The Open Ears Project

By WQXR & WNYC Studios

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: Music

Open in Apple Podcasts


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 217
Reviews: 0

Description

Part mix tape, part sonic love-letter, the Open Ears Project is a daily podcast where people share the classical track that means the most to them. Each episode offers a soulful glimpse into other human lives, helping us to hear this music—and each other—differently. The Open Ears Project is produced by WQXR and WNYC Studios, home of great podcasts including Radiolab, Death, Sex & Money, On the Media, Nancy, and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin.

Episode Date
BONUS: Tom Hiddleston on The Nutcracker
5:06

“I find it lifts me out of wherever I am... I just love it.”

For this bonus festive episode, actor Tom Hiddleston fondly reminisces about one of his earliest childhood memories, dancing along to a VHS of The Nutcracker by Tchaikovsky. He reveals that the energetic Russian Dance is still a piece he listens to when he needs a shot of vitality in his day.

Tom Hiddleston is a British actor who has won multiple awards for his work on stage and screen. A performer of vast range, from Shakespeare to John Le Carré to comic book characters, he is best known for playing Loki in the Marvel Universe and recently made his Broadway debut in an acclaimed production of Harold Pinter’s Betrayal.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to catch up on previous episodes or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

The Open Ears Project will be back in 2020 for season two, so stay tuned...

Dec 20, 2019
30. Esther Perel on Peace
11:43

“The language of music brings out different parts of us. It's universal. It's probably the most important thing with which [we] can make peace.”

For the final episode in our opening season of The Open Ears Project, relationship therapist Esther Perel talks about the first time she heard Fauré’s Requiem as a young woman and how it seemed to “understand” an inexpressible sadness she was carrying inside her.

She describes with great tenderness the way music connects her to her mother, a survivor of the Holocaust, and how this piece transports her to something akin to a religious experience.

Esther Perel is a psychotherapist, relationships expert, author, and creator and host of the podcast Where Should We Begin? Season 3 of Where Should We Begin? Comes out Thursday October 10th on Spotify. Later this fall she will launch a new podcast on Spotify focused on workplace dynamics. Learn more at Estherperel.com/podcast

Did you like the track Esther chose? Listen to the music in full:


In Paradisum by Gabriel Fauré 
Oct 09, 2019
29. Krystal Hawes on Imperfection
10:01
“For me on a chaotic day, where maybe things are out of control or I don't have a lot of control over what's happening... I listen to this on repeat. And it smooths out some of the angular parts of the day.”

Producer Krystal Hawes talks about how as a jazz student she had held classical music at a distance, thinking it was something perfect and pristine. But hearing the unexpected, almost jazz-like soundworld of Maurice Ravel’s Pavane pour une infante défunte helped open the door to a lifelong love of classical music.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Krystal Hawes is a producer and project coordinator at WQXR.


Did you like the track Krystal chose? Listen to the music in full:


Pavane pour une infante défunte by Maurice Ravel
Oct 08, 2019
28. Dessa on Patience
18:29
“There’s a patience that it asks for, and a patience it imparts, and you sort of have to be tall enough to ride this ride.”

In this episode, Dessa talks about how when her father played her the Chaconne from J.S. Bach’s Partita for Violin in D Minor as part of a classical music “starter kit”, the piece immediately spoke to her, not just because she finds an unexpected connection between rap and classical music, but in how its range of emotions, and its interplay between beauty and anger have given her something to lean on in challenging times.

Dessa is a singer and rapper with the Doomtree crew of Minneapolis, Minnesota.


Did you like the track Dessa chose? Listen to the music in full:


Chaconne for Violin by J.S. Bach
Oct 07, 2019
27. Jesse Eisenberg on History
5:27
“It changed my life… I had this revelation, juxtaposing my own privilege and the lucky life I had, compared to what she had gone through.”

In this episode, Jesse Eisenberg talks about how a trip to visit family in Poland made him realize how removed he had been from the experience of the Holocaust, and how that sense of guilt inspired him to write The Revisionist, his play about a cousin who’d survived the the Holocaust.

To create the right sense of place, Jesse used Polish expatriate composer Frédéric Chopin’s pyrotechnic Etude Opus 10, No. 1 as part of the production. 

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Jesse Eisenberg is an actor and playwright. 


Did you like the track Jesse chose? Listen to the music in full:


Etude Opus 10, No. 1 by Frederic Chopin


Oct 06, 2019
26. Christopher Wheeldon on A Journey
“It just makes me feel so much, this piece. There’s something happening here that’s so incredibly sweet but also so mournful.”

 In this episode, Christopher Wheeldon talks about how he discovered Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev after seeing his first ballet, Romeo and Juliet, at the Royal Opera House. He later fell in love with Prokofiev's Second Violin Concerto, wearing out a cassette tape of it in the process of playing it over and over.

The music stuck with him for years to come, and though he’d abandoned previous attempts to create a ballet for it, once Wheeldon started his own company, he finally felt able to choreograph for the music he’d connected with so strongly as a child.

Christopher Wheeldon is a Tony-Award winning choreographer. His work includes An American in Paris, the closing ceremony of the 2012 London Olympic Games and the minimalist ballet After The Rain, which inspired the Open Ears episode by Megan Reid


Did you like the track Christopher chose? Listen to the music in full:


Violin Concerto No. 2, second movement by Sergei Prokofiev
Oct 05, 2019
25. Megan Reid on What Changed My Life
12:58
“If the lights were on in the audience, listening to this music I would just be flayed open...”

Children’s author and television producer Megan Reid talks about how a performance of choreographer Christopher Wheeldon’s After the Rain sparked her lifelong obsession with ballet.

Watching the ballet’s second half, a stark dance duet set to Estonian composer Arvo Pärt’s Spiegel im Spiegel, Reid found that great dance — like great writing — created a world she wanted to live in forever.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Megan Reid is a children’s book author and the director of literary scouting and development at FX Networks.


Did you like the track Megan chose? Listen to the music in full:


Spiegel im Spiegel by Arvo Pärt
Oct 04, 2019
24. Terrance McKnight on Overcoming Adversity
8:23
“Beethoven, the guy who created art to speak to justice and equality. The guy who loved family, you know, so close to his mother — like I am.”

WQXR evening host Terrance McKnight talks about a late Beethoven bagatelle and how the composer’s perseverance in the face of adversity draws a connection between, family, art, and the Langston Hughes poem “Life is Fine.”

Terrance McKnight is the evening host at WQXR. 


Did you like the track Terrance chose? Listen to the music in full: 


Bagatelles, Op. 126, No. 1 by Ludwig van Beethoven
Oct 03, 2019
23. Justin Jackson on Imagination
5:42
When I was younger, classical music was only played in, like, bookstores... But nowadays you can expose children to the music in a way that allows them just to appreciate [it] without any stereotypes.

In this episode, New York City preschool teacher Justin Jackson tells us how Edvard Grieg’s In the Hall of the Mountain King inspired him as a child to march around the living room, and how he shares that excitement with his young students as he passes on his love of creativity, imagination, and the arts.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Justin Jackson is a New York City preschool art teacher.

Did you like the track Justin chose? Listen to the music in full:


In the Hall of the Mountain King by Edvard Grieg
Oct 02, 2019
22. Alison Stewart on Just Letting Go
7:55
“When I hear that piece playing, my back relaxes, actually. That's where I carry all my stress.”

In this episode, Alison talks about how she gave up learning the piano when she was young after the sudden death of her piano teacher, and how the rocking ebbs and flows of Satie’s Gymnopédie No. 1 helped her come back to the instrument as an adult — and learn to let go.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Alison Stewart is a Peabody Award–winning journalist and the host of WNYC’s show All Of It

Did you like the track Alison chose? Listen to the music in full:


Gymnopédie No. 1 by Erik Satie
Oct 01, 2019
21. Daniel Libeskind on Perspective
13:45

 "I think that’s the beauty of music, there’s eternity in it. And I think that’s true also of architecture even in ruined architecture, you can see an [eternal] sense of a spirit.”

Architect Daniel Libeskind talks about listening to the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor by J. S. Bach, and how music, like architecture, creates a shared space — rooted in memory but looking ahead to eternity — that connects us all.

Daniel Libeskind is an Polish-American architect best known for designing the Jewish Museum Berlin and his master plan for the World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan.


Did you like the track Daniel chose? Listen to the music in full:


Toccata and Fugue in D minor by J.S. Bach (arranged for orchestra by Leopold Stokowski)
Sep 30, 2019
20. Jacqui Cheng on Resolution
8:04
“It’s a sad peacefulness that sometimes we all need. When we need to take a breath — just before starting something new.”

WQXR’s Jacqui Cheng talks about her journey in finding the Adagio movement from J.S. Bach’s Violin Sonata No. 1.

Her interest in Bach started with the soundtrack to the Atari 2600 game “Gyruss” (which included 8-bit snippets of Bach's Fugue in D Minor), and led her to the public library, where she found emotional comfort in Bach’s resolution of dissonances.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Jacqui Cheng is a musician, technologist, and WQXR’s Editor-in-Chief

Did you like the track Jacqui chose? Listen to the music in full:


Violin Sonata No.1, Adagio by J.S. Bach
Sep 29, 2019
19. Wynton Marsalis on Time and Consciousness
6:21

“There [are] so many emotions in the piece, and so many states of consciousness — there's not one thing. There's an intensity of relationships that unfold over time.”

Trumpeter and composer Wynton Marsalis talks about how Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 16 helped him understand the role of music — and the musician — in connecting the past and the future.

Beyond his technical achievements, Marsalis relates with Beethoven’s ability to unflinchingly investigate and combine conflicting emotions and states of consciousness to create art that unfolds in time.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Trumpeter and composer Wynton Marsalis is the artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center.


Did you like the track Wynton chose? Listen to the music in full:


String Quartet No. 16, second movement by L.V. Beethoven
Sep 28, 2019
18. Eva Chen on Nourishing The Soul
17:31
“The best children's books have this moment of ‘Why am I here? What am I doing?’ ... And I feel that in this music.”

In this episode, Eva talks about how, each evening after finishing her day job at Instagram and spending time with her two young children, she resets by putting on the first movement of Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 17.

The piece’s emotional transitions help put her into the mindset of Juno Valentine, the heroine of her children’s book series.  

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Eva Chen is a children’s book author and director of fashion partnerships at Instagram. Her latest book in the Juno Valentine series will be out October 29th.

Did you like the track Eva chose? Listen to the music in full:


Piano Concert No. 17, first movement by W.A. Mozart
Sep 27, 2019
17. Eddie Izzard on Elevation
8:42

“It actually takes you off the ground. You are floating in the clouds, which doesn't make logical sense, but that's what it feels like.”

Comedian and actor Eddie Izzard talks about Claude Debussy’s Clair de Lune, and how its emotional pulse takes him outside the flow of metronomic time and into the deep connections he feels with his family and audience.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Eddie Izzard is a stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and activist.

Did you like the track Eddie chose? Listen to the music in full:


Clair de Lune by Claude Debussy
Sep 26, 2019
16. J'nai Bridges on Forgiveness
10:32

I think I've learned to not take things so personally through this piece of music.”

In this episode, mezzo-soprano J’Nai Bridges discusses the song “When I am laid in earth, also known as Dido’s Lament”. It’s a stunning aria from Henry Purcell’s opera Dido and Aeneas in which Dido laments over her broken heart after her lover, the Trojan war hero Aeneas, abandons her.

The song gave Bridges insight into the nature of memory and respect that she’s taken to heart, and illustrates one of the many powerful lessons opera can teach us all.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

J'Nai Bridges is a mezzo-soprano. She’ll be appearing this season with the Metropolitan Opera as Nefertiti in Philip Glass’s Akhnaten.

Did you like the track J'Nai chose? Listen to the music in full:


"When I am laid in earth" by Henry Purcell
Sep 25, 2019
15. Joe Young on How We Listen
10:54
“Not only did it change how I listen to music. It absolutely changed how I listen to people.”

When Joe Young, army reservist and New York Public Radio receptionist, was stationed in Texas, part of his job in the army band was to play the “Taps” bugle call for soldiers who didn’t return from deployment.

The experience left him facing a crisis of confidence, until he came across Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians which gave him a new perspective on how to listen to more than just the music.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Joe Young is a musician, composer, New York Public Radio’s receptionist and a member of the United States Army Band.

Did you like the track Joe chose? Listen to the music in full:


Music For 18 Musicians: Pulses by Steve Reich
Sep 24, 2019
14. Robert Macfarlane on A Quiet Kind Of Miracle
9:29
P“In a scene of such brutality, to have something of such delicacy must have been a quiet kind of miracle.”

Writer Robert Macfarlane remembers how he first read about Chopin’s Berceuse in the wartime diaries of Welsh poet Edward Thomas, whose nature writing inspired Macfarlane’s own.

Thomas, who died in 1917 on the Western Front, chronicled how he and his fellow soldiers found moments of peace in music including this lullaby, which helped them find sleep on what would be their final night.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Robert Macfarlane is an award-winning writer on travel, landscape, nature, and the human heart, and fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge University. His latest book is Underland. 

Did you like the track Robert chose? Listen to the music in full:


Berceuse by Frédéric Chopin
Sep 23, 2019
13. Nicola Benedetti on Empathy
14:48
“The possibility for you as a listener is to open yourself up enough be taken somewhere that seems far from you.”

Nicola Benedetti tells us how as a 10-year-old she first heard the second movement of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, and without knowing what “this thing from heaven” was, the sound resonated with her in a way she couldn't quite yet understand. 

Over 20 years later, having played it in concert halls around the world, she reflects on the concerto's ability to capture the full range of human emotion that can connect to any listener.

Nicola Benedetti is a violinist and music educator. She recently appeared as a soloist at the BBC Proms and with at the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music performing Wynton Marsalis' first Violin Concerto.

Did you like the track Nicola chose? Listen to the music in full:


Violin Concerto, second movement - Beethoven
Sep 22, 2019
12. Lee Hill on Finding Your Truth
4:43

“For me, this is a melody of truth.”

Lee Hill, Director of Public Engagement at New York Public Radio, talks about how “Little's Theme”, from Nicholas Britell’s score for Moonlight, let him find a way to stand in his own truth.

Hill connected with the film like few other works of art he’d experienced, and the score voiced feelings he had never been able to put into words, centering him in his own experience and building a connection with other listeners.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Lee Hill is the Director of Public Engagement and Content Culture at WNYC.

Did you like the track Lee chose? If so you can listen to it in full here:


"Little's Theme" by Nicholas Britell
Sep 21, 2019
11. Sam Mendes on American Beauty
8:12
“Music defies language in so many ways. One of its joys is that it takes words and direct meaning and narrative out of the equation.”

In this episode, Sam Mendes talks about how, when he was looking for music to capture the emotional dissonances of the opening sequence of American Beauty, he found the perfect mood with Carl Orff’s Gassenhauer (which, in turn, inspired Thomas Newman’s Oscar-nominated score). Today the music still reminds Sam of this happy, creative period in his life, and of the collision of American and European culture in his work.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Sam Mendes is an Oscar and Tony award-winning producer and director. His films include American Beauty, Road to PerditionSkyfall and the upcoming 1917. 


Did you like the track Sam chose? Listen to the music in full: 


Gassenhauer by Carl Orff
Sep 20, 2019
10. Rachel Strauss-Muñiz on Happiness
8:23
“Great music transcends time... everything. No matter where this came from, happiness is happiness.”

In this episode, actor, comedienne, and podcaster Rachel “La Loca” Strauss-Muñiz talks about sharing Mozart’s First Piano Sonata with her babies, and reflects on how their joy at hearing Mozart reminds her of how so much of the music we listen to is rooted in classical music — and how music connects us all.  

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Rachel Strauss-Muñiz is an actor, comedienne and writer. She co-hosts the podcast Latinos Out Loud.  


Did you like the track Rachel chose? Listen to the music in full:


Piano Sonata No. 1 - I. Allegro by W.A. Mozart
Sep 19, 2019
9. Jon Batiste on Challenging Expectations
8:48

“It's more just about feeling the wealth of greatness and the depth of humanity that these things that I love really harbor.”

In this episode, musician, composer, and bandleader Jon Batiste talks about revisiting Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring. When he first heard the piece it seemed like cacophony, but repeat listenings (and seeing it used in Disney's Fantasia) gave him an understanding of how the composer was playing with form and narrative and upsetting expectations ideas Jon would go on to incorporate into his own music.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Jon Batiste is a musician, composer, bandleader on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, music director for The Atlantic magazine, and co-artistic director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.


Did you like the track Jon chose? Listen to the music in full:


The Rite of Spring, Part 1 - Introduction by Igor Stravinsky
Sep 18, 2019
8. Jamie Barton on Catharsis
8:03

“It transports me back into this bedroom that I had as a kid. Sitting in my bay window, overlooking the field, leading up to the forest. There's nothing else out there.”

Opera singer Jamie Barton grew up in an isolated rural community in northwest Georgia. Her first listen to Chopin's Nocturne No. 21 in C Minor — found on a CD titled Chopin and Champagne — began an obsession with classical music that turned her teenage alienation into a powerful sense of belonging to music and connection with its listeners, whoever they are and wherever they come from.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Jamie Barton is a mezzo-soprano. She is singing the part of Orfeo in the Metropolitan Opera’s fall production of Orfeo & Euridice.

Did you like the track Jamie chose? Listen to the music in full:


Nocturne No. 21 by Frédéric Chopin
Sep 17, 2019
7. Eric Jacobsen on Vulnerability
16:06
“She loved the interaction of what a conversation is, and that's what chamber music is — it’s talking to people with your instruments.”

In this episode, conductor and cellist Eric Jacobsen talks about Franz Schubert’s Piano Trio No. 1. It was his mother’s favorite piece, and 25 years after her death it still reminds him of the love for music and other human beings she passed on to him both of which come together in the ongoing conversation of chamber music.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Eric Jacobsen is a conductor and cellist, and co-founder of New York’s dynamic young orchestra, The Knights.


Did you like the track Eric chose? Listen to the music in full:


Piano Trio No. 1, Second Movement by Franz Schubert
Sep 16, 2019
6. Ian McEwan on What Cannot Quite Be Said
12:17
“I think when a close friend dies the first thing you confront is the love.”

In this episode, Ian McEwan talks about how this slow, contemplative second movement of J.S. Bach’s Concerto for Two Violins in which the instruments answer one another and play in unison like a pair of lovers walked him through a teenage “eruption of self-awareness” and longing, and later in life helped him process the loss of a beloved friend.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Ian McEwan is a British author. His works include Atonement and the Booker Prize-winning Amsterdam.

Did you like the track Ian chose? Listen to the music in full:


Concerto for Two Violins by J.S. Bach
Sep 15, 2019
5. Aminatou Sow on Finding Joy
7:52
“It is now part of the soundtrack of my life.”

In this episode, podcaster and author Aminatou Sow talks about hearing the Juba Dance, from Florence Price’s first symphony, on the day she received her cancer diagnosis, and how the piece’s mood of joyful defiance supported her in the face of adversity.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Aminatou Sow is a podcaster, author, and co-host of Call Your Girlfriend with Ann Friedman.


Did you like the track Aminatou chose? Listen to the music in full:


Symphony No.1, III. Juba Dance by Florence Price
Sep 14, 2019
4. Miloš Karadaglić on Being Home
7:28
“In music there are no shields, there is nothing... it's just you, and the music.”

In this episode, guitarist Miloš Karadaglić talks about “Lágrima,” which Spanish composer Francisco Tárrega supposedly wrote as a response to the homesickness he’d felt while visiting London,  England — an emotion Miloš connected with deeply when he moved to the same city to pursue his own career.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Miloš Karadaglić is a classical guitarist, his new album is out now.

Did you like the track Miloš chose? Listen to the music in full:


Lágrima by Francisco Tárrega
Sep 13, 2019
3. Connie Viglietti on Making Grandma Proud
11:50
Music is always there for us, we just have to reach out and connect to it.

In this episode, yoga teacher Connie Viglietti tell us about how she remembers her beloved Grandma Ginger by singing one of her favorite songs, Schubert’s “Ave Maria”, and contemplates the transporting power that music has to connect us to the people we love the most, even if they are no longer with us.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Connie Viglietti teaches yoga at Yoga Vida and is co-founder of Emaya, an organization that empowers women through yoga and meditation. 

Did you like the track Connie chose? Listen to the music in full:


“Ave Maria” by Franz Schubert
Sep 12, 2019
2. Rob Vogt on Conquering Fear
10:51

“Every firefighter feels some fear — a little bit — or they wouldn't be human. It's the fact that you have that fear and still do your job is what makes them amazing.”

In this episode, New York City firefighter Rob Vogt — who spent the months following 9/11 as part of the “bucket brigade” searching the rubble for the bodies of those killed in the attack — talks about finding comfort in Francis Ford Coppola’s film Apocalypse Now, in particular the adrenaline rush of the helicopter attack scene set to Richard Wagner’s “Ride of the Valkyries” from his opera Die Walküre.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Rob Vogt is a New York City firefighter. The Tunnel to Towers Foundation was set up in honor of Rob's uncle Stephen Siller.


Did you like the track Rob chose? Listen to the music in full:


"Ride of the Valkyries" by Richard Wagner
Sep 11, 2019
1. Alec Baldwin on Resetting Your Day
13:32
“It never ceases to lift my spirits. You listen to this music, and this music is soaring.”

Actor Alec Baldwin talks about how the soaring soundscape of the Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia from Khachaturian’s ballet Spartacus revives him when he needs to reset.

Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts to receive a new episode every day or delve deeper into our companion playlist.

Alec Baldwin is an actor and the host of WNYC’s podcast Here’s The Thing With Alec Baldwin. You can also hear him as host of WQXR’s broadcasts with the New York Philharmonic.

Did you like the track Alec chose? Listen to the music in full:


Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia from the Spartacus Suite No. 2 by Aram Khachaturian
Sep 10, 2019
Introducing: The Open Ears Project

Which piece of music speaks to your soul? Each bite-sized episode of The Open Ears Project introduces you to a new classical work and offers a brief and soulful glimpse into a human life, helping us to listen to this music—and each other—differently. 

Starting on Tuesday September 10th you can follow the project from day 1 by subscribing to our newsletter and following #OpenEarsProject on Instagram and Twitter.

The Open Ears Project is produced by WQXR and WNYC Studios.

Aug 21, 2019