TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing

By TED

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Category: Education

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Subscribers: 2153
Reviews: 1

Davidson
 Sep 20, 2019
I find this podcast to be very educative and creative. Kudos to the team.

Description

TED-Ed's commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED's mission of spreading great ideas. Within TED-Ed's growing library of TED-Ed animations, you will find carefully curated educational videos, many of which represent collaborations between talented educators and animators nominated through the TED-Ed website (ed.ted.com).

Episode Date
What causes opioid addiction, and why is it so tough to combat? | Mike Davis
00:08:19
In the 1980s and 90s, pharmaceutical companies began to market opioid painkillers aggressively, while actively downplaying their addictive potential. The number of prescriptions skyrocketed, and so did cases of addiction, beginning a crisis that continues today. What makes opioids so addictive? Mike Davis explains what we can do to reverse the skyrocketing rates of addiction and overdose. [Directed by Good Bad Habits, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Landon Trimble/ Playdate].
May 08, 2020
Which is better: Soap or hand sanitizer? | Alex Rosenthal and Pall Thordarson
00:05:36
Your hands, up close, are anything but smooth. With peaks and valleys, folds and rifts, there are plenty of hiding places for a virus to stick. If you then touch your face, the virus can infect you. But there are two extraordinarily simple ways you can keep that from happening: soap and water, and hand sanitizer. So which is better? Alex Rosenthal and Pall Thordarson investigate. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
May 05, 2020
What really happened during the Salem Witch Trials | Brian A. Pavlac
00:05:10
You've been accused of a crime you did not commit. It's impossible to prove your innocence. If you insist that you're innocent anyway, you'll likely be found guilty and executed. But if you confess, apologize, and implicate others, you'll go free. This was the choice facing those accused of witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts in the 17th century. How did this happen? Brian A. Pavlac investigates. [Directed by Lucy Animation Studio, narrated by Susan Zimmerman, music by Stephen LaRosa].
May 04, 2020
What happens if you cut down all of a city's trees? | Stefan Al
00:05:05
By 2050, it's estimated that over 65% of the world will be living in cities. We may think of nature as being unconnected to our urban spaces, but trees have always been an essential part of successful cities. Humanity has been uncovering these arboreal benefits since the creation of our first cities thousands of years ago. So what makes trees so important to a city's survival? Stefan Al explains. [Directed by Mette Ilene Holmriis, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Bamm Bamm Wolfgang].
Apr 24, 2020
The wildly complex anatomy of a sneaker | Angel Chang
00:05:03
Australians call them "runners." The British know them as "trainers." Americans refer to them as "sneakers." Whatever you call them, these casual shoes are worn by billions of people around the world. Today, roughly 23 billion shoes are produced each year. So, how can we balance our love of sneakers with the need for sustainability? Angel Chang explores how shoe manufacturing impacts our planet. [Directed and animated by Ella Dobson, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Stephen LaRosa].
Apr 23, 2020
What's the point(e) of ballet? | Ming Luke
00:04:39
A baby cursed at birth. A fierce battle of good and evil. A true love awoken with a kiss. Since premiering in 1890, "The Sleeping Beauty" has become one of the most frequently staged ballets in history. So what makes this piece so beloved? And what exactly does ballet bring to this— or any other— story? Ming Luke shares what makes ballet the perfect medium for stories old and new. [Directed by Visorama, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Jarrett Farkas].
Apr 20, 2020
The Gauntlet | Think Like A Coder, Ep 8 | Alex Rosenthal
00:08:01
This is episode 8 of our animated series "Think Like A Coder." This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. [Directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Apr 16, 2020
The bug that poops candy | George Zaidan
00:04:23
Aphids can reproduce incredibly fast: they can make 20 new generations within a single season. And that means lots of poop. Some aphid populations can produce hundreds of kilograms of poop per acre— making them some of the most prolific poopers on the planet. We know this poop as the sweet, syrupy liquid called honeydew. George Zaidan explores the wonderfully weird life of an aphid. [Directed by Hype CG, narrated by George Zaidan, music by Gabriel Maia].
Apr 14, 2020
The hidden life of Rosa Parks | Riché D. Richardson
00:04:39
Throughout her life, Rosa Parks repeatedly challenged racial violence and the prejudiced systems protecting its perpetrators. Her refusal to move to the back of a segregated bus ignited a boycott that lasted 381 days and helped transform civil rights activism into a national movement. But this work came at an enormous risk— and a personal price. Riché D. Richardson details the life of Rosa Parks. [Directed by Eido, narrated by Christina Greer, music by John Poon].
Apr 13, 2020
How does alcohol make you drunk? | Judy Grisel
00:05:04
Ethanol: this molecule, made of little more than a few carbon atoms, is responsible for drunkenness. Often simply referred to as alcohol, ethanol is the active ingredient in alcoholic beverages. So how exactly does it cause drunkenness, and why does it have dramatically different effects on different people? Judy Grisel explores alcohol's journey through the body. [Directed by Anton Bogaty, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott].
Apr 09, 2020
How the Monkey King escaped the underworld | Shunan Teng
00:04:43
The Monkey King, a legendary troublemaker hatched from stone and schooled in divine magic, had stolen the Dragon Lord's most treasured weapon: a magical staff. Returning to his kingdom to show off his treasure to his tribe of warrior monkeys, he finds himself caught in the clutches of two soul collectors, dragging him to his death. Shunan Teng details the Monkey King's journey to the underworld. [Directed by Yijia Cao & Mohammad Babakoohi, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by Epidemic Sound].
Apr 07, 2020
The art forger who tricked the Nazis | Noah Charney
00:04:52
It was one of the strangest trials in Dutch history. The defendant in a 1947 case was an art forger who had counterfeited millions of dollars worth of paintings. But he wasn't arguing his innocence— in fact, his life depended on proving that he had committed fraud. Who was this artist, and why was he on trial for his life? Noah Charney investigates the notorious Han van Meegeren. [Directed by Hype CG, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Gabriel Maia].
Apr 06, 2020
Can you solve the sea monster riddle? | Daniel Finkel
00:04:55
According to legend, once every thousand years a host of sea monsters emerges from the depths to demand tribute from the floating city of Atlantartica. As the ruler of the city, you'd always dismissed the stories... until today, when they rose out of the roiling waters, surrounded your city and demanded a ransom of pearls. Can you figure out which chest of pearls is the ransom? Dan Finkel shows how. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Apr 02, 2020
History vs. Sigmund Freud | Todd Dufresne
00:05:15
Working in Vienna at the turn of the 20th century, he began his career as a neurologist before pioneering the discipline of psychoanalysis, and his influence towers above that of all other psychologists in the public eye. But was Sigmund Freud right about human nature? And were his methods scientific? Todd Dufresne puts this controversial figure on trial in History vs. Sigmund Freud. [Directed by Brett Underhill, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Mar 31, 2020
How the world's longest underwater tunnel was built | Alex Gendler
00:05:08
Flanked by two powerful nations, the English Channel has long been one of the world's most important maritime passages. Yet for most of its history, crossing was a dangerous prospect. Engineers proposed numerous plans for spanning the gap, including a design for an underwater passage more than twice the length of any existing tunnel. Alex Gendler details the creation of the Channel Tunnel. [Directed by Studio Kimchi, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Aurélien Vieira Lino].
Mar 30, 2020
What is schizophrenia? | Anees Bahji
00:05:16
Schizophrenia was first identified more than a century ago, but we still don't know its exact causes. It remains one of the most misunderstood and stigmatized illnesses today. So what do we actually know about its symptoms, causes, and treatments? Anees Bahji investigates. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Susan Zimmerman, music by Stephen LaRosa].
Mar 26, 2020
Why isn't the Netherlands underwater? | Stefan Al
00:04:56
In January 1953, a tidal surge shook the North Sea. The titanic waves flooded the Dutch coastline, killing almost 2,000 people. 54 years later, a similar storm threatened the region. But this time, they were ready. This was thanks to a massive, interlocking system known as the Delta Works— the most sophisticated flood prevention project in the world. Stefan Al dives into this marvel of engineering. [Directed by JodyPrody, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by André Aires / AIM Creative Studios].
Mar 24, 2020
Who was the world's first author? | Soraya Field Fiorio
00:04:34
4,300 years ago in ancient Sumer, the most powerful person in the city of Ur was banished to wander the vast desert. Her name was Enheduanna, and by the time of her exile, she had written forty-two hymns and three epic poems— and Sumer hadn't heard the last of her. Who was this woman, and why was she exiled? Soraya Field Fiorio details the life of history's first author. [Directed by Laura White, narrated by Christina Greer, music by Phil Brookes].
Mar 23, 2020
The imaginary king who changed the real world | Matteo Salvadore
00:05:13
In 1165, copies of a strange letter began to circulate throughout Europe. It spoke of a fantastical realm, containing the Tower of Babel and the Fountain of Youth— all ruled over by the letter's mysterious author: Prester John. Who was this powerful ruler, and was he even real? Matteo Salvadore shares the legend of a mythical king who impacted the decisions of European leaders for 400 years. [Directed by Anna Nowakowska, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Cam Misirlioglu / WORKPLAYWORK].
Mar 19, 2020
How one scientist took on the chemical industry | Mark Lytle
00:05:03
In 1958, after receiving a letter describing the deaths of songbirds due to the pesticide known as DDT, Rachel Carson began an investigation into the misuse of chemicals and their toll on nature. In 1962, she published her findings in "Silent Spring," which immediately drew both applause and impassioned dissent. How did this biologist and writer ignite such controversy? Mark Lytle investigates. [Directed by Héloïse Dorsan Rachet, narrated by Susan Zimmerman, music by Luke O'Malley].
Mar 17, 2020
How can we solve the antibiotic resistance crisis? | Gerry Wright
00:05:59
Antibiotics: behind the scenes, they enable much of modern medicine. We use them to cure infectious diseases, and to safely facilitate everything from surgery to chemotherapy to organ transplants. But we've stopped discovering new ones and we're at risk of losing them forever. How did we get into this situation? Gerry Wright shares what we can do about antibiotic resistance. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Stephen LaRosa].
Mar 16, 2020
The tale of the doctor who defied Death | Iseult Gillespie
00:05:02
A husband and wife were in despair. The woman had just given birth to their 13th child, and the growing family was quickly running out of food and money. Wandering into the woods, the father encountered a skeletal figure with sunken eyes and a gaunt face: this was Death himself, come to offer his services as Godfather. Iseult Gillespie tells the tale of Death and the doctor. [Directed by Yael Reisfeld, narrated by Jack Cutmore-Scott, music by Jarrett Farkas].
Mar 12, 2020
The meaning of life according to Simone de Beauvoir | Iseult Gillespie
00:04:50
At the age of 21, Simone de Beauvoir became the youngest person to take the philosophy exams at France's most esteemed university. But as soon as she mastered the rules of philosophy, she wanted to break them. Her desire to explore the physical world to its fullest would shape her life, and eventually, inspire radical new philosophies. Iseult Gillespie explores the life of the revolutionary thinker. [Directed by Sarah Saidan, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by Stephen LaRosa].
Mar 10, 2020
What's a squillo, and why do opera singers need it? | Ming Luke
00:04:52
An orchestra fills an opera house with music, but a singer's voice soars above the instruments. Its melody rings out across thousands of patrons— all without any assistance from a microphone. How is it possible that a single voice can be heard so clearly? The answer lies in the physics of the human voice. Ming Luke explains the carefully honed technique of an expert opera singer. [Directed by Franz Palomares, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Mar 09, 2020
The Tower of Epiphany | Think Like A Coder, Ep 7 | Alex Rosenthal
00:07:58
This is episode 7 of our animated series "Think Like A Coder." This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. [Directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Feb 27, 2020
Why do people fear the wrong things? | Gerd Gigerenzer
00:04:21
A new drug reduces the risk of heart attacks by 40%. Shark attacks are up by a factor of two. Drinking a liter of soda per day doubles your chance of developing cancer. These are all examples of a common way risk is presented in news articles, and can often be misleading. So how can we better evaluate risk? Gerd Gigerenzer explores the difference between relative and absolute risk. [Directed by Visorama, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Feb 25, 2020
Vultures: The acid-puking, plague-busting heroes of the ecosystem | Kenny Coogan
00:04:45
In the African grasslands, a gazelle suffering from tuberculosis takes its last breath. The animal's corpse threatens to infect the water, but for the vulture, this isn't a problem: it's a feast. With a stomach of steel that can digest diseased meat and waste, vultures are essential to removing dangerous pathogens from ecosystems. Kenny Coogan explores the importance of the desert's cleanup crew. [Directed by Katarina Jukić, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Feb 24, 2020
The secret messages of Viking runestones | Jesse Byock
00:04:15
With their navigational skills and advanced longships, the Vikings sustained their seafaring for over 300 years. But for all their might, they left few monuments. Instead, fragments of stone, bark and bone found in the sites of ancient settlements provide the keys to their culture. Many of these objects are inscribed with Old Norse written in runic letters. Jesse Byock explores the ancient language. [Directed by Lisa LaBracio, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott].
Feb 20, 2020
How do blood transfusions work? | Bill Schutt
00:04:28
In 1881, doctor William Halsted rushed to help his sister Minnie, who was hemorrhaging after childbirth. He quickly inserted a needle into his arm, withdrew his own blood, and transferred it to her. After a few uncertain minutes, she began to recover. What made this blood transfusion successful? Bill Schutt explains the history of the life-saving procedure. [Directed by Hype CG, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Gabriel Maia].
Feb 20, 2020
The legend of Annapurna, Hindu goddess of nourishment | Antara Raychaudhuri and Iseult Gillespie
00:04:40
Historically, the union between Shiva and Parvati was a glorious one: a sacred combination which brought fertility and connection to all living things. Yet a rift had grown between these two forces. Setting out to prove the importance of her work, Parvati withdrew from the world and sent the Earth into darkness. Antara Raychaudhuri and Iseult Gillespie tell the story of the goddess Annapurna. [Directed by Roxane Campoy, narrated by Susan Zimmerman, music by Stéphane Gassot].
Feb 13, 2020
Epic Engineering: Building the Brooklyn Bridge | Alex Gendler
00:04:52
In the mid-19th century, suspension bridges were collapsing all across Europe. Their industrial cables frayed and snapped under the weight of their decks. So when German American engineer John Roebling proposed building the largest and most expensive suspension bridge ever conceived, New York City officials were understandably skeptical. Alex Gendler details the building of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge. [Directed by Jeremiah Dickey, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Feb 11, 2020
The accident that changed the world | Allison Ramsey and Mary Staicu
00:04:36
In 1928, scientist Alexander Fleming returned to his lab and found something unexpected: a colony of mold growing on a Petri dish he'd forgotten to place in his incubator. And around this colony of mold was a zone completely and surprisingly clear of bacteria. What was this mysterious phenomenon? Allison Ramsey and Mary Staicu detail the discovery of penicillin and how it transformed medicine. [Directed by WOW-HOW Studio, narrated by Susan Zimmerman].
Feb 10, 2020
Everything changed when the fire crystal got stolen | Alex Gendler
00:03:46
Someone has tripped the magical alarms in the Element Temple. When you and the other monks arrive on the scene, you know you have a disaster on your hands. Four young apprentices broke into the temple's inner chamber to steal the sacred element crystals. But when the alarm went off they panicked, and each of them swallowed a crystal. Can you determine who ate which crystal? Alex Gendler shows how. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Feb 07, 2020
Do politics make us irrational? | Jay Van Bavel
00:05:14
Can someone's political identity actually affect their ability to process information? The answer lies in a cognitive phenomenon known as partisanship. While identifying with social groups is an essential and healthy part of life, it can become a problem when the group's beliefs are at odds with reality. So how can we recognize and combat partisanship? Jay Van Bavel shares helpful strategies. [Directed by Patrick Smith, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Feb 04, 2020
The life, legacy & assassination of an African revolutionary | Lisa Janae Bacon
00:05:07
In 1972, Thomas Sankara was swept into the revolution seeking to wrest control of Madagascar from France's lingering colonial rule. The protests inspired the West African native to read works by socialist leaders and seek wisdom from military strategy. Leaving Madagascar in 1973, he was determined to free his country from its colonial legacy. Lisa Bacon details the life of the revolutionary icon. [Directed by Tomás Pichardo-Espaillat, narrated by Christina Greer, music by WORKPLAYWORK / Cem Misirlioglu].
Feb 03, 2020
The Chasm | Think Like A Coder, Ep 6 | Alex Rosenthal
00:06:24
This is episode 6 of our animated series "Think Like A Coder." This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. [Directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Jan 30, 2020
Licking bees and pulping trees: The reign of a wasp queen | Kenny Coogan
00:04:52
As the sun rises, something royal stirs inside a pile of firewood. It's the wasp queen; one of thousands who mated in late autumn and hibernated through the winter. Now she must emerge into the spring air to begin her reign. This queen is the lone survivor of her old hive, and now, she must become the foundress of a new one. Kenny Coogan details a year in the life of a wasp queen. [Directed Biljana Labovic, animated by Denis Chapon, narrated by Addison Anderson, music Stephen LaRosa].
Jan 28, 2020
How bones make blood | Melody Smith
00:04:21
Bones might seem rock-solid, but they're actually quite porous inside. Most of the large bones of your skeleton have a hollow core filled with soft bone marrow. Marrow's most essential elements are blood stem cells and for patients with advanced blood cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, the best chance for a cure is often a bone marrow transplant. How does this procedure work? Melody Smith explains. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by Harlan Hodges / WORKPLAYWORK].
Jan 27, 2020
Why is cotton in everything? | Michael R. Stiff
00:04:33
Centuries ago, the Inca developed ingenuous suits of armor that could protect warriors from even the fiercest physical attacks. These hardy structures were made not from iron or steel, but rather something unexpectedly soft: cotton. Today cotton is used to make everything from fabric, to currency, diapers and fishing nets. Michael Stiff explores the science of what makes cotton so versatile. [Directed by WOW-HOW Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Jan 24, 2020
What was so special about Viking ships? | Jan Bill
00:04:30
As the Roman Empire flourished, Scandinavians had small settlements and no central government. Yet by the 11th century, they had spread far from Scandinavia, gaining control of trade routes throughout Europe, conquering kingdoms as far as Africa, and building outposts in North America. What was the secret to their success? Jan Bill dives into the history of the formidable Viking longship. [Directed by TOTEM Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Julián André and Blas Cernicchiaro].
Jan 21, 2020
Mating frenzies, sperm hoards, and brood raids: the life of a fire ant queen | Walter R. Tschinkel
00:04:59
In the spring, just after a heavy rainfall, male and female fire ants swarm the skies for a day of romance, known as the nuptial flight. Thousands of reproduction-capable ants take part in a mating frenzy, and for one successfully mated female, her work is only beginning. Walter R. Tschinkel details how the new queen builds a colony and protects it from neighboring ant armies. [Directed by Lisa Vertudaches, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Phil Brookes].
Jan 16, 2020
The Artists | Think Like A Coder, Ep 5 | Alex Rosenthal
00:06:25
This is episode 5 of our animated series "Think Like A Coder." This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. [Directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Jan 13, 2020
Can you solve the dragon jousting riddle? | Alex Gendler
00:04:23
After years of war, the world's kingdoms have come to an agreement. Every five years, teams representing the elves, goblins, and treefolk will compete in a grand tournament of dragon jousting. You have the important job of recording the scores for the inaugural tournament. But, you overslept and the games are already underway. Can you figure out the real score of each match? Alex Gendler shows how. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Jan 10, 2020
The mysterious life and death of Rasputin | Eden Girma
00:04:52
On a night in 1916, Russian aristocrats set a plot of assassination into motion. If all went as planned, a man would be dead by morning, though others had already tried and failed. The monarchy was on the brink of collapse, and they believed this man was the single cause of it all. Who was he, and why was he to blame for the fate of an empire? Eden Girma explores the life of the notorious Rasputin. [Directed by Hype CG, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Gabriel Maia].
Jan 08, 2020
Could a breathalyzer detect cancer? | Julian Burschka
00:04:17
How is it that a breathalyzer can measure the alcohol content in someone's blood, hours after they had their last drink, based on their breath alone? And could we use this same technology to detect disease by analyzing a person's breath, without having to use more invasive diagnostic tools like biopsies, blood draws, and radiation? Julian Burschka details the complicated process. [Directed by Cabong Studios, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Matheus Wittmann].
Jan 06, 2020
A brief history of alcohol | Rod Phillips
00:04:56
Nobody knows exactly when humans began to create fermented beverages. The earliest known evidence comes from 7,000 BCE in China, where residue in clay pots has revealed that people were making an alcoholic beverage from fermented rice, millet, grapes, and honey. So how did alcohol come to fuel global trade and exploration? Roderick Phillips explores the evolution of alcohol. [Directed by Anton Bogaty, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Jan 02, 2020
Why should you read "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding? | Jill Dash
00:04:25
After witnessing the atrocities of his fellow man in World War II, William Golding was losing his faith in humanity. Later, during the Cold War, as superpowers began threatening one another with nuclear annihilation, he was forced to interrogate the very roots of human nature and violence. These musings would inspire his first novel: "Lord of the Flies." Jill Dash dives into the timeless satire. [Directed by Lucy Animation Studio / Silvia Prietov, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Stephen LaRosa].
Dec 12, 2019
Hacking bacteria to fight cancer | Tal Danino
00:04:51
In 1884, an unlucky patient who had a rapidly growing cancer in his neck came down with an unrelated bacterial skin infection. As he recovered from the infection, the cancer surprisingly began to recede. The infection had stimulated the patient's immune system. Today, synthetic biologists program bacteria to safely deliver drugs directly to tumors. How is this possible? Tal Danino investigates. [Directed by Chris Bishop, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Dec 11, 2019
The Train Heist | Think Like A Coder, Ep 4 | Alex Rosenthal
00:05:43
This is episode 4 of our animated series "Think Like A Coder." This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. [Directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Dec 09, 2019
How does chemotherapy work? | Hyunsoo Joshua No
00:05:05
During World War I, scientists were trying to develop an antidote to the poisonous yellow cloud known as mustard gas. They discovered the gas was irrevocably damaging the bone marrow of affected soldiers. This gave the scientists an idea: cancer cells and bone marrow both replicate rapidly. Could mustard gas be used to fight cancer? Hyunsoo No details the discovery and development of chemotherapy. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Dec 05, 2019
Why doesn't the Leaning Tower of Pisa fall over? | Alex Gendler
00:04:49
In 1990, the Italian government enlisted top engineers to stabilize Pisa's famous Leaning Tower. There'd been many attempts during its 800 year history, but computer models revealed the urgency of their situation. The tower would topple if it reached an angle of 5.44 degrees— and it was currently leaning at 5.5. What gives the tower its infamous tilt? Alex Gendler explores the monument's history. [Directed by Aim Creative Studios, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by André Aires].
Dec 03, 2019
How corn conquered the world | Chris A. Kniesly
00:05:00
Corn currently accounts for more than one tenth of our global crop production. And over 99% of cultivated corn is the exact same type: Yellow Dent #2. This means that humans grow more Yellow Dent #2 than any other plant on the planet. So how did this single variety of this single plant become the biggest success story in agricultural history? Chris Kniesly investigates the rise of this wonder-crop. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Dec 02, 2019
Is marijuana bad for your brain? | Anees Bahji
00:06:21
In 1970, marijuana was classified as a schedule 1 drug in the United States: the strictest designation possible, meaning it was completely illegal and had no recognized medical uses. Today, marijuana's therapeutic benefits are widely acknowledged, but a growing recognition for its medical value doesn't answer the question: is recreational marijuana use bad for your brain? Anees Bahji investigates. [Directed by Anton Bogaty, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Bamm Bamm Wolfgang].
Dec 02, 2019
Can you outsmart this logical fallacy? | Alex Gendler
00:03:21
Meet Lucy. She was a math major in college, and aced all her courses in probability and statistics. Which do you think is more likely: that Lucy is a portrait artist, or that Lucy is a portrait artist who also plays poker? How do we know which statement is more likely to be true? Alex Gendler explores our tendency to look for shortcuts and the phenomenon known as the conjunction fallacy. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by WORKPLAYWORK / Cem Misirlioglu].
Nov 25, 2019
History's "worst" nun | Theresa A. Yugar
00:04:32
Juana Ramírez de Asbaje sat before a panel of prestigious theologians, jurists, and mathematicians. They had been invited to test Juana's knowledge with the most difficult questions they could muster. But she successfully answered every challenge, from complicated equations to philosophical queries. Who was this impressive woman? Theresa Yugar details the life of the Mexican poet and scholar. [Directed by WOW-HOW Studio, narrated by Christina Greer, music by Stephen LaRosa].
Nov 21, 2019
How does laser eye surgery work? | Dan Reinstein
00:05:16
In 1948, Spanish ophthalmologist Jose Ignacio Barraquer Moner was fed up with glasses. He wanted a solution for blurry vision that fixed the eye itself, without relying on external aids. The surgery he eventually devised was called "keratomileusis," and his technique focused on reshaping the cornea— what we now know as LASIK. So how does laser eye surgery actually work? Dan Reinstein explains. [Directed by Hype CG, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Nov 19, 2019
The Furnace Bots | Think Like A Coder, Ep 3 | Alex Rosenthal
00:05:55
This is episode 3 of our animated series "Think Like A Coder." This 10-episode narrative follows a girl, Ethic, and her robot companion, Hedge, as they attempt to save the world. The two embark on a quest to collect three artifacts and must solve their way through a series of programming puzzles. [Directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Nov 18, 2019
The myth of Loki and the master builder | Alex Gendler
00:04:25
Asgard, a realm of wonders, was where the Norse Gods made their home. There Odin's great hall of Valhalla towered above the mountains and Bifrost, the rainbow bridge, anchored itself. Though their domain was magnificent, it stood undefended from the giants and trolls who sought to destroy them. But a stranger appeared and made the gods an offer. Alex Gendler details the myth of the master builder. [Directed by Hype CG, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Nov 14, 2019
Can a black hole be destroyed? - Fabio Pacucci
00:04:57
Black holes are among the most destructive objects in the universe. Anything that gets too close to a black hole, be it an asteroid, planet, or star, risks being torn apart by its extreme gravitational field. By some accounts, the universe may eventually consist entirely of black holes. But is there any way to destroy a black hole? Fabio Pacucci digs into the possibility.
Oct 25, 2019
The hidden network that makes the internet possible - Sajan Saini
00:05:11
In 2012, a team of researchers set a world record, transmitting 1 petabit of data— that’s 10,000 hours of high-def video— over a fifty-kilometer cable, in a second. This wasn’t just any cable. It was a souped-up version of fiber optics, the hidden network that links our planet and makes the internet possible. What is fiber optics, how does it work, and how is it evolving? Sajan Saini explores the vital technology.
Oct 25, 2019
The "End Of History" Illusion - Bence Nanay
00:04:15
Time and time again, we’ve failed to predict that the technologies of the present will change the future. Recently, a similar pattern was discovered in our individual lives: we’re unable to predict change in ourselves. But is there anything wrong with assuming that who we are now is who we will continue to be? Bence Nanay details the consequences of seeing ourselves as finished products.
Oct 25, 2019
Is fire a solid, a liquid, or a gas? - Elizabeth Cox
00:04:26
Sitting around a campfire, you can feel its heat, smell the woody smoke, and hear it crackle. If you get too close, it burns your eyes and stings your nostrils. You could stare at the bright flames forever as they twist and flicker in endless incarnations… But what exactly are you looking at? Elizabeth Cox illuminates the science behind fire.
Oct 25, 2019
How CRISPR lets you edit DNA - Andrea M. Henle
00:005:26
From the smallest single-celled organism to the largest creatures on Earth, every living thing is defined by its genes. With recent advancements, scientists can change an organism’s fundamental features in record time using gene editing tools such as CRISPR. But where did this medical marvel come from and how does it work? Andrea M. Henle examines the science behind this new technology.
Oct 25, 2019
The mysterious science of pain - Joshua W. Pate
00:04:55
In 1995, the British Medical Journal published a report about a builder who accidentally jumped onto a nail, which pierced straight through his steel-toed boot. He was in such agonizing pain that any movement was unbearable. But when the doctors took off his boot, they discovered that the nail had never touched his foot at all. What’s going on? Joshua W. Pate investigates the experience of pain.
Oct 04, 2019
Ugly History: Witch Hunts - Brian A. Pavlac
00:05:13
In the German town of Nördlingen in 1593, innkeeper Maria Höll found herself accused of witchcraft. She was arrested for questioning, and denied the charges. She insisted she wasn’t a witch through 62 rounds of torture before her accusers finally released her. Other accused witches weren’t so “lucky." Why did these witch hunts occur? Brian A. Pavlac digs into this horrific chapter in human history.
Oct 04, 2019
How does impeachment work? | Alex Gendler
00:04:56
For most jobs, it's understood that you can be fired – whether for crime, incompetence, or just poor performance. But what if your job happens to be the most powerful position in the country – or the world? That's where impeachment comes in. But how does it work? Alex Gendler details the process of impeachment. [Directed by Mark Phillips, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Sep 26, 2019
What really happens to the plastic you throw away - Emma Bryce
00:04:06
We’ve all been told that we should recycle plastic bottles and containers. But what actually happens to the plastic if we just throw it away? Emma Bryce traces the life cycles of three different plastic bottles, shedding light on the dangers these disposables present to our world.
Sep 20, 2019
How to grow your own glacier - M Jackson
00:05:14
In the 13th century, Genghis Khan embarked on a mission to take over Eurasia, swiftly conquering countries and drawing them into his empire. But, legend has it that there was one obstacle that even he couldn’t overcome: a towering wall of ice, grown by locals across a mountain pass. M Jackson explores the ancient methods of growing glaciers and how they can be used to combat climate change.
Sep 20, 2019
Why are earthquakes so hard to predict? - Jean-Baptiste P. Koehl
00:04:56
In 132 CE, Zhang Heng presented his latest invention: a large vase he claimed could tell them whenever an earthquake occurred for hundreds of miles. Today, we no longer rely on pots as warning systems, but earthquakes still offer challenges to those trying to track them. Why are earthquakes so hard to anticipate, and how could we get better at predicting them? Jean-Baptiste P. Koehl investigates.
Sep 06, 2019
Accents by Denice Frohman
00:02:31
This animation is part of our new series, "There's a Poem for That," which features animated interpretations of poems both old and new that give language to some of life's biggest feelings. Check out the full series here: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTheresAPoemForThat
Sep 06, 2019
The Chinese myth of the immortal white snake - Shunan Teng
00:03:51
The talented herbalist Xu Xian had just started his own medicine shop where he created remedies with the help of his wife, Bai Su Zhen. One day a monk named Fa Hai approached him, warning him that there was a demon in his house. The demon, he said, was Bai Su Zhen. Xu Xian laughed. How could his kind-hearted wife be a demon? Shunan Teng traces the tale of the immortal white snake.
Aug 30, 2019
Can you solve the unstoppable blob riddle? - Dan Finkel
00:03:38
A shooting star crashes onto Earth and a hideous blob emerges. It creeps and leaps, it glides and slides. It’s also unstoppable: no matter what you throw at it, it just re-grows and continues its rampage. The only way to save the planet is to cut the entire blob into precise acute triangles while it sleeps, rendering it inert. Can you stop the blob from destroying the planet? Dan Finkel shows how.
Aug 30, 2019
History vs. Christopher Columbus - Alex Gendler
00:05:55
Many people in the United States and Latin America have grown up celebrating the anniversary of Christopher Columbus’s voyage. But was he an intrepid explorer who brought two worlds together or a ruthless exploiter who brought colonialism and slavery? And did he even discover America at all? Alex Gendler puts Columbus on the stand in History vs. Christopher Columbus.
Aug 23, 2019
Could underwater farms help fight climate change? - Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Megan Davis
00:04:24
For billions of people, seafood provides a significant source of protein and nutrition, but over half the seafood we eat isn’t caught in the wild, it’s grown through aquaculture. Farmed seafood is one of the fastest-growing food industries, but the farming methods echo the problems we’ve seen in industrial agriculture. Is there a way to sustainably farm the ocean? Ayana Johnson and Megan Davis investigate.
Aug 23, 2019
How does the stock market work? - Oliver Elfenbaum
00:04:17
In the 1600s, the Dutch East India Company employed hundreds of ships to trade goods around the globe. In order to fund their voyages, the company turned to private citizens to invest money to support trips in exchange for a share of the profits. In doing so, they unknowingly invented the world’s first stock market. So how do companies and investors use the market today? Oliver Elfenbaum explains.
Aug 23, 2019
How to grow your own glacier - M Jackson
00:05:14
In the 13th century, Genghis Khan embarked on a mission to take over Eurasia, swiftly conquering countries and drawing them into his empire. But, legend has it that there was one obstacle that even he couldn’t overcome: a towering wall of ice, grown by locals across a mountain pass. M Jackson explores the ancient methods of growing glaciers and how they can be used to combat climate change.
Aug 23, 2019
Turbulence: one of the great unsolved mysteries of physics - Tomás Chor
00:05:12
You’re on an airplane when you feel a sudden jolt. Outside your window nothing seems to be happening, yet the plane continues to rattle you and your fellow passengers as it passes through turbulent air in the atmosphere. What exactly is turbulence, and why does it happen? Tomás Chor dives into one of the prevailing mysteries of physics: the complex phenomenon of turbulence.
Aug 23, 2019
How to spot a pyramid scheme - Stacie Bosley
00:05:03
In 2004, a nutrition company offered a life-changing opportunity to earn a full-time income for part-time work. There were only two steps to get started: purchase a $500 kit and recruit two more members. By 2013, the company was making $200 million. There was just one problem -- the vast majority of members earned less than they paid in. Stacie Bosley explains what a pyramid scheme is and how to spot one.
Aug 02, 2019
The princess who rewrote history - Leonora Neville
00:04:55
Anna Komnene, daughter of Byzantine emperor Alexios, spent the last decade of her life creating a 500-page history of her father’s reign called “The Alexiad.” As a princess writing about her own family, she had to balance her loyalty to her kin with her obligation to portray events accurately. Leonora Neville investigates this epic historical narrative.
Aug 02, 2019
How do self-driving cars “see”? - Sajan Saini
00:05:11
It’s late, pitch dark and a self-driving car winds down a narrow country road. Suddenly, three hazards appear at the same time. With no human at the wheel, the car uses smart eyes, sensors that’ll resolve these details all in a split-second. How is this possible? Sajan Saini explains how LIDAR and integrated photonics technology make self-driving cars a reality.
Aug 02, 2019
A brie(f) history of cheese - Paul S. Kindstedt
00:05:30
Before empires and royalty, before pottery and writing, before metal tools and weapons – there was cheese. As early as 8000 BCE, Neolithic farmers began a legacy of cheesemaking almost as old as civilization. Today, the world produces roughly 22 billion kilograms of cheese a year, shipped and consumed around the globe. Paul Kindstedt shares the history of one of our oldest and most beloved foods.
Aug 02, 2019
What causes heartburn? - Rusha Modi
00:04:55
Humans have been battling heartburn for hundreds, if not thousands, of years. But recently the incidence has risen, making it a common complaint worldwide. What causes this problem, and how can it be stopped? Rusha Modi details the causes and treatments of heartburn.
Jul 26, 2019
How tall can a tree grow? - Valentin Hammoudi
00:04:46
Reaching heights of over 100 meters, Californian sequoias tower over Earth’s other 60,000 tree species. But even these behemoths seem to have their limits: no sequoia on record has been able to grow taller than 130 meters. So what exactly is stopping these trees from growing taller, forever? Valentin Hammoudi investigates why trees have limited heights.
Jul 26, 2019
A brief history of cannibalism | Bill Schutt
00:04:30
15th century Europeans believed they had hit upon a miracle cure: a remedy for epilepsy, hemorrhage, bruising, nausea and virtually any other medical ailment. It was a brown powder known as "mumia," and was made by grinding up mummified human flesh. But just how common is human cannibalism, and how do cultures partake in it? Bill Schutt explores the complex history of cannibalism. [Directed by Basa, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Jul 25, 2019
The hidden network that makes the internet possible - Sajan Saini
00:05:19
In 2012, a team of researchers set a world record, transmitting 1 petabit of data— that’s 10,000 hours of high-def video— over a fifty-kilometer cable, in a second. This wasn’t just any cable. It was a souped-up version of fiber optics, the hidden network that links our planet and makes the internet possible. What is fiber optics, how does it work, and how is it evolving? Sajan Saini explores the vital technology.
Jul 19, 2019
A brief history of dogs - David Ian Howe
00:04:59
Since their emergence over 200,000 years ago, modern humans have established communities all over the planet. But they didn’t do it alone. Whatever corner of the globe you find humans in today, you’re likely to find another species as well: dogs. So how did one of our oldest rivals, the wolf, evolve into man’s best friend? David Ian Howe traces the history of humanity’s first domesticated animal.
Jul 19, 2019
From DNA to Silly Putty, the diverse world of polymers - Jan Mattingly
00:05:00
You are made of polymers, and so are trees and telephones and toys. A polymer is a long chain of identical molecules (or monomers) with a range of useful properties, like toughness or stretchiness -- and it turns out, we just can't live without them. Polymers occur both naturally -- our DNA is a polymer -- and synthetically, like plastic, Silly Putty and styrofoam. Jan Mattingly explains how polymers have changed our world.
Jul 12, 2019
The death of the universe - Renée Hlozek
00:04:34
The shape, contents and future of the universe are all intricately related. We know that it's mostly flat; we know that it's made up of baryonic matter (like stars and planets), but mostly dark matter and dark energy; and we know that it's expanding constantly, so that all stars will eventually burn out into a cold nothingness. Renée Hlozek expands on the beauty of this dark ending.
Jul 12, 2019
The motion of the ocean - Sasha Wright
00:05:19
The constant motion of our oceans represents a vast and complicated system involving many different drivers. Sasha Wright explains the physics behind one of those drivers -- the concentration gradient -- and illustrates how our oceans are continually engaging in a universal struggle for space.
Jul 05, 2019
An athlete uses physics to shatter world records - Asaf Bar-Yosef
00:03:50
When Dick Fosbury couldn't compete against the skilled high jumpers at his college, he tried jumping in a different way -- backwards. Fosbury improved his record immediately and continued to amaze the world with his new technique all the way to Olympic gold. Asaf Bar-Yosef explains the physics behind the success of the now dominant Fosbury Flop.
Jul 05, 2019
Is radiation dangerous? - Matt Anticole
00:05:20
When we hear the word radiation, it's tempting to picture huge explosions and frightening mutations. But that's not the full story — radiation also applies to rainbows and a doctor examining an X-ray. So what is it, really, and how much should we worry about its effects? Matt Anticole describes the different types of radiation
Jun 28, 2019
Can wildlife adapt to climate change? - Erin Eastwood
00:04:46
With rising temperatures and seas, massive droughts, and changing landscapes, successfully adapting to climate change is increasingly important. For humans, this can mean using technology to find solutions. But for some plants and animals, adapting to these changes involves the most ancient solution of all: evolution. Erin Eastwood explains how animals are adapting to climate change.
Jun 28, 2019
Why the octopus brain is so extraordinary - Cláudio L. Guerra
00:04:16
Octopuses have the ability to solve puzzles, learn through observation, and even use tools – just like humans. But what makes octopus intelligence so amazing is that it comes from a biological structure completely different from ours. Cláudio L. Guerra takes a look inside the amazing octopus brain.
Jun 21, 2019
The incredible collaboration behind the International Space Station - Tien Nguyen
00:09:13
The International Space Station is roughly the size of a six-bedroom house and weighs more than 320 cars -- it's so large that no single rocket could have lifted it into orbit. Instead, it was assembled piece by piece while hurtling through space at 28,000 kilometers per hour, lapping the Earth once every 90 minutes. Tien Nguyen explains how.
Jun 21, 2019
How a few scientists transformed the way we think about disease - Tien Nguyen
00:04:38
This video was created with support from the U.S. Office of Research Integrity: http://ori.hhs.gov. For several centuries, people though diseases were caused by wandering clouds of poisonous vapor. We now know that this theory is pretty ridiculous, and that diseases are caused by specific bacteria. But how did we get to this new idea of germ theory? Tien Nguyen describes the work of several scientists who discredited a widely accepted theory in a way that was beneficial to human health.
Jun 14, 2019
The race to sequence the human genome - Tien Nguyen
00:04:59
In 1990, The Human Genome Project proposed to sequence the entire human genome over 15 years with $3 billion of public funds. Then, seven years before its scheduled completion, a private company called Celera announced that they could accomplish the same goal in just three years at a fraction of the cost. Tien Nguyen details the history of this race to sequence the human genome.
Jun 14, 2019
The threat of invasive species - Jennifer Klos
00:04:46
Massive vines that blanket the southern United States, climbing high as they uproot trees and swallow buildings. A ravenous snake that is capable of devouring an alligator. Rabbit populations that eat themselves into starvation. These aren’t horror movie concepts – they’re real stories. But how could such situations exist in nature? Jennifer Klos gives the facts on invasive species.
Jun 07, 2019
How miscommunication happens (and how to avoid it) - Katherine Hampsten
00:04:33
Have you ever talked with a friend about a problem, only to realize that he just doesn't seem to grasp why the issue is so important to you? Have you ever presented an idea to a group, and it's met with utter confusion? What's going on here? Katherine Hampsten describes why miscommunication occurs so frequently, and how we can minimize frustration while expressing ourselves better.
Jun 07, 2019
The Opposites Game | Brendan Constantine
00:04:25
A classroom erupts into a war of words as students grapple with a seemingly simple prompt: what is the opposite of a gun? This animation is part of the TED-Ed series, "There's a Poem for That," which features animated interpretations of poems both old and new that give language to some of life's biggest feelings. [A TED-Ed Production, a film by Anna Samo + Lisa LaBracio, poem by Brendan Constantine, poem performed by Brendan Constantine, sound Design by Weston Fonger, animation & Design by Anna Samo + Lisa LaBracio, animation Produced by Gerta Xhelo].
Jun 03, 2019
Why the metric system matters - Matt Anticole
00:05:07
For the majority of recorded human history, units like the weight of a grain or the length of a hand weren't exact and varied from place to place. Now, consistent measurements are such an integral part of our daily lives that it's hard to appreciate what a major accomplishment for humanity they've been. Matt Anticole traces the wild history of the metric system.
May 31, 2019
How to turn protest into powerful change - Eric Liu
00:04:56
We live in an age of protest. On campuses, in public squares, on streets and social media, protestors around the world are challenging the status quo. But while protest is often necessary, is it sufficient? Eric Liu outlines three strategies for peacefully turning awareness into action and protest into durable political power.
May 31, 2019
Evolution in a big city - Jason Munshi-South
00:05:08
Using newts, coyotes and mice, Jason Munshi-South shows how animals develop genetic differences in evolution, even within an urban city.
May 24, 2019
How do we separate the seemingly inseparable? - Iddo Magen
00:04:24
Your cell phone is mainly made of plastics and metals. It's easy to appreciate the process by which those elements add up to something so useful. But there's another story we don't hear about -- how did we get our raw ingredients in the first place, from the chaotic tangle of materials that is nature? Iddo Magen uncovers the answer in a group of clever hacks known as separation techniques.
May 24, 2019
How does your body know what time it is? - Marco A. Sotomayor
00:05:02
Being able to sense time helps us do everything from waking and sleeping to knowing precisely when to catch a ball that’s hurtling towards us. And we owe all these abilities to an interconnected system of timekeepers in our brains. But how do they work? Marco A. Sotomayor details how human bodies naturally tell time.
May 17, 2019
Why is this painting so captivating? - James Earle and Christina Bozsik
00:03:58
On first glance, the painting “Las Meninas” (“The Maids of Honor”) might not seem terribly special, but it’s actually one of the most analyzed pieces in the history of art. Why is this painting by Diego Velazquez so captivating? James Earle and Christina Bozsik share the context and complexity behind this work of art.
May 17, 2019
The science of milk - Jonathan J. O'Sullivan
00:05:23
The milk industry produces in excess of 840 million tons of products each year. Why do humans drink so much milk? And given that all mammals lactate, why do we favor certain types of milk over others? Jonathan J. O’Sullivan describes how milk is made. Lesson by Jonathan J. O'Sullivan, animation by TED-Ed.
May 03, 2019
Meet the tardigrade, the toughest animal on Earth - Thomas Boothby
00:04:10
Without water, a human can only survive for about 100 hours. But there’s a creature so resilient that it can go without it for decades. This 1-millimeter animal can survive both the hottest and coldest environments on earth, and can even withstand high levels of radiation. Thomas Boothby introduces us to the tardigrade, one of the toughest creatures on Earth. Lesson by Thomas Boothby, animation by Boniato Studio.
May 03, 2019
A brief history of numerical systems - Alessandra King
00:05:01
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9... and 0. With just these ten symbols, we can write any rational number imaginable. But why these particular symbols? Why ten of them? And why do we arrange them the way we do? Alessandra King gives a brief history of numerical systems.
Apr 26, 2019
Is there a limit to technological progress? - Clément Vidal
00:04:46
Many generations have felt they’ve reached the pinnacle of technological advancement. Yet, if you look back 100 years, the technologies we take for granted today would seem like impossible magic. So — will there be a point where we reach an actual limit of technological progress? And if so, are we anywhere near that limit now? Clément Vidal consults Kardashev’s scale to find out.
Apr 26, 2019
Historical role models - Amy Bissetta
00:02:28
Many notable American historical figures are considered role models -- but why? George Washington was devilishly smart, and Abraham Lincoln was a brave leader, but have you heard of Sybil Ludington or Beriah Green? Amy Bissetta expounds on the lessons of character we can learn from these historical giants, whether you've heard of them or not.
Apr 19, 2019
Dark matter: How does it explain a star's speed? - Don Lincoln
00:03:05
All the stars in a spiral galaxy rotate around a center -- but to astronomers, the speed that each star travels wasn't making sense. Why didn't stars slow down toward the edges as expected? Don Lincoln explains how a mysterious force called dark matter is (possibly) the answer -- and why the search for an answer matters.
Apr 19, 2019
Four sisters in Ancient Rome - Ray Laurence
00:08:31
How did the young, wealthy women of Ancient Rome spend their days? Meet Domitia and her sister Domitia and her sister Domitia and her sister Domitia. Ray Laurence sketches the domestic life of leisure that these young girls lived, despite little recorded information on women from this otherwise well-documented era.
Apr 12, 2019
What happened to antimatter? - Rolf Landua
00:05:06
Particles come in pairs, which is why there should be an equal amount of matter and antimatter in the universe. Yet, scientists have not been able to detect any in the visible universe. Where is this missing antimatter? CERN scientist Rolf Landua returns to the seconds after the Big Bang to explain the disparity that allows humans to exist today.
Apr 12, 2019
The genius of Marie Curie | Shohini Ghose
00:04:43
Marie Skłodowska Curie's revolutionary research laid the groundwork for our understanding of physics and chemistry, blazing trails in oncology, technology, medicine, and nuclear physics, to name a few. But what did she actually do? Shohini Ghose expounds on some of Marie Skłodowska Curie's most revolutionary discoveries. [Directed by Anna Nowakowska, narrated by Julianna Zarzycki, music by Matthias Runge].
Apr 05, 2019
What causes kidney stones? - Arash Shadman
00:05:09
The biggest kidney stone on record weighed more than a kilogram and was 17 centimeters in diameter. The patient didn’t actually swallow a stone the size of a coconut; kidney stones form inside the body. So how do they grow in the first place? And why are they so painful to get out? Arash Shadman shares the science behind kidney stones. Lesson by Arash Shadman, animation by TED-Ed.
Apr 05, 2019
How does the Nobel Peace Prize work? - Adeline Cuvelier and Toril Rokseth
00:06:14
Among the top prestigious awards in the world, the Nobel Peace Prize has honored some of the most celebrated and revered international figures and organizations in history. But how does the nomination process work? And who exactly is eligible? Adeline Cuvelier and Toril Rokseth detail the specifics of the Nobel Peace Prize.
Apr 05, 2019
How to spot a pyramid scheme | Stacie Bosley
00:04:49
In 2004, a nutrition company offered a life-changing opportunity to earn a full-time income for part-time work. There were only two steps to get started: purchase a $500 kit and recruit two more members. By 2013, the company was making $200 million. There was just one problem -- the vast majority of members earned less than they paid in. Stacie Bosley explains what a pyramid scheme is and how to spot one. [Directed by Wooden Plane Productions, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by Matthew Reid].
Apr 02, 2019
Why do animals form swarms? - Maria R. D'Orsogna
00:04:04
When many individual organisms come together and move as one entity, that’s a swarm. From a handful of birds to billions of insects, swarms can be almost any size. They have no leader, and members interact only with their neighbors or through indirect cues. Members follow simple rules: travel in the same direction as those around you, stay close and avoid collisions. Maria R. D’Orsogna shares why. Lesson by Maria R. D’Orsogna, animation by Matt Reynolds. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Joren Schiks, Аркадий Скайуокер, Milad Mostafavi, Rob Johnson, Singh Devesh Sourabh, Ashley Maldonado, Clarence E. Harper Jr., Bojana Golubovic, Mihail Radu Pantilimon, Sarah Yaghi, Benedict Chuah, Karthik Cherala, haventfiguredout , Violeta Cervantes, Elaine Fitzpatrick, Lyn-z Schulte, Sharon Chou, Henrique 'Sorín' Cassús, Tim Robinson, Kiarash Asar, Jun Cai, Paul Schneider, Amber Wood, Nathalia Ortega Bravo, Ophelia Gibson Best, Cas Jamieson, Michelle Stevens-Stanford, Phyllis Dubrow, Andreas Voltios, Aliyya Rachmadi, Eunsun Kim, Philippe Spoden, Samantha Chow, Armando Ello, Minh Tran, Ayala Ron, Manognya Chakrapani, Simon Holst Ravn, Doreen Reynolds-Consolati, Rakshit Kothari, Melissa Sorrells, Antony Lee, Husain Mohammad, Dino Hrnjić, Max Shuai Tang, Côme Vincent, Astia Rizki Safitri, Alan Froese, Zhufeng Wang, alessandra tasso, Daniel Mardale, Jamerson Chingapanini, Gerald Onyango, Dalton Valette, Katrina Harding, Ezgi Yersu, Al the Scottish Wildcat, Katie Dean, Kin Lon Ma, Carsten Tobehn, Boris Langvand, Jeremy Fryd, Ran Ben Dov, Charlene You, Jarrel Cacdac, Carolyn Corwin and rakesh Katragadda.
Mar 29, 2019
How North America got its shape - Peter J. Haproff
00:04:57
North America didn’t always have its familiar shape, nor its famed mountains, canyons, and plains: all of that was once contained in an unrecognizable mass, buried deep in Rodinia, a huge supercontinent that lay on the face of the Earth. Peter J. Haproff explains how it took millions of years and some incredible plate tectonics to forge the continent we know today. Lesson by Peter J. Haproff, animation by Globizco.
Mar 29, 2019
Frida Kahlo: The woman behind the legend | Iseult Gillespie
00:03:54
In 1925, Frida Kahlo was on her way home from school in Mexico City when the bus she was riding collided with a streetcar. She suffered near-fatal injuries and her disability became a major theme in her paintings. Over the course of her life, she would establish herself as the creator and muse behind extraordinary pieces of art. Iseult Gillespie dives into the life and work of Frida Kahlo. [Directed by Ivana Bošnjak and Thomas Johnson, narrated by Christina Greer, music by Stephen LaRosa].
Mar 28, 2019
How does your body process medicine? - Céline Valéry
00:04:12
Have you ever wondered what happens to a painkiller, like ibuprofen, after you swallow it? Medicine that slides down your throat can help treat a headache, a sore back, or a throbbing sprained ankle. But how does it get where it needs to go in the first place? Céline Valéry explains how your body processes medicine. Lesson by Céline Valéry, animation by Daniel Gray.
Mar 22, 2019
What is entropy? - Jeff Phillips
00:05:14
There’s a concept that’s crucial to chemistry and physics. It helps explain why physical processes go one way and not the other: why ice melts, why cream spreads in coffee, why air leaks out of a punctured tire. It’s entropy, and it’s notoriously difficult to wrap our heads around. Jeff Phillips gives a crash course on entropy. Lesson by Jeff Phillips, animation by Provincia Studio.
Mar 22, 2019
How do hard drives work? - Kanawat Senanan
00:05:11
The modern hard drive is an object that can likely hold more information than your local library. But how does it store so much information in such a small space? Kanawat Senanan details the generations of engineers, material scientists, and quantum physicists who influenced the creation of this incredibly powerful and precise tool.
Mar 22, 2019
How stress affects your body - Sharon Horesh Bergquist
00:04:42
Our hard-wired stress response is designed to give us the quick burst of heightened alertness and energy needed to perform our best. But stress isn’t all good. When activated too long or too often, stress can damage virtually every part of our body. Sharon Horesh Bergquist gives us a look at what goes on inside our body when we are chronically stressed.
Mar 22, 2019
Why do we love? A philosophical inquiry | Skye C. Cleary
00:05:35
Ah, romantic love; beautiful and intoxicating, heart-breaking and soul-crushing... often all at the same time! If romantic love has a purpose, neither science nor psychology has discovered it yet – but over the course of history, some of our most respected philosophers have put forward some intriguing theories. Skye C. Cleary outlines five of these philosophical perspectives on why we love. [Directed by Avi Ofer, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Brooks Ball and Cem Misirlioglu].
Mar 15, 2019
How stress affects your brain | Madhumita Murgia
00:04:00
Stress isn't always a bad thing; it can be handy for a burst of extra energy and focus, like when you're playing a competitive sport or have to speak in public. But when it's continuous, it actually begins to change your brain. Madhumita Murgia shows how chronic stress can affect brain size, its structure, and how it functions, right down to the level of your genes. [Directed by Andrew Zimbelman, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Josh Smoak].
Mar 15, 2019
How blood pressure works - Wilfred Manzano
00:04:31
If you lined up all the blood vessels in your body, they’d be 60 thousand miles long. And every day, they carry the equivalent of over two thousand gallons of blood to the body’s tissues. What effect does this pressure have on the walls of the blood vessels? Wilfred Manzano gives the facts on blood pressure.
Mar 15, 2019
How do geckos defy gravity? - Eleanor Nelsen
00:04:29
Geckos aren't covered in adhesives or hooks or suction cups, and yet they can effortlessly scale vertical walls and hang from ceilings. What's going on? Eleanor Nelsen explains how geckos' phenomenal feet allow them to defy gravity.
Mar 15, 2019
Could a blind eye regenerate? - David Davila
00:04:06
We tend to think of blindness as something you're born with, but with certain genetic diseases, it can actually develop when you’re a kid, or even when you’re an adult. But could blind eyes possibly regenerate? David Davila explains how the zebrafish’s amazing regenerative retinas are causing scientists to investigate that very question. Lesson by David Davila, animation by Eli Enigenburg.
Mar 08, 2019
The chemistry of cold packs - John Pollard
00:04:31
If you stick water in the freezer, it will take a few hours to freeze into ice. How is it, then, that cold packs go from room temperature to near freezing in mere seconds? John Pollard details the chemistry of the cold pack, shedding light on the concepts of energetics and entropy along the way.
Mar 08, 2019
What is depression? | Helen M. Farrell
00:04:14
Depression is the leading cause of disability in the world; in the United States, close to ten percent of adults struggle with the disease. But because it's a mental illness, it can be a lot harder to understand than, say, high cholesterol. Helen M. Farrell examines the symptoms and treatments of depression, and gives some tips for how you might help a friend who is suffering. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Mar 01, 2019
Einstein's brilliant mistake: Entangled states - Chad Orzel
00:05:09
When you think about Einstein and physics, E=mc^2 is probably the first thing that comes to mind. But one of his greatest contributions to the field actually came in the form of an odd philosophical footnote in a 1935 paper he co-wrote -- which ended up being wrong. Chad Orzel details Einstein's "EPR" paper and its insights on the strange phenomena of entangled states.
Mar 01, 2019
How heavy is air? - Dan Quinn
00:03:20
Too often we think of air as empty space -- but compared to a vacuum, air is actually pretty heavy. So, just how heavy is it? And if it's so heavy, why doesn't it crush us? Dan Quinn describes the fundamentals of air pressure and explains how it affects our bodies, the weather and the universe at large.
Mar 01, 2019
Why is ketchup so hard to pour? | George Zaidan
00:04:14
Ever go to pour ketchup on your fries...and nothing comes out? Or the opposite happens, and your plate is suddenly swimming in a sea of red? George Zaidan describes the physics behind this frustrating phenomenon, explaining how ketchup and other non-Newtonian fluids can suddenly transition from solid to liquid and back again. [Directed by TOGETHER, narrated by George Zaidan].
Feb 22, 2019
What would happen if you didn't drink water? | Mia Nacamulli
00:04:37
Water is essentially everywhere in our world, and the average human is composed of between 55 and 60% water. So what role does water play in our bodies, and how much do we actually need to drink to stay healthy? Mia Nacamulli details the health benefits of hydration. [Directed by Chris Bishop, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Feb 15, 2019
The wars that inspired Game of Thrones | Alex Gendler
00:05:45
Beginning around 1377, medieval England was shaken by a power struggle between two noble families, which spanned generations and involved a massive cast of characters, complex motives and shifting loyalties. Sound familiar? Alex Gendler illustrates how the historical conflict known as the Wars of the Roses served as the basis for much of the drama in Game of Thrones. [Directed by Brett Underhill, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by WORKPLAYWORK and Cem Misirlioglu].
Feb 15, 2019
The science of spiciness | Rose Eveleth
00:03:39
When you take a bite of a hot pepper, your body reacts as if your mouth is on fire -- because that's essentially what you've told your brain! Rose Eveleth details the science and history behind spicy foods, giving insights into why some people continue to pay the painful price for a little spice. [Directed by Flaming Medusa Studios Inc., narrated by Rose Eveleth].
Feb 15, 2019
The true story of Sacajawea - Karen Mensing
00:03:40
In the early 19th century, a young Agaidika teenager named Sacajawea was enlisted by explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to aid her husband Toussaint Charbonneau as a guide to the Western United States. Karen Mensing debunks some of the myths that surround the familiar image of the heroic woman with a baby strapped to her back and a vast knowledge of the American wilderness.
Feb 08, 2019
A brief history of video games (Part I) - Safwat Saleem
00:04:43
Video games are everywhere these days, but where did they actually come from? The history of video games is a complicated story that involves giant computers in science labs, the founder of Chuck E. Cheese and billions of dollars in quarters. Safwat Saleem examines the evolution of the beloved world of gaming.
Feb 08, 2019
Inside your computer - Bettina Bair
00:04:12
How does a computer work? The critical components of a computer are the peripherals (including the mouse), the input/output subsystem (which controls what and how much information comes in and out), and the central processing unit (the brains), as well as human-written programs and memory. Bettina Bair walks us through the steps your computer takes with every click of the mouse.
Feb 01, 2019
How big is the ocean? - Scott Gass
00:05:25
While the Earth’s oceans are known as five separate entities, there is really only one ocean. So, how big is it? As of 2013, it takes up 71% of the Earth, houses 99% of the biosphere, and contains some of Earth’s grandest geological features. Scott Gass reminds us of the influence humans have on the ocean and the influence it has on us.
Feb 01, 2019
The brilliance of bioluminescence - Leslie Kenna
00:04:01
Some lucky animals are naturally endowed with bioluminescence, or the ability to create light. The firefly, the anglerfish, and a few more surprising creatures use this ability in many ways, including survival, hunting, and mating. Leslie Kenna investigates this magical glow - and our quest to replicate it.
Jan 25, 2019
Gyotaku: The ancient Japanese art of printing fish - K. Erica Dodge
00:03:29
How did fishermen record their trophy catches before the invention of photography? In 19th century Japan, fishing boats were equipped with rice paper, sumi-e ink, and brushes in order to create gyotaku: elaborate rubbings of freshly caught fish. K. Erica Dodge recounts the story of this competitive fishing culture, plus some tips on how to make your very own etchings.
Jan 25, 2019
How do cancer cells behave differently from healthy ones? - George Zaidan
00:03:47
How do cancer cells grow? How does chemotherapy fight cancer (and cause negative side effects)? The answers lie in cell division. George Zaidan explains how rapid cell division is cancer’s "strength" -- and also its weakness.
Jan 18, 2019
You are your microbes - Jessica Green and Karen Guillemin
00:03:42
From the microbes in our stomachs to the ones on our teeth, we are homes to millions of unique and diverse communities which help our bodies function. Jessica Green and Karen Guillemin emphasize the importance of understanding the many organisms that make up each and every organism.
Jan 18, 2019
Solving the puzzle of the periodic table - Eric Rosado
00:04:14
How did the periodic table of elements revolutionize our understanding of the world? What scientists contributed to the table we have today? Eric Rosado discusses the key people and discoveries that have molded our understanding of chemistry today.
Jan 11, 2019
How big is a mole? (Not the animal, the other one.) - Daniel Dulek
00:04:22
The word "mole" suggests a small, furry burrowing animal to many. But in this lesson, we look at the concept of the mole in chemistry. Learn the incredible magnitude of the mole--and how something so big can help us calculate the tiniest particles in the world.
Jan 11, 2019
How Thor got his hammer | Scott A. Mellor
00:04:39
Loki the mischief-maker, writhes in Thor's iron grip. The previous night, he'd snuck up on Thor's wife and shorn off her beautiful hair. To fix what he'd done, Loki rushes to the dwarves and tricks them into making gifts for the gods. Wanting to best their smith rivals, the dwarves make a set of golden treasures, including a hammer called Mjolnir. Scott A. Mellor traces the legend of Thor's hammer. [Directed by Remus and Kiki, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Playhead].
Jan 07, 2019
How to speed up chemical reactions (and get a date) - Aaron Sams
00:04:53
The complex systems of high school dating and chemical reactions may have more in common than you think. Explore five rules for speeding up chemical reactions in the lab that might just land you a date to a dance!
Jan 04, 2019
Deep ocean mysteries and wonders - David Gallo
00:08:21
In the deepest, darkest parts of the oceans are ecosystems with more diversity than a tropical rainforest. Taking us on a voyage into the ocean -- from the deepest trenches to the remains of the Titanic -- marine biologist David Gallo explores the wonder and beauty of marine life. (Launching a series on Awesome Nature)
Jan 04, 2019
The history of the world according to cats | Eva-Maria Geigl
00:04:20
In ancient times, wildcats were fierce carnivorous hunters. And unlike dogs, who have undergone centuries of selective breeding, modern cats are genetically very similar to ancient cats. How did these solitary, fierce predators become our sofa sidekicks? Eva-Maria Geigl traces the domestication of the modern house cat. [Directed by Chintis Lundgren, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by Draško Ivezić].
Jan 03, 2019
Are food preservatives bad for you? - Eleanor Nelsen
00:04:53
Food doesn't last. In days, sometimes hours, bread goes moldy, apple slices turn brown, and bacteria multiply in mayonnaise. But you can find all of these foods out on the shelf at the grocery store — hopefully unspoiled -- thanks to preservatives. But what exactly are preservatives? How do they help keep food edible? And are they safe? Eleanor Nelsen investigates.
Dec 21, 2018
What happens to our bodies after we die? - Farnaz Khatibi Jafari
00:04:41
Since the dawn of humanity, an estimated 100.8 billion people have lived and died, a number that increases by about 0.8% of the world’s population each year. What happens to all of those peoples’ bodies after they die? And will the planet eventually run out of burial space? Farnaz Khatibi Jafari traces the evolution of how humanity has treated bodies and burials.
Dec 21, 2018
Real life sunken cities - Peter Campbell
00:04:31
Though people are most familiar with Plato’s fictional Atlantis, many real underwater cities actually exist. Peter Campbell explains how sunken cities are studied by scientists to help us understand the lives of our ancestors, the dynamic nature of our planet, and the impact of each on the other.
Dec 14, 2018
The ferocious predatory dinosaurs of Cretaceous Sahara - Nizar Ibrahim
00:04:20
In Cretaceous times (around 100 million years ago), North Africa was home to a huge river system and a bizarre menagerie of giant prehistoric predators -- including the Spinosaurus, a dinosaur even more fearsome than the Tyrannosaurus rex. Nizar Ibrahim uses paleontological and geological data to reconstruct this “River of Giants” in surprising detail.
Dec 14, 2018
How to make your writing funnier - Cheri Steinkellner
00:05:07
Did you ever notice how many jokes start with “Did you ever notice?” And what’s the deal with “What’s the deal?” There’s a lot of funny to be found simply by noticing the ordinary, everyday things you don’t ordinarily notice every day. Emmy Award-winning comedy writer Cheri Steinkellner offers a few tips and tricks for finding the funny in your writing.
Dec 07, 2018
Why are there so many insects? - Murry Gans
00:04:44
If insects suddenly morphed into large beings and decided to wage war on us, there's no doubt that humans would lose. There are an estimated 10 quintillion individual insects on earth, outnumbering humans by more than a billion to one. So what's their secret to success? Murry Gans details the reasons behind insect abundance.
Dec 07, 2018
Are we running out of clean water? | Balsher Singh Sidhu
00:04:43
Despite water covering 71% of the planet's surface, more than half the world's population endures extreme water scarcity for at least one month a year. Current estimates predict that by 2040, up to 20 more countries could be experiencing water shortages. These statistics raise a startling question: is the Earth running out of clean water? Balsher Singh Sidhu takes a closer look at water consumption. [Directed by Kozmonot Animation Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Deniz Dogancay].
Dec 06, 2018
How stress affects your brain - Madhumita Murgia
00:04:16
Stress isn’t always a bad thing; it can be handy for a burst of extra energy and focus, like when you’re playing a competitive sport or have to speak in public. But when it’s continuous, it actually begins to change your brain. Madhumita Murgia shows how chronic stress can affect brain size, its structure, and how it functions, right down to the level of your genes. Lesson by Madhumita Murgia, animation by Andrew Zimbelman.
Nov 30, 2018
What makes the Great Wall of China so extraordinary
00:04:30
The Great Wall of China is a 13,000-mile dragon of earth and stone that winds its way through the countryside of China. As it turns out, the wall’s history is almost as long and serpentine as its structure. Megan Campisi and Pen-Pen Chen detail the building and subsequent decay of this massive, impressive wall.
Nov 30, 2018
Why should you read Kurt Vonnegut? | Mia Nacamulli
00:05:04
Kurt Vonnegut found the tidy, satisfying arcs of many stories at odds with reality, and he set out to explore the ambiguity between good and bad fortune in his own novels. He tried to make sense of human behavior by studying the shapes of stories — ditching straightforward chronologies and clear-cut fortunes. Mia Nacamulli dives into the sometimes dark, yet hopeful works of Vonnegut. [Directed by TED-Ed, narrated by Addison Anderson].
Nov 29, 2018
The science of smog - Kim Preshoff
00:05:44
On July 26, 1943, Los Angeles was blanketed by a thick gas that stung people’s eyes and blocked out the Sun. Panicked residents believed their city had been attacked using chemical warfare. But the cloud wasn’t an act of war. It was smog. So what is this thick gray haze actually made of? And why does it affect some cities and not others? Kim Preshoff details the science behind smog. Lesson by Kim Preshoff, directed by Juan M. Urbina Studios.
Nov 16, 2018
Why is it so hard to cure cancer? - Kyuson Yun
00:05:23
We’ve harnessed electricity, sequenced the human genome, and eradicated smallpox. But after billions of dollars in research, we haven’t found a solution for a disease that affects more than 14 million people and their families at any given time. Why is it so difficult to cure cancer? Kyuson Yun explains the challenges. Lesson by Kyuson Yun, directed by Artrake Studio. Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible. Mukamik, Tushar Sharma, Dmitry Neverov, Mohammad Khory, Goh Xiang Ting Diana, Umar Farooq, Kevin Wong, Activated Classroom Teaching, Constantin Salagor, Daniel Mardale, Monica Grace Ward, Dawn Jordan, Yanira Santamaria, Prasanth Mathialagan, Savannah Scheelings, Yalda A., Susan Herder, Be Owusu, Samuel Doerle, David Rosario.
Nov 16, 2018
Can you solve the fish riddle? - Steve Wyborney
00:04:50
As the cargo director on the maiden voyage of the S.S. Buoyant, you’ve agreed to transport several tanks containing the last specimens of an endangered fish species to their new aquarium. Unfortunately, the boat is battered by a fierce storm, throwing your precious cargo overboard. Can you get the fish to safety and save the day? Steve Wyborney shows how. Lesson by Steve Wyborney, animation by Artrake Studio.
Nov 09, 2018
How does caffeine keep us awake? - Hanan Qasim
00:05:15
Over 100,000 metric tons of caffeine are consumed around the world every year. That’s equivalent to the weight of 14 Eiffel Towers! Caffeine helps us feel alert, focused, and energetic, even if we haven’t had enough sleep — but it can also raise our blood pressure and make us feel anxious. So how does it keep us awake? Hanan Qasim shares the science behind the world’s most widely used drug. Lesson by Hanan Qasim, animation by Adriatic Animation.
Nov 09, 2018
Check your intuition: The birthday problem - David Knuffke
00:05:07
Imagine a group of people. How big do you think the group would have to be before there’s more than a 50% chance that two people in the group have the same birthday? The answer is … probably lower than you think. David Knuffke explains how the birthday problem exposes our often-poor intuition when it comes to probability. Lesson by David Knuffke, animation by TED-Ed.
Nov 02, 2018
Why do animals have such different lifespans? - Joao Pedro de Magalhaes
00:04:57
For the microscopic lab worm C. elegans, life equates to just a few short weeks on Earth. The bowhead whale, on the other hand, can live over two hundred years. Why are these lifespans so different? And what does it really mean to ‘age' anyway? Joao Pedro de Magalhaes explains why the pace of aging varies greatly across animals.
Nov 02, 2018
How to practice effectively...for just about anything - Annie Bosler and Don Greene
00:04:50
Mastering any physical skill takes practice. Practice is the repetition of an action with the goal of improvement, and it helps us perform with more ease, speed, and confidence. But what does practice actually do to make us better at things? Annie Bosler and Don Greene explain how practice affects the inner workings of our brains.
Oct 26, 2018
The Egyptian Book of the Dead: A guidebook for the underworld - Tejal Gala
00:04:32
Ancient Egyptians believed that in order to become immortal after death, a spirit must first pass through the underworld — a realm of vast caverns, lakes of fire, and magical gates. Needless to say, one needed to come prepared. But how? Tejal Gala describes an Egyptian "Book of the Dead" -- a customized magic scroll written by the living to promote a smooth passage to the afterlife when they died.
Oct 26, 2018
Does time exist? | Andrew Zimmerman Jones
00:05:10
The earliest time measurements were observations of cycles of the natural world, using patterns of changes from day to night and season to season to build calendars. More precise time-keeping eventually came along to put time in more convenient boxes. But what exactly are we measuring? Andrew Zimmerman Jones contemplates whether time is something that physically exists or is just in our heads. [TED-Ed Animation by Nice Shoes].
Oct 23, 2018
Can you solve the virus riddle? - Lisa Winer
00:05:13
Your research team has found a prehistoric virus preserved in the permafrost and isolated it for study. After a late night working, you’re just closing up the lab when a sudden earthquake hits and breaks all the sample vials. Will you be able to destroy the virus before the vents open and unleash a deadly airborne plague? Lisa Winer shows how. Lesson by Lisa Winer, animation by Artrake Studio.
Oct 19, 2018
How to master your sense of smell - Alexandra Horowitz
00:04:34
Some perfumers can distinguish individual odors in a fragrance made of hundreds of scents; tea-experts have been known to sniff out the exact location of a particular tea; and the NYC Transit Authority once had a employee responsible only for sniffing out gas leaks. But can anyone learn to smell with the sensitivity of those experts? Alexandra Horowitz shares three simple steps to a better nose. Lesson by Alexandra Horowitz, animation by Black Powder Design.
Oct 19, 2018
How do nuclear power plants work? - M. V. Ramana and Sajan Saini
00:08:07
Our ability to mine great amounts of energy from uranium nuclei has led some to bill nuclear power as a plentiful, utopian source of electricity. But rather than dominate the global electricity market, nuclear power has declined from a high of 18% in 1996 to 11% today. What happened to the great promise of this technology? M.V. Ramana and Sajan Saini detail the challenges of nuclear power. Lesson by M. V. Ramana and Sajan Saini, animation by Wooden Plane Productions.
Oct 12, 2018
Can machines read your emotions? - Kostas Karpouzis
00:04:39
Computers can beat us in board games, transcribe speech, and instantly identify almost any object. But will future robots go further by learning to figure out what we’re feeling? Kostas Karpouzis imagines a future where machines and the people who run them can accurately read our emotional states — and explains how that could allow them to assist us, or manipulate us, at unprecedented scales. Lesson by Kostas Karpouzis, animation by Lasse Rützou Bruntse.
Oct 12, 2018
The neuroscience of imagination - Andrey Vyshedskiy
00:04:49
Imagine, for a second, a duck teaching a French class. A ping-pong match in orbit around a black hole. A dolphin balancing a pineapple. You probably haven’t actually seen any of these things. But you could imagine them instantly. How does your brain produce an image of something you’ve never seen? Andrey Vyshedskiy details the neuroscience of imagination. Lesson by Andrey Vyshedskiy, animation by Tomás Pichardo-Espaillat.
Oct 05, 2018
Why don't perpetual motion machines ever work? - Netta Schramm
00:05:31
Perpetual motion machines — devices that can do work indefinitely without any external energy source — have captured many inventors’ imaginations because they could totally transform our relationship with energy. There’s just one problem: they don’t work. Why not? Netta Schramm describes the pitfalls of perpetual motion machines.
Oct 05, 2018
Why do we itch? - Emma Bryce
00:04:44
The average person experiences dozens of individual itches each day. We’ve all experienced the annoyance of an inconvenient itch — but have you ever pondered why we itch in the first place? Is there actually an evolutionary purpose to the itch, or is it simply there to annoy us? Emma Bryce digs deep into the skin to find out. Lesson by Emma Bryce, animation by Sashko Danylenko.
Sep 28, 2018
Why are sloths so slow? - Kenny Coogan
00:05:15
Sloths spend most of their time eating, resting, or sleeping; in fact, they descend from their treetops canopies just once a week, for a bathroom break. How are these creatures so low energy? Kenny Coogan describes the physical and behavioral adaptations that allow sloths to be so slow.
Sep 28, 2018
Why should you listen to Vivaldi's "Four Seasons"? - Betsy Schwarm
00:04:20
Light, bright, and cheerful, "The Four Seasons" by Antonio Vivaldi is some of the most familiar of all early 18th century music, featured in numerous films and television commercials. But what is its significance, and why does it sound that way? Betsy Schwarm uncovers the underlying narrative of this musical masterpiece.
Sep 21, 2018
What causes cavities? - Mel Rosenberg
00:05:01
When a team of archeologists recently came across some 15,000-year-old human remains, they made an interesting discovery: the teeth of those ancient humans were riddled with holes. So what causes cavities, and how can we avoid them? Mel Rosenberg takes us inside our teeth to find out. Lesson by Mel Rosenberg, animation by Andrew Foerster.
Sep 21, 2018
Why do we feel nostalgia? - Clay Routledge
00:04:09
Nostalgia was once considered an illness confined to specific groups of people. Today, people all over the world report experiencing and enjoying nostalgia. But how does nostalgia work? And is it healthy? Clay Routledge details the way our understanding of nostalgia has changed since the term was first coined in the late 17th century.
Sep 14, 2018
Could we survive prolonged space travel? - Lisa Nip
00:04:56
Prolonged space travel plays a severe toll on the human body: microgravity impairs muscle and bone growth, and high doses of radiation cause irreversible mutations. As we seriously consider the human species becoming space-faring, a big question stands: even if we do break free from Earth’s orbit, can we adapt to the extreme environments of space? Lisa Nip examines our odds.
Sep 14, 2018
How do cigarettes affect the body? | Krishna Sudhir
00:05:13
Cigarettes aren't good for us. That's hardly news -- we've known about the dangers of smoking for decades. But how exactly do cigarettes harm us, and can our bodies recover if we stop? Krishna Sudhir details what happens when we smoke -- and when we quit. [TED-Ed Animation by TED-Ed].
Sep 13, 2018
What is bipolar disorder? - Helen M. Farrell
00:05:58
The word bipolar means ‘two extremes.’ For the many millions experiencing bipolar disorder around the world, life is split between two different realities: elation and depression. So what causes this disorder? And can it be treated? Helen M. Farrell describes the root causes and treatments for bipolar disorder. Lesson by Helen M Farrell, animation by Uncle Ginger.
Sep 07, 2018
Plato’s best (and worst) ideas - Wisecrack
00:04:49
Few individuals have influenced the world and many of today’s thinkers like Plato. He created the first Western university and was teacher to Ancient Greece’s greatest minds, including Aristotle. But even he wasn’t perfect. Along with his great ideas, Plato had a few that haven’t exactly stood the test of time. Wisecrack gives a brief rundown of a few of Plato’s best and worst ideas.
Sep 07, 2018
How a single-celled organism almost wiped out life on Earth - Anusuya Willis
00:04:14
There's an organism that changed the world. It caused the first mass extinction in Earth's history ... and also paved the way for complex life. How? Anusuya Willis explains how cyanobacteria, simple organisms that don't even have nuclei or any other organelles, wrote a pivotal chapter in the story of life on Earth.
Aug 31, 2018
How to use rhetoric to get what you want - Camille A. Langston
00:04:30
How do you get what you want, using just your words? Aristotle set out to answer exactly that question over two thousand years ago with a treatise on rhetoric. Camille A. Langston describes the fundamentals of deliberative rhetoric and shares some tips for appealing to an audience's ethos, logos, and pathos in your next speech.
Aug 31, 2018
Is radiation dangerous? - Matt Anticole
00:05:21
When we hear the word radiation, it’s tempting to picture huge explosions and frightening mutations. But that’s not the full story — radiation also applies to rainbows and a doctor examining an X-ray. So what is it, really, and how much should we worry about its effects? Matt Anticole describes the different types of radiation.
Aug 24, 2018
The psychology behind irrational decisions - Sara Garofalo
00:04:39
Often people make decisions that are not “rational” from a purely economical point of view — meaning that they don’t necessarily lead to the best result. Why is that? Are we just bad at dealing with numbers and odds? Or is there a psychological mechanism behind it? Sara Garofalo explains heuristics, problem-solving approaches based on previous experience and intuition rather than analysis. Lesson by Sara Garofalo, animation by TOGETHER.
Aug 24, 2018
Why is Mount Everest so tall? - Michele Koppes
00:04:53
At 8,850 meters above sea level, Qomolangma, also known as Mount Everest, has the highest altitude on the planet. But how did this towering formation get so tall? Michele Koppes peers deep into our planet’s crust, where continental plates collide, to find the answer.
Aug 17, 2018
Why do cats act so weird? - Tony Buffington
00:04:58
They’re cute, they’re lovable, and judging by the 26 billion views on over 2 million YouTube videos of them, one thing is certain: cats are very entertaining. But their strange feline behaviors, both amusing and baffling, leave many of us asking: Why do cats do that? Tony Buffington explains the science behind some of your cat’s strangest behaviors.
Aug 17, 2018
How do nerves work? - Elliot Krane
00:05:00
At any moment, there is an electrical storm coursing through your body. Discover how chemical reactions create an electric current that drives our responses to everything from hot pans to a mother’s caress.
Jul 27, 2018
How bees help plants have sex - Fernanda S. Valdovinos
00:05:26
Plants have a hard time finding mates -- their inability to get up and move around tends to inhibit them. Luckily for plants, bees and other pollinator species (including butterflies, moths and birds) help matchmake these lonely plants in exchange for food. Fernanda S. Valdovinos explains how these intricate pollination networks work and how it can all change from one season to the next.
Jul 27, 2018
Can you solve the passcode riddle? - Ganesh Pai
00:04:08
In a dystopian world, your resistance group is humanity's last hope. Unfortunately, you've all been captured by the tyrannical rulers and brought to the ancient coliseum for their deadly entertainment. Will you be able to solve the passcode riddle and get everyone out safely? Ganesh Pai shows how.
Jul 27, 2018
History vs. Napoleon Bonaparte - Alex Gendler
00:05:22
After the French Revolution erupted in 1789, Europe was thrown into chaos. Neighboring countries' monarchs feared they would share the fate of Louis XVI and attacked the new Republic, while at home, extremism and mistrust between factions led to bloodshed. In the midst of all this conflict, Napoleon emerged. But did he save the revolution, or destroy it? Alex Gendler puts Napoleon on trial.
Jul 27, 2018
Why do our bodies age? - Monica Menesini
00:05:10
Human bodies aren't built for extreme aging: our capacity is set at about 90 years. But what does aging really mean, and how does it counteract the body's efforts to stay alive? Monica Menesini details the nine physiological traits that play a central role in aging.
Jul 27, 2018
Why the insect brain is so incredible - Anna Stöckl
00:04:23
The human brain is one of the most sophisticated organs in the world, a supercomputer made of billions of neurons that control all of our senses, thoughts, and actions. But there was something Charles Darwin found even more impressive: the brain of an ant, which he called “one of the most marvelous atoms of matter in the world.” Anna Stöckl takes us inside the tiny but mighty insect brain.
Jul 27, 2018
The survival of the sea turtle - Scott Gass
00:04:26
Watch the miraculous journey of infant sea turtles as these tiny animals run the gauntlet of predators and harsh conditions. Then, in numbers, see how human behavior has made their tough lives even more challenging.
Jul 20, 2018
Mysteries of vernacular: X-ray - Jessica Oreck and Rachael Teel
00:01:59
The story of the word X-Ray is one of great thinkers. French philosopher Rene Descartes isolated the letters X, Y and Z to stand for unknowns, and centuries later, Wilhelm Röntgen discovered the X-ray, using the X for the unknown nature of the radiation. Jessica Oreck and Rachael Teel shed some light on the etymology of this modern marvel.
Jul 20, 2018
History vs. Christopher Columbus - Alex Gendler
00:05:55
Many people in the United States and Latin America have grown up celebrating the anniversary of Christopher Columbus’s voyage. But was he an intrepid explorer who brought two worlds together or a ruthless exploiter who brought colonialism and slavery? And did he even discover America at all? Alex Gendler puts Columbus on the stand in History vs. Christopher Columbus.
Jul 13, 2018
Dead stuff: The secret ingredient in our food chain - John C. Moore
00:03:51
When you picture the lowest levels of the food chain, you might imagine herbivores happily munching on lush, living green plants. But this idyllic image leaves out a huge (and slightly less appetizing) source of nourishment: dead stuff. John C. Moore details the "brown food chain," explaining how such unlikely delicacies as pond scum and animal poop contribute enormous amounts of energy to our ecosystems.
Jul 13, 2018
How many universes are there? - Chris Anderson
00:04:43
The fact that no one knows the answer to this question is what makes it exciting. The story of physics has been one of an ever-expanding understanding of the sheer scale of reality, to the point where physicists are now postulating that there may be far more universes than just our own. Chris Anderson explores the thrilling implications of this idea.
Jul 06, 2018
Inside a cartoonist's world - Liza Donnelly
00:04:23
From cave drawings to the Sunday paper, artists have been visualizing ideas -- cartoons -- for centuries. New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly walks us through the many stages every cartoon goes through, starting with an idea and turning into something that connects us on a deeply human level.
Jul 06, 2018
When is water safe to drink? - Mia Nacamulli
00:05:24
Water is refreshing, hydrating, and invaluable to your survival. But clean water remains a precious and often scarce commodity – there are nearly 800 million people who still don’t have regular access to it. Why is that? And how can you tell whether the water you have access to — whether from a tap or otherwise — is drinkable? Mia Nacamulli examines water contamination and treatment. Lesson by Mia Nacamulli, directed by Rooftop Animation.
Jun 29, 2018
What happens when you get heat stroke? - Douglas J. Casa
00:03:54
Have you ever suffered from exertional heat stroke? This condition is caused by intense activity in the heat and is one of the top three killers of athletes and soldiers in training. Douglas J. Casa explains heat stroke's tremendous effects on the human body and details an action plan in case it ever happens to someone you know.
Jun 29, 2018
The ancient origins of the Olympics - Armand D'Angour
00:03:20
Thousands of years in the making, the Olympics began as part of a religious festival honoring the Greek god Zeus in the rural Greek town of Olympia. But how did it become the greatest show of sporting excellence on earth? Armand D’Angour explains the evolution of the Olympics.
Jun 22, 2018
How do we know what color dinosaurs were? - Len Bloch
00:04:24
The microraptor was a four-winged carnivorous dinosaur with iridescent black feathers. But if our information about this dinosaur comes from fossils, how can we be certain about its color? Len Bloch shows how making sense of the evidence requires careful examination of the fossil and a good understanding of the physics of light and color.
Jun 22, 2018
Why are sharks so awesome? - Tierney Thys
00:04:36
Sharks have been celebrated as powerful gods by some native cultures. And today, sharks are recognized as apex predators of the world's ocean. What is it that makes these fish worthy of our ancient legends and so successful in the seas? Tierney Thys takes us into the ocean to find out.
Jun 15, 2018
A different way to visualize rhythm - John Varney
00:05:23
In standard notation, rhythm is indicated on a musical bar line. But there are other ways to visualize rhythm that can be more intuitive. John Varney describes the ‘wheel method’ of tracing rhythm and uses it to take us on a musical journey around the world.
Jun 15, 2018
What is dyslexia? - Kelli Sandman-Hurley
00:04:35
Dyslexia affects up to 1 in 5 people, but the experience of dyslexia isn't always the same. This difficulty in processing language exists along a spectrum -- one that doesn't necessarily fit with labels like "normal" and "defective." Kelli Sandman-Hurley urges us to think again about dyslexic brain function and to celebrate the neurodiversity of the human brain.
Jun 08, 2018
The genius of Marie Curie - Shohini Ghose
00:05:04
Marie Skłodowska Curie’s revolutionary research laid the groundwork for our understanding of physics and chemistry, blazing trails in oncology, technology, medicine, and nuclear physics, to name a few. But what did she actually do? Shohini Ghose expounds on some of Marie Skłodowska Curie’s most revolutionary discoveries.
Jun 08, 2018
How does a jellyfish sting? - Neosha S Kashef
00:04:17
You’re swimming in the ocean when something brushes your leg. When the tingling sets in, you realize you’ve been stung by a jellyfish. How do these beautiful gelatinous creatures pack such a painful punch? Neosha S Kashef details the science behind the sting.
Jun 01, 2018
Why is Vermeer's "Girl with the Pearl Earring" considered a masterpiece? - James Earle
00:04:34
Is she turning towards you or away from you? No one can agree. She's the subject of Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer's "Girl with the Pearl Earring," a painting often referred to as the ‘Mona Lisa of the North.' But what makes this painting so captivating? James Earle explains how this work represents the birth of a modern perspective on economics, politics, and love.
Jun 01, 2018
The mystery of motion sickness - Rose Eveleth
00:03:10
Although one third of the population suffers from motion sickness, scientists aren't exactly sure what causes it. Like the common cold, it's a seemingly simple problem that's still without a cure. And if you think it's bad on a long family car ride, imagine being a motion sick astronaut! Rose Eveleth explains what's happening in our bodies when we get the car sick blues.
May 25, 2018
Can you solve the airplane riddle? - Judd A. Schorr
00:04:38
Professor Fukanō, the famous scientist, has embarked on a new challenge – piloting around the world in a plane of his own design. There’s just one problem: there's not enough fuel to complete the journey. Luckily, there are two other planes to help. Can you help the professor fly for the whole trip and achieve his dream, without anyone running out of fuel and crashing? Judd A. Schorr shows how.
May 25, 2018
Why wasn’t the Bill of Rights originally in the US Constitution? - James Coll
00:04:33
When you think of the US Constitution, what's the first thing that comes to mind? Free speech? The right to bear arms? These passages are cited so often that it's hard to imagine the document without them. But the list of freedoms known as the Bill of Rights was not in the original text and wasn't added for three years. Why not? James Coll goes back to the origins of the Constitution to find out.
May 18, 2018
Would you weigh less in an elevator? - Carol Hedden
00:03:36
What happens when you jump in a moving elevator? Do you weigh more when you're going up and less when you're going down? Carol Hedden explores the relationship between gravity, weight, and relative motion, using a moving elevator to explain the fascinating physics.
May 18, 2018
How memories form and how we lose them - Catharine Young
00:04:20
Think back to a really vivid memory. Got it? Now try to remember what you had for lunch three weeks ago. That second memory probably isn’t as strong—but why not? Why do we remember some things, and not others? And why do memories eventually fade? Catharine Young gives the basics on memory and memory loss.
May 11, 2018
Who was Confucius? - Bryan W. Van Norden
00:04:30
Most people recognize his name and know that he is famous for having said something, but considering the long-lasting impact his teachings have had on the world, very few people know who Confucius really was, what he really said... and why. Bryan W. Van Norden reveals the man behind the mystery.
May 11, 2018
Can you solve the prisoner boxes riddle? - Yossi Elran
00:04:52
Your favorite band is great at playing music...but not so great at being organized. They keep misplacing their instruments on tour, and it’s driving their manager mad. Can you solve the brain-numbing riddle their manager assigns them and make sure the band stays on their label? Yossi Elran shows how.
May 04, 2018
What are the universal human rights? - Benedetta Berti
00:04:47
The basic idea of human rights is that each one of us, no matter who we are or where we are born, is entitled to the same basic rights and freedoms. That may sound straightforward enough, but it gets incredibly complicated as soon as anyone tries to put the idea into practice. What exactly are the basic human rights? Who gets to pick them? Who enforces them—and how? Benedetta Berti explores the subtleties of human rights.
May 04, 2018
How X-rays see through your skin - Ge Wang
00:04:42
Originally discovered by accident, X-rays are now used about 100 million times a year in clinics around the world. How do these magic eyes work? Ge Wang details the history and mechanics of the X-ray machine and CT scanners.
Apr 27, 2018
How do schools of fish swim in harmony? - Nathan S. Jacobs
00:06:07
How do schools of fish swim in harmony? How do the tiny cells in your brain give rise to the complex thoughts, memories, and consciousness that are you? Oddly enough, those questions have the same general answer. Nathan S. Jacobs explains the concept of emergence, the spontaneous creation of sophisticated behaviors and functions from large groups of simple elements.
Apr 27, 2018
How do pregnancy tests work? - Tien Nguyen
00:04:34
Over-the-counter pregnancy tests give potentially life-changing results with a pretty high rate of accuracy. But how do they work? Tien Nguyen explains how each test performs a scientifically rigorous, multi-stage experiment that goes from start to finish in the time that it’ll take you to watch this video.
Apr 20, 2018
The world’s most mysterious book - Stephen Bax
00:04:43
Deep inside Yale's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library lies a 240 page tome. Recently carbon dated to around 1420, its pages feature looping handwriting and hand drawn images seemingly stolen from a dream. It is called the Voynich manuscript, and it’s one of history’s biggest unsolved mysteries. The reason why? No one can figure out what it says. Stephen Bax investigates this cryptic work.
Apr 20, 2018
How computers translate human language - Ioannis Papachimonas
00:04:45
Is a universal translator possible in real life? We already have many programs that claim to be able to take a word, sentence, or entire book in one language and translate it into almost any other. The reality, however, is a bit more complicated. Ioannis Papachimonas shows how these machine translators work, and explains why they often get a bit mixed up.
Apr 13, 2018
Why doesn’t anything stick to Teflon? - Ashwini Bharathula
00:04:45
Teflon was in the spacesuits the Apollo crew wore for the moon landing, in pipes and valves used in the Manhattan project, and it may be in your kitchen, as the nonstick coating on frying pans and cookie sheets. So what is this slippery solid — and why doesn’t anything stick to it? Ashwini Bharathula describes the science behind Teflon.
Apr 13, 2018
How do animals see in the dark? - Anna Stöckl
00:04:23
To human eyes, the world at night is a formless canvas of grey. Many nocturnal animals, on the other hand, experience a rich and varied world, bursting with details, shapes, and colors. What is it, then, that separates moths from men? Anna Stöckl uncovers the science behind night vision.
Apr 06, 2018
Can you solve the temple riddle? - Dennis E. Shasha
00:04:13
Your expedition finally stands at the heart of the ancient temple. But as you study the inscriptions in the darkness, two wisps of green smoke burst forth. The walls begin to shake. The giant sandglass begins flowing with less than an hour before it empties, and a rumbling tells you that you don’t want to be around when that happens. Can you use math to escape the temple? Dennis E. Shasha shows how.
Apr 06, 2018
How do pain relievers work? - George Zaidan
00:04:14
Some people take aspirin or ibuprofen to treat everyday aches and pains, but how exactly do the different classes of pain relievers work? Learn about the basic physiology of how humans experience pain, and the mechanics of the medicines we've invented to block or circumvent that discomfort.
Mar 30, 2018
Einstein's miracle year - Larry Lagerstrom
00:05:16
As the year 1905 began, Albert Einstein faced life as a “failed” academic. Yet within the next twelve months, he would publish four extraordinary papers, each on a different topic, that were destined to radically transform our understanding of the universe. Larry Lagerstrom details these four groundbreaking papers.
Mar 30, 2018
Why do some people go bald? - Sarthak Sinha
00:04:49
What do Charles Darwin, Michael Jordan, and Yoda have in common? They, like many other historical and fictive individuals, are bald. Scientists have long pondered, why do some people lose their hair, and how can we bring it back? Sarthak Sinha explores the basics of baldness.
Mar 23, 2018
Does "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" have a hidden message? - David B. Parker
00:04:44
In his introduction to “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,” L. Frank Baum claims that the book is simply an innocent children’s story. But some scholars have found hidden criticisms of late-nineteenth-century economic policies in the book. Is it possible that one of America’s favorite children’s stories is also a subversive parable? David B. Parker investigates the text for clues.
Mar 23, 2018
The science of static electricity - Anuradha Bhagwat
00:03:39
We’ve all had the experience: you’re walking across a soft carpet, you reach for the doorknob and … ZAP. But what causes this trademark jolt of static electricity? Anuradha Bhagwat sheds light on the phenomenon by examining the nature of matter.
Mar 16, 2018
Making sense of irrational numbers - Ganesh Pai
00:04:41
Like many heroes of Greek myths, the philosopher Hippasus was rumored to have been mortally punished by the gods. But what was his crime? Did he murder guests or disrupt a sacred ritual? No, Hippasus's transgression was mathematically proving the hitherto unprovable. Ganesh Pai describes the history and math behind irrational numbers.
Mar 16, 2018
How do vaccines work? - Kelwalin Dhanasarnsombut
00:04:36
The first ever vaccine was created when Edward Jenner, an English physician and scientist, successfully injected small amounts of a cowpox virus into a young boy to protect him from the related (and deadly) smallpox virus. But how does this seemingly counterintuitive process work? Kelwalin Dhanasarnsombut details the science behind vaccines.
Mar 09, 2018
The origins of ballet - Jennifer Tortorello and Adrienne Westwood
00:04:38
Can you imagine a party where every movement and every visual detail were governed by a complex system of rules and procedures? For centuries, such rituals were commonplace for European nobility. And while they've gone out of fashion, we recognize the components under a familiar label: ballet. Jennifer Tortorello and Adrienne Westwood outline the history of this graceful and precise dance.
Mar 09, 2018
Mary's Room: A philosophical thought experiment - Eleanor Nelsen
00:04:52
Imagine a neuroscientist who has only ever seen black and white things, but she is an expert in color vision and knows everything about its physics and biology. If, one day, she sees color, does she learn anything new? Is there anything about perceiving color that wasn’t captured in her knowledge? Eleanor Nelsen explains what this thought experiment can teach us about experience.
Mar 02, 2018
How to unboil an egg - Eleanor Nelsen
00:04:10
It’s so obvious that it’s practically proverbial: you can’t unboil an egg. But actually, it turns out that you can -- sort of. Eleanor Nelsen explains the process by which mechanical energy can undo what thermal energy has done.
Mar 02, 2018
The treadmill's dark and twisted past | Conor Heffernan
00:03:55
The constant thud underneath your feet. The constrained space. The monotony of going nowhere fast. Running on a treadmill can certainly feel like torture, but did you know it was originally used for that very purpose? Conor Heffernan details the dark and twisted history of the treadmill. [Directed by Yukai Du, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by WORKPLAYWORK and Cem Misirlioglu].
Sep 07, 2017