview, they talk in-depth about their two upcoming films, “The Blues Brothers” and Stephen Spielberg’s “1941.” Also in the interview, Belushi reveals how he came up with the Samurai character he played on Saturday Night Live, and Aykroyd tells where he found the inspiration for the SNL skit the Coneheads. 


In the interview Aykroyd and Belushi talk about:

- They talk in-depth about their yet to be made film The Blues Brothers.

- How democratic Saturday Night Live is.

- The greatness of performing on live tv. 

- How they met and Second City days.

- How the Blues Brother’s look came to be.

- Aykroyd reveals how he came up with the SNL skit the Coneheads.

- The inspiration for Belushi’s Samurai character.

- Auditioning for SNL

- Thoughts on one of their next films, 1941.


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Mar 25, 2020
#019 Tom Morello (Rage Against the Machine) 1993
00:20:05

In this episode, we have the first of two interviews with Rage Against the Machine’s Tom Morello. At the time of this interview in 1993, Morello was 29 years old and was out on tour supporting his band’s self-titled first record. In the interview, Tom talks about the pushing of an anti-censorship agenda, the Lollapalooza t-shirt debacle, and how Rage Against the Machine is not like Public Enemy for white kids.


A never before published music interview with Tom Morello (Rage Against the Machine) from 1993.

In the interview Morello talks about:

- The diversity of Rage Against the Machine’s audience

- The band’s intent not to preach to the converted

- The pushing of pushing an anti-censorship agenda

- The threat of the PMRC

- Boycotting record stores that don't believe in in the first amendment

- The Lollapalooza t-shirt debacle

- And more...


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Mar 18, 2020
#018 John Mellencamp 1991
00:32:42

A never before published interview with John Mellencamp from 1991.

In the interview Mellencamp talks about:

- Hows he’s given up on trying to save the world

- How big corporations don’t give a shit about your town

- In-depth with his album “Whenever We wanted”

- Turning 40 

- How the world is run by men we never hear of

- His thoughts on a friend that loves Ronald Reagan

- The movie he directed what it was like making his first film

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Mar 11, 2020
#017 Alex Van Halen 1980
00:32:57

A never before heard interview with Alex Van Halen from 1981.


In the interview Van Halen talks about:

• Van Halen days before being signed

• Working with Ted Templeton.

• The best heavy metal band he ever saw play live

• The future of Van Halen

• And more...


Show Note: In the interview, Marc asks if it's true that Van Halen has in their rider that there are to be no brown M&Ms backstage. It wasn't until years later that David Lee Roth revealed the real reason behind their no brown M&Ms rule.


For transcripts to this episode


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Mar 04, 2020
#016 Izzy Stradlin 1993 (Formerly w/Guns N' Roses)
00:18:51

A never before heard interview with Izzy Stradlin from 1993. (Formerly w/Gun N' Roses)


In the interview Izzy talks about:

• Growing up in Indiana.

• If he’s still friends with his ex-bandmates.

• How he loves the drums.

• Recording with the JuJu Hounds

• And more...


For transcripts to this episode https://www.thetapesarchive.com/izzy-stradlin


This episode is brought to you by the award-winning true-crime documentary Dead Man's Line.

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Feb 26, 2020
#015 Ace Frehley 1994
00:24:19

A never before heard interview with Ace Frehley from 1994.


In the interview Frehley talks about:

• What “sucks” about rock’n’roll.

• His side gig in computer graphics.

• The possibility of a KISS reunion.

• Playing while sober.

• His influence on other guitars players.

• And more...

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Feb 19, 2020
#014 Dave Matthews 1996
00:34:32

A never before heard interview with Dave Matthews from 1996


In the interview Matthews talks about:

• His fancy footwork

• His band’s first live performance.

• Why we should teach children varied philosophies.

• The making of his album “Crash”.

• Why we want freedom.

• Whether he cares or not if he makes it into the Rock and Roll Hall of fame.

And more...


For transcripts to this episode https://www.thetapesarchive.com/


This episode is brought to you by the award-winning true-crime documentary Dead Man's Line.

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Feb 12, 2020
#013 Neil Peart of Rush second interview 1991
00:23:24

A never before heard interview with Neal Peart from the band Rush in 1991.


In this episode, we have our second of three interviews with drummer Neal “The Professor” Peart of the band Rush. At the time of this interview in 1991, he was 39 years old and was out on tour with Geddy and Alex in support of the band’s 14th studio album Roll the Bones. In the interview, Neil talks about how he has become comfortable with a random universe, the strength of the individual, talking philosophy with his friends, and how he convinced the band to add a rap to one of their songs.


This episode is brought to you by the award-winning true-crime documentary Dead Man's Line.

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Feb 05, 2020
#012 Frank Zappa 1991
00:31:56

When I asked Frank Zappa if he had any regrets about the first 25 years of his career, he was blunt, as he always was. 

"There are certain things I might have said in a different way," he said. "But basically, there it is."

And that's why Frank Zappa was and is still revered by his fans—because he said and did what he believed and never let commercial considerations deter him.

In this 1991 interview from The Tapes Archive, Zappa, then 50, talked about standing up to the Parents' Music Resource Center and its warning labels on record albums, how he stepped into Eastern Europe to help American businesses establish ties in formerly communist countries, and why he refused to apologize for songs such as “Jewish Princess,” which offended some organizations.

There’s also talk about his anti-bootlegging project, “Beat the Boots,” and he tells a classic story about one of his greatest songs, “Black Napkins.”

A couple of items that need context:

-At the beginning of the interview, when he mentions “swine,” he’s referring to a show at the Indiana State Fairgrounds where he remembered seeing the Swine Barn.

-Later, when I refer to “the book,” I’m talking about “The Real Frank Zappa Book,” which was published in 1989.

More about Frank Zappa is at https://www.zappa.com/.

Oct 30, 2019
#011 Dweezil Zappa 1994
00:28:13

In the story I wrote in 1994 based on this interview with Dweezil Zappa, the lead paragraph summed up the conversation pretty well: “His father treated life as if it were a wave of stupidity he could somehow contain. Dweezil Zappa prefers to smirk and ride the tide.”

"There's not much use in being negative 24 hours a day," he said. "I can spend a few minutes of my day being negative, but ultimately I like to enjoy things more than I like to promote my disdain for things.”

Dweezil was 24 at the time. He was touring with his band Z in support of the record Shampoohorn, and he also has been acting, with roles in a sitcom called “Normal Life” and a cartoon called “Duckman.” We talk about those things, as well as his love for terrible TV shows and movies, and the state of the music industry. Of course, there’s also some discussion about his father, Frank, who died in December 1993, a couple of months before this interview was recorded.

"You had to be on your toes to talk to him,” Dweezil said. “You didn't want to just talk to him about something unless it was goofy and guaranteed for a laugh. He wanted to learn something every time you talked to him. He was great for that."

More about Dweezil is at https://www.dweezilzappa.com/.

Oct 23, 2019
#010 Shannon Hoon of Blind Melon 1995
00:50:25

When I spoke to Shannon Hoon in September 1995, he and his band, Blind Melon, were on the verge of stardom. Their first album yielded the massive hit single “No Rain,” they had played Woodstock ’94, and they were excited about their new album, “Soup.”

We talked about the new album and how different it was from the band’s debut, about his growing up in Lafayette, Indiana, and about parenthood. His girlfriend Lisa Crouse had just given birth to their daughter, Nico Blue, two months earlier. 

About a month after this interview, Hoon was dead, victim of a cocaine overdose. He was 28.

It was hard to understand his death then, and it’s still difficult today—especially after listening to this conversation again. In 1995, Hoon had a great life to look forward to. He was upbeat, funny, and enjoying his family life.

Now it’s 2019, and he’s been dead almost as long as he was alive.

A few notes:

-We discuss Hoon’s friend and fellow musician Mike Kelsey, a great guitarist whose work has long deserved a much wider audience. Check him out at https://www.michaelkelsey.com/

-At one point, Hoon brings up a negative review of Soup that appeared in the Indianapolis Star. The reviewer wrote: “With a better singer, this band could have some staying power.”

-Hoon references the morning radio team Bob & Tom, which at the time were heard only in the Indianapolis area. Since then, the show has expanded nationally to more than 100 stations.

-Blind Melon continued on without Hoon until 1999, when the group disbanded. After an eight-year hiatus, it teamed up with singer Travis Warren for the album “For My Friends.” Over the next 10 years, the band performed occasionally, and in 2018 they decided to get back together permanently.  

More about Blind Melon is at blindmelon.com.

For more info please visit our [website.](https://www.thetapesarchive.com/)

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit [Osiris](https://www.osirispod.com).

Oct 15, 2019
#009 Bill Maher 1994
00:28:48

Bill Maher is a huge part of the comedy and talk-show landscape, thanks to his HBO show Real Time, which is now in its 17th season.

But in 1994, when this interview was recorded, Maher, then 38, really was just taking off. His Comedy Central show “Politically Incorrect” was about to start its third season, he was an occasional correspondent on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” and he had just released a comic novel called “True Story.”

In this interview, we talked a lot about those subjects, as well as politics. In listening to the tape, what’s striking is how we’re still debating the same political issues we were in 1994—especially healthcare and gun control.

One thing I particularly like about this interview is Maher himself. It’s generally hard to make a comedian laugh. But if Maher thinks something is funny, he laughs. I was happy to make him laugh a couple of times.

Also, it’s great to see how consistent he’s been over the years. In the interview, I asked him if it’s accurate to describe him as a disillusioned Democrat who liked Ross Perot’s ideas but knew he could never carry them out, who thinks government is too intrusive and that people are much too dependent on government, who thinks people have gotten fat, lazy and unwilling to accept responsibility.

He liked that description.

I’d say it’s still entirely apt today.

For more info please visit our website.

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit Osiris.

Oct 09, 2019
#008 Jeff Tweedy of Wilco 1997
00:30:10

Jeff Tweedy is often described as a reticent interview subject, but I found him to be relaxed and easygoing when we spoke in 1997.

At the time, Tweedy and his band Wilco were touring behind their second record, “Being There,” and he was learning to balance the responsibilities of career and fatherhood. 

Our talk is largely about music and musical influences, and about Wilco getting away from the “alt-country” label. The funniest part of the conversation is near the end, where Tweedy tells stories about weird interactions with fans.

As fans know, Tweedy wrote a memoir, “Let’s Go (So We Can Get Back),” that came out in 2018, and Wilco’s 11th album, “Ode to Joy,” is scheduled for release on October 4.

More about Wilco is at wilcoworld.net.

For more info please visit our [website.](https://www.thetapesarchive.com/)

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit [Osiris](https://www.osirispod.com).

Oct 02, 2019
#007 Neil Peart of Rush 1990
00:43:17

I interviewed Neil Peart several times over the years and thoroughly enjoyed every conversation. In addition to being a great drummer, he’s a smart, thoughtful, articulate gentleman whose worldview extends well beyond rock ‘n’ roll.

This interview, recorded in 1990, was the first of our talks. Nearly 30 years later, I’m still amazed by his interest in visiting art museums and bicycling around the United States, his desire to become a prose writer, and his simple explanation for why Rush had been able to stay together for so long. (“We’ve retained not only respect but also affection for each other over the years.”) When we talked, Rush was touring behind Presto, its 13th studio album, so there’s also a lot of conversation about songs on that album.

A bit of context:

-Early on, we talk about—but don’t name—Rush’s first drummer. He was John Howard Rutsey, who left the group in 1974. He died in 2008.

-We also discuss the Meech Lake Accord, which would have recognized Quebec as a ''distinct society'' in the body of the Canadian constitution. The accord ultimately failed.

For more about Rush, visit rush.com/band/, where the group’s credentials are laid out nicely: “More than 40 million records sold worldwide. Countless sold-out tours. A star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Officers of the Order of Canada. And that's all very nice. But for these three guys, it's all about the music, their friendship, and the fans.”

For more info please visit our website.

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit Osiris.

Sep 25, 2019
#006 Rick James 1997
00:32:43

When I spoke to Rick James in 1997, he had already been a megastar, a prisoner, and a recipient of royalties for the use of his “Super Freak” bassline in MC Hammer’s “U Can’t Touch This.”

At the time, he was about to start a tour to promote his first album in nine years, “Urban Rhapsody,” and was in the midst of writing his autobiography, “The Confessions of Rick James: Memoirs of a Super Freak,” which eventually came out in 2007—three years after his death.

In this interview, James, then 49, talked freely about his drug use, how prison turned out to be a good thing for him, what he thought of rap (not much), and his friendships with Neil Young and Joni Mitchell. You’ve gotta like someone who says, “A lot of things I had done over the years, I can't remember if I did 'em or not. But they sort of sound great."

I think you’ll enjoy this interview.

As for the concert, it was OK. My review started like this:

"This is not a concert tonight; this is a reunion," Rick James announced early in his set Friday night at the Indiana Convention Center. Actually, it was both a concert and a reunion, as well as a throwback to an era when performers favored sexual innuendo (rather than outright vulgarity) and identified people by their Zodiac signs. James led his Stone City Band through an imbalanced, sporadically invigorating set in his return to action after two years in prison on a drug and assault conviction, plus years of inactivity due to drug addiction.

For more info please visit our website.

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit Osiris.

Intro music by the Budos Band

Sep 18, 2019
#005 Joan Rivers 1990
00:30:49

For more info please visit our website.

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit Osiris.

Intro music by the Budos Band

Sep 11, 2019
#004 Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull 1993
00:42:36

For more info please visit our website.

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit Osiris.

Intro music by the Budos Band

Sep 04, 2019
#003 - Trey Anastasio(Phish) 1993
00:43:09

Trey's response to Marc Allan's review

For more info please visit our website.

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit Osiris.

Intro music by the Budos Band

Aug 28, 2019
#002 — Billy Joel 1994
00:31:21

For more info please visit our website.

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit Osiris.

Intro music by the Budos Band

Aug 20, 2019
#001 — George Carlin 1989
00:30:29

For more info please visit our website.

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit Osiris.

Intro music by the Budos Band

Aug 19, 2019
#000 — Introduction to The Tapes Archive 2019
00:01:43

An introduction to the podcast, and a little bit of background on how and why this podcast was created.

The podcast is a collaboration between documentary filmmaker Alan Berry (“Dead Man’s Line”) and his longtime friend, journalist Marc Allan, who conducted and recorded the interviews decades ago. Allan recorded these interviews via phone, and the podcast provides a unique, intimate look into music, culture and these artists’ careers at specific moments in time. Most interviews were conducted between 1985-1995.

Berry and Allan curated a 12-episode season that will include interviews with Neil Peart of Rush, Frank Zappa, Ray Charles, Joan Rivers and more.

The Tapes Archive is part of the Osiris network. For more podcasts and experiences, please visit Osiris.

Aug 19, 2019