Talks with Teachers

By Brian Sztabnik: English Teacher, Blogger, Podcaster

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Category: K-12

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Inspiring Interviews with America’s Great Educators

Episode Date
Kathy Keyes — Episode #98
41:22
<p>Kathy Keyes taught English for 36 years—at a rural high school, at an urban university, and at a college preparatory Catholic high school. A graduate of Purdue and Indiana University, Kathy recently stepped out<br /> of the teaching profession for a “gap year” in order to reevaluate and process the joys and challenges of teaching. She served as co-chair of the English department where she mentored teachers. She taught AP Literature for 17 years, was an AP reader, and served on the AP Lit development committee from 2016-2019. During her gap year, she plans to conquer at last the reading pile that has accumulated in her living room and to enjoy mornings without an alarm clock.</p> <p>Her Twitter handle is @kthkeyes</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/kathykeyes/">Kathy Keyes — Episode #98</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 02, 2019
Erik Powell — Episode #97
44:04
<p>This fall, Erik begins his 26th year of teaching, most of them at Ferris High School in Spokane. He loves working with passionate, intelligent, and innovative colleagues who are committed to helping students each day. Erik teaches English 10 and AP English Literature & Composition and has coached soccer, basketball, and track. In addition to his work at Ferris, Erik has served as a member of ASCD's Understanding by Design cadre, helping schools across the country implement backward design in their classes. He has also worked on several College Board committees over the years, mostly having to do with AP English. Currently, he is the co-chair of the AP English Literature & Composition Development Committee.</p> <p>Outside of school, Erik loves spending time with his family, traveling, reading, and enjoying life.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/erik-powell-episode-97/">Erik Powell — Episode #97</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 01, 2019
Brandon Abdon — Episode #96
40:19
<p>Originally from Greenup, Kentucky - a small town in Appalachia - Brandon now lives in Cincinnati with Angela, his wife, and their 2 sons, Hilton (9) and Dorian (6).  After high school, he attended Ashland Community College as a nursing major before transferring to the University of Kentucky.  He graduated in 2002 with degrees in English Education and Classics.  Since then, he has taught public school in a variety of settings - urban, rural, suburban - and worked with teachers and students at the local, state, and national levels.  While teaching, he has earned masters degrees in both English and Education and he has also earned an Education Specialist degree in administration.</p> <p>Proud of where he comes from - and where his family still lives - he balks at stereotypes of people, especially those based on where they're from or how they talk.  He is a fierce advocate for the education of under-served and under-privileged groups and sees fair and equal access to education as a major way to overcome poverty and disadvantage.  Providing that education begins with teacher education and teacher support, which leads him to one of his favorite phrases, "do work with teachers, not to them."</p> <p>In his spare time, he likes to read and play sports, though he does only one of them well and both of them slowly.  He also spends a lot of time with is family and likes to travel and be outdoors - including hiking, camping, and fishing.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/brandon-abdon-episode-96/">Brandon Abdon — Episode #96</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Aug 28, 2019
Roy Smith — Episode #95
37:49
<p>Roy F. Smith is the English Department Chair at Round Rock High School and teaches AP English Literature and Dual-Credit English.  Roy is an AP English Literature College Board Consultant. He is also a consultant for the National Math and Science Institute (NMSI). In 2015, he was named Round Rock High School and the Round Rock ISD Secondary Teacher of the Year.  In his spare time, he enjoys reading, running and playing with my grandsons, Lincoln and Harrison. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/roy-smith-episode-95/">Roy Smith — Episode #95</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Aug 14, 2019
Donna Carpenter — Episode #94
23:44
<p>Donna Carpenter is committed to lifelong learning and student-centered teaching. She earned her Bachelors from Gettysburg College and her Masters from University of Pennsylvania. Following a successful career in publishing, Donna returned to the classroom at Kingsway High School in Southern New Jersey where she has taught ninth grade English, Film Studies and her greatest passion: AP English Literature and Composition. In 2010-2011, she was named Teacher of the Year in her district. While she is most at home in her classroom and interacting with students, she reaches beyond those four walls as English Department Chair, AP English Literature Table Leader, a member of the Pre-AP National Faculty, an AP Mentor, a fellow of the National Writing Project, Chair of her school’s AP Roundtable, and a Scoring Leader for the English PRAXIS. She spends her free time in conversations with other teachers discussing how to engage students and improve the craft of teaching. When she’s not reading student essays, she is out biking with her husband or reading, always anticipating the joy of opening the next book on her TBR stack.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/donna-carpenter-episode-94/">Donna Carpenter — Episode #94</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Aug 07, 2019
Elizabeth Matheny — Episode #93
29:23
<p>Elizabeth Matheny has taught for Maryland Public Schools for thirteen years. She currently teaches English 9 and AP Language and Composition. When she’s not teaching, she’s usually hiking or exploring independent bookstores with her husband and son. You can find her and what’s happening in her classroom on Twitter @matheeli.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/elizabeth-matheny-episode-93/">Elizabeth Matheny — Episode #93</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jul 30, 2019
Megan Neville — Episode #92
28:05
<p> </p> <p>Megan is an English Teacher and Department Coordinator at Cuyahoga Heights High School. She has been teaching English language arts to high school students near Cleveland, Ohio since 2004, earning her master's degree from Kent State University in 2007 and achieving National Board Certification in 2013. She has ventured beyond her own classroom to work with urban youth through the Akron based organization Alchemy, Inc. and has also traveled to Istanbul, Turkey to work with teachers and students on developing constructivist practices.</p> <p>Her poems have appeared in English Journal, Belt Magazine, Whiskey Island, Into the Void, and elsewhere. She tweets @MegNev. Poet Jose Olivarez said of her new chapbook, Rust Belt Love Song, “Megan Neville’s poems are unflinching in their observations of cruelty and tenderness alike. Rust Belt Love Song is still music, and Neville is a worthy artist—stretching ordinary moments to show all of the wonder, pain, and yes, love that exists just under the surface.”</p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/megan-neville-episode-92/">Megan Neville — Episode #92</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jul 29, 2019
Dave Stuart Jr. — Episode #91
36:59
<p>Dave Stuart Jr. is a husband and dad who teaches high schoolers in a small town. He is animated by a simple belief: all students and teachers should flourish. Every article he write, every lesson he teaches, and book he reads is driven by the certainty that that can, and must, happen.</p> <p>He is the author of These 6 Things: How to Focus Your Teaching on What Matters Most (Corwin Literacy), he shares his work on his blog, www.davestuartjr.com, and reaches teachers through his newsletter.</p> <p> <br /> In this episode you will learn about:</p> <p> his teaching mentors<br /> his fundamental beliefs about reading<br /> how he creates genuine connections with students<br /> how he develops teacher credibility<br /> how he creates great classroom discussion<br /> how he creates his pop-up debates<br /> why he writes books and what his goals are with his blog<br />  the people that have influenced his teaching<br /> the common habits of master teachers<br /> how to create an Everest statement</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/dave-stuart-jr-episode-91/">Dave Stuart Jr. — Episode #91</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Aug 06, 2018
Alex Kajitani: Episode #90
35:19
<p>Fifteen years ago, Alex Kajitani was a struggling new teacher in one of California’s poorest neighborhoods. He’d left a potentially lucrative career in restaurant management to pursue his teaching dream, and now his inner-city middle school students were unmotivated, unengaged and uninterested in the math he was teaching. Demoralized and desperate, he set out on a journey to turn his class, and his life, around.</p> <p>Today, Alex holds the title of California Teacher of the Year and a Top-4 Finalist for National Teacher of the Year, 2009, and is lauded for his innovation and “real talk” as a teaching and leadership speaker and trainer nationwide.</p> <p>Follow Alex on Twitter: @AlexKajitani</p> <p>website: www.alexkajitani.com</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/alex-kajitani-episode-90/">Alex Kajitani: Episode #90</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
May 11, 2018
#89 Jim Burke of the English Companion
56:48
<p>Jim Burke is the author of numerous bestselling books, including the English Teacher’s Companion and What’s the Big Idea? The question he’s always tried to answer is “How can we teach our students better?” He seeks these answers daily through his work in his own classroom at Burlingame High School in California where he still teaches after twenty years.</p> <p>Jim has received numerous awards, including the NCTE Intellectual Freedom Award, the NCTE Conference on English Leadership Award, and the California Reading Association Hall of Fame Award. He served on the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Committee on Adolescence and Young Adulthood English Language Arts Standards.</p> <p>He founded the English Companion Ning, described by Education Week as “the world’s largest English department” and winner of several Edublog Awards for Best Social Network for Education. In addition to the EC Ning, Jim offers a steady stream of recommended resources through his website (www.englishcompanion.com) and Twitter (@englishcomp) where he is ranked in the top 100 educators to follow at the top within the online English teacher community.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/89-jim-burke-english-companion/">#89 Jim Burke of the English Companion</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 18, 2017
Shanna Peeples: 2015 National Teacher of the Year
28:39
<p>Shanna Peeples, is now a graduate student at the Harvard School of Education. She was a high school English teacher from Amarillo, Texas, and was named the 2015 National Teacher of the Year.  Peeples taught AP English at Palo Duro High School, where she served as the English department chair as well as an instructional coach for other teachers.</p> <p>In this Talks with Teachers episode you will learn:</p> <p> How Shanna took a circuitous route to the classroom. She worked as a disc jockey, medical assistant, pet sitter and journalist before teaching<br /> Shanna's education background. How she earned an Associate’s degree from Amarillo College, a Bachelor of Arts from West Texas A&M University and a Master of Education from the University of Texas at Arlington.<br /> The way in which Shanna connected literature to her students' lives. While at Palo Duro High School, Peeples' students came from many different backgrounds. Amarillo is one of several cities in the United States that helps refugees find new paths in life and gain access to critical resources. As a result, Peeples worked with many students who speak English as a second language or recently entered the United States from another country.<br /> How Jim Carey influenced Shanna's career trajectory and how she incorporated this lesson into the classroom<br /> The way in which Shanna incorporate reading into her daily life.<br /> How she planned her units and developed her lesson plans.<br /> The influence Sherman Alexie had on her teaching.<br /> The book she recommends to teachers:</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/shanna-peeples/">Shanna Peeples: 2015 National Teacher of the Year</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 30, 2017
David Miller: AP Literature Chief Reader
41:35
<p>David Miller -- Episode #87<br /> An insightful thinker, an incredible scholar and well-respected English teacher at Mississippi College for more than two decades, David Miller received accolades as MC’s Distinguished Professor of the Year in 2013.<br /> Miller graduated summa cum laude graduate at 3,400-student Nyack College that’s known as New York’s Christian college. Founded in 1882 in New York City as a training school for missionaries, the school bills itself as the first Bible college in North America. The Mississippi resident also received a master’s degree and doctorate from Baylor University in Waco, Texas.David also serves as the Chief Reader for the AP Literature and Composition exam.</p> <p>You can follow  on Twitter @Miller_DG</p> <p> David has taught at Mississippi College for 26 years<br /> graduate school is when he realized that the classroom is where he belonged<br /> David recognizes the two types of mentors -- those we choose and those that are formally assigned to us<br /> He admires the adaptability of high school teachers in comparison to higher ed<br /> What David did when his students did not do the reading<br /> How David puts himself out there and places him in situations to interact with students<br /> Why it is so important to take risks<br /> How texts are tools not entities in and of themselves<br /> Why literature is a verb, not a noun<br /> The goals of the AP Literature and Composition exam<br /> How David plans a unit or a novel<br /> What happens in the process of reading a complex text<br /> Two books that teachers should read are:</p> <p> Parker Palmer's The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life<br /> Kylene Beers and Robert Probst's Disrupting Thinking: Why How We Read Matters</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/david-miller-ap-literature-chief-reader-2/">David Miller: AP Literature Chief Reader</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 24, 2017
Chris Bronke
31:04
<p>Episode #86<br /> Christopher Bronke has been teaching English for 13 years and is in his 5th year as English Department Chair at Downers Grove North. In this role he teaches 9th-grade honors, evaluates teachers, oversees the literacy coaching program, plans and implements PD, and works with other district leaders on CCSS integration/implementation and common assessments and rubrics. He has presented nationally on CCSS integration across all subject areas, creating a teacher brand, blogging to empower teacher voice, collaborative leadership, teacher blogging, teacher leadership, literacy leadership, as well as social media in the classroom. Christopher’s work with social media has been featured in the Atlantic, with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, on EduTalk Radio, and on the social media platforms MightyBell and Celebrate Teaching.</p> <p> How he empowers his students to do more while he does less<br /> How Chris Bronke redesigned his assessments to better serve his students<br /> How he shifted the purpose of his class away from content and toward skill development<br /> What were the deciding factors that enabled him to switch schools mid-career<br /> Why he co-founded The National Blogging Collabotative<br /> Why he is a firm believe in the book, Falling in Love with Close Reading: Lessons for Analyzing Texts--and Life</p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/chris-bronke/">Chris Bronke</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Mar 01, 2017
Monica Burns: Class Tech Tips (Episode #85)
21:51
<p>Dr. Monica Burns is a Curriculum and EdTech Consultant, Apple Distinguished Educator and Founder of ClassTechTips.com. As an educator, Monica was part of her school’s Federal Magnet Funding leadership team and was a vocal advocate for bringing 1:1 technology into her 5th grade classroom. During her tenure as a classroom teacher, Monica used iPads to create engaging, differentiated learning experience to meet the unique needs of her students. Realizing the power of tech tools in the classroom, Monica started ClassTechTips.com to provide a resource for educators and administrators on implementing EdTech in the classroom.</p> <p>Since starting ClassTechTips.com, Monica has presented to teachers, administrators and tech enthusiasts at numerous national and international conferences including SXSWedu, ISTE, and EduTECH. She is a webinar host for SimpleK12 and a regular contributor to Edutopia and Channel One News.  Monica is the author of Deeper Learning with QR Codes and Augmented Reality: A Scannable Solution for Your Classroom (Corwin Press, 2016) and #FormativeTech: Meaningful, Sustainable, and Scannable Formative Assessment with Technology (Corwin Press, 2017).<br /> In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How Monica leads professional development for teachers around the country<br /> Why instructional coaches should listen as much as their share<br /> How to transition from the classroom to instructional coach<br /> How to develop quality interactions with technology<br /> How to personalize tech professional development for teachers<br /> How to use technology to aid in assessment<br /> How to grow a teacher blog<br /> Why Harry Wong's The First Days of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher should be required reading<br /> Why webinars are the future of PD<br /> How virtual reality can transform education</p> <p>Follow Monica on Twitter at ClassTechTips or read her blog, Class Tech Tips</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/monica-burns-class-tech-tips-episode-85/">Monica Burns: Class Tech Tips (Episode #85)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Feb 12, 2017
Mentor Texts with Allison Marchetti and Rebekah O’Dell
27:27
<p>Episode #83 of the Talks with Teachers podcast<br /> Allison Marchetti  (Co-Founder of Moving Writers) currently teaches English 8 and Reading Writing Workshop 9 at Trinity Episcopal School in Richmond, Virginia. Previously, she taught English 9, 10, Creative Writing, and AP Language at James River High School in Midlothian, Virginia. Allison earned her B.A. in English with a Poetry Writing Emphasis and her Master of Teaching from the University of Virginia. Allison is a professional development provider with Heinemann PD.  You can connect with her via email atallisonmarchetti@trinityes.org or Twitter @allisonmarchett.</p> <p>Rebekah O’Dell (Co-Founder of Moving Writers) currently teaches Reading Writing Workshop 9 and 12th gradeInternational Baccalaureate students at Trinity Episcopal School in Richmond, Virginia.  Rebekah previously taught English 9-12 at Atlee High School in Hanover County, Virginia. As a member of Virginia Commonwealth University’s clinical faculty, Rebekah also has extensive experience teaching and mentoring pre-service teachers. Rebekah earned her B.A. in English and  her Master of Teaching from the University of Virginia. Rebekah is a professional development provider with Heinemann PD. You can connect with her via email at rebekahodell@trinityes.org or Twitter @RebekahOdell1.<br /> In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How Allison and Rebekah define the term mentor text</p> <p>Why there was a need in the curriculum to create a mentor text unit</p> <p>Where you can go online to find good mentor texts</p> <p>What is the first step you should take to develop a mentor text unit</p> <p>What students gain from using mentor texts</p> <p>How Rebekah and Allison developed their book, Writing with Mentors</p> <p>If you enjoy the interview, I highly recommend Writing with Mentors: How to Reach Every Writer in the Room. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/mentor-texts/">Mentor Texts with Allison Marchetti and Rebekah O’Dell</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 28, 2016
#83 Sean Gaillard and Natalie Krayenvenger
27:50
<p>Sean Gaillard is Principal of John F. Kennedy High School in North Carolina. He founded#EdBeat and #CelebrateMonday, and is a#Read4Fun co-founder. He is also a co-organizer for EdCamp Global.</p> <p>Natalie Krayenvenger is the sherpa of learning to some amazing 4th graders in Maryland.  She is a reader, blogger, positive warrior, presenter for Kahoot! and #Buncee Ambassador.</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> The power of being a connected educator<br /> How to get started on Twitter<br /> How you can incorporate ideas found on Twitter into your own classroom<br /> The value of going to ISTE<br /> The ways in which you can encourage other educators to become connected<br /> How to ditch the desks in your classroom<br /> Why Buncee is such a valuable e-portfolio platform</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/episode83/">#83 Sean Gaillard and Natalie Krayenvenger</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Aug 28, 2016
Les Burns: Responsive Teaching
37:00
<p>Les Burns is an Associate Professor of Literacy at the University of Kentucky and a former high school English language arts teacher in rural and suburban Kansas. He is the Program Chair of English Education for the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Les served as the chief curriculum consultant for the state of Kentucky’s P-12 Model Curriculum Framework for all content areas and grade levels, which was awarded the John I. Wilson National Award for Innovation in Education in 2010. He is a winner of the Edward B. Fry Book Award for Empowering Struggling Readers in 2011 for the advancement of knowledge, research, and intellectual risk-taking in the field of literacy, and served as the Higher Education Representative for English language arts in Kentucky’s Teacher Leader Network, which developed the standards and learning targets for teaching P-12 language arts in classrooms throughout Kentucky.<br /> "What can we do as teachers to be responsive to who our students are, what they want, and what they will do in their futures?"<br /> In this episode you will learn about Les Burns, responsive teaching, and so much more.<br /> Les shares:</p> <p> How he transformed his students into readers on the high-school level<br /> Why co-collaboration and co-construction of the curriculum with students is so important<br /> Why getting to know who you students are is the best data you can collect<br /> What he did to help his students read 27 books in a year<br /> How responsive teaching can change your classroom and activate learning<br /> How to manage a responsive classroom and create, what Les calls, primary knowers<br /> How to develop student relationships by "embracing the cheese"<br /> What Les did to go from no classroom library to a 1,500 volume library<br /> How to go from triage teaching to responsive teaching<br /> The 6 steps you can take to incorporate responsive teaching into your classroom<br /> Why being a voracious reader is essential to good teaching<br /> The way in which handwriting is so important to student development</p> <p>Get your copy of Les' new book, Teach on Purpose! Responsive Teaching for Student Success.</p> <p>Follow Les on Twitter.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/les-burns-responsive-teaching/">Les Burns: Responsive Teaching</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Aug 14, 2016
Episode #81 — Jodi Rice
59:50
<p> </p> <p>Jodi Rice teaches AP Language and Composition, a social science course online, administers the online courses at The Bishop Strachan School. She also works on the AP Language and Composition Test Development Committee and coaches the Public Speaking and Debate team. In this episode you will learn:</p> <p>-- How Jodi incorporate more nonfiction into a Literature-based course</p> <p>-- How to understand the construction of arguments, whether implied or explicit</p> <p>-- Why English teachers should read Everything's an Argument</p> <p>-- The ways in which online learning can be effective</p> <p>-- What technology has yet to solve to make online learning truly effective</p> <p>-- How Jodi prepares for a new course</p> <p>-- What her lesson plans look like on a weekly basis</p> <p>-- What goes into making a standardized test like the AP Language and Composition exam</p> <p>-- The amazing amount of work that goes into to development of each question on the AP Language exam</p> <p>-- Jodi recommends all English teachers read is Thank You For Arguing, Revised and Updated Edition: What Aristotle, Lincoln, And Homer Simpson Can Teach Us About the Art of Persuasion. It is the summer reading assignment for her students, along with Stephen King's On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>-- Why your students should read their work out loud and how that can impact their writing</p> <p>-- What Google apps for education can do for teachers</p> <p>-- Why Jodi is proud to be a part of the AP Language community</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/jodi-rice/">Episode #81 — Jodi Rice</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Apr 17, 2016
Episode #80 with Anita Jordan
33:20
<p>Listen to all episodes of the Talks with Teachers podcast on</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Anita Jordan is a skilled, caring professional to work with educational professionals building effective programs and strategies for Advanced Placement English.</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> how she knew she was best suited for teaching high school instead of middle school<br /> why middle school kids are neither fish nor fowl<br /> how she was able to get her students to think for themselves<br /> why a teacher should not answer questions but provide more questions<br /> how to do a cold reading in class and why that is so important<br /> what a think aloud is and how to do it with your students<br /> how to get students to read with all their faculties<br /> why every class she taught was different</p> <p>Anita's daughter, Hillary Jordan, is an acclaimed novelist. If you have not read Mudbound<br /> I encouraged you to do so. It is one of the best novels I have read in the past five years.</p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/episode-80-anita-jordan/">Episode #80 with Anita Jordan</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Mar 27, 2016
#79 Dan Tricarico — The Zen Teacher
20:02
<p>Dan Tricarico is The Zen Teacher. He has been a member of the West Hills High School English Department for over twenty years.  He is author of The Zen Teacher: Creating Focus, Simplicity, and Tranquility in the Classroom and the teaching methods text You're a Teacher. . .So Act Like One!  Improving Your Stage Presence in the Classroom (Writer's Club Press 2002). Additionally, he spent a full year as columnist for the writing website Scribophile.</p> <p>In his spare time, he enjoys writing fiction, listening to music (especially Roots Rock and The Blues), reading mystery novels, staring out of windows, and watching movies.  One of Dan's first loves is writing poetry, and he has published many poems both in print and on-line.<br /> In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How his background in drama influenced him as an English teacher<br /> The way in which Jane Schaffer trained him to be a better teacher<br /> How an entire department can overcome teacher isolation<br /> What works well when teaching poetry and novels<br /> Why spontaneity is so important in the classroom</p> <p> What true teaching means, and how that is different from what many teachers have been told<br /> Why the best professional development costs very little and why everyone should read Parker Palmer's The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life<br /> How Weebly makes it easy to start a teacher blog<br /> The way in which The Zen Teacher can help educators avoid burnout and focus on well-being.</p> <p>Follow Dan on Twitter @thezenteacher and read The Zen Teacher blog</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/4463-2/">#79 Dan Tricarico — The Zen Teacher</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Feb 11, 2016
#78 Sarah Donovan of Ethical ELA
29:00
<p>Sarah Donovan</p> <p>Ethical ELA provides teachers with that which is compassionate, just, and good in English Language Arts for the human beings with whom we are entrusted. Written by teachers, teacher educators, parents, and students for the good of humanity.</p> <p> <br /> In this episode Sarah and I discuss:</p> <p> Her transition from social work to education<br /> What she brought from her social work background into the classroom<br /> The lessons she learned as a new teacher<br /> How to effectively navigate the systems of a school<br /> How a unit of genocide changed the trajectory of her teaching career<br /> Why vulnerability is important in the classroom<br /> How Ethical ELA contributes to the conversation of responsibility, ethics, and dignity in teaching<br /> Why blogging is more empathetic than narcissistic<br /> Check out Sarah's post on oversharing</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/sarah-donovan-of-ethical-ela/">#78 Sarah Donovan of Ethical ELA</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jan 24, 2016
#77 Teaching Channel’s Erika Nielsen Andrew
23:54
<p>Erika Nielsen Andrew is the Chief Academic Officer at Teaching Channel. She started her career as a high school social studies teacher in several Bay Area schools. After a short stint as a high school administrator, she earned her doctorate at University of California, Berkeley, and went on to found and lead several coaching groups at the School of Education, including the Urban Schools Network and the Teaching and Learning Alliance.<br /> Subscribe to Talks with Teachers on iTunes<br /> In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How she and Teaching Channel are working to make professional learning as invigorating and inspiring as can be.<br /> Where she began her career and how it ultimately led to a career at Teaching Channel.<br /> Why we need to open the doors on more classrooms<br /> The two similarities between coaching athletes and coaching teachers<br /> Two sure-fire ways to give feedback to large numbers of students<br /> How Teaching Channel establishes its culture of respect and collaboration<br /> The primary reason why most professional development is inadequate<br /> The struggles teachers still face with the Common Core<br /> The 3 easy things any teacher can do when they first arrive on Twitter chat<br /> Why a personal passion outside of the classroom is so important inside the classroom</p> <p>Follow Erika Nielsen Andrew on Twitter @thenewready</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/77-teaching-channels-erika-nielsen-andrew/">#77 Teaching Channel’s Erika Nielsen Andrew</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jan 11, 2016
Pursue Your Passion
5:37
<p>In this week's podcast episode I talk about something I believe will help English develop amazing experiences for their students, The Best Lesson Series: Literature. The book contains 15 extraordinary lessons from great teachers. The lessons and practical approaches in the book prove how anyone is capable of engaging students, building skills, and making their classroom a magical place.</p> <p> </p> <p> <br /> Get a FREE sample of The Best Lesson Series: Literature<br /> Order your copy today!</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/pursue-your-passion/">Pursue Your Passion</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Nov 12, 2015
Episode #75 Laura Bradley Talks NaNoWriMo
30:34
<p>Download on iTunes</p> <p>Follow Laura on Twitter</p> <p>Laura teaches English language arts, digital design, and media productions, and co-advises the student-produced news station, at Kenilworth Junior High School in Petaluma, California. She is a Google for Education Certified Innovator, National Board Certified Teacher, Edutopia Facilitator, Bay Area Writing Project Teacher Consultant with an MA in Ed. Tech. In 2015, she was a first place winner of the Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation Teacher Innovator Award. Laura has been teaching since 1988: before state standards, before standardized tests, before scripted, one-size-fits-all curriculum and before threats of Program Improvement and merit pay. In an attempt to push back against the voices that condemn and despair over our public schools, she also blogs and tweets.<br /> Show Notes Coming Soon!<br /> http://laurabradley.me/</p> <p>www.bestlessonseries.com</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/episode-75-laura-bradley-talks-nanowrimo/">Episode #75 Laura Bradley Talks NaNoWriMo</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 28, 2015
Episode #74 David Bosso
29:03
<p>David Bosso, the 2012 Connecticut Teacher of the Year, has been teaching Social Studies at Berlin High School since 1998.  He was recently named the 2012-2013 Outstanding Secondary Social Studies Teacher of the Year by the National Council for the Social Studies, and was recognized by the Connecticut Council of the Social Studies for its Excellence in Social Studies Education award in 2009.</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How David uses the textbook as a tool, not as a curriculum<br /> How David makes history as relevant as possible<br /> How to exist beyond the curriculum<br /> How to get involved in education leadership<br /> Why David blogs about his teaching experiences<br /> Why teachers should stay in the classroom</p> <p>Read Education in the United States and Finland: What is and what can be by David Bosso</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/episode-73-david-bosso/">Episode #74 David Bosso</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 04, 2015
Episode 73 with Terry Heick of Teach Thought
29:31
<p>Listen on iTunes</p> <p>Terry Heick is the creator of Teach Thought. He is a former English teacher turned education dreamer who is interested in how learning is changing in a digital and connected world. This includes, among other changes, the rise of self-directed learning.</p> <p>He is also interested in the power of questions, the role of play in learning, clarifying digital literacy, the flexibility of project-based learning, marrying mobile learning and place-based education (especially through mentoring), the potential of video games and simulations in learning, what it really means to “understand” something, and how all of this produces wisdom and self-knowledge in students.</p> <p>In addition to his work with TeachThought, he also presents at national conferences, provides professional development for schools, blogs for edutopia, and creates content for companies including learn.ist.</p> <p>Teaching Tips:</p> <p> He started a blog for himself as a teacher to see curriculum different and escape the bubble of his school<br /> He went to ASCD and ISTE that exposed him to possibilities that his teaching program had not prepared him for.<br /> Terry found inspiration from what he was reading personally and the music he was listening to, allowing him to bring his interests into the classroom.<br /> By incorporating these emerging technologies, he found he could better teach the child than teach the text.<br /> Terry believes we read to better understand ourselves and experience the classic human struggles. That understanding is enhanced and made immediate when we see what was said in the past and apply it to the present.<br /> He feels scripted curriculum reduce teacher capacity.<br /> There are so many opportunities for so many different types of learning to occur. It does not need to be scripted.<br /> Two books he highly recommends are Understanding by Design, Expanded 2nd Edition and Teaching What Matters Most: Standards and Strategies for Raising Student Achievement.</p> <p>Information About His Blog</p> <p> Teach Thought is an organization dedicated to innovation in learning.<br /> He is constantly seeing his site differently.<br /> It started off as a way to share his curriculum and is now much bigger than him and serves a larger purpose.<br /> He is constantly trying to examine what is happening in education.<br /> He is helping educators reconsider how to teach in a modern world.<br /> Teach Thought is starting a podcast, a professional development faculty, but at its marrow Teach Thought is an idea.<br /> He sees blogging as a selfish act but ultimately it is selfless because you are having to see what your peers are talking and thinking about.<br /> A good post from Teach Thought is The Characteristics of a Good School<br />  With blogging, everyone can have a voice. It allows for a specific focus in education as well a broad overview.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/episode-73-with-terry-heick-of-teach-thought/">Episode 73 with Terry Heick of Teach Thought</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 13, 2015
#72 — Penny Kittle: Engaging Readers and Building Better Writers
21:14
<p>Penny Kittle is an English teacher, literacy coach, and director of new teacher mentoring at Kennett High School in North Conway, New Hampshire. She teaches 10th, 11th, and 12th graders each fall and also occasionally in the alternative night school for adult students.</p> <p>Penny is also currently the National Council of Teachers of English Policy Analyst for the State of New Hampshire. You can follow her at www.pennykittle.net</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> Penny's travels as a teacher and educator in various states throughout the country<br /> Her time as a woodcarving teacher<br /> What it takes to be a good coach in sports and how that is transferrable to coaching teachers<br /> The impact Donald Graves had on her teaching<br /> The importance of teachers existing as writers<br /> Mini lessons are most efficient and least effective and conferring is least efficient yet most effective.<br /> How to turn dependent learners into independent thinkers<br /> What type of feedback matters to students<br /> The two books that are fascinating her right now:</p> <p>                 </p> <p> Why teachers need to help students set specific, measure goals<br /> Why every teacher needs to feed his or her own curiosity and fascination<br /> How the Book Love Foundation has come to define her professional life and serve as her biggest source of pride.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/penny-kittle/">#72 — Penny Kittle: Engaging Readers and Building Better Writers</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jul 27, 2015
#71 Michael Dunlea — Listening to Student Voices
36:53
<p>Michael Dunlea became a teacher for the same reason most did, he wanted to make a difference. He decided to become a teacher via the alternate route after working in restaurant/hotel management for over 20 years. He was a finalist for the NJ State Teacher of the Year, which set him on a path of teacher leadership that included becoming a Teacher Fellow with America Achieves in 2012 and Hope Street Group in 2014.</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How he created a grassroots, teacher-led storm crew in response to Hurricane Sandy.<br /> Why he was a finalist for the New Jersey Teacher of the Year and was a Hope Street Group Fellow<br /> What was impactful about his 3rd grade teacher, Mrs. Finn<br /> How his wife, a social worker, showed him what it means to be dedicated to the betterment of children.<br /> What choice every teacher must make <br /> The number of hours he put in over contract in a school year<br /> What policy makers fail to realize about students<br /> Why every teacher should read Rick Lavoie's When The Chips Are Down: Learning Disabilities and Discipline (Strategies For Improving Children's Behavior)<br /> How you can be a part of your school's community<br /> Why Twitter helps teachers<br /> How to use student surveys effectively to understand what's happening in your classroom</p> <p>Follow Michael on Twitter @MichaelJDunlea</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/71-michael-dunlea-listening-to-student-voices/">#71 Michael Dunlea — Listening to Student Voices</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jul 21, 2015
#70 Angela Watson: Advocating for Teachers and Students
24:18
<p> </p> <p>Using backwards design, share your teaching story. Tell the Talks with Teachers audience where you are now and how you arrived at this place in your career.</p> <p>-- Her role is as an educational consultant and and instructional coach. Angela considers herself an advocate for students and teachers. She had 11 years of experience in Washington D.C. and Florida. She started writing books for teachers and curriculum for teachers. </p> <p>Identify a mentor that guided you in your journey to become a master teacher and share what you gained from that relationship.</p> <p>-- As a teacher, she never had a mentor. That is why she is so passionate about coaching and mentoring teachers now. Angela did have someone that she shared a classroom with and co-taught with. She was able to see what she did day in and day out. She laughed with her kids but was also able to get her student to work really hard. The experience was valuable because she worked side-by-side for a whole year with another passionate teacher.</p> <p>What did you learn from a lesson that did not go as planned?</p> <p>-- Angela said that many lessons did not go as planned. Every lesson has that point where it can make that left turn and go off track. It is an important point for teachers to realize that they need to be super-responsive to kids' needs and be able to turn on a dime and support them in that moment.</p> <p>What is a teacher need at the moment?</p> <p>-- Angela believe that a great teacher need right now is more autonomy. She believes that teachers feel that they don't have the freedom to meet their students' needs They are in this really hard place where they feel like a cog in a broken system. She believes that we have to empower teachers to make choices and make decisions rather than follow scripted lessons.</p> <p>How does she empower teachers to be autonomous?</p> <p>-- Teachers must focus on what they can control and realize what they can't control. Often teachers have more freedom than they realize and they have to focus on the small things that can drive them to greater freedoms.</p> <p>What is motivating Angela in education?</p> <p>-- She's excited by the trend in which the ways classrooms are being managed. It is no longer about tracking student behavior, it is about connecting with kids and building student relationships.</p> <p>A book recommendation for teachers?</p> <p>Pernille Ripp's Passionate Learners. She talks so honestly about missteps and failures.</p> <p>How can teachers exist outside the box while still providing benefits for their students?</p> <p>Teachers need to purposefully and consciously manage their energy.</p> <p>What are small things that a teacher can do that can lead to student success?</p> <p>Angela believes that having predictable routines can set students up for success. When student do not know the routines and expectations, it can stress them and take away the energy they need to devote to their own learning.</p> <p>What are the habits of  successful teachers?</p> <p>They know how to prioritize. The problem with teaching is that everything feels like an emergency. It can become overwhelming and that can create burnout. Teachers have to figure out for themselves what is most important because they can not give 110% to everything everyday.</p> <p>What is Angela most proud of from her career in education?</p> <p>She is proud of the fact that she has earned the trust of teachers and she has kept that trust since she began blogging in 2003.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/70-angela-watson-advocating-for-teachers-and-students/">#70 Angela Watson: Advocating for Teachers and Students</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Mar 24, 2015
#69 Rafranz Davis: The Five Words That Can Change a Student’s Life
22:31
<p>Rafranz Davis</p> <p>LEARNER! Math & Tech Geek! Tech Specialist, Google Certified Teacher, Disruptor of Ridiculousness, Social Media writer for @DiscoveryEd Math #educolor</p> <p>Subscribe on iTunes</p> <p> </p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> What enabled her to transition from a middle school math teacher into tech specialist<br /> How you can have an impact on a classroom in a country you've never visited<br /> Why Rafranz does not get to have an off day as a teacher of color<br /> How she learned to challenge her students in new ways when her lesson plans were upended<br /> Why passion is something she will never tire pursuing and advocating for<br /> Why reading should be important to teachers and why she read Jose Vilson's This is Not a Test three times<br /> Why five words can change your relationship with students<br /> How reflective listening can improve your classroom</p> <p>visit rafranzdavis.com</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/69-rafranz-davis-the-five-words-that-can-change-a-students-life/">#69 Rafranz Davis: The Five Words That Can Change a Student’s Life</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Mar 15, 2015
#68 Edutopia: Inspiration That Works
29:30
<p>Elana Leoni and Samer Rabadi</p> <p>Social Media Team at Edutopia</p> <p>In this episode you will learn about:</p> <p> Edutopia's mission<br /> How Edutopia evolved from a print magazine to a digital resource<br /> Edutopia's community-building strategies<br /> What teachers can do to be solution oriented in their approach to the craft of teaching<br /> How teachers are using Edutopia to give voice to what's happening in the trenches right now<br /> The ways in which teachers can apply Edutopia's community-building strategies to their own classrooms<br /> The common teacher needs on Edutopia<br /> How to keep conversations about educationally-sound practices without getting political<br /> Success stories of how Edutopia's content inspired teachers</p> <p>www.edutopia.org </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/68-edutopia-inspiration-that-works/">#68 Edutopia: Inspiration That Works</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Mar 03, 2015
#67 Dan McCabe: Changing Words to Develop a Growth Mindset
32:06
<p>Dan McCabe</p> <p>Lead Learner ★ Assistant Principal ★ Co-Moderator #NYEDchat ★ Co-Founder @EdCampLI ★http://danmccabe.blogspot.com </p> <p>Subscribe on iTunes</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> What students gain from taking business courses<br /> The ways in which students can develop entrepreneurial thinking<br /> How mentorship from a colleague made Dan a better educator<br /> Why leadership is a choice, not a title<br /> How Dan transitioned from a business teacher to an assistant principal<br /> How social media can be your best entryway into a powerful learning network<br /> What we can do to reach those students that are disengaged<br /> The overlooked challenged of responsibility that teachers face<br /> Why disruption is an important term in education right now<br /> Why you should read The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything by Sir Ken Robinson<br /> The ways in which teachers can seek work-life integration<br /> How teachers can develop principles to improve their craft based on Stephen Covey's 7 Habits<br /> How the relationships teachers build and the words they use can have a lasting impact</p> <p> </p> <p>Follow Dan on Twitter: @danieldMcCabe </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/dan-mccabe-changing-words-to-develop-a-growth-mindset/">#67 Dan McCabe: Changing Words to Develop a Growth Mindset</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Feb 23, 2015
#66 Connecting with Students: James Sturtevant on the Art of Relationships
23:17
<p>James Sturtevant</p> <p>Jim Sturtevant first stepped in front of high school students in the late summer of 1985. Jim predicted he would teach a year or two, before pursuing something grown up: go to law school, get a PhD, or enter the private sector and earn a fortune.  But, a funny thing happened on the way to the forum.  Jim fell in love with his students.  Could one really get paid for bonding with young people?  The answer was…ABSOLUTELY!  And still is, some thirty years and thousands of students later.  “Your students seem so relaxed and happy.  How’d you create this atmosphere?” Caught off guard, he gave a meager and vague response.  After much reflection and research, Jim finally answered the question in You've Gotta Connect.</p> <p>Subscribe on iTunes</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How James develops relationships with his students<br /> Why relationship develop is just as important, if not more important, than content knowledge<br /> How to connect with those students that seem disengaged and reluctant to learn<br /> Ways in which you can take strong relationships and turn them in passionate learners<br /> What administrators should know about student connections and why they are so important in the learning process</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/connecting-students-james-sturtevant-art-relationships/">#66 Connecting with Students: James Sturtevant on the Art of Relationships</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Feb 16, 2015
#65 Tech as a Tool to Differentiate Instruction
15:11
<p>Cheryl Costello</p> <p>Academic Tech Coordinator at Cheshire Academy,an independent school in Cheshire, CT. Member of #CAIS Commission on Technology</p> <p>Subscribe on iTunes</p> <p> </p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How she began using technology as a tool to differentiate instruction<br /> How she managed to go from a stay-at home mom to a successful teacher<br /> What she learned about flexibility in lesson panning and how she learned it<br /> The time and planning that goes into successful teaching<br /> Why everyone should readMindset by Carol Dweck<br /> How you can create a personal learning community on Twitter<br /> Why you should read education blogs like Edutopia and Ed Tech Teacher<br /> How her passion for her content showed through her students' work</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/65-tech-tool-differentiate-instruction/">#65 Tech as a Tool to Differentiate Instruction</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Feb 05, 2015
#64 Brianna Crowley — ASCD Emerging Leader
27:04
<p>Brianna Crowley</p> <p>#Teacherpreneur w/ @teachingquality, 2013 @ASCD Emerging Leader, English Teacher, TechCoach, NBCT</p> <p> http://about.me/brianna.crowley</p> <p> </p> <p>Subscribe on iTunes</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> Her hybrid role as a classroom teacher and a Teacherpreneur for The Center for Teaching Quality<br /> Why she became a teacher and how she became a master teacher by connecting with others<br /> Her lesson that fell flat and how it crushed her at the time<br /> What the public fails to realize about teaching<br /> Why Mindset by Carol Dweck and Quiet by Susan Cain are valuable professional-development reads<br /> How we should be interesting people for our students<br /> Why Elana Aguilar's The Art of Coaching was the best PD that she attended<br /> What a comment code can do to benefit student writing<br /> The ever-evolving, always-collaborating nature of great teachers</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/64-brianna-crowley-ascd-emerging-leader/">#64 Brianna Crowley — ASCD Emerging Leader</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jan 28, 2015
#63 Active and Engaged Math Teaching: Michael Flynn
31:23
<p>Michael Flynn</p> <p>Director of Mathematics Leadership Program at Mount Holyoke College</p> <p> </p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How he went from hating math to teaching it<br /> Why teaching the way you were taught is not always a successful practice<br /> The ways in which we can use our colleagues as resources<br /> Why summer PD can transform your teaching<br /> How his teaching changed from teacher-centered to student-centered<br /> The questions you should ask to determine if your classroom is student-centered.<br /> Why we need time to practice, experiment, and try things out<br /> The difference between a fun activity and a fun learning outcome<br /> How the dynamic nature of the classroom can be invigorating<br /> Why Principles to Action is a book that every math teacher should read<br /> The ways in which everyone can be life-long learners<br /> Why the workbook method in math can turn students off<br /> How to make math an active process<br /> The ever-evolving, always-collaborating nature of great teachers</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/michaelflynn/">#63 Active and Engaged Math Teaching: Michael Flynn</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jan 20, 2015
#62 Marguerite Izzo — Giving Our Very Best
24:13
<p>Marguerite Izzo -- National Teaching Hall of Fame Inductee</p> <p>Subscribe to "The Test" -- Brian's new podcast about teaching in an era of testing<br /> Listen to find out:</p> <p> Why Marguerite has taught every grade from 5-12<br /> Marguerite is a member of the Teaching Hall of Fame<br /> Why she firmly believes that if you can teach middle school, you can teach anything<br /> How teaching is more difficult than being a doctor and why our best is needed every day<br /> How administrative support can be a game changer for a teacher<br /> What happens when we don't reflect and adjust when we are teaching<br /> What the general public fails to understand about teaching, the challenge of reaching that affective domain and how that can influence the intellectual domain<br /> The exhausting and exhilarating nature of reaching 30+ students<br /> Learn the three essential things that she loves about teaching<br /> Marguerite recommends The Courage to Teach as a book  that all teachers should read<br /> Why taking care of yourself is so important in teaching<br /> How you can use The Teaching Channel  to improve as a teacher<br /> What confidence can do for students and how we can empower their success<br /> Marguerite's belief in the importance of national standards<br /> Her proudest moments as a teacher</p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/63-marguerite-izzo-giving-best/">#62 Marguerite Izzo — Giving Our Very Best</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jan 13, 2015
Special Project: AP Lit Help’s “The Test”
7:23
<p>Subscribe to The Test on iTunes</p> <p>check out aplithelp.com</p> <p>Could they read and could they write? That’s what they wanted to know. Of course they could do it, but how well could they do it? So they worked in silence for three hours, reading and writing. That’s all it took — three hours. A year’s worth of work, and it was done in three hours. And then, they awaited judgement.</p> <p>Issac and Annie are two of the nearly 400,000 students globally that took the AP Literature and Composition exam last year. It is a rigorous exam. Typically, the best and brightest students in a school take AP exams, at least that’s the way it was when I was in school.  The multiple choice section lasts an hour. Then in the next two hours students write three essays, back to back to back. Its exhausting. Few do well on it.</p> <p>How tough is it? Well only 8% scored a 5 last year. 18% scored a 4. If you do the math, and bear with me I’m an English teacher, nearly 75% failed to score a four or a five. 75% of the smart kids. That’s a tough exam. But when you want to award college credit for high school students, this isn’t the in-house soccer program, not everyone gets a trophy.</p> <p>But Is it fair? Can a test, especially a high-stakes one, reveal what you know?</p> <p>This is a podcast about one TEST. I want to know what those two students did to succeed? What did their teachers teach? Did they teach to the test? Did they ignore it? But once you start asking those questions, your magnifying glass picks up clues that lead down a much bigger rabbit hole. It leads you to wonder, what should a test do? Are we testing too much? How do you help a struggling reader?  Can you assess a student, a school, and entire educational initiative if you don’t test what they know and how they’ve progressed? And what about the students? What impact is all this having on them? Over the next few weeks, I’m going to talk to students, teachers, test makers, advocates and critics. I’m going to ask questions of them all to better understand where we are, what’s working and what isn’t, and the impact its having.</p> <p>Welcome to THE TEST</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/special-project-ap-lit-helps-test/">Special Project: AP Lit Help’s “The Test”</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jan 07, 2015
#60 2014 National Teacher of the Year — Sean McComb
26:12
<p>Sean McComb -- 2014 National Teacher of the Year</p> <p>Sean McComb, an English teacher at Patapsco High School & Center for the Arts  in Baltimore County, was named 2014 National Teacher of the Year. In addition to teaching, McComb supports his Patapsco colleagues through coaching and training as the school's Staff Development Teacher. He also served as a curriculum writer for the school system and an adjunct instructor in Education and Writing at Towson University.</p> <p> <br /> In this episode you will learn: </p> <p> Sean's journey into teaching<br /> Patapsco's A.V.I.D. program<br /> The emotional toll of being a teacher<br /> A lesson that failed for Sean<br /> How to ignite passion in the classroom<br /> How to ask the right essential questions<br /> When to hold back and let students control the class<br /> Why intellectual curiosity is important<br /> What you can do to build better connections with your students<br /> Why the Teaching Channel is a great resource<br /> a tip to improve student writing<br /> What he is most proud of as a teacher</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/60-2014-national-teacher-year-sean-mccomb/">#60 2014 National Teacher of the Year — Sean McComb</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Dec 15, 2014
#59 1-Year Anniversary w/ Brian Sztabnik
26:49
<p>Brian Sztabnik -- educator </p> <p>Brian Sztabnik runs the Talks With Teachers podcasts, #aplitchat and created aplithelp.com.  He has taught English Language Arts for ten years in middle schools, high schools, the inner city and the suburbs.  He is currently the lead English teacher at a high school on Long Island, where he teaches AP Literature and electives.  He has presented at the AP Annual Conference, LI Connected Educators, the New York State English Council Conference, and at local workshops on the Common Core Standards.  He coached varsity basketball coach for 10 years and now spends his time as a devoted father and a frequent typo-maker.</p> <p>www.aplithelp.com</p> <p> <br /> In this episode you will learn: </p> <p> How I became interested in teaching after a brief career in sports journalism<br /> The inspiration for the creation of Talks with Teachers<br /> My teaching story and what I have learned from the four schools that I have worked for in the past 10 years<br /> The qualities of successful schools<br /> The habits of successful teachers<br /> What I have learned doing the podcast for the past year<br /> What I would like to do in the future with Talks with Teachers</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/briansztabnik/">#59 1-Year Anniversary w/ Brian Sztabnik</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Dec 08, 2014
#58 Teacher Time with Ali Wright and Angela Gunter
27:12
<p>Ali Wright and Angela Gunther </p> <p>Recently, Kentucky teacher leaders, led by Ali Wright and Angela Gunther, posed a challenge: rethink professional learning and restructure the school day to improve learning for students and teachers. Along with the Center for Teaching Quality, they analyzed current teacher schedules and conducted an intensive three-day chat discussing teacher needs and opportunities for reallocating time.</p> <p> http://www.teachingquality.org/teachertime</p> <p>Teacher Time Info Graphic</p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/58-teacher-time-ali-wright-angela-gunter/">#58 Teacher Time with Ali Wright and Angela Gunter</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Dec 01, 2014
#57 The Cult of Pedagogy with Jennifer Gonzalez
29:02
<p>Jennifer Gonzalez -- educator and blogger</p> <p>For eight years, Jennifer taught middle school language arts. Half that time was spent in an east-coast state, the other half in a Midwestern state. She earned her National Board Certification in 2004. Then, after having her first child, she left teaching to be a stay-at-home mom, knowing there was no way she could do both jobs well. In 2008, she was hired by a local university to teach pre-service teachers. This work gave her a new passion for preparing and supporting educators.</p> <p>With Cult of Pedagogy, she hopes to create a vibrant, encouraging, stimulating community of teachers, supporting each other toward excellence. She believes if we can reach across the limits of geography and find each other, there’s no limit to the amazing things we can accomplish.</p> <p>www.cultofpedagogy.com</p> <p> <br /> In this episode you will learn: </p> <p> How Jennifer first became an educational blogger<br /> What she learned teaching on the middle school and college levels<br /> What book every educator should read<br /> Where to find the best resources for teachers on the internet<br /> Why blogging can be simple or a painstaking labor depending on the purpose<br /> Who mentored Jennifer early in her career<br /> What teachers can do to know their students better<br /> Why modeling is so important for writing instruction</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/57-cult-pedagogy-jennifer-gonzalez/">#57 The Cult of Pedagogy with Jennifer Gonzalez</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Nov 24, 2014
#56: The Cool Cat Teacher Talks Digital Tools and How Leaders are Readers
31:22
<p>Vicki Davis -- educator, author, speaker</p> <p>@coolcatteacher</p> <p>www.coolcatteacher.com</p> <p> <br /> In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How Vicki transferred from a career initially in the business world to the world of teaching and education <br /> Why you can be exceptional anywhere in any discipline<br /> The difference between talking about research-based best practices and living these practices in your classroom<br /> How not to feel alone as a teacher<br /> What you can do to motivate your students<br /> Why the complexities of teaching can be overwhelming<br /> How she handles and manages her multiple commitments<br /> Why connecting is important<br /> How voice messaging can improve student writing<br /> What Pro Writing Aid can do for students and their writing<br /> Why you should read an hour a night to better yourself<br /> What you can do to incorporate more digital apps in your teaching and your classroom<br /> Why 15 minute time for yourself is important<br /> The importance of mind mapping and organizing one's thoughts</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/56-cool-cat-teacher-talks-digital-tools-leaders-readers/">#56: The Cool Cat Teacher Talks Digital Tools and How Leaders are Readers</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Nov 16, 2014
#55 Throwing Out Grades with Mark Barnes
<p>Mark Barnes -- educator, author, speaker</p> <p> <br /> Internationally-recognized speaker and education writer Mark Barnes is the author of Role Reversal: Achieving Uncommonly Excellent Results in the Student-Centered Classroom, named a 2013 Best Professional Book by Teacher Librarian Magazine,The 5-Minute Teacher (ASCD, 2013), Teaching the iStudent (Corwin, 2014), 5 Skills for the Global Learner and Assessment 3.0 (Corwin, 2015). Mark presents keynotes and seminars worldwide on his Results Only Learning Environment, feedback for learning and web-based instruction. @markbarnes19 is regarded as one of education's most influential content curators on Twitter, and his Brilliant or Insane blog has more than 60,000 monthly readers.</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How Mark changed his teaching over time to make his class student centered<br /> Information about his new book, Assessment 3.0, which talks about how teachers can change their grading practice.<br /> Why the traditional method of assessing was not working and how Mark upended his approach to grades<br /> What teacher can do to break the cycle of failure<br /> How the feedback model can increase student retention<br /> The Facebook group, Teachers Throwing Out Grades<br /> What multiple-choice based assessments must do to continue the conversation about learning<br /> a digital tool that Mark recommends, Socrative, which teachers can set up to create quick, multiple-choice questions and get instant feedback<br /> How to navigate your school's technology policy<br /> The responsibility to keep your students safe<br /> The beauty and excitement of a-ha moments<br />  Why everyone should read Drive by Daniel Pink<br /> How to use social media for your teaching benefit<br /> How to talk to your students rather than at them<br /> Why EdCamp is a great way to do professional development on the cheap</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/throwing-grades-mark-barnes/">#55 Throwing Out Grades with Mark Barnes</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Nov 10, 2014
#54 Scaffolding for Strength with David Grossman
20:29
<p>David Grossman </p> <p> </p> <p>David is a 7th grade science teacher at TK Stone Middle School in Elizabethtown, Kentucky.  His  goal is to inspire wonder in his students as they explore science, gaining the science literacy that they need to be successful members of society.</p> <p>Find David on Twitter @tkSciGuy</p> <p>Check David's website dedicated to the Next Generation Science Standards</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> David's journey as a teacher that includes teaching in an alternative school, being a librarian, and working as a middle school science teacher.</p> <p> How to recognize the emotional needs of each grade level.<br /> Why students need love and support at all ages<br /> How to rescue a failing lesson<br /> Ways to build academic muscles through scaffolding<br /> Why schools can not follow a business model<br /> The unpredictable nature of teaching middle school and why that is a great thing<br /> How to be with each student in the moment and take it one step further by supporting them outside the classroom<br /> Ways in which students can read like scientist and write like reporters<br /> How Voxer can improve your teaching<br /> A book every teacher should read Empowered Schools, Empowered Students: Creating Connected and Invested Learners</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/moment/">#54 Scaffolding for Strength with David Grossman</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Nov 02, 2014
#53 Introducing Poetry with 3-D Art
5:31
<p>Episode #53</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/introducing-poetry-3-d-art/">#53 Introducing Poetry with 3-D Art</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 29, 2014
#52: The Creative Classroom: Tim Needles, Art Teacher
35:30
<p>Tim Needles</p> <p>www.timneedles.com</p> <p>@timneedles</p> <p>Tim Needles is art and film teacher at Smithtown High School and an adjunct professor at Adelphi University. He earned a M.A. with a focus in media arts from the State University of Stony Brook and a B.F.A. in photography and education from the School of Visual Arts. He is an Adobe Master Teacher and has been teaching fine art, film history, animation, and media arts for over eight years on the high school and college level. Tim is also the founder and director of The Strictly Students Film Festival. Tim has been the recipient of the Robert Rauschenberg Power of Art Award, the Suffolk County Legislature Award of Merit, and he was recently recognized by the National Foundation for the Advancement in the Arts. Tim is also a freelance artist, animator, and writer and continues to exhibit and perform regularly.</p> <p>Contact: Needlesart@aol.com</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How to teach creativity through art <br /> Why art should be a vital part of a student's experience<br /> Ways in which you can design your class around questions and themes<br /> How technology is influencing art class<br /> If the Common Core has impacted art class<br /> Ways to connect with and have your students collaborate with teachers from around the world<br /> How to approach critiques of student work<br /> Why humor is so important in the classroom, especially in the high school<br /> How MC Escher's art can improve math practice<br /> Ralph Steadmen's connection with Hunter S. Thompson<br /> Robert Frank's relationship with the Beat writers<br /> How every major art museum can benefit teachers and their lesson plans<br /> Why improv classes improved Tim's teaching<br /> The differences between art history and studio in art<br /> How the art room is different and what other teachers can learn from it<br /> Why the image is just as powerful as the word</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/creative-classroom-tim-needles-art-teacher/">#52: The Creative Classroom: Tim Needles, Art Teacher</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 26, 2014
Is Homework Helpful?
6:32
<p>Episode #51</p> <p> <br />  <br /> Want a transcript of this episode? Ready to share your homework philosophy? Click here<br />  <br />  </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/homework-helpful/">Is Homework Helpful?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 22, 2014
The Power of Branding with Tony Sinanis and Joe Sanfelippo
33:38
<p>Tony Sinanis and Joe Sanfelippo</p> <p>Tony Sinanis, principal and “lead learner” at Cantiague Elementary School in Jericho, was selected as the 2014 New York State Elementary Principal of the Year by the School Administrators Association of New York State (SAANYS) and the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> Dr. Joe Sanfelippo is the Superintendent of the Fall Creek School District in Fall Creek, Wisconsin. Joe holds a BA in Elementary and Early Childhood Education from St. Norbert College, a MS in Educational Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a MS in Educational Leadership, and a PhD in Leadership, Learning, and Service from Cardinal Stritch University.  He also serves on the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Educator Effectiveness Teachscape Team. </p> <p>Get the book -- The Power of Branding: Telling Your School's Story</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How Joe and Tony first connected<br /> Why Twitter is a great resource for teachers<br /> How teachers can advance their own learning online through social media<br /> Why social interaction is important in professional development<br /> How to brand your school's story<br /> What to do to represent your students' voices in the branding of your school or classroom<br />  What to do to let more people know about the great things going on in your school<br /> How 17 out of 20 classrooms in Tony's  school are using social media to share their story<br /> How you can model appropriate digital citizenship<br /> Ways in which you can integrate students into the process<br /> Ways in which you can confront the fear of opening a school to social media branding<br /> Why branding shows active engagement on an administrator's part</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/power-branding-tony-sinanis-joe-sanfelippo/">The Power of Branding with Tony Sinanis and Joe Sanfelippo</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 19, 2014
Shakespearean Musical Chairs: A Deep Dive Into a Wacky Wednesday
7:20
<p>Episode #49</p> <p>Subscribe and be inspired each week</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Want a transcript of this episode? Want to share your version of musical chairs? Do it here.</p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/shakespearean-musical-chairs-deep-dive-wacky-wednesday/">Shakespearean Musical Chairs: A Deep Dive Into a Wacky Wednesday</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 15, 2014
#48 Submit to the Work: Todd Finley
41:17
<p>Todd Finley</p> <p>East Carolina University</p> <p>Todd Finley, PhD, is tenured professor of English Education at East Carolina University. He has taught elementary and 8-12th grade English and co-developed the Tar River Writing Project. His BA in Elementary Education and Secondary English was earned at the University of Puget Sound. His MA in English and PhD in C&I were earned at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Finley teaches, researches, works with schools and publishes in the field of composition, curriculum, instruction, technology, and collaboration.</p> <p>Todd's Edutopia blog posts</p> <p>Todd's Twitter </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> Where he's traveled and taught in his teaching career<br /> What helped him write his dissertation for his PhD<br /> How to submit to the work of a teacher<br /> Why he struggled his first year of teaching<br /> How to understand your students and connect with them<br /> Why his pre-service teachers make home visits<br /> What he means when he says there are no shortcuts in education<br /> How the first 60 seconds matter when working with an audience<br /> What students respond to in the classroom<br /> Why teaching is harder than you think<br /> How naming emotions can improve your classroom atmosphere<br /> Why social and emotional learning deserves as much attention as rigor<br /> What it takes to improve student writing</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>                              </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/submit-work-todd-finley/">#48 Submit to the Work: Todd Finley</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 12, 2014
In Defense of Reading
5:15
<p>Episode #47</p> <p>I like the heft of books in my hand. I like the smooth feel of their pages and the artistry of their covers. But most of all, I love the escape that their stories provide.</p> <p>I’m going to make more time for books this year. The October focus for the 30-Day Challenge is to set teaching goals and personal ones as well. But it is not just about setting them, it is about achieving them. I’m challenging myself to read one book a month and I’m counting on others in the group to hold me accountable. That’s why I’m writing this post. It is the first step in my accountability process. The next step, starting October 1st, is to read Kafka on the Shore. Then, as the day winds down and my son is tucked in bed, I will retire to the couch with Murakiami’s novel and in doing so, escape the frenzied grip of social media.</p> <p>Studies show that reading sharpens and strengthens brain function and expands one’s vocabulary, but that’s not why I do it. Those are added benefits but not the primary reasons. Nor do I do it to escape the base and superficial scanning that occurs online, although reading is a welcomed reprieve. I do it, above all, because it is pleasurable. When I read I become welded to characters, get crushed by conflict, travel in time and place, and learn to empathize with others. Reading allows me to think, feel, and imagine like nothing else can.</p> <p>Loving literature isn’t just an English-teacher thing. It is a human-being thing, and the more I read of imaginary people the more I understand the real people I interact with each day.</p> <p>I understand the courage it takes to parent in moments of crisis because of Atticus Finch. I know the feeling of otherness because of Othello. I experience the memories of 9/11 differently through the lens of Corrigan and Jasmine. I mature artistically along with Stephen Daedalus. And I empathize with Holden’s loneliness.</p> <p>Although many stories take time and effort to read, they are worth it. The prolonged satisfaction is superior to instant gratification.  I can’t say the same thing after scrolling through a Twitter or Facebook feed night after night. Even television shows and films, which can sometimes tell stories well, fall short of the satisfaction of a book. They are crafted from someone else’s interpretation. Yet I own the experience of a book, and that has made all the difference.</p> <p>Here are 20 books that are worth the time:</p> <p> The Giving Tree<br /> Where the Red Fern Grows<br /> Hamlet<br /> On Writing: 10th Anniversary Edition: A Memoir of the Craft<br /> On the Road<br /> The Book Thief<br />  Looking for Alaska<br /> Where’d You Go, Bernadette: A Novel<br /> Mudbound<br /> Frankenstein<br /> 1984<br /> A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man<br /> The Fault in Our Stars<br /> The Corrections<br /> Let the Great World Spin<br /> Fahrenheit 451<br /> The Complete Sherlock Holmes (The Heirloom Collection)<br /> The Great Gatsby<br /> The Catcher in the Rye <br /> To Kill a Mockingbird</p> <p> </p> <p>Share your favorite books in the comments section below</p> <p>Join the 30-Day Challenge</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/in-defense-of-reading/">In Defense of Reading</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 08, 2014
#46: Law School to Master Teacher: Megan Allen shares her teaching journey
23:51
<p>Megan Allen</p> <p>Mt. Holyoke College</p> <p>Her passion in education is focused on one major tenet: the successful transformation of our education system, led by professional educators. Megan's current areas of research are around teacher leadership, cultivating teacher leadership capacity in pre-service teachers, career continuums in education, education policy and its impacts on the classroom, and working with high-needs populations.</p> <p>http://www.teachingquality.org/blogs/MeganAllen</p> <p>@redhdteacher</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> Why she never considered being a teacher in high school or college<br /> How Ally McBeal and Boston Public changed her life path<br /> What Megan is doing to developing a graduate program in teacher leadership<br /> When collaboration with colleagues can make a difference<br /> How failure can help teachers grow<br /> The epic fight that broke out in her classroom and what she learned from it<br /> Why summers are essential to teacher growth<br /> What blogs you should follow like Jose Vilson, Donalyn Miller, and  Bill Ferriter<br /> What reflection means and how to do it properly<br /> How to build relationships on social media</p> <p> </p> <p>Megan's book recommendations:</p> <p>  Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us</p> <p>  This Is Not A Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education<br />          </p> <p>  Mindset: The New Psychology of Success</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/law-school-to-master-teacher-megan-allen-shares-her-teaching-journey/">#46: Law School to Master Teacher: Megan Allen shares her teaching journey</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 06, 2014
What the Standards Leave Out
6:34
<p>Should interest and engagement be measured?</p> <p>Download on iTunes for Your Morning Commute </p> <p>Click here to read a transcript of this episode</p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/what-the-standards-leave-out/">What the Standards Leave Out</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Oct 01, 2014
Creativity and Imagination: A New Way to View Student Ability
28:42
<p>Scott Barry Kaufman</p> <p>www.scottbarrykaufman.com </p> <p>@sbkaufman</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Scott is Scientific Director of The Imagination Institute in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Kaufman investigates the development and measurement of intelligence, creativity, and personality (see scientific papers). He has six books, including Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined and The Philosophy of Creativity (with Elliot Samuel Paul). Kaufman is also co-founder of The Creativity Post, and he writes the column Beautiful Minds for Scientific American (seepopular posts). </p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> The purpose of the Imagination Institute <br /> What the elements of postive psychology are and how they can help teachers understand students<br /> Why we are misguided in measuring intelligence<br /> How to think broadly about intelligence to develop the learning outcomes that you really care about<br /> Why active learning skills out-predict learning outcomes better than IQ exams<br /> Why we shouldn't categorize one master list of intelligence<br /> A new definition of intelligence: the dynamic interplay of engagement and ability in the pursuit of personal goals<br /> How to move past the negativity of labeling students based on their mind bends<br /> How to look for hidden gifts in your students<br /> The Future Project's role in school with its Dream Director<br /> Why creative expression is self expression. Scott will explain why he is not a big fan of creative exercises, but how he prefers to foster autonomy</p> <p> </p> <p>Scott's books:</p> <p>                  </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/creativity-and-imagination-a-new-way-to-view-student-ability/">Creativity and Imagination: A New Way to View Student Ability</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 28, 2014
Grading Student Work: How to Do More in Less Time
5:52
<p>Should interest and engagement be measured?</p> <p>Download on iTunes for Your Morning Commute <br /> Have you felt the guilt? C’mon, you know the feeling, I certainly have had it. It is the torment from those neglected assignments that sit on your desk far too long only to be shoved in a folder and hidden in drawer to be further avoided. If you are like me, you eventually come to your senses and realize that there is no escaping the grading, and while you hate yourself for procrastinating all along you never take that step to stop it the next time.<br /> This week I collected 78 essays from my AP Literature students. Two and three page responses that asked them to connect How to Read Literature Like a Professor with 1984. Along with those 200-or-so pages of essays, each student completed a multi-page project. It is self-inflicted torture.<br /> In the past the sheer volume of that paper load would intimidate me. Like the dishes, no matter how much progress I made, I knew there would be more tomorrow. But that’s in the past. This year I have resolved to achieve a better balance. Already I’m seeing dividends. Assignments are being returned at a quicker rate. I’m repeating mantras that are keeping me on track. And I’ve found a practice that is saving time while building better writers.<br /> Here are three tips on managing the paper load.<br /> 1. Break the work into manageable chunks<br /> It is a humbling truth that sometimes the simplest logic is the easiest to ignore. With grading, I couldn’t see the trees, my eyes were fixed on the vastness of the forest. Rather than tackle it, I’d ignore it, allowing the work to pile. Now I divide and conquer. This is accomplished by setting small goals, with mantras to guide me like “one class per day,”  or “15 papers per prep period.” I repeat them in my mind and it is helping me to stay focused. In fact, those summer reading essays, which normally would have taken me over a week to return, were in the students’ hands three days later because I set a goal of one class set per day.<br /> 2. Say it loud, say it proud<br /> This year I purchased a hanging file folder, which is on full display in the front of the classroom. There is no hiding from the grading now. In the past I would binder-clip their work and stuff it in my work bag, out of sight, out of mind. Now, the students can see the progress and hold me accountable when there is inertia.  Not only can they see it, I tell them when the work will be returned, setting a realistic deadline and inviting them to hold me accountable in the process.  While a mantra can dissolve quickly, a promise to a student is harder to break.</p> <p>3. Converse rather than comment<br /> I’ve saved the best for last. Don’t gasp but… I don’t comment. No notes scribbled on the side, no words of critique at the end. Ask yourself, can you really develop a writer in the margins of a paper? Perhaps, but most students read them once and never act upon them. I’ve found a better way to do it. I build relationships.<br /> I allow students to rewrite their essays as long as they conference with me. The irony of it all is that these conferences are probably more time consuming than the comments but their impact is exponentially more enduring. We sit, we talk about the strengths of the writing, we look for weaknesses. We strategize how to articulate ideas, we look for more substantial support for topic sentences, we address grammatical issues. It takes time, sure, but it is time worth spending.<br />  YA author Laurie Halse Anderson once told me that her novels go through seven to nine rewrites, her final draft differing vastly from the first version. She can’t fathom why students are given once chance to get it right because, in her opinion, writers are made through the rewriting process.<br /> So there you have it. Three ways that have me focused on the grading, inviting students along for accountability, and building relationships all the while.
Sep 24, 2014
Making Magic Happen with Dyane Smokorowski
21:58
<p>Dyane Smokorowski: Instructional Technology Coach </p> <p>@Mrs_Smoke</p> <p>Dyane serves as an instructional technology trainer, providing professional development for the Andover school district, and throughout the state training preK-12 teachers on 21st Century Skills, project-based learning and technology tools.  In addition, she is an Intel National Senior Trainer, training other teachers around the nation in project-based learning strategies with enhanced technology integration, and co-hosts monthly online professional development trainings focused on effective technology integration and 21st Century Skills for PreK-12 educators for the Intel Teach Live International Monthly Webinar series.</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How Dyane makes teachers nerdy<br /> Why she didn't expect to land in middle school education<br /> How she gets stuck in that space of middle school jokes, books, and jargon<br /> A time when she almost betrayed a child's trust and what she learned from it<br /> How Shelly Schott, of Intel Education, has mentored her. Dyane considers her a Teaching Yoda<br /> What you can do to make the magic happen with Project-Based Learning<br /> Ways to break the stereotype that teachers don't have passion<br /> How to bridge the gap between old school pedagogy and new age technology<br /> How to do teacher field trips<br /> Where to find inspiration, especially at places like EdCamp<br /> What great teachers do over and over again<br /> Why everyone should read Kelly Gallagher's books, especially Write Like This and Deeper Reading</p> <p>         </p> <p>           </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/making-magic-happen-with-dyane-smokorowski/">Making Magic Happen with Dyane Smokorowski</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 22, 2014
#Wacky Wednesday
4:02
<p>A Way to Think Outside the Box</p> <p>We love five-star ratings</p> <p> </p> <p>Click here to read a transcript of this episode</p> <p>Comment here</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/wacky-wednesday/">#Wacky Wednesday</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 17, 2014
#40: A Vision of Teacher Leadership
44:22
<p>Katherine Bassett: The National Network of State Teachers of the Year</p> <p>@NNSTOY</p> <p>www.nnstoy.org</p> <p>Your support is appreciated. Provide a review for Talks with Teachers on iTunes</p> <p>A 26-year middle school librarian and NJ State Teacher of the Year 2000, Katherine Bassett is NNSTOY’s Executive Director, responsible for establishing and expanding the organization. Prior to this position, Bassett served as Director of Policy and Partnerships for the Center for Educator Effectiveness at Pearson, working to support research into educator practice and self-efficacy, and to building partnerships with like-minded organizations to support education.</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> How Katherine moved on from her 26 years as a school librarian to the Educational Testing Service<br /> Where she found creative challenges as a teacher<br /> The impact standards-based learning can have on teaching<br /> Why the time is ripe for teacher leadership<br /> How to feel valued as an educator<br /> What it means when we say "I am a teacher"<br /> How teachers can take a bigger role in policy and the public's eye<br /> Why lack of respect is damaging the teacher profession<br /> The habits of excellent teachers<br /> Visualizing-Teacher-Leadership<br /> Books Katherine recommends</p> <p>         </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/a-vision-of-teacher-leadership/">#40: A Vision of Teacher Leadership</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 15, 2014
Six Habits of Teaching Excellence
4:17
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/six-habits-of-teaching-excellence/">Six Habits of Teaching Excellence</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 10, 2014
This is Not a Test with Jose Vilson
30:49
<p>A Teacher-Leader That Listens for Student Wisdom</p> <p>Your support is appreciated. Provide a review for Talks with Teachers on iTunes</p> <p>José Luis Vilson is a math educator for a middle school in the Inwood / Washington Heights neighborhood of New York, NY. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Syracuse University and a master’s degree in mathematics education from the City College of New York. He’s also a committed writer, activist, web designer, and father.<br /> He currently serves as a board member on the Board of Directors for the Center for Teaching Quality and the president emeritus of the Latino Alumni Network of Syracuse University. He writes regularly for Edutopia and TransformED / Future of Teaching, and has contributed to The New York Times, CNN.com, Education Week, Huffington Post, and El Diario / La Prensa NY. He has also been featured at PBS, Mashable, Idealist, Chalkbeat NY, TakePart, Manhattan Times, and the National Journal.</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> how teacher leadership can help you be better in and out of the classroom<br /> how to move from survival mode to thriving as a teacher<br /> how to make a collage of mentors to help you better your teaching<br /> why Renee Moore's ability to speak truth to power has made her a teacher leader<br /> why rote lessons fall flat<br /> what to do when the students are totally lost<br /> why process time for students is crucial<br /> how more planning time can help teachers<br /> how he hears where each student's wisdom lies<br /> why the middle school is such an interesting time in a student's life<br /> ways to have a variety of assessments that highlights student strengths rather than point out their weaknesses<br /> the importance of having students reflect in all classes<br /> how EdCamp and Twitter can be a great means to professional development and gateways to niche communities<br /> the debate between tradition and progressive approaches in math<br /> Books he recommends -- Lisa Delpit's Other People's Children and his This is Not a Test.</p> <p>Connect with Jose at:</p> <p>The Jose Vilson blog</p> <p>@TheJVL on Twitter</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/this-is-not-a-test-with-jose-vilson/">This is Not a Test with Jose Vilson</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 08, 2014
Re-Writing the Rest of Your Career
5:45
<p>3 Things to Consider for the Next 10 Years</p> <p>Subscribe to Talks with Teachers on iTunes</p> <p>Comment on this episode and read a transcript</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/re-writing-the-rest-of-your-career/">Re-Writing the Rest of Your Career</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 03, 2014
Building a Better Teacher with Elizabeth Green
29:05
<p>Background</p> <p>Elizabeth Green is co-founder, CEO, and editor-in-chief of Chalkbeat. Elizabeth previously co-founded GothamSchools, now Chalkbeat New York, and covered education for The New York Sun and U.S. News & World Report. She has also written about education issues for The New York Times Magazine. Elizabeth serves on the board of the Education Writers Association. In 2009-2010, she was a Spencer Fellow in education journalism at Columbia University, and in 2011, she was an Abe Journalism Fellow studying education in Japan. Her book, Building a Better Teacher, will be published in August 2014 by W. W. Norton.</p> <p> </p> <p>About Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach It to Everyone)</p> <p>What happens in the classroom of a great teacher? Opening with a moment-by-moment portrait of an everyday math lesson—a drama of urgent decisions and artful maneuvers—Building a Better Teacher demonstrates the unexpected complexity of teaching.</p> <p>Green focuses on the questions that really matter: How do we prepare teachers and what should they know before they enter the classroom? How does one get young minds to reason, conjecture, prove, and understand? What are the keys to good discipline? Incorporating new research from cognitive psychologists and education specialists as well as intrepid classroom entrepreneurs, Green provides a new way for parents to judge what their children need in the classroom and considers how to scale good ideas. Ultimately, Green discovers that good teaching is a skill. A skill that can be taught.</p> <p>Get the book</p> <p> <br /> In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> the research Elizabeth did for Building a Better Teacher<br /> the common habits of successful teachers<br /> how developing teachers can improve themselves<br /> ways in which schools can develop their teachers on a large scale<br /> how technology can help and hinder teachers<br /> how little good teaching has changed over the years</p> <p>Connect with Elizabeth Green at:</p> <p>@elizwgreen</p> <p>Follow Chalk Beat -- the news site covering educational change<br />  </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/building-a-better-teacher-with-elizabeth-green/">Building a Better Teacher with Elizabeth Green</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Sep 01, 2014
The Compelled Educator — Jennifer Hogan
22:58
<p>Jennifer is  in her 21st year as an educator, and her 9th year as an administrator. She is a public education advocate, exercise junkie, sports enthusiast, and life-long learner. Co-founder/Co-moderator of #ALedchat and #USedchat.</p> <p>In this episode you will learn:</p> <p> why she returned to teaching after stepping away from the classroom<br /> what she has learned from her mentors<br /> a lesson that failed and what she learned from it<br /> the overlooked challenge of being an administrator<br /> a book that every teacher should read<br /> the importance of literacy<br /> why Twitter and Voxer are changing the way teachers develop</p> <p>Connect with Jennifer at:</p> <p>http://thecompellededucator.blogspot.com</p> <p>@JenniferHogan where she hosts #ALedchat and #USedchat</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/twt-35-jennifer-hogan-the-compelled-educator/">The Compelled Educator — Jennifer Hogan</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Aug 25, 2014
A Teacher with Courage — Josh Waldron
29:27
<p>Former high school social studies teacher</p> <p>Waynesborough, VA</p> <p>Waldron worked with teens at Waynesboro High School in Virginia in what he described as "one of the most meaningful jobs anyone can sign up for" but ultimately became disillusioned by a system "so deeply flawed that students suffer and good teachers leave (or become jaded)." He feels that to improve the public education system, five major areas must be addressed, including the need for simpler metrics, future planning measures, fair compensation, community investment and less emphasis on standardized testing.</p> <p>Read Diane Ravitch's bolg post about Josh</p> <p>The Washington Post's article about Josh's letter of resignation</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/twt-34-josh-waldron/">A Teacher with Courage — Josh Waldron</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Aug 18, 2014
The Global Read Aloud’s Pernille Ripp
27:25
<p> Download on iTunes</p> <p>Sign Up For the Talks with Teachers' 30-Day Challenges</p> <p>Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>http://pernillesripp.com<br /> @pernilleripp<br /> Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?    – Pernille did not want to be a teacher at all because her mother was a teacher and several family members were as well. Yet in her early 20s she realized that working with children and the one thing that she ran away from, teaching, is what she really wanted to do. She now teaches 7th grade English in Oregon, Wisconsin.</p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – Her first mentor was a special ed teacher in her old district. The minute Pernille walked into her classroom she knew she wanted to be like her because she taught from the heart and made each student feel like they were the most important thing in her world.</p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – One lesson that stood out was during student teaching. It was a math lesson and the students were totally lost. She kept repeating the instructions over and over, almost forcing it upon kids. She knew it was failing and couldn't fix it at the moment. It taught her that you couldn't just barrel through the content or lesson, especially when its someone else's idea. You have to make it your own.</p> <p>What is the challenge in teaching?  – You are many things to many kids. Some need need discipline, some need a bystander in their life, some need comfort. You cant be the same teacher for every kid.</p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?    – The students -- what they give to you. THey offer up pieces of they heart and their soul for you to safeguard. She also loves the fact that it is never the same.</p> <p>Segment II —</p> <p>What book do you recommend to a teacher that wants to develop? <br />             <br />                              <br /> What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- Find time for yourself.</p> <p>Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally? -- Bounce around and explore your curiosity. Twitter is one place where you can jump in and out of conversations.</p> <p>Provide a writing practice that is effective?  –  She introduced student blogs and allowed them to be reflective. It gave them a voice to the world.</p> <p>Update the cannon. What books belongs in the classroom?<br />                   </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/pernille-ripp/">The Global Read Aloud’s Pernille Ripp</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Aug 11, 2014
ASCD Emerging Leader — Nicole Lemme
33:32
<p>ELA Curriculum Master TeacherASCD 2014 Emerging Leader Download on iTunes</p> <p>Segment I – Background and Inspiration  </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?    – Nicole is a Curriculum Master Teacher for K-12 English Language Arts for the school district of Lee County in Florida. She has taught all levels of ELA which helps in her current role, forming vertical alignment for her district.</p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – Her career as a teacher started as a child. Her father was a state teacher of the year in New Jersey. She enjoyed watching him engage with his students and she wanted to be a part of that magic. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – In her first year, Nicole was asked to do a pre-reading lesson on The Grapes of Wrath. She planned this amazing lesson and had students listen to Woody Guthrie's "This Land is My Land." It was an ESOL course and there were 11 students that represented 11 different countries. Hence, this land was NOT their land.  Yet, it turned into a discussion about the songs of their native lands. </p> <p>What is the challenge in teaching?  – There is a huge challenge giving relevant and timely feedback. Nicole is looking at digital tools to help solve this problem.</p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?    – The absolute love for the profession comes from the proverbial student who asks, "how did you get that from one paragraph?" learn to think for himself or herself and do that level of analysis on their own. </p> <p>Segment II —</p> <p>What book do you recommend to a teacher that wants to develop? <br />             </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- Nicole takes the time to read for pleasure. Certainly we need to read our curriculum, but we must re-engage with pleasure reading because the more teachers do that the more they can stay excited about books and have great conversations with students.</p> <p>Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally? -- <br /> Nicole recommends that new teachers join organizations like NCTE, ASCD. They give you such great exposure to a wide array of professional reading.  Also, she recommends free professional development opportunities like Twitter, Talks with Teachers Book Club, or MOOCs.<br /> Provide a writing practice that is effective?  –  She encourages other teachers to have students frame conversations in class with claim, evidence, connection. It improves the quality of discourse in class, which then results in better writing later on. </p> <p>Update the cannon. What books belongs in the classroom? </p> <p>             </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/nicole-lemme/">ASCD Emerging Leader — Nicole Lemme</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jun 30, 2014
Utah Teacher of the Year — Allison Riddle
34:58
<p>2014 Utah Teacher of the YearFifth-Grade Teacher  Download on iTunes</p> <p>Segment I – Background and Inspiration  </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?    – Allison is a fifth-grade teacher, a mom and an educational consultant. She has had some interesting adventures as a teacher and consultant. She has been in the classroom for 26 years.  <br />    </p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – Her principal, Liz Beck, gave her the confidence she needed to balance home and career. Allison does not believe that, without her, she would not have the confidence to keep herself organized. She also benefitted from amazing high school teachers that inspired her.</p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – Her mishaps usually involve glue and glitter.  One time she admitted to purchasing the wrong flowers for a lab. She asked the students to be flexible and work with her. It ended up being a writing activity later in the day. One thing she will never forget was the look on the students' faces. But her patience with her students making mistakes allowed her students to be patient with her when she did. </p> <p>What is the challenge in teaching on the elementary level?  – Utah is the state with the highest class size and the lowest spending per student. The large numbers in each class correlates to a variety of reading and math levels. Some students are working on an 8th-grade level and some are on a 2nd grade level. </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?    – Allison loves being the first person to teach a child about the early history of the United States. She loves cooperative learning and working in teams. She also loves the fact that the amount of energy that she brings to the classroom is mirrored  by the energy that her students give back to her.</p> <p>Segment II —</p> <p>What book do you recommend to a teacher that wants to develop? <br />                    </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- She takes the question that is in her mind and she puts on her tennis shoes. Running, biking, and walking have all helped her think through the challenges of teaching. Teaching can be very taxing, but there is nothing more important than your health. </p> <p>Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally? -- </p> <p> The Utah Teacher's Network<br /> Boxcars and One-Eyed Jacks<br /> The History Channel</p> <p>Provide a writing practice that is effective?  – One of her biggest mistakes was teaching writing as a subject. Now she teaches it in everything that she does. She also uses smaller opportunities to write to build up to more substantial writing. </p> <p>Update the cannon. What books belongs in the 5th grade classroom? </p> <p>Her goal is to get kids hooked on series. Some great examples are:<br />                  </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/allison-riddle/">Utah Teacher of the Year — Allison Riddle</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jun 16, 2014
New York Times Motherlode Blogger — Jessica Lahey
35:07
<p>English, Latin and Writing Teacher, NHCorrespondent -- The Atlantic, The New York Times</p> <p> Coming of Age in the Middle: http://jessicalahey.com</p> <p>Twitter: @jesslahey<br /> My bi-weekly New York Times column, "The Parent-Teacher Conference"<br /> My author page at The Atlantic<br /> My commentary page at Vermont Public Radio</p> <p>The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed HarperCollins (August 2015)<br />  Download on iTunes</p> <p>Segment I – Background and Inspiration  </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?    – Jessica is finishing her book, The Gift of Failure, which resulted from an article she wrote for The Atlantic.  </p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – Mr. Potts, her high school English teacher, was a really cool guy but was also an amazing teacher. He is now the head of the English department at her high school. She quotes him in the book and has so much respect for him. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – In 2011 she wrote a piece called "Things Fall Apart" about one of those times when she taught something and she felt her students really knew it. But when it came time for the evaluation, it turns out they didn't know it. She realized that she could get frustrated or freak out, but she decided to reverse engineer the entire thing -- the test, the unit. They went back and figured out what went wrong.  It turned into a great experience because she realized what she did wrong and the students realized what they failed to do as well.</p> <p>What is the challenge in teaching three different subjects?  – There is a huge challenge in changing gears with three different preps. Yet, the most challenging aspect in middle school is the huge difference in ability levels -- based not on smarts, but on the neurological connections that happen in the brain. Some kids are able to handle symbolism and metaphor, yet some are still thinking concretely.  </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?    – The moment where a kid that has been looking at you blankly for two years, and then suddenly you will see it click. A student will move from a literal interpretation of just words on a page to realizing that there is so much more underneath those words. </p> <p>Segment II —</p> <p>What book do you recommend to a teacher that wants to develop? <br />             </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- She takes them outside the classroom, especially for writing.   the question that is in her mind and she puts on her tennis shoes. Running, biking, and walking have all helped her think through the challenges of teaching. Teaching can be very taxing, but there is nothing more important than your health. </p> <p>Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally? -- <br /> The New York Times Learning Network, the NPR education podcast, Scott Barry Kaufman's Beautiful Minds at Scientific American, Rebecca McMillan's Creativity Post, Annie Murphy Paul's Brilliant blog, and Ed Yong's "Ed's Up" newsletter. <br /> Provide a writing practice that is effective?  –  All writing is done in class and it is a lot of repetition of the basic skills. Do you have a thesis? Is there evidence to support that thesis? What structure would best support your thesis? She does not do a lot of creative writing in the classroom. </p> <p>Update the cannon. What books belongs in the classroom? <br /> Jessica is a fan of the classics. Middle school teachers are in a weird spot because often the books she wants to put in kids' hands are "mature." That said,
Jun 16, 2014
Teaching the Whole Child with Kristin Ziemke (Apple Distinguished Educator)
29:20
<p> Apple Distinguished Educator, Chicago’s Tech Innovator of the Year  Elementary Teacherwww.kristinziemke.com</p> <p>@KristinZiemke</p> <p>Segment I – Background and Inspiration  </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?    – This is her 14th year in education. She is currently a first-grade teacher and Technology Integrationist. She has fallen in love with urban education as is passionate about helping all students reach their potential. <br />    </p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – Both of her parents are teachers. SHe comes from a teaching family, thus her first courses in education came at the dinner table. She also is thankful for the help that Stephanie Harvey and Smokey Daniels provided over the years.</p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – Many lessons fell flat, but as she evolved as an educator, Kristin saw those experiences as opportunities. Once she was trying to get her first-grade students to use Edmodo, the wi-fi went down at school. She remembers sweating in that moment, trying to give support to as many students as she could. Instead, she transitioned to annotations on sticky notes.  </p> <p>What is the challenge in teaching on the elementary level?  – The biggest challenge is that you are teaching the whole child at that moment. It is not about teaching the subject, it is nurturing their academic, social, emotional needs. It is also setting the tone for all future learning. So much time is spent developing a vision of who students are as readers, writers, and thinker. </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?    – Kristin loves the struggle of meeting the many needs of students. That makes it so rewarding. She also loves developing a community of learners, shifting their mindset, making them realize that there is not just one teacher in the room, there are 34.</p> <p>Segment II —</p> <p>What book do you recommend to a teacher that wants to develop?  <br />                                 </p> <p>      </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- Make connections that really matter. Her best advice to any educator is to build a network -- develop a personal PLN. Conferences are also a great place to meet people.</p> <p>Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally? -- The internet can be like drinking from a fire hose. There are a number of different blogs that she reads like:</p> <p> Chris Lehman's blog<br /> Teaching Like its 2999<br /> She also likes #1stchat on Twitter<br /> As well as the Heinemann digital campus.</p> <p>Provide a writing practice that is effective?  – Give them consistent, sustain opportunities to write. Find the chunks of time to make writing meaningful. </p> <p>Update the cannon. What books belongs in the 1st grade classroom?  </p> <p>                </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/kristin-ziemke/">Teaching the Whole Child with Kristin Ziemke (Apple Distinguished Educator)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jun 09, 2014
#28: ESL on Fire with Dorina Sackman — 2014 Florida Teacher of the Year
35:56
<p>    </p> <p>2014 Florida Teacher of the Year</p> <p> ESOL </p> <p>Orlando, Fl </p> <p>Segment I – Background and Inspiration  </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?    – Dorina is an ESOL teacher as well as the 2014 Florida Teacher of the Year and a finalist for the National Teacher of the Year. She is the daughter of a business teacher and began her career in Massachusetts. <br />    </p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?    – Her mother, a business teacher at a Title I school on Long Island, the head of the Applied Linguistics department at the University of Massachusetts, and her assistant principal at Westridge Middle School, Cynthia Haupt.  </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.   – In trying to infuse every culture her students possessed into a lesson, it ended up being a miss-mosh. The assignment was a persuasive essay and in that moment she realized that sometimes less is more. Her students noticed that she was trying too hard.</p> <p>What is the difficult of teaching ESOL? – The biggest challenge is having students from 17 different countries, 11 different languages in one classroom. It is also the cultural differences and differing backgrounds in one room -- one student did not know how to hold a pen. </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?    – The kids. She gets emotional because she has got 160 of them every year. She loves them so much. </p> <p>Segment II — </p> <p>What book do you recommend to a teacher that wants to develop?  </p> <p>                                              </p> <p> What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- Most of Dorina's classroom exists outside the classroom.  Dorina believes that community service should be an essential part of her students' education. </p> <p>Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p> teachertube<br /> edmodo<br /> Smithsonian Education <br /> Teaching Channel (Dorina's lesson)<br /> Dave's ESL Cafe <br /> Elite Daily</p> <p>Provide a writing practice that is effective?  – Formulaic writing. It provides structure for students that need it. is a process, not a product. ne minute of conferencing is worth 15 minutes of comments on the paper. </p> <p>Update the cannon. What book, written in the last 10-15 years, belongs in the classroom? -- Dorina allows her students to read books from their native countries.  </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/dorinasackman/">#28: ESL on Fire with Dorina Sackman — 2014 Florida Teacher of the Year</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Jun 01, 2014
Genius Hour with Joy Kirr
27:46
<p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>TWT #27 -- Genius Hour</p> <p> </p> <p>Watch this for an introduction to #GeniusHour</p> <p>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMFQUtHsWhc</p> <p> </p> <p>Show Notes<br /> Joy is a 7th grade ELA teacher at Thomas Middle School in Arlington Heightands, Illinois. She has implemented genius hour projects with all of her classes. You can’t find a blog post about genius hour without a comment from Joy. She is a wife, a daughter, a sister, an aunt, a grandma... and a passionate NBCT. Joy is a strong advocate for #Geniushour, geocaching, and edcamps. <br /> In this episode we discuss:</p> <p> How to engage more readers<br /> A working definition for #Geniushour<br /> How to begin incorporating #Geniushour<br /> How to help students develop ideas for #Geniushour<br /> Ways to inform parents about what happens in the classroom<br /> Sample #Geniushour guiding questions for research <br /> What skills students gain during #Geniushour</p> <p> </p> <p>#Geniushour LiveBinder</p> <p>Visit Joy's Blog</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/joy-kirr/">Genius Hour with Joy Kirr</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
May 26, 2014
Inspiring Students to Read with Joshua Parker
34:54
<p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Josh Parker</p> <p>English teacher -- Baltimore, Maryland</p> <p>2012 Maryland Teacher of the Year</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p> </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Joshua initially wanted to be a professional basketball player despite coming from a family of teachers. He worked in sports but did not find it fulfilling. He ended up substitute teaching and then decided to go back to school to obtain his teaching certification. He has been teaching in various capacities in Baltimore since and was named the 2012 Maryland Teacher of the Year.</p> <p> </p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher? </p> <p>– 3 people</p> <p>1. His department chair -- Mandy Shanks</p> <p>2. his principal </p> <p>3. Dr Alfred Tatum who writes a lot of books about teaching African-American males how to read. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– He taught Accelerated English and it was for students that failed the test and needed remediation. It was a class that had a scripted program. He went against his instincts and trusted the book and the script. Along the way he learned to not to trust the script so much as to trust his knowledge of students.  He also learned how to match real-time data with real-time metrics. </p> <p>How do we develop a love of reading?</p> <p> – 6 things:</p> <p>1. relevancy -- don't throw out Shakespeare but add Walter Dean Myers Langston Hughes</p> <p>2. We need to understand the differences in boys and teach that way. Sometimes boys don't have great attention spans so we have to chunk the reading.</p> <p>3. Make the case -- sometimes students don't know how important reading is until they hear the statistics of illiterate or disfunctional readers</p> <p>4. Allow time for expression --the students have to be able to speak what they read, speak their ideas, speak their stories.</p> <p>5. Embrace their out of school reading styles -- some students will read comic books or sports stories. Celebrate that and share it in your classroom.</p> <p>6. Model reading yourself -- Carry books wherever you go.</p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom? </p> <p> – The energy, the synergy, the anything-can-possible-happen. Having the rapt attention of 25 adolescents is one of the best feelings that you can have.</p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p>What book do you recommend to a teacher striving to improve his or her craft?</p> <p>-- Two books: The English Teacher's Companion by Jim Burke and Teaching Reading to Black Adolescent Males by Dr. Alfred Tatum.</p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>-- A teacher has to discover themselves and pouring that energy into that and then bring it into the classroom. Joshua loves to play basketball and enjoys bringing that passion into the classroom. </p> <p>What sites are valuable on the internet?</p> <p>-- Teaching Channel and the English Companion are the tried and true sources for Joshua.</p> <p>Provide a writing practice that is effective?</p> <p> – Shorten and simplify the rubric. </p> <p>Update the cannon. What book, written in the last 10-15 years, belongs in the classroom?</p> <p> -- The Other Wes Moore. Fist, Stick. Knife. Gun. by Geoffery Canada. is another. </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/joshuaparker/">Inspiring Students to Read with Joshua Parker</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
May 19, 2014
#25 The Together Teacher — Maia Heyck-Merlin
25:31
<p>TWT #25<br /> Subscribe to Talks with Teachers in iTunes<br /> www.thetogetherteacher.com -- Free teacher time management materials, please head to the resource page </p> <p>Maia Heyck-Merlin has over a decade of experience juggling high-volume roles in results-oriented organizations. She most recently served as Chief Talent Officer and Chief Operating Officer for Achievement First, a charter school management organization running 20 schools in Brooklyn and Connecticut. During this time, she oversaw teams that led recruitment, human capital, operations, and development and evaluation of school leaders and teachers at Achievement First. She currently continues to work with Achievement First in a part-time capacity.<br /> Prior to joining Achievement First, she worked at Teach For America in a variety of capacities. Maia began as a corps member in South Louisiana where she taught fourth grade for two years and was named Teacher of the Year for her school and selected as a Fulbright Memorial Fund recipient. She then shifted to teach fifth grade at Children’s Charter School and directed Teach Baton Rouge’s first summer training institute for The New Teacher Project. In 2002, Maia returned to Teach For America as the Executive Director in South Louisiana, overseeing programmatic efforts for a corps that had doubled in size. She then served for three years as the Houston Institute Director, leading training and development for the incoming corps. In her last role at Teach For America, Maia founded and led the National Institute Operations team, which managed national operations for all five summer training institutes.<br /> In the podcast Maia offers advice on:</p> <p> How to manage your time and all the stuff that goes along with it.<br /> Ways talented teachers can avoid drowning and burnout <br /> What the Together Teacher does to maximizing your time<br /> Why the old-school inbox and outbox doesn’t work<br /> How to ruthlessly clean as you go<br /> The way in which students can be an asset in a well-organized classroom<br /> 3 Things that Together Teachers do religiously</p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/maia-heyck-merlin/">#25 The Together Teacher — Maia Heyck-Merlin</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
May 12, 2014
#24 #Teachingis Campaign with Julie Hiltz
27:33
<p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Julie Hiltz is a media specialist at Lutz Elementary in Hillsborough County, Florida, and a National Board Certified Teacher with 12 years of experience. She is also a 2013-14 Center for Teaching Quality Teacherpreneur, who is spending half of her workweek this school year engaging colleagues across the state in teacher evaluation and Common Core reforms.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>To win a copy of Teacherpreneurs: Innovative Teachers Who Lead But Don't Leave </p> <p>take two simple steps:</p> <p> </p> <p>1. Share your idea of what #teachingis on Twitter in 140 characters or less</p> <p>2. Record your #teachingis tweet with Talks with Teachers by clicking on the voicemail option on our homepage.</p> <p> </p> <p>In this episode Julie and I discuss:</p> <p> </p> <p> the role of a media specialist<br /> how technology is changing literacy<br /> her connection with the Center for Teaching Quality<br /> the Teacherpreneur fellowship<br /> her #teachingis campaign</p> <p> <br /> "We have to keep our best teachers in the classroom. There needs to be a lattice rather than a ladder." -- Julie Hiltz<br />  </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/julie-hiltz/">#24 #Teachingis Campaign with Julie Hiltz</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
May 04, 2014
#23 The First Year Teacher’s Survival Guide with Julia Thompson
36:34
<p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Julia Thompson</p> <p>English teacher -- Vriginia</p> <p>Author of The First Year Teacher's Survival Guide</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p> </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Julia has taught for 37 years. She teaches 9th grade English at a high school in Fairfax Co., Virginia. Even though she has taught all kinds of subject and all kinds of grade levels, she is a high school English teacher.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher? </p> <p>– She has had so many wonderful mentors over time. She believes we all need them no matter what stage of our career we are in. There was one mentor that changed her career, though, and that was her first principal. He stayed with her through the first few years of her career. He gave her solid advice every day, taking Julia under his wing. Whenever Julia needed him, he seemed to be a guardian mentor to help her. He even got her the job that she has now in northern Virginia. What she cherishes is that he could see past the silliness of her youth. He gave helpful advice, practical advice. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– Julia has had 10,000 lessons that have gone wrong. Now thing that is nice about education is that there are so many opportunities to learn from your mistakes. 10 years into her career she was transferred from a small suburban school to an inner-city school. Her first day she heard more swear words that she had in her entire. She learned you can not force students to do anything.. especially one with parole officers. She learned how important a good lesson plan is. She learned that the most important thing she could do was connect. Connect, connect connect. She also learned to be super organized because she couldn't turn her back on kids. She also learned the very worst students in the room deserved the very best from her. </p> <p>Why are the language arts and literacy important?</p> <p>– English is about life. It is about how to live your life. Even though we teach skills, the most important thing that we we do is teach students about the civilized world. We teach about the big issues -- love, the true price of immortality, justice, how to build a family. </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom? </p> <p> – Julia loves the kids. You would think that after all these years, nothing would surprise her. Yet, every day the students show her something new.</p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p>What book do you recommend to a teacher striving to improve his or her craft?</p> <p>-- New teachers are Julia's speciality. Her book The First-Year Teacher's Survival Guide: Ready-to-Use Strategies, Tools and Activities for Meeting the Challenges of Each School Day<br /> is the culmination of 30 years of work. She saw a need to give new teachers guidance, provide practical tips of how to be better. It has gone through three editions and she has been fortunate to have really good experiences with readers whom the book has resonated. </p> <p>                                                         <br /> What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>-- Julia believes that you can be a part of professional organizations such as NCTE to get quality materials that you can then use in the classroom.</p> <p> </p> <p>Provide a writing practice that is effective?</p> <p> – Julia believes that we you assign something to students, they will immediately move to the final draft. Give them time to brainstorm, organize their ideas, and find some focus and clarity before they write. </p> <p>Update the cannon. What book,
Apr 27, 2014
#22 Connected Education with Tom Whitby
36:44
<p>Subscribe to Talks with Teachers on iTunes</p> <p>Visit Tom's Blog</p> <p> </p> <p>Tom is a a retired Adjunct Professor of Education at St Joseph’s College in New York, having taught for 6 years.  I came to that position after 34 years as a secondary English teacher in the Public School system. I was also a leader in my New York State United Teacher Locals for 30 years. I have founded a number of Educational Groups on Linkedin including Technology Using Professors Group.  I have been recognized with an Edublog Award for the most Influential Educational Twitter Series, Edchat, which I founded. Additionally, I host The Edchat Radio Show for the BAM Networkk and available as free podcasts from K-12 education at the Apple iStore. I have contributed articles to several education journls and I have been a guest Blogger with contributions to The Royal Treatment and Teacher’s Reboot Camp. I Created the Ning site, The Educator’s PLN. http://edupln.ning.com/ </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/tomwhitby/">#22 Connected Education with Tom Whitby</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Apr 14, 2014
#21 The Impact of Teaching with Renee Moore
24:55
<p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Renee Moore</p> <p>English teacher -- Cleveland, Mississippi </p> <p>2001 Mississippi Teacher of the Year </p> <p>Resource of the Week:</p> <p> Brian's Post on Edutopia                           <br /> Rate Talks with Teachers on iTunes<br /> Talks with Teachers 4-Week  </p> <p> </p> <p>Talks with Teachers has developed a new way to help you. Sure we’ve got this podcast that’s great to listen to. Sure there are valuable lessons on our website for all levels that can help your teaching. But the one thing that has been lacking is COMMUNITY. We have a loyal following of listeners, Tweeters, and contributing teachers that have all interacted with us. Yet, we have not allowed you to interact with each other. </p> <p>That’s where the Talks with Teachers 4-Week Challenge comes in. We want you to do something small each day to grow as a teacher. We’ve got readings, videos, fun, little projects lined up to foster your love of teaching. And best of all, there will be a community forum for you to share your success and encourage others to find purpose and joy in teaching.</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p> </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Renee teacher English full time at Mississippi Delta Community College. She initially was a journalist in her hometown of Detroit but when she moved to Mississippi to return to her husband's home state she switched careers and began teaching English. She taught English and journalism for over 26 years before she switched to the community college setting. </p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher? </p> <p>– Mrs. Dorothy Grennell was a veteran English teacher, who taught for 46 years. Renee took over her position when she retired. Mrs. Grennell took her under her wing because her house was across the street from the school. Renee would visit her after school and could cry.  Dorothy gave her the materials that she accumulated over 46 years of teaching. Renee has also been a part of many teaching networks of her career such as the National Writing Project, the Bread Loaf Teaching Network, and the Center for Teaching Quality. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– She taught at a small school and had students that would often loop -- she would have them in 9th grade and later on in 11th or 12th grade. She had a grammar lesson that she had taught to students when they were in her class previously and now that they were being asked to recall that content, it went incredibly bad, so bad that she felt compelled to write about it in her teaching journal. That lesson turned in to an action-research project that lasted 10 years all because she questioned why students struggled with grammar. It became a major paper, a website, one of the most fantastic learning experiences she's ever done and chapters in books that she would eventually write. Sometimes the things that pose the greatest problems become the greatest learning experiences for teachers.   </p> <p>Why are the language arts and literacy important?</p> <p>–Even though the label on our content is English, she considers herself a teacher of communication. To be able to communicate is the most fundamental human skill of all.</p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom? </p> <p> – Renee averaged 100-150 kids a day and if you multiply that by 25 years you see the impact she had on student lives'. Most of all, she loved learning new things. It happened even the day this interview was recorded.  </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p>What book do you recommend to a teacher striving to improve his or her craft?</p> <p>Renee likes The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of ...
Apr 06, 2014
#20 National Teacher of the Year Rebecca Mieliwocki
33:10
<p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Rebecca Mieliwocki</p> <p> ELA teacher, Burbank (CA) </p> <p>2012 National Teacher of the Year </p> <p>Resource of the Week:<br /> Talks with Teachers 4-Week  </p> <p>Talks with Teachers has developed a new way to help you. Sure we’ve got this podcast that’s great to listen to. Sure there are valuable lessons on our website for all levels that can help your teaching. But the one thing that has been lacking is COMMUNITY. We have a loyal following of listeners, Tweeters, and contributing teachers that have all interacted with us. Yet, we have not allowed you to interact with each other. </p> <p>That’s where the Talks with Teachers 4-Week Challenge comes in. We want you to do something small each day to grow as a teacher. We’ve got readings, videos, fun, little projects lined up to foster your love of teaching. And best of all, there will be a community forum for you to share your success and encourage others to find purpose and joy in teaching.</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p> </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Rebecca teaches 7th grade English at Luther Burbank Middle School in Burbank, CA. She has taught middle school for 10 years. She started her teaching career as a high school English teacher, but prior to that she was in publishing, working for a company that made textbooks. She still apologizes to her students for the massive textbooks that they lug around because in the textbook industry, the bigger the book, the bigger the profits. </p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher? </p> <p>– Her growth into greatness has depended on the support group that surrounded her. Mr. Campbell was a teacher that struck fear into the hearts of students and if you taught next to him, you were in fear of making a mistake. He was exacting and proper but a wonderful person. But at the end of the year students were so thankful to be in his class because they learned so much and were pushed. She admired that. When she started middle school she learned a lot from Karen Burkland, a veteran teacher that was a Zen master. She was supportive of students. Nothing would stop her from teaching. Also, she ensured that her students didn't use excuses to prevent them from doing the work.</p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– Just last week she taught appositives. Her students bombed the quiz. Rebecca did what Harry Wong recommends; she went back and re-taught the material. A teacher should only move on when 70-80% of the students master the material. Not a week goes by when something is a dud, though. Rebecca believes that we are much better at 2:30 then we are at 8:30. And that is what is great about teaching; we get the chance to improve each period and each day. </p> <p>Why is literacy important?</p> <p>– It is everything. Students have to understand the norms and restrictions -- the rules of the road -- whether they are writing, tweeting, blogging, podcasting, etc. Each form has its own rules. Students can then see the choices of an author and how that influences meaning. </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom? </p> <p> – Rebecca loves that it is unpredictable, safe, fun, and uncertainty. A student in the other middle school recently passed away of cancer. It has been a week of deep tragedy. She didn't turn to literature, she made her classroom a safe place. </p> <p> </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies<br /> She had mentioned Harry Wong earlier in the interview and his book The First Days Of School: How To Be An Effective Teacher<br /> . It illuminates the difference between rules and procedures, when to re-teach, and mastery teaching.
Mar 30, 2014
#19 Building Better Writers with Troy Hicks
28:28
<p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Troy Hicks</p> <p>Associate Professor of English Education, Former Middle School Teacher</p> <p>(Central Michigan University) </p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p> </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p> </p> <p>– Troy teaches at Central Michigan University. He is also involved in the National Writing Project in his area in Michigan.  To backtrack, he graduated from MSU and taught middle school at a rural school in Concord, Michigan. He eventually went back to MSU to earn his graduate degree and eventually made his way into higher education. </p> <p> </p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher? </p> <p> </p> <p>– He had a mentor from Day 1 at his middle school in Concord. Chris Miller was the 7th grade science teacher and Troy was the 7th grade Language Arts teacher.  Chris was focused on the students. He would joke that he was so student-focused that he didn't begin teaching science until mid-September. When Troy was deciding to stay in the classroom or going to graduate school to pursue Education, Chris gave him the most timely and sympathetic encouragement to pursue goals beyond the four walls of the school.  </p> <p> </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p> </p> <p>– He felt he had read all the right books during his undergraduate experience about reading and writing workshops. When he got into teaching, like many first and second year teachers, suddenly the book became his curriculum. He eventually learned to let go and give students more choice. Ultimately he learned to strike a balance between what he had to do that was mandated by the curriculum and what he felt the students needed or wanted to do.</p> <p> </p> <p>Why is literacy important?</p> <p>– Troy believes that if we don't frame literacy as a thinking process, then it is really difficult to make the case for literacy with math, science and social studies. We want students to be critical thinker and have substantive conversations. </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> </p> <p> – The thing that he talks about with his pre-service students and what he took away from his middle school years is the moment of discovery. To sit with a student, conference with him or her, and see the lightbulb go off, is a small moment that he really values.</p> <p> </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies<br /> While there are a number of classics,<br /> Troy tends to recommend the book that he is reading at the moment.Thrive: 5 Ways to (Re)Invigorate Your Teaching is a book that he reviewed. It is written by Meenoo Rami, a young, energetic teacher that is doing great things in the classroom. He found it refreshing, clear and concise. </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>-- Troy believes that you have to take time for yourself. Put it on your calendar because you might not do it. make time to read. Watch the show you've been meaning to watch. Go for walks. You have to invest in yourself .</p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>– www.digitalis.nwp.org has layer upon layer of resources. The NWP Digital Is website is an emerging and open knowledge base created and curated by its community of members. We gather resources, collections, reflections, inquiries, and stories about what it means to learn and teach writing in our increasingly digital and interconnected world. </p> <p> </p> <p>Provide a writing practice that is effective?</p> <p> – One minute of conferencing is worth 15 minutes of comments on the paper.
Mar 24, 2014
#18 The Un-Classroom with Curtis Chandler
22:26
<p>Curtis Chandler</p> <p>ELA teacher, 2011 Kansas Teacher of the Year</p> <p>(Wamgeo Middle School -- Wamego, KS) </p> <p>Resource of the Week:<br /> Twitter Chats </p> <p>#aplitchat</p> <p>#elachat </p> <p>#apbiochat</p> <p>#engchat</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Curtis has taught for 17 years, just outside of Topeka, Kansas. He is at Wamego Middle School but he is someone that moved a lot as a child because his father was in the military. Curtis was not a stellar student but he had a few teachers that encouraged him, put books in his hands, and allowed him to learn through creative activities. </p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher? </p> <p>– He has been helped by a lot of talented professionals, like the Center for Teaching Quality. Yet, his first set of models were his parents. His mom was a teacher and his dad was military. He spent a lot of time overseas and his parents dragged him to every museum, attraction, cultural center to learn. His wife, a special education teacher, reminds him that some students may have exceptions but all students are exceptional. Finally, parenting has taught him a lot about teaching and teaching has taught him a lot about parenting. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– His first year of teaching was a real struggle. He was working with struggling reader at a school near a military base. He assumed that a year with any kid would be long enough to fix their issues. He learned that education is a progressive act. It does not occur is a single year. He learned to desire constant improvement from himself and from his students. </p> <p>Why is literacy important?</p> <p>– Literacy is constantly involving and changing. Many of his students are doing all sorts of discourse on their own, many times collaborative. Our focus needs to evolve. We can't think about preparing students for THE future, but THEIR future, which is increasingly technological, collaborative and highly literate. </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – When students take control of their own learning. </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher? </p> <p>-- He tends to recommend the book that he is reading at the moment. The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students through Digital Learning. With the emergence of all this ground-breaking stuff -- like social media -- we need to harness the power of human creativity. This is a book that can help you  consider how reform that focuses on “skill-and-drill” standardized tests and college education as status or mere vocational training. In the book, Gee laments that we have lost the true meaning of education in the service of personal enlightenment and broader social good.</p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>-- He gave a series of lectures and workshops about the un-classroom. Learning takes place as much outside the classroom as much as it does inside. Educators need to stay in touch with the learning process. One way to do this is to continuously force yourself to learn to do something new. It is hard to do this. We get reminded of the frustration of trying something difficult because that is what our students may be going through.  </p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>– Curtis tries to read as much as possible in his own discipline. Also, Twitter allows him to participate in conversations about education. It forces him to think more and say less.
Mar 16, 2014
#17 AP Biology with David Knuffke
27:55
<p>David Knuffke</p> <p>Biology teacher, AP Biology Community moderator</p> <p>www.knuffke.com</p> <p>(Deer Park High School -- Deer Park, NY) </p> <p>Resource of the Week:<br /> Poems By Heart from Penguin Classics - Penguin Group USA</p> <p>Each new poem you learn becomes an important part of you who are, and the Huffington Post describes Poems By Heart as “the best poetry app I’ve seen in a while.”</p> <p>Poems By Heart uses brain-training techniques to make remembering poetry easy and fun – in a fast and responsive game. The National Endowment for the Arts calls the app “smart and beautifully designed, with a skillful blend of iconic poetry, memorization techniques, and great gaming.”</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– David teaches Biology at Deer Park High School on Long Island. It was his first and only teaching job. He was hired in 2004. He works at a great district primarily because it doesn't put a lot of obstacles in front him to prevent him from teaching. </p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher? </p> <p>– His father taught biology for his entire career. He became a good sounding board when David had questions or concerns, especially early on in his career. It has been nice to have that basis to grow and develop from the beginning.</p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– He's had all sorts of lessons that he thought would be great that just fell short. Early in his career he had info-dense lessons. He thought science was going to drive kids through it. He also realized that his style wouldn't reach certain kids. It helped him realize that it was equally him as well as the students that create the learning equation.  </p> <p>Why is literacy, and particularly, literacy in sciences important?</p> <p>– Science is all about information literacy. It is about assimilating information from all different sources. If a student can't parse through information in a literate capacity, students will face difficulties. Students need to use science to make meaning of the world.   </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – David loves everything about being in the classroom,. It is the greatest job that he could possibly have. He appreciates the freedoms that he has in his district. He has the ability to make his job what he wants to make it. He's moved to standards-based grading and other things that have been supported and encouraged.  </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher? </p> <p>-- The major book that David can point to is Teaching As a Subversive Activity. While it is beneficial to science teachers, David also recommends it to anyone that is interested in an inquiry-based approach to teaching should look at this book.  </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>-- Particularly in science, it is important to stay interested in the discipline. David has been removed from his proper education in biology for over a decade and it has moved so rapidly since then. He also believes is staying curious as a learner. Teachers should be willing to look for new things and try new things in their professional life. One more thing is to do the work. David tries to write everyday. And even though he is critical of his own blogging, he believes it is important to do it and et it out there. </p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>– Dave subscribes to his content list serve run by a state school.
Mar 10, 2014
#16 Why the Classics Matter with Steve Perkins (2014 Indiana Teacher of the Year)
23:33
<p> Steve Perkins Latin/Classics teacher, 2014 Indiana Teacher of the Year (North Central High School -- Indianapolis, IN)  Resource of the Week: With Rigor for All, Second Edition: Meeting Common Core Standards for Reading Literature<br /> Again and again the Common Core Standards state that students must read “proficiently and independently” but how do we achieve this when students are groaning about having to read demanding literature and looking for ways to pass the class without turning pages?      Carol Jago shows middle and high school teachers how to create English classrooms where students care about living literate lives and develop into proficient independent readers. With 50% new material, With Rigor for All, Second Edition features:</p> <p> integration of the Common Core State Standards as teaching touchstones<br /> YA lit pairings with classic texts to aid comprehension for middle and high school students<br /> tips to motivate reluctant readers with immersion, encouragement, and small steps<br /> a study guide and guidelines for curriculum development.</p> <p>(email me your favorite resource talkswithteachers@gmail.com)    </p> <p>Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught?  – Steve teaches Latin at North Central High School in Indianapolis. He's been there since 1998.  He began his teaching career in Kansas City after getting his undergraduate degree from Indiana University. He went down to Texas for graduate school at the University of Texas in Classics studies but then moved back to Indiana in 1998 with his wife.  </p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?  – He has had many but he can point to four. Two were his Latin teachers when he was in high school. Tim Long, a Greek professor, at Indiana University was a mentor when Steve was an undergrad. Finally, his wife Melissa is the real teacher in the family. She has helped him see so many things about teaching.</p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience. – He thought his idea of having students blog was going to be fantastic but writing on the web in another language proved difficult. Teachers need to know when something is not working and when to ditch it. Steve had success with blogs in another course, Theory of Knowledge, which is a part of the school's IB program, but it just didn't suit his Latin class. </p> <p>Why is literacy, and particularly, literacy in Latin important? – The study of Latin helps develop literacy. Students learn to develop good decoding skills. Study another language also foster the ability to see another culture and allows students to bring their culture to another language.</p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?  – The creativity and curiosity in the classroom. He describes teaching as that shared journey to discovery. The subtitle of his website is "antiquity never gets old" and he hopes that learning never gets old with him and his students.  </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies  </p> <p>  What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?   -- Steve loves the classics so he reaches back to the 16th century with Montaigne and his essay "On the Education of Children." In it, he states that "the mark of a strong and lofty soul knows how to come down to a child's gait and guide it." Another work that has proved helpful has been by George Steiner, his book Lessons of the Masters (Charles Eliot Norton Lectures; 2001-2002).   </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom? -- Keep the fascination with one's own discipline. He loves classics and not only has that not waned over the years, it has increased.
Mar 02, 2014
#15 Thrive with Meenoo Rami, creator of #engchat
34:54
<p>Meenoo Rami</p> <p>English teacher, author of Thrive</p> <p>(Science Leadership -- Philadelphia, PA) </p> <p>www.meenoorami.org </p> <p>Resource of the Week: www.commonlit.org <br /> It was founded in December by a group of about 15 former middle school reading teachers who are current graduate students at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. It thinks scripted curricula disempowers teachers, so Common Lit provides four valuable functions:<br /> 1) It collects the best supplemental texts for middle school curricula, 2) It negotiates the copyright permissions to disseminate these texts, and 3) It formats, levels, and organizes these texts by theme, and 4) It puts them online so that teachers can download and print them immediately--no paywalls or subscriptions or "district codes."<br /> (email me your favorite resource talkswithteachers@gmail.com)</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p> </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Meenoo started teaching in 2006 in Philadelphia, where she teaches to this day. She was blown away by the conditions and behaviors, when she first stepped into classrooms. She was a philosophy and English major at Temple and went back to get her Master's because she did not want to give up on urban education.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher? </p> <p>– She believes that we have different mentors at different points in life and in our careers. She had great high school English teachers and she credits her boss, Chris Lehman, for empowering her to take risks in the classroom. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– Just moments before the interview, in her class, Storytelling, students are focusing on storytelling and good game design. Her students have to design a game and see if a narrative emerges from that. Some games are going amazingly well and some are just not working. She believes that when you do truly creative work you have to task risks and fail in order to succeed.</p> <p>What do you love about the Language Arts?</p> <p>– The more she teaches and experiences the world the less focused on content she becomes. She is more focused on the way her students think, how they collaborate, the methods of their inquiry. She loves the way in which she get to empower her students to tell their stories. See the example of her students' teen magazine HERE.</p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – A big transition that she made was that when she first started teaching it was about "I" and "them." Now, she thinks of her classroom as "we." What are we going after, what questions do we have? What challenges are we tackling?</p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher? <br /> -- Thrive: 5 Ways to (Re)Invigorate Your Teaching attempts to re-write the current narrative about what it means to be a teacher in 2014. It offers practical strategies for teachers to direct their own learning, to find their way to improve their practice in the classroom. It shows you how to find mentors, how to plug into networks, and how to keep your work intellectually challenging. </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>-- Meenoo talks about this in the book. Teachers need to take breaks from the grading, planning, etc. We need to read the books, attend the concerts, see the films and participate in the dinner parties so that we can nourish our own interests and passions. Having a diverse set of experiences makes us more complete as teachers. </p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teacher...
Feb 24, 2014
#14 Teach Like a Pirate with Dave Burgess
28:01
<p>Dave Burgess</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>US History, author, workshop/seminar presenter</p> <p>(West Hills High School -- San Diego, CA) </p> <p> <br />        </p> <p>Resource of the Week: www.newsela.com (Bethany Whinnem, Fairhaven High School)<br /> NewsELA provides high interest nonfiction articles about current events that are updated daily. There are several benefits of the website:<br /> 1. The same article can be adjusted to various reading levels.<br /> 2. At least one article each day has a four question quiz attached, which is tied to specific reading standards indicated by the anchor in the corner. (The questions are also worded differently depending on the reading level selected.<br /> 3. When students log in and create an account with the teacher code, it corrects and keeps track of the questions for each student. So, teachers can track problem areas for the class.<br /> 4. They usually send out a monthly progress email to the teachers.<br /> (email me your favorite resource talkswithteachers@gmail.com)</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p> </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Dave has taught US History at West Hills High School in San Diego, CA for 17 years. He came to the school first as a basketball coach and a teaching job soon ensued. He is currently on a one-year leave to promote his book, Teach Like a PIRATE: Increase Student Engagement, Boost Your Creativity, and Transform Your Life as an Educator.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p> </p> <p>– Dave worked for three summers at the John Wooden basketball camp. To learn from such an extraordinary coach and man of character has benefitted him. Wooden's idea of success, the piece of mind arising from doing your best, has influences Dave's teaching. He tries to embed LCLs (life-changing lessons) into everything that he does in the classroom.  </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– Dave created a whole lesson around the War of the Worlds. He had the classroom in complete darkness and wanted students to listen to the radio broadcast. There were behavior problems and the students were disengaged. He was very discouraged. Through reflection he realized that the broadcast is flat-out boring. Good teaching is like a heat-seeking missile.  Any time it is off course is has the intuition to return to its proper direction. Through reflection we can get ourselves back on course.  </p> <p>What role does literacy play in a U.S. History class?</p> <p>– Dave believes there should be an emphasis on primary sources. Also, writing forces students to get clear about their thinking. Both enables students to become more critical as thinkers.</p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – Dave loves the day-to-day interactions and relationships with students. It is something that is missing right now while he is on this year-long book/workshop tour. </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher? <br /> -- Teach Like a PIRATE: Increase Student Engagement, Boost Your Creativity, and Transform Your Life as an Educator<br /> is about embracing the spirit of a pirate -- to be a maverick and sail into unchartered waters without guarantee of success. They also embrace diversity. Their crews reflect a broad range of abilities and backgrounds. There is also the whole idea of trying to hook students and draw them into content. One of the key lessons of the book is encouraging teachers to find what is unique about themselves and draw on those talents and energies and bring them into the classroom.</p> <p> </p>
Feb 18, 2014
#13 40 Years in the Classroom with Laura Robb
30:32
<p>Laura Robb </p> <p>Author, teacher, coach, and 43-year veteran of teaching</p> <p> (Virgina) <br />        </p> <p>  </p> <p>Resource of the Week: New York Times most emailed articles  </p> <p>(email me your favorite resource talkswithteachers@gmail.com)</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Laura taught for 43 years, yet she still teaches about three months a year and does consulting and workshops because she loves being in the classroom. She loves seeing kids as they begin school (kindergarden or 1st grade) and loves seeing them at the end, before they embark to high school (8th grade). She had worked in advertising in New York City after graduating Queens College with a Bachelor's in English and French. When her husband took a music job in Virginia, she moved with him and she obtained a teaching job in a rural school in Virginia. Laura was the only faculty member not related to the principal.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– Laura has all of Donald Graves' books. In her opinion, Donald trusts the children. It defies the concept of the sage on the stage. Graves shows the true collaboration of teaching that exists between teacher and student. She recommends to read his work. He has such respect for teachers and children and in today's climate we have lost a lot of that.  In Testing Is Not Teaching: What Should Count in Education, he argues that learning is not about a test but about creativity and encouragement. </p> <p> </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– Laura had a string of lessons that didn't go as planned. It happened when she transitioned from being a 5th grade teacher to a middle school teacher. She lost a lot of reading time in the transition. She had to manage ways to get students to read during class and resulted in a  book, Differentiated Reading Instruction. </p> <p>What do you love about the Language Arts?</p> <p>– Literacy is about communication and it is about learning and Laura can't imagine life without either one. These are essential qualities to get a good job, be a productive citizen. The Language Arts holds our stories and we are a species that is all about stories.  We think in terms of story, we a re programmed in terms of stories. It is what helps us learns about others.</p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – She loves the energy in the room, especially when kids are doing different things and they come together to share what they've been working on. </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher? --<br /> Ralph Fletcher's book on writing workshop, Writing Workshop: The Essential Guide is outstanding.<br />  The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child by Donalyn Miller is a great book about choice in reading. You should read that before reading her new book, Reading in the Wild: The Book Whisperer's Keys to Cultivating Lifelong Reading Habits. Laura believes it is all about choice. </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>–She read children's literature, discovering authors that she loved. It allowed her to brings books into the classroom. She also saw the importance of taking care of herself. She has always enjoyed hiking and being active. Laura emphasizes nurturing your own soul.</p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>– Laura uses the web more for students than for herself. She had her students create blogs and develop podcasts. She reads Edutopia, Middle Web,
Feb 09, 2014
#12 Using Twitter to Your Advantage — Starr Sackstein
35:16
<p>Starr Sackstein </p> <p>English and Journalism teacher (World Journalism Preparatory School --  Queens, NY) </p> <p> </p> <p>January Contest: Win a Copy of Carol Jago's With Rigor for All by emailing me a lesson that worked (email)</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Starr started at Far Rockaway High School. She obtained certification by teaching in a high-needs district. After the initial feeling-out-process passed, she fell in love with teaching and her students. From there she proceeded to Locust Valley High School, an affluent suburban Long Island district. She thought that was going to be it for her, she would stay there for the rest of her career. But the politics of the district got the better of her. Now she is at World Journalism Preparatory School and has been there since its second year, which has allowed her to grow with the school.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– Starr's high school English teacher opened her room to her as she was doing her observations. Lori Mayo, the teacher-center representative at Far Rockaway, got Starr involved in NCTE and the Writing Project, which helped her how as a teacher.  She is involved with JEA, Journalism Education Association, not just as a member but also as the state director. Her own personal learning network on Twitter has also been immensely valuable. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– Starr tried to do a dinner party after her students finished reading Pride and Prejudice. Everybody was excited about it. Yet, within 15 minutes it was evident that it was not working. Students forgot props and conversations died shortly thereafter. She called everyone to order and order them back to the text as their character. They re-did the lesson on Monday. She came in more prepared as did the students and it turned out much better. </p> <p>What do you love about the Language Arts?</p> <p>– There are no right answers! Starr doesn't like to talk grades with her students. Learning is about being proved and thinking about how we feel and how we connected with the literature. The Humanities piece of education offers students the opportunities to explore themselves in a lot of ways. </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – There is nothing more amazing than stepping into a classroom and feeling obsolete because you have empowered young minds to trust themselves and their voices. Starr enjoys bringing that sense of awe back into their lives… The better she does her job, the less that her students need her.</p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p>-- Dave Burgess' Teach Like a PIRATE: Increase Student Engagement, Boost Your Creativity, and Transform Your Life as an Educator. She really connected with the idea of going outside the box.   </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>–Starr is a writer. Her blogging and writing helps her as a teacher. It gives her a practical connection to the struggles of a writer. She has shown her students her writing from college and how much she has crossed out, changed, and edited.</p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>–Starr believes that Twitter is all about who you follow and the lists that you create for yourself. #COLchat (Community of Learning) is a way to reach a community beyond your school. Teach 100 has excellent teacher blogs. It is a good idea to read what other teachers are doing and be reflective in your practice.
Feb 03, 2014
#11 The Maker Movement with Jeff Charbonneau (2014 National Teacher of the Year)
29:36
<p>Jeff Charbonneau </p> <p>2013 National Teacher of the Year</p> <p>STEM Teacher (Zillah High School --  Zillah, WA) </p> <p> </p> <p>January Contest: Win a Copy of Carol Jago's With Rigor for All by emailing me a lesson that worked (email)</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Jeff was the 2013 National Teacher of the Year. He is out of the classroom right now but he will return next year. He teaches at the same high school that he attended, Zillah High School. </p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– Jeff asks for help about every 30 minutes. Yet, he had two outstanding cooperating teachers during his student teacher experience. They had completely different styles, one was traditional the other was affectionate and loving. Both were outstanding educators and what he learned was that you need to be true to yourself. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– It seems like that sums up every day of teaching in his career. One experience  that stands out was when he had a fish tank while teaching biology. They had trouble stabilizing the tank. And after being absent one day, he returned to see that the fish were dead. The tank had been smelling and in his absence one student thought it was wise to pour perfume into the fish tank. The worse thing he could have done was to yell at the student. No learning would come of that. Instead, he tries to stop and think about what is going on in their brains first before he reacts.</p> <p>What role does literacy play in the science classroom?</p> <p>– It plays a huge part. One colleague taught a Sci-Fi Literature class. Jeff has jealous at first but then realized that he could create similar experiences too, he just needed to find ways to make science come alive. For example, when teaching atomic theory he can have students read Neils Bohr. His students read a play entitled Copenhagen, about the 1941 meeting of physicists Neils Bohr and Werner Heisenberg.</p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – Jeff loves being there at the moment of discovery. Students will work with difficult material and all of a sudden students will scream "I GET IT!!! I GET IT!!!" He thoroughly enjoys those moments that open their eyes. </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p>-- ParkerPalmer's The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life, 10th Anniversary Edition was a book that inspired him as an undergrad. A more recent book is Dave Burgess' Teach Like a PIRATE: Increase Student Engagement, Boost Your Creativity, and Transform Your Life as an Educator. He also recommends 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, which he used in a leadership class with students.   </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>–2 ways: 1. Place yourself where the students are. Get them to see you not just as a teacher. Let them see you working for their benefit of them. Go to the sporting events, be at the dances, stay after school. 2. Be a life-long learner. Be involved in your craft and show your students that you are watching the Discovery Channel or staying current in the latest science news.</p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>–Jeff has looked into Twitter in the past year to further his professional development. He participates in education chats like #ntchat (new teacher chat). What he likes about Twitter is that it connects you with people. Make Magazine is another place that he goes to for ...
Jan 26, 2014
#10 Modeling and Scaffolding with Larry Ferlazzo
33:28
<p>Larry Ferlazzo </p> <p>English and Social Studies Teacher (Luther Burbank HS -- Sacramento, CA), </p> <p> </p> <p>January Contest: Win a Copy of Carol Jago's With Rigor for All by emailing me a lesson that worked (email)</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Larry teaches at Luther Burbank High School in Sacramento, California… Sacramento's largest inner-city high school. He has taught there for 10 years. Prior to that he spent 19 years of his life as a community organizer.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– Larry finds inspiration from experienced teachers, especially Kate Hull a colleague and author. Her patience and understanding have been an inspiration to him.</p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– He has had his fair share of lessons that have fallen flat… and even gone worse. One clear reason has been a lack of preparation and a failure to model appropriately.  </p> <p>Why teach English and the Language Arts?</p> <p>– He has found success is agitating his students to think about how and why they should learn the elements of English or Social Studies. </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – Larry loves that every day is different and the challenges and potential gifts are also different. He believes that if you are relational as a teacher, the next day is always a fresh start. Students will forget the bad lesson but they will not forget if you treat then badly or disrespectfully. </p> <p> </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p>-- A critical book for teachers to read is Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us<br /> by Daniel Pink. So many teachers focus on extrinsic motivation to the detriment to them and their students. That motivation will be effective on tasks that require no higher-order thinking skills. Instead, we have to help students get in touch with their intrinsic drive because extrinsic factors just won't cut it. </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?<br />  –2 ways: 1. Being connected to other educators through social media. PLN is a personal learning network, and there are so many educators around the world willing to offer their experience and expertise. 2. Making home visits to family. It is something that his district does to connect with parents, families, and kids to develop the relationships than are necessary to success.   </p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>–Be less site focused and more person focused. Find people that are reputable and worth following. Yet, if you want to follow sites, Edutopia and Education Week are two websites that he recommends.  </p> <p>What can a teacher can do to make students better writers?</p> <p> – Larry believes that modeling is critical. The other thing is to scaffold with graphic organizers. Finally, take the time to listen to student experiences and students stories.</p> <p>Update the cannon. What new work should be included in the school curriculum?<br /> -- For a book, his students have always had a great response to Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. by Luis Rodriguez.</p> <p>For Social Studies, two things: 1. Students have to identify an alternate history to an important event. 2. Students first identify what qualities of a neighborhood are important to them. Then they take a tour of the wealthy neighborhood in Sacremento and then the one around the school and realize that the qualities that they listed are right...
Jan 19, 2014
#9 Debating in the Classroom with Tim Averill
38:00
<p>Tim Averill</p> <p>HS English Teacher (Waring School, MA), AP Community Moderator, St. Johnsbury Summer Academy Facilitator</p> <p> </p> <p>January Contest: Win a Copy of Carol Jago's With Rigor for All by emailing me a lesson that worked (email)</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Tim has taught for 44 years at Manchester Essex RHS and, most recently, The Waring School. He grew up in Topeka, KS went to Kansas University, where he obtained a French and English degree, and then Harvard for graduate school. He worked at Manchester from 1971-2005, where he also coached Debate.  The Waring School is a bi-lingual school where all students learn French and travel to France.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– He believes that example is a great teacher because he had great professors at Kansas University who inspired him. While in Springfield, Harvard had assigned him a master teacher to work with him and that was of great benefit. At Manchester, a couple of colleagues took him under their wing and helped him develop as a teacher. A supportive spouse is also helpful to be there for you when you have good days and bad days. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– Tim has had plenty of examples where he thought something would go well and it didn't. While in Springfield, some kids from another school came over unannounced to visit. Tim relied on his students to tell them that they were not welcome and his students did not side with him. It was an unsetting for him, yet his colleagues reminded him that his students are not going to side with a rookie teacher when there are friends are around. He reminded us that when a lesson goes wrong, we often have the tendency to believe that the failure is a reflection on us,  when it can be a reflection of the material. </p> <p>Why teach English and the Language Arts?</p> <p>– It is a way for students to know themselves. The purpose of education is for students to get to know themselves, yet Tim believes we are far too career-oriented in education right now.  Too frequently we are teaching them that their value in society is based on what they can produce and consume.</p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – Taking students to debate and seeing their joy of discovery when they feel empowered. His job as a teacher is to be less and less important as the year goes on because they've gained the confidence to think independently. </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p>-- This may date him as a teacher but Death at Early Age by Jonathan Kozol and Teaching as a Subversive Activity by Neil Postman. </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?<br />  – Participate as much as possible in the culture of the kids. Be at the basketball games, chaperone the dances, volunteer for after-school activities.   </p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>– The AP Community. It has 8,775 members. Every teacher can join the community.</p> <p>What can a teacher can do to make students better writers?</p> <p> – Have students publish their work. Publishing can be as simple as having them read it aloud or enter it into a contest but it makes an assignment exist beyond the teacher and beyond a grade. </p> <p>Update the cannon. What new work should be included in the school curriculum?</p> <p>--  A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving is a novel that he was overjoyed to see on recent AP exams.
Jan 12, 2014
#8 The Teaching Channel’s Sarah Brown Wessling
34:12
<p>Sarah Brown Wessling</p> <p>HS English Teacher, 2010 National Teacher of the Year, Host -- Teaching Channel (Johnston, Iowa)</p> <p> </p> <p>January Contest: Win a Copy of Carol Jago's With Rigor for All by emailing me a lesson that worked (email)</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Sarah comes from a family of teachers and initially wanted to be a teacher and principal. Yet, she started university as a broadcast journalism major, then switched around from philosophy to psychology until she had an epiphany and realized that she could do all of those things if she were in the classroom. She turned right around and head to the education department.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– Sarah has had supportive professors and other teachers that have given her guidance, but it is an accumulation of a lot of factors. She conveyed the importance of experiences, whether it be going through National Board Certification or scoring AP exams that facilitated her growth. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– She has had so many but the best-documented example was a lesson for the Teaching Channel, How a Lesson PLan Can Fail. In it you see her thinking out loud, talking through how she was going to correct a lesson that was not going well. Sarah spoke that we will all have similar experiences, and rather than blame external factors that are beyond ourselves, we have to be accountable for what we can be accountable for... and ultimately that is ourselves.</p> <p>Why teach English and the Language Arts?</p> <p>– Language is absolutely crucial. It is the way we communicate as humans. Without an understanding of stories, we become more isolated. ELA goes beyond literature it is reading, and writing, and speaking. In a more universal way we need to realize that the Humanities are not dead. Stories are at the heart of the strong arguments currently being written by Malcolm Gladwell and Atul Gawande in the New Yorker. </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – There are so many things that she loves, such as the unpredictability. Yet most of all, she loves watching them become autonomous. It is always a sign of their growth and independence. The other part that she loves is the questions that students bring to the classroom.    </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p>-- Lots of books, yet books speak to different people at different times. She often turns to Parker Palmer's The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life. It has been an important compass because it encourages thinking about who we are as teachers and what the work requires. </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?<br />  – Being a parent. It changed her as a teacher. While it didn't change her instructional strategies, it shifted her understanding of the dynamic of home and school and it also shifted what it was like to want the world for someone. She better understood how to pay attention to kids,individually, because that is what she wants for her child.  </p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>– Certainly the Teaching Channel. She sees so much value in its videos because we can learn from high-quality instruction. Edutopia, Read Write Think, National Board, NCTE are others. The resources have become an extension, or house, her professional community.  It is about the community, mores than the resources,
Jan 05, 2014
# 7 Falling in Love with Close Reading’s Chris Lehman
40:28
<p>Chris Lehman<br /> Educational Consultant, Author, Blogger -- Bronx, NY</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Chris has been in education for 12 years. He started as a middle school teacher in the Bronx, then moved to a high school in Brooklyn. He has also been a literacy coach, and he's worked with the Reading and Writing project with Columbia University, where he served as a senior staff developer. Now, he's working on the K-12 level effecting literacy and he has moved into the digital world with his blog.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– His family -- his parents and grand parents, who inspired his love of learning. A pivotal person was and made him believe in himself was his 7th grade English teacher, Mrs. Ekstrand, who took him from shy Chris and made him believe in himself. Caroline Wagner, at NYU, also believed in him and noticed that the way he listened to kids is special.</p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– In his second year there was one student who was the quintessential classroom management problem. One day this student threw someone's backpack out the window. No one knew what to do with this young man that was so disconnected from the school experience. His parents started to lose faith with the school because no one was getting through to him. Looking back, Chris learned that this student's parents didn't feel valued or believe that their voice was heard. The school really didn't listen to her concerns and collaborate with her about what to do with her son. Chris realizes now that he and the school should have asked more questions and listened more to her answers. </p> <p>Why teach English and the Language Arts?</p> <p>– It primarily gives each student, when it is really working, the power to use his or her own voice. Chris comes from a place of social justice. He wants every child to feel empowered. He believes that when we learn to write well, we are allowing our students to impact other people. Reading allows us to escape, to learn new things, but it also allows us to learn to pay attention to characters and consequently pay attention to ourselves.</p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> – Everything! Chris loves children's minds as well as educators' minds. </p> <p> </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p>-- His short list includes The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child by Donalyn Miller for reading. For writing, any of Carl Anderson's books, Assessing Writers.</p> <p> The longer list would include  Penny Kittle's Book Love: Developing Depth, Stamina, and Passion in Adolescent Readers and Smart Charts K-2: Optimizing an Instructional Staple to Create Independent Readers and Writers</p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?<br />  – Go to other classrooms and other schools!!! It broadens your horizons and helps your to collaborate a lot more. You learn so much walking in someone else's hallways and sitting with students in someone else's classroom. </p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>–  Chris believes that you have to be on Twitter. The educator community is so huge and vast. You can join in the various education chats there. Nearly every day there is some sort of educational chats. One of his favorite resources is the Nerdy Book Club, which is a group of educators and young-adult book authors.   </p> <p>What can a teacher can do to make students better writers?
Dec 29, 2013
#6 The Souls of Students with Dan Sharkovitz
31:23
<p>Dan Sharkovitz</p> <p>English Teacher/Department Chair -- Martha's Vineyard Regional High School</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Dan has been teaching at the Martha's Vineyard Regional High School since 1979. He began is teaching career at the Beacon Hill School in Boston before he officially became a teacher.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– John Morelli was his first department chair at MVRHS and gave him his opportunity. He was always willing to listen and made Dan feel that his ideas were worth listening to and valued. The second was Ken McCrory, who gave feedback on a paper Dan wrote in grad school. Ken wrote three pages (single spaced) of notes in response to the paper. It wasn't about fulfilling a rubric. It was the most thoughtful response that Dan had ever received. It showed how much he cared about his students.</p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– A bathroom issue arose early in his career. A lubber (automotive student) pointed out that Dan gave privileges to certain students. It lead to a fascinating discussion on tracking and the students' experience with it. He mentioned this development in a workshop he was attending with his principal at Brown University and it led to two of his students presenting their experiences with tracking at Brown to an audience of 70-80 teachers, administrators, and school leaders, including Ted Siezer.</p> <p>Why teach English and the language arts?</p> <p>– Dan believes that what we were doing 40-50,000 years ago is still true today. We are writing on the digital cave walls of the internet and other media to communicate... Students  are still captivated by poems. The souls of students, when they connect to any form of literature, are defending the subject matter for us because literature is what sustains us.</p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> –   Dan loves that on every Monday 20-25 students file into a small room where the school newspaper is assembled and stay for hours to get the school newspaper done.  It serves as a metaphor for successful classrooms. Students are there, not because it is a requirement, but because they love the experience.</p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p>-- Find where the sparks of one's passion lies and then blow on those sparks. Uncommon Sense: Theoretical Practice in Language Education (Heinemann/Cassell Language & Literacy) by John Mayher is a book Dan recommends because he take truisms in education and tries to explain why we need to rethink what we assume to be common sense.</p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p> – Find ways to allow students to apply what they are learning inside the classroom to things going on outside the classroom. Dan had set up a Slam Poetry night at a local coffee shop. The shop help 60 people and 300 showed up on the first night. It ran successfully for years and was a great community event. </p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>–  Dan's site and Jim Burke's English Companion Ning.</p> <p>What can a teacher can do to make students better writers?</p> <p> – We need to create situations in which students want to write. That is an indirect way to improve student writing and create passion writers.</p> <p>What novel or poem do you love to teach and why?</p> <p>-- Hamlet</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.
Dec 23, 2013
#5 Lesson Planning with James Cross
32:02
<p>James Cross</p> <p>English Teacher -- Lakewood High School/ Director of AP Oxford Academy</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– This is his 40th year in the classroom. He was hired over the telephone in 1974... sight unseen at St. John Bosco High School. At Bosco he was allowed to grow professionally, becoming the department chair. He left there is 2000 because he wanted to stay in the classroom and not become principal. He is now at Lakewood High School, where he also coaches soccer, which he has done since he began teaching. Through it all, the students have allowed him to endure and prevent teacher burnout.</p> <p> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– He was taught by great teachers himself. His  5th grade teacher -- Sister Patricia -- was an early influence. She had 47 students in the class and had a handle on everything. He went to a Franciscan brother high school who were always ready, always prepared. Another professor, Bill Leary, advocated for the teacher being the authority over the text. We as teachers should be authorities over all facets of the text. Finally, his wife, Debbie, during his first year, compelled him to teach and treat everyone in the classroom as if they were your nieces and nephews. </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p> </p> <p>– A young man, who was not doing well in class, went over to the window, said "I had enough" and jumped out. Thankfully, the busses were there, and Jim just turned to the class and said, "well, I guess I have one less paper to grade." A way to avoid a lot of pitfalls of a failed lesson is being well prepared and having back ups ready to go. </p> <p>Why teach English and the language arts?</p> <p>– Teaching allows us to save civilization one desk at a time and language gives us more of an identity that the information in our wallets. Fitzgerald said "a writer who is anything, must be a mirror of what going on in the world" and literature allows us to see the artistic perspective on the times. </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p> –  Jim loves its spontaneity  He is teaching Heart of Darkness right now and there are four different versions of the text that is being taught with each class period.  </p> <p> </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p>-- Parker Palmer's The Courage to Teach Guide for Reflection and Renewal, 10th Anniversary Edition. It advocates for the sacredness of the classroom. Palmer peaks of not only the courage to teach, but also the fear of a teacher going into the classroom is a natural fear, but one that can be harnessed into a positive force of energy. Papers, Papers, Papers: An English Teacher's Survival Guide and With Rigor for All, Second Edition: Meeting Common Core Standards for Reading Literature by Carol Jago are also recommended. The latter argues that all students deserve to be exposed to worthy work of literature. He uses Jago as his text for curriculum development with his teaching-candidatestudents at Cal-State Long Beach.</p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p> – Being well prepared is an important step one can do outside the classroom. He also uses coaching to make connections with students outside of the classroom. Beyond that, Jim believes that we must not neglect to take care of, and plan for ourselves (family, recreation, health, etc). </p> <p> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>–  Education Week, NCTE,
Dec 15, 2013
#4 Teaching the Novel with Ariel Sacks
29:23
<p> Ariel Sacks<br />   8th grade ELA teacher at Brooklyn Prospect Charter School (NY)</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration<br />  </p> <p>Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? <br />  <br /> – Ariel has been teaching for 10 years. She is currently at Brooklyn Prospect Charter School where she teaches 8th grade English. Before that she taught at two NYC DOE schools both of which were high-needs schools that served 100% poverty populations.<br />  <br /> Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?<br />  <br /> – She had unbelievable training at Bank Street College. In particular, Madeline Ray, who was her mentor, also served as a prolonged influence, mentoring her for an additional two years when she began her teaching career. <br />   <br />  <br /> It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.<br />  <br /> – In Ariel's first year she asked her students read the entire novel through before discussing it. When the due date arrived, it quickly became clear that 50% of the students had not read. She had lost many of her students in that moment but gave the students amnesty. She divided the class between those who had read and those who did not. The ones that finished had amazing discussions about the text and those that did not read saw this, overheard this and were inspired to read. This method was still a powerful model in her eyes, she just had to build the systems and structures to support all students.<br />  <br />  <br /> Why teach English and the language arts?<br />  <br /> – She believes that English is all about how to communicate with people -- how to listen, speak persuasively, and how to write coherently. Then there is the artistic elements of beauty, wonder, sadness, which helps us to understand our place in the world. <br />  <br />  <br /> What is one thing that you love about the classroom?<br />  <br /> –  A teacher can create structures and routines but it the dynamic of a classroom is unpredictable. Every class, every day, every year is different.<br />  </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> <br /> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?<br /> -- Whole Novels for the Whole Class: A Student-Centered Approach. This is the book that she wishes she had when she started out teaching. It is a progressive, yet practical approach to teaching literature to adolescents. </p> <p> Also Reading, Writing, and Rising Up: Teaching About Social Justice and the Power of the Written Word it offers writing assignments that embraces the diversity of the classroom to bring out student voices. She has used just about everything in that book.  <br />  <br /> What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?<br />  <br /> – Ariel believes that teachers should get acquainted with the neighborhood where students live is valuable. Walking a mile in her students shoes can create a lot of opportunities for greater understanding and empathy for their background.<br />  <br />  <br /> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?<br />  <br /> –  Her best interactions with other teachers happen through Center for Teaching Quality. She has recently become interested in #Engchat on Twitter.  </p> <p> <br />  <br /> What can a teacher can do to make students better writers?<br />  <br /> – Pair students and have the partner read the draft. This is because writing is in the ear. Often we don't hear our own weakness until is is read to us and the reader will pick up on it and the writer will hear it as well.<br />  <br />  <br />  <br /> What novel or poem do you love to teach and why?<br />  <br />  Sherman Alexie's The Absolutely True Diary of a P...
Dec 09, 2013
#3 The Art of Communication with Kathy Thomas
21:09
<p>Kathy Thomas<br />  English teacher  <br /> Paradise High School (CA)</p> <p>Segment I – Background and Inspiration<br />  <br />  Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What   classes have you taught? <br />  <br /> – Kathy went to Arizona State and was originally a business major but took a lot of language classes, especially French, and became a teacher of foreign languages for the first 12 years of her career.</p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?<br />  <br /> – Not one specific person... a lot of people put her under their wing. Her math colleagues taught her organization and served as voices of comfort.<br />   <br />  <br /> It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.<br />  <br /> – Early in a career, while doing a lesson on telling time, only one student was paying attention. The clock that she had, made of card stock, hit the one student that was paying attention. But she took away, years later, not to take things personally. The reality is that not every student will share the same level of enthusiasm but now she has learned to step back and assess why students may not be engaged.<br />  <br />  <br /> Why teach English and the language arts?<br />  <br /> – Kathy believes it is the most important subject because it is all about communication through writing, speaking, reading, and listening. <br />  <br />  <br /> What is one thing that you love about the classroom?<br />  <br /> –  The discussions that happen in the classroom. There is nothing more satisfying than engaging in a discussion with a teenager.  She draws out conversation though Socratic Seminars and turning over the power of the classroom to the students with structure so it is not just a discussion about feelings.<br />  <br />  <br /> Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies<br />  <br />  <br /> What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?<br />  </p> <p> – Reading Don't Fix No Chevys: Literacy in the Lives of Young Men. It addresses the male population in the classroom. The discovery was that boys were different in the way that they attacked reading. <br />  <br />  <br /> What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?<br />  <br /> – Kathy joined her local writing project (connect with your local a National Writing Project). It really changed who she was in the classroom. <br />  <br />  <br /> Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?<br />  <br /> –  NCTE. She is also a Quizlet addict. She also recently discovered Pixton, a cartoon maker that she uses for alternative assessment.<br />  <br />  <br /> What can a teacher can do to make students better writers?<br />  <br /> – She believes in discussion once again. If a student can talk about a topic and make sense of it, the next progression is to put those ideas on paper.<br />  <br />  <br />  <br /> What novel or poem do you love to teach and why?<br />  </p> <p> <br /> – The Great Gatsby. As Francine Prose said, it is just gorgeous writing. The story is so rich and complicated and beautiful. As far as non-fiction goes, she really enjoys teaching Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers: The Story of Success.</p> <p> <br />  </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/kathythomas/">#3 The Art of Communication with Kathy Thomas</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Dec 07, 2013
#2 Understanding by Design with Grant Wiggins
28:50
<p>GRANT WIGGINS</p> <p>Segment I – Background and Inspiration<br />  <br /> Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching? What classes have you taught? </p> <p>– Grant's first teaching experience was as a sophomore in high school when his math teacher had to attend a wedding and asked him to run the class (back in the day when you could do those kinds of things). Some of his peers gave him grief and it led to an epiphany. It made him realized how difficult it was to teach.</p> <p>Later, in life he was motivated by the need to make learning an exciting activity, not boring. He taught for 15 years and now is a leader in curriculum development.</p> <p> </p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>– His father was in the foreign service so he had a diverse experience with school. Then, having gone to St. John's College, the so-called Great Books school, so he appreciated the importance of Socratic Seminar early on. He saw the power of giving students responsibility at the board or in student-led discussion rather than the teacher telling them what to think. Mentoring became personal with a colleague named Jim, who he did PLC (personal learning community) with before the term had ever been coined. As a soccer coach, Jim once said to Grant, "how come we teacher differently out there than we do in our classrooms." That has stayed with Grant to this day. Jim was someone who took teaching and learning more seriously than anyone else in the school.</p> <p> </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>– A bought of laryngitis forced him to turn control of the Socratic Seminar over to the class and the results showed how much guidance his students needed.  student threatened to throw the desk out the window. In his vocal absence, the students went off on all sorts of absurd tangents. He realized he hadn't done what he thought he was doing, which was to make them independent. Also, being video-taped for the first time allowed him to see and hear how he spoke to struggling readers. It all made him realize how his good intentions were missing the mark with student understanding. He realized how his soccer coaching experience had to come together with his teaching practice. He had to be more purposeful and deliberate with students in identifying the norms of discussion and the roles they could take in discussion.</p> <p> </p> <p>Why teach English and the language arts</p> <p>– Grant would like to see courses called Language Arts instead of English because the danger of teaching "English" is that you can fall back into a tour of certain time periods. He believes that we have a huge problem in this country of engaging adolescent boy readers. A lot of high school English classes are a forced march through books. </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p>–  He is at his happiest in probing the thinking of adolescents. Having a discussion with kids about meaningful issues is about as fun as it gets in 42 minutes.</p> <p> </p> <p>Segment II — Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p>What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p> – Grant believes you can't go wrong with the master, John Dewey's, Democracy and Education. It is one of the best books you could read. It is a clarion call to remind ourselves of why we teach. </p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>– Plan better. Understanding by Design, Expanded 2nd Edition. Its just a no-brainer that no matter your style, there is nothing better than unit planning and backward design. Everyone needs a plan to cause a difference in the student -- in his or her learning.</p> <p> </p> <p>Is there an internet resource that you can recomme...
Dec 07, 2013
TWT #1 Carol Jago
23:54
<p> Carol Jago<br />  Nov. 18, 2013</p> <p> </p> <p> Segment I – Background and Inspiration</p> <p> </p> <p> Tell your story. Where are you from and how long have you been teaching?  What classes have you taught? </p> <p> -- She started student teaching, which turned into her first job because the master  teacher called in sick and never returned. That turned into a 32-year career teaching     middle and high school English in Santa Monica, California. She had the same desk for  27 years.</p> <p> </p> <p>Who has helped you in your journey to become a master teacher?</p> <p>-- Bill Clawson, 20 years her senior, took her under his wing. While he was different in size -- 6'3", 250 pounds -- and style it was the approach that he shared with her. It was the daily conversations of reflective practice that really made the difference. This is something she discusses in her book, With Rigor for All, Second Edition: Meeting Common Core Standards for Reading Literature</p> <p> </p> <p>It is important for other teachers to know that we all have had setbacks in the classroom. Identify an instance in which you struggled as a teacher and explain what you learned from that experience.</p> <p>-- A  student threatened to throw the desk out the window. Yet, she had a community of teachers around her that cared that not only would she survive, she would thrive. In 32 years she never sent a kid to the office, she did not want to give up authority. Carol believes that when you turn a student over to a higher power, you give up authority, you give up control.</p> <p> </p> <p>Why teach English and the language arts?</p> <p>-- Why teach anything else? Get paid to read Hamlet? It is the most wonderful life in the world. Like Stephen Greenblatt, she believes that literature is the most astonishing technological means human beings have discovered to convey experience. Her job was to bring those means to students. She wants literature to open up like a flower for students. Her goal was for students to see how they can be readers too. If you believe it very strongly and you can convey it with enthusiasm, students will come a long way with you.</p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing that you love about the classroom?</p> <p>--  The discussion that take a direction that is never planned but is about the text and when the period ends, she knows more than she did before. The lucky aspect of teaching is that we become learners.</p> <p> </p> <p>Segment II -- Digging into the Teacher Bag of Goodies</p> <p> </p> <p>What book do you recommend to a developing teacher?</p> <p>-- Papers, Papers, Papers: An English Teacher's Survival Guide It is about handling the paper load. Teachers are not copy editors there to correct every error. She offers other approaches to responding to student work. Give them one thing to think about.</p> <p> </p> <p>What is one thing a teacher can do outside the classroom that can pay off inside the classroom?</p> <p>-- Roll with your strengths. It is critically important to cultivate one's own interest. Carol uses visual art all the time in the classroom. Her friend uses sports metaphors to explain difficult concepts to kids. It makes the classroom experience richer. </p> <p> </p> <p>Is there an internet resource that you can recommend which will help teachers grow professionally?</p> <p>-- Twitter. NCTE. Edsitement. Poetry Foundation</p> <p> </p> <p>What can a teacher can do to make students better writers?</p> <p>-- Have students put a slash mark at every end punctuation. It will allow students to see their sentence variety, which is an important element in effective writing.</p> <p> </p> <p>What novel or poem do you love to teach and why?</p> <p>-- Crime and Punishment. She taught the first 100 pages and then assigned the rest over break. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com/caroljago/">TWT #1 Carol Jago</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://talkswithteachers.com">Talks with Teachers</a>.</p>
Dec 06, 2013