GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

By Morgan Dixon + Vanessa Garrison

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Description

GirlTrek's epic 21-day walking meditation to remember where we came from and to gather strength for the road ahead.We're celebrating one Black woman in history and using her story and lessons to help guide us through these uncertain times. Each and every day, we will convene a conversation with thousands of you by phone to stay connected, have fun, and organizing a national agenda.

Episode Date
Day 21: Octavia Butler
2089

As we close out this 21-day series, and prepare for the next (yes, there is more of this goodness to come) we end not by looking back, but by looking forward as we examine the life and legacy of the extraordinary writer, Octavia Butler, a Black woman who dared to imagine a future that centered Blackness and the voices and experiences of Black women.  The invitation into her sci-fi world was an invitation for all of us to think beyond the drab expectations of a cruel reality that does not see our magic or power,  to create a future that makes space for all of our glorious gifts to be on full display.

The godmother of Afrofuturism. Octavia Butler was a pioneer who traveled from the future to warn us and prepare us for a time such as this. She knew what would happen if power went unchecked, if the earth continued to be neglected, and if the wealthy were allowed to cannibalize the poor. She knew. And throughout her illustrious career as a science fiction writer, which included her winning every major award in her field, she tried to warn us. Today we listen. Today we acknowledge that an awkward Black girl with an almost paralyzing shyness was given the gift to foretell the future and that she wrote it all down in a series of masterpieces that literally read like a blueprint for survival.


Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Janelle Monáe - Q.U.E.E.N. feat. Erykah Badu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEddixS-UoU

Octavia Butler on Charlie Rose: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1W9CNwl2e8

Jun 30, 2020
Day 20: Ruby Dee
1924

Ruby Dee was the zeitgeist of Black womanhood.  She was our Ruth in Raisin in the Sun, our Queen in Roots, our Mother-Sister in Do the Right Thing, our Mama Lucas in American Gangster.  Ruby Dee's face, her soulful voice, her spirited laughter is the very epitome of Black cinema.

Her Hollywood career was phenomenal but life painted an even more brilliant story.  She was an activist.  A forceful member of CORE, SNCC, NAACP, Urban League, AND Delta Sigma Theta.  Harlem through and through, Ruby was for us, by us. 

And can we talk about Black Love?

You can’t utter the sound of her name, Ruby Dee, without your tongue clicking praise to her lover, Ossis Davis.  Their love was definitive. Instructional. Swoon-worthy. ...an aperitif for our collective imagination. They gave us a master class on Black Love as Legacy. Eye contact. Hand holding. Passionate embraces.  Side-by-sideness. It was, well, satisfying.  They made us remember.

It is no wonder that upon their deaths, they were cremated and their ashes put in the same urn, with the inscription, "In this thing together." 

Today is a celebration of Black Love, starring Ruby Dee.

...and Ossie Davis.


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Stevie Wonder - If You Really Love Me: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmR4y4slhmo

Ruby Dee - Men Who Have Loved Me: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVRzeTWP9Fk&feature=youtu.be

Jun 29, 2020
Day 19: Mamie Till-Mobley
2182

“Let the people see what I have seen.” Mamie Till-Mobley launched a movement with those words, insisting on an open casket funeral for her 14-year-old son, Emmett Till, who was brutally murdered by two white men in Mississippi. That strategic decision, and the decision to publish graphic photos from the funeral in Jet magazine, galvanized the country and forced the world to finally make eye contact with the horrors being inflicted on Black people, especially throughout the American South.
 
Mamie Till-Mobley was an ordinary Black woman who used her darkest hour to shine a light on injustice and mobilize the masses, and for that, we celebrate her legacy on day 19 of Black History Bootcamp.


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Summertime / Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child by Mahalia Jackson: https://youtu.be/gfYlzSeSFu4

Mamie Till Speaks of Forgiveness: https://youtu.be/6Q3ZOCjkEwY

Jun 27, 2020
Day 18: Dovey Johnson Roundtree
1921

No Black women were in the military? She changed that. No Black women were in law school at Howard? Bam. Now there are. Black women everywhere were forced to give up their seats on buses? Before the Freedom Rides or RFK could call a press conference, it was her landmark case that waged the first blow against “separate but equal”. She was the first Black woman admitted to the all-white DC Bar Association. ...one of the first women to be ordained as a minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. And as she did all of this justice work, and ran her DC law firm on “greens and leftover pound cake” as payment, she moonlighted at the post office to pay the bills. We gone celebrate her today.

If Black excellence had a name, it would be Dovey Johnson Roundtree. 

Just two days ago, June 22, 2020, Netflix made a historic investment of $40 million to Spelman College. Spelman named this unprecedented scholarship after one woman: Dovey Johnson Roundtree. “The Fixer” of The People.  A one-woman crusade. Today we salute this unsung hero.


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Betty Everett - Shoop Shoop Song (it´s in his kiss): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4KN6TFhy2I

Dovey Roundtree: Howard Law School: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7ng_My7jtU&mc_cid=9d55451262&mc_eid=b187d8127e

Jun 25, 2020
Day 17: Rosetta Tharpe
2090

It makes sense to us that God would plant the blueprint of rock 'n' roll into the soul of a little Black girl born in a town called Cotton Plant.  Sister Rosetta Tharpe sang music that was infused with the melodies of Black folks who understood loss and survival. A child prodigy who was touring with her preacher mother and a troupe of evangelical musicians by the age of 6, Rosetta Tharpe dared to combine the sacred with the secular, mixing gospel music with rhythm and blues to create a rock 'n' roll sound that would change the world. But it is her life, not just her music that we will gather to talk about on today’s call. From this woman – queer, Black, bold, and brave – we learn about living authentically, taking risks, and understanding your value. Join us for the live discussion or download the recap. Either way, tune in to this history!


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Hallelujah (1979) - COGIC International Mass Choir: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4bzWtOLEzAI

"Up Above My Head" - Sister Rosetta Tharpe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeaBNAXfHfQ


Jun 24, 2020
Day 16: Stagecoach Mary
2144

If John Henry has a folk song this woman needs one too!

Introducing Stagecoach Mary a.k.a. Mary Fields a.k.a. Black Mary.

At 60-years old she was the fastest person - man or woman - in the state of Montana to hitch a team of six horses to a coach.  She was the first Black woman to earn a US Postal Service contract.  She drove that team of horses for eight years, through rough and wild territories of the West.  In the winter, the snow was so deep that she’d leave the horses behind and carry-on with the mail on her back. She never missed a day. Not a single day.  She carried a shotgun to demand respect.  She once got kicked out of a Catholic convent for using it.  When the law banned women from drinking in saloons, she got an exception from the mayor. 

“I fight through rainstorms...snowstorms ...risk hurricanes and tornadoes. I like to be rough. I like to be rowdy. I also like to be loving ...caring."  We are the daughters of hard and soft. ...that edge hitting a soft breeze.  We are electric.  The storm of posibility.  Like the clap of Juneteenth in the middle of global meltdown.  Like the swirl and swagger of Mary Fields.

"I do bold and exciting things." she confessed.

Cheers foremother.  Cheers!

(She needs her own folk song.)


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

More Bounce To The Ounce - Zapp: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1ijvN7ADt4

Our Vision Is Our Voice - Sonia Sanchez: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckFKVT2fzJk&feature=youtu.be

Jun 23, 2020
Day 15: Ida B. Wells
2020

Born to enslaved parents, one year before the Emancipation Proclamation, Ida B. Wells was once considered the most famous Black woman in the United States. As a journalist, she spent her entire life tirelessly fighting to tell the truth and shame the devil – to their face. She wasn’t afraid to pick a fight and she always seemed to show up prepared for battle, with the truth on her side. We think her life is a lesson for all of us and on today’s call we will honor her by speaking truth to power. We promise it’s a conversation you don’t want to miss.


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Lost Ones - Lauryn Hill: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HhfKArW3BY

Beautiful Black Men - Nikki Giovanni: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DX6i_4WSXQ

Jun 22, 2020
Day 14: Angela X
2012

Why hasn’t someone made this into a movie!?
 
Angola is the huge country below the equator on the west coast of Africa. That’s where it all started. ...ground zero for the transatlantic slave trade.  White missionaries, greed, exploitative trade, tech advances that made exploration by sea possible, a massive need for labor and yes, tribal wars.  It was the perfect storm for the greatest crime in human history, the capture, sale, and violent exportation of our ancestors.
 
Yes, and we know that the first enslaved Africans arrived in America 400 years ago, in 1619. The next part is not as well known.
 
20 or so Africans were the first to walk on American soil.  They were survivors.  They survived wars on the continent. They survived a 70-mile walk down the Kwanza River.  They survived the humiliation of baptism and branding by Catholic traders of enslaved people.  They survived the dungeons, the canoe ride to the ships, the months at sea, the sickness, filth, violence, and murder.  They survived the day that their Portuguese ship was jacked by British pirates in little-ass boats.  They sailed to America and were sold on the shores of Hampton, Virginia. 
 
They survived.
 
And one of those survivors was a woman named Angela. 

...In Virginia, Angela X lived with Captain Whoever and his wife and two other indentured servants from England. Slavery wasn’t legally codified yet. We know this because, in 2017, something amazing happened.  Buried beneath her home in Jamestown, archeologists found four cowrie shells.  Evidence of her journey  -  the most exciting archeological find in decades – or ever – if you ask us.
 
Today, we honor Angela and every African woman whose names we will never know.

Join us in a conversation about survival and the systematic destruction of Black women that began on the coast of Africa and was fortified through The Virginia Code just 50 years after Angela arrived.


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Celie Shaves Mr./Scarification Ceremony (From "The Color Purple" Soundtrack): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFTvbp-Fjkk

Still I Rise by Maya Angelou: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qviM_GnJbOM&feature=youtu.be

Jun 18, 2020
Day 13: Lucille Clifton
1838

Lucille Clifton was the GOAT. The fact that we are not all walking around quoting her like we do Jay-Z or Drake is beyond understanding. She could have stepped into a booth with either of them, holding a cup of chamomile tea, and whispered two bars (because she liked to get to the point), drop the mic and walk out. It would have been over. Her words are so stunning. So precise. So full of celebration for Black people. You could quote only Lucille Clifton poems for the rest of your Instagram life and you would never run out of profound things to say. And this masterful body of work came from a woman who wrote for 30 years before being published. A woman who had six children and buried two, but still kept on living and producing beautiful art.  There is so much to learn from this legendary writer. Don't miss the conversations.


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

“Won't You Celebrate With Me” | Lucille Clifton: https://vimeo.com/197834578

Lucille Clifton & Sonia Sanchez: Mirrors & Windows: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8aCnU9oArI

Jun 17, 2020
Day 12: Eartha Kitt
2243

Orson Welles called her “the most exciting woman in the world.”  And she was. Eartha Kitt sang in 11 languages. Danced with Katherine Dunham. Broke boundaries for Black women in Hollywood when she played Catwoman. She was nominated for Tony Awards, Grammy Awards, and Emmys. And still, she felt unwanted, unloved. At the end, she was asked to summarize her life in six words. She said, “Rejected, ejected, dejected, used, accused, abused.”


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Eartha Kitt - Live 1968: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdsHKw6939k

Eartha Kitt Interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MpPq8vlld_E&mc_cid=6605522284&mc_eid=b187d8127e 

Jun 16, 2020
Day 11: Marsha P. Johnson
2236

Look, Marsha said she ain’t do it!

Although legend has it that it was Marsha P. Johnson who threw a shot glass at police inside of the Stonewall Inn in NYC in 1969, as an act of resistance against the police who were there harassing patrons, Marsha later said, she didn’t start the riot - she said she came running as fast as she could though once she knew it was happening, because baaaby, she was a fighter and was tired of the BS.

What happened that day at Stonewall (“The Stonewall Uprising”) is considered by many to be the catalyst that launched the modern L.G.B.T. civil rights movement and it was Marsha who would lead the fight in the streets. She, along with co-founder Sylvia Rivera, established one of the country's first safe spaces for transgender and homeless youth, Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR). She also tirelessly advocated on behalf of sex workers, prisoners, and people with HIV/AIDS. Marsha’s work was powerful, but it didn’t keep her from a fate that far too many Black women have met. Marsha died in 1992. Her body was recovered in a river in New York and her death was ruled a suicide. Authorities later reclassified the cause, ruling it drowning from undetermined causes. The case remains open, and the mystery of her death reminds us of the ongoing violence black and transgender people face all too often in this country.

Tune in live today. You don’t want to miss it.


Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

En Vogue - Free Your Mind: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7iQbBbMAFE

Jamila Woods - Holy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3MhH2WekcY

Jun 15, 2020
Day 10: Esther Jones
2099

"Baby Esther" was a phenomenal scat singer, and one of the most charismatic performers of her time.  She was a trained dancer and acrobat.  At 4-years-old, Russian-American theatrical manager Lou Bolton saw her performance and was blown away.  "She's a young Florence Mills," the newspapers said. Like Josephine Baker and many performers of her day, Baby Esther was not accepted in America because she was Black.  Instead, her manager arranged a European tour in 1929 and she was described as the highest-paid child artist in the world. She sold out the Moulin Rouge and performed for royals.

At GirlTrek, we say "never ask permission to save your own life."  We say it WHILE we work together to topple oppressive systems because we believe that we have what it takes to thrive.  But this story reminds us of the many things that have been stolen from us - resources, culture, reputation, royalties, and childhoods.  Let's take stock on today's call.

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Black Beauty - Duke Ellington: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4fP4cGo6sc

Fingertips (Pts. I & II) - Little Stevie Wonder: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3ubgVjp3CY

Jun 12, 2020
Day 9: Zora Neale Hurston
1894

If “I said what I said” was a person, it would be literary great Zora Neale Hurston. A writer. An anthropologist. The belle of the Harlem Renaissance. Unapologetically Black. A woman wholly committed to being herself. Today we talk about her life and the lessons she has to teach us about worth, value, speaking truth to power, and jumping at the sun.

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Zora Neale Hurston '28 Sings "Halihmuhfack": https://youtu.be/Ut0xmfgcK3w

Ruby Dee on the Humanity in Zora Neale Hurston's Work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__d8NS1IiWE&feature=youtu.be

Jun 11, 2020
Day 8: Sojourner Truth
2102

Forget what your 8th-grade teacher taught you.

Sojourner Truth's life was so juicy, so "say what!?," that you cannot miss this live discussion.  She is everyone's favorite spiritual leader, yes.  But did you know that Sojourner Truth bore the child of a slave owner, then - when she escaped his bondage - she sued his ass for custody and won!  Sojourner Truth was the first Black woman to go to court against a white man in America and win. Bring your tambourines as we hit the streets for a Truth Revival! We honor her hope and fervent calling today.

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Sweet Honey in the Rock - Sojourner's Battle Hymn: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwSZgLLqPy8

Cicely Tyson performs Sojourner Truth's "Ain't I a woman?": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0YR1eiG0us

Jun 10, 2020
Day 7: Olive Morris
1921

From London, by way of Jamaica, Olive Morris lived 27 years and she made every one of them count. She was Gangster with a capital G, organizing with the Black Panther Party Youth Collective, occupying empty and abandoned buildings to demand fair housing rights, and setting up the first networks for women of color in Britain. Despite her powerful work, Olive Morris, like countless other Black women, has been left out of the telling of our history, until now! Join us live to talk about her legacy, and how Black women today can start to unite with our sisters abroad to get this liberation party really poppin’ off.

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Judy Mowatt - Black Woman
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHUQg5rvBEg

Jun 09, 2020
Day 6: Nina Simone
1932

Did you know Nina's government name was Eunice Kathleen Waymon!?  Us either.  Here's the story.  She was at a nightclub singing, trying to protect her family's good name.  She started calling herself Nina and the rest is history. She became the voice of a generation - brave, uncompromising, raw.  She taught us to practice fearlessness and – in her very public battle with mental illness – she reminds us that genius is delicate and must be protected at all costs.  Join us as we honor this classical musician who wrote the book on soul.

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Nina Simone - How It Feels to be Free:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5dlrXCYrNYI

Nina Simone - Freedom Interview:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySYRI4wXUpo

Jun 08, 2020
Day 5: Toni Morrison + Breonna Taylor
1980

Welcome to day 5 of GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp.  As we celebrate the life of Breonna, we look to the words of literary giant Toni Morrison for comfort and direction. Toni Morrison refused to let Black women be invisible. Without apology she centered us in her work, writing about the Black experience with precision and beauty that was unmatched. She gave voice to our pain, our love, our loss, and our joys, and today we explore her life and look to the lessons she taught us.
 
Let today’s walk be a celebration of life. Come with your sadness and your rage and lay it down at the altar for just 30 minutes. Walk through the tightness and let the energy and the footsteps of the thousands of other Black women who will be walking with us, transform you.

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Happy Birthday · Stevie Wonder: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcVZfJO01NI

White People Have a Very Very Serious Problem - Toni Morrison on Charlie Rose: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2txzMkT5Pc

Jun 05, 2020
Day 4: Georgia Gilmore
1874

She was rowdy, fun, and made the best pork chops in town.  Oh - and she single-handedly funded the Montgomery Bus Boycotts!  Let's get into it.  Today's walk is dedicated to the great Georgia Gilmore, a midwife, and mother of six.  After hearing of Rosa Parks' arrest, she started cooking, feeding our people, and raising record amounts of money for the movement.  With her new business, she hired Black drivers to carpool people to work during historic boycotts of the racist bus system.  We can't WAIT to celebrate this giant in self-determination on today's walk.

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Georgia Gilmore interview: http://repository.wustl.edu/concern/file_sets/p5547t15w

Jun 04, 2020
Day 3: Shirley Chisholm
1830

Look. We have learned a thing or two from our mamas about turning pain into purpose. That's why as primary elections kicked off across the country yesterday, we decided to dig into the crates and pull out everything we know about the woman who dared to be the first Black woman in Congress and the first Black women to seek the nomination for President of the United States from a major party ticket, Ms. Shirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm. Today's Bootcamp is dedicated to her memory and everything that she taught us about being "Unbought and Unbossed."

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the speech excerpt played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Jun 03, 2020
Day 2: Ella Baker
2011

Listen ya'll:  We need this resistance training now!  Last night, the military was deployed on peaceful protestors.  So today, we are bringing out the GOAT...

ELLA JO BAKER, the greatest organizer in Black History. There would be no March on Washington, no Freedom Rides, no Selma without Ella Baker.  Today’s playlist is dedicated to her.  It includes a "stop playing with us" speech she gave in 1974 and 10 songs to hit the streets and remember where you came from.

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:

Jun 02, 2020
Day 1: Audre Lorde
2010

Today's 30-minute walk is dedicated to the brave and brilliant Audre Lorde.  She argued that our very survival is political - that we were never meant to survive.  As you walk, meditate on her idea of "radical self-care."  What would it look like if you were radical about caring for yourself? How would it even feel?  What does it require? Today, you can walk in silent meditation, join our phone conversation, or cue up the playlist to let Audre Lorde's inspiring words guide you. This is your 21-day journey.  The only thing we ask is that you walk at least 30 minutes and reflect each day.  This habit will transform your life. We'll be cheering! #daughtersof #girltrek

Join the 21 Day Black History Bootcamp at https://bit.ly/blackhistorybootcamp to receive specially curated emails with inspiring words, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each featured legendary Black woman.

Jun 01, 2020