Therapy Chat | Psychotherapy | Mindfulness | Trauma | Attachment | Worthiness | Self Care | Parenting

By Laura Reagan, LCSW-C

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: Social Sciences

Open in iTunes


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast


Description

Host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C, Psychotherapist, Clinical Supervisor, Burnout Consultant and Certified Daring Way™ Facilitator, interviews therapista and other experts about perfectionism, worthiness, authenticity, self care, trauma, attachment, parenting, relationships, mindfulness and holistic psychotherapy methods. Laura brings you interesting discussions about our emotional experience of being human. You'll feel like a fly on the wall listening to Laura share her thoughts or discuss these topics with fellow professionals. Listen in and learn more about yourself!

Episode Date
146: When Your Partner Doesn't Understand Trauma
29:11

Welcome to episode 146 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week Laura re-visits the issue of when your partner doesn't understand trauma.

*The names and characters in this episode represent a composite of people I have know personally and professionally. No real person is represented in this episode, which is intended for educational purposes.*

When Your Partner Doesn't Understand Your Trauma

Michael can't understand it. He just doesn't get what is going on with his wife of over 25 years, Amy. Michael is concerned about her and wondering when she is going to "get over" the childhood physical and sexual abuse she went through years ago.  He really just wants her to be okay. And honestly, he's sick of her trauma symptoms affecting her, him and their children. He's not sure how much longer he can take it. 

Why can't she just get over it?

To be fair, Michael doesn't realize that Amy's mood and behavior are related to her childhood trauma. He just knows that despite years of therapy with various therapists, she sometimes becomes deeply depressed and can't seem to get off the couch for days. Other times the smallest thing will seem to trigger her becoming highly anxious, which can turn into controlling behavior towards himself and the kids. She will sometimes go shopping, overspending with abandon even though they have agreed to stop running up credit card debt - then she hides it from him and acts like she is afraid he will hurt her when he receives the credit card bill. Although he does get really frustrated when this happens, it bothers him that she feels afraid of him at times, because he feels he would never harm her, and he never has gotten physical with her in more than 25 years. He also suspects she may be binging and purging, but they don't talk about it. He's afraid to bring it up and he suspects she would deny it if he asked.. Although she takes medication, her mood swings are still pretty unpredictable and he's never really sure whether he is going to come home from work and find the smiling, got-it-together wife he married; or the disorganized, scattered, overwhelmed and controlling woman she sometimes becomes; or the sad, crying woman he barely recognizes who just wants to sleep as much as possible. He doesn't know how to help her.

"She's Changed."

All Michael knows is that Amy has changed.  He knew when they got married that she had a "difficult" childhood. He also saw how resilient Amy was then. Despite being abused throughout her childhood she had finished college and started a great career before they married. Although she spoke openly about having experienced that abuse, it didn't seem to have a negative impact on her then. Other than acknowledging that it happened, she didn't really talk about it. And he didn't really want to talk about it - then or now - because just the thought of what she went through, particularly the sexual abuse, horrifies him.  He's not sure if the physical abuse was really all that bad, or why it affects her so much. He wonders if she is really trying in therapy, or whether she somehow is doing all this just for attention.

Michael isn't sure how to deal with the emotions that come up for him when Amy is not okay. It reminds him of how he felt responsible for taking care of his mother after his dad died when he was 10. He would often come home from school and his mom would be sitting in the dark on the sofa in her bathrobe. He found himself needing to be adult-like to take care of her, and he was kind of on his own to take care of himself and his younger brother too. He was so relieved to get away from that unhappy childhood, to go to college and start his career, but sometimes he wonders if he married someone he will always have to take care of too. The burden of handling Amy's emotional needs feels very heavy and familiar to Michael. He feels sad, hopeless and discouraged. 

Image credit: Canva

She feels disconnected.

Amy, too, was overjoyed to leave her abusive family behind to marry Michael. She thought things would be so much better once she got away from her controlling, abusive father and her passive mother who was mostly focused on pretending everything was perfect. And things were so much better! She loved her career, she and Michael got along great, and she was very happy to raise her three beautiful children. However, when her third child, little Megan, turned 5 years old Amy started having flashbacks to the abuse that her father inflicted on her as a little girl. A part of her had always felt that she was somehow responsible for the sexual abuse and deserving of the beatings. But seeing her sweet, innocent little Megan, a bright, inquisitive kindergartner, she pictured herself as a little girl and wondered whether it was really true that an innocent child could ever be deserving of being harmed the way her father had harmed her. These thoughts were so sad and overwhelming she tried to push them away. Sometimes she was successful, but other times, particularly in the Spring, she was overwhelmed with fear and worry that something bad would happen to Megan or her two sons. She is bothered by nightmares, trouble sleeping and physical symptoms like Irritable Bowel Syndrome and a feeling that someone is watching her which makes her skin crawl. Sometimes she suddenly vomits, just out of the blue, and she never knows when a panic attack is coming. Much of the time she feels like she is going through the motions of life. She feels disconnected from her neighbors and the other moms in her community. She describes herself as "on the outside looking in" to her life. She doesn't work outside the home now, and she's not sure if she ever will again. Most of the time she feels like she is barely holding it together. She wishes Michael were more empathetic and supportive of what she's going through but he doesn't seem to understand why she can't just "put the past behind her." She feels alone and disconnected from him, and wonders what happened to the happy newlyweds they once were. She is sad and worried about the way she feels, but she doesn't know what to do about it.

The Truth Is, They Are Both Struggling

This dynamic is all too common and I hear stories from both sides of the relationship described above in my office every day. Many of my clients are women like Amy who feel deeply ashamed that they are still affected by the abuse from their childhood years. And others are men like Michael who wonder if they can handle the emotional burden of their partner's PTSD. Regardless of gender, both Amy and Michael could be any one of us. They both feel alone and don't know how to reach the other partner.

Whether you can relate to Amy's feelings or Michael's, it's helpful to understand a few things. 

Three Things to Remember:

  1. You are not alone. Whether you are the person who experienced childhood trauma or the person who loves them, what you are feeling is common. Many people are affected by childhood trauma. It is so much more common than most of us realize. Click here to learn more about the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) and the prevalence of childhood trauma. 
  2.  Trauma survivors aren't trying to be difficult.They are actually just trying to feel normal. In the scenario I described above, both Amy and Michael are affected by childhood trauma, though neither of them understands the effects in depth. Amy could be described as the "identified patient" - she's the one who is seen as having a problem and needing help. And she does need help. She is suffering so much. Amy's trauma is that she was physically and sexually abused by an adult (her father) whom she trusted to take care of her and keep her safe. Her mother was unable to protect her and pretended nothing was wrong. So both of her primary caregivers, whom she depended on for safety and protection, let her down. She is affected by a loss of attachment as well as the effects of the abuse.

But Amy's not the only one in this example who needs help. Michael, too, experienced childhood trauma. His father died when he was only ten, and in her grief his mother was unable to attend to Michael's emotional needs. Instead, in order to be safe, Michael had to take care of his mom's emotional needs, and his own needs were ignored. He also had a younger brother to look out for. So Michael experienced a loss of attachment when neither of his parents was available to take care of his emotional needs, as well as the trauma of his dad's sudden death.  It's no wonder that Amy and Michael were drawn to each other, because they both had unresolved pain they were trying to escape when they met. However, Michael's role as a caregiver in his family may have helped him feel comfortable marrying someone who he perceived as having gone through something terrible (without realizing how he himself was affected by his own trauma). Both Amy and Michael were young when they met, and they were both doing the best they could. They both wanted to be okay, and they were trying to be okay together. For a while they were, but the effects of trauma always pop up just when you least expect them. Neither Amy nor Michael is able to be a support for the other, because they are both affected by their own childhood trauma. They can both benefit from counseling with a skilled trauma therapist.

  1. Trauma therapy can help. The reason Amy has been in and out of therapy for 10 years without experiencing relief from her trauma symptoms is that she hasn't had the right kind of therapy. 9 times out of 10, my clients with extensive trauma histories will tell me that their previous therapists never explained trauma to them or told them that their symptoms could be related to trauma. Why? The therapists probably didn't know. Trauma is still a newer field of study, although its effects have been documented for years.  Understanding that your symptoms are caused by trauma helps take an overwhelming set of symptoms that are seemingly unrelated and offers hope and clarity. You begin to recognize that you developed these coping methods (like dissociation, comfort eating, compulsive shopping, depression, anxiety) because of the effects of trauma, and not because there is something wrong with you. 

Can You Relate?

You may be wondering if you are an Amy or a Michael. I can't answer that for you, but here are some symptoms which may indicate that you are affected by childhood trauma. 

If you have had some kind of disturbing experience in childhood that has always bothered you, for example:

  • Loss of a primary caregiver
  • Any unwanted sexual experience
  • Any sexual experience you were too young to understand
  • Witnessing violence, whether it happened to you, your caregiver or another family member
  • Feeling that no one understood you, no one cared about you, or that you were abandoned, unwanted, or unloved
  • Being bullied
  • Receiving physical punishment, including spanking, beating, whipping, or being physically abused or harmed by an adult when you were a child
  • Having a parent or primary caregiver who abused alcohol or drugs

These are just a few examples of situations that could be traumatic in childhood. Read this article for more, and consider taking the ACES quiz as well. 

So if you have some kind of childhood experience you think might have been traumatic AND you have some of these symptoms:

  • Trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, nightmares, sleep paralysis
  • Feeling numb, detached, zoning out, trouble concentrating, easily distracted, losing time
  • Memory issues - feeling forgetful, being disorganized
  • Feeling a nagging sense that there is just something wrong with you, something that makes you different from everyone else
  • Feeling like you are on the outside looking in
  • Trouble feeling close with other people, trust issues, feeling suspicious of other people's motives, thoughts like "no one can be trusted" and a feeling that it's you against the world
  • Panic attacks, anxiety, need to maintain control at all times, rigidity, need for order
  • Feeling mistrustful of your partner, feeling judgmental and critical of others and yourself
  • Body image issues, physical symptoms like chronic pain, stomach issues, migraines, 
  • Sexual problems - lack of interest in sex, shame related to sex
  • Constantly on high alert, watchful, vigilant, can't relax - you hate it when someone comes up behind you and touches your shoulder or stands too close to you

You might be affected by childhood trauma. No article can substitute for talking with a qualified therapist. If you are wondering if you are affected by childhood trauma, talk to a therapist. You can usually speak to them by phone before scheduling an appointment to make sure they feel qualified to help with the issue that affects you. 

Here are some resources for finding a qualified trauma therapist:

National Child Traumatic Stress Network

ISSTD

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute

EMDRIA

Sidran Institute

Somatic Experiencing Institute

RAINN

And here are some suggestions for further reading and learning:

The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolk

In the Realm Of Hungry Ghosts by Gabor Maté

ACES Primer (video)

Finding a therapist who understands the effects of trauma on child development and has specialized training in trauma recovery can make a huge difference. Whether you are directly affected by childhood trauma or it is a problem for someone you love, therapy can help. You don't have to keep suffering.  

The first step is understanding that your trauma is real, that it matters, and that you can feel better. Then the hard part comes - trusting a therapist to help you. I know there are many caring and skilled trauma therapists out there who want to help. I am one of them. If you're in the Baltimore area of Maryland, I would love to talk about how we can work together to help you feel better. Give me a call at 443-510-1048 or e-mail me at laura@laurareaganlcswc.com. 

You can also contact me directly through my website at this link. Or visit my website to learn about how I work with trauma. 

Please consider supporting Therapy Chat by becoming a member on Patreon! Just $1 a month would make a huge impact to keep Therapy Chat going strong! To learn more: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat - members get special perks and swag too!

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Aug 10, 2018
145: Attachment, Meditation, Yoga & Compassion In Trauma Therapy
43:31

Welcome to episode 145 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week Laura re-visits her interview with Deirdre Fay, MSW, LICSW, who integrates trauma and attachment theory with yoga and meditation in embodiment. She is also the founder of the Becoming Safely Embodied Skills and maintains a private practice in Arlington, MA.

The work she does arises out of her life. What she knows is grounded in her own healing as well as rigorous training as a psychotherapist looking for answers and ways to help others navigate the often-difficult terrain of healing trauma and attachment wounds.

Deirdre knows what it’s like to make that journey. She did it dealing with her own history of trauma and as she searched for answers to relational and attachment issues. During the course of her life, she was lucky to have lived for six years in a spiritual community [Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health] which surrounded her with a nurturing environment. That experience grounded Deirdre in her commitment to finding ways to help other people.

The Becoming Safely Embodied Skills were born during those years and came to fruition as she worked with trauma survivors in Boston both in her private practice and in hospital settings. She wanted to develop easy to apply take home skills that people could use when they weren’t in therapy.

Resources

https://dfay.com

http://www.thecouplesexpertscottsdale.com

http://www.thecouplesexpertscottsdale.com/podcasts

http://www.iceeft.com

http://www.simplypsychology.org/bowlby.html

Please consider supporting Therapy Chat by becoming a member on Patreon! Just $1 a month would make a huge impact to keep Therapy Chat going strong! To learn more: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat - members get special perks and swag too!

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Aug 03, 2018
144: How Does Our Attachment Style Affect Our Relationships?
49:43

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C re-visits her interview with Stuart Fensterheim, LCSW

Stuart is a clinical social worker in Scottsdale, Arizona, practicing with couples using Sue Johnson’s Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) which is an attachment-based couples therapy method. 

In the episode, Stuart talks about how he works on making connections with couples and how our childhood attachment affects the way we show up in relationships as adults. He also touches upon John Bowlby's Attachment Theory, which focuses on your relationship with your primary caretaker and how it influences everything through your life. To make sense of this theory, he talks further about the relationship young babies have with their caretaker, avoiding failure to thrive and how the needs of a young baby to experience touch and closeness, continue with us throughout our adult life.

Resources

http://www.thecouplesexpertscottsdale.com

http://www.thecouplesexpertscottsdale.com/podcasts

http://www.iceeft.com

http://www.simplypsychology.org/bowlby.html

Please consider supporting Therapy Chat by becoming a member on Patreon! Just $1 a month would make a huge impact to keep Therapy Chat going strong! To learn more: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat - members get special perks and swag too!

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Jul 27, 2018
143: Attachment, Trust + Being Seen
42:53

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C re-visits her interview with Rebecca Wong, LCSW-R. 

Rebecca Wong, LCSW-R, a relationship therapist in New Paltz, NY, the creator of Connectfulness, and co-host of the upcoming Practice Of Being Seen podcast.

Rebecca talks about using play in her couples work, as well as how our attachment relates to our ability to trust our partners. Rebecca explains that needing attention is not a bad thing – it’s normal. She talks about the concept of being seen, in relationships and in our work with clients. She and Laura discuss getting out of our heads and into our bodies to connect with our partners, other people in our lives and as therapists, how we can connect with our clients. Rebecca explains how using animal-assisted therapy with dogs and horses helps us understand our emotions as shown in our bodies.

Rebecca describes her five-step process of Connectfulness, a research-based practice she developed and uses with her couples therapy clients. She talks about all the things we do to avoid uncomfortable feelings and how those things interfere with connection. 

Resources

http://connectfulness.com

Please consider supporting Therapy Chat by becoming a member on Patreon! Just $1 a month would make a huge impact to keep Therapy Chat going strong! To learn more: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat - members get special perks and swag too!

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Jul 20, 2018
142: Attachment Trauma & Adoption
52:50

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C re-visits her interview with Amy Sugeno, LCSW.

Amy is a clinical social worker in private practice who specializes in working with survivors of trauma related to attachment, particularly related to adoption.

Amy explains how attachment trauma can affect children who were adopted, even if the adoption went as smoothly as it possibly could. She describes how children who have been adopted may act out behaviorally to tell their parents how they feel. Amy also talks about a surprising way adoptive parents (and others parenting traumatized children) may experience trauma themselves and how to recognize the symptoms. She and Laura discuss how prior difficulty with conceiving a child can contribute to the experience for parents, how the parent’s own attachment style and trauma history is “churned up” through the process of adoption. She describes how adoption can change relationships within a family and between the family and their community. She explains some of the non-verbal ways of processing trauma that she uses with her clients. Amy describes Nature as her “co-therapist.” She tells listeners how to get on her mailing list and offers opportunities to hear her speak around the country.

This is the first of the series on trauma and attachment, which will continue on alternating weeks through the next few months. And on the opposite weeks you will hear the series on integrative mental health! Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat. Please get in touch and let host Laura Reagan know what you thought of this episode!

Resources

http://www.amysugenocounseling.com

Please consider supporting Therapy Chat by becoming a member on Patreon! Just $1 a month would make a huge impact to keep Therapy Chat going strong! To learn more: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat - members get special perks and swag too!

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Jul 13, 2018
141: Bringing Yoga Therapy Into A Talk Therapy Practice
45:53

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode, Laura speaks with trauma specialist and EMDR trained clinician Nityda Gessel.

Feeling like a foreigner in your own body is beyond unsettling. Despite your drive and success, it is challenging to feel worthy, comfortable, and at peace within your own skin, and this further exacerbates your fear that you are just not good enough. You might worry that there is no fix for you and you'll feel this way forever. And because to others, you appear to have it all together, it's incredibly lonely to know that inside you there is a longing for love and living that is not being satiated- a pervasive fear that love and joy may never come.

Nityda Gessel works with women who due to a traumatic past and overwhelming self-doubt, struggle to cultivate meaningful and fulfilling relationships and feel a sense of purpose in life. Her approach is one that addresses the mind and body as a whole.

Nityda integrates somatic awareness, yoga, meditation and mindfulness into psychotherapy. There is a well-spring of wisdom within you that's been neglected. With a compassionate heart and non-judgmental mind, she will help you listen to and trust that wise voice within. A moment of courage can jumpstart a journey toward happiness and lasting peace.

Resources

http://traumaconsciousyoga.com

Please consider supporting Therapy Chat by becoming a member on Patreon! Just $1 a month would make a huge impact to keep Therapy Chat going strong! To learn more: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat - members get special perks and swag too!

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Jul 06, 2018
140: Dynamics Of Dysfunctional Or Alcoholic Families
50:14

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode, Laura speaks with Sharon Martin, LCSW.

Sharon is a licensed therapist, counselor, and mental health and wellness writer based in San Jose, CA. She has spent 20 years providing counseling, therapy, and clinical supervision.

Sharon has built a specialized private practice that reflects her belief that you matter, and you can love yourself, heal, be empowered, speak your truth, and create a life you love. Listen for Sharon’s incredible insights on life, well-being and much more!

Resources

https://livewellwithsharonmartin.com

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Jun 29, 2018
139: Equine Assisted Learning & Authenticity
46:28

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode, Laura speaks in person with Charlotte Hiler Easley.

Charlotte is a psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in working with survivors of trauma using equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP). Charlotte discusses her work using Equine Assisted Survivors of Trauma Therapy, a method she developed in collaboration with a rape crisis center when she was in grad school.

When you work with Charlotte, you will be encouraged, coached, and heard with compassion and understanding. You can also expect to be gently challenged to understand who you really are and why you’re here.

You will work together with Charlotte to understand your patterns of behavior and thought and develop skills that will enable you to get unstuck and to move ahead in your story.

Resources

Charlotte’s website: https://charlotteeasley.com/

Charlotte’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/charlottehilereasleyLCSW

Central Kentucky Riding for Hope’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CKyRH/

Please consider supporting Therapy Chat by becoming a member on Patreon! Just $1 a month would make a huge impact to keep Therapy Chat going strong! To learn more: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat - members get special perks and swag too!

Register here for the upcoming Authentic Self Equine/Daring Way™ Retreat: https://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat 

 

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Jun 22, 2018
138: A Holistic Approach To Mindful Recovery
48:56

Welcome to episode 138 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week, we speak with Rebecca E. Williams, PhD and Julie S. Kraft, MA, LMFT, about their new book The Gift of Recovery: Mindfulness Skills for Living Joyfully Beyond Addiction.

Rebecca E. Williams, PhD, is a clinical psychologist specializing in recovery from mental illness and addictions. She received her master's degree from Harvard University and her PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is currently the Wellness and Vocational Enrichment Clinic director of the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System. In addition, she is an associate clinical professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, an adjunct faculty member at the University of San Diego, and coauthor of Couple Therapy for Alcoholism. Williams is coauthor, with Julie Kraft, of The Mindfulness Workbook for Addiction. She has a psychotherapy practice in San Diego, CA.

Julie S. Kraft, MA, LMFT, received her master's degree in marriage and family therapy from the University of San Diego's school of leadership and education sciences. She has provided counseling to veterans and their family members at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and has provided psychotherapy to individuals, couples, families, and groups in community settings. In her current position with Sharp HealthCare, she treats clients struggling with both addiction and mental health concerns. She lives and works in San Diego, CA.

Resources:

Find everything Rebecca & Julie are doing here: www.mindfulnessworkbook.com

Julie wanted you to see this video related to her comments about addiction being one bright spot that can be tough to let go of: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkZXEf304ss&app=desktop

The Suicide Prevention Hotline # is US: 800-273-8355

Please consider supporting Therapy Chat by becoming a member on Patreon! Just $1 a month would make a huge impact to keep Therapy Chat going strong! To learn more: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat - members get special perks and swag too!

Register here for the upcoming Authentic Self Equine/Daring Way™ Retreat: https://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat/

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Jun 15, 2018
137: What Is Spiritual Bypass?
39:04

*Warning, explicit episode*

Welcome to episode 137 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week, we speak with Tamara Powell, LMHC about spiritual bypass.

Tamara is the owner of Arya Therapy Services, the now global phenomenon in holistic health and healing. She is also the founder of Tales from a Trapezoid dedicated to the more raw and edgier side of life, working with those who may often feel like a trapezoid in a world full of circles.

Tamara also hosts her own podcast Sacred Psychology, where through stories and interviews, she takes listeners behind the veil of counseling into erotic, relational, and spiritual diversity, uncovering how to accomplish mankind’s greatest challenge – finding purpose and passion no matter the worldview or proclivity.

Resources

Find Tamara at:

https://aryatherapy.com

https://aryatherapy.com/about-the-podcast (Sacred Psychology Podcast)

https://talesfromatrapezoid.com

https://www.facebook.com/talesfromatrapezoid

Become a member of Therapy Chat by joining me on Patreon: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat 

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Jun 08, 2018
136: Embodied Recovery
46:26

Welcome to episode 136 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week, we speak with Paula Scatoloni, LCSW, CEDS, SEP and Rachel Lewis-Marlow, MS, EdS, LPC, LMBT about embodied recovery.

Paula is a somatic-based psychotherapist, Certified Eating Disorders Specialist, and Somatic Experiencing™ practitioner in Durham, NC. She has a private practice in Chapel Hill, NC and has worked in the field of eating disorders for over two decades. Prior to developing Embodied Recovery, Paula co-developed the first intensive outpatient program for eating disorders with Dr. Anita Johnston author, Eating In the Light of the Moon. She also served as the Eating Disorder Coordinator at Duke University for nine years where she developed campus policies and managed a multidisciplinary treatment team. She is a certified Shake Your Soul ® instructor and has provided mindful movement classes at Carolina House Treatment Center. Paula has taught extensively on the etiology and treatment of eating disorders through classes, workshops, professional trainings, and conferences.  She is currently an SEP assistant and session provider.  She has training in Bodywork and Somatic Education (BASE) and additional models for somatic work with developmental trauma.   She is a faculty member at the NC Center for Resiliency in Chapel Hill, NC and has been collaborating with researchers for the past four years to develop a study on the efficacy of somatic therapy within the eating disorder population. 

Rachel is a somatically integrative psychotherapist, dually licensed in counseling and therapeutic massage and bodywork. She is a Certified Advanced Practitioner in Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and has advanced training and 25 + years of experience in diverse somatic therapies including Craniosacral Therapy, Energetic Osteopathy, Oncology massage and Aromatherapy. Rachel worked as a primary therapist at Carolina House for 4 years. There she developed the Embodying Recovery group therapy protocol which formed the basis for her contribution to the EMBODIED RECOVERY treatment model.  Rachel is a private consultant to eating disorders treatment facilities. She provides ongoing training and supervision to clinical and support staff in the programmatic implementation of the embodied recovery model. She is currently consulting for Carolina House in their residential, partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient treatment programs.  In her private practice in Chapel Hill, NC, Rachel works with trauma, eating disorders, and dissociative disorders.  She has extensive experience as a teacher and presenter, focusing on accessing the body’s unique capacity to give voice to the subconscious and to lay the foundation for healing and maintaining psychological and physical health.

Resources

https://embodiedrecovery.org

Become a member of Therapy Chat by joining me on Patreon: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat 

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Jun 01, 2018
135: Cults & Psychotherapy With Former Cult Members
52:26

Welcome to episode 135 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week, we have a very interesting guest in Dr. Natalie Feinblatt who speaks to us all about cults and how they work.

Dr. Natalie Feinblatt is a licensed clinical psychologist in private practice. She is based in Santa Monica & specializes in addiction.

Natalie's goal is to empower her clients to live their lives with as much passion & purpose as possible. If you're willing to make changes to live a better life, then she is happy to help you do so every step of the way.

If you're struggling to get sober, you're scared about the impact sobriety might have on your creative abilities (and life in general). If you're in early sobriety, you're working to gain your footing in a new landscape. If you're a trauma survivor, you're wondering why your sensitivity & insight aren't helping you get to that light at the end of the tunnel. What do you do if your pain is too great to handle on your own?

Working with Natalie, you will be accepted and listened to carefully & perceptively. You will feel centered and much more grounded. She adapts her style to fit your needs and strive to treat you with a balance of gentleness and active encouragement.

Resources

http://www.drnataliefeinblatt.com

https://www.betterhelp.com/natalie-feinblatt

Become a member of Therapy Chat by joining me on Patreon: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat 

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

May 15, 2018
134: It's Not Always Depression - So What Is It?
44:53

Welcome to episode 134 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week, we’re delighted to welcome back Hilary Jacobs Hendel, LCSW. In this episode, Hilary speaks to me all about her amazing new book “It’s Not Always Depression”.

Hilary grew up in New York City in a culture of "mind over matter." Raised by a psychiatrist and a guidance counselor, family time included analyzing her thoughts and dreams. Feelings were rarely mentioned (except perhaps to discuss how to get rid of them!) She thought she had total control over my emotions. Now she wants to share what she (and many psychotherapists and researchers) know about the new science of emotions. She wants others to learn what she had the good fortune to learn: that core emotions provide a path to physical and psychological well-being.

Resources

http://www.hilaryjacobshendel.com

https://www.facebook.com/AuthorHilaryJacobsHendel

Become a member of Therapy Chat by joining me on Patreon: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat 

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

May 04, 2018
133: Equine Assisted Survivors of Trauma Therapy
37:57

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode, as we lead up to the next Daring Way, Laura Reagan, LCSW-C re-visits her interview with Charlotte Hiler Easley, LCSW.

Charlotte is a psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in working with survivors of trauma using equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP). Charlotte discusses her work using Equine Assisted Survivors of Trauma Therapy, a method she developed in collaboration with a rape crisis center when she was in grad school.

Charlotte talks about how horses are able to read our body language and react to our emotional experience. She explains what equine assisted psychotherapy is – hint: you don’t have to touch a saddle. She describes how survivors of trauma working with horses are able to learn and practice new ways of being in a relationship; setting boundaries; making a mind-body connection; feeling what safety feels like – because the work is all experiential.

Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat. Please get in touch and let host Laura Reagan know what you thought of this episode!

Resources

EAGALA: http://www.eagala.org/about

PATH: http://www.pathintl.org/

Charlotte’s website: https://charlotteeasley.com/

Charlotte’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/charlottehilereasleyLCSW

Central Kentucky Riding for Hope’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CKyRH/

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Apr 27, 2018
132: Ending Sexual Violence
01:12:07

Welcome to this special Sexual Assault Awareness Month Episode! I'm sharing two episodes from early in Therapy Chat's life on the issue of sexual assault. After the #MeToo movement, founded by Tarana Burke, ignited on social media over the past year, the general public began to understand what most women and many men already knew: sexual violence can affect anyone, and its effects are deep and longlasting. This is a problem in our culture which can be ended, but not without everyone gaining awareness. Statistics indicate that one in four women and one in six men will be sexually assaulted during their lifetime. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, a great time to learn more about this important issue. Here's an article from the New York Times about why Tarana Burke started this movement: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/20/us/me-too-movement-tarana-burke.html

What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Two types of sexual assault are Childhood Sexual Abuse (to be covered in a later episode) and Sexual Assault/Rape not involving a child. This is our focus today.
  • If you are assaulted, you have several options to consider:
    • Call a Sexual Assault Crisis Hotline. Visit the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network at www.rainn.org.
    • Most hospitals provide a forensic evidence exam at no cost to you, within 120 hours of the assault. Your state's sexual assault coalition can give you a list of hospitals with forensic programs.
    • It is your personal decision whether or not to report the assault to the police and you can usually receive an evidence collection exam without reporting to police.
  • The victim should tell someone who will be supportive. Visit www.evawintl.org (End Violence Against Women International.) Check out their “Start by Believing” campaign.
  • The US military and most colleges/universities have separate options for reporting sexual assault.
  • Keep in mind that the civil legal process is another option outside the criminal investigation; a settlement can be obtained without bringing criminal charges.
  • The Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Abuse (MCASA) is an outstanding resource for survivors. http://www.mcasa.org/
  • Find a Sexual Assault Crisis Center Directory at www.centers.rainn.org.
  • There are some common reactions of victims following sexual abuse. Find a comprehensive list at www.musc.edu
  • There are many community events across the country in April to bring awareness to sexual assault. Some events include The Clothesline Project, The Monument Quilt, Performances of The Vagina Monologues (find info at: www.vday.org), Take Back the Night, and Walk a Mile in Her Shoes. 

This is Part 2 of a series about Sexual Assault Awareness, and today’s focus is on Childhood Sexual Abuse. Let’s jump right into our topic!

What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Childhood Sexual Abuse is “a form of child abuse including sexual activity with a minor who is not capable of consenting.” Remember that a child CANNOT give consent to sexual activity!
  • Childhood Sexual Abuse is not always physical contact, but can include digital/online interaction, fondling, exhibitionism, child pornography, sex trafficking, and much more.
  • In 93% of cases, the sexual abuser of a child is someone known to the child or the family.
  • Most statistics under-represent the frequency of occurrence, but data indicates 1 in 5 girls and 1 in 20 boys will be sexually abused during childhood.
  • Up to 20% of adult females and 5-10% of adult males have been sexually abused during childhood.
  • There is an increased risk of sexual assault later in life when a child has had their boundaries violated in this way.
  • Most offenders are male, with about 33% being juveniles.
  • There is often a “grooming process” used by the abuser to draw the child into a sexual relationship, and usually, the abuser will fill roles of trust and value in the victim’s family. This makes it harder for children to come forward and makes them more likely to believe they are responsible for the abuse
  • The effects of childhood sexual abuse can include emotional problems, mental health issues, behavioral problems, and academic problems.
  • The effects can also include PTSD, depression, anxiety, suicide, and eating disorders.
  • Many times these behaviors are not recognized as signs of sexual abuse.
  • Protect children by showing interest in their lives, knowing the people in their lives, and knowing caregivers especially well.
  • Background checks and the sex offender registry are NOT foolproof.
  • Know how to ask questions to the child and how to respond without judgment and blame.
  • Report abuse to the police and, if applicable, to Child Protective Services.
  • Call the Child Help National Abuse Hotline: 1-800-422-4453
  • Help is available at sexual abuse crisis centers. Visit centers.rainn.org and search by zip code.
  • When seeking a therapist look for one with specific training in the field of sexual abuse. Not all therapists are qualified to help in all areas. The therapist should have knowledge and experience in developmental trauma.
  • Other resources include: victimsofcrime.org and www.rainn.org.
  • Call the National Sexual Assault Hotline 24/7 to speak to someone who can help you if you need someone to talk to after listening to this episode. The phone number (US Only) is: 1-800-656-4673

The RAINN chat hotline is available at: https://hotline.rainn.org/online/terms-of-service.jsp

Other Notes: 

Register for the Authentic Self Two Day Retreat with Charlotte Hiler Easley, LCSW and Laura Reagan, LCSW-C at: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Apr 22, 2018
131: Why Is Parenting So Hard?
01:06:36

Welcome to episode 131 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week’s guest features Anna Seewald who talks about why parenting is so hard.  

Anna Seewald is the founder of Authentic Parenting®. She is a speaker, author and a parent educator. She also has a popular Podcast on iTunes called Authentic Moments. She is a mom to a vibrant 9-year-old who doesn’t approve of her fashion choices. As a child she survived through a severe earthquake. She lost her young mom. She has been through trauma, pain, and a lot suffering.

With a strong passion helping children Anna dedicated her life working with abused, neglected, orphaned, institutionalized children and juvenile delinquents.

After nearly 20 years she realized that it is through helping parents she can help children.

Today she is supporting parents around the world by moving from traditional ways of parenting into more peaceful, conscious ways by making sense of their past life experiences, healing from trauma, building effective communication, practicing non-punitive discipline and setting limits with love and kindness.

She is a multilingual, multitalented person who loves dark roast coffee and dark chocolate with salted caramel.

Resources

http://authenticparenting.com 

Become a member of Therapy Chat by joining me on Patreon: https://patreon.com/TherapyChat 

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

 

Apr 13, 2018
130: Spirituality As Burnout Prevention
53:08

Welcome to episode 130 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week’s guest features Lanie Smith who talks about spirituality as burnout prevention using eco-art therapy.

Lanie Smith, MPS, ATR, a registered art therapist, has worked in a variety of settings for several years. Her work began with the Nat'l Institute of Health, researching the efficacy of art therapy with war-affected youth in N. Uganda, followed by two publications. Lanie developed environmental art therapy for sustainable practice at numerous sites in the Phoenix area.

She provides art therapy to others to support the prevention of burnout, compassion fatigue, and vicarious trauma. Lanie also supervises and trains on the ethical considerations regarding the use of art in therapy.

Resources

https://www.laniesmithcoaching.com

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Therapists! Would you like to get a free month of service with Brighter Vision, the worldwide leaders in custom website design for therapists? Go to this link to sign up and get a free month: https://try.brightervision.com/therapychatpodcast

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Apr 06, 2018
129: Representation & Connection Via Expressive Arts
39:25

Welcome to episode 129 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week’s guest features Xanthia Johnson. She is the founder of Urban Playogoly in Washington, DC. Urban Playology provides psychotherapy services to children, adolescents, individuals, couples and families.

During defining transitions, she provides a safe place for you to be who you are. Whether you are 2 years old or 85 years young, you will enjoy a transformative experience. Her clinical areas of specialization and interest include but are not limited to: Women & Women of Color Issues, Urban Play Therapy, Expressive Arts, Sandtray Therapy, Grief & Loss, LGBTIQ Folk, TF-CBT, Broad Spectrum Couples & Family Work

At Urban Playology, they utilize an Integrative therapy model with emphasis on advocacy and social justice for all clients. This approach helps them provide optimal support and sustainable nurturing for all clients. They offer professional training, clinical supervision, and clinical consultation on advocacy projects of interest.

In this episode, you will hear Xanthia discuss representation and connection via expressive arts as Laura and Xanthia talk about the film "Black Panther".

Resources

Dante’s RESPECT video: https://youtu.be/yII9_sQATXU

Find Xanthia Johnson at: http://www.urbanplayology.com/

Laura’s Facebook post with resources to learn about privilege, racism, oppression: https://www.facebook.com/LauraJReaganLcswC/photos/a.738409226187611.1073741828.624687057559829/2008445822517272/?type=3&theater

Register now for the next Daring Way™ and Relational Equine Assisted Learning retreat: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreat

Therapists! Would you like to get a free month of service with Brighter Vision, the worldwide leaders in custom website design for therapists? Go to this link to sign up and get a free month: https://try.brightervision.com/therapychatpodcast

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

 

Mar 30, 2018
128: Mindfulness & Trauma
56:25

Welcome to episode 128 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. Today Laura speaks to David Treleaven, PhD. David's book is Trauma Sensitive Mindfulness.

David Treleaven, PhD, is a writer, educator, and trauma professional whose work focuses on the intersection of mindfulness, trauma, and social justice. He received his master’s in counseling psychology at the University of British Columbia, and a doctorate in East-West psychology from the California Institute of Integral Studies.

This year he'll be offering workshops on trauma-sensitive mindfulness at the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society at UMass Medical School, Omega Institute's Mindfulness and Education Conference, and True North Insight in Montréal, Canada. He is a senior teacher with Strozzi Institute, which helps leaders embody skillful action, and with generative somatics, an organization that integrates personal and social transformation.

Resources:

https://www.davidtreleaven.com

https://www.amazon.com/Trauma-Sensitive-Mindfulness-Practices-Transformative-Healing/dp/0393709787/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1521777121&sr=8-1&keywords=trauma+sensitive+mindfulness 

https://www.amazon.com/You-Want-Talk-About-Race-ebook/dp/B073P53DVL

Therapists! Would you like to get a free month of service with Brighter Vision, the worldwide leaders in custom website design for therapists? Go to this link to sign up and get a free month: https://try.brightervision.com/therapychatpodcast

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

 

Mar 23, 2018
127: Mindfulness & Somatic Work In Healing Trauma
38:44

Welcome to episode 127 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. Today Laura speaks to Lynn Fraser about mindfulness & somatic work in healing trauma.  

Lynn Fraser is a senior meditation and yoga teacher in the Himalayan Yoga Meditation tradition; and a Senior Facilitator of the Living Inquiries and Natural Rest. She brings the depth and richness of twenty years experience teaching meditation and yoga philosophy to her work. She specializes in holding a safe and trusted space for healing trauma in her private Living Inquiries online sessions with individuals. Lynn lives near family, the ocean and forest in Nova Scotia Canada where she also plays flute in a jazz band.

Lynn is a student and teaches within the Himalayan Tradition  of  Swami Rama as taught by Swami Veda Bharati. She is certified through the Association of Himalayan Yoga Meditation Societies (AHYMSIN) and the Yoga Center of Calgary. She was a founding member of the organizing committee for the AHYMSIN teacher training program and is faculty for the Yoga Studio College in Calgary. Lynn has studied extensively in the United States and India with Swami Veda Bharati,  Pandit Dabral and other senior teachers in the Himalayan Tradition.

She teaches in Halifax/Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. Her classes are suitable for students in various physical conditions as a primary emphasis for asana (yoga poses) is on training the mind through the body. Her teaching features an integrated approach of relaxation, asana, pranayama, meditation and philosophy for every day life. She is a certified Himalayan Institute Ayurveda Yoga Specialist.

Lynn supports people healing from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other trauma through meditation, yoga therapy and mindfulness inquiry.

Resources:

http://stillpointyoga.ca

Therapists! Would you like to get a free month of service with Brighter Vision, the worldwide leaders in custom website design for therapists? Go to this link to sign up and get a free month: https://try.brightervision.com/therapychatpodcast

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Mar 16, 2018
126: How Much Is Too Much For A Therapist To Share In A Session?
47:00

Welcome to episode 126 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. Today Laura speaks to Dr. Maelisa Hall about how much is too much for a therapist to share in a session?

Dr. Maelisa Hall is a licensed clinical psychologist and her passion is to help therapists create rock-solid documentation so they can spend more time with their clients and less time worrying about paperwork.  After eight years working in mental health agencies, she started her own company to help therapists learn how to make documentation flow naturally, decrease their workload and be confident in all their paperwork. She shows clinicians that paperwork is a valuable part of therapy and that it doesn’t have to be slow and painful! You’ll have more time to work with clients because you’ll know you can take on the paperwork no problem.

Maelisa consults with psychotherapists in private practice, agencies and group practices to teach them things like how to write great notes, what to consider if insurance is involved, how to document high-risk issues and what forms they actually need for their clientele.

Training is her passion so she has created online programs that help connect therapists so they can learn from any place at any time. Her goal is make everything she does serve a real need so she makes sure to include plenty of real-life examples and interactive exercises in every workshop she creates.

Resources:

https://www.mybizbestie.com

https://www.qaprep.com

Therapists! Would you like to get a free month of service with Brighter Vision, the worldwide leaders in custom website design for therapists? Go to this link to sign up and get a free month: https://try.brightervision.com/therapychatpodcast

Go to https://global.oup.com/academic/product/healing-justice-9780190663087?q=healing%20justice&lang=en&cc=us and use code “ASFLYQ6” to save 30% on Loretta’s book!

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Mar 09, 2018
125: Healing Justice - The Connection Between Self Care & Social Justice For Helping Professionals
52:29

Welcome to episode 125 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. Today Laura speaks to Dr. Loretta Pyles about her work and new book “Healing Justice”.

Loretta came to mind-body healing practices in 1999, after leaving a difficult long-term relationship and becoming burnt out from her social services and social change work. She found herself anxious, grief-ridden, and disconnected from her body, mind and spirit. Over the years, she has committed herself to a journey toward wholeness, presence, and compassion. The realizations that she later found in meditation and yoga deepened her ability to understand the ways in which oppression and undigested experiences rest in the mind-body continuum.  To learn more about these parts of herself and to experience life more fully, she practices a range of modalities including mindfulness, lovingkindness, breath work, physical poses, devotional mantra, group support, and self-inquiry.

Loretta’s sensibility about transformative social change was formed during her time working in a women's collective at a community-based domestic violence program in Lawrence, Kansas.  She continues to be inspired by the insights of collective and consensus building that come from feminist and other social movements, as well as conscious communication practices. She works with public and non-profit organizations to promote healing justice and offers workshops which support social workers and activists to embody mindful practice and self-care through trauma-informed and anti-oppression lenses.

Loretta received her B.A. in philosophy and sociology from Baker University, an M.A. in philosophy from the University of Kansas and a Ph.D. in social work from the University of Kansas. Formerly on the faculty at Tulane University School of Social Work in New Orleans, Loretta is Professor in the School of Social Welfare at the State University of New York at Albany.  She was Director of UAlbany’s Community and Public Service Program from 2008-2012. The National Science Foundation has funded her research on human capabilities, community participation, and disaster recovery.  Loretta's social change and healing justice work has taken her across the globe including to Haiti, Mongolia, and Indonesia.

Resources:

http://lorettapyles.com

Therapists! Would you like to get a free month of service with Brighter Vision, the worldwide leaders in custom website design for therapists? Go to this link to sign up and get a free month: https://try.brightervision.com/therapychatpodcast

Go to https://global.oup.com/academic/product/healing-justice-9780190663087?q=healing%20justice&lang=en&cc=us and use code “ASFLYQ6” to save 30% on Loretta’s book!

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Mar 02, 2018
124: Eating Right To Feel Good - Nutrition & Mood with Dr. Leslie Korn
43:46

Welcome to episode 124 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. Today Laura welcomes back Dr. Leslie Korn.  

Dr. Leslie Korn has had a bi-lingual (Eng/Span) clinical practice since 1977 and providing over 50,000 hours of integrative health care to people with a diverse range of health problems in both urban and rural settings.

She is the author of 4 books; Nutritional Essentials for Mental Health, (Norton, 2015), Cultural Competency Workbook, (Premiere Publishing , 2015) Rhythms of Recovery Trauma Nature and the Body (Routledge, 2013), and Preventing and Treating Diabetes Naturally, The Native Way, (DayKeeper Press, 2009) and her latest book The Good Mood Kitchen will be out in 2017.

Dr. Korn consults to clinicians and advises clients who want to people to reduce or eliminate pharmaceutical use and in particular psychotropic medications. She works with people who want to integrate natural approaches to their health care and she has a specialty practice in mental health nutrition and body oriented psychotherapy. She also consults to community mental health, hospital based programs and on tribal reservations supporting the integration of traditional healing and integrative medicine for mental and physical health.

Dr. Korn received her PhD in Behavioral Medicine from the Union Institute, a MA degree in cross cultural health psychology from Lesley University, and a MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Resources:

https://drlesliekorn.com

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Feb 23, 2018
123: Trauma Focused Equine Assisted Psychotherapy: A New Clinician's Story With Julia Alexander
35:58

Welcome to episode 123 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. Today Laura speaks to Julia Alexander, LMSW, M.Ed.

For the last decade, Julia has worked to create effective spaces for people to heal. She believes children’s behavior, especially behavior that appears problematic, often meets an important need. Using a compassionate and flexible treatment approach, grounded in the neurobiology of trauma, Julia aims to support children and caregivers in understanding the purpose of current behaviors in order to eventually develop more adaptive coping strategies. She knows that the most effective treatment involves a recognition of children, caregiver and system strengths and needs with a focus on connected, attuned relationships.

Julia was trained by leading experts in intergroup dialogue facilitation and social justice curriculum design. She has extensive training in the Attachment, Regulation and Competency Trauma Treatment model and has attended trainings in Sensory Motor Arousal Regulation Treatment for Traumatized Children and Adolescence (SMART) as well as The Neurobiology of Trauma. Julia not only brings her clinical experience to Spirit Reina but also, a lifetime of horse experience! She loves the ways in which horses support the therapeutic process by asking us to take responsibility for the types of relationships we create.

She is excited to be starting her dual certification in Natural Lifemanship. When not at Spirit Reins you can find Julia spending time exploring Austin, hanging out with her two dogs or dancing. Julia holds an MSW from Smith College School for Social Work, an M.Ed in Social Justice Education from UMass Amherst and a B.A in Psychology from Mount Holyoke College.

Resources:

https://spiritreins.org

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Feb 16, 2018
122: Q&A - Deeper Discussion on Intimate Partner Violence
47:25

Welcome to episode 122 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. Today Laura has a deeper discussion about intimate partner violence.

Resources:

1-800-799-7233 (SAFE) National Domestic Violence Hotline

https://nnedv.org/

https://www.techsafety.org/resources/

www.ncadv.org

I talked about the HBO series “Big Little Lies”

https://cops.usdoj.gov/Default.asp?Item=2881

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Feb 09, 2018
On Break February 1
51

Hey all! I'm not releasing a new episode the week of February 1, because I'm busy working on my Q&A episode series which will start next week with Elizabeth's question about my interview with Tamara Hill on Trauma Bonding. 

I'll miss you but please join us in the Therapy Chat Facebook group! To join, request to join on FB here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TherapyChat/  and then sign up for the Therapy Chat e-mail list! You'll then be added to the group.

Talk to you soon! New episode February 8th!

 

Feb 01, 2018
121: Bottom-Up Processing Using Sensorimotor Psychotherapy
43:55

Welcome to episode 121 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. Today Laura speaks about bottom-up processing using sensorimotor psychotherapy with Dr. Pat Ogden.

SPI is a professional educational organization that designs and provides the highest-level trainings and services to serve a global network of mental health practitioners, and for the public at large. Seeking to enhance human relationships, our paradigm is substantiated by interpersonal neurobiology and impelled by mindfulness applied in interactive contexts.

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy draws from somatic therapies, neuroscience, attachment theory, and cognitive approaches, as well as from the Hakomi Method. Since the first course in Sensorimotor Psychotherapy was offered in the early 1980’s, it has gained international acclaim. The first book on Sensorimotor Psychotherapy®, Trauma and the Body: A Sensorimotor Approach to Psychotherapy, published in the Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology in 2006 gained international acclaim. The sequel to the first book, Sensorimotor Psychotherapy: Interventions for Trauma and Attachment was published in spring of 2015.

Dr. Ogden is currently developing Sensorimotor Psychotherapy for children, adolescents, families, and couples with colleagues. Several research studies to gather data on the effectiveness of SP are underway or in the process of publication at the following institutions:

  • Maudsley Hospital (London, UK)
  • Womens’ College Hospital (Toronto, Ontario)
  • Modum Bad Outpatient Clinic (Oslo, Norway)

 Resources:

https://www.sensorimotorpsychotherapy.org

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button. 

Sign up for waiting list for Trauma Therapist Community: https://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/soar/

Join Trauma Therapists Unite Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1774552256196397/?ref=bookmarks - Request to join, complete form with license information and join e-mail list! (For licensed therapists only)

Join Therapy Chat Podcast Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TherapyChat/ - Request to join

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

 

Jan 26, 2018
120: Parts Work, Continued
27:48

Welcome to episode 120 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. Today is a solo episode where I’m continuing the conversation on from episode 117 about Parts Work.

Resources:

IFS website for resources I mentioned:

https://selfleadership.org/ifs-store.html

Interview with Renee Beck on the Shadow: http://traffic.libsyn.com/baltimoreannapolispsychotherapypodcast/Renee_Beck.mp3

Interview with Lourdes Viado on the Shadow: http://traffic.libsyn.com/baltimoreannapolispsychotherapypodcast/Lourdes_interview.mp3

Interview with Keri Nola on the Shadow:

http://traffic.libsyn.com/baltimoreannapolispsychotherapypodcast/Keri_Nola_Shadow.mp3

Poem: The Guest House by Rumi

The Ferentz Institute: http://theferentzinstitute.com

Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Jan 19, 2018
119: Happy 2018!
04:56

Hi all! This week's episode is just a quick hello and a few words about the New Year. Hope you are all enjoying a peaceful return from holiday fun and that you've been able to take it easy. I wanted to share my thoughts on New Year's resolutions. I also gave a little preview of what's coming up over the next few weeks!

If you'd like to contribute to the Q&A episodes, e-mail Laura at laura@laurareaganlcswc.com or visit https://therapychatpodcast.com and click on the Speakpipe button to leave a message. If your question is selected, you may hear it on a future episode along with a response from Laura.

Listeners to Therapy Chat are welcome to join the Facebook group where you can interact with other listeners and host Laura Reagan, as well as some past guests. Go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/TherapyChat/ and follow the instructions. Request to join the Facebook group and go to the link provided to sign up for the Therapy Chat Facebook group e-mail list. Listeners in the group gave feedback that they'd enjoy hearing Q&A episodes. 

As always, thank you for your support of Therapy Chat! We couldn't do it without you!

Jan 06, 2018
118: Surviving & Thriving During The Holidays
22:11

Feeling holly-jolly? Maybe not so much. In this episode of the Baltimore Annapolis Psychotherapy Podcast host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C discusses three reasons why for some of us the holidays can be the most stressful time of the year. Listen in if you've ever felt stressed during the holidays with all of the emphasis on consumerism and comparing your house to everyone else's. This podcast episode is great for people who have strained relationships with family of origin, childhood trauma, and highly conflictual families. 

 

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Dec 23, 2017
117: All Parts Are Welcome
50:39

Welcome to episode 117 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. I’m delighted to have as my guest today, Dr. Richard Schwartz.  

Richard Schwartz earned his Ph.D. in Marriage and Family Therapy from Purdue University, after which he began a long association with the Institute for Juvenile Research at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and more recently at The Family Institute at Northwestern University, attaining the status of Associate Professor at both institutions. He is coauthor, with Michael Nichols, of Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods, the most widely used family therapy text in the United States.

Dr. Schwartz developed Internal Family Systems in response to clients' descriptions of experiencing various parts–many extreme–within themselves. He noticed that when these parts felt safe and had their concerns addressed, they were less disruptive and would accede to the wise leadership of what Dr. Schwartz came to call the "Self." In developing IFS, he recognized that, as in systemic family theory, parts take on characteristic roles that help define the inner world of the client. The coordinating Self, which embodies qualities of confidence, openness, and compassion, acts as a center around which the various parts constellate. Because IFS locates the source of healing within the client, the therapist is freed to focus on guiding the client's access to his or her true Self and supporting the client in harnessing its wisdom. This approach makes IFS a non-pathologizing, hopeful framework within which to practice psychotherapy. It provides an alternative understanding of psychic functioning and healing that allows for innovative techniques in relieving clients' symptoms and suffering.

In 2000, Richard Schwartz founded The Center for Self Leadership in Oak Park, Illinois. CSL offers three levels of IFS training, national and international workshops for both professionals and the general public, an annual conference, publications, and video resources of Dr. Schwartz's work through its website at www.selfleadership.org. Dr. Schwartz is a featured speaker for many national psychotherapy organizations and a fellow of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, and he serves on the editorial boards of four professional journals. He has published four books and over fifty articles about IFS. His books include Internal Family Systems Therapy, Introduction to the Internal Family Systems Model, and The Mosaic Mind (with Regina Goulding), as well as Metaframeworks (with Doug Breunlin and Betty Karrer). His most recent book is about using IFS with couples, titled You Are The One You've Been Waiting For, under the Trailheads imprint of The Center for Self Leadership. Dr. Schwartz lives and practices in Brookline, MA.

Resources:

https://www.selfleadership.org  

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Dec 15, 2017
116: Your Inner Resonance
51:21

Welcome to episode 116 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. I’m delighted to have as my guest today, Sarah Peyton.

Sarah Peyton, international speaker and facilitator, has a passion for weaving together neuroscience knowledge and experiences of healing that unify people with their brains and bodies. Sarah makes Interpersonal Neurobiology research available for our embodied brains to use in living at peace with ourselves. Funny, touching, and filled with personal stories and up-to-date research on our nervous systems and how they interact with each other, her presentations change lives and invite self-acceptance and self-compassion. Sarah offers healing experiences of hearing ourselves and others deeply (using the precision and resonant language that come alive in the long-term study of Nonviolent communication) and 3D body-centered explorations of families over generations (through family constellation work.)

Sarah is a CNVC Certified Trainer of Nonviolent Communication;  an experienced facilitator of Family Constellation work; speaks and writes internationally on the confluence of NVC, Constellation work, and the world of neuroscience research; guest lectures at the International Systemic Constellations Association (ISCA) Intensive at Bernried, Germany ('14, '15, '16); has been a regular contributor to the Global Association of Interpersonal Neurobiology Studies (GAINS) journal and currently contributes to The Knowing Field journal. In 2015 she published a chapter on Constellations and Health in the German book, Salutogenesis, edited by Stephan Hausner.

Resources:

http://empathybrain.com

https://www.yourresonantself.com

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Dec 08, 2017
115: Connecting With Your True Self
49:22

I’m delighted to welcome back Kyle Davies this week for part two of our conversation on connecting with your true self.

Kyle Davies is a wellbeing and mindset coach, author and trainer. He specializes in helping individuals and groups to optimise their energy and wellbeing, combat stress and stress related symptoms, improve mental clarity and performance, and develop inner resilience and flow.

Kyle originally qualified as a Chartered Occupational Psychologist and  is the creator of Energy-Flow Coaching™. He spent a chunk of his career pioneering a new approach for treating chronic fatigue and pain, anxiety, depression and other stress related symptoms – which is reflected in the recently published book, The Intelligent Body.

Kyle’s work is about developing people from the inside out. He doesn’t try to get people to learn loads of mental techniques that they quickly forget, or to try and fix their environment because situations and environments often can’t be changed. Rather he helps people to gain a better and deeper understanding of themselves so they can tap into their own resilience, flow and potentials, helping them be more effective at work, at home, and in life.

Kyle facilitates transformations for those who are stuck, overwhelmed, lost or stressed and empowers them to experience greater personal freedom and higher consciousness. His work offers a new understanding of the relationship between hidden stress in the body, emotional energy, and chronic health challenges.

Resources:

http://www.energyflowcoaching.com

http://kyledavies.net

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Nov 30, 2017
114: What Is Shamanism?
01:04:12

Have you ever wondered about Shamanism? Dr. Carmen Roman is a psychologist from Mexico who now practices in California, and she explains how she developed an interest in this work.

Dr. Carmen Roman is a psychotherapist with 25 years of experience working in both Mexico and in California the last 5 of those years. She offers you a combination of both cultures and both worlds of psychology. She specializes in trauma, sexual abuse, and immigration issues.

Dr. Roman works mainly with couples and families. Some clinical issues she works with are: anxiety, depression, fear, severe trauma, or low self-esteem.

Based on Gestalt therapy she helps her clients to live with awareness, responsibility and in the here-and-now. Aided by the transpersonal psychology she addresses issues of spirituality, the use of meditation and shamanic experiences. She is a specialist in creative expression in therapy at master's and PhD levels. Thus, most likely you will work with creative expression tools you already have or will learn to ease your emotional healing.

Carmen is also a bilingual podcaster. The English and Spanish podcast is called Emotions in Harmony and you will find it in various platforms. If you want to connect and participate in her FB live videos in Spanish visit her FB page on Tuesdays at noon Pacific time. 

Resources:

Website – www.emotionsinharmony.com

Email her at carmen@armoniaemocional.com

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DraCarmenRoman/

Twitter https://twitter.com/DraCarmenRoman

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/cafecitovirtual

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Nov 24, 2017
113: Honest Talk About Pregnancy & Motherhood
50:19

Interview with Melissa Divaris Thompson on the realities of pregnancy and motherhood that most people never talk about.

Melissa is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist with a private practice in New York City, seeing primarily women in their 20s and 30s, pregnant women, and new moms. As a holistic and depth-oriented therapist, her role is to support my clients in finding wholeness — mind, body, and spirit — creating more joy, ease, and healthy relationships.

Melissa helps her clients remember their empowered authentic voice and “tap back into” their true selves. Melissa attended The California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, CA and through that, met my Honest Mamas counterparts, Claire and Sophie.

Honest Mamas is a website committed to the authentic emotional and spiritual lives of mothers. The focus of the site is the journey of motherhood, including fertility and pregnancy. It is an online community that supports women during these transitional and transformational times, when grounded, positive and honest information is vital to their emotional well being. Honest Mamas is a place to be real, witnessed, celebrated, and comforted.

Resources:

http://embracingjoy.com

https://honestmamas.com

Support Therapy Chat, get a free audiobook and receive a 30 day trial subscription to Audible by signing up at https://audibletrial.com/therapychat

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Nov 17, 2017
112: Chronic Pain & Chronic Illness
01:08:42

An interview with chronic pain expert Daniela Paolone, LMFT of Westlake Village Counseling.

Daniela specializes in supporting people living with chronic pain, illness, anxiety, and depression. Their unique challenges aren’t understood by those who haven’t experienced these issues. She’s here to deepen our understanding and awareness, because many of us have loved ones who are facing these challenges.

Daniela has worked as a therapist for the past seven years in many settings. That includes working at a non-profit agency, in schools, and in private practice. Before becoming a therapist though she worked as a teacher’s assistant and was also a behavioral coach for children with special needs. She has also run batterer’s intervention groups that were court-ordered.

Working with the courts and in rehabilitating perpetrators of domestic violence was rewarding work where Daniela learned so much. During that time, she also provided counseling to victims of domestic violence and their families.

Resources:

https://westlakevillage-counseling.com

Facebook group Daniela Paolone  https://www.facebook.com/groups/137753713504096/

Therapy Chat Podcast group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/TherapyChat/

Online Clinical Consultation Groups (for therapists only): https://laurareaganlcswc.com/join

Support Therapy Chat, get a free audiobook and receive a 30 day trial subscription to Audible by signing up at https://audibletrial.com/therapychat

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Nov 09, 2017
111: Relationships & Childhood Emotional Neglect
40:00

Interview with Dr. Jonice Webb on her new book, Running On Empty No More about repairing relationships affected by Childhood Emotional Neglect. 

Dr. Webb has been a licensed psychologist since 1991, and has worked in a variety of different settings over the course of her career, including a psychiatric emergency service and substance abuse programs.  She has been the Director of several large outpatient clinics.  For the past eight years, she has been enjoying her private practice in Lexington, Massachusetts, specializing in the treatment of couples and families.

Dr. Jonice Webb has been interviewed on NPR and over thirty radio shows across the United States and Canada about the topic of her book, Emotional Neglect, and has been quoted as a psychologist expert in the Chicago Tribune. She writes the popular Childhood Emotional Neglect Blog on PsychCentral.com.

Over two decades of practicing psychology, Dr. Webb gradually started to see a factor from childhood which weighs upon people as adults.  This factor is extremely subtle.  In fact, it’s so difficult to see that it goes virtually unnoticed while it quietly saps a person’s joy in life, causing him or her to struggle with self-discipline, or to feel disconnected and unfulfilled.  Dr. Webb gave a name to this invisible factor from childhood.  She calls it Childhood Emotional Neglect (CEN).

Resources:

www.emotionalneglect.com

http://www.drjonicewebb.com/cenquestionnaire

www.facebook.com/JWebbPhd

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkB4-oY0XAqv8kzBlYov34w

Twitter: @jwebbphd

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Nov 03, 2017
110: Your Intelligent Body with Kyle Davies
53:09

Welcome to episode 110 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Kyle Davies.

Kyle Davies is a wellbeing and mindset coach, author and trainer. He specializes in helping individuals and groups to optimise their energy and wellbeing, combat stress and stress related symptoms, improve mental clarity and performance, and develop inner resilience and flow.

Kyle originally qualified as a Chartered Occupational Psychologist and  is the creator of Energy-Flow Coaching™. He spent a chunk of his career pioneering a new approach for treating chronic fatigue and pain, anxiety, depression and other stress related symptoms – which is reflected in the recently published book, The Intelligent Body.

Kyle’s work is about developing people from the inside out. He doesn’t try to get people to learn loads of mental techniques that they quickly forget, or to try and fix their environment because situations and environments often can’t be changed. Rather he helps people to gain a better and deeper understanding of themselves so they can tap into their own resilience, flow and potentials, helping them be more effective at work, at home, and in life.

Kyle facilitates transformations for those who are stuck, overwhelmed, lost or stressed and empowers them to experience greater personal freedom and higher consciousness. His work offers a new understanding of the relationship between hidden stress in the body, emotional energy, and chronic health challenges.

Resources:

http://www.energyflowcoaching.com

http://kyledavies.net

Join the Therapy Chat Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/TherapyChat/ !

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Oct 27, 2017
109: Brainspotting with Beth Medina
51:51

Welcome to episode 109 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Beth Medina.

Beth Medina has been a therapist since 1997 and a trauma counselor since 2001, when she initially trained in EMDR while working with people suffering from addictions. Today, sheis  a trauma specialist, who is a Certified Brainspotting Practitioner/Certified Brainspotting Consultant through Brainspotting International, as well as a Certified EMDR Therapist through EMDRIA. These designations denote ongoing, advanced training, not only in trauma but also in the use of these effective, transformative modalities.

Resources:

https://brainspottingjax.com

https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreats-1  

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Oct 20, 2017
108: Healing From Trauma
29:11

Welcome to episode 108 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Dr. Carmen Roman.    

Dr. Carmen Roman is a psychotherapist with 25 years of experience working in both Mexico and in California the last 5 of those years. She offers you a combination of both cultures and both worlds of psychology. She specializes in trauma, sexual abuse, and immigration issues.

Dr. Roman works mainly with couples and families. Some clinical issues she works with are: anxiety, depression, fear, severe trauma, or low self-esteem.

Based on Gestalt therapy she helps her clients to live with awareness, responsibility and in the here-and-now. Aided by the transpersonal psychology she addresses issues of spirituality, the use of meditation and shamanic experiences. She is a specialist in creative expression in therapy at master's and PhD levels. Thus, most likely you will work with creative expression tools you already have or will learn to ease your emotional healing.

Carmen is also a bilingual podcaster. The podcast is called Emotions in Harmony and you will find it in various platforms. If you want to connect and participate in her FB live videos in Spanish visit her FB page on Tuesdays at noon Pacific time. 

Resources:

Website – www.emotionsinharmony.com

Email her at carmen@armoniaemocional.com

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DraCarmenRoman/

Twitter https://twitter.com/DraCarmenRoman

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/cafecitovirtual

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Oct 13, 2017
107: Abusive Relationship Dynamics & Traumatic Bonding
50:45

Welcome to episode 107 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Tamara Hill.   

Támara Hill, M.S, NCC, CCTP, LPC is a licensed therapist and certified trauma professional specializing in child and adolescent behavioral and mood disorders including psychological and emotional trauma. As an internationally quoted therapist, Támara aims to empower families from various walks of life to gain further knowledge and rediscover authentic living.

Támara holds to one life principle: authenticity. While being interviewed by a #1 ranked national mobile website, she explained: “I’ve always had a somewhat difficult time referring to myself as an “expert” because I strive to remain modest in all I do. I have found that modesty connects me more authentically to families who are suffering.”

While working to help troubled and at risk kids utilize their strengths in the home, school, and community, she became known, internationally, for her passion and dedication to seeing change in their lives.

She strives to not only maintain clarity about the purpose of her own life, but the needs within the lives of parents, families, & caregivers. “Having a strong woman as a mother has inspired me to reach out to other parents and inspire them,” Hill says.

Resources

https://twitter.com/therapisttee

https://anchoredinknowledge.com

http://www.nnedv.org

http://wlcmd.org

http://www.loveisrespect.org

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Oct 06, 2017
106: Finding Gratitude & Peace: Self-Compassion In Troubled Times
43:19

Interview with Buddhist Psychologist and student of Thich Nhat Hahn Tim Ambrose Desmond, LMFT.  

Tim Desmond is a mindfulness teacher, therapist in private practice, and co-founder of Morning Sun Mindfulness Center in Alstead, NH. He is the author of Self-Compassion in Psychotherapy (W.W. Norton, 2015) and offers training and consultation to therapists around the world, helping them to integrate positive psychology and mindfulness practices into their work.

Tim has presented at Yale University, the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy Colloquium, Greater Oregon Behavioral Health Conference, and the International Society for Ethics in Psychology and Psychiatry, as well as to mental health audiences around the country. His writings on mindfulness and positive psychology have appeared in the Psychotherapy Networker and the Mindfulness Bell magazine. Tim was interviewed about self-compassion by the Huffington Post, and writes for major mental health websites such as Madinamerica.com.

He developed and teaches “dialogue-based mindfulness training,” a technique for teaching mindfulness and self-compassion in which the client is guided through a meditation while giving the clinician feedback about their experience in real-time. The clinician uses this feedback to adjust and custom tailor the meditation instructions in order to ensure the client learns the technique effectively.

In 2005, Tim was ordained by Thich Nhat Hanh into the Order of Interbeing after many years of practicing in that tradition. He leads meditation retreats around the US and teaches regularly at Morning Sun Mindfulness Center in NH. In addition to the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh, Tim teaches Nonviolent Communication and positive psychology.

Resources

https://www.timdesmond.net

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Sep 29, 2017
105: When Your Partner Doesn't Understand Trauma
25:01

*The names and characters in this episode represent a composite of people I have know personally and professionally. No real person is represented in this episode, which is intended for educational purposes.*

When Your Partner Doesn't Understand Your Trauma

 

Michael can't understand it. He just doesn't get what is going on with his wife of over 25 years, Amy. Michael is concerned about her and wondering when she is going to "get over" the childhood physical and sexual abuse she went through years ago.  He really just wants her to be okay. And honestly, he's sick of her trauma symptoms affecting her, him and their children. He's not sure how much longer he can take it. 

Why can't she just get over it?

To be fair, Michael doesn't realize that Amy's mood and behavior are related to her childhood trauma. He just knows that despite years of therapy with various therapists, she sometimes becomes deeply depressed and can't seem to get off the couch for days. Other times the smallest thing will seem to trigger her becoming highly anxious, which can turn into controlling behavior towards himself and the kids. She will sometimes go shopping, overspending with abandon even though they have agreed to stop running up credit card debt - then she hides it from him and acts like she is afraid he will hurt her when he receives the credit card bill. Although he does get really frustrated when this happens, it bothers him that she feels afraid of him at times, because he feels he would never harm her, and he never has gotten physical with her in more than 25 years. He also suspects she may be binging and purging, but they don't talk about it. He's afraid to bring it up and he suspects she would deny it if he asked.. Although she takes medication, her mood swings are still pretty unpredictable and he's never really sure whether he is going to come home from work and find the smiling, got-it-together wife he married; or the disorganized, scattered, overwhelmed and controlling woman she sometimes becomes; or the sad, crying woman he barely recognizes who just wants to sleep as much as possible. He doesn't know how to help her.

"She's Changed."

All Michael knows is that Amy has changed.  He knew when they got married that she had a "difficult" childhood. He also saw how resilient Amy was then. Despite being abused throughout her childhood she had finished college and started a great career before they married. Although she spoke openly about having experienced that abuse, it didn't seem to have a negative impact on her then. Other than acknowledging that it happened, she didn't really talk about it. And he didn't really want to talk about it - then or now - because just the thought of what she went through, particularly the sexual abuse, horrifies him.  He's not sure if the physical abuse was really all that bad, or why it affects her so much. He wonders if she is really trying in therapy, or whether she somehow is doing all this just for attention.

Michael isn't sure how to deal with the emotions that come up for him when Amy is not okay. It reminds him of how he felt responsible for taking care of his mother after his dad died when he was 10. He would often come home from school and his mom would be sitting in the dark on the sofa in her bathrobe. He found himself needing to be adult-like to take care of her, and he was kind of on his own to take care of himself and his younger brother too. He was so relieved to get away from that unhappy childhood, to go to college and start his career, but sometimes he wonders if he married someone he will always have to take care of too. The burden of handling Amy's emotional needs feels very heavy and familiar to Michael. He feels sad, hopeless and discouraged.

 

Image credit: Canva

She feels disconnected.

Amy, too, was overjoyed to leave her abusive family behind to marry Michael. She thought things would be so much better once she got away from her controlling, abusive father and her passive mother who was mostly focused on pretending everything was perfect. And things were so much better! She loved her career, she and Michael got along great, and she was very happy to raise her three beautiful children. However, when her third child, little Megan, turned 5 years old Amy started having flashbacks to the abuse that her father inflicted on her as a little girl. A part of her had always felt that she was somehow responsible for the sexual abuse and deserving of the beatings. But seeing her sweet, innocent little Megan, a bright, inquisitive kindergartner, she pictured herself as a little girl and wondered whether it was really true that an innocent child could ever be deserving of being harmed the way her father had harmed her. These thoughts were so sad and overwhelming she tried to push them away. Sometimes she was successful, but other times, particularly in the Spring, she was overwhelmed with fear and worry that something bad would happen to Megan or her two sons. She is bothered by nightmares, trouble sleeping and physical symptoms like Irritable Bowel Syndrome and a feeling that someone is watching her which makes her skin crawl. Sometimes she suddenly vomits, just out of the blue, and she never knows when a panic attack is coming. Much of the time she feels like she is going through the motions of life. She feels disconnected from her neighbors and the other moms in her community. She describes herself as "on the outside looking in" to her life. She doesn't work outside the home now, and she's not sure if she ever will again. Most of the time she feels like she is barely holding it together. She wishes Michael were more empathetic and supportive of what she's going through but he doesn't seem to understand why she can't just "put the past behind her." She feels alone and disconnected from him, and wonders what happened to the happy newlyweds they once were. She is sad and worried about the way she feels, but she doesn't know what to do about it.

The Truth Is, They Are Both Struggling

This dynamic is all too common and I hear stories from both sides of the relationship described above in my office every day. Many of my clients are women like Amy who feel deeply ashamed that they are still affected by the abuse from their childhood years. And others are men like Michael who wonder if they can handle the emotional burden of their partner's PTSD. Regardless of gender, both Amy and Michael could be any one of us. They both feel alone and don't know how to reach the other partner.

Whether you can relate to Amy's feelings or Michael's, it's helpful to understand a few things. 

Three Things to Remember:

  1. You are not alone. Whether you are the person who experienced childhood trauma or the person who loves them, what you are feeling is common. Many people are affected by childhood trauma. It is so much more common than most of us realize. Click here to learn more about the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) and the prevalence of childhood trauma. 
  2.  Trauma survivors aren't trying to be difficult.They are actually just trying to feel normal. In the scenario I described above, both Amy and Michael are affected by childhood trauma, though neither of them understands the effects in depth. Amy could be described as the "identified patient" - she's the one who is seen as having a problem and needing help. And she does need help. She is suffering so much. Amy's trauma is that she was physically and sexually abused by an adult (her father) whom she trusted to take care of her and keep her safe. Her mother was unable to protect her and pretended nothing was wrong. So both of her primary caregivers, whom she depended on for safety and protection, let her down. She is affected by a loss of attachment as well as the effects of the abuse.

But Amy's not the only one in this example who needs help. Michael, too, experienced childhood trauma. His father died when he was only ten, and in her grief his mother was unable to attend to Michael's emotional needs. Instead, in order to be safe, Michael had to take care of his mom's emotional needs, and his own needs were ignored. He also had a younger brother to look out for. So Michael experienced a loss of attachment when neither of his parents was available to take care of his emotional needs, as well as the trauma of his dad's sudden death.  It's no wonder that Amy and Michael were drawn to each other, because they both had unresolved pain they were trying to escape when they met. However, Michael's role as a caregiver in his family may have helped him feel comfortable marrying someone who he perceived as having gone through something terrible (without realizing how he himself was affected by his own trauma). Both Amy and Michael were young when they met, and they were both doing the best they could. They both wanted to be okay, and they were trying to be okay together. For a while they were, but the effects of trauma always pop up just when you least expect them. Neither Amy nor Michael is able to be a support for the other, because they are both affected by their own childhood trauma. They can both benefit from counseling with a skilled trauma therapist.

  1. Trauma therapy can help. The reason Amy has been in and out of therapy for 10 years without experiencing relief from her trauma symptoms is that she hasn't had the right kind of therapy. 9 times out of 10, my clients with extensive trauma histories will tell me that their previous therapists never explained trauma to them or told them that their symptoms could be related to trauma. Why? The therapists probably didn't know. Trauma is still a newer field of study, although its effects have been documented for years.  Understanding that your symptoms are caused by trauma helps take an overwhelming set of symptoms that are seemingly unrelated and offers hope and clarity. You begin to recognize that you developed these coping methods (like dissociation, comfort eating, compulsive shopping, depression, anxiety) because of the effects of trauma, and not because there is something wrong with you. 

Can You Relate?

You may be wondering if you are an Amy or a Michael. I can't answer that for you, but here are some symptoms which may indicate that you are affected by childhood trauma. 

If you have had some kind of disturbing experience in childhood that has always bothered you, for example:

  • Loss of a primary caregiver
  • Any unwanted sexual experience
  • Any sexual experience you were too young to understand
  • Witnessing violence, whether it happened to you, your caregiver or another family member
  • Feeling that no one understood you, no one cared about you, or that you were abandoned, unwanted, or unloved
  • Being bullied
  • Receiving physical punishment, including spanking, beating, whipping, or being physically abused or harmed by an adult when you were a child
  • Having a parent or primary caregiver who abused alcohol or drugs

These are just a few examples of situations that could be traumatic in childhood. Read this article for more, and consider taking the ACES quiz as well. 

So if you have some kind of childhood experience you think might have been traumatic AND you have some of these symptoms:

  • Trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, nightmares, sleep paralysis
  • Feeling numb, detached, zoning out, trouble concentrating, easily distracted, losing time
  • Memory issues - feeling forgetful, being disorganized
  • Feeling a nagging sense that there is just something wrong with you, something that makes you different from everyone else
  • Feeling like you are on the outside looking in
  • Trouble feeling close with other people, trust issues, feeling suspicious of other people's motives, thoughts like "no one can be trusted" and a feeling that it's you against the world
  • Panic attacks, anxiety, need to maintain control at all times, rigidity, need for order
  • Feeling mistrustful of your partner, feeling judgmental and critical of others and yourself
  • Body image issues, physical symptoms like chronic pain, stomach issues, migraines, 
  • Sexual problems - lack of interest in sex, shame related to sex
  • Constantly on high alert, watchful, vigilant, can't relax - you hate it when someone comes up behind you and touches your shoulder or stands too close to you

You might be affected by childhood trauma. No article can substitute for talking with a qualified therapist. If you are wondering if you are affected by childhood trauma, talk to a therapist. You can usually speak to them by phone before scheduling an appointment to make sure they feel qualified to help with the issue that affects you. 

Here are some resources for finding a qualified trauma therapist:

National Child Traumatic Stress Network

ISSTD

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute

EMDRIA

Sidran Institute

Somatic Experiencing Institute

RAINN

And here are some suggestions for further reading and learning:

The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel van der Kolk

In the Realm Of Hungry Ghosts by Gabor Maté

ACES Primer (video)

Finding a therapist who understands the effects of trauma on child development and has specialized training in trauma recovery can make a huge difference. Whether you are directly affected by childhood trauma or it is a problem for someone you love, therapy can help. You don't have to keep suffering.  

The first step is understanding that your trauma is real, that it matters, and that you can feel better. Then the hard part comes - trusting a therapist to help you. I know there are many caring and skilled trauma therapists out there who want to help. I am one of them. If you're in the Baltimore area of Maryland, I would love to talk about how we can work together to help you feel better. Give me a call at 443-510-1048 or e-mail me at laura@laurareaganlcswc.com. 

You can also contact me directly through my website at this link. Or visit my website to learn about how I work with trauma. 

Sep 22, 2017
104: Bonus Episode - Suicide In Our Communities
46:42

Bonus Episode for Suicide Awareness & Prevention Month! Replay of Laura's interview with Dr. Jonathan Singer, host of the Social Work Podcast, professor at Loyola University in Chicago, and co-author of the book, "Suicide in Schools" which details how communities can address the issue of suicide.

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! Today’s topic is a serious one, and something that needs to be talked about, although most of us would rather not think about it. September is Suicide Prevention & Awareness Month, and host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C recorded this special episode to honor a friend’s brother who died by suicide almost 3 years ago. Today Laura interviews someone who has worked for years in the field of suicide prevention. Jonathan B. Singer, PhD is podcaster, a social work professor at Loyola University in Chicago and one of the co-authors of the book “Suicide in Schools: A Practitioner’s Guide to Multi-Level Prevention, Assessment, Intervention and Postvention.” This book is a guide for schools and communities, as well as families, to understand what we can all do to make a difference in the problem of suicide which plagues the United States. Jonathan shares some shocking statistics about the problem of suicide – how often it happens and who is most at risk. He describes specific things schools and communities can do to prevent suicide and to support a person who is feeling suicidal. He also talks about how schools can develop crisis plans to put into action when a school community member dies by suicide. Our community has been affected by suicide far too often. One person dying by suicide is too many, but the numbers are much higher than that. This episode may inspire you to take action to make a difference in your community to reduce suicide. And host Laura Reagan invites you to make a donation in honor of Nick Moothart by visiting the Team Nick fundraising page for the Annapolis Out of the Darkness Walk, hosted by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP).

 

Click here to make a donation to Team Nick

 

Click here to make a donation to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

 

Listen to the Social Work Podcast here

 

Learn more and order Suicide in Schools: A Practitioner’s Guide here.

 

Learn more about Jonathan B. Singer, PhD here

 

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

 

Thank you for listening!

Sep 19, 2017
103: Psychotherapy Can Be Like Improv - Eating Disorders, Trauma & ACT
40:37

Welcome to episode 103 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Valerie Martin (LCSW, RYT, CSAT Candidate) who is a psychotherapist and yoga instructor in Nashville, TN.

Valerie focuses on a holistic treatment approach of mind + body integration and trauma resolution, using EMDR, ego state therapy, yoga (including trauma-sensitive yoga), Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT), and somatic (body-based) and experiential techniques. She is also a Certified Sexual Addiction Therapist (CSAT) Candidate. Valerie has spoken at numerous behavioral health conferences, primarily in the area of eating disorder treatment. She received a BS in Communications and MSSW in Clinical Social Work at the University of Texas at Austin.

In addition to her private practice, Valerie is a trauma specialist at The Ranch residential treatment center, where she formerly worked as a primary therapist in the eating disorders program.

Resources

Valerie Martin’s website: wonderwelltherapy.com

Emily Sandoz ACT book https://www.amazon.com/Acceptance-Commitment-Therapy-Eating-Disorders/dp/162625396X

Emily Sandoz book: Living With Your Body And Other Things You Hate  https://www.amazon.com/Living-Your-Body-Other-Things/dp/1608821048/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=R7627YQ0JK908W4Y8862

Support Therapy Chat and get a free month of Audible AND a free book by visiting: http://audibletrial.com/therapychat

Click here to visit the iTunes store to download the Therapy Chat app and leave a rating and review!

Click here to make a donation to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention in support of Team Nick, the group I’m walking with.

Sep 15, 2017
102: Expressive Arts - Drama Therapy
44:59

In Episode 102, host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews Krista Verrastro, RDT, a Maryland drama therapist. Krista is one of only six hundred-plus drama therapists in the United States. She explains what drama therapy is, how she got involved with it, and how she uses it in her practice.

Krista defines drama therapy and explains how it is active, experiential and integrative. She discusses the roles we play in our lives and how this fits closely with drama therapy. She notes some similarities between drama therapy and play therapy. She reminds us how experiential therapies like expressive and creative arts methods – including drama therapy – help us to connect with our emotions in a balanced way, so we can both feel and think at the same time.

She teaches us how creative arts therapies can help externalize the emotions we feel so that we can feel safer to explore them. She also discusses how drama therapy can help heal trauma. She explains the connection between drama therapy and social justice and its roots in efforts to overcome oppression.

Krista talks about psychodrama and drama therapy, how they’re similar and different. She gives examples of some techniques and exercises that may take place in a drama therapy session. She also relates the challenge of serving people who would benefit from drama therapy because the field is so little known.

Visit Krista’s website to learn more about her work:  http://www.kristaverrastro.com/

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Sep 08, 2017
101: Attachment Style & Relationships
50:24

Episode 101 of Therapy Chat is the last in the "Best Of Therapy Chat" segment. Our number one most popular episode is the interview with Stuart Fensterheim, the Couples Expert! Stuart talks about how our attachment style affects our adult relationships. 

Welcome to episode 62 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This is the third episode in the trauma and attachment series featuring Stuart Fensterheim, LCSW. Stuart is a clinical social worker in Scottsdale, Arizona, practicing with couples using Sue Johnson’s Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) which is an attachment-based couples therapy method. 

In the episode, Stuart talks about how he works on making connections with couples and how our childhood attachment affects the way we show up in relationships as adults. He also touches upon John Bowlby's Attachment Theory, which focuses on your relationship with your primary caretaker and how it influences everything through your life. To make sense of this theory, he talks further about the relationship young babies have with their caretaker, avoiding failure to thrive and how the needs of a young baby to experience touch and closeness, continue with us throughout our adult life.

Resources

http://www.thecouplesexpertscottsdale.com

http://www.thecouplesexpertscottsdale.com/podcasts

http://www.iceeft.com

http://www.simplypsychology.org/bowlby.html

Thank you to this episode's sponsor, TherapyNotes! You can get a free month of TherapyNotes plus 10% off for a year using the code CHAT17 ! Visit https://therapynotes.com to sign up! Or just click here to get the 10% discount for 12 months!

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Sep 01, 2017
100: Audience Participation & Themes from First 100 Episodes
41:58

Welcome to episode 100 (woohoo!) of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. In this episode, we hear from listeners about what they enjoy about the podcast, favorite episodes and more.

We also look at the overarching themes that have developed since the start of the podcast that includes:

  • Parenting & Relationships
  • Mindfulness
  • Self-Care
  • Perfectionism and Self-Compassion
  • Trauma and Sexual Assault
  • Trauma and Attachment
  • Experiential Therapies
  • Inner Knowing

Thank you to each and every one of you that has supported the podcast for the past two years, I’m truly grateful to have you on this journey with me.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can hear every episode of Therapy Chat at: Http://therapychatpodcast.com

Aug 30, 2017
99: The Food-Mood Connection
01:18:54

Best of Therapy Chat! Today's interview with author Dr. Leslie Korn, who is a Harvard-trained body-oriented psychotherapist who has worked for four decades to help people understand the connection between physical and emotional health, is the 2nd most popular episode of the first 100! Leslie spoke with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C all the way from Mexico, where she lives and works.

Leslie talks about how she got started doing body-oriented psychotherapy, what she learned in the jungle, and how nutrition can help our mental health. She discusses the connection between trauma and physical and mental health; self care; and her book "Nutrition Essentials for Mental Health". She talks about the "right diet" for everyone, explaining that fat is actually our friend! She explains that she prefers to take the ideology out of nutrition, stating that clinicians can use the science and the art of nutrition to help clients. Leslie discusses the idea of the gut as the second brain.

Leslie answers the question Laura has been wondering about for years. What is the connection between childhood trauma and ACES and long term physical health problems? She clearly explains this for clinicians to understand and explain to clients. And any survivor of childhood trauma who is listening will surely feel empowered to understand this connection from listening to Leslie's very clear explanation.

Finally, Leslie discusses pharmaceuticals "du jour" and diagnoses "du jour" and how the food-mood connection can be in direct conflict with traditional Western ideas about medicine and health. And she explains how the gall bladder plays a role in mental health, and how social justice fits in. In her work with indigenous groups and in the US she has observed the effects of the loss of traditional diets and culture on physical and mental health. And she points out that blood sugar can play a very significant role in mental health, and explains how clinicians can help clients look at this differently.


Dr. Leslie Korn teaches therapists nationally in the US through PESI on multicultural as well as offering supervision and working with clients in Mexico. Her most recent book is Nutrition Essentials for Mental Health, published by Norton; and Rhythms of Recovery: Trauma, Nature and the Body. Her new book will be published in early 2017.  Here's where you can find more of what Dr. Leslie Korn is doing (hint - her new book is out now!):

www.drlesliekorn.com

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please visit iTunes to subscribe and leave a rating and review! 

Aug 18, 2017
98: Traumatic Stress & Your Health
56:03

Internationally known physician Dr. Gabor Maté joined host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C on this episode of Therapy Chat to help listeners understand why it is important to address trauma occurring in childhood, even during pregnancy. Dr. Maté explains that the effects of trauma on our health endure over a lifetime and even in our genetic code passed on to future generations of our families. He describes how our physical health, mental health and emotional wellbeing are affected by our exposure to childhood trauma and the link between trauma and all kinds of addictions. You'll be fascinated at this expert's explanation of the mind-body connection! 

Episode 98 is the 3rd most popular episode of Therapy Chat, which is celebrating its 2nd birthday in mid-August, 2017 and its 100th episode at the same time! This encore episode was originally released in April, 2017. Tune in to hear Laura Reagan's interview with Dr. Gabor Maté, to learn more about the Therapy Chat app, and to get the details on two communities Laura is creating for trauma therapists. And please support our sponsor, TherapyNotes

You can save 10% for 12 months on a subscription to TherapyNotes using the code "CHAT17" or by clicking here!

 

 

Welcome to episode 79 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week's episode features Dr. Gabor Maté. Dr. Maté is the co-founder of Compassion for Addiction, a new non-profit that focuses on addiction. He is also an advisor of Drugs over Dinner.

As an author, Dr. Maté has written several bestselling books including the award-winning In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters with Addiction; When the Body Says No: The Cost of Hidden Stress; and Scattered Minds: A New Look at the Origins and Healing of Attention Deficit Disorder, and co-authored Hold on to Your Kids. His works have been published internationally in twenty languages.

In the fall of 2017, Dr. Maté will be launching a brand new website offering online courses in his various areas of expertise. The first course will be a training program for health professionals working with people with addiction.

Dr. Maté explains the connection between childhood traumatic stress at any point in development - even in utero - and mental and physical health and well-being. Beyond a discussion of ACES, he describes the causes of illness and how trauma fits in. Did you know that ADD/ADHD, MS, Prostate cancer, ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease) and many other diseases, as well as addictions of all kinds are linked to trauma? Gabor's books, In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts, Scattered, and When the Body Says No go into depth with the research to support his assertions.

Resources

https://drgabormate.com

https://www.compassion4addiction.org

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66cYcSak6nE (Ted Talk)

Here’s a link to the article Dr. Maté mentioned: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/129/2/e460.short

Thank you to this episode's sponsor, TherapyNotes! You can get a free month and save 10% for 12 months on a subscription to TherapyNotes using the code "CHAT17" or by clicking here!

To request to join the Trauma Therapists Unite free Facebook community, go here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1774552256196397/ and read the instructions. It's a 2 step process!  

If you're interested in the Trauma Therapist Community online clinical consultation groups, you can go here to get all the details and register: http://laurareaganlcswc.com/join

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. Get the app here!

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Aug 11, 2017
97: Core Emotions & Change Triangle
01:02:22

This month we are celebrating Therapy Chat! Therapy Chat's 2nd birthday is coming up this month, we recently achieved our first month of 50,000 downloads, and the 100th episode is coming out at the end of this month! Listen to my interview with Hilary Jacobs Hendel, which was the 4th most popular episode overall since Therapy Chat started! She talks about accessing core emotions in psychotherapy and her upcoming book, It's Not Always Depression: Working the Change Triangle to Listen to the Body, Discover Core Emotions, and Connect to your Authentic Self. She also talks about her work consulting on the AMC TV show, Mad Men, one of Laura's favorites for its accurate depiction of someone who is tortured by his past and doesn't realize what is affecting him. 

Visit Hilary's website for all the latest details on what she's up to: https://www.hilaryjacobshendel.com/ 

Also, go to https://therapychatpodcast.com to leave a message using Speakpipe. Tell Laura which episode is your favorite and why. Your message may be used in the upcoming 100th episode celebration later in August! 

To get the details about the Authentic Self Retreat and the Authentic Therapist Retreat co-hosted by Laura Reagan and Charlotte Hiler Easley, visit: https://laurareaganlcswc.com/retreats-1 

Thanks for your support! Therapy Chat wouldn't be what it is without you!

Aug 04, 2017
96: Expressive Arts: Music Therapy
44:37

Welcome to episode 96 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Maya Benattar. Maya is a music psychotherapist, but you might also call her a mindfulness mentor, a creativity coach, or a big fan of slowing down. 

Maya helps women who long to experience true clarity and confidence in themselves and their lives, but are held back by anxiety or fear. She supports them in slowing down and exploring their lives creatively so they can make significant changes and discover the strong, confident woman they can be. 

She knows from her own life and many years of helping other women that putting yourself first and asking for help can kick up a lot of fear and shame – but she strongly believes that slowing down and looking inside can help you become strong, passionate, sensitive, and brave. 

As a trained and experienced therapist she has a Masters degree from NYU and is an NYS licensed psychotherapist), she knows a lot about how to slow down your hectic life, explore your dreams and thoughts through mindfulness, play and more (adults need to play too!), and develop new ways of coping creatively. 

Resources 

http://mayabenattar.com  

Please support our sponsor, TherapyNotes! You can save 10% for 12 months on TherapyNotes by using the code: CHAT17 or clicking here!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. Http://therapychatpodcast.com 

Jul 28, 2017
95: Compulsive Sexual Behaviour, Attachment & Shame
47:29

Welcome to episode 95 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Duane Osterlind.

As co-founder of NOVUS Mindful Life Institute, Duane Osterlind’s vision is to provide comprehensive care for individuals struggling with process addictions in the utmost confidential, comprehensive and caring environment to ensure clients feel safe and accepted with anticipation that recovery is possible.

Duane has over eight years of experience as a therapist helping individuals find hope and healing. He received his Master’s Degree in Marriage and Family Therapy from California State University, Long Beach. He has also trained with Patrick Carnes, P.hD., a leading expert in the treatment of sexual addiction issues and author of “Out of the Shadows”. He is a member of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists (CAMFT), and the Society of Sexual Health (SASH). MFT#44567

Duane’s clinical focus is on treating individuals and couples struggling with process addictions using a mindfulness and task centered approach. He facilitates the Men’s Sexual Addiction Process Group and well as a DBT group for individuals struggling with anxiety and depression.

Resources

http://theaddictedmind.com

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. Http://therapychatpodcast.com 

Jul 20, 2017
94: Attachment, Meditation, Yoga & Compassion In Trauma Therapy
47:20

Welcome to episode 94 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Deirdre Fay, MSW, LICSW, who integrates trauma and attachment theory with yoga and meditation in embodiment. She is also the founder of the Becoming Safely Embodied Skills and maintains a private practice in Arlington, MA.

The work she does arises out of her life. What she knows is grounded in her own healing as well as rigorous training as a psychotherapist looking for answers and ways to help others navigate the often-difficult terrain of healing trauma and attachment wounds.

Deirdre knows what it’s like to make that journey. She did it dealing with her own history of trauma and as she searched for answers to relational and attachment issues. During the course of her life, she was lucky to have lived for six years in a spiritual community [Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health] which surrounded her with a nurturing environment. That experience grounded Deirdre in her commitment to finding ways to help other people.

The Becoming Safely Embodied Skills were born during those years and came to fruition as she worked with trauma survivors in Boston both in her private practice and in hospital settings. She wanted to develop easy to apply take home skills that people could use when they weren’t in therapy.

Resources

https://dfay.com

Register for Equine/Daring Way™ Retreats here: https://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/retreats-1/

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. Http://therapychatpodcast.com 

Jul 14, 2017
93: Experiential Therapy, Vulnerability & Trusting The Process
50:25

Laura recaps on common themes that have emerged throughout previous episodes and also talks further about equine-assisted therapy and the benefits of spending times with horses.

Now 44 years old, Laura is more determined than ever to increase the amount of time she spends with horses, whilst her body has changed quite a bit since she first rode a horse when she was 13, it's safe to say that her heart hasn't changed much, if at all, as she learned through this experience.

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. Http://therapychatpodcast.com 

 

Jul 07, 2017
92: The Emotionally Absent Mother & The Effects of Childhood Emotional Neglect
52:30

Welcome to episode 92 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Jasmin Lee Cori, who speaks to me about emotionally absent mothers and the affects of childhood emotional neglect.

Jasmin became a therapist at the tender age of 24 and didn’t last long, as might be expected for someone who had yet to do her own healing work. When she reached 40, she uncovered childhood trauma, which began her journey of descent. She was a student of The Diamond Approach at that time, a spiritual school conversant with the intertwining of psychological and spiritual work. She was discovering her deeper essence at the same time she was dropping into dark places she hadn’t known were there; so during that time heaven and hell were unfolding simultaneously.

This continued, with yet deeper dips into both. She lost her voice, job and suffered significant health challenges and financial struggle. Yet in the midst of being flattened, sick in bed, she midwifed a book of mystical poetry in a matter of months.

Since she is a writer whose personal experience deeply informs her work, the result of this descent was authoring two books that changed her life: Healing from Trauma and The Emotionally Absent Mother. These books were healing not only for her but for tens of thousands who have read them.

Resources

http://www.jasmincori.com

Thank you to our sponsor, TherapyNotes! You can save 10% for 12 months using this link: https://www.therapynotes.com/r/therapy%20chat%20podcast Get your discount on TherapyNotes today! You can also visit TherapyNotes.com and use the coupon code: CHAT17. 

Jun 30, 2017
91: What Is Soul Care & How Do We Do It?
43:15

Welcome to episode 91 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. My guest this week is Chonteau McElvin, who has been described as modern day medicine woman.

Chonteau wears many hats but her main reason for being on the planet is to assist in the awakening and remembrance that we are all connected and the time to step into our brilliance is now. In her early 20’s she received a vision and was told by Spirit that she was a teacher and healer of the old ways. This is when her modern day Shamanic training began. She completed her formal education as a Social Worker, followed in the footsteps of her father and became a Naturalist. At 20, her father taught her how to do self-hypnotism and she began to hone her skills as a Mindfulness Practition er, Folk Healer, and Herbalist.

For as long as she can remember she has been giving to others. As a child, she remembers being a volunteer for Meals on Wheels, she served lunch to “at risk” children. The spirit of service was instilled in her at an early age. What was not instilled in her, was the spirit of self-care. When tough times arrived, she did not know how to navigate her way through it. She did not know what it meant to take care of herself.

Twelve years ago, when she suffered major personal losses, she was forced to evaluate her self-care and spiritual practices, and something amazing happened, she put “spirituality into action” and soul self-care became a way of life. She wishes she could tell you life transitions are easier when you are a Lightworker or Alternative Healer, when in fact, our need for soul nourishment is greater because of all we give. For those of us who are constantly giving to others, there does not always seem to be a safe place to our deep soul work. This can leave us feeling frustrated, fragmented and lonely, which equates to, an inability to be fully present with our clients, families and most importantly ourselves.

Resources

http://chonteau.com

Therapy Chat EP04 with Chonteau

Jun 23, 2017
90: Psychospiritual Therapy - Coming Home To The Soul
38:54

Welcome to episode 90 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. In this week's episode, I speak to Margot Borden about psychospiritual therapy, combining eastern approaches and western psychology and find out more about her new book “psychology in the light of the east”.

Margot Borden has been working internationally as a psychotherapist since 1986 and specializes in an approach called Integral Psychotherapy. Read more about Integral Psychotherapy.

Margot completed her first personal development training in 1985 and began her professional psychotherapy practice in 1986. In addition to earning a Master of Arts in Humanistic Counseling at the University of Durham, UK, Margot continues to participate in professional training and certification programs.

Margot has a long-term dedication to personal and professional exploration of the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual aspects of human consciousness. Her search involves ongoing exploration and experience of many psychological and spiritual traditions, experiential therapies as well as Eastern meditation and yogic techniques. Her success in helping clients is the result of her integrated understanding and application.

Resources

http://margotborden.com

https://www.amazon.com/Psychology-Light-Margot-Esther-Borden/dp/1442260262

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Jun 16, 2017
89: Connecting With Your Inner Wisdom To Process Emotions & Access Self-Compassion Using Journaling
49:03

Welcome to episode 89 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. In this week's episode, I’m delighted to welcome back Lisa Ferentz who speaks to me about her new book Finding Your Ruby Slippers: Transformative Life Lessons from the Therapist which looks at how you can overcome everyday obstacles, boost confidence, and end self-critical thoughts with simple life lessons.

Lisa is a recognized expert in the strengths-based, depathologized treatment of trauma and has been in private practice for 32 years. She presents workshops and keynote addresses nationally and internationally, and is a clinical consultant to practitioners and mental health agencies in the United States, Canada, and the UK.

She has been an Adjunct Faculty member at University of Maryland School of Social Work, University of Baltimore at Maryland, University of Maryland Department of Family Medicine, and is the Founder of The Ferentz Institute, formerly known as The Institute for Advanced Psychotherapy Training and Education, now going into its tenth year of providing continuing education to mental health professionals and graduating over 800 clinicians from her two Certificate Programs in Advanced Trauma Treatment.

In 2009, she was voted the “Social Worker of Year” by the Maryland Society for Clinical Social Work. Lisa is the author of Treating Self-Destructive Behaviors in Traumatized Clients: A Clinician’s Guide, now in its second edition, and Letting Go of Self-Destructive Behaviors: A Workbook of Hope and Healing. Her next book, “Finding Your Ruby Slippers: Transformative Life Lessons from the Therapist’s Couch,” will be out in January 2017. Lisa hosted a weekly radio talk show in 2014—2015. She writes for Psychologytoday.com and publishes her own blog. You can follow Lisa’s work on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

Resources

https://www.theferentzinstitute.com

https://www.amazon.com/Finding-Your-Ruby-Slippers-Transformative/dp/1683730429

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Jun 09, 2017
88: Just When the Caterpillar Thought The World Had Ended It Became A Butterfly
37:16

Welcome to episode 88 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. In this week's episode, I speak to Stephanie Macadaan, LMFT about how we can turn some of the most negative experiences in our lives to a source of strength, the need to not shield ourselves from negative experiences and stepping out of our comfort zones to further our personal growth.

Stephanie Macadaan, is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, providing individual and couples counseling in Los Angeles, California. She first became interested in studying psychology when many of her own life experiences fueled her fascination with the minds and behaviors found with each of us. Through her studies, she found she was on the path to discovering herself, which led to great personal growth and more happiness.

The profound changes she underwent drove her passion to help others, and she was compelled to become a therapist. She knows from her own experience what it’s like to be open and to create powerful change that reverberates into all areas of your life.

She's drawn to working with people starting anew, whether it’s getting your feet back on the ground after a break-up or together with your partner trying to decide the future of your relationship or find each other again.

Resources

https://therapywithstephanie.com

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Jun 02, 2017
87: Why Is It So Hard To Let Go When Our Kids Transition to Adulthood?
20:10

Some points to ponder if you are struggling to let go.

What was it like for you to move out of your parents’ home and into adulthood? Did you go to college? Did you live with your parents past the age of 18? When were you ready to move out? Were your parents ready for you to go before you were ready? Or were you ready to go before your parents wanted you to leave?

Individuation is a developmental task every young adult must complete in order to become an independent and self sufficient adult. Some families discourage individuation by refusing to allow children and adolescents to express their own individuality. Conformity is highly valued and dissent is not tolerated. These parent/child relationships can be described as enmeshed, when the child and the parent are not felt to be independent people, but rather the children are seen by the parents as an extension of the parents. When you make a mistake, I feel ashamed that you have embarrassed the family. Some kids rebel and express themselves through their appearance. The parents may believe that everyone should wear khaki pants and navy blue shirts and have traditional hairstyles, but the child wants to dress in all black with long purple hair and a safety pin through his lip.  Parents may see this as disrespectful and a power struggle escalates to the point where the child is kicked out of the house by the time they are 18, if not earlier. Do you know how to allow your child to leave home with grace and joy, rather than a big fight? If your parents were angry at you for wanting to be an independent adult, you might react the same way towards your kid without even realizing it.

Have you allowed your child opportunities to make mistakes? To experience failure? Or have you taken care of everything and made sure your child wouldn’t have the opportunity to screw up? If they did screw up (as most of us do at some point as teenagers) did you make it all better for them or did they have to experience the consequences of their actions?  We can help them with how they feel about such experiences, being supportive and allowing them to express their emotions, but if we intervene to the point that they don’t feel the consequences at all, they miss out on the chance to learn from the mistake. Maybe you didn’t take care of everything so they wouldn’t have the opportunity to screw up, but rather you were careful to control every situation so the possibility of failure just didn’t come up. So what happens when they inevitably do face failure? It is painful, no doubt. We want to protect our children from experiencing pain. But can we trust that we have raised them well enough that they will be able to handle adversity and that they can live through painful experiences, even though they may hate every minute of it? Because there is literally no way we can protect our children from every painful experience. It just isn’t possible.

What was it like for you when you went out on your own? Did you struggle? Did bad things happen? What kind of healing work have you done to address the pain of those struggles?  If you are terrified that what happened to you will happen to your child, it might be a good time to get some therapy.  It’s normal to feel this way, but if it’s interfering with YOU being okay, therapy can help. 

I realized when my oldest child went to college (and it is coming up again as I am about to send my daughter off to school) that it pretty much drove me crazy not to know what my kid was doing all the time. Not seeing them daily and being able to look into their eyes and sense whether they are okay or not felt like a loss of control. I didn’t realize how much I needed to feel in control in that way until I lost the ability to see my oldest daily. So I worried, and worried, and worried, and monitored social media, and worried and worried and waited and waited for something bad to happen. My child would tell me he was okay but I didn’t know if he really was. I tried to hide my anxiety from him but I was a ball of nerves, as any of my friends can tell you, for the entire first semester he was at college. I think I finally calmed down at Thanksgiving and it felt great when he came home for winter break. How stressful it must have been for him to have his mother so anxious!!! He might have wondered if he would be okay since I seemed to be so worried about it. Or maybe he worried about taking care of my emotions. Or felt burdened by them. I had something I needed to take care of, because this was a lot harder for me than it needed to be. There were some 18 to 20 year old parts of me that needed attention. Instead of obsessing about my son, I turned my attention inward and got help to deal with my emotions. Most of us therapists go to therapy off and on throughout our adult lives, whenever something flares up that needs attention. This is how I have grown so much personally and professionally over the past 15 years or so (and I still have a long way to go!). It helped a lot. And it is helping now as I struggle with letting go of my daughter. New awarenesses are awakening for me. Just when I thought I had it all figured out!

You know, it’s funny, when you have been a parent for 20 years you get really used to the reality that you can’t just go and do what you want because there are people who are depending on you to come home, make sure they get fed, be there for them physically and emotionally, help them when they need it. If you had the thought that you wanted to go out to dinner with friends after work and maybe have some drinks, you would need to make arrangements for someone to take care of the kids, or, if they are old enough to stay home alone, you’d need to make sure they have something to eat for dinner, that they are on top of their homework, and that they know when you’ll be back. 

It’s a real shift in identity when you are not defined by being “Mom.” I know I am a mother, wife, therapist, friend, student learning to ride horses, a dog’s best friend…but the role of parent has been so big and important for the last 20 years that I will need some time to adjust to having that role take up less of my physical, mental and emotional energy.

So where I am right now is that I am experiencing being home with my husband this week, with no kids, and we can do what we want. We can go where we want, when we want, with no one to consider but each other and ourselves. This is because right now my youngest is off at the beach with friends all week and my oldest is away at college, and he isn’t coming home this summer.  So I can do what I want. So what is that? Mostly we are going to work and back. I have always had hobbies and interests, but the easiest thing to do is to work. So I don’t want to overwork because while that may be my go-to, it’s not good for me. I don’t really watch that much TV…I can read, but not a work related book….what would I like to do? If I really check in with myself what I want to do, what feels right to do is wait. And worry. Until my kid comes home, hopefully all in one piece.  Just wait, suspended animation. I’ll be right here so if something happens I can spring into action. Even though she is not close enough for me to do anything if she does have a problem, at least not immediately. That is what I want to do. I’ll be right over here, waiting and worrying. You may see me wringing my hands and pacing, just ignore it. However, that is really not what I should do either. So far my two choices seem to be overwork or obsessive worry. Okayyyyyyy….there’s got to be something else. Well it’s too late to go to the gym but I can do that tomorrow morning. That will help, I know this. Then tomorrow night after work, uhhhh….I had some good ideas about fun things to do when my daughter goes to college, but right now I can’t remember any of them. Just this worry.

What I don’t want to do is sit with the discomfort. One of my least favorite things, sitting with uncertainty, is something I try to avoid by distracting myself. I know we all do this. It’s uncomfortable so we avoid it. I am really good at doing this by filling all of my time up so there is no time in between to feel. I could keep myself from feeling almost all the time this week if I stay busy enough but I don’t want that. I do want to feel. I don’t know if my daughter will be okay at college. I don’t know if my son will be okay either. I don’t know anything that is going to happen, if I’m being honest. We don’t know. We don’t have any control. Fear of the unknown can drive our behavior if we aren’t paying attention.

So now I remember what I need to do. First, take a deep breath in, then breathe out. Then do it again. Repeat a few more times. Everything automatically feels better when I do that. I have to remind myself because when anxiety is taking over I forget. I could reach out to a supportive friend. I have many – a perk of being a therapist. Therapists for friends.  There is something else that I can remind myself. I ask myself, “what can I control?” The answer is, I can control me. I can’t control situations my daughter and son will encounter or how they feel. But I can control taking care of me and how I feel. If I attend to my emotions then I can remain calm and centered (or return to that state) in stressful situations. My kids will be able to trust me, and they will be able to come to me for help when things inevitably happen. They can trust that I will be able to handle my own emotions so they won’t have to put aside their own feelings to take care of mine. It’s always been important that my kids not feel like it is their responsibility to take care of my emotions.

There is no question that I am happy that my daughter graduated. I am so proud of her and she has an amazing future ahead of her. She needs to do this, it is what she should do, and what we have hoped for her. So I need to take care of me so I can be present for her. You can do the same with your young person transitioning to adulthood. Here’s an easy shortcut. Start out with your feet on the floor, close your eyes or look down and take a long deep inhale. Exhale slowly. Repeat the long inhale. Then exhale slowly. One more long deep inhale. Exhale slowly. Now, turn your attention inward. In your mind, ask yourself what you are feeling. Tune in to that emotion, even if you don’t like what it is. See if you can allow that feeling instead of trying to push it away. Breathe into it. Just be with that. Next, in your mind, ask yourself “what do I need right now?” and notice what comes up. It may be a word, a feeling, a person that comes to mind. Once you get an answer for what you need, consider if there is a way to give it to yourself. It can be so comforting to simply place a hand on your heart and feel the warmth of it resting there. Or to take your right hand and place it on your left arm, just below the shoulder and rub. Doing this does not change what is, but it allows some space to have a different perspective about what’s happening. In that space there is an opportunity for self compassion.

The point that I hope you are taking away from this is simple. Our feelings about our children growing up are normal, and they are not about the child. The difficulty I am having adjusting to my daughter leaving in a few months is not really about her, it’s about me. She is doing her normal developmental task. I am grieving the loss of childhood, the loss of daily in person connection, and anticipating pain that hasn’t happened yet. Maybe it won’t happen. Most likely it won’t happen in the exact way that I’m worrying it will happen. But I am really grieving my own experiences that maybe I didn’t deal with the first time around because I wasn’t ready in terms of my emotional development at the time.  Now it is time to take care of that younger me.

And one thing I know is that this uncomfortable place I am in is part of the process of me coming to terms with what is. I don’t like feeling this way, but part of the path from where I was to where I will be is this part. I don’t like it, I want it to go away, but you can’t skip the middle part. Later this month I will post a bonus episode on the subject of rising up out of the muck, that messy middle part of life that we don’t enjoy but which makes it richer and helps us grow. As they say, everything you want in life happens outside of your comfort zone.

And if you are struggling with the change in identity as your kids grow older, consider getting some counseling! It really helps. If you’re in the Baltimore area visit my website laurareaganlcswc.com to find out about working with me or another therapist in my office.

Resources

http://www.therapychatpodcast.com

Daring Greatly by Brené Brown

Rising Strong by Brené Brown

Self Compassion by Kristin Neff

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

May 26, 2017
86: Navigating Your Child's Transition to Adulthood:
33:44

Welcome to episode 86 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. In this week's episode, I’m flying solo to talk about coping with loss during transitions, my thoughts and feelings and ways to improve how you feel through this transitional period in your life.  

This week is an exciting one for our family, as our oldest child graduates from high school in a few days. It's a joyful and exciting time - but there are some underlying feelings of sadness and loss which have caught me by surprise.  I know that many of you are experiencing a similar transition in the life of your family, as graduation and wedding season begin. I thought I'd share my thoughts and feelings, and how I'm coping with the changes, in hopes that it will be helpful to you, too.

As I've been eagerly anticipating his graduation I've been very proud and excited for my child. My thoughts are that this is a wonderful milestone in his life.  I'm so happy that he has successfully completed his high school career and that he plans to go to college in the Fall. I have high hopes for what this young man will accomplish as he matures. I am looking forward to seeing what he decides to do for his career after college. I know that this is a normal developmental process, in which my child will leave the nest to become a fully realized adult. Although it does not happen overnight with this event, this milestone is an extremely important rite of passage in our culture. I want him to move through this process, because it's what is right for him developmentally. But...he's my baby!

I knew something was wrong when I noticed that I didn't seem to have any feelings about the graduation. I actually felt kind of numb. I knew intellectually that I felt happy and excited and maybe a little sad because he won't be living at home with us for most of the next four years. But I didn't feel it. In fact I was telling myself that it is not time to feel sad yet, because graduation is a happy time, and going away to college is something that will happen later this summer, so I can feel it then. Ha ha! Joke's on me! 

Read the full show notes here - https://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/connectwithyourtrueselfblog/2015/5/24/letting-go-part-1

Resources

http://www.therapychatpodcast.com

http://therapynotes.com

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

May 19, 2017
85: Shaming Parents Only Makes Things Worse!
39:15

Welcome to episode 85 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. In this week's episode, I’m delighted to welcome back the first ever guest of the podcast; Mercedes Samudio who speaks to me about parent shaming, how culture plays into what we view is ok and not ok and the need to help parents and not label them as bad people.

Mercedes Samudio is a parent coach who supports parents and children to communicate with each other, manage emotional trauma, navigate social media and technology together, and develop healthy parent-child relationships. As a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with a private parent coaching practice, Mercedes has worked with adoptive families, foster families, teen parents, parents navigating the child protective services system, and children living with mental illness. Mercedes seeks to empower parents to believe that they are already great guides for raising healthy and happy children.

Being raised by someone who was not her biological mother (but who she called mom) really shaped how she saw myself, how she saw families, and how she saw parenting. And, it also put her on the path to figuring out how to support and heal families.

Whether you are a biological parent or not, being in a family system is complicated. As she healed her own relationship with her mother (a relationship she talks about in her book), and as she began to work with more and more families professionally, she realized that so many parents crumble under the pressure of being shamed, not knowing if they’re doing this parenting thing right, and struggling to connect with themselves and their children.

Resources

https://shameproofparenting.com

https://shameproofparenting.com/buybook

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

May 12, 2017
84: Bonus Episode - 4 Reasons Mother's Day Can Be Hard & How To Help Yourself Through It
18:31

Welcome to episode 84 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. In this week's episode, I talk about Mother’s Day.

As another Mother's Day approaches, you may be feeling a little less than enthusiastic about the big day. No need to feel guilty if it doesn't feel joyful to you. You're not alone! Most of my clients and a good number of my friends share that they have mixed feelings about Mother's Day too. This post is for all of you out there who hate the second Sunday in May for whatever reason. And there can be lots of reasons!

There are so many reasons why people find negative emotions coming up near Mother's Day. Here are some that I hear frequently, along with a few suggestions for dealing with these feelings. Feel free to share any ideas I missed in the comments below.

4 reasons why people say they hate Mother's Day:

"I hate Mother's Day because my mom's not here. Mother's Day reminds me how much I miss her and makes me wish I could tell her one more time how much I love her."

Maybe you were close with your mom and she passed away. Or maybe you weren't as close as you wanted to be, and her death left a lot of unresolved feelings about the relationship. You might feel the loss even more acutely on Mother's Day, even if her death was a long time ago. Maybe you were adopted and you want to connect with your birth mother. The marketing of Mother's Day means you see and hear commercials which tug at your heartstrings. Be gentle with yourself, knowing that you are sad about her loss. Allow yourself to feel your feelings on this tough day. Ask yourself what you can do in remembrance or to honor her. Think about what would make you feel nurtured, and do that, whether it's lying on the sofa wrapped in a cozy blanket watching Steel Magnolias, or going roller skating with your best friend, or cuddling with a puppy at the local animal shelter. Maybe your most special friends or family are not nearby. Can you call, video chat or text them? I'm sure you know what makes you feel loved and taken care of. Do that!

"Mother's Day is hard for me because I have always wanted to be a mom and I'm dealing with infertility."

Infertility can feel very isolating, especially if your friends and family members are getting pregnant and having babies, and you have miscarried or had trouble conceiving. Even if you have made the decision not to have children, or you have delivered a baby or adopted after experiencing infertility or pregnancy loss, Mother's Day can stir up a lot of mixed feelings. Many people say they feel no one understands what they're going through. It might be helpful to spend this day doing something that feels comforting to you. Don't worry about what other people are posting on social media today. Honor your own experience in a way that feels right to you. Are you part of a support group, in person or online? If not, would you like to find one? The National Infertility Association has a list of helplines and support groups as well as a number of other resources on its website. Through The Heart has ideas for coping on its website.

"I feel sad seeing everyone's Facebook posts saying they love their moms so much, and my mom was never there for me emotionally when I was a child. We still don't have a good relationship. I am mad at her for not taking better care of me."

I specialize in working with people who have experienced some kind of abuse or neglect in childhood. Therefore, many of my clients find Mother's Day triggers their trauma symptoms. Our culture places such importance of the mother role! Many people who are disappointed in their relationships with their moms also feel guilty about having those feelings. It is okay to feel however you feel about your mom. You do not have to pretend your relationship with her is different from how it truly is just because of Mother's Day. Here's a podcast episode I did on being estranged from important loved ones you may find helpful.

This is a good time to do what makes you feel special. If you have a partner, letting that person know this is a tough day for you and asking for extra support can be helpful. You can nurture yourself, even if you were not nurtured as a child. If you need extra support with this, therapy can be helpful. Here's a podcast episode on how childhood emotional neglect can make us feel as if we have a "fatal flaw" making us unlovable.

"I am a single mother and no one supports me on Mother's Day or any other time of the year."

Mother's Day might feel just like any other day if you have little kids and no partner to make sure that you are celebrated on this day. I'll add it might be just like any other day, with an extra dose of resentment about feeling overworked and unappreciated. Once again, I recommend you try to do what you can to take care of you. Your kids will understand everything you do for them when they're older, but for now, they don't get it. Reaching out to a friend who is also a single mom could be helpful. Maybe it would feel nice for you and your kids to get together with a mom friend and her kids. While the kids play you can provide one another with moral support. Or maybe you can take your kids to the park, so they can play while you get a bit of respite. Do you have any family or friends who would be willing to watch the kids so you can do something that makes you feel special on Sunday?

A couple more things that might help:

I have two more recommendations that might make the day easier if you struggle on Mother's Day. First, it might be wise to avoid social media that day and the day after. Just like on Valentine's Day, Mother's Day is a notorious day to catch a bad case of comparison-itis when you see what your friends on social media are posting. There will be "perfect" family photos, flowers, and many photos of the fabulous brunches that someone's wonderful spouse or kids treated them to on Mother's Day. I'm not taking anything away from your friends and the wonderful Mother's Day experience they want to share on social media, but if you know this is going to be tough for you, it might help to just not look that Sunday and Monday.

My second recommendation is to try this meditation if you need a little Loving-Kindness (Metta) in your life.

To begin, sit comfortably on a chair or meditation cushion, with your feet on the floor or legs crossed. Sit up tall and breathe deeply for three inhales and three exhales. Bring your awareness to your heart and try to recall loving feelings from someone who made you feel nurtured. Slowly repeat these words:
Click on the image to visit my website where you can listen to and download two free guided meditations.
Click on the image to visit my website where you can listen to and download two free guided meditations.

May I be safe.

May I be happy.

May I be kind to myself.

May I be free of suffering.

Notice what feelings arise. You may feel the loving kindness spread over your body. You may also notice that sadness or anger are felt. Do not try to push these feelings away, but just notice them. If you can allow yourself to feel them you might find that they pass. Continue taking deep breaths in and out, and just notice how you feel. There is no right or wrong way to feel. This simple practice can be done for a minute or two, or for longer if you wish. It is up to you.

I hope the meditation I have described above will offer some comfort, even if you hate Mother's Day. If you'd like more guided meditations, Here is a link to two free meditations on my website.

If you have a reason for hating Mother's Day that I didn't mention, please comment below! I'd also love to hear of any other ideas you may know of that are helpful in getting through Mother's Day if it's a hard day for you. And please remember that you are not alone.

Find this in blog post format here: https://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/connectwithyourtrueselfblog/2015/5/5/hate-mothers-day-this-ones-for-you

With loving kindness,

Laura Reagan, LCSW-C

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

May 10, 2017
83: Maternal Health - What Moms & Therapists Need To Know
01:03:20

Welcome to episode 83 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. In this week's episode, I speak to Dr. Kat Kaeni about the issue of Maternal Mental Health, which is all about your mental health during conception, pregnancy, miscarriage or loss, birth and postpartum.

Dr. Kat is a psychologist, who helps you find ways out of suffering or confusion and into wellness. People go to her psychotherapy practice when they are struggling with things in their life and want to feel better. Her style of working with people is to be real and keep therapy down to earth. In her sessions, she uses compassion, insight, and empathy in addition to her education and training to guide your healing. Her belief is that therapy should not be a mysterious process. She believes that you have the ability to get better. Sometimes we just need a little help; sometimes we need a lot of help.

You may have heard of postpartum depression already. There are other things that most folks don’t know about…It’s not always rainbows and puppy dogs, like we are meant to think it’s “supposed to be”. For about 20% of women, the transition into parenthood can lead to severe mood changes. There are things that don’t go as planned such as: Pregnancy or postpartum depression, anxiety, trauma, OCD and less frequently, bipolar disorder or psychosis. These are serious, but very treatable conditions.

In this episode, Dr. Kat talks about how this is a more common issue than people realize, how you can identify the symptoms of maternal mental health and ways in which to prevent these disorders.

Resources

https://drkaeni.com

http://momandmind.com

http://www.postpartum.net

http://www.postpartumprogress.com

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ppd-gone/id529141505?mt=8 (PPD Gone App)

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

May 05, 2017
82: Love Relationships When One Partner Is Anxious
46:50

Welcome to episode 82 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. In this week's episode, I speak to Carolyn Daitch, Ph.D. who has been a psychologist in private practice for more than 30 years. She is a psychologist, trainer, author and presenter, and the director of the Center for the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in Farmington Hills, Michigan.

Dr. Daitch is a consultant with the University of Michigan School of Medicine’s Department of Complementary and Alternative Research. She has served three terms on the Executive Council of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH) and as a member-at-large, Psychology. She has also been elected an officer in Division 30, of the American Psychological Association. She was the Educational co-chair of the Society of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. Dr. Daitch is the recipient of two Presidential awards from the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis for her writing, teaching, and contributions to ASCH. She is also past-president of the Michigan Society of Clinical Hypnosis, from whom she was honored with a lifetime achievement award in 2008.

In 2007, Dr. Daitch published the award-winning Affect Regulation Toolbox: Practical and Effective Hypnotic Interventions for the Over-reactive Client (W.W. Norton), which has received international acclaim. She is a contributing author of Clinical Pearls of Wisdom: Leading Therapists Offer Their Key Insights (W.W. Norton, 2010). Dr. Daitch is also the author of Anxiety Disorders: The Go-To Guide for Clients and Therapists (W.W. Norton, 2011), and co-author of Anxious in Love: How to Manage Your Anxiety, Reduce Conflict and Reconnect with Your Partner (New Harbinger, 2012). Her newest project is The Road to Calm Workbook: Life-Changing Tools to Stop Runaway Emotions (W.W. Norton, In Press).

In this episode, Dr. Daitch talks further about anxiety, how it can affect relationships and ways in which couples can communicate better to overcome this issue.

Resources

http://carolyndaitchphd.com

https://www.amazon.com/Anxious-Love-Anxiety-Conflict-Reconnect/dp/1608822311/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1435380113&sr=1-4&keywords=carolyn+daitch

canxietydisorders@me.com

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Apr 28, 2017
81: Trauma Isn't Always What You Think It Is
19:01

Welcome to episode 81 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week's episode is a solo episode with myself expanding more on trauma, what you think it is: and what you can do if you have experienced it.

If you listened to episode 79 with Dr. Gabor Maté, you’ll be interested in this episode, in that episode we defined what trauma was, but there is still confusion around what trauma is, so I hope this episode will help in explaining further what trauma is and the issues around it.

When you hear the word "trauma," what do you think of? If you're like most people, you probably imagine that people experience the effects of trauma after a plane crash, surviving a fire, a major car accident, or participating in military combat. It's true that all of those things can cause someone to experience trauma symptoms, but there are many other traumatic experiences which are more common in the general population that we don't always recognize as being traumatic.

I must point out, though, that I have talked to many people who have survived house fires or military combat. Most often when I describe that these experiences - which you and I can pretty much agree, can we not, are considered by most people to be experiences fitting the definition of trauma - could have been traumatic, the person sitting with me in the therapy room will say, "I don't really think of it as traumatic. I mean, so many people have been through much worse."

There is a reason why that statement is so interesting, which I explain in the podcast… Enjoy!

Resources

Episode 79: Childhood Traumatic Stress: The Mind-Body Connection http://directory.libsyn.com/episode/index/show/baltimoreannapolispsychotherapypodcast/id/5241791

Episode 25: What Is Childhood Emotional Neglect? - https://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/connectwithyourtrueselfblog/2016/3/21/therapy-chat-podcast

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Apr 21, 2017
80: Nature As Co-Therapist
50:04

Welcome to episode 80 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week's episode features Amy Sugeno, LCSW, PLLC.

If you listened to episode 79 with Dr. Gabor Maté, you’ll be interested in this interview with Amy Sugeno, LCSW of Marble Falls, Texas, who is a clinical eco-therapist. Amy talks about what Eco Therapy is, the research on its use and effectiveness with depression and anxiety, stress relief, ADHD, grounding and self-regulation for trauma survivors.

Amy explains that Eco Therapy can take many forms, including animal-assisted (for example, canine and equine) therapies, wilderness therapies, walk and talk therapy, horticulture therapy and clinical eco-therapy in an office, as well as many other possibilities. She explains that this is a depth-oriented type of psychotherapy which can be very powerful. Amy describes how she conducts an eco-therapy session what to wear and what a client can expect overall. She and Laura discuss the power dynamics of the therapy relationship and how Eco Therapy can help create a balance.

For the past 10 years, Amy has worked to help people heal from trauma. Most of her work has been with adults and teens affected by interpersonal violence and sexual abuse. Over the years, she has also worked with people struggling with suicidal thoughts, self-harming behaviors, eating disorders, homelessness, chronic mental illness, and substance abuse.

In this episode, you will hear Amy talk about the positive benefits of Eco Therapy, forest bathing and the shared vulnerability Eco Therapy can create between Amy and her client.

Resources

Amy’s website: http://www.amysugenocounseling.com/

The Animas Institute www.animas.org

Episode 78 with Lanie Smith on Eco Art Therapy: http://traffic.libsyn.com/baltimoreannapolispsychotherapypodcast/EP78_LanieSmith.mp3

Episode 79 with Dr. Gabor Maté on the effects of traumatic stress during development:  http://traffic.libsyn.com/baltimoreannapolispsychotherapypodcast/TherapyChat_EP79_GaborMate.mp3

Amy’s previous interview on Therapy Chat on Attachment: http://traffic.libsyn.com/baltimoreannapolispsychotherapypodcast/Amy_Sugeno_final.mp3

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Apr 14, 2017
79: Childhood Traumatic Stress: The Mind-Body Connection
51:08

 

Welcome to episode 79 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week's episode features Dr. Gabor Maté. Dr. Maté is the co-founder of Compassion for Addiction, a new non-profit that focuses on addiction. He is also an advisor of Drugs over Dinner.

As an author, Dr. Maté has written several bestselling books including the award-winning In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters with Addiction; When the Body Says No: The Cost of Hidden Stress; and Scattered Minds: A New Look at the Origins and Healing of Attention Deficit Disorder, and co-authored Hold on to Your Kids. His works have been published internationally in twenty languages.

For twelve years Dr. Maté worked in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside with patients challenged by hard-core drug addiction, mental illness and HIV, including at Vancouver’s Supervised Injection Site. With over 20 years of family practice and palliative care experience and extensive knowledge of the latest findings of leading-edge research, Dr. Maté is a sought-after speaker and teacher, regularly addressing health professionals, educators, and lay audiences throughout North America.

In the fall of 2017, Dr. Maté will be launching a brand new website offering online courses in his various areas of expertise. The first course will be a training program for health professionals working with people with addiction.

Dr. Maté explains the connection between childhood traumatic stress at any point in development - even in utero - and mental and physical health and well-being. Beyond a discussion of ACES, he describes the causes of illness and how trauma fits in. Did you know that ADD/ADHD, MS, Prostate cancer, ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease) and many other diseases, as well as addictions of all kinds are linked to trauma? Gabor's books, In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts, Scattered, and When the Body Says No go into depth with the research to support his assertions.

Resources

https://drgabormate.com

https://www.compassion4addiction.org

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66cYcSak6nE (Ted Talk)

Article Dr. Maté referenced: "An Integrated Scientific Framework for Child Survival and Early Childhood Development" from Pediatrics, February 2012, Vol 129, Issue 2.

Thank you to this episode's sponsor, TherapyNotes! You can get a free month of TherapyNotes plus 10% off for a year using the code CHAT17 ! Visit https:// therapynotes.com to sign up! Or just click here to get the 10% discount for 12 months: https://www.therapynotes.com/r/therapy%20chat%20podcast 

 

To request to join the Trauma Therapists Unite free Facebook community, go here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1774552256196397/ and read the instructions. It's a 2 step process!  

If you're interested in the Trauma Therapist Community online clinical consultation groups, you can go here to get all the details and register: http://laurareaganlcswc.com/join

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Apr 07, 2017
78: Eco-Art Therapy
41:58

Welcome to episode 78 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week's episode features Lanie Smith.  

Lanie Smith is the founder of Integrative Art Therapy in Phoenix, AZ helping kids, teens and adults express themselves through art to improve wellness. Art therapy is the creative process of art-making to improve and enhance the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual well-being of individuals of all ages. The creative process offers an outlet for self-expression and helps to resolve conflicts, develop interpersonal skills, manage behavior, reduce stress, increase self-esteem/awareness, and alter the brain state to improve overall functioning.

As an Eco-Art Therapist and the owner/founder of Integrative Art Therapy, she has watched so many clients learn how to “bring the inside out and the outside in.” Her passion is to help you recognize your own innate beauty and wisdom as it’s reflected in the trees, mountains, wildlife, and in your own creativity.

Her practice is designed to move clients out of chronic stress, overwhelm, and defensive reactivity into a sense of calm and inner peace; beyond the use of coping techniques. Ultimately, her clients shed unnecessary protective layers in order to become who they truly are. Together, they decide on what changes are needed and collaborate on the best path to reach the final destination, using EcoArt Therapy as the vehicle.

In this episode, you will hear Lanie speak about what integrative art therapy involves, her work with eco-art therapy in dreamy draw mountain and her work can be used to support self-care.

Resources

https://integrativearttherapy.net

http://www.ecobuddhism.org/wisdom/psyche_and_spirit/james_hillman

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Eco-Art-Therapy-Creative-Activities-Earth/dp/0615901476

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mindfulness-Based-Ecotherapy-Workbook-Charlton-LMFT-S/dp/1514840103

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Mar 31, 2017
77: What Is Covert Emotional Incest?
45:05

Welcome to episode 77 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week's episode features Adena Bank Lees.  

Recognized as an energetic presenter and integrative thinker, Adena Bank Lees has been offering expert services in training, consulting and psychotherapy around the globe for over 25 years. She possesses the ability to energize others to create, implement new ideas and incorporate them into their professional and personal lives.

Adena's love of psychodrama was sparked way back in 1989 while employed as a post-master's intern at the Caron Foundation, Wernersville PA. She knew immediately this was the theory and modality of transformation she would utilize as the underpinning of her life's work. She received her C.P. February 7, 2014, after 25 years of study and raising then launching her only son to independence.

Adena is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Licensed and Internationally Certified Substance Abuse Counselor, Board Certified Expert in Traumatic Stress, a Certified Imago Relationship Therapist and Certified Practitioner in Psychodrama. She is an adjunct faculty member of the Arizona Psychodrama Institute. As a leader in childhood sexual abuse and addiction treatment, Adena has provided over 800 presentations to mental health and allied professionals across the globe on childhood sexual abuse and its relation to PTSD, substance/process addictions, intimacy, self-harm behaviors, dissociation and eating disorders. Her most recent book is titled, 12 Healing Steps for Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse; A Practical Guide. Adena nurtures her fun-loving side by pursuing her interest in acting and singing at the community theater level, enjoys hiking in the Arizona desert and filling her days with laughter.

In this episode, you will hear Adena speak about covert emotional incest, its impact on individuals & families and how you can identify if you are suffering from covert emotional incest.

Resources

http://adenabanklees.com  

https://www.facebook.com/AdenaBankLees

https://www.amazon.com/Healing-Survivors-Childhood-Sexual-Practical/dp/1481021249

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Mar 24, 2017
76: Kundalini Yoga for Mental Health
55:25

Welcome to episode 76 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week's episode features David Shannahoff-Khalsa.

David Shannahoff-Khalsa is the Director of The Research Group for Mind-Body Dynamics at UCSD’s BioCircuits Institute, and a member of the UCSD Center for Integrative Medicine. Prior to coming to UCSD in 1994 he spent 23 years at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, first working on the building blocks of the genetic code, and then pioneering novel studies in the neurosciences.

He has discovered a novel step in the evolution of the nervous system that gives new insights to mind-body (psychophysiological) states and how to control these states. He has published widely in scientific journals and conducted three clinical trials using Kundalini Yoga meditation techniques for treating obsessive compulsive disorders and OC spectrum disorders, and pioneered the use of whole-head magnetoencephalography brain imaging to study these and other yogic meditation techniques.

His 3 books published by W. W. Norton and Co. include: Kundalini Yoga Meditation: Techniques Specific for Psychiatric Disorders, Couples Therapy, and Personal Growth, 2006; Kundalini Yoga Meditation for Complex Psychiatric Disorders: Techniques Specific for Treating the Psychoses, Personality, and Pervasive Developmental Disorders, 2010; Sacred Therapies: The Kundalini Yoga Meditation Handbook for Mental Health, 2012. And Psychophysiological States: The Ultradian Dynamics of Mind-Body Interactions, Academic Press (Elsevier Scientific Publications), 2008.

In this episode, you will hear David speak about how he started as a biologist, his work with Kundalini Yoga Meditation and the scientific evidence behind his work.

Resources

http://sacredtherapies.com

http://theinternetyogi.com

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13707821-sacred-therapies

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Mar 17, 2017
75: Trauma Sensitive Yoga
59:37

Welcome to episode 75 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week's episode features David Emerson.

David is the Founder and Director of Yoga Services for the Trauma Center at the Justice Resource Institute in Brookline Massachusetts, where he coined the term “trauma-sensitive yoga”. He was responsible for curriculum development, supervision and oversight of the yoga intervention component of the first of its kind, NIH funded study, conducted by Dr. Bessel van der Kolk to assess the utility and feasibility of yoga for adults with treatment-resistant PTSD.

Mr. Emerson has developed, conducted, and supervised TSY groups for rape crisis centers, domestic violence programs, residential programs for youth, military bases, survivors of terrorism, and Veterans Administration centers and clinics. In addition to co-authoring several articles on the subject of yoga and trauma, Mr. Emerson is the co-author of Overcoming Trauma through Yoga, released in 2011 by North Atlantic Books and Author of the forthcoming, Trauma-Sensitive Yoga in Therapy (Norton, 2015).

He leads trainings for yoga teachers and mental health clinicians in North America, Europe, and Asia. David trains in the U.S. and abroad and is a supervisor in the certification program

In this episode, you will hear David speak about how he began his work with trauma sensitive Yoga, the neuroscience behind the work he does and the shared authentic experience and attachment theory.  

Resources

http://www.traumasensitiveyoga.com

https://www.amazon.com/Overcoming-Trauma-through-Yoga-Reclaiming/dp/1556439695/ref=sr_1_1_twi_pap_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1490148282&sr=8-1&keywords=overcoming+trauma+through+yoga

http://directory.libsyn.com/episode/index/id/5090996 (EP72 - Yoga for Depression & Anxiety)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1774552256196397

https://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/join

Thank you to Lesley University for sponsoring this episode, find them online here - http://www.lesley.edu/mental-health-programs

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Mar 10, 2017
74: Using Sandplay Therapy with Children & Adults
54:27

Welcome to episode 74 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week’s guest features E. Anna Goodwin. Anna is a psychotherapist and lecturer turned writer and professional speaker.  Anna applies her extensive knowledge and experience with those suffering from trauma and stress in her highly-acclaimed book, “How to Cope with Stress After a Trauma: Especially for Veterans, their Families, and Friends.”

Anna also co-authored a renowned textbook for counselors and psychologists entitled “Sandplay Therapy: A Step-by-Step Manual for Psychotherapists of Diverse Orientations” and is now writing psychological suspense using her extensive knowledge of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. She lives in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho.

At present Anna is writing a fiction trilogy under her penname Ana Parker Goodwin about what she loves most: a mixture of psychology and mystery/suspense. Why is she writing fiction? Simple. She can create her own ending to a story, which she could not do in real life. Forbidden Justice deals with the wildly disparate views of “memory” in the field of psychology today.

What is real? What is not? Her heroine, Dr. Faythe Bradington, Clinical Psychologist, is shocked to discover that a prestigious but unscrupulous law firm has filed a multimillion dollar lawsuit against her. One of her ex-clients is accusing her of implanting false memories of childhood abuse. Why? Faythe is sure she is innocent. :

In this episode, you will her discuss her work around sandplay / sandtray therapy, how it can be used by therapists and working with people suffering with PTSD.

Resources

https://anaparkergoodwin.com

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1374376.Sandplay_Therapy

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Mar 03, 2017
73: Creating A Safe Space for All the Parts of Ourselves
31:05

Welcome to episode 73 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week’s guest features Xanthia Johnson. She is the founder of Urban Playogoly in Washington, DC. Urban Playology provides psychotherapy services to children, adolescents, individuals, couples and families.

During defining transitions, she provides a safe place for you to be who you are. Whether you are 2 years old or 85 years young, you will enjoy a transformative experience. Her clinical areas of specialization and interest include but are not limited to: Women & Women of Color Issues, Urban Play Therapy, Expressive Arts, Sandtray Therapy, Grief & Loss, LGBTIQ Folk, TF-CBT, Broad Spectrum Couples & Family Work

At Urban Playology, they utilize an Integrative therapy model with emphasis on advocacy and social justice for all clients. This approach helps them provide optimal support and sustainable nurturing for all clients. They offer professional training, clinical supervision, and clinical consultation on advocacy projects of interest.

In this episode, you will her discuss her work at Urban Playology, the need for creating a safe space, the importance of the safe space for both the therapist and client and creating the conditions for people to know what they want from the therapy sessions.  

Resources

http://www.urbanplayology.com

https://twitter.com/UrbanPlayology

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Feb 24, 2017
72: Yoga for Depression & Anxiety
33:27

Welcome to episode 72 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week’s guest features Amy Weintraub. Amy has been a pioneer in the field of yoga and mental health for over twenty years.  She offers the LifeForce Yoga Practitioner Training for Mood Management to health and yoga professionals and offers workshops for everyday practitioners.

Amy leads workshops and professional trainings at academic and psychology conferences internationally at such venues as the Boston University Graduate School of Psychology, the University of Arizona Medical School, the Psychotherapy Networker Symposium, the Integrative Mental Health Conference, the Cape Cod Institute, Kripalu Center, Omega Institute, Sivananda Ashram, Yogaville, Esalen, Patanjali University in Haridwar, India and Yoga studios throughout the United States. Amy is also a regular contributor on the Goddesses in America blog.

In the episode, Amy talks about her background, the primary practices of Yoga for depression & anxiety and gives an example of the use of “Stair, Step, Breath”. Amy has also won numerous literary prizes for her short fiction, including national prizes from Writer’s Digest Magazine, explorations and Wind. Her novel-in-progress, and her film documentaries have received awards from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, San Francisco State University, and many other national competitions.

Resources

http://yogafordepression.com

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13707823-yoga-skills-for-therapists

http://www.goddessesinamerica.com

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Feb 17, 2017
71: Addiction & Trauma
29:51

Welcome to episode 71 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week’s guest features Robert Cox, NCC. Robert is a therapist in Missouri near Kansas City who specializes in trauma, addictions, and autism. Trauma and addictions almost always go hand in hand. He specializes in walking with his patients through those rough patches. He uses therapy and mindfulness to work towards overcoming the past, repairing damaged relationships and moving into the future with a new ability to set boundaries and hold healthy relationships.

 As Robert says in his own words:

 “It has occurred to me that some of my future clients might wonder who they are hiring to help them through some very rough patches and trusting to walk with them on some vulnerable journeys.  I understand that because I have been many of the places my clients have been and will go.  I have my own history of addiction.  In 1988 I used for the last time and I have been clean since.  I know what it is to struggle with trauma, anxiety and craving.  I know what it is to feel so raw all the time that all you want is for things to stop hurting and to be willing to do anything to escape that.  I know what it is to feel you have disappointed and hurt everyone around you but not know how to stop.  Those experiences have deepened my ability to help my clients know that I feel what they feel…. that I have known what they know.”

In the episode, Robert talks about his background, how trauma & autism are related and how he became involved with mindfulness. Robert also has two podcasts of his own “Listening to Autism” and “Mindful Recovery” which you can check out from the links below.

Resources

http://liferecoveryconsulting.com

http://listeningtoautism.libsyn.com

http://liferecoveryconsulting.com/podcast-2

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Feb 10, 2017
70: Core Emotions & the Change Triangle
55:30

Welcome to episode 70 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week’s guest features Hilary Jacobs Hendel, LCSW. Hilary was gracious enough to speak to me again after a fault with technology disrupted our previous interview. I originally touched base with Hilary because she consulted on the show Mad Men (which I’m a huge fan of) and in episode 53 & 54 you can hear me dissect the character of Don Draper and relate it to childhood trauma, secrecy, and shame.

Hilary grew up in New York City in a culture of "mind over matter." Raised by a psychiatrist and a guidance counselor, family time included analyzing her thoughts and dreams. Feelings were rarely mentioned (except perhaps to discuss how to get rid of them!) She thought she had total control over my emotions. Now she wants to share what she (and many psychotherapists and researchers) know about the new science of emotions. She wants others to learn what she had the good fortune to learn: that core emotions provide a path to physical and psychological well-being.

In the episode, Hilary talks about core emotions, the change triangle, the disconnect between thoughts and body experience. She also goes further in depth on her analysis of the character Don Draper from Mad Men, analyzing which core feelings Don would able to identify after treatment.

Resources

http://www.hilaryjacobshendel.com

https://www.facebook.com/AuthorHilaryJacobsHendel

Today's sponsor, Lesley University: http://www.lesley.edu/mental-health 

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Feb 03, 2017
69: Helping Survivors of Sexual Violence with the Legal System
41:45

Welcome to episode 69 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This week’s guest features the director of the Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault (MCASA), Lisae Jordan.MCASA supports legislation that promotes justice for survivors of sexual assault, accountability for offenders, and protection for the general public.

MCASA supports legislation that promotes justice for survivors of sexual assault, accountability for offenders, and protection for the general public. MCASA responds to policy questions and legislative initiatives throughout the year and is represented in Annapolis during the legislative session. MCASA tracked over 35 bills during the 2016 legislative session to assure that the needs of survivors are addressed.

In the episode, Lisae talks about the work she does and her commitment to support rape crisis centers, schools, forensic nurse examiners, law enforcement, and survivors. She also talks about the ways in which MCASA has been able to change laws in Maryland to benefit survivors, such as the Rape Survivor Family Protection Act which will be introduced in the Maryland legislature in January, 2017.

Resources

http://www.mcasa.org

http://www.mcasa.org/social-media-enewsletter

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Jan 27, 2017
68: Creativity & the Therapeutic Process: An Interview with Lisa Mitchell
49:30

Welcome to episode 68 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This is the third episode in the integrative mental health series featuring Lisa Mitchell. She became a therapist 20 years ago — and for the first 10 years of her private practice, taught thousands of therapists how to integrate art into their work safely and effectively. As she walked along her teaching path, she made a surprising discovery. Most of the therapists she met already identified as “creative types” — but most were nervous about incorporating “creativity” into their work, with clients.

 In the episode, Lisa talks about the work she does, working in her private practice in Sacramento, California. Her two niche categories of people she works with are teens and professional women, she helps them to work more with art to understand themselves better and to find experiences that help them resolve the issues going on in their lives. She also touches upon of the five stages of the creative process and how the therapist and client can embrace the vulnerable space of being curious, open and collaborative, helping to navigate the creative process together.

 Resources

http://www.innercanvas.com

Creativity as Co-Therapist: The Practitioner's Guide to the Art of Psychotherapy (Book)

 Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

Jan 20, 2017
67: Connection Through Groups
46:06

In Episode 67 Therapy Chat host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews therapist and group specialist Katie K. May, a licensed professional counselor in the Philadelphia area who also calls herself the “Group Guru” because she loves running groups and teaching therapists how to effectively plan and market their groups. Katie talks about how therapeutic groups are different from individual therapy and why she loves offering groups in her practice. If you’re a therapist, this episode will likely inspire you to offer more groups, and if you are someone who is interested in continuing your therapeutic journey by participating in groups, hopefully you will have found inspiration.

 

As always, please visit iTunes to leave a rating and review and subscribe to Therapy Chat so you will receive the latest episodes as soon as they’re released!

 

Find Katie May’s info on growing groups for therapists here: http://katiekmay.com

 

Sign up for information about Laura Reagan’s Daring Way™ groups beginning in March, 2017 here: http://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/groupsandintensives/

 

Learn more about Laura Reagan’s Trauma Therapist Community: http://laurareaganlcswc.com/join/

 

Therapy Chat website: http://therapychatpodcast.com

 

Visit iTunes to leave a rating and review of Therapy Chat: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/therapy-chat-psychotherapy/id1031099411?mt=2

 

 

 

Jan 13, 2017
66: How Can Nutrition Affect Mental Health?
01:11:04

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! Today's episode, the second in the Integrative Mental Health Series, includes a fascinating interview with author Dr. Leslie Korn, who is a Harvard-trained body-oriented psychotherapist who has worked for four decades to help people understand the connection between physical and emotional health. Leslie spoke with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C all the way from Mexico, where she lives and works.

Leslie talks about how she got started doing body-oriented psychotherapy, what she learned in the jungle, and how nutrition can help our mental health. She discusses the connection between trauma and physical and mental health; self care; and her book "Nutrition Essentials for Mental Health". She talks about the "right diet" for everyone, explaining that fat is actually our friend! She explains that she prefers to take the ideology out of nutrition, stating that clinicians can use the science and the art of nutrition to help clients. Leslie discusses the idea of the gut as the second brain.

Leslie answers the question Laura has been wondering about for years. What is the connection between childhood trauma and ACES and long term physical health problems? She clearly explains this for clinicians to understand and explain to clients. And any survivor of childhood trauma who is listening will surely feel empowered to understand this connection from listening to Leslie's very clear explanation.

Finally, Leslie discusses pharmaceuticals "du jour" and diagnoses "du jour" and how the food-mood connection can be in direct conflict with traditional Western ideas about medicine and health. And she explains how the gall bladder plays a role in mental health, and how social justice fits in. In her work with indigenous groups and in the US she has observed the effects of the loss of traditional diets and culture on physical and mental health. And she points out that blood sugar can play a very significant role in mental health, and explains how clinicians can help clients look at this differently.


Dr. Leslie Korn teaches therapists nationally in the US through PESI on multicultural as well as offering supervision and working with clients in Mexico. Her most recent book is Nutrition Essentials for Mental Health, published by Norton; and Rhythms of Recovery: Trauma, Nature and the Body. Her new book will be published in early 2017.  Here's where you can find more of what Dr. Leslie Korn is doing:

www.drlesliekorn.com

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please visit iTunes to subscribe and leave a rating and review! 

 

Jan 05, 2017
65: Year End Reflections
04:08

Welcome back! In this brief episode host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C extends an end of year greeting to listeners of Therapy Chat. She pauses to reflect on the increase in audience of Therapy Chat from the beginning of 2016 to the end, talks about what is coming up in the next few months, and makes a confession about the difficulty she finds in practicing self care. Happy New Year!

Dec 31, 2016
64: Six Podcasts I'm Loving Right Now
21:17

Looking for some new podcasts to listen to?

I'm on a bit of a holiday hiatus from new episodes of Therapy Chat podcast. In the meantime, I wanted to tell you about some other podcasts I love. Here are 6 podcasts I'm listening to and recommending frequently! I hope you will check them out and please comment with your favorite podcast!

1. Women In-Depth with Dr. Lourdes Viado, MFT - I love this podcast because my friend and colleague Lourdes Viado conducts interesting and (as the name implies) in-depth interviews on topics that people don't usually talk about. Lourdes is a depth psychologist who was mentored by Jungian analyst and author Dr. James Hollis. She is so knowledgeable about her work and I love listening to her soothing voice. The podcast is fantastic and I recommend it without reservation! Some of the episodes I frequently recommend to my clients include:

Episode 10: Spiritual Abuse: What It Is & Why It Matters with Tamara Powell, LMHC

Episode 23: Understanding Spiritual Abuse (Part 2) with Tamara Powell, LMHC

Episode 14: Women and the Midlife Crisis with Diann Wingert, LCSW

Episode 21: Healing the Mother Wound with Bethany Webster

Women In-Depth covers subjects that people may consider off-limits or taboo, such as infidelity, sexual abuse, staying in an unhappy marriage, and much more. I hope you'll check it out! Let me know what you think! 

I must add, Lourdes has been a guest on Therapy Chat too. I frequently tell people about her episode, which was about "The Shadow." To listen to that episode click here! I've also been a guest on her podcast.

2. Mom & Mind with Dr. Kat Ritchie - Dr. Kat is a clinical psychologist who specializes in maternal mental health. She is knowledgeable, skilled and experienced at helping people who are struggling with infertility, emotional health related to pregnancy - including pregnancy loss, and post-partum stress like depression, anxiety, OCD and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. Her podcast is a fabulous resource offering information to pregnant and parenting moms, fathers and people who are trying to conceive as well as healthcare providers and psychotherapists. I have learned so much from Dr. Kat and her podcast and I recommend it frequently! Start out with these episodes:

 

 

Episode 1: My Postpartum Story: Anxiety and Depression

Episode 3: Resources for PPD Healing and Learning

Episode 7: The Good Mother

Mom and Mind is a great resource. Stay tuned to my podcast to hear an upcoming interview with Dr. Kat. I can't wait to share her with my audience! 

 

3. Galactic Vibrations with Keri Nola and Lloyd Burnett - if you've listened to my podcast you've heard Keri Nola there. She's been on twice, talking about intuition and the Shadow. I am a huge fan of both Keri and Lloyd, who are amazing energy healers and coaches. Their podcast is brand new (it came out less than a month ago) and it is a huge hit already. If you are into the "woo woo" stuff like I am, you'll enjoy hearing their energetic forecasts, oracle card readings, and so much more.  Get started by listening to these three episodes:

Episode 1: Understanding & Healing the Energy of Denial

Episode 2: Using the Energy of Fear to Unlock the Mystery of Ascension

Episode 3: The Shadow of Force, the Truth of New Years Resolutions, and People Pleasing

I've done coaching for business and personal growth with both Keri and Lloyd. They're great at what they do! And as I mentioned, Keri has been on my podcast. She talked about using intuition in therapy in Episode 11, back when my podcast was called The Baltimore Annapolis Psychotherapy Podcast. And she contributed to my series of episodes on the Shadow (after Lourdes's episode, mentioned above) in Episode 42.

4. Launching Your Daughter with Nicole Burgess, LMFT - My friend and colleague Nicole Burgess, LMFT, practices in Indianapolis, Indiana with a focus on teen girls and women. Nicole is super passionate about her work and it comes through when you listen to her podcast.

She has been kind enough to have me on her podcast twice!  Once I talked about The Daring Way™ and the second time was about helping your daughter (or son) if they experience sexual violence. Nicole's podcast covers a wide variety of topics related to the issues of parenting girls.

Here's a sampling of some of her episodes that I've enjoyed:

Episode 34: How Art Therapy Can Be Effective With Teens

Episode 33: How to Create Healthy Boundaries In Your Family

Episode 31: Ways Parents & Teens Can Receive Support Around Suicide Prevention

I hope you'll enjoy listening to Launching Your Daughter as much as I do.

These last two podcasts are super amazing ones for therapists who are building private practices. Both of the podcasters are my buddies - they've both helped me in tons of different ways and if you're a therapist you probably already know of them. If not - prepare to have your mind blown!

5. Selling The Couch with Dr. Melvin Varghese - Melvin is an awesome psychologist in Philadelphia who wanted to start his own private practice so like any good student, he set out to learn from people who have already done it. Melvin has interviewed dozens upon dozens of therapists and other experts in practice-building to learn how they have managed to build successful private practices and other types of businesses. Melvin has interviewed experts on marketing, multiple income streams, running groups, building websites, creating Psychology Today profiles, writing books, mindset shifts, and so much more. He's had over 100 episodes so far and his podcast is listed in the top 100 business podcasts on iTunes, which is a pretty significant accomplishment! I'm super excited for Melvin as he's now building his private practice, following all that great advice he's received, and I know he will help many people! Here are a few of his most recent episodes. There are so many - if you're a therapist trying to build your private practice I recommend you listen to every episode - but here are a few to get you started:

Episode 93: How Comparison Can Steal Your Joy

Episode 92: My Morning Routine & Productivity

Episode 85: Saying No As a Private Practice Owner

Melvin was on my podcast talking about how therapists can use podcasting to grow their practices. He knows his stuff. He taught me pretty much everything I know about podcasting. Podcasting has enriched my life in so many ways and it's mainly Melvin who I have to thank for it. Here's Episode 49 of Therapy Chat with Melvin Varghese.

6. Blissful Practice Podcast with Dr. Agnes Wainman - this is another brand new podcast. Disclaimer - I was the first guest on this podcast. But I don't love it only because I've been on it. Agnes is a psychologist in Ontario, Canada who has learned the hard way how to create a private practice that feels blissful. She spent time at the other end of that spectrum, feeling burned out, and she wants to help therapists who are building private practices find their own bliss.  On her podcast, Agnes talks to therapists about their journeys to private practice. I love her perspective and I think you'll love her podcast. Check it out here:

Episode 3: Why I Became A Therapist

Episode 2: Networking Guru Allison Salmon Puryear

Episode 1: Therapists Can Change the World: A Discussion with Laura Reagan, LCSW-C

Agnes was one of my early guests on Therapy Chat (back when it wasn't called that). Check out our interview here!

So now you have my list of 6 podcasts I'm loving right now. When you have downtime this holiday season, check them out! I am sure you'll find at least one that you really love. 

Of course, you're always welcome to listen to Therapy Chat, there are 64 episodes counting the podcast version of this blog post, and I would love for you to listen, subscribe and leave a rating and review! 

If you want to read more of what I write, follow me on TwitterFacebookInstagram and Pinterest. You can also visit iTunes to subscribe to Therapy Chat. There you'll hear me talking about what I talk about and interviewing other people about what I'm interested to discuss. Or you can listen to Therapy Chat on my website, or on iHeartRadioStitcher or Google Play.

If you're in Maryland, and you want therapy to explore the vulnerable parts of yourself that are in need of healing, check out my website. Therapists can learn about my Trauma Therapist Community by clicking here.

You can also call me at 443-510-1048 or e-mail me at laura@laurareaganlcswc.com. I look forward to connecting! In the meantime, take care and I hope you enjoy the holidays!

 Warmly,

Laura Reagan, LCSW-C

Dec 23, 2016
63: Doing Hard Things
22:51

Today, I did something hard. Have you heard Glennon Doyle Melton say "We can do hard things"? Well, we can. I can. I think. It's not always something huge - for me, today, it was trying something new and very challenging.

Fulfilling a promise I made to myself and to listeners of Therapy Chat (talk about accountability!), I took my 45 year old body which has not been on the back of a horse for 32 years - and even then, at age 13, my experience was limited to two or three times I rode a horse while someone held on and walked it - and had my first horseback riding lesson. My first lesson, ever. It was clear that the people at the barn and at the shop where I bought my helmet today expected I had SOME kind of experience on a horse when they were talking to me. They kept saying "so you're coming back to riding?" I was like, "no, I'm an absolute beginner. I've never done it at all."

I like knowing.
I'll be honest, I hated how it felt to admit that I didn't know ANYTHING about horsemanship. I am realizing more and more - I LIKE KNOWING! Not knowing is totally uncomfortable! At this stage of my life I feel like I KNOW in most situations. Maybe it's because I'm a parent and I've become comfortable in that "bossy know it all" role. Maybe I don't push myself out of my comfort zone often enough. Yet I do challenge myself fairly often! In fact, when discussing this with my husband he noted that it seems easy for me to do new things. Not really! Recent experiences of stepping into unfamiliar territory have reminded me (i.e. I've reluctantly accepted) that it's okay to be a beginner. But I am not going to lie, I strongly dislike that feeling.

It seems like a metaphor for what it must be like for my clients to come to therapy. And what it has been like for me to go to therapy. It's vulnerable!!! Vulnerable is an understatement. Vulnerability makes my skin crawl.

In fact, the more I know as a therapist, the harder it is to be the one on the couch. Yet I also know that I will be my best self as a therapist when I continue exploring the parts of myself that I don't really enjoy looking into. For all of us, those parts are there and they are either in the shadows, where we don't see them as they are calling all the shots, or they are in our conscious awareness and we can manage them more effectively. [Listen to previous Therapy Chat episodes on the Shadow here, here, here and here].

So today I was struggling with not knowing, being a beginner. Pretending I don't feel that way - or avoiding noticing this overwhelming sense of wanting to know - might seem easier. I certainly don't need to write about it here! I'd rather play it cool. I could just have this private experience and not say anything about it publicly. I am sharing it here because I hope it will help you sit with that discomfort when it comes up in your life. You can turn toward the discomfort - feel it - or turn away from it - avoidance.

It's much more fun and interesting, from my perspective, for me to sit back and tell you how much I know about what you might want to try doing differently so you can feel better in your life. But what I really know all comes from my own experiences of struggling and figuring stuff out the hard way. Yes, I have a lot of training and experience but if I couldn't apply these lessons to my own life something would be missing. So showing you that I struggle too is a way I hope to help.

How did I get here?
How did I end up on the back of a very large horse today? I've been talking about wanting to learn horsemanship. I've been talking about it for more than 10 years. I talked about it in a previous blog and Therapy Chat episode. I've told myself that all I need to do is sign up and get started. True. So this year I signed up. I got started today. And this is what happened:

Spoiler: it wasn't all rainbows and butterflies.
I was scared. I was nervous. I struggled with not knowing. I found myself using self-deprecation while purchasing a helmet at the Saddlery and while learning how to groom and tack at the Equestrian Center. I probably won't remember how to groom and tack and will have to re-learn next time. I judged myself - fairly harshly. I told myself my body isn't able to do this - even while knowing that my body is strong. I kept telling myself I am too big for this - too tall, not slim enough. Maybe the people who ride are slim because it's great exercise. Maybe I will become slimmer too. Maybe I won't. Maybe they aren't all slim. Maybe it doesn't matter.

A horse weighs over 1,000 pounds. The horse did not seem troubled or disturbed to have me sitting on his back. He wasn't groaning at holding me up. I watched myself in the mirror, thinking, "ugh, do I look like that?" even while knowing my body is strong. Knowing I've never done this. I don't have muscle memory for this. I will learn this. I am strong! But I was judging myself. Judging my appearance. Judging myself for judging myself. Yes, I'm serious.

Getting up on that horse was HARD. It was SCARY. It was really high up! I was afraid I wouldn't be able to mount the horse. I literally felt like I felt when I went skiing at age 13 and I fell, and I didn't think I would be able to get up. It is not easy to follow verbal directions in that kind of situation when the animal you are trying to climb onto is moving and you can't really see where to place yourself. By the way, getting down was even harder and I almost fell. But I didn't. And even if I did. so what? Even if I got hurt?! I will be okay.

There is an element of trust to this. I'm working on it. Do I need to trust the horse or trust myself? Maybe - probably - both. As my daughter said to me today when I was telling her how hard it was, "Not everything is a therapeutic experience, Mom." Well, true. But I am convinced that this can be. And I am struggling - so apparently it already is.

When my hourlong lesson was over today, I wanted to be like "this was so amazing!" But I didn't feel like it was amazing. I had about 5 seconds during the whole experience when I was like "Wow, I'm doing this!" I also thought "Does this horse like me? I'm grateful he hasn't tried to throw me off of his back. Am I doing this correctly?" That last thought occurred at least 20 times. I said it maybe 5 times to the instructor. I wanted to say it like 100 times, at least. I judged myself for feeling scared and unsure. I wondered how the horse and the instructor were judging me.

Judging, judging, judging
When I got in my car, I felt like maybe I wanted to quit. Maybe I can't do it. And I was judging myself for feeling that way. Are you confused yet? Me too! I hated feeling like this vulnerable kid who doesn't know how to do things and doesn't believe in herself. But I allowed myself to feel that way instead of pretending it was different. I was telling anyone who would listen - my friend Anne, who I talked to after the lesson; my husband; my daughter; the saleswoman at the Saddlery; the riding instructor - how hard it was, and how discouraged I feel. As I was telling them my feelings I was judging myself for feeling that way. At home I felt exhausted. Bone tired. Emotionally worn out and physically worn out. An Epsom salt bath is in my future.

Has this ever happened to you in any situation? How often do you push yourself outside of your comfort zone? Do you like it? Hint: NO.

So why don't I just quit this silly horsemanship idea? Well, I actually believe that I will get better at this. I believe that I will have the experience of learning how to do something new, overcoming my doubts, and it will result in not only a sense of mastery - eventually - but also it will remind me that I can do hard things. I am strong. I'm stronger than I think I am. Emotionally and physically. Cognitively, in my logical brain, I know this. The part of me that is a scared little girl is just one of my parts. There are also other parts of me that are confident. Somewhere in there a part of me knows that this will be FUN! One day! If I keep at it. I am giggling to myself as I write that. Somewhere inside I know that's true.
No Mud No Lotus Thich Nhat Hahn
Again, it's like therapy. You go through the hard parts because you know something better is on the other side. Or you believe it is. You hope it is. And it is. Something good will come from it. I realize therapy isn't all fun and games. But it's better than staying where you are and what comes from the hard work is so beautiful, indescribably so. And you're permanently changed - you can never go back to who you were. As Thich Nhat Hahn says, "No mud, no lotus." That is true of large and small experiences of discomfort over our lifetimes. And what's the alternative?

Embracing what is (?)
So I'm going to treasure this experience of being so new at horsemanship. I'm going to try to enjoy this feeling of being a beginner. I'll remember that once I didn't know how to do this at all. One day I'll be on the back of a horse, galloping through a field, maybe even jumping. Who knows? The sky's the limit. I have a long life ahead of me and I am going to do hard things, even when I'm scared. I mean, I don't actually know how long my life will be. Of course, no one does. But in this moment, I did this hard thing. And I am embracing that feeling, in all of its glory. The good and the bad.

I hope this will inspire you to push yourself outside of your comfort zone, too. That is where the magic happens. That is where we grow. And that is really what life is all about - a journey toward self-actualization, whatever that means for each of us. It's going to be okay.

My next lesson is on Thursday of this week. Wish me luck.

If you want to read more of what I write, follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest. You can also visit iTunes to subscribe to Therapy Chat. There you'll hear me talking about what I talk about and interviewing other people about what I'm interested to discuss. Or you can listen to Therapy Chat on my website, or on iHeartRadio, Stitcher or Google Play.

If you're in Maryland, and you want therapy to explore the vulnerable parts of yourself that are in need of healing, check out my website. You can also call me at 443-510-1048 or e-mail me at laura@laurareaganlcswc.com. I look forward to connecting! In the meantime, take care!

Warmly,

 

Laura Reagan, LCSW-C

 

Dec 08, 2016
62: How Does Attachment Style Affect Our Relationships?
47:27

Welcome to episode 62 of the Therapy Chat Podcast with host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C. This is the third episode in the trauma and attachment series featuring Stuart Fensterheim, LCSW. Stuart is a clinical social worker in Scottsdale, Arizona, practicing with couples using Sue Johnson’s Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) which is an attachment-based couples therapy method. 

In the episode, Stuart talks about how he works on making connections with couples and how our childhood attachment affects the way we show up in relationships as adults. He also touches upon John Bowlby's Attachment Theory, which focuses on your relationship with your primary caretaker and how it influences everything through your life. To make sense of this theory, he talks further about the relationship young babies have with their caretaker, avoiding failure to thrive and how the needs of a young baby to experience touch and closeness, continue with us throughout our adult life.

 

Resources

http://www.thecouplesexpertscottsdale.com

http://www.thecouplesexpertscottsdale.com/podcasts

http://www.iceeft.com

http://www.simplypsychology.org/bowlby.html

 

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know! Also, if you’d like to share a tip that helps you get through the holidays, record a message and your comment may be included in the December holiday episode!

 

Here’s the link to find out about clinical supervision and consultation with Laura Reagan, LCSW-C and the Trauma Therapist Community: http://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/for-professionals/

 

Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dec 02, 2016
61: 11 Therapists Share Their Self Care Tips
36:36

Welcome back! In Episode 61 Therapy Chat host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C asked 11 therapists to contribute their best tips for using self care to manage holiday stress. With Thanksgiving Day tomorrow in the US, hopefully you will find something useful here.

 

Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat. Please get in touch and let host Laura Reagan know what you thought of this episode!

 

Thanks to the eleven therapists who participated! See below for their names and links to their websites!

 

 

Elizabeth Cush, MA, LGPC

Progressioncounseling.com

Robert Cox, MA, PLPC, NCC

http://www.liferecoveryconsulting.com

Charlotte Hiler Easley LCSW ESMHL

www.charlotteeasley.com

Daniela Paolone LMFT

westlakevillage-counseling.com

Elizabeth Burke, LCSW

www.empoweredtherapy.org

Gina Della Penna, LMHC

www.ginadellapenna.com

Jackie Flynn EdS | LMHC | RPT

www.counselinginbrevard.com

Melvin Varghese, PhD

melvinvarghese.com

Ellis Edmunds, Licensed Psychologist

www.drellisedmunds.com

Rebecca Wong, LCSW

www.connectfulness.com

Michelle Lewis, LCSW

www.slweightcounseling.com

 

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

Here’s the link to find out about clinical supervision and consultation with Laura Reagan, LCSW-C and the Trauma Therapist Community: http://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/for-professionals/

 

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know! Also, if you’d like to share a tip that helps you get through the holidays, record a message and your comment may be included in the December holiday episode!

 

Thank you for listening!

Nov 23, 2016
60: What Is Integrative Mental Health?
36:45

Welcome back! In Episode 60, the first in the series on Integrative Mental Health, Therapy Chat host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews James Lake, MD, an integrative psychiatrist in California who has authored four books, including 2009’s Integrative Mental Health: A Therapist’s Handbook. Dr. Lake is a leader in the field of integrative mental health, as you will hear in this interview.

 

Dr. Lake discusses how he uses complementary and alternative medicine (“CAM”) in his clinical practice, and how Master’s-level therapists can use integrative methods in their practices, within their scope of practice. He discusses use of supplements in psychotherapy practice, collaboration with alternative and complementary practitioners as well as allopathic medicine physicians as well. He shares information on his E-book series on integrative mental health and how practitioners can use it.

 

This is the Episode 1 of the series on integrative mental health, which will continue on alternating weeks through the next few months. On the opposite weeks you will hear the series on trauma and attachment, with one exception. The next episode will be a special holiday episode focused on self care. Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat. Please get in touch and let host Laura Reagan know what you thought of this episode!

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

American Psychiatric Association Caucus on Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine website: http://www.intpsychiatry.com/

 

International Network for Integrative Mental Health website: https://inimh.org/

 

Find Dr. Lake’s e-book series here: http://theintegrativementalhealthsolution.com

 

Dr. Lake’s website: http://progressivepsychiatry.com

 

Here’s the link to find out about clinical supervision and consultation with Laura Reagan, LCSW-C and the Trauma Therapist Community: http://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/for-professionals/

 

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

 

Thank you for listening!

 

 

Welcome back! In Episode 60, the first in the series on Integrative Mental Health, Therapy Chat host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews James Lake, MD, an integrative psychiatrist in California who has authored four books, including 2009’s Integrative Mental Health: A Therapist’s Handbook. Dr. Lake is a leader in the field of integrative mental health, as you will hear in this interview.

 

Dr. Lake discusses how he uses complementary and alternative medicine (“CAM”) in his clinical practice, and how Master’s-level therapists can use integrative methods in their practices, within their scope of practice. He discusses use of supplements in psychotherapy practice, collaboration with alternative and complementary practitioners as well as allopathic medicine physicians as well. He shares information on his E-book series on integrative mental health and how practitioners can use it.

 

This is the Episode 1 of the series on integrative mental health, which will continue on alternating weeks through the next few months. On the opposite weeks you will hear the series on trauma and attachment, with one exception. The next episode will be a special holiday episode focused on self care. Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat. Please get in touch and let host Laura Reagan know what you thought of this episode!

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

American Psychiatric Association Caucus on Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine website: http://www.intpsychiatry.com/

 

International Network for Integrative Mental Health website: https://inimh.org/

 

Find Dr. Lake’s e-book series here: http://theintegrativementalhealthsolution.com

 

Dr. Lake’s website: http://progressivepsychiatry.com

 

Here’s the link to find out about clinical supervision and consultation with Laura Reagan, LCSW-C and the Trauma Therapist Community: http://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/for-professionals/

 

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

 

Thank you for listening!

 

 

Nov 17, 2016
59: Trust, Play, Attachment & Being Seen
47:35

Welcome back! In Episode 59, # 2 in the series on Trauma and Attachment, Therapy Chat host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews Rebecca Wong, LCSW-R, a relationship therapist in New Paltz, NY, the creator of Connectfulness, and co-host of the upcoming Practice Of Being Seen podcast.

 

Rebecca talks about using play in her couples work, as well as how our attachment relates to our ability to trust our partners. Rebecca explains that needing attention is not a bad thing – it’s normal. She talks about the concept of being seen, in relationships and in our work with clients. She and Laura discuss getting out of our heads and into our bodies to connect with our partners, other people in our lives and as therapists, how we can connect with our clients. Rebecca explains how using animal-assisted therapy with dogs and horses helps us understand our emotions as shown in our bodies.

 

Rebecca describes her five-step process of Connectfulness, a research based practice she developed and uses with her couples therapy clients. She talks about all the things we do to avoid uncomfortable feelings and how those things interfere with connection. She offers a free download from her website, the link is below.

 

This is the Episode 2 of the series on trauma and attachment, which will now continue on alternating weeks through the next few months. On the opposite weeks you will hear the series on integrative mental health! Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat. Please get in touch and let host Laura Reagan know what you thought of this episode!

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

Rebecca’s website for everything she’s doing: http://connectfulness.com

 

Please visit this to get Rebecca’s free list of 5 magical relational steps for your relationship: http://connectfulness.com/therapychat

 

Here’s the link to find out about clinical supervision and consultation with Laura Reagan, LCSW-C and the Trauma Therapist Community: http://www.laurareaganlcswc.com/for-professionals/

 

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

 

Thank you for listening!

 

 

 

Nov 11, 2016
58: Attachment Trauma & Adoption
53:52

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! Episode 58 is the first in the series on Trauma and Attachment. In today’s episode host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews Amy Sugeno, LCSW. Amy is a clinical social worker in private practice who specializes in working with survivors of trauma related to attachment, particularly related to adoption.

 

Amy explains how attachment trauma can affect children who were adopted, even if the adoption went as smoothly as it possibly could. She describes how children who have been adopted may act out behaviorally to tell their parents how they feel. Amy also talks about a surprising way adoptive parents (and others parenting traumatized children) may experience trauma themselves and how to recognize the symptoms. She and Laura discuss how prior difficulty with conceiving a child can contribute to the experience for parents, how the parent’s own attachment style and trauma history is “churned up” through the process of adoption. She describes how adoption can change relationships within a family and between the family and their community. She explains some of the non-verbal ways of processing trauma that she uses with her clients. Amy describes Nature as her “co-therapist.” She tells listeners how to get on her mailing list and offers opportunities to hear her speak around the country.

 

This is the first of the series on trauma and attachment, which will continue on alternating weeks through the next few months. And on the opposite weeks you will hear the series on integrative mental health! Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat. Please get in touch and let host Laura Reagan know what you thought of this episode!

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

Amy Sugeno’s website: http://www.amysugenocounseling.com/

Nov 03, 2016
57: How Children Are Like Horses
14:01

How Children Are Like Horses (And Why You Should Care)

 

If you have been listening to Therapy Chat podcast lately, you know that I have been talking about using equine assisted psychotherapy and education methods to get in touch with our emotional experiences. In Episode 55 I described my own experience of making a deep soul connection in a barn when I spent a Saturday morning at an equine learning workshop with four other women and two horses. That changed me and I am still feeling it, weeks later. I can’t wait to do more – and I will in a couple weeks when I trek to the Hudson Valley for a beautiful Equine Retreat for Therapists and Healers offered by my friends and colleagues Rebecca Wong and Marisa Goudy.

 

Then in Episode 56 I interviewed Charlotte Hiler Easley, an LCSW and Equine Specialist in Lexington, Kentucky who developed a model called Equine Assisted Survivors of Trauma Therapy that is being used with survivors of sexual assault to experientially teach safety in our bodies, to see what it feels like to set and hold boundaries, and to take care of ourselves in relationship – as well as allowing ourselves to be vulnerable and risk trusting another who may hurt us. This experiential work with survivors of trauma sounds very powerful to me, as someone who has worked for years with trauma survivors; and as someone who has recently had a life-changing experience with horses.

 

In hearing about Charlotte’s work and after my own experience I realized there are some similarities between children and horses which are very relevant to the therapy work I do with my clients. It might seem like a strange connection, but stay with me. I’m going to tell you about three ways that children are like horses and why you should care.

 

As I explained in episode 55 and the blog post that went with it – this information comes from the EAGALA website - equine-assisted psychotherapy and learning works for these reasons:

 

  1. “Because horses are prey animals, they rely on non-verbal cues to stay alive. Their lives depend on accurately reading these cues.” Horses learn from their interactions with us whether or not we are safe, which lets them know if they are safe. Children do the same thing. They read our body language more than our words.

 

  1. “Like humans, horses are social creatures who live in herds.”We humans are wired for connection, as Brené Brown frequently says. It goes back to attachment. Children need protection and care from the adults they depend on for survival. When a baby is born that child is completely helpless and dependent upon their caregivers for protection. Safety to a newborn baby means being given food, sheltered from the elements and being held and soothed. Physical safety is being protected from harm; emotional safety is “will you be there when I need you? Do you care about what I need?”

 

  1. “Horses know when what we are saying and doing don't match what we are feeling and sensing, even though we might not know. They reflect back to us what we are feeling and sensing, or the incongruence between our feelings, sensations, words and actions, even (especially) when it's outside of our conscious awareness." Children also notice incongruence between our words and our non-verbal cues. Children know when a parent says they are not mad but they really are. They know when a parent is crying, but says nothing is wrong, that it isn’t true. Why do they pay attention to this? It’s part of how they make sure they are safe. If their primary caregiver isn’t okay, then they aren’t okay, because who will take care of them if something happens to the primary caregiver?

 

Okay, so I’ve made my case for children being like horses in three ways, but why should you care? Well, you should care if you are a parent because it’s important to understand what your children need in order to thrive. (Click here to listen to Episode 21 on raising well-adjusted children). And you should care even if you aren’t a parent because you were once a child! Yeah, but that was in the past, right? Not so fast! Attachment affects us throughout the lifespan. It shows up in our peer relationships, intimate partner relationships, in our interactions with our coworkers, supervisors and supervisees and it affects how we feel about ourselves in general.

 

The attachment that develops between a child and their primary caregiver begins immediately at birth. It continues to develop, with the most intense period of attachment development happening between birth and age 3. As I mentioned, children depend upon the attachment with their primary caregivers for survival.

 

However, attachment repair can happen throughout the lifespan, so even if there was a disruption to secure attachment between the child and the primary caregiver, in most cases it is not too late to change this. In the worst cases of child neglect, in which children are deprived of touch and verbal interaction with their primary caregivers, brain development can be severely impacted. Studies have found a connection between severe child neglect and reduced brain size and changes to structures of the brain using brain scans for side-by-side comparison. You can learn more about this at Dr. Bruce Perry’s Child Trauma Academy, which is found at www.childtrauma.org.

 

In Episode 46 of Therapy Chat I talked with Julie Hanks about how assertiveness is influenced by attachment. In future episodes you’re going to hear a lot more about attachment and trauma. Our next episode will kick off the series on attachment and trauma with an interview with Amy Sugeno, LCSW. Amy is in private practice in Texas, where she specializes in helping people who have experienced childhood trauma, including adoption. Later in the series you’ll hear from Stuart Fensterheim, LCSW; Rebecca Wong, LCSW-R; Brittainy Wagner, LPC; Katie K. May, NCC; David Emerson of the Trauma Center at JRI; David Shannahoff-Khalsa of the UCSD Center for Integrative Medicine; Robert Cox, PLPC and many others. I hope you’ll enjoy this series on a subject which I personally find fascinating. The more I learn, the more I realize the way we show up in our lives is all about attachment.

 

I can’t wait to share these episodes with you over the coming months. Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat today! I hope you have heard something useful. I’d love to hear your feedback! What do you like, what do you not like? Is there a topic you would like to hear discussed on Therapy Chat? Get in touch with me! Visit http://therapychatpodcast.com and leave a message for me using the green button you’ll see there. And please visit iTunes to leave a rating and review and subscribe to receive all the latest episodes of Therapy Chat! You can find all episodes on the website, and Therapy Chat is also on iHeartRadio, Google Play, Stitcher and YouTube.

Oct 28, 2016
56: Equine-Assisted Survivors of Trauma Therapy
41:23

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode, as a follow up to Episode 55 about falling in love in a barn, host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews Charlotte Hiler Easley, LCSW. Charlotte is a psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in working with survivors of trauma using equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP). Charlotte discusses her work using Equine Assisted Survivors of Trauma Therapy, a method she developed in collaboration with a rape crisis center when she was in grad school.

 

Charlotte talks about how horses are able to read our body language and react to our emotional experience. She explains what equine assisted psychotherapy is – hint: you don’t have to touch a saddle. She describes how survivors of trauma working with horses are able to learn and practice new ways of being in relationship; setting boundaries; making a mind-body connection; feeling what safety feels like – because the work is all experiential. Finally, Charlotte shares about her work helping therapists create practices using equine assisted psychotherapy, and describes an upcoming retreat she is offering for trauma therapists.

 

This episode is a must for therapists and anyone who has experienced trauma. Charlotte shares so much knowledge! Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat. Please get in touch and let host Laura Reagan know what you thought of this episode!

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

EAGALA: http://www.eagala.org/about

 

PATH: http://www.pathintl.org/

 

Charlotte’s website: https://charlotteeasley.com/

 

Charlotte’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/charlottehilereasleyLCSW/?fref=ts

 

Central Kentucky Riding for Hope’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CKyRH/

 

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

 

Thank you for listening!

Oct 20, 2016
55: I Found Heart & Soul Connection In A Barn
26:41

I found my heart and soul connection in a barn.

I had a new experience which was a game-changer for me. I've been saying for at least 10 years that I want to take horseback riding lessons. I talked about it on an episode of Therapy Chat earlier this year, vowing that I would make it happen.

 

I've ridden a horse maybe 5 times in my whole life, all between the ages of 10-13 years old. For a time I was obsessed with them, as many children are. I grew up in the city but close enough to rural areas that there was one horse farm many of us knew to visit. 

Recently as I've learned more about equine-assisted therapy and the benefits of spending times with horses, I've become determined to increase the amount of time I spend with horses. I'm now 44 years old and my body has changed quite a bit since I was 13. I think it's safe to say that my heart hasn't changed much, if at all, though, as I learned through this experience. 

Before I tell you what happened, let me give you some information from Equine Assisted Growth And Learning Association, also known as EAGALA. From their website, www.eagala.org:

 

How Does Equine-Assisted Learning and Growth Work?

  • Horses are bigger and stronger than us. They are powerful creatures, and being around them can feel intimidating, which creates an opportunity to get up close and personal with our fears.

  • Like humans, horses are social creatures who live in herds. They have a social hierarchy in terms of how they relate to one another in the herd. Working on how we relate to horses is a way to work on how we relate to other humans and ourselves.

  • Because horses are prey animals, they rely on non-verbal cues to stay alive. Their lives depend on accurately reading these cues. Humans are predators. Yet for some reason horses are willing to interact with us anyway, if we let them know we are safe.

  • Horses know when what we are saying and doing don't match what we are feeling and sensing, even though we might not know. They reflect back to us what we are feeling and sensing, or the incongruence between our feelings, sensations, words and actions, even (especially) when it's outside of our conscious awareness.

The Shadow...Again?

Horses can bring our Shadow to our awareness. Yes, the Shadow again. As a wise person told me, once the Shadow is out in the light you can't ignore it anymore. I am finding this to be true again and again.

If you don't know what I'm talking about, check out these episodes of Therapy Chat podcast: Episode 53; Episode 38 with Renee Beck, LMFT; Episode 40 with Lourdes Viado, MFT, PhD; Episode 42 with Keri Nola.

So this is what happened. I went to a workshop on learning with horses. I gathered in a barn with a group of two other women, the instructor and the horse trainer. I really didn't know what to expect, because I haven't done anything like this before, although I have heard about it from fellow therapists. The whole experience was on the ground, not on the horses. 

We were introduced to two horses, a darker colored one and a lighter colored one. I felt super vulnerable and nervous. I wanted to know what to do and not to do, and how, and what was going to happen. I told myself to sit with the discomfort, knowing that this is where growth happens. Part of me wanted to relax, be in the moment, let go and see what happened. Part of me wanted to know, to check whether or not I was doing it right, if I was okay, to understand, to know why. These parts of myself battled for that entire two hour period. 

When we walked up to each horse I had lots of thoughts. I wondered how to touch the horse, if it was okay to touch him, and whether he would hurt me. I was acutely aware of how large and heavy he was, and that he could kick me, bite me or step on me if he felt like it. Then, I went a little deeper into my emotions. I suspected that he didn't like me. I felt self-conscious about being uncomfortable and worried who could tell. I was pretty sure he could tell, though he didn't say anything. I felt his soft, velvety coat and tangled mane. I noticed that he was beautiful and he looked like he had been through some things. I decided maybe he wasn't judging me as harshly as I was judging myself. This all happened in a span of maybe 2 minutes. Feeling a little softer toward myself, I approached the other horse.

One of the other women was standing with the horse, and I felt protective toward her time with him. I held my hand out to him, wondering if he was okay with me petting his nose. He gently nuzzled my hand. I didn't know if this was what they always do, or if he liked my touch. I awkwardly stood there for a few seconds, continuing to let him smell my hand and nuzzle it.

Then something surprising happened. He tilted his head toward me and sort of snuggled up to my neck. I don't even know what to call it. Immediately, tears sprang to my eyes. I felt seen and understood, probably better understood by the horse than I was understanding myself, at least in that moment. I had the strange experience of a felt sense - when you just know something that is coming from within. Your inner wisdom, your soul, your wisest self, whatever you want to call it, it tells you something from within yourself. It's more than just a thought. The felt sense told me "he knows I'm sad."

 

One of the reasons it was weird is because I hadn't known I was sad until that moment. I felt apologetic toward the other woman standing there, because the horse was giving me more attention, and because I was fighting back tears, which is pretty uncomfortable any time, but especially in front of a stranger. At the same time, I was incredibly grateful to the horse. 

As Brené Brown says, "Vulnerability is courage."

All of that happened in the first 30 minutes of this experience. After that we alternated between activities with the horses and seated in chairs. But more strange things happened. During the time we were seated in our chairs as a group, the horses were free to roam this indoor space. 

We were talking and I was continuing my struggle between the parts of myself that wanted to avoid the discomfort of this new experience and the parts that were trying to be open and let it unfold. I'll point out that while this experience was new, that struggle is not. In fact, it is quite familiar, if I'm honest.

I practice mindfulness by checking in with myself many times throughout a given day. I notice what I am thinking, what I am feeling, what my body is holding. I frequently ask myself what I need, or what my body wants me to know. There is always an answer, if I listen. What I often notice is this struggle to know, to have the answers. It is something that pops up when I am in situations where I feel unsure. It is an attempt to avoid discomfort. I don't do it consciously, it is a defense that I'm sure developed quite early. I know I was always praised for being smart. This quality is one that I never doubted I had, and I received much attention, love and acceptance around being smart when I was a child.  

I felt very uncomfortable quite a lot of the time during childhood, so this defense (it's called intellectualization) served me very well back then and it has helped me many times since. But it does get in the way. I'm grateful for my intelligence, yet I need to ask the part of myself that wants to know to step aside quite frequently so I can stay in the moment. It's okay to be curious, as long it doesn't take me away from the current moment. 

The Most Powerful Moment

So now I'll get back to the most powerful part of the experience in the barn. After the horse snuggled up against me, while we were sitting in the chairs as a group, the horses moved around the barn. Slowly they moved toward us. Eventually, both horses came to stand behind me. While we talked, one by one they slowly crept forward until both horses were standing with their heads over me. I wish I had a picture, because to the others in the group I must have looked funny with one horse's head coming over one shoulder and the other horses's head coming over my other shoulder. They kind of crossed their heads in front of me.

It was so strange, with a result that I couldn't see the other group participants. The group leader noted that the horses could have stood anywhere they wanted, and for some reason they chose to stand over me that way. They remained that way until we stood to do another activity, and then when we returned to sitting, they did it again, just as gradually as the first time. I can't really say what happened, other than the horses knew I needed something. But that can't be all because I'm sure the other group members were having their own emotional experiences in their seats. Yet the horses gravitated to me.

I think the leader was suggesting that they knew I needed either comfort, protection or something. She didn't come right out and say it (I think she wanted me to figure it out myself). All I know is I was in love with these horses. I felt like they got me. I felt like we had a connection. I am laughing as I write these words, but I really mean it, and I still feel that way, even though more than 24 hours have passed. In fact, I've had more experiences of self discovery (what I like to call shifts) since doing that. I am eager to do more work with horses and see what happens. It was truly a magical experience.

Why Am I Sharing This?

 

You might be wondering why I'm sharing this. There are a few reasons. First, I want to document this magical experience for myself. Also, I want people to know that spending time with horses can be incredibly powerful, almost unbelievably so. Some things you just have to experience for yourself, and I hope this article will encourage some of you who are reading to try Equine Assisted Learning and Growth. Lastly, I'm sharing this because it's important as a therapist that I live the way I encourage my clients to do. I've been on a journey of personal growth - intentionally only for the past two years, but probably for my whole life.  

I believe we never stop growing and learning (unless we refuse to try), and that we must continue pushing ourselves outside of our comfort zones, because that is where growth happens.

I can't take my clients anywhere that I haven't been. The more I allow myself to be vulnerable and expose myself to new experiences allowing me a deeper connection with myself, the more capable I become of walking alongside my clients as they are on that journey. I have seen this to be true, and I know as my connection with myself deepens my skill as a therapist will deepen as well. 

Next week I'm taking time to venture deeply inward as I spend time with an intuitive coach in California to reflect on the direction of my business in the year ahead and do more Shadow work (gulp!). This will also be a reunion with some beautiful souls who live across the country and I am so honored that I will be spending time with them there. More is ahead, as I head to the beautiful Hudson Valley of New York in November for a retreat with horses and fellow therapists and other healers. I can't freakin' wait. Honestly, I have been bitten by the horse bug now and I can't wait for my next opportunity to spend time among these amazing creatures. And yes, I am still planning to take horseback riding lessons. It will happen! I'm currently exploring various locations to learn with horses in a different way. That will be a new arena (literally!) for me. I know what Brené Brown means when she talks about Daring Greatly. If you don't know what I'm talking about, check out her book by that name.

So that is the story of how I found my heart and soul connection, with two horses and with myself in a barn. I hope it somehow inspired you to get more connected with yourself. Let me know in the comments!

If you're interested in walking together on your journey of personal growth, and you live near Baltimore, Maryland, get in touch with me. You can also follow my musings on social media. You'll find me on Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram andFacebook. And don't forget my podcast, Therapy Chat. 

Wholeheartedly,

Laura Reagan, LCSW-C

Oct 14, 2016
54: What's Up With Don Draper?
39:23

Welcome to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C discusses the AMC drama “Mad Men.” If you are a fan of the show, you’ll want to listen and if you haven’t watched it before, maybe you will be intrigued to check it out. Just a warning, though, this episode contains some spoilers so if you don’t want to know some of the important plot points, maybe you should watch the show first and come back to this episode later. Laura is a trauma therapist, and she talks about how the main character of Mad Men, Don Draper, exhibits characteristics common in survivors of childhood abuse trauma. Actor Jon Hamm and show creator Matthew Weiner masterfully characterize a man who is tormented by his inner demons. Laura describes how the traumatic experiences of Don Draper’s childhood could have led to him becoming the adult we meet in the first episode of the series, and what someone who has these symptoms now can do to get help. Laura explains some of the symptoms commonly experienced by survivors of childhood abuse and neglect and lists some of the therapeutic techniques which can be effective in healing childhood trauma. Laura also references past episode of Therapy Chat with more information on the subjects of childhood abuse and the long term emotional and physical effects of childhood trauma.

 

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

Therapy Chat Episode 19 on the Epidemic of Childhood Trauma

 

Therapy Chat Episode 30 on Childhood Sexual Abuse

 

Therapy Chat Episode 26 on Using the Body to Heal Trauma with Lisa Ferentz, LCSW-C, DAPA

 

Find out more about Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and Find a Practitioner

 

Find out more about EMDR and Find a Practitioner

 

 

We want to hear from you! Go to Therapy Chat Podcast website and share what you like or don’t like about the podcast. www.therapychatpodcast.com - click on the green button and let host Laura Reagan know if it’s okay to share your feedback on the podcast! You may be included in a future episode!

 

Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes!

Oct 07, 2016
53: Secrecy, Shame & The Shadow
42:31

Welcome to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C talks about Secrecy, Shame and the Shadow. Laura references previous Therapy Chat episodes 38 with Renee Beck, 40 with Lourdes Viado and 42 with Keri Nola – all about the Shadow. If you haven’t listened to those episodes yet, check them out too – links are below. Laura talks about how we carry beliefs about what makes us different – what disconnects us from everyone else, and how we hold shame about those things we don’t like about ourselves. Those secrets we can’t tell anyone are shameful to us, and create further disconnection. Laura talks about how we can connect based on our common human experience, and how using loving kindness can help us to embrace all the parts of ourselves. Tune in and then contact Laura through the Therapy Chat website to share something you think makes you different, a part of yourself you don’t like! You may be featured on a future episode (with your permission).

Resources mentioned in this episode:

Therapy Chat Episode 38
Therapy Chat Episode 40
Therapy Chat Episode 42

Glennon Doyle Melton’s Blog, Momastery Carry On Warrior, by Glennon Doyle Melton Love Warrior, by Glennon Doyle Melton Post Secret website

We want to hear from you! Go to Therapy Chat Podcast website and share what you like or don’t like about the podcast. www.therapychatpodcast.com - click on the green button and let host Laura Reagan know if it’s okay to share your feedback on the podcast! You may be included in a future episode!

Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes!

Sep 30, 2016
52: Suicide - What Can Schools & Communities Do?
43:05

Welcome back to Therapy Chat! Today’s topic is a serious one, and something that needs to be talked about, although most of us would rather not think about it. September is Suicide Prevention & Awareness Month, and host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C recorded this special episode to honor a friend’s brother who died by suicide almost 3 years ago. Today Laura interviews someone who has worked for years in the field of suicide prevention. Jonathan B. Singer, PhD is podcaster, a social work professor at Loyola University in Chicago and one of the co-authors of the book “Suicide in Schools: A Practitioner’s Guide to Multi-Level Prevention, Assessment, Intervention and Postvention.” This book is a guide for schools and communities, as well as families, to understand what we can all do to make a difference in the problem of suicide which plagues the United States. Jonathan shares some shocking statistics about the problem of suicide – how often it happens and who is most at risk. He describes specific things schools and communities can do to prevent suicide and to support a person who is feeling suicidal. He also talks about how schools can develop crisis plans to put into action when a school community member dies by suicide. Our community has been affected by suicide far too often. One person dying by suicide is too many, but the numbers are much higher than that. This episode may inspire you to take action to make a difference in your community to reduce suicide. And host Laura Reagan invites you to make a donation in honor of Nick Moothart by visiting the Team Nick fundraising page for the Annapolis Out of the Darkness Walk, hosted by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP).

 

Click here to make a donation to Team Nick

 

Click here to make a donation to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

 

Listen to the Social Work Podcast here

 

Learn more and order Suicide in Schools: A Practitioner’s Guide here – during September, 2016 it is on sale at the Routledge publishing website

 

Learn more about Jonathan B. Singer, PhD here

 

Visit Therapy Chat website at Http://therapychatpodcast.com and send host Laura Reagan a voice message letting her know what you think of Therapy Chat! Did you like this episode? Did you dislike it? Let her know!

 

Thank you for listening!

Sep 23, 2016
51: Your Unique Business Strategy with Tara Gentile
50:18

 

Welcome to Therapy Chat! Today’s episode, the 9th and final episode in the Practice Building Series, is about using what makes you unique to create a successful business. Host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews amazing business strategist Tara Gentile, host of Profit.Power.Pursuit podcast, highly sought out speaker, creator of Quiet Power Strategy™ and the author of Quiet Power Strategy, The Art of Earning, The Observation Engine and The Art of Growth. Tara talks about exactly how you can tap into your Quiet Power and use it to highlight who you are and what makes clients want to work with you. She explains that it’s not just about being yourself. She explains how she uses systems to help people find her. She defines the three pillars of a business used in Quiet Power Strategy and why market research is important. Tara explains how you can use a “virtual focus group” to develop your business strategy. She speaks about what causes entrepreneur burnout and offers one key to avoiding it. She lists tangible ways you can change what you’re doing to avoid entrepreneur burnout. She teaches us about the importance of being intentional in your work in marketing your business, and what business strategy really is, in words we can easily understand. She leaves us with one question to ask that helps us identify our business strategy.

  

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

Book: The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding by Al Ries & Laura Ries on Amazon: (non affiliate link): https://www.amazon.com/22-Immutable-Laws-Branding/dp/0060007737/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1474393744&sr=8-1&keywords=22+immutable+laws+of+branding

 

Toggl time tracking tool: https://toggl.com/

 

Tara’s podcast: Profit.Power.Pursuit.

 

Tara’s Quiet Power Strategy website: http://quietpowerstrategy.com

 

Tara’s QPS – the Lab: http://Lab.quietpowerstrategy.com

 

Tara’s books: http://taragentile.com/books/

  

We want to hear from you! Go to Therapy Chat Podcast website and share what you like or don’t like about the podcast. www.therapychatpodcast.com - click on the green button and let host Laura Reagan know if it’s okay to share your feedback on the podcast! You may be included in a future episode!

 

Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes!

Sep 22, 2016
50: Therapists Share Their Favorite Self Care Tips
25:34

 Welcome to Episode 50 of Therapy Chat! Today’s episode is extra special because it’s the 50th episode of Therapy Chat! Host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C decided to try something different. She asked her fellow therapists to record a favorite self care tip, and they jumped at the chance to share what they recommend, and what they use personally. Listeners will hear a variety of therapists sharing their favorite self care tips. Check in with Therapy Chat and let Laura know: what’s your favorite tip? What did you take away from this episode that you can use?

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

 

Laura’s blog post on self care apps recommended by therapists: Read here

 

Previous episodes of Therapy Chat about self care:

 

Episode 22 with Ashley Davis Bush, author of Simple Self Care for Therapists: Episode 22

 

Episode 24 on Vicarious Trauma/Secondary Traumatic Stress & Self Care: Episode 24

 

Episode 44 with Laura van Dernoot Lipsky, author of Trauma Stewardship: Episode 44

 

Poem quoted in this episode:

 

“and i said to my body. softly. ‘i want to be your friend.’ it took a long breath. and replied ‘i have been waiting my whole life for this.’ Copyright Nayyirah Waheed. Check out her powerful poetry collections “salt” and “nejma” and her website: www.nayyirahwaheed.com

 

Go to Therapy Chat Podcast website and share what you like or don’t like about the podcast. www.therapychatpodcast.com

 

Thanks for listening to Therapy Chat!

 

Therapists Contributing to This Episode:

 

Daniela Paolone LMFT

Westlake Village Counseling in Westlake Village California

http://westlakevillage-counseling.com

Sarah Leitschuh, MA, LMFT

Sarah Leitschuh Counseling, PLLC Eagan, MN

 

www.sarahleitschuhcounseling.com 

Jessica Scales, LMFT

Next Level Therapy, NW in Federal Way, WA

www.nextleveltherapynw.com

Susan Faurot, LMFT, Certified Life Coach

Online only

www.consciouspathinc.com

Rachel Goodman, MFT

Rachel Goodman, MFT Psychotherapy for Helpers, Berkeley, California

rachelgoodmanmft.com

Rebecca Wong LCSW-R

Connectfulness Counseling, New Paltz NY

Connectfulness.com

Nicole Burgess LMFT

Burgess Counseling and Consulting LLC; Indianapolis, IN

www.NicoleCBurgess.com

Stacey Steinmiller, LCSW


Authentic Self Counseling Rochester, NY 14610

www.ascounseling.com

Sep 16, 2016
49: Benefits of Podcasting for Therapists
52:33

 

Welcome to Episode 49 of Therapy Chat! Today’s episode is #8 in the therapist practice building series. Host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews the amazing Melvin Varghese, PhD, who is a psychologist and host of Selling the Couch podcast. Melvin, whose podcast is one of the top 100 business podcasts according to the iTunes rankings, discusses how podcasting can help therapists grown their practices and help them scale their businesses away from simply trading time for money. Melvin shares statistics about how podcasting is growing, and gives concrete examples of the skills most therapists already have that make us naturals at podcasting. He describes specific ways that podcasting can be used to grow a therapist’s business. He shares some of his free resources and invites listeners to check out his Healthcasters course for health, wellness and fitness podcasters, whether their podcasts have already begun or they are just in the ideas phase. He shares the changes podcasting has made to his business and his income.

Resources Melvin mentioned in this episode:

Jackie Flynn’s Parenting In the Rain podcast: http://jackieflynnconsulting.com/home/parenting-in-the-rain/

Robert Cox’s Mindful Recovery podcast: http://liferecoveryconsulting.com/podcast/

Check out Melvin’s podcast, Selling the Couch: http://sellingthecouch.com/podcast/

Melvin’s free podcasting tutorial: http://sellingthecouch.com/podcastingtutorial - check out the discount on Healthcasters found in this tutorial!

Get the info on Melvin’s podcasting course/community, Healthcasters: http://sellingthecouch.com/the-healthcasters/

Canva: http://canva.com

As always, you can find Therapy Chat at http://therapychatpodcast.com

Please remember to visit iTunes to leave a rating and review, download episodes and subscribe to receive all the latest episodes as soon as they are released!

Sep 09, 2016
48: What is Peaceful Parenting?
44:12

Welcome to Episode 48 of Therapy Chat! Today’s guest is Eric Greene, also known as “1 Awesome Dad”! Host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C and Eric discuss the random way they reconnected after growing up in the same community, even though neither of them lives there now. Eric talks about what he calls “peaceful parenting.” Eric explains the key to peaceful parenting, which is by definition non-violent – no hitting, spanking, smacking or popping, is to remain calm and connected with the child. Laura and Eric talk about some of the situations which can be challenging for parents and how to implement peaceful parenting when these issues come up. Eric describes how empathizing with your child and teaching them to express emotions can allow connection instead of disconnection when a child exhibits behavior that isn’t appropriate. Eric shares a painful experience which led him to commit to peaceful parenting when his son was born. He shares resources he recommends and how you can work with him for consultation. Enjoy!

 

Resources Eric mentioned in this episode:

 

Join Eric’s 1 Awesome Dad Facebook group here: https://www.facebook.com/1AwesomeDad/

 

Eric’s Peaceful Parenting Community is here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/PeacefulParentingCommunity/

 

Eric’s website: http://1AwesomeDad.com

 

Dr. Laura Markham’s book Peaceful Parents, Happy Kids on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Peaceful-Parent-Happy-Kids-Connecting/dp/0399160280 (this book is also available on Audible)

 

Dr. Shefali Tsabary’s books:

The Conscious Parent on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Conscious-Parent-Transforming-Ourselves-Empowering/dp/1897238452/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1472775848&sr=1-3&keywords=shefali+tsabary

The Awakened Family on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Awakened-Family-Revolution-Parenting/dp/0399563962/ref=pd_bxgy_14_img_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=BGNE9TZ0A76PPME9M064 (both books also available on Audible)

 

 

Alfie Kohn’s book Unconditional Parenting on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Unconditional-Parenting-Moving-Rewards-Punishments/dp/0743487486/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1472776168&sr=1-1&keywords=unconditional+parenting (this book is also available on Audible)

 

Therapy Chat website: http://therapychatpodcast.com

 

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Get a free download and help out Therapy Chat when you start a 30 day trial of Audible using this link: http://www.audibletrial.com/TherapyChat

 

You can find all the books recommended by today’s guest on Audible.

 

 

 

 

 

Sep 02, 2016