Carnegie Endowment Events

By Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: News & Politics

Open in iTunes


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 48
Reviews: 0

Description

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is a unique global network of policy research centers in Russia, China, Europe, the Middle East, India, and the United States. Our mission, dating back more than a century, is to advance the cause of peace through analysis and development of fresh policy ideas and direct engagement and collaboration with decisionmakers in government, business, and civil society.

Episode Date
China's Ballistic Missile Submarines and Strategic Stability
01:25:04
Carnegie's Tong Zhao, Fellow based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy, discusses the growth of China's nuclear ballistic missile submarine program and its implications for US-China strategic stability.
Oct 26, 2018
Brokering Peace in Nuclear Environments
01:41:57
Drawing on the history of conflict between India and Pakistan, in his new book Brokering Peace in Nuclear Environments, Moeed Yusuf describes and evaluates how the process of third-party intervention affects deterrence strategies and prospects for peace, and applies lessons to other regional nuclear rivalries
May 21, 2018
Preventing Escalation in the Baltics: A NATO Playbook
01:26:12
Preventing Escalation in the Baltics: A NATO Playbook by Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Apr 04, 2018
Assessing Effectiveness of Aid Implementation
01:12:18
In his new book, "Navigation by Judgment: Why and When Top-Down Control of Foreign Aid Doesn’t Work," Dan Honig presents an empirically grounded argument for the value of implementation led by the judgment of field staff, particularly when tasks are difficult to measure and country environments are unpredictable. In this roundtable discussion, Honig will present his key findings and their implications for major aid organizations. Nilmini Rubin and Larry Garber, experienced development practitioners, will respond with comments and reflections.
Mar 29, 2018
The Demise of America's First Missile Defense System and the Rise of Strategic Arms Limitaiton
01:33:07
Why did the United States move from a position of nuclear superiority over the Soviet Union at the beginning of the 1960s to one of nuclear parity under conditions of mutual assured destruction in 1972? The story of this transition both sheds new light on the Cold War and offers new insights for today’s nuclear challenges. Drawing on declassified conversations between three presidents and their most trusted advisers, James Cameron offers an original answer to this question in his new book The Double Game: The Demise of America’s First Missile Defense System and the Rise of Strategic Arms Limitation. John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Richard Nixon struggled to reconcile their personal convictions about the nuclear arms race with public demands. In doing so they engaged in a double game, hiding their true beliefs behind a façade of strategic language, while grappling in private with the complex realities of the nuclear age.
Feb 08, 2018
Toward a Post-American Europe? Transatlantic Relations One Year After Trump's Election
01:33:46
One year after U.S. President Donald Trump’s election, Europe is still struggling to make sense of his administration’s disruptive foreign policy. What impact has Trump had on the transatlantic relationship thus far, and what lies ahead? Where and how can Europe engage with the United States going forward? Experts convened at Carnegie on November 28, 2017 for a conversation.
Dec 06, 2017
Non-nuclear Weapons and the Risk of Nuclear War: A Russian Perspective
01:21:46
The risk of a nuclear war is rising because of growing non-nuclear threats to nuclear weapons and their command-and-control systems. In a conventional war, such “entanglement” could lead to non-nuclear operations inadvertently threatening the opponent’s nuclear deterrent or being misinterpreted as preparations for nuclear use, potentially sparking catastrophic escalation. Alexey Arbatov, who co-authored a new Carnegie volume, Entanglement: Chinese and Russian Perspectives on Non-nuclear Weapons and Nuclear Risks, gives a Russian view of this problem and presents potential policy options in conversation with James Acton.
Dec 05, 2017
Non-nuclear Weapons and the Risk of Nuclear War: A Chinese Perspective
01:25:19
Non-nuclear Weapons and the Risk of Nuclear War: A Chinese Perspective by Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Nov 20, 2017
Can Legal Aid Change Power Dynamics? Experiences from India, Sierra Leone, and Elsewhere
01:38:05
Access to justice is a key governance concern in developed and developing countries alike. Community legal workers aim to help poor or comparatively powerless people defend themselves against land grabs, obtain public services, and challenge corruption. Can this bottom-up approach counter powerful interests seeking to entrench their control? Can legal empowerment help respond to rising authoritarianism and repression of civil society?
Oct 30, 2017
Implications for U.S. Policy
01:24:00
While wars, terrorism , and rapidly changing economic conditions in the Middle East grab headlines, the close links between these issues and governance are increasingly relegated to back pages. Carnegie’s Middle East program and Stanford University’s Center for Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law hosted an in-depth discussion with experts from the region and leading American scholars about these issues, including lessons learned from other regions and implications for U.S. policies.
Sep 11, 2017
Global Comparisons to the Middle East and North Africa
00:59:30
While wars, terrorism , and rapidly changing economic conditions in the Middle East grab headlines, the close links between these issues and governance are increasingly relegated to back pages. Carnegie’s Middle East program and Stanford University’s Center for Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law hosted an in-depth discussion with experts from the region and leading American scholars about these issues, including lessons learned from other regions and implications for U.S. policies.
Sep 11, 2017
Yemen's Catastrophe: What Can Be Done to Stop the War?
01:35:06
Now entering its third year, the civil war in Yemen has exacted a horrific toll on civilians and enabled the expansion of al-Qaeda. Intervention by both the U.S.-backed, Saudi-led Gulf coalition and Iran has only sharpened the country’s fault lines and worsened its humanitarian crisis. Outside efforts at mediation have fallen short. Where is Yemen’s war heading and what can local, regional, and international actors do to end it?
Sep 11, 2017
Oil Corruption: How the United States Can Counteract a Curse
01:36:17
The oil industry has been entangled in serious corruption controversies. In response, the U.S. government has shown leadership over the past decade in helping bring more transparency to the sector.
Aug 10, 2017
India's Search for Prosperity
01:24:55
Vijay Joshi presents on his new book "India's Long Road: The Search for Prosperity." Subir Gokarn and Milan Vaishnav join to discuss India's economic development.
Jun 13, 2017
Has Pakistan's Democracy Turned a Corner?
01:08:30
Ahmed Bilal Mehboob, one of Pakistan’s leading analysts of political, legislative, and electoral affairs, discusses challenges that affect the prospects for a second peaceful transition to power in Pakistan. He also shares key insights into the current state of democracy and governance in Pakistan. Carnegie’s Milan Vaishnav moderates.
Jan 26, 2017
Half Lion: How P.V. Narasimha Rao Transformed India
01:01:28
Vinay Sitapati shares key findings on how P.V. Narasimha Rao shaped India's economy, nuclear program, foreign policy, and domestic politics.
Dec 21, 2016
The Other One Percent: Indians in America
01:26:20
One of the most remarkable stories of immigration in the last half century is that of Indians to the United States. Not only do people of Indian origin now make up a little over one percent of the American population, but they have become the most-educated and highest-income group in the world’s most advanced nation. The Other One Percent: Indians in America, co-authored by Sanjoy Chakravorty, Devesh Kapur, and Nirvikar Singh, delivers the first data-driven, comprehensive account of the community.
Dec 05, 2016
Sino-Indian Relations in Turbulence
01:34:15
Sino-Indian relations have hit a rough patch in recent months. China’s opposition to India’s Nuclear Suppliers Group membership, Beijing’s continued support for Pakistan on issues of terrorism, and its continued obstinacy with respect to territorial claims in the South China Sea, have cast a shadow on Sino-Indian relations. These tensions exacerbate the ongoing border dispute and Indian concerns about China’s other activities in the region, such as in Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. Manoj Joshi will analyze the sharpened discord in the relationship and shed light on India’s and China’s paths forward. Daniel Twining will join the discussion.
Nov 30, 2016
Should We Fear Russia?
01:08:26
In this latest book, Dmitri Trenin, the longtime director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, explains why the Cold War analogy is misleading. Relations between the West and Russia are certainly bad and dangerous but, he argues, they are bad and dangerous in new ways. Trenin outlines the crucial differences, which make the current rivalry between Russia, the EU, and the United States more fluid and unpredictable. By unpacking the dynamics of this increasingly strained relationship, Trenin makes the case for handling Russia with pragmatism and care and cautions against simply giving into fear.
Nov 30, 2016
2016 WJP Rule of Law Index Launch Event
01:20:43
Strengthening the rule of law is essential for anyone interested in advancing peace, equity, and opportunity. Measuring how well countries adhere to the rule of law in practice can be a first step in setting benchmarks, stimulating and guiding reforms, and deepening understanding and appreciation for its fundamental features. Join us for the launch of the 2016 WJP Rule of Law Index.
Nov 30, 2016
The View From New Delhi: A Conversation With Indian MPs
01:23:51
To take stock of the current state of India’s politics, economics, and foreign policy, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace—in collaboration with the Georgetown University India Initiative and the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI)—hosted a wide-ranging discussion with three leading members of Parliament from across the political spectrum. Carnegie’s Milan Vaishnav moderated. The delegation’s visit was part of FICCI’s annual India-U.S. Forum of Parliamentarians, which aims to deepen the engagement between lawmakers of both countries.
Nov 30, 2016
U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz on Future Nuclear Challenges
00:58:36
The Obama administration has made significant progress in securing nuclear materials, eliminating unnecessary nuclear stockpiles, and reaching a comprehensive agreement with Iran. However, much remains to be done globally in order to harness the power of nuclear energy while reducing the risk of nuclear materials and technologies falling into malicious hands.
Nov 30, 2016
John F. Sopko on Countering Corruption in Afghanistan
01:21:23
Corruption hardly topped the threat list when U.S. military forces and civilians first entered Afghanistan in 2001. But recognition of its devastating potential to undermine U.S. national security objectives is far higher today. Despite a myriad of U.S. efforts, however, corruption remains deeply entrenched in Afghanistan. It undermines the government’s legitimacy, enables an emboldened insurgency, and puts at risk the gains from U.S. taxpayers’ nearly $115 billion investment in reconstruction. The Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) has publicly reported on corruption in Afghanistan since 2008. Now SIGAR is releasing its first lessons learned report, on U.S. efforts to address the Afghan corruption problem: Corruption in Conflict: Lessons from the U.S. Experience in Afghanistan. John F. Sopko explored the U.S. experience fighting corruption in Afghanistan and its broader implications, and detailed recommendations to Congress and policy makers to improve such efforts in current and future contingency operations.
Nov 29, 2016
Social Activism, Media, and Blogging in the Arab World
01:19:06
Where are those voices in the Arab world that called so compellingly for change and spurred the 2011 uprisings that swept across the region? Which spaces are they using for expression as governments crack down on street protests, civil society, and media?
Nov 29, 2016
Bankrupting Kleptocracy: Financial Tools to Counter Atrocities in Africa’s Deadliest War Zones
01:25:03
One under-recognized factor is fueling many of the world’s most violent crises—not bitter identity rifts or imperial delusions, but the simple drive to amass lucre. Carnegie hosted for a discussion about how this trait can be exploited to reduce mass atrocities and leverage peace and good governance. We introduced a new report by the Enough Project, Bankrupting Kleptocracy: Financial Tools to Counter Atrocities in Africa’s Deadliest War Zones.
Nov 29, 2016
Not War, Not Peace?: Motivating Pakistan to Prevent Cross-Border Terrorism
01:33:26
India confronts an exceptionally difficult national security problem: how to motivate Pakistan to prevent cross-border terrorism. Last month’s attack on the Indian Army base at Uri and India’s response, highlight the complexity of this challenge. George Perkovich and Toby Dalton discussed their new book, Not War, Not Peace?, which provides a timely assessment of the options available to India to deter and respond to cross-border terrorism.
Nov 29, 2016
Creating a Stable Asia
01:25:25
The election of Donald J. Trump as president of the United States could bring about a radical change in U.S. foreign policy in every region of the world. The uncertainties of the Trump presidency call for a probing, long-term strategy for strengthening stability in Asia. As the Western Pacific is experiencing a fundamental and potentially destabilizing military and economic power transition driven primarily by China’s economic and military rise and a corresponding relative decline in American power, efforts by the United States or China to secure future predominance will prove futile and dangerous, given a host of security, economic, and diplomatic factors. Instead, creating a stable de facto balance of power is necessary and feasible for both countries.
Nov 29, 2016
The War in Yemen: Is There an End in Sight?
01:14:36
A battleground marked by regional intervention and a growing al-Qaeda presence, Yemen's civil war continues unabated. The fighting has exacted a horrific toll on civilians, whether from bombing by the Saudi-led coalition, indiscriminate shelling by Houthi insurgents, food and medical shortages, or the kidnappings of journalists and human rights activists. Meanwhile, international pressure is growing, with calls by the UN for an independent investigation and demands in the U.S. Congress to restrict arms sales to Saudi Arabia. Where is the war heading and what can outside actors do to end the conflict?
Nov 29, 2016
Understanding Chinese Nuclear Thinking
01:29:32
Chinese nuclear experts think about nuclear weapons very differently from their U.S. counterparts. They use different terminology and contrasting security paradigms to discuss and make decisions on nuclear policy. How can Washington and Beijing promote an effective dialogue and shared understanding despite their disparate approaches? In their latest report, Li Bin and Tong Zhao present their findings on the topic. Their analysis is followed by a moderated conversation.
Nov 18, 2016
International Perspectives: Autonomy and Counter-autonomy in Military Operations
01:30:56
The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and Carnegie Mellon University host the first session of their joint Colloquium on Digital Governance and Security. Part one address the "Future of Consumer Privacy: Machine Learning and New International Data Protection", while part two touches on "Autonomy and Counter-autonomy in Military Operations."
Nov 17, 2016
The Future of Consumer Privacy: Machine Learning and New International Data Protection
01:42:01
The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and Carnegie Mellon University host the first session of their joint Colloquium on Digital Governance and Security. Part one address the "Future of Consumer Privacy: Machine Learning and New International Data Protection", while part two touches on "Autonomy and Counter-autonomy in Military Operations."
Nov 17, 2016
A Conversation With UN Deputy Secretary General Jan Eliasson
01:02:21
A conversation with UN Deputy Secretary General Jan Eliasson on the future of the United Nations and multilateralism in a changing global landscape.
Nov 16, 2016
Thinking Strategically About Women's Political Empowerment
01:35:56
With democracy struggling in many countries, providers of democracy support are looking to tailor assistance strategies to respond to the growing variety of troubled transitional contexts. Aiding women's political empowerment—a crucial area of international aid for democracy as well as for development more generally—shares this challenge. How can aid providers and activists alike think more strategically about women's political empowerment?
Oct 14, 2016
The Future of Arms Control and Strategic Stability with P5 Delegates
02:00:16
After meeting as part of the intergovernmental P5 process, representatives from the five nuclear-weapon states recognized by the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons participated in a public discussion on the future of arms control and strategic stability. They debated questions such as: What is the current relationship between disarmament and strategic stability? How might arms control and disarmament change in the twenty-first century? What relevance does the security environment have in current and future arms control initiatives? The event consisted of two panels—one comprised of nongovernmental experts from each P5 country and the other consisting of senior government officials—and allowed time for audience questions.
Sep 19, 2016
How Can Myanmar Avoid the Resource Curse? (full audio)
01:27:40
Myanmar’s abundant natural resources have served as the country’s main export revenue, but have also been a primary driver of conflict in ethnic areas. What should the newly elected government do to improve the governance of resource wealth in the country, and how can the international community assist?
Aug 08, 2016
The Rise of Russia's New Nationalism
01:17:13
Charles Clover depicts the intellectual ferment that has brought provocative strands of Russian nationalism at the heart of the Kremlin’s policy-making apparatus under Vladimir Putin.
Jul 26, 2016
Oil Market Futures: The Policy and Politics Shaping Twenty-First Century Energy (full audio)
02:40:35
The oil market has been turned upside down over the past two years. How will future policies, designed to meet the Paris climate agreement, shape the future of oil demand?
Jul 06, 2016
U.S. Nuclear Weapons in the Twenty-First Century (full audio)
01:23:12
Can and should the United States do more to reduce the role of nuclear weapons in its security strategy and the number of weapons in its arsenal? This question is particularly timely given the lively international debate on nuclear disarmament. Brad Roberts will discuss his assessment of this question and the analysis in his new book, The Case for U.S. Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century. Carnegie's George Perkovich moderates.
Jun 30, 2016
Global Internet Policy and the U.S.-Japan Alliance
01:30:01
The topic of information and communication technologies diplomacy has been a dynamic aspect of U.S.-Japan cooperation since 2010 when U.S. President Barack Obama and then Japanese prime minister Naoto Kan first launched a U.S.-Japan Policy Cooperation Dialogue on the Internet Economy. The two countries have led efforts to promote national interests and ensure a global digital economy based around an open, free, and secure Internet. Yet not all countries agree on priorities, and some governments seek greater state control of this space. Meanwhile, technology and the Internet economy are rapidly evolving. In this podcast, Ambassador Daniel A. Sepulveda, Minister Kanji Yamanouchi, and ITI President Dean Garfield discuss U.S.-Japan cooperation to promote data localization, cross-border data flow, and privacy protection as well as how these issues are managed with broader policies and politics. Commentary by Tim Maurer. Moderated by Jim Schoff.
Jun 30, 2016
The Economics Of The Arab Spring And Its Aftermath
01:14:33
The Arab uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen, Libya, and Syria over the past five years represent a conundrum. Standard development indicators failed to capture or predict the outburst of popular anger during the so-called Arab Spring of 2011. The World Bank’s Elena Ianchovichina and Shantayanan Devarajan discussed the findings of their recent report Inequality, Uprisings, and Conflict in the Arab World, and reflected on the economic origins of the Arab revolts. While many believe that income inequality was the most significant cause of the uprisings, the report weighs the role of other major drivers, mainly citizen frustrations with a shortage of quality jobs in the formal sector, poor quality public services, and governance issues. Carnegie’s Joseph Bahout moderated.
Jun 20, 2016
Arab Voices On The Challenges Of The New Middle East
01:09:43
The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted a review of its first Arab Experts Survey. The results of the survey, conducted in English and Arabic, represent the views of more than one hundred accomplished political thinkers representing almost every Arab country and answer broad questions around terrorism and extremism, civil war and foreign intervention, sectarianism, corruption, and governance. The survey is part of Carnegie’s Arab World Horizons project, an effort to examine the social, political, and economic forces shaping the Arab world. Marwan Muasher, Perry Cammack, and Shibley Telhami discussed the findings of the survey, and Joyce Karam moderated.
Jun 20, 2016
Iranian Civil Society: Past, Present, and Future
01:22:38
In a neighborhood engulfed in turmoil, Iran has enjoyed relative political stability of late. But have the rifts between state and society been reconciled? Has Iranian civil society resigned itself to incremental change within the confines of the Islamic Republic? How has the role of women in Iranian civil society evolved? Who are the most important change agents in Iranian society and what are their ambitions and motivations?
Jun 20, 2016
On the New Arab Wars: Uprisings and Anarchy in the Middle East
01:02:29
Less than twenty-four months after the hope-filled Arab uprising, the popular movement had morphed into a dystopia of resurgent dictators, failed states, and civil wars. Marc Lynch’s new book, The New Arab Wars, is a profound illumination of the causes of this nightmare. It details the costs of the poor choices made by regional actors, delivers a scathing analysis of Western misreading of the conflict, and questions international interference that has stoked the violence.
Jun 20, 2016
Authoritarian Resilience and Revision after the Arab Uprisings
01:25:31
Five years after the 2011 uprisings, countries in the region are caught between the competing impulses of fragmentation and two equally unstainable authoritarian visions—that of the self-proclaimed Islamic State, or classic autocratic regimes.
Jun 16, 2016
Where Will Driverless Cars Take Us? A Transatlantic Conversation (full audio)
01:25:56
Promethean changes are poised to reshape the transport sector, with significant implications for the greenhouse gas emissions of twenty-first century mobility. Will autonomous vehicles prove to be a climate policy tool, or a climate policy challenge?
Jun 14, 2016
The Evolution of the Nuclear Order: A Global Perspective (full audio)
01:38:31
Tensions in the global nuclear order are rising. The new Carnegie report Perspectives on the Evolving Nuclear Order asks what role ‘middle ground,’ or emerging, nuclear states will play in the global debate on these issues. Debak Das, Mariana Nascimento Plum, and Tong Zhao discuss Indian, Brazilian, and Chinese views on the nuclear order. Carnegie’s Toby Dalton moderates. Immediately following, Adam Scheinman comments on themes presented in the first panel in the context of his experience leading the U.S. delegation to the 2015 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. Carnegie’s Togzhan Kassenova moderates.
Jun 07, 2016
A New Normal in Indian Politics - Full Audio
01:34:05
A quarter century ago, Indian National Congress dominance in New Delhi began to give way to two distinct political forces—the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party and a wide-ranging collection of regional political parties.
May 12, 2016
Philippines Votes 2016: What’s at Stake for U.S.-Philippines Relations? (Full Audio)
01:10:36
On May 9, Filipinos will vote for a new president and vice president in arguably one of the country’s most consequential elections. While outgoing President Aquino has overseen a dramatic turnaround in his country’s economic fortunes, the Philippines still faces a range of important challenges, including an unfinished economic reform agenda, an internal security threat from Islamic militants, and potential confrontation with China over disputed islands in the South China Sea. A panel of Southeast Asia experts discusses how Aquino’s potential successor would handle these challenges and what’s at stake for U.S.-Philippines relations. Carnegie’s Vikram Nehru moderates. This event is co-sponsored by the U.S.-Philippines Society and the Southeast Asian Studies Program of the Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies.
May 05, 2016
Whither Ukrainian Reform?
01:06:35
The severe political crisis in Kyiv has raised fundamental questions in recent weeks about the fate of Ukrainian reform.
Apr 29, 2016
Japanese and U.S. Approaches to Support Asia-Pacific Development: Past as Prologue?
01:34:26
Seventy years after World War II, Southeast Asia stands at a crossroads amid multilateral trade negotiations, economic integration initiatives, political turmoil, and the establishment of new development institutions and regional governance frameworks. How should the United States and Japan respond and contribute constructively? Are the lessons of the past relevant to the challenges ahead?
Apr 28, 2016
Opportunities, Challenges, and Priorities for Asia-Pacific Development in the Future
01:28:48
Seventy years after World War II, Southeast Asia stands at a crossroads amid multilateral trade negotiations, economic integration initiatives, political turmoil, and the establishment of new development institutions and regional governance frameworks. How should the United States and Japan respond and contribute constructively? Are the lessons of the past relevant to the challenges ahead?
Apr 28, 2016
The First Fifty Years of Japan-Republic of Korea Relations: Observations and Implications
01:43:50
This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of normalized relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea with the signing of the Treaty of Basic Relations. Over the past five decades, bilateral relations have far surpassed those of the previous sixteen centuries in terms of security cooperation, economic interdependence, and intellectual and cultural exchange, yet the scars of the past continue to challenge efforts toward more fundamental reconciliation and deeper collaboration. What can success–and shortcomings–over the past fifty years of Japan-Korea relations tell us about how best to navigate the future for the mutual benefit of all three countries and for the region?
Apr 28, 2016
The Next Fifty Years for Japan and Korea: Security, Foreign Policy and Economic Perspectives
01:34:06
This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of normalized relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea with the signing of the Treaty of Basic Relations. Over the past five decades, bilateral relations have far surpassed those of the previous sixteen centuries in terms of security cooperation, economic interdependence, and intellectual and cultural exchange, yet the scars of the past continue to challenge efforts toward more fundamental reconciliation and deeper collaboration. What can success–and shortcomings–over the past fifty years of Japan-Korea relations tell us about how best to navigate the future for the mutual benefit of all three countries and for the region?
Apr 28, 2016
Japan-Russia Relations: 1st Panel - Historical Background & Outstanding Issues
01:13:25
Japan-Russia relations have received a flurry of attention in both countries’ capitals since 2013, and rumors of possible progress toward a long-pursued peace treaty persist. More recently, however, the process has stalled amid an intractable territorial dispute and other tensions. Sasakawa USA and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted a public forum on outstanding historical issues between Japan and Russia, prospects for cooperation in the fields of security, energy, trade, and investment, and the impact of these relations on the U.S.-Japan alliance.
Apr 27, 2016
Japan-Russia Relations: 2nd Panel - Perceptions and Priorities for Security & Foreign Policy
01:28:04
Japan-Russia relations have received a flurry of attention in both countries’ capitals since 2013, and rumors of possible progress toward a long-pursued peace treaty persist. More recently, however, the process has stalled amid an intractable territorial dispute and other tensions. Sasakawa USA and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted a public forum on outstanding historical issues between Japan and Russia, prospects for cooperation in the fields of security, energy, trade, and investment, and the impact of these relations on the U.S.-Japan alliance.
Apr 27, 2016
Japan-Russia Relations: 3rd Panel - Energy, Trade, & Investment Issues in the Asia Pacific
01:29:55
Japan-Russia relations have received a flurry of attention in both countries’ capitals since 2013, and rumors of possible progress toward a long-pursued peace treaty persist. More recently, however, the process has stalled amid an intractable territorial dispute and other tensions. Sasakawa USA and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted a public forum on outstanding historical issues between Japan and Russia, prospects for cooperation in the fields of security, energy, trade, and investment, and the impact of these relations on the U.S.-Japan alliance.
Apr 27, 2016
Japan-Russia Relations: 4th Panel - Implications for the Region & the U.S.-Japan Alliance
01:29:41
Japan-Russia relations have received a flurry of attention in both countries’ capitals since 2013, and rumors of possible progress toward a long-pursued peace treaty persist. More recently, however, the process has stalled amid an intractable territorial dispute and other tensions. Sasakawa USA and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted a public forum on outstanding historical issues between Japan and Russia, prospects for cooperation in the fields of security, energy, trade, and investment, and the impact of these relations on the U.S.-Japan alliance.
Apr 27, 2016
Lessons from the Agreed Framework with North Korea and Implications for Iran
01:43:06
Although Japan was not an official party to the U.S.-North Korea Agreed Framework nuclear deal twenty years ago, it was a vital partner in the effort to implement that agreement. The failure of the Agreed Framework taught the allies valuable lessons relevant to the recent multilateral deal with Iran. What are the most pertinent lessons from the past? And how can Japan and the United States support implementation of the Iran deal?
Apr 27, 2016
Opportunities, Challenges, and Priorities for Asia-Pacific Development in the Future
01:23:00
Although Japan was not an official party to the U.S.-North Korea Agreed Framework nuclear deal twenty years ago, it was a vital partner in the effort to implement that agreement. The failure of the Agreed Framework taught the allies valuable lessons relevant to the recent multilateral deal with Iran. What are the most pertinent lessons from the past? And how can Japan and the United States support implementation of the Iran deal?
Apr 27, 2016
Arctic Leadership-From Washington to Helinski
01:25:29
This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the Arctic Council, with the United States handing over its rotating chairmanship to Finland. How can environmental and economic imperatives be balanced over the long-term?
Apr 22, 2016
The United Kingdom and the Asia-Pacific Region
00:59:06
The U.S. rebalance to the Asia-Pacific is well-known but the United States is far from the only country turning toward the region.
Apr 22, 2016
From Silk to Silicon: The Story of Globalization Through Ten Extraordinary Lives
01:18:34
A single person can make a significant impact even in the face of transformational trends such as globalization, climate change, and income inequality.
Apr 21, 2016
Prospects for Low Income Developing Countries
01:29:18
Min Zhu will discuss the IMF's new study on Low Income Developing Countries, economic consequences of the outlook, and the policy options available.
Apr 21, 2016
Arab Voices on the Challenges of the New Middle East
01:07:18
The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace hosted a review of its first Arab Experts Survey. Conducted in both English and Arabic, the survey represents the views of more than one hundred accomplished political thinkers representing almost every Arab country.
Apr 21, 2016
Dissecting Taiwan’s 2016 Election Results
01:13:56
The domestic implications of Taiwan’s legislative and presidential elections will be important for the region, as China’s slowing economy and Taiwan’s growing resistance to mainland influence continue to play out.
Apr 20, 2016
Return to Cold War
01:25:01
Professor Robert Legvold discusses his new book "Return to Cold War," which focuses on the decline of US-Russia relations since Crimea and what might be done to improve them.
Apr 20, 2016
Is Indonesia Changing Direction?
01:08:12
Indonesia’s President Joko (“Jokowi”) Widodo appears to be using his improving political strength and popularity to introduce much needed economic reforms. His administration is in the early days of a significant policy shift toward creating a more open and modern economy. It has introduced ten packages of regulatory reforms over the past six months and placed considerable emphasis on improving the country’s woefully inadequate infrastructure. James Castle, a longtime observer of the Indonesian economy, explains the political factors behind these reforms and what they portend for Indonesia’s economic performance in 2016 and beyond. Carnegie’s Vikram Nehru moderates.
Apr 14, 2016
Japan in 2016: First Panel (Full)
01:31:51
At this event co-hosted by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Japan-America Society of Washington DC, experts from Japan and the United States reflected on the events of 2015 and discussed what issues they expected to dominate the headlines in 2016.
Apr 12, 2016
Japan in 2016: Second Panel (Full)
01:26:29
At this event co-hosted by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Japan-America Society of Washington DC, experts from Japan and the United States reflected on the events of 2015 and discussed what issues they expected to dominate the headlines in 2016.
Apr 12, 2016
A Global Reality Check on Nuclear Security (full audio)
01:22:42
Ahead of the upcoming Nuclear Security Summit in Washington, a new report presents a stark choice: Will the world recommit to continuous improvement in strengthening nuclear security, or will efforts decline and the danger of nuclear terrorism grow? Carnegie's Toby Dalton moderates a discussion with Matthew Bunn, Martin Malin, Nickolas Roth, and William Tobey of the Harvard Belfer Center’s Project on Managing the Atom, who launch their new report.
Mar 24, 2016
A Norm for Nuclear Material Production: Beyond the Washington Summit and the Iran Deal (full audio)
01:19:34
The Nuclear Security Summit has made little progress on preventing the production of fissile material that has no plausible use. One way forward would be to establish a norm that such production should be consistent with reasonable civilian needs. Carnegie’s James M. Acton, Ariel Levite, and Togzhan Kassenova explore the potential value of this norm and discuss whether progress is possible. Ambassador Thomas R. Pickering, former U.S. under secretary of state for political affairs, moderates.
Mar 24, 2016
Myanmar's Burden Of High Expectations
01:05:03
By April 1 Myanmar will have elected its new president, heralding the end of over six decades of authoritarianism. But the new administration—burdened with high expectations, little administrative experience, and a looming military presence circumscribing its every move—faces daunting economic, social, and political challenges. Since general elections in November 2015, the political scene in Myanmar has changed rapidly, highlighting the complexity of the democratic transition taking place. Mary Callahan, U Aung Din, and Christina Fink make sense of these developments, examining their implications for the peaceful handover of power in April, and give their assessment on what to expect in the aftermath. Carnegie’s Vikram Nehru moderates.
Mar 07, 2016
Science and Technology Diplomacy and the U.S.-Japan Alliance
04:24:23
A diverse group of specialists from Japan and the United States discuss the role of science and technology in twenty-first century diplomacy.
Mar 01, 2016
Myanmar's Elections: What Happened And What Happens Now (Full Audio)
01:02:17
Myanmar’s new parliament will begin deliberations in late January 2016, and a new president will be elected in March. But there is no certainty that the transfer of power will be smooth or peaceful—or whether it will happen at all.
Dec 16, 2015
Examining the Puzzle of Non-Western Democracy
01:14:36
Many people in non-Western countries say that they want a democratic system of governance—but just not Western-style democracy. Yet what is meant by non-Western democracy often remains unclear, and at times is merely a cover for non-democratic practices.
Dec 09, 2015
3-D Printing the Bomb? The Challenge for Nuclear Nonproliferation (Full Audio)
01:28:58
3-D printing may enable the most sensitive pieces of a nuclear weapons program to be more easily produced and transferred undetected around the globe. Tristan Volpe and Matthew Kroenig launch their new article and explore how the United States can adopt both top-down and bottom-up strategies to combat this threat to international security‪. ‬Bruce Goodwin moderates.
Dec 02, 2015
Why India Is Not a Great Power (Yet) - Full Audio
01:59:12
What are the deficits in India’s military capabilities and in the ‘software’ related to hard power, and how have these shortfalls prevented the country from achieving great-power status?
Nov 13, 2015
Creating a New Medina: The Quest for Pakistan
01:15:50
Contrary to the received wisdom, Pakistan was not simply a vague idea that serendipitously emerged as a nation-state, but was broadly conceived as a sovereign Islamic state—a new Medina.
Nov 06, 2015