Infinite Earth Radio – weekly conversations with leaders building smarter, more sustainable, and equitable communities

By Michael Hancox

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Infinite Earth Radio is a weekly podcast produced by Skeo and the Local Government Commission and hosted by Mike Hancox and Vernice Miller-Travis. Each week they interview visionary leaders, dedicated government officials, savvy businesses and forward thinking individuals who are working to build smarter, more equitable, sustainable, and prosperous communities through social and economic inclusion that values the contribution of all citizens and seeks meaningful lives for everyone. You will discover new leading edge strategies for lifting up and building great 21st century communities, along with cutting edge strategies for revitalizing under resourced communities and empowering excluded populations. Smart Growth, Prosperity and Sustainability are not possible without social, civic, and economic inclusion for people of all economic, social, and racial backgrounds.

Episode Date
Oakland and the New IPCC Climate Change Report
43:31
Topic: Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – acting now and bringing change to scale Guest & Organization: Daniel Hamilton serves as the Sustainability Manager for the City of Oakland, California.  Daniel has 20 years of experience in managing sustainability programs, policies, and plans for local governments and utilities. He has led multiple award winning projects and plans across California and has taught professional and university courses in energy management, sustainable policy development, and green building design and construction.  He holds a BA in Architecture and an MA in Sustainable Planning, both from the University of Kansas. Resources: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) – Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C (SR15) Oakland Preliminary Sea Leve Rise Road Map (Fall 2017) Pathways to Deep GHG Reductions in Oakland: Executive Summary (March 2018) Pathways to Deep GHG Reductions in Oakland: Final Report (March 2018) Local Government Commission
Nov 15, 2018
Addressing Inequity in Rural California
23:21
Topic: Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – the widening disparity in California and the challenges to address across California’s regions Guest & Organization: Jim Mayer is President & CEO of California Forward, a bipartisan public interest effort to bolster democracy and improve the performance of government in California. Working with civic and governmental partners statewide, CA Fwd has been the consistent advocate for comprehensive governance reforms that will lead to better results and accountability. As its chief executive, Mayer has helped to usher California’s modernization of redistricting, primary elections, term limits, ethics and transparency laws – to empower voters, encourage bipartisan solutions and restore public trust.  He shepherded CA Fwd’s efforts to build capacity within governments to improve outcomes, and to advance a shared agenda among private, civic and public sector leaders to sustainably and equitable increase prosperity. Resources: California Forward California Economic Summit’s Elevate Rural CA Initiative Local Government Commission
Nov 08, 2018
The Intergalactic Design Guide
29:19
Topic: Urban Resilience – design for social innovation Guest & Organization: Cheryl Heller is the Founding Chair of the first MFA program in Design for Social Innovation at SVA and President of the design lab CommonWise. She was recently awarded a Rockefeller Bellagio Fellowship, and is a recipient of the prestigious AIGA Medal for her contribution to the field of design. She founded the first design department in a major advertising agency and as president, grew the division to $50m in billings when it was spun off as an independent entity. As a strategist, she has helped grow businesses from small regional enterprises to multi-billion global market leaders, launched category-redefining divisions and products, reinvigorated moribund cultures, and designed strategies for hundreds of successful entrepreneurs. She has taught creativity to leaders and organizations around the world. Her clients have included Ford Motor Company, American Express, Reebok, Mariott International, Renaissance Hotels, Sheraton, MeadWestvaco, StoraEnso, the Arnhold Institute for Global Health, Medtronic, Pfizer, Mars Corporation, Discovery Networks International, Cemex, Herman Miller, Gap, Bayer Corporation, Seventh Generation, L’Oreal, Elle Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, The World Wildlife Fund, Ford Foundation, and the Girl Scouts of America. Heller is the former Board Chair of PopTech, and a Senior Fellow at the Babson Social Innovation Lab. She created the Ideas that Matter program for Sappi in 1999, which has since given over $13 million to designers working for the public good, and partnered with Paul Polak and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum to create the exhibit, “Design for the Other 90%.” She is the author of Intergalactic Design Guide: Harnessing the Creative Potential of Social Design, published by Island Press. Resources: Find Cheryl on Twitter @cherylheller CommonWise Design for Social Innovation at SVA The Intergalactic Design Guide – Harnessing the Creative Potential of Social Design by Cheryl Heller Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press App! Learn more about the app here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Nov 01, 2018
Facing the Environment and Invisibility in West Virginia
25:12
Topic: Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development series – seeking justice in a disempowered place Guest & Organization: Angie Rosser is the Executive Director of West Virginia Rivers Coalition, a statewide advocacy organization promoting access to clean water for all. Her 20+ years of experience in social justice work came to bear during a massive water contamination event that sparked transformative dialogue around safe drinking water. Her motivation is personal and political; she believes everyone has a right to enjoy clean water and that conservation of our water resources is central to a shared prosperity. Angie holds a BA in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina and an MA in Organizational Communication from West Virginia University. Resources: Facing Race: A National Conference is presented by Race Forward: The Center for Racial Justice Innovation – November 8-10, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan West Virginia Rivers Expanding the Circle: Strategies to Authentically Engage Under-Resourced Communities to Improve the Chesapeake Bay for All Skeo – Equity, Sustainability and Resiliency
Oct 25, 2018
Climate Safe Infrastructure
48:54
Topic: Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – how to make infrastructure more resilient to the growing threats of climate change Guest & Organization: Cris Liban is the Executive Officer of Environmental Compliance and Sustainability at Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Agency. At LA Metro, Cris oversees their internationally recognized Environmental, Sustainability, and Energy initiatives.  Cris has a bachelors of science in Geology, a masters in Civil Engineering and earned his PhD in environmental science and engineering from UCLA. Cris is a widely published author, a national speaker and serves on a number of commissions and working groups including the chairing the sustainability committee for the American Society of Civil Engineers, serving on the National Council for Environmental Policy and Technology at US EPA, and serving on California’s AB2800 Climate-Safe Infrastructure Working Group CA Department of Natural Resources. Resources: Climate Safe Infrastructure Report   American Society of Civil Engineers Roadmap Local Government Commission
Oct 18, 2018
Rural Economic Development
22:01
Topic: Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – building relationships and keeping rural communities rural Guest & Organization: Kim Dolbow Vann brings more than 20 years of experience and dedication to economic development and the improvement of rural life. As USDA Rural Development State Director, Vann oversees a $6.7 billion portfolio, more than 40 programs and 18 offices resulting in average annual investments of $1 billion into rural California. Previously, Vann spent eleven years as a Colusa County Supervisor representing the first district. During her tenure she served as the chair of Rural County Representatives of California, and led the charge on all federal and state issues that affect the state’s rural counties. In addition, from 2016-2017 Vann served as the chair of Sites Reservoir Joint Powers Authority, leading the new public private partnership in creating an above-ground water storage facility in rural Colusa County. Resources: United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development – California Find California Rural Development on Twitter @CaliforniaRD Local Government Commission
Oct 11, 2018
Urban Heat Island Effects
25:19
Topic: Urban Resilience – heat impacts and cooling centers Guest & Organization: As Environmental Policy and Advocacy Coordinator, Cynthia is tasked with advancing policy goals that align with WE ACT’s Northern Manhattan Climate Action (NMCA) project, which seeks to increase community participation, within and outside of the government and build neighborhood capacity in response to climate change. Prior to working at WE ACT, Cynthia served as a NASA Climate Change Research Fellow, using new technology to enhance understanding of urban climates and better inform policy makers. Cynthia is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer and holds an M.S. in Sustainability Management from Columbia University. Resources: WE ACT for Environmental Justice How We Can Use Climate Action Planning to Beat the Heat (WE ACT) WE ACT’s Policy Campaigns & Initiative: 2017 Agenda Heat Check - Extreme heat kills more than a hundred New Yorkers yearly. Here's how the city's tackling the problem in a warming world. (By Justine Calma on Jul 11, 2018)
Oct 04, 2018
Anacostia Community Museum and Urban Waterways
36:28
Topic: Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development series – the significance of the Anacostia River to Washington DC Guest & Organization: Katrina D. Lashley is Program Coordinator of Urban Waterways at Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum. She received her BA in English Literature and Italian at Rutgers University and earned an MA in History (Public History track) at American University, with a focus on the British Caribbean. Ms. Lashley has worked on projects for the National Museum of American History and Arlington House. In addition to her Public History work, she taught English Literature and English Language for 12 years. Resources: Urban Waterways Newsletter Issue 9 Urban Waterways Newsletter Issue 8 Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum Skeo – Equity, Sustainability and Resiliency Other related resources developed by Skeo: The Urban Waters National Partnership Handbook Expanding the Circle: Strategies to Authentically Engage Under-Resourced Communities to Improve the Chesapeake Bay for All
Sep 27, 2018
Transitioning Fossil Fuel Communities
33:01
Topic: Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – how communities can prosper economically despite transitions Guest & Organization: Kate Gordon is an internationally recognized expert on the intersection of clean energy and economic development. She wears a number of hats including Partner on the sustainability team of RIDGE-LANE Limited Partners; Senior Advisor at the Paulson Institute; and non-resident Fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University. Kate may be best known for her work as the founder and director of the “Risky Business Project,” co-chaired by Michael Bloomberg, Henry Paulson, and Tom Steyer. The Risky Business project focused on the economic risks the U.S. faces from unmitigated climate change. Kate is a regular contributor to the Wall Street Journal as one of the paper’s “Energy Experts.” Kate also serves on the non-profit board the American Jobs Project; is also a member of the Sustainable Investing Advisory Board at Brown Advisory. Resources: Risky Business Project California Adaptation Forum Local Government Commission American Jobs Project
Sep 20, 2018
Lyft – Fighting Climate Change One Ride at a Time
20:37
Topic: Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – transportation, climate change and sustainability goals Guest & Organization: Sam Arons is the Director of Sustainability at Lyft. Sam oversees the company’s sustainability and climate impact efforts. He plays an essential role in helping Lyft achieve its Climate Impact Goals to address the threat posed by global climate change, and make the long-term vision a reality. Sam comes to Lyft after 10 years at Google, where he developed the company’s sustainability efforts as Senior Lead for Energy & Infrastructure. Prior to his time with Google, Sam researched wind energy and plug-in vehicles at Williams College and UC Berkeley, respectively. Resources: Lyft Local Government Commission
Sep 13, 2018
Replay – Hunger in America – Thinking Outside the Food Pantry
33:47
Topic: Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development series – Taking a Look at Food Insecurity Guest & Organization: Sharon Thornberry is the Community Food Systems Manager at the Oregon Food Bank. Sharon has been a grassroots organizer, trainer and advocate for community food systems, rural communities, and anti-hunger work in Oregon since 1986. She grew up on farms, was very active in 4-H and Girl Scouts, and was one of the first female members of Future Farmers of America. In 1979, she was a homeless mom with two small children. Sharon has served on the Oregon Hunger Task Force for 16 years, the board of the Community Food Security Coalition for six years (three as President), and the board of Bread for the World and Bread for the World Institute for six years. The sum of her experiences have come together to make her a passionate and knowledgeable community food security and anti-hunger advocate. She is the 2009 recipient of the Billi Odegard Public Health Genius Award from the Community Health Partnership of Oregon. She has worked for Oregon Food Bank for the past 16 years focusing on rural food systems and is the creator of “FEAST”, the nationally recognized community food systems organizing program. She has been a resident of Philomath, Oregon for 30 years. She is an avid gardener and loves to share the cooking traditions learned in the farm kitchens of her youth with friends and family. Resources: Follow Sharon Thornberry on Twitter Oregon Food Bank A Place at the Table book and film Local Government Commission Skeo Solutions
Sep 06, 2018
Cap and Trade and Environmental Injustice
35:14
Topic: Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development series – revolutionary air quality monitoring Guest & Organization: Veronica Eady is Assistant Executive Officer for Environmental Justice at the California Air Resources Board. In this capacity, Ms. Eady is responsible for overseeing Environmental Justice activities of the Board.Her role will be to serve as the primary internal and external contact for CARB on environmental justice issues and concerns and will be responsible for providing policy consultation and recommendations to CARB staff. She will also participate in decision making during the development and implementation of all major CARB programs to ensure that environmental justice and tribal concerns are considered. Ms. Eady was formerly the Vice President and Director of Conservation Law Foundation Massachusetts and was the Associate General Counsel and Director of Environmental Justice at New York Lawyers for the Public Interest, a non-profit civil rights law firm in New York City. Eady has also served as Director of the Environmental Justice and Brownfields Programs for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, where she was the principal author of Massachusetts Environmental Justice Policy. Eady was also Executive Director of Alternatives for Community and Environment, an environmental justice advocacy organization. She is the former chair of EPA's federal advisory committee for environmental justice, the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council. Eady has held appointments on several faculties, including Europe-Viadriana University in Germany, Tufts University, in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, Fordham Law School, and at the Stanford Law School. Eady received her B.A. in journalism from the University of Southern California, and her J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. Luis Olmedo is the executive director of Comité Civico Del Valle, a community advocacy group serving Imperial County, California. Comite Civico Del Valle (CCV) is a 501 (c) (3)  organization founded in 1987 that has grown to serve thousands of children, students, community residents, and professionals in California through a variety of programs: Promotoras, Outreach Events, Educator Training, Health Education, Environmental Health Research, and Environmental Conference. In 2007, the CCV expanded its programs to work with government agencies, academia, and underserved groups on specific neighborhood environmental justice problem solving that culminated in the implementation of the “First Environmental Justice Leadership Conference”. Our Environmental Conference has been the catalyst for major policy change in the U.S./Mexico Rural California Border Region. Resources: California Air Resources Board Comite Civico Del Valle, Inc. Skeo Solutions
Aug 30, 2018
Transformative Equitable Resilience
32:55
Topic: Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – funding and financing resilience Guest & Organization: Joyce Coffee, is founder and President of Climate Resilience Consulting, a Certified B Corp. She is an accomplished organizational strategist and visionary leader with over 25 years of domestic and international experience in the corporate, government and non-profit sectors implementing resilience and sustainability strategies, management systems, performance measurement, partnerships, benchmarking and reporting. More recently, she created corporate social responsibility plans and reports for Fortune 500 companies as a Vice President at Edelman and ran a preeminent global adaptation nonprofit grounded in university-based research and analytics, the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Initiative, ND-GAIN. Joyce regularly speaks as an expert in climate adaptation and resilience and has presented at Climate Week, WEF and COP side-events, and Greenbiz, among others. Resources: Climate Resilience Consulting California Adaptation Forum – the 3rd California Adaptation Forum will be held in Sacramento, CA from August 27-29, 2018. Register now! Local Government Commission
Aug 23, 2018
The Sustainable City with Dr. Steven Cohen
24:09
Topic: Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – importance of cities as the center of industry and life Guest & Organization: The Research Program is led by Dr. Steven Cohen, Professor in the Practice of Public Affairs at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. He is also Director of the Master of Public Administration Program in Environmental Science and Policy at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and the Director of the Masters of Science in Sustainability Management at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies. He is a consultant, former policy analyst, and former member of the Advisory Council on Environmental Policy and Technology for the U.S. EPA. Cohen is the author of several books, including The Sustainable City (2017), Understanding Environmental Policy (2006, 2014), Sustainability Management (2011), The Effective Public Manager (1988, now co-authored in its fifth edition), and the co-author of Sustainability Policy: Hastening the Transition to a Cleaner Economy (2015), and is a regular contributor for the Huffington Post on issues sustainability management and environmental policy. He is a graduate of Franklin College of Indiana (1974) and the State University of New York at Buffalo (MA, 1977; PhD, 1979). Dr. Cohen views the forthcoming research as a necessary next step in moving the needle towards more rigorous sustainability initiatives. Resources: Learn more about Dr. Steven Cohen The Sustainable City Local Government Commission
Aug 16, 2018
Open Spaces Sacred Places
22:26
Topic: Urban Resilience - urban green spaces designed with a purpose Guest & Organization: Fred Smith is the Director of Stringfellow Health Fund Grants at the Community Foundation of Northeast Alabama.  He has an Associate of Science degree from Southern Union Community College, Bachelor’s degree in marketing and a Master’s degree in Public Administration—both from Jacksonville State University. Fred is also a graduate of the Alabama Association of Not for Profit Executive Leadership certificate program. He is a recent appointee to the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama Roundtable, a group that gives young civic and business leaders the opportunity to study issues and government policy in Alabama in conjunction with the research conducted by the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama. The group meets with public officials and other leaders to learn about and discuss issues currently affecting the state and local governments while also seeking solutions to the state’s problems. Prior to joining the Community Foundation, he served as an Instructor for Gadsden State Community College and previously served as, the Director of Jacksonville State University’s Community Wellness program which received several local and state commendations for its contributions to community programming. He completed the Essential Skills & Strategies for New Grantmakers in 2016 and has also participated in Foundations on the Hill held in Washington D.C. both hosted by Southeastern Council of Foundations. Fred also has a previous connection to the Foundation.  He has written grants to, received grants from, and successfully managed grants for the Foundation and has served as a volunteer grant reviewer.  In addition to managing the Stringfellow Health Fund competitive grants program, Fred also conducts grantee site visits, manages the poverty project to align the foundation’s grant making with the Community Needs Assessment, and is coordinating the 100th anniversary celebration of Susie Parker Stringfellow’ s will in 2020. Fred met his lovely wife Rochelle while they both attended Jacksonville State University. They have two daughters, Eden and Zion, and they reside in Jacksonville Al. Resources: A Southern Interpretation of Sacred Nature Sacred Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press App! Learn more about the app here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Aug 09, 2018
The Patuxent River Keeper
33:45
Topic: Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development Series – serving diverse communities and the watershed movement Guest & Organization: Fred Tutman is a grassroots community advocate for clean water in Maryland’s longest and deepest intrastate waterway and holds the title of Patuxent Riverkeeper and organization that he founded in 2004. He also lives and works on an active farm located near the Patuxent that has been his family’s ancestral home for nearly a century. Prior to Riverkeeping, Fred spent over 25 years working as a media producer and consultant on telecommunications assignments all over the globe. Fred now teaches an adjunct course in Environmental Law and Policy at Historic St. Mary’s College of MD. An accomplished Blacksmith, farmer and outdoor adventurer, Fred is the recipient of numerous regional and state awards for his various environmental works. He is among the longest serving Waterkeepers in the Chesapeake region and the only African-American Waterkeeper in the nation. Resources: Patuxent Riverkeeper Skeo Solutions
Aug 02, 2018
Replay – Regenerative Agriculture with John Roulac of Nutiva: Voting for a Sustainable Future Three Times Per Day
27:12
Topic: What you eat can help save the planet. Guest & Organization: John W. Roulac is the founder and CEO of Nutiva, the world’s leading organic superfoods brand of hemp, coconut, chia, and red palm superfoods. John founded Nutiva in 1999 with a mission to nourish people and planet. Through his leadership, Nutiva has become the fastest-growing superfoods company on the planet, with a 55 percent annual growth rate since 2002, and has for five years in a row been named one of Inc. magazine’s fastest-growing companies in America. This growth keeps bringing John closer to his dream of a world that places people above profits—one where people everywhere have access to wholesome, organic foods. Nutiva® is the world’s leading brand of all-organic hemp foods, coconut oil, red palm oil and chia seeds. We’re a values-driven brand, dedicated to “Nourishing people and planet.” In a world where the industrialized food system has led us down a tangled path, where food choices have been reduced to the lesser-of-evils, and where distrust reigns, we are the champions of the greater good. Tireless seekers of pure and delicious foods that will nourish our bodies and our planet, we have devoted ourselves to a dream, a vision, a mission. We will revolutionize the way the world eats! And in so doing we will bring nourishment and balance, health and well being, sustainability and community to people and planet. We know change is hard, but we want to make it easy. We went out looking for the kind of foods that packed a powerful amount of nutrition into every bite, so that you could make small changes to big effect. We found superfoods—nutrient-dense powerhouses that can also be grown and processed in a sustainable way. These are foods that are truly good for you and for the planet. They’re foods like hemp and coconut, chia and red palm. They’re organic, full of vital nutrition, easy to use and delicious additions to your diet. We say food doesn’t have to be a choice between the lesser of evils. We say let food lead us to a better world. We say super people deserve superfoods. We say, come join us in our mission. Together, we can change the world. Resources: Learn More about John here Learn More about John’s work Find John on Facebook Learn More about Nutiva Nutiva’s Real Food Manifesto
Jul 26, 2018
UrbanFootprint
21:09
Topic: Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – data-driven tools to assist in decision making Guest & Organization: Joe DiStefano is Principal and Co-Founder of UrbanFootprint (formerly Calthorpe Analytics). He leverages more than 20 years of experience in land use and transportation planning in leading the development and deployment of the UrbanFootprint software platform. His career has focused on the implementation of actionable, data-driven tools that bring critical information to land use planning decisions, energy and water resource choices, and the environmental, public health, and social equity challenges of our times. Joe has led some of the most complex planning and design projects in the US and globally, including the award-winning Envision Utah regional plan, post-hurricane recovery in Southern Louisiana, and major scenario modeling and design efforts in Los Angeles, Mexico City, and the Middle East. He now leads UrbanFootprint, a web-based software platform designed to optimize each step of the sustainable urban planning and design process by supporting planners and communities with easy access to data science and advanced scenario planning. Joe holds a Master’s in Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of California at Berkeley. He lives in Berkeley, California with his wife and two children and is an avid cyclist. Resources: UrbanFootprint - Urban Planning Software for Sustainable Cities Local Government Commission
Jul 19, 2018
Public Transit and Local Leadership
30:31
Topic: Urban Resilience Series – public transit that reflects your values Guest & Organization: Jarrett Walker is an international consultant in public transit network design and policy, with 25 years of experience planning public transit in North America, Europe, Russia, Australia, and New Zealand.  His firm Jarrett Walker and Associates, based in Portland, Oregon, provides transit planning and executive advice to clients worldwide. He has worked in about 100 cities, including successful network redesign projects in Houston, Anchorage, Canberra, and Auckland.  His firm is currently undertaking network design studies in Philadelphia and Dublin, among many others. He is a frequent keynote speaker, both at conferences and at events building a city’s interest and understanding of the public transit challenge. He is a well-known innovator in describing transit issues to the public, in building values-based policies and standards, and in running interactive design processes for transit plans.  His training programs range from executive workshops to two-day intensive courses. His book, Human Transit: How Clearer Thinking about Public Transit Can Enrich Our Communities and Our Lives, was published by Island Press in 2011.  The book offers an introduction to transit issues for the average reader, designed to help anyone form clearer views that reflect their own values.  In addition to his consulting, teaching, and speaking, he writes about public transit issues at HumanTransit.org. Practically interested in an impractical number of fields, he is probably the only person with peer-reviewed articles in both the Journal of Transport Geography and Shakespeare Quarterly. Resources: Jarrett Walker and Associates HumanTransit.org Human Transit: How Clearer Thinking about Public Transit Can Enrich Our Communities and Our Lives Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Jul 13, 2018
Replay – Street Soccer USA: Transforming Lives and Neighborhoods
27:05
Topic: The role of sports in increasing social mobility and improving communities Guest & Organization: Lisa Wrightsman is the Regional Program Manager of Street Soccer USA Sacramento and the Founder and Coach of Sacramento Lady Salamanders. Lisa earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication with a concentration in Digital Video from California State University, Sacramento. She was a member of the University’s NCAA Division I Women’s Soccer team and currently holds multiple program records as well as recognition as a member of the All-Decade team. After college she played over five years of semi professional soccer for the Elk Grove Pride. Today her passion for soccer is seen in her social entrepreneurship initiatives with Street Soccer USA; a nationwide non-profit that uses soccer to break the cycle of homelessness and domestic abuse. Lisa is the founder and current Director and Coach of Street Soccer USA’s Sacramento Lady Salamanders. She started this program in 2010 and has since seen tremendous results and growth of the program as it has proven to successfully reverse the effects of addiction and domestic violence in 92% of team participants. Street Soccer USA uses this team platform to create a training curriculum of job preparation, life skills, and other specialized services, ultimately connecting participants directly to jobs, education, and housing. Lisa was recognized in 2015, as one of Sacramento Business Journal’s top 40 Under 40 young professionals. She is a Senior Fellow of the Nehemiah Emerging Leader’s Program. Since 2010 Lisa has coached the USA Women’s Street Soccer team at the Homeless World Cup and in 2016 was selected as Women’s Coach of the Tournament. Most recently Lisa was selected as a 2016 Change-Maker by TEDx Sacramento where she shared her story of resilience, hope, and how to be a catalyst for change. Resources: Interested in supporting Street Soccer USA? Click here to donate! Street Soccer USA Local Government Commission
Jul 13, 2018
Thriving Earth Exchange
33:47
Topic: Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – using science to advance community priorities Guest & Organization: Raj Pandya directs American Geophysical Union (AGU)’s Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX). TEX helps volunteer scientists and community leaders work together to use science, especially Earth and space science, to advance community priorities related to sustainability, resilience, disaster risk reduction, and environmental justice. Raj’s work invites everyone to be part of guiding and doing science, especially people from historically marginalized communities, so that science can contribute to a world where all people and all creatures can thrive, now and in the future. Raj chairs the National Academies committee on “Designing Citizen Science to Support Science Learning” and serves on the boards for Public Lab and the Anthropocene Alliance.  He was a founding member of the board of the Citizen Science Association and has helped lead education and diversity related activities for the American Meteorological Society.  As part of TEX, Raj helped launch the Resilience Dialogues – a public-private partnership that uses facilitated online dialogues to advance community resilience. Formerly, Raj led Spark Science Education and SOARS, both part of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).  While at UCAR, he led a team that worked with Navrongo Health Research to Centre using weather data to better manage meningitis in Africa. He also cohosted, with indigenous leaders, UCAR’s first conference on indigenous knowledge and climate science “Planning for Seven Generations”. Prior to joining UCAR, Raj served as a faculty member at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. Raj got his PhD from University of Washington exploring how large thunderstorms grow and sustain themselves. Resources: American Geophysical Union’s Thriving Earth Exchange Resilience Dialogues California Adaptation Forum – Register for California’s Premier Adaptation Gathering taking place in Sacramento, CA on August 27-29, 2018! Global Climate Action Summit 2018 – San Francisco, CA on September 12-14, 2018 Local Government Commission
Jul 13, 2018
Small Cities and the Transportation Revolution
25:41
Topic: Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – emerging mobility trends Guest & Organization: Christopher Cabaldon was first elected Mayor of West Sacramento in 1998, and is serving his ninth term. He is the first mayor elected directly by the voters of the city, after serving three terms on the city council. The Sacramento Bee says that “under his leadership, the city has become one of the municipal stars of the region.” At the United States Conference of Mayors, he is Chair of the Jobs, Education, and the Workforce Committee and one of the nation’s leading mayors on innovation, ports and exports, civil rights, and education. An appointee in the administrations of four California governors spanning both political parties, Mr. Cabaldon currently serves as California’s commissioner on the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education, where he is chair of the issues analysis & research committee. Mayor Cabaldon’s work on transportation, land use, water, air quality and climate change, housing, and economic development at the local, regional, and statewide scales has won numerous awards, and has become the model for effective regional collaborative action. Mr. Cabaldon earned his B.S. in environmental economics from UC Berkeley, and a Master of Public Policy & Administration degree from CSU Sacramento, where he received the Distinguished Alumni Award. Resources: City of West Sacramento’s Via On-Demand Rideshare – link to download the Via app, get information on the Pilot, and find links out to Via’s Support page and additional FAQs City of West Sacramento’s JUMP Bike Share Local Government Commission
Jul 13, 2018
Prosperity and Poverty in Urban America
32:19
Topic: Urban Resilience Series – growth in American cities Guest & Organization: Alan Mallach is a senior fellow at the Center for Community Progress in Washington, DC. He is the author of many works on housing and planning, including Bringing Buildings Back and Building a Better Urban Future: New Directions for Housing Policies in Weak Market Cities. He has served as director of housing and economic development for Trenton, N.J. as a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, and as a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Resources: Urban Revitalization for All — A webinar conversation with Alan Mallach and former D.C. mayor Anthony Williams: Join Island Press on Friday, June 29th from 1:15-2:30 pm ET for this free webinar! RSVP for your spot by visiting bit.ly/dividedcity The Divided City: Poverty and Prosperity in Urban America Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Jul 13, 2018
Transportation Inequity in Baltimore
23:36
Topic: Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development Series – transportation inequity Guest & Organization: Tracee Strum-Gilliam, AICP is the Director of Mid-Atlantic Client Solutions for PRR. For her, working at PRR is thrilling! The core part of her position at PRR is to grow the Baltimore office and PRR’s transportation and infrastructure practice on the East Coast. As a 20-year veteran of the transportation industry, it is most certainly a challenge that she welcomes, because she loves helping clients solve challenges and achieve their goals through strategic planning. She is a proud member of several Transportation Research Board committees, Women’s Transportation Seminar Baltimore Chapter, and the Waterfront Partnership Board of Baltimore. When she’s not working, she’s traveling with family. She always has a passport handy and a suitcase ready. PRR specializes in advancing major public issues and sparking market transformation across a diverse range of segments that include environment, transportation, healthcare, and land use. Resources: PRR Local Government Commission  New Partners for Smart Growth conference
Jul 13, 2018
Resiliency Planning Success Stories
33:39
Topic: Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – getting adaptation and resilience projects to move forward Guest & Organization: Ellory Monks is co-founder of The Atlas Marketplace, a free online community for public officials upgrading their systems to be stronger, smarter and more sustainable. The Atlas is a hassle-free space where cities come to learn, share, and connect about what’s working in their communities. As co-founder, Ellory works with 70+ partner cities to help them scale and replicate proven urban innovations – and the benefits they generate – in their own communities. Prior to co-founding The Atlas, Ellory was Partner at re:focus partners, a firm dedicated to the design & financing of resilient infrastructure, and before that, held a fellowship in Washington D.C., where she acted as the executive secretary of the Obama Administration’s Climate Data and Tools Initiative, and more broadly, provided analytical and technical support to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). She has a B.A. in Civil & Environmental Engineering and Public Policy from Rice University. Resources: Atlas Marketplace – access is free! Miami-Dade $13B CIP plan that prioritizes resilience Upcoming workshop at Kresge Foundation: “Procuring Resilience” Workshop Retain Your Rain, Norfolk VA Citizen Science for King Tide Flooding, Broward County California Adaptation Forum – the 3rd California Adaptation Forum will be held in Sacramento, CA from August 27-29, 2018 Local Government Commission  Infinite Earth Radio Episode 45: Radical Innovation and Resilient Infrastructure—Climate Adaptation Infinite Earth Radio Episode 117: Coastal Adaptation in Louisiana
Jul 13, 2018
Local Policies and the Transportation Revolution
21:06
Topic: Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – integrating new mobility technology into cities Guest & Organization: Working out of BB&K’s Washington, D.C. office, Greg uses his unique experience working on Capitol Hill and as in-house counsel for a transportation planning agency to provide legal and regulatory guidance concerning federal grant and contracting requirements, and monitors, counsels and advocates for clients on federal legislation, rulemakings and funding opportunities related to transportation infrastructure. Greg’s practice includes providing strategic guidance, policy tracking, and legal assistance on the regulation and incorporation of emerging transportation technologies into our transportation network, including on-demand mobility, automated and connected vehicles, and drones. Greg is a co-host on the @MobilityPodcast and can be found on Twitter at @smartertranspo. Resources: BB&K Attorneys at Law Mobility Podcast The First Self-Driving Death  Roads of the Future Today  Dockless Disruption: Maximizing Opportunities Through Smart Regulations Automated Vehicle Regulatory Challenges: Avoiding Legal Potholes Through Collaboration  Local Government Commission
Jul 13, 2018
Resilience for All
25:25
Topic: Urban Resilience Series – Resiliency planning, equity and community-driven design Guest & Organization: Barbara Brown Wilson is an Assistant Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning at the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture. Barbara Brown Wilson’s research and teaching focus on the ethics, theory, and practice of sustainable community design and development, and on the history of urban social movements. Wilson’s current research projects include understanding how grassroots community networks reframe public infrastructure in more climate and culturally appropriate ways across the U.S. and helping to elevate the standards of evaluation for community engaged design around notions of social and ecological justice. Her research is often change-oriented—she collaborates with real community partners to identify opportunities for engaged and integrated sustainable development.  She is a member of the Equity Collective, whose work is currently featured in the Cooper Hewitt Museum’s By the People: Designing a Better America Exhibition. Alongside Architect Jeana Ripple, Wilson is coordinating the community engaged aspects of the Public Art Installation for the ArtHouse Social Kitchen Project in Gary, Indiana. She is also working, as a researcher, an educator, and a board member of the Piedmont Housing Alliance (PHA) with their leadership to identify venues where PHA residents can more actively engage in and shape their communities. In those collective posts, Wilson is serving as a resource ally to PHA’s new Youth Leadership in Land Use program that brings in resident youth from Friendship Court as valued members of the design team for the Redevelopment project currently underway in their neighborhood. She is a co-founder of the Design Futures Student Leadership Forum, a five day student leadership training which convenes students and faculty from a consortium of universities with leading practitioners all working to elevate the educational realms of community engaged design; and a co-founder of the Austin Community Design and Development Center (ACDDC), a nonprofit design center that provides high quality green design and planning services to lower income households and the organizations that serve them. Resources: Resilience for All – Striving for Equity Through Community-Driven Design Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Jul 13, 2018
Charlottesville Beyond the Headlines
35:03
Topic: Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development Series – current political climate in Charlottesville and beyond Guest & Organization: Dayna Bowen Matthew is the William L. Matheson and Robert M. Morgenthau Distinguished Professor of Law and F. Palmer Weber Research Professor of Civil Liberties and Human Rights at the University of Virginia. Matthew is a leader in public health who focuses on racial disparities in health care. She joined the Virginia faculty in 2017. She is the author of the book “Just Medicine: A Cure for Racial Inequality in American Health Care.” Matthew previously served on the University of Colorado law faculty as a professor, vice dean and associate dean of academic affairs. She was a member of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities on the Anschutz Medical Campus and held a joint appointment at the Colorado School of Public Health. She has also taken on many public policy roles. Matthew worked with a law firm partner in 2013 to found the Colorado Health Equity Project, a medical-legal partnership incubator aimed at removing barriers to good health for low-income clients by providing legal representation, research and policy advocacy. In 2015 she served as the senior adviser to the director of the Office of Civil Rights for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where she expedited cases on behalf of historically vulnerable communities besieged by pollution. She then became a member of the health policy team for U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow of Michigan, and worked on public health issues. During 2015 and 2016 she was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow, in residence in Washington, D.C., and pivoted her work toward population-level clients. She forged relationships with influential policy groups such as the Brookings Institution, where she is currently a non-resident senior fellow, and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. Resources: Just Medicine: A Cure for Racial Inequality in American Health Care University of Virginia School of Law
May 11, 2018
Transportation, Place & Prosperity — GoTRANS
23:30
Topic: Smart Growth and Livable Communities Series – active transportation and community design Guest: Peter Katz has been a leader in advancing innovative approaches to community planning and transportation for more than a quarter century. He helped to catalyze the New Urbanism movement, first as author of The New Urbanism: Toward an Architecture of Community, and later as founding director of the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU). At CNU, Katz set up a strategic partnership with the US Department of Housing & Urban Development that led the agency to adopt more neighborhood-oriented development models. He was recently named a fellow of CNU in recognition of his contributions to the New Urbanism movement. As consultant to government, public agencies, and private-sector clients, Katz addresses real-world needs with state-of-the-art strategies. He was lead advisor to local redevelopment officials on the highly successful Contra Costa Centre Transit Village (American Planning Association National Award Winner, 2012). Organization: GoTRANS, a recently formed nonprofit organization, is building a community of car-free and car-light individuals and families across the United States. It provides a range of consumer and municipal supports to advance the use of active transportation (walking and bicycling), public transportation and other shared-mobility formats. Through its programs, products and services, GoTRANS seeks to lower the cost of urban living for families that would otherwise “drive until they qualify” for car-dependent housing at the suburban edge. Resources: Congress for the New Urbanism Local Government Commission
May 11, 2018
Replay – Portland is a Movable Side Yard Feast
24:48
Topic: Providing Local Food to the Local Community Guest & Organization: Stacey Givens is the farmer/chef/owner of The Side Yard Farm & Kitchen. She grew up in a big fat Greek family and was instilled with DIY values from a very young age. Farming in their backyard, foraging olives with her mom from the nearby hills and learning to brine them with her Yiayia (grandmother). Givens has been in the food industry since the age of 15. Working her way through kitchens up the west coast from LA to SF to Pdx. After landing in Pdx in 2006, she cooked in various kitchens including Lincoln, Southpark, Rocket and Noble Rot. Currently, she is based in the Ne Cully Neighborhood, where her team grows diverse vegetables on a 1 acre plot of land. She sells her harvests to nearby restaurants in what she calls an invaluable “chef-to-chef” produce service. Since then, Givens has established the first ‘urban’ seed to plate catering company and supper club in the Portland area where she uses Side Yard grown goods. She also sources from other urban farms in her hood for goat milk, eggs, honey and fruit. Its urban craft all the way, from the seed to the plate. Making her own cheese, charcuterie, vinegars, pollen, spices and pickles. Her inspiration to get her hands in the dirt sprouted when she was cooking at Rocket (now Noble Rot), which had the first rooftop garden of its kind in Portland. Crafting ‘urban farm to table’ meals led Givens into what she calls her ‘seed to plate’ food philosophy. Find Stacey on Twitter The Side Yard is an urban farm, supper club and catering company located in the NE Cully Neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. They have been providing local restaurants with creative organic produce and the community with food, education and opportunity since 2009. The farm is largely operated by volunteers and interns who gain hands on experience with the urban seed to plate movement. The Side Yard offers farm suppers & brunches, private catering,  pop-ups, DIY workshops, farm tours and more. Their focus is to provide local food for the local community, from the seeds we sow, animals we raise and to the craftsmanship we embrace. They grow our produce sustainably and ethically, with a creative touch. The farm produces a wide range of seasonal veggies, fruits, seeds and culinary herbage that are harvested within hours of delivery to ensure quality and freshness. They are known for our unique selection of specialty herbs and micro crops. Resources: The Side Yard Farm and Kitchen Local Government Commission
May 11, 2018
20 Years Of Life – Public Health and Political Power
27:29
Topic: Urban Resilience Series – Addressing public health disparities Guest & Organization: Suzanne Bohan covered health and science for 12 years with the Bay Area News Group, a 650,000-circulation newspaper chain which includes the San Jose Mercury News, Contra Costa Times, and Oakland Tribune. She previously worked for the Sacramento Bee, and her writing has also been published in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Miami Herald, San Francisco Chronicle, and other newspapers nationwide.Bohan has won nearly 20 journalism awards, including the 2010 White House Correspondents’ Association Edgar A. Poe award for the series “Shortened Lives: Where You Live Matters” on why life expectancies vary so dramatically between nearby neighborhoods, and initiatives to shrink this unjust gap. Her earlier book, 50 Simple Ways to Live a Longer Life: Everyday Techniques from the Forefront of Science, won a National Health Information Award for health promotion/disease prevention. Bohan has a master’s degree in journalism from Stanford University and a bachelor’s degree in biology from San Francisco State University. She interned at CNN and worked in radio, but decided to focus her career on print media. She lives in Northern California with her husband.In Twenty Years of Life, award-winning health journalist Suzanne Bohan exposes the disturbing flip side of the American dream: your health is largely determined by your zip code. The strain of living in a poor neighborhood, with sub-par schools, lack of parks, fear of violence, few to no healthy food options, and the stress of unpaid bills is literally taking years off people’s lives. Residents living in distressed communities die upwards of 20 years earlier than those living in wealthier neighborhoods often just miles away. But there is another way. In Twenty Years of Life, Bohan tells a success story that has resulted in the passage of more than 500 new policies and laws that are improving millions of resident’s lives. Resources: Suzanne Bohan’s website Suzanne Bohan’s Amazon Author page Twenty Years of Life – Why the Poor Die Earlier and How to Challenge Inequity Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
May 11, 2018
Art and Creative Place Making
16:40
Topic: The arts and community engagement as highly effective community and economic development strategies Guest & Organization: Juanita Hardy is the Senior Visiting Fellow (SVF) for Creative Placemaking at the Urban Land Institute (ULI). Her work supports the Institute’s Building Healthy Places Initiative by deepening and broadening ULI’s focus on creative placemaking through content, the ULI District Council network, and the Healthy Corridors grant program. Hardy has a passion for making business and cultural connections that foster healthy, thriving, and culturally rich places to work, live, and enjoy.  She founded Tiger Management Consulting Group, a global training and business consulting services firm, after retiring from IBM in 2005.  Hardy has over 43 years of business experience, including 31 years with IBM, and over 35 years in the arts as a nonprofit leader, trustee, collector, and patron of the arts.  For IBM, she led many client transformational leadership initiatives and frequently coached leaders on making change at the individual and organizational level.  Her work with Tiger Management included helping clients build successful relationships with businesses in other countries and cultures. As SVF for ULI, Hardy has done extensive research and identified best practices, conducted an assessment on the presence of creative placemaking at ULI, worked with ULI District Councils on programming and capacity building activities, and authored a guide on implementing creative placemaking in real estate development. Hardy is the former Executive Director of CulturalDC, a nonprofit committed to making space for artists and art organizations and fostering cultural and economic vibrancy in communities through its creative placemaking services. While at CulturalDC, she worked closely with area developers to integrate arts and culture into development projects across the Washington, D.C., area. She served as an awards program juror for the ULI Washington District Council’s Real Estate Trends Conference for three years, 2015-2017. Since 2006, Hardy has served as an executive coach with Right Management, a global human capital development firm, and has served on many nonprofit art boards dating to the 1980s. She co-founded Millennium Arts Salon, an art education initiative, in 2000. Hardy is an accomplished writer and public speaker.  Her recent writing includes a trilogy of creative placemaking articles in Urban Land magazine. Resources: Urban Land Institute’s Building Healthy Places Initiative Urban Land Institute’s Creative Placemaking National Endowment for the Arts National Endowment for the Arts' Creative Placemaking Paper by Ann Markusen, Markusen Economic Research Services and Anne Gadwa, Metris Arts Consulting Local Government Commission
Apr 12, 2018
Collateral Environmental Federalism
26:16
Topic: Diversity Equity and Inclusion, Environmental Justice and Equitable Development Series – Advancing environmental justice and equity at the state and local levels Guest & Organization: Dr. Adrienne L. Hollis is the Director of Federal Policy at WE ACT for Environmental Justice, in the Washington, DC office. Dr. Hollis is an experienced environmental toxicologist as well as an environmental attorney. She has worked with a number of community organizations and has a wealth of experience in community-based participatory research around environmental justice issues. It is well-documented that some of the most polluted environments in America are where people of color live, work, play, and pray. WE ACT was started in 1988 when three fearless community leaders saw that environmental racism was rampant in their West Harlem neighborhood, and they demanded community-driven, political change. Today, the organization has grown to over 16 staff members and 2 locations in NYC and Washington, D.C., and is considered an active and respected participant in the national Environmental Justice Movement. WE ACT’s mission is to build healthy communities by ensuring that people of color and/or low income residents participate meaningfully in the creation of sound and fair environmental health and protection policies and practices. WE ACT envisions a community that has: informed and engaged residents who participate fully in decision-making on key issues that impact their health and community. strong and equal environmental protections. increased environmental health through community-based participatory research and evidence-based campaigns.   Resources: WE ACT WE ACT’s Cleaner Air, Cleaner Communities: 6 Steps to Develop Environmentally Just State Implementation Plans was created to provide state agencies, local governments and community-based organizations with a step-by-step process, tools and case studies to integrate environmental justice considerations into Clean Air Act State Implementation Plans (SIPs). The Clean Air Act SIP is a federally-required plan under the Clean Air Act that describes how each state will reduce criteria air pollutants to meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The SIP provides a consistent opportunity for communities to engage in clean air policy. Environmental Justice Forum Releases Guidance on Incorporating Environmental Justice in State Implementation Plans
Apr 05, 2018
Coastal Adaptation in Louisiana
32:12
Topic: Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – Issues Facing Coastal Communities Guest & Organization: Liz Williams Russell is the Coastal Community Resilience Director at the Foundation for Louisiana where she designs strategies to support communities influenced by land loss and relative sea-level rise across coastal Louisiana. With a background and training in architectural design, landscape systems, and urban planning, Liz incorporates the complexities of the developed urban ecosystem to promote equitable opportunities in areas altered and affected by land change. Liz manages coastal grant-making areas with an advisory committee and relevant partners that work to help communities face a range of issues and challenges that range in scale from mega-regional networks and hydrologic basins to stormwater management and flood insurance. Risk mitigation and resilience-based programs require an awareness of and participation with these transitioning watersheds. In order to better provide opportunities, establish and cultivate partnerships, and advocate for informed and diverse public engagement, Liz supports fundraising initiatives and guides the common campaign and funding plan across Foundation for Louisiana’s Coastal Resiliency Leverage Fund. Liz previously has worked as a Research Fellow and Affiliate with the Coastal Sustainability Studio at Louisiana State University. In this role she led and collaborated with cohorts of civil engineers, urban planners, coastal scientists, and landscape architects alongside economic, legal, and cultural advisors. Each project engaged a set of unique conditions within the coastal landscape and proposed developments through which residents and communities might advance and thrive in a future with evolving challenges. The mission of the Foundation for Louisiana is to invest in people and practices that work to reduce vulnerability and build stronger, more sustainable communities statewide. Resources: Foundation for Louisiana Local Government Commission
Mar 29, 2018
Adaptation Professionals – ASAP
34:27
Topic: Adaptation and Livable Communities Series – An Introduction to Adaptation Professionals Guest & Organization: Beth Gibbons is the Executive Director of the American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP). In this role, she is responsible for strengthening the ASAP network and bringing adaptation best practices into the broader conversation across sectors and scales. Beth brings a decade of experience in sustainable development and climate adaptation to her role. Previously, Beth supported urban resilience initiatives at the Institute for Sustainable Communities alongside her role as ASAP Managing Director. Prior to leading ASAP she was Director of the University of Michigan Climate Center and managed NOAA’s Great Lakes Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments Center. She served in the Peace Corps in Agodopke, Togo. Beth earned her undergraduate degree in Comparative Politics from the Catholic University of America and holds a Master of Urban Planning from the University of Michigan. ASAP connects and supports climate adaptation professionals, while advancing innovation in the field of climate change adaptation. Through ASAP’s website, affinity groups, webinars and meetings climate adaptation leaders interact, share what’s working, collaborate with their colleagues and build essential climate resilience for communities across the country. Resources: American Society of Adaptation Professionals (ASAP) Local Government Commission  California Adaptation Forum
Mar 22, 2018
Three Revolutions – The Future of Cars
28:44
Topic: Autonomous vehicles, shared vehicle services and electric vehicles Guest & Organization: Dr. Daniel Sperling is the Blue Planet Prize Distinguished Professor of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science and Policy and founding director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis, which oversees the 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program. He has held the transportation seat on the California Air Resources Board since 2007 (appointed by Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jerry Brown) and served as Chair of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies in 2015-16. Among his many prizes are the 2013 Blue Planet Prize from the Asahi Glass Foundation for being "a pioneer in opening up new fields of study to create more efficient, low-carbon, and environmentally beneficial transportation systems." He served twice as lead author for the IPCC (sharing the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize), has testified 7 times to the U.S. Congress, and provided 40 keynote presentations in the past five years. He has authored or coauthored over 250 technical papers and 12 books; is widely cited in leading newspapers; has been interviewed many times on NPR, including Science Friday, Talk of the Nation, and Fresh Air; and in 2009 was featured on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. In Three Revolutions, transportation expert Dan Sperling, along with seven other leaders in the field, share research–based insights on potential public benefits and impacts of the three transportation revolutions. They describe innovative ideas and partnerships, and explore the role government policy can play in steering the new transportation paradigm toward the public interest—toward our dream scenario of social equity, environmental sustainability, and urban livability. Resources: Three Revolutions - Steering Automated, Shared, and Electric Vehicles to a Better Future by Daniel Sperling 3 Revolutions Future Mobility Program at the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store! Yosemite Policymakers Conference – building livable communities Local Government Commission
Mar 15, 2018
The History and Power of the Built Environment
28:20
Topic: Urban revitalization and land regeneration Guest & Organization: Dekonti Mends-Cole serves as the Director of Policy for the Center for Community Progress. Prior to joining Center for Community Progress in September 2015, Dekonti worked in Detroit as the Deputy Director of Dispositions for the Detroit Land Bank Authority overseeing disposition, property management and compliance programs.  In addition, she served as a fellow with the White House Strong Cities, Strong Communities Initiative embedded in the City of Detroit’s Law Department. Dekonti brings international experience and best practice having previously worked on local economic development projects in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa including infrastructure investment strategies in Iraq and Zambia for the United Nations and community development projects tied to the 2012 London Olympics. She holds an MSc from London School of Economics in Urban Regeneration and Affordable Housing, a Juris Doctor from Georgetown Law Center, and a BA from University of Miami in International Studies and Economics. Founded in 2010, the Center for Community Progress is the only national nonprofit specifically dedicated to building a future in which vacant, abandoned, and deteriorated properties no longer exist. Resources: Center for Community Progress Dekonti Mends-Cole on Memory Banking and the City Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It Local Government Commission
Mar 08, 2018
Tax Policy and Urban Form
23:35
Topic: The relationship between tax and land use policies Guest & Organization: Joe Minicozzi is an urban planner imagining new ways to think about and visualize land use, urban design and economics. Joe founded Urban3 to break down and visualize the market dynamics created by tax and land use policies. Urban3's work is establishing new conversations across multiple sectors, policy makers, and the public to creatively address the challenges of urbanization. Urban3’s extensive studies have ranged geographically from over 30 states, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Joe holds a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Miami and Master of Architecture and Urban Design from Harvard University. In 2017, Joe was recognized as one of the 100 Most Influential Urbanists of all time.   Resources: Urban3 Local Government Commission  New Partners for Smart Growth Conference
Mar 01, 2018
Puerto Rico and Disaster Capitalism
31:17
Topic: Post-disaster relief efforts to rebuild and revitalize Puerto Rico Guest & Organization: Elizabeth Yeampierre is an internationally recognized Puerto Rican attorney and environmental and climate justice leader of African and Indigenous ancestry born and raised in New York City. A national leader in climate justice movement, Elizabeth is the co-chair of the Climate Justice Alliance. She is Executive Director of UPROSE, Brooklyn's oldest Latino community based organization. Prior to assuming the Executive Director position at UPROSE, Ms. Yeampierre was the Director of Legal Education and Training at the Puerto Rican Legal Defense Fund, Director of Legal Services for the American Indian law Alliance and Dean of Puerto Rican Student Affairs at Yale University. Resources: UPROSE  Here’s how environmental justice leaders are pushing forward in the Trump era  Imagine a Puerto Rico Recovery Designed by Puerto Ricans  Resilience Matters: Transformative Thinking in a Year of Crisis (Free e-book download!) Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Feb 22, 2018
Realtors Promoting Smart Growth
Topic: Smart growth and the real estate industry Guest & Organization: Hugh Morris has practiced urban planning for twenty-five years with a focus on transportation issues.  After graduating from UCLA with a Masters in Planning, he spent five years with a transportation consulting firm working on transit plans, travel demand forecasting models, and travel surveys.  He spent the next two years working for an energy efficiency think tank where he focused on transportation issues, including investigating the real cost of our transportation system.  The next ten years were spent working with the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy helping communities convert abandoned railroad corridors into hiking/biking trails.  His principle area of focus was urban trails that were used for trip making as well as recreation.  He has spent the last twelve years with the Smart Growth Program at the National Association of Realtors where he helps local Realtor associations around the country to become advocates for smart growth style development in their communities. He has had two papers presented at and published by the National Academy of Science’s Transportation Research Board.  Additionally, he has contributed to the American Planning Association’s publication titled “Planning and Urban Design Standards” as well as “Trails for the 21st Century: a planning, design, and management manual” published by Island Press. Resources: On Common Ground - smart growth magazine from the National Association of Realtors How to Become a Small-Scale Developer - by Meg White Local Government Commission
Feb 15, 2018
Funding Climate Adaptation
Topic: Holistic Approaches to Climate Challenges Guest & Organization: Senator Bob Wieckowski represents the 10th Senate District in the California State Legislature. The district stretches from southern Alameda County into Santa Clara County and shares the member’s focus on job creation, clean technologies, protecting our environment and reducing unnecessary regulations. Mr. Wieckowski chairs the Environmental Quality Committee and Budget Subcommittee 2 on Resources, Environmental Protection, Energy and Transportation.  He is also a member of the Senate committees on Judiciary; Budget and Fiscal Review; Transportation and Housing; and Ethics.  He was appointed by Senate President Pro Tem to serve on the Energy and Environment Committee of the Council of State Governments West and in 2017 became the first Californian to chair the committee. The Senator is a state leader in advocating for climate adaptation programs and has participated on state and regional panels examining green infrastructure investments. A strong voice in the Legislature for consumers and low-income earners, he received the “Champion of Justice” Award from the East Bay Community Law Center for fighting against abusive debt collectors and oppressive wage garnishments.  Statewide organizations have selected him Legislator of the Year and the California Judges Association gave him its “Scales of Justice Award” for his steadfast support for increased court funding. Tech America also named him “Legislator of the Year.” Mr. Wieckowski is a small business owner and a bankruptcy attorney.  He has helped hundreds of families and seniors persevere through economic hardship, keep their homes and live with dignity.  He received his B.A. from the University of California and his J.D. from Santa Clara University School of Law. Senator Wieckowski lives in Fremont with his wife, Sue. Resources: California Senate Standing Committee on Environmental Quality California Governor’s Office of Planning and Research – Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resiliency Program (ICARP) California’s Climate Adaptation Strategy – January 2018 – Safeguarding California Plan Local Government Commission
Feb 08, 2018
Recovering from Wildfire in Northern California
Topic: Wildfire recovery in wine country Guest & Organization: Chris Coursey grew up in a military family, and by the time he graduated from college had never lived in any city for more than three years. He came to Santa Rosa in 1980 to take a job that he thought would be a brief stop in his rising journalism career. Instead, he found a community that has sustained him for 37 years, and a city that has become his home town. He worked for the Santa Rosa Press Democrat for 27 years, covering a variety of subjects and writing a column sharing his personal thoughts on a wide range of community issues. In 2007, he was hired by the SMART rail district to manage communications and community outreach in advance of the successful 2008 sales tax election. He left SMART in 2011 to establish a consulting business focusing on freelance writing and public relations. He was elected to the Santa Rosa City Council in 2014. In December 2016, he was selected by his fellow Council members to serve as Mayor. His term expires in December 2018. Tennis Wick has served as Sonoma County’s Permit & Resource Management Department Director since November 2013.  The agency balances environmental protection and sustainable development of Sonoma County’s natural resources through the agency’s planning, engineering, building, well and septic, code enforcement and customer service authority. Before joining the County of Sonoma, Wick worked as a principal at Berg Holdings responsible for government affairs, site acquisition, design and entitlement.  Previously, Tennis practiced as a partner at the engineering and planning consulting firm CSW/Stuber-Stroeh Engineering Group, Inc.  He began his career with the County of Marin where he led current planning as Development Chief. Wick is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners (10447) and the American Planning Association.  Tennis Wick holds a Juris Doctor degree from Golden Gate University School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science with a Public Service Emphasis from the University of California, Santa Barbara. A long-time Petaluma resident, Tennis Wick has been civically active twice serving as a City Planning Commissioner and as Board President of the Friends of the Petaluma River, Petaluma Peoples Service Center and the Petaluma Area Chamber of Commerce.  Wick is also a member of the Sonoma County Farm Bureau and the Sonoma County Alliance. Tennis is part owner of Hen House Brewing Co.  He and his wife Holly have four grown daughters and are active in endurance sports, cooking and gardening. Resources: Santa Rosa and Sonoma County Fire Recovery Local Government Commission  2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Feb 01, 2018
The Next Generation of Public Service
Topic: Supporting the next generation of young leaders Guest & Organization: Danielle Metzinger is a Learning and Development Specialist at CalSTRS, and serves as Membership Lead for NxtGov including administering the new NxtGov Ambassador Program. Danielle’s interest in public service led her from the nonprofit to the public sector in 2013 when she began her career at the State of California. Since then she’s collaborated on several initiatives to develop the state workforce and improve civil service. Danielle is currently pursuing a Master of Science in Organization Development from University of San Francisco. ... Angelica Quirarte, “Angie,” is the Assistant Secretary for Digital Engagement at the CA Government Operations Agency (GovOps) and the founder of NxtGov. She started her career in public service as an Executive Fellow in 2013 and has been leading efforts in open data and web user-centered design through the management of data.ca.gov and ca.gov. She was part of the team that launched the Lean Academy,  partially project managed the Civil Service Improvement Initiative, and most recently helped coordinate the creation of the new Department of Tax and Fee Administration. Angie was born in Guadalajara, Mexico and migrated to the Bay Area with her parents and two younger brothers when she was 10 years old. She has a BA in History of Public Policy from UC Santa Barbara. Resources: NxtGov Local Government Commission 2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Jan 25, 2018
Watersheds and Homelessness – Part 2
Topic: Homelessness and water resource protection Guest & Organization: Mike Antos is a Senior Watershed Manager for the Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority, facilitating the One Water One Watershed program and leading engagement with members of disadvantaged communities for collaborative watershed management. Mike holds a PhD in Geography from UCLA where he remains a member of the Water Resources Group of the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability. He is on the advisory board of the Loyola-Marymount University Center for Urban Resilience, a founding board member of the Mediterranean Cities Climate Change Consortium, and is a Fellow of the Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation. Mike serves as co-chair of the American Water Resources Association Integrated Water Resources Management technical committee, and sits on the Technical Advisory Council of California’s Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program. Resources: Infinite Earth Radio Episode 106: Water and Homelessness with Mike Antos One Water One Watershed Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority (SAWPA) Local Government Commission  2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Jan 18, 2018
Watersheds and Homelessness
Topic: The intersection of homelessness and water management Guest & Organization: Mike Antos is a Senior Watershed Manager for the Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority, facilitating the One Water One Watershed program and leading engagement with members of disadvantaged communities for collaborative watershed management. Mike holds a PhD in Geography from UCLA where he remains a member of the Water Resources Group of the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability. He is on the advisory board of the Loyola-Marymount University Center for Urban Resilience, a founding board member of the Mediterranean Cities Climate Change Consortium, and is a Fellow of the Robert & Patricia Switzer Foundation. Mike serves as co-chair of the American Water Resources Association Integrated Water Resources Management technical committee, and sits on the Technical Advisory Council of California’s Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program. Resources: One Water One Watershed Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority (SAWPA) Local Government Commission  2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018 Local Government Commission  2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Jan 11, 2018
Affordable Housing and A Politics of Yes
Topic: Yes in my back yard (YIMBY) Guest & Organization: Sonja Trauss is the founder of the San Francisco Bay Area Renters' Federation – an unincorporated club of pro-building, pro-density renters. Born and raised by a labor and delivery nurse and legal aid attorney in Philadelphia, PA, Trauss learned at an early age the importance of representing the city's most vulnerable populations. As an undergraduate at Temple University, she worked for the local Neighborhood Advisory Committee, where she first learned about the mechanics of municipal government. During the financial crisis, she worked as a paralegal for Philadelphia Legal Assistance, helping to defend low income homeowners from foreclosure. She earned her master’s degree in economics in 2011 at Washington University in St. Louis where she then relocated to the Bay Area. As a renter – in El Cerrito and West Oakland, and now in Soma (South of Mission) – she has experienced the Bay Area's housing and transit issues. Trauss started the San Francisco Bay Area Renters’ Federation (SFBARF) in 2014 as a response to the anti-growth, anti-newcomer mindset driving housing prices higher in the Bay. Higher housing prices displace many of the most vulnerable long-term residents, making it harder for people to move there, and increase the cost of living for everyone. SFBARF has been nationally recognized as a pioneer in the YIMBY movement to densify our cities, and drive housing prices lower by increasing the number of available houses. Trauss is currently running for supervisor and aims to raise her son in a neighborhood that's greener, denser, more pedestrian-friendly, inclusive and more welcoming for everyone, regardless of their origins or present condition. Resources: YIMBY Action California Renters Legal Advocacy and Education Fund (CaRLA) Sonja Trauss for Supervisor 2018 Local Government Commission  2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Jan 04, 2018
Design & Dignity
Topic: The dignifying power of design Guest & Organization: An architect by training, John Cary has devoted his career to expanding the practice of design for the public good. John's first book was The Power of Pro Bono and his writing on design, philanthropy, and fatherhood has appeared in The New York Times, CNN, and numerous other publications. John works as an advisor to an array of foundations and nonprofits around the world and frequently curates and hosts events for TED, The Aspen Institute, and other entities. Deeply committed to diversifying the public stage, he is a founding partner in FRESH, a next-generation speaker’s bureau that represents young women and people of color. For seven years, John served as executive director of nonprofit Public Architecture, building the largest pro bono design program in the world, pledging tens of millions of dollars in donated services annually. Resources: Design for Good: A New Era of Architecture for Everyone by John Cary Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Dec 28, 2017
Updates from Bonn
Topic: Adapting to a changing climate Guest & Organization: Ellie Cohen, President and CEO of Point Blue Conservation Science since 1999, is a leader in catalyzing collaborative, nature-based solutions to climate change, habitat loss and other environmental challenges. She and Point Blue’s 160 scientists work with natural resource managers, ranchers, farmers, local governments and others to reduce the impacts of environmental change and develop climate-smart conservation approaches to benefit wildlife and people. Ellie is the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Observer Organization representative for Point Blue. She is Immediate Past Chair and Steering Committee member of the CA Landscape Conservation Cooperative, an invited member of the SF Bay Area's Resilient by Design Research Advisory Committee, and co-founder of the Bay Area Ecosystems Climate Change Consortium.  Ellie was honored with the Bay Nature 2012 Environmental Hero Award for her climate change leadership. Ellie received her undergraduate degree in Botany with honors at Duke University and an MPP from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government where she was honored with the first Robert F. Kennedy Public Service Award. She speaks regularly on the urgent need to include nature-based approaches in the climate change solutions toolbox. Learn More about Ellie and her work here. Jonathan Parfrey is the Executive Director and Founder of Climate Resolve, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit, founded in 2010, that is dedicated to creating practical solutions to meet the climate challenge while making Southern California more livable and prosperous today and for generations to come by inspiring people at home, at work, and in government to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and local air pollution, as well as prepare for climate change impacts. Climate Resolve is a Los Angeles-based nonprofit, founded in 2010, that is dedicated to creating real, practical solutions to meet the climate challenge while building a better city for Angelenos. Their mission is to make Southern California more livable and prosperous today and for generations to come by inspiring people at home, at work, and in government to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and local air pollution, as well as prepare for climate change impacts. Resources: Infinite Earth Radio Episode 096: Bonn Chance with Alden Meyer of the Union of Concerned Scientists City Climate Planner from the World Bank City Climate Planner Certificate Program Carbon-Free City Handbook (a publication released at COP23 at the UN 2017 climate conference in Bonn, Germany that helps city staff implement climate policies and actions that resolutely place their communities on an aggressive path toward sustainable, low-carbon economies) Point Blue Conservation Science Climate Resolve Local Government Commission  2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Dec 21, 2017
Government Alliance on Race and Equity
Topic: Strategies and tools for addressing racism personally and professionally Guest & Organization: Dwayne S. Marsh serves as Vice President of Institutional and Sectoral Change at the new Race Forward. The new Race Forward is the union of two leading racial justice non-profit organizations: Race Forward and Center for Social Inclusion (CSI). He also serves Deputy Director of Government Alliance on Race & Equity (GARE), a core program of the new Race Forward. Prior to GARE/Race Forward, Marsh was, for six years, a senior advisor in the Office of Economic Resilience (OER) at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. There, he helped advance sustainable planning and development through interagency partnerships, departmental transformation, and funding initiatives managed through OER. He was OER’s principal coordinator for a $250 million grant program and led the development of capacity building resources that reinforced the work of pioneering grantees in 48 states and the District of Columbia. Under his leadership, OER prioritized equity as a foundational principal for its planning and investment initiatives. Marsh brings to GARE/Race Forward his expertise and considerable experience in coalition building for regional equity and leadership development for policy change. He provides technical assistance and capacity building knowledge to equitable development initiatives that address continuing disparities in affordable housing, transportation investment, and environmental justice. Before HUD, Marsh spent a decade at PolicyLink, the national organization committed to economic and social equity. Before PolicyLink, he directed the FAITHS Initiative for eight years at The San Francisco Foundation, building a nationally renowned community development and capacity building program that continues to this day. Resources: Race Forward Government Alliance on Race and Equity Center for Social Inclusion (CSI) Local Government Commission  2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Dec 13, 2017
Rural Economies and Urban Sustainability
Topic: The state of rural regions and economies. Guest & Organization: Steve Frisch is President of Sierra Business Council and one of its founding members. Over the last 20 years, Sierra Business Council has leveraged more than $100 million of investment in the Sierra Nevada and its communities through community and public-private partnerships. Sierra Business Council also manages the Sierra Small Business Development Center focusing on advancing sustainable business practices and linking new and expanding businesses to climate mitigation and adaptation funding. Sierra Business Council pioneers and demonstrates innovative approaches and solutions to increase community vitality, economic prosperity, environmental quality, and social fairness in the Sierra Nevada. In the Sierra Nevada, change and challenge create opportunities. Through innovation, integrity, and respect, Sierra Business Council harnesses these opportunities by implementing projects that model proactive change. Their goal is a diverse, inventive, and sustainable region where the economy is vibrant, the land is thriving, and the communities offer opportunity for all. They act as steward leaders of the region, taking responsibility for the care and responsible management of our place, guided by the triple bottom line that considers the economy, environment, and community simultaneously. Resources: Infinite Earth Radio – Climate Adaptation Series with Steve Frisch and Jonathan Parfrey •  Episode 36 – Part 1 •  Episode 37 – Part 2 •  Episode 38 – Part 3 •  Episode 39 – Part 4 Infinite Earth Radio Episode 100 - The Future of Smart Growth with Matthew Dalbey Sierra Business Council Local Government Commission 2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Dec 07, 2017
The Future of Smart Growth
Topic: Celebrating our 100th episode by kicking off the conversation about the upcoming New Partners for Smart Conference Guest & Organization: Matthew Dalbey is the Director of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Sustainable Communities. The Office of Sustainable Communities (OSC) supports locally led, community-driven efforts to revitalize local economies and attain better environmental and human health outcomes. OSC collaborates with other EPA programs; federal agencies; regional, state, and local governments; and a broad array of nongovernmental and private-sector partners to help communities become stronger, healthier, and more livable. OSC helps to meet communities at their needs by collaborating with other agencies and programs to use federal resources effectively and efficiently and better leverage public and private investment. This work directly supports EPA’s mission of protecting human health and the environment, contributing to clean air, clean water and other important goals in communities all across the country. To help communities learn about and implement development strategies that protect human health and the environment, create economic opportunities, and provide attractive and affordable neighborhoods, the Office of Sustainable Communities: Provides technical assistance in response to community requests: Local Foods, Local Places; Healthy Places for Healthy People; Cool & Connected; Building Blocks; Greening America’s Communities; and Governors’ Institute on Community Design. Produces tools, research, case studies and other information on a variety of topics. Shares examples of community strategies and projects that can be models for other places. Convenes diverse interests to encourage better growth and development. Resources: EPA’s Office of Sustainable Communities EPA's Strategic Plan Local Government Commission 2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Nov 30, 2017
Firestorm
Topic: How wildfires will shape our future Guest & Organization: Edward Struzik is an award-winning writer and photographer. His previous books include Firestorm, Future Arctic, Arctic Icons, and The Big Thaw, among others. A fellow at the Institute for Energy and Environmental Policy at Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada, his numerous accolades include the prestigious Atkinson Fellowship in Public Policy and the Sir Sandford Fleming Medal, awarded for outstanding contributions to the understanding of science. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta. Learn More About Ed   In Firestorm, journalist Edward Struzik visits scorched earth from Alaska to Maine, and introduces the scientists, firefighters, and resource managers making the case for a radically different approach to managing wildfire in the 21st century. Wildfires can no longer be treated as avoidable events because the risk and dangers are becoming too great and costly. Struzik weaves a heart-pumping narrative of science, economics, politics, and human determination and points to the ways that we, and the wilder inhabitants of the forests around our cities and towns, might yet flourish in an age of growing megafires. Resources: “Firestorm: How Wildfire Will Shape Our Future” Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Nov 23, 2017
Street Soccer USA: Transforming Lives and Neighborhoods
Topic: The role of sports in increasing social mobility and improving communities Guest & Organization: Lisa Wrightsman is the Regional Program Manager of Street Soccer USA Sacramento and the Founder and Coach of Sacramento Lady Salamanders. Lisa earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication with a concentration in Digital Video from California State University, Sacramento. She was a member of the University's NCAA Division I Women's Soccer team and currently holds multiple program records as well as recognition as a member of the All-Decade team. After college she played over five years of semi professional soccer for the Elk Grove Pride. Today her passion for soccer is seen in her social entrepreneurship initiatives with Street Soccer USA; a nationwide non-profit that uses soccer to break the cycle of homelessness and domestic abuse. Lisa is the founder and current Director and Coach of Street Soccer USA’s Sacramento Lady Salamanders. She started this program in 2010 and has since seen tremendous results and growth of the program as it has proven to successfully reverse the effects of addiction and domestic violence in 92% of team participants. Street Soccer USA uses this team platform to create a training curriculum of job preparation, life skills, and other specialized services, ultimately connecting participants directly to jobs, education, and housing. Lisa was recognized in 2015, as one of Sacramento Business Journal’s top 40 Under 40 young professionals. She is a Senior Fellow of the Nehemiah Emerging Leader’s Program. Since 2010 Lisa has coached the USA Women’s Street Soccer team at the Homeless World Cup and in 2016 was selected as Women's Coach of the Tournament. Most recently Lisa was selected as a 2016 Change-Maker by TEDx Sacramento where she shared her story of resilience, hope, and how to be a catalyst for change Resources: Interested in supporting Street Soccer USA? Click here to donate! Street Soccer USA Local Government Commission 2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Nov 16, 2017
Reconnecting Planning and Public Health
Topic: Making the connection between planning and public health Guest & Organization: Anna Ricklin, AICP is manager of the American Planning Association's (APA) Planning and Community Health Center, where she oversees applied research and place-based initiatives to advance health-oriented planning practice. She has a background in health impact assessment, active transportation planning, and cross-sector collaboration, as well as recent work in healthy planning metrics and comprehensive planning for health. Anna holds an MHS from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and is based in Washington, DC. The Planning and Community Health Center leads the first nationwide program linking public health and planning practice. Community design directly effects human health. Development patterns, zoning, and land use impact walkability and transportation options, access to services, the availability of healthy foods, and vulnerability to hazards. Planners can help create places that offer choices for everyone to be healthy and safe. APA’s Planning and Community Health Center provides tools and technical support to members so they can integrate health into planning practice at all levels. Areas of focus include active living, healthy eating, and health in all planning policies. They implement their aims through applied research, place-based investment, and education. Resources: American Planning Association’s Planning and Community Health Center Metrics for Planning Healthy Communities Local Government Commission 2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference– February 1-3, 2018
Nov 09, 2017
Bonn Chance
Topic: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change - 2017 COP 23 Meeting Guest & Organization: Alden Meyer is director of strategy and policy for the Union of Concerned Scientists and the director of its Washington, DC, office. He provides general oversight and strategic guidance for the organization’s advocacy on energy, transportation, agriculture, and arms control issues. Mr. Meyer is also the principal advocate for UCS on national and international policy responses to the threat of global climate change. In addition, he works extensively on renewable energy and electricity policy. Mr. Meyer has nearly 40 years of experience in energy and environmental policy at the state and national levels. He has testified before Congress on global warming and energy issues, and has authored numerous articles on climate change, energy policy, and electric utility and nuclear power issues for environmental and general interest publications. He has also served on several federal advisory panels, including the U.S. Secretary of Energy's advisory board. Mr. Meyer is an expert on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change process, and the key design issues that will likely comprise the next global climate agreement, slated to be signed in 2015. Mr. Meyer has attended the climate negotiations since they first started in 1990 and his expertise has helped shape U.S. and UN policies. The Union of Concerned Scientists puts rigorous, independent science to work to solve our planet’s most pressing problems. Joining with citizens across the country, we combine technical analysis and effective advocacy to create innovative, practical solutions for a healthy, safe, and sustainable future. Learn More about Alden and the Union of Concerned Scientists Resources: COP 23 Bonn Climate Action Business Association (CABA) Union of Concerned Scientists
Nov 02, 2017
Energy Democracy
Topic: The Connection Between Race and Energy In This Episode: 01:35  Guest Denise Fairchild is introduced. 02:12  Denise explains what energy democracy is and why it’s important. 05:31  How does energy shape our political system? 08:11  Denise talks about the ownership and distribution of energy. 11:03  Denise touches on how a community ownership of energy would work and gives examples of models. 17:01  Denise tells why production decentralization matters and if distributive production meets all of our needs. 21:22  What is the connection between race and energy? 24:30  Denise describes how confronting racial issues will drive a new energy democracy. 28:29  Denise mentions the parallels between fossil fuel interests and the struggle to end slavery. 30:48  Denise shares where people can go to buy her book. Guest and Organization: Denise Fairchild is president and CEO of Emerald Cities Collaborative, a national nonprofit organization of business, labor, and community groups dedicated to climate resilience strategies that produce environmental, economic, and equity outcomes. She is co-editor of the new book "Energy Democracy: Advancing Equity in Clean Energy Solutions". Take Away Quotes: “It’s interesting that we are really seeing the reason for economic democracy when we look at what’s going on in Puerto Rico right now.  It is the prime example about how the burning of fossil fuel is leading to climate crisis, that’s led to the loss of life and property, showing that the fossil fuel economy, the extractive economy, not only impacted our environment but our economy.” “Our current economy, our dirty energy economy, is also impacting issues of equity.  Dirty energy lifts up the racial inequality that exists in our current capitalist economy.  Those that are most challenged by and vulnerable to the impacts of dirty energy are low-income people.” “Energy democracy’s addressing the challenges of a centralized monopoly over energy where profit matters more than planet and people.” “If you can put the source of energy on your rooftop or in a community, two or three miles from where energy’s going to be used, you’re going to save 20 or 30% more in terms of the cost of transmitting energy.” Resources: Emerald Cities Collaborative "Energy Democracy: Advancing Equity in Clean Energy Solutions" Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP!  Learn more about the APP here, and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Oct 26, 2017
Biking as a Way of Life
Topic: Making Urban Streets More Bicycle and Pedestrian Friendly In This Episode: 01:07  Guest Grace Kyung describes Trailnet. 01:16  Grace shares what motivated her to become a bicycle and pedestrian planner. 02:31  Grace tells what she’s learned and what we need to do to make communities more bikeable and pedestrian friendly. 05:18  Grace explains what traffic calming is. 06:25  Grace states how, at a local level, to start making communities more pedestrian friendly. 10:05  Grace addresses the obstacles to redesigning bicycle- and pedestrian-friendly streets. 14:42  Does St. Louis have a capital improvement plan that tells where the city will invest in infrastructure and when it will happen? 15:41  Grace continues with strategies for making communities more pedestrian friendly. 18:12  Grace tells where people can go to learn more about Trailnet. 18:24  Grace mentions how communities can learn about becoming more pedestrian and bike friendly. Guest and Organization: Grace Kyung is the Special Projects Director at Trailnet, a non-profit improving walking, bicycling, and transit as a way of life. Grace provides technical assistance on how to improve the built environment to increase accessibility for all ages and abilities throughout the state of Missouri. Grace enjoys the challenges and opportunities of using tactical urbanism approaches to engage and educate stakeholders about safer street designs. Grace is interested in using place-based approaches to create healthy equitable communities. Before moving to St. Louis, Grace received a Masters in Public Health and Masters in Urban Planning from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. While a student, Grace ran a successful campaign to bring in a permanent funding source for bicycle-related projects at the university, led social justice campaigns, planned student service trips, and served on a local non-profit board. Grace serves as co-chair on the Healthy Communities Collaborative an interest group of the American Planning Association. She is focused on bridging the connection between public health and urban planning to address transportation and equity concerns. Grace enjoys conversations about how to create livable communities where people come first. Grace is a multi-modal commuter who loves riding her bike to find doughnuts and a good book to read. For more than 25 years, Trailnet has brought together friends, organizations and people from many communities to create positive change in the St. Louis bi-state region by encouraging healthy, active living. Trailnet works to improve the quality of life for our families, neighbors, and communities. Their work and their partnerships directly impact local citizens, schools, businesses, communities, and nonprofit agencies throughout their region. Take Away Quotes: “So with how we’ve built our cities, and especially within the city of St. Louis, our streets are just overbuilt. We just have really wide travel lanes, and it’s just what people have gotten used to, so more people don’t feel comfortable walking or biking outside because it’s not as safe.” “With the paradigm of how things have been, if we’re going to make actual shifts to address what the larger concerns are, we need to start looking at, from a community’s perspective, more of a grassroots level what’s going on with these communities, how are decisions made that the cities are built that way; and if we are trying to promote more walkable or bikeable infrastructure, is that through changing policies or is that how the city funds these sort of projects, and how do we work with the city in creating new structures?”   “In St. Louis, we’ve been having these deeper-level discussions of talking about ways that we can work with the community to understand even what they want in the first place and seeing how we can bring them the resources in order to walk or bike places.” “It’s shown [nationally] that 12% of fatal crashes involve people wa...
Oct 19, 2017
Inclusive Creative Place Making
Topic: Transforming a Community Through the Power of Art In This Episode: 01:44  Guests Linda Steele and Roseann Weiss are introduced. 02:44  Vernice shares her interest in place-making strategies through art and artistry. 03:39  Roseann tells of the work that is happening in St. Louis. 04:59  Linda tells of the work that is happening in Memphis. 07:24  Linda shares her background. 09:02  Roseann shares her background. 11:32  Linda gives her thoughts on what her role is in building stronger, more vibrant communities. 17:28  Roseann gives her thoughts regarding art and culture being the component that connects people in St. Louis. 22:12 Roseann states if her work could be coupled with the urban vitality and ecology initiative in the Wells-Goodfellow community. 26:01  Linda talks about whether reclaiming the arts, culture and blues-jazz-gospel history in Memphis is a driver for revitalization. 28:27  Vernice shares her thoughts on the importance of capturing the history of the physical place where people live. 29:27  Linda and Roseann provide the one policy that they would advocate for to advance community revitalization. 29:49  Roseann states what an individual can do to contribute to the work that she’s doing. 30:37  Linda states what an individual can do to contribute to the work that she’s doing. 31:05  Linda shares what art and culture placemaking looks like 30 years from now. 31:35  Roseann shares what art and culture placemaking looks like 30 years from now. 32:27  Roseann identifies where listeners can go for more information. 32:40  Linda identifies where listeners can go for more information. Guest and Organization: Roseann Weiss is the Director of Artist and Community Initiatives for the Regional Arts Commission. The Regional Arts Commission leads, strengthens, and gives voice to a creative community where every citizen can be proud to live, work, and play in a world-class region. In short, we are proud of our St. Louis cultural identity and want to do whatever we can to grow, sustain, and promote that identity in the future. We are at the forefront of helping transform St. Louis into a more vibrant, creative, and economically thriving community through the arts – and want everyone to know just how special the creative community is within the region.   Linda Steele is Founder & CEO of ArtUp, an innovative startup based in Memphis, Tennessee that uses arts, culture and design strategies to redevelop and revitalize disinvested communities. Linda spent 3 years incubating the work of ArtUp at local arts agency and United Arts Fund, ArtsMemphis including launching the game changing Fellows Program which has received the Robert E. Gard award from Americans for the Arts and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. Linda has worked in various arts and cultural organizations including performing arts center, museums, and arts education organizations. Linda is a graduate of Amherst College where she has served as a Wade Fellow and Harvard University.   Take Away Quotes: “About 20 years ago, we started something called the Community Arts Training Institute…we believe that it should be cross-sector, and that has been the beauty at the Regional Arts Commission of the CAT Institute in that it’s been cross-sector. So, we train not only artists of all disciplines, but we train their community partners as well—so, social workers, community activists, teachers, politicians, have all gone through the CAT Institute, and we know have 350 alumni working within our community.”—Roseann “Memphis is considered the poorest major city in the nation, and also, it has one of the poorest, if not poorest, zip codes in the nation.  So there’s a lot of segregation in terms of not only racial and cultural segregation but certainly socioeconomic as well.”—Linda “I think it’s a very bold statement to say that arts and culture can actually address issues and challenges such as poverty,
Oct 12, 2017
WE ACT For Environmental Justice
Topic: Looking at the Past, Present, and Future of the Environmental Justice Movement In This Episode: 02:06  Guest Peggy Shepard is introduced. 02:24  Peggy shares of her experience as a journalist. 06:34  Peggy relates how she made the transition from being in a political space to being in the environmental justice space. 08:25  Peggy gives her response to those who say that environmental and climate justice are new concepts. 09:30  Peggy states what the biggest environmental justice threats were in 1991 and what the threats are now. 10:25  Peggy informs us how racism is intertwined with environmental injustice. 12:22  Peggy tells if there has been progress in lessening the targeting and the disproportionate impact on populations of people of color from environmental threats. 13:53  Peggy describes the Northern Manhattan Climate Action Plan. 17:28  Peggy says if it was easier to get people’s attention about climate resilience issues after living through Superstorm Sandy. 19:18  Peggy identifies the political and social objectives that WE ACT is trying to accomplish. 23:47  Peggy elaborates on the power of speaking for ourselves. Guest and Organization: Peggy Shepard is co-founder and executive director of WE ACT For Environmental Justice and has a long history of organizing and engaging Northern Manhattan residents in community-based planning and campaigns to address environmental protection and environmental health policy locally and nationally. She has successfully combined grassroots organizing, environmental advocacy, and environmental health community-based participatory research to become a national leader in advancing environmental policy and the perspective of environmental justice in urban communities — to ensure that the right to a clean, healthy and sustainable environment extends to all. Her work has received broad recognition: the Jane Jacobs Medal from the Rockefeller Foundation for Lifetime Achievement, the 10th Annual Heinz Award For the Environment, the Dean’s Distinguished Service Award from the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, and an Honorary Sc.D from Smith College. Take Away Quotes: “That report [Toxic Waste and Race] has been reconfirmed around this country in so many other research studies. That race is the primary predictor of where a toxic waste facility is and that income is the secondary predictor.” “People really want energy security.  They want to feel that they can help reduce greenhouse gasses by using alternative energy sources but also secure their energy future by being able to have a little more autonomy over energy—how they use it and what kind of energy they use.” “We are working from the ground up, and we know that community organizing is essential but that you can’t really organize a community to be empowered and advocate on their own without information.  So we have a…nine-week environmental health and leadership training program that we put all of our members through…We’re making sure that they are informed about air pollution, water quality, children’s environmental health, toxics, climate change, energy, the whole host of issues that evolve to have importance at varying times in communities.” Resources: Island Press Urban Resilience Project WE ACT For Environmental Justice People Power: How Residents of Northern Manhattan are Creating an Energy Revolution Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here  and find it on Google Play and Apple App Store!
Oct 05, 2017
Disaster Recovery Activist
Topic: Disaster Preparedness, Recovery, and Resiliency for Smaller and Rural Communities In This Episode: 01:37  Guest Laura Clemons is introduced. 01:44  Laura tells how she became interested in community resiliency and disaster work. 02:50  Laura explains the difference between an advocate and an activist. 04:24  Laura describes how individuals may be able to help after a disaster. 07:36  Laura talks about how to mobilize people, before disaster hits, to develop a more resilient community. 09:23  Laura shares how to communicate to people that they have the ability to create networks of resiliency. 14:13  Laura states where people can go to learn about her diagnostic tool and her work. 18:59  Laura expresses how to intervene in the division between urban and rural. Co-Host: Kif Scheuer is the Climate Change Program Director at the Local Government Commission (LGC). Kif is a solution-oriented sustainability professional with a strong history of engaging diverse audiences in real-world climate protection efforts through innovative, market-focused research and analysis, creative program design, effective project implementation, and compelling public advocacy and education. In 2013 Kif organized the first California Adaptation Forum, which attracted over 800 attendees and served to kick start the statewide conversation on adaptation. Kif led the development and growth of one of the LGC’s key coalitions – the Alliance of Regional Collaboratives for Climate Adaptation, a statewide network focused on addressing adaptation at the regional scale. Guest and Organization: Laura Clemons is the founder and CEO of Collaborative Communities Management Company, LLC, (CCMC) and serves as the company’s head project team leader. Ms. Clemons is a LEED Accredited Professional with a specialty designation in Building Design and Construction and has been working in the sustainable built environment since 2008. She transitioned into disaster recovery after the devastating tornados of April 2011 and has combined her diverse background into being a foremost expert on resiliency.    She has been working with the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) since 2014 on a comprehensive approach to Hurricane Sandy recovery that is designed to protect over 350 acres of Sandy damaged NYCHA property from increasing climate change risks including storm surge, sea level rise and rain inundation. Her strategy for stormwater management is that it be achieved through creative land re-engineering to maximize perviousness and drainage while embracing Placemaking. Currently she is invested in helping flood ravaged communities across Texas and Louisiana rebuild in a safer, more sustainable way.   CCMC is based in Austin, Texas but works with clients across the U.S. They provide a range of local constituencies with logistical support for environmentally sustainable and socially conscientious community revitalization in both pre- and post-disaster scenarios. CCMC serves in both a consultative and project management role ensuring that all project participants operate on budget and schedule and that the client gets a project with multiple co-benefits. CCMC was created because of the widely acknowledged need for hands-on, focused coordination of various groups involved in creating projects and programs that benefit communities. They approach holistic resiliency solutions through partnership building and collaboration. They have a sensitivity to diversity and inclusion with special attention paid to the most vulnerable populations. Take Away Quotes: “What I really focus on when I talk to people—whether it’s at conferences or it’s with clients that I meet with in a post-disaster situation or just neighborhoods that want to try and be better—it’s about personal activism and figuring out how you can unleash your inner activist.  Find the things in the world that you can change and figure out who the other people are that feel the same way th...
Sep 28, 2017
Disaster Preparedness and Recovery
Topic: It’s “Just” Rain: Weather Events Impacting Rural Communities In This Episode: 02:41  Laura explains the impacts of extreme weather on smaller rural communities. 05:48  Laura talks about some of the resources available to help small communities recover from a weather event. 08:49  Laura describes what a disaster declaration is. 10:30  Is the average number of federal disaster declarations increasing? 14:36  Laura shares some strategies that communities can use when a disaster hits. 19:35  How should weather events be integrated into planning? 22:46  How can communities learn about what they should do to be prepared? Co-Host: Kif Scheuer is the Climate Change Program Director at the Local Government Commission (LGC). Kif is a solution-oriented sustainability professional with a strong history of engaging diverse audiences in real-world climate protection efforts through innovative, market-focused research and analysis, creative program design, effective project implementation, and compelling public advocacy and education. In 2013 Kif organized the first California Adaptation Forum, which attracted over 800 attendees and served to kick start the statewide conversation on adaptation. Kif led the development and growth of one of the LGC’s key coalitions – the Alliance of Regional Collaboratives for Climate Adaptation, a statewide network focused on addressing adaptation at the regional scale. Guest and Organization: Laura Clemons is the founder and CEO of Collaborative Communities Management Company, LLC, (CCMC) and serves as the company’s head project team leader. Ms. Clemons is a LEED Accredited Professional with a specialty designation in Building Design and Construction and has been working in the sustainable built environment since 2008. She transitioned into disaster recovery after the devastating tornados of April 2011 and has combined her diverse background into being a foremost expert on resiliency.    She has been working with the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) since 2014 on a comprehensive approach to Hurricane Sandy recovery that is designed to protect over 350 acres of Sandy damaged NYCHA property from increasing climate change risks including storm surge, sea level rise and rain inundation. Her strategy for stormwater management is that it be achieved through creative land re-engineering to maximize perviousness and drainage while embracing Placemaking. Currently she is invested in helping flood ravaged communities across Texas and Louisiana rebuild in a safer, more sustainable way.   CCMC is based in Austin, Texas but works with clients across the U.S. They provide a range of local constituencies with logistical support for environmentally sustainable and socially conscientious community revitalization in both pre- and post-disaster scenarios. CCMC serves in both a consultative and project management role ensuring that all project participants operate on budget and schedule and that the client gets a project with multiple co-benefits. CCMC was created because of the widely acknowledged need for hands-on, focused coordination of various groups involved in creating projects and programs that benefit communities. They approach holistic resiliency solutions through partnership building and collaboration. They have a sensitivity to diversity and inclusion with special attention paid to the most vulnerable populations. Take Away Quotes: “There’s a lot of philosophical discussion about climate change and climate adaptation, and when I go to conferences, I see a lot of people talking about Katrina and Sandy.  It is very disappointing to me because I work in disaster recovery, and I see the events that are happening: we’re averaging a federal declaration about one a week.  And when I poll most audiences and ask people, how often do you think we are having a disaster, they say, like, one a year, maybe two a year.” “We’ve done a good job in this country of building dams.
Sep 21, 2017
California Leading the Nation on Carbon Legislation
Topic: California’s Cap-and-Trade Program In This Episode: 01:16  Guest Arjun Patney is introduced. 02:11  Arjun describes his work at the American Carbon Registry. 04:28  Arjun explains how the California carbon market works. 07:26  Arjun talks about what was exempt from the market. 08:42  Since California is a large exporter of agricultural product, did that have a part in the decision making? 09:22  Arjun gives his thoughts on why the agricultural sector is less regulated than the industrial sector. 09:56  Arjun talks about why there’s been less-than-expected revenue for various programs. 12:37  How can cap-and-trade legislation become a bipartisan issue? 15:29  Arjun states what was done in this legislation to address concerns about people who might bear burdens disproportionately. 17:46  Arjun touches on the future of carbon market legislation.   Co-Host: Michael Green is the Executive Director of the Climate Action Business Association (CABA). He is also co-host here on Infinite Earth Radio. Michael is a seasoned advocate for climate policy and environmental action and has played strategic roles in several of the largest national, as well as international campaigns dedicated to fighting climate change. Since 2012, he has served as a representative to the United Nations focusing on international climate science and policy. As an activist, he has played strategic roles in several of the largest national, as well as international campaigns dedicated to fighting climate change. In his role at CABA, Michael manages staff and oversees the development of all program areas. He sits on the Board of Boston area non-profits as well as a policy advisor to national business associations on topics ranging from energy policy to climate adaptation. Michael is a Northeastern University graduate with degrees in international affairs and environmental studies, course work at the University of Edinburgh’s MSc Program in Environmental Protection and Management and Harvard Business School’s CORe Program. Climate Action Business Association (CABA) is a membership-based organization in Boston, Massachusetts, that helps businesses take targeted action on climate change. We provide our member businesses with the resources and tools needed to work within their business on sustainability efforts, political advocacy and building a community of shared values. Guest and Organization: Arjun Patney is the Policy Director of Winrock’s American Carbon Registry, which engages with regulators in California and other jurisdictions to help ensure that market-based climate change mitigation programs address the full range of emissions reduction opportunities. In this way, he advances greenhouse gas mitigation that delivers economic opportunities as well as environmental and social benefits. Patney’s diverse experience in the environmental field spans technical, policy and business spheres. Practical sustainability solutions have been the common thread of his work in the U.S. and Asia, whether he was negotiating carbon credit deals, implementing environmental management systems, engineering spill controls, or helping foreign clean tech companies enter Asian markets. Patney previously established the U.S. carbon trading desk at the multinational corporation Cargill and subsequently worked with USAID to advance international forest carbon markets. He received a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, an M.S. in environmental management and policy from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and an M.B.A. from Columbia Business School. Winrock has long recognized the threat posed by climate change. The American Carbon Registry (ACR), founded in 1996 and operated by Winrock, is dedicated to the belief that markets are the most effective tools to tackle climate change. As such, ACR has developed transparent and science-based methodologies to incentivize carbon reductions in agriculture,
Sep 14, 2017
Green Stormwater Management
Topic: Incorporating Green Infrastructure into Street Design In This Episode: 01:57  Guest Corinne Kisner is introduced. 02:10  Corinne shares about the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO). 02:33  Mike tells about Island Press and NACTO’s book, “The Urban Street Stormwater Guide”. 03:17  Corinne explains why sustainable stormwater management matters and why transportation officials should be concerned about stormwater management. 05:12  Corinne gives the benefits of using green stormwater infrastructure in street design. 06:49  Corinne comments on green stormwater systems making cities more desirable and more attractive places to live. 08:30  Corinne gives the characteristics of successful city projects. 11:03  Corinne shares the elements that help make green infrastructure work within a street design. 13 :07  Corinne states the challenges that cities face in stormwater street design. 14:02  What should be kept in mind when designing or implementing a stormwater street project? 15:08  Corinne talks about underserved communities using green infrastructure as a community-building, community-investment strategy. 17:16  Corinne shares whether there is a role for green stormwater infrastructure in areas that have a drier climate. 17:47  How can green infrastructure projects positively change a city’s growth and development? 19:06  Is green infrastructure more or less expensive than traditional infrastructure approaches? 20:35  Is "The Urban Street Stormwater Guide" currently available, and where can people go to buy the book? 21:25  Corinne discusses what needs to happen next to get more cities to implement green infrastructure as part of their normal course of business. Guest and Organization: Corinne Kisner is the Director of Programs at the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO). In this role, she facilitates networks of peer cities working to build safe, sustainable transportation systems and equitable, active cities through better street design and transportation policy. Corinne directs the annual Designing Cities conference and facilitates city policy initiatives on issues such as Vision Zero, planning for automated vehicles, and integrating green stormwater infrastructure into multi-modal street design. Corinne also oversees NACTO’s communications, external partnerships, and leadership development program for city transportation officials. NACTO’s mission is to build cities as places for people, with safe, sustainable, accessible and equitable transportation choices that support a strong economy and vibrant quality of life. Follow Corinne and NACTO on Twitter Take Away Quotes: “NACTO is an association of 55 member cities and transit agencies across North America, formed to help exchange best practices and ideas in city transportation and raise the bar nationally to what city transportation can do in cities.” “We’ve been seeing cities across the country really thinking critically about the design of streets and how that plays in to city goals for sustainability and equity and access and really livable, vibrant cities.” “The network of cities that we work with are starting to think critically, too, about how streets play a role in the stormwater infrastructure, in the stormwater network within the city.  Most streets are very impervious, meaning that water can’t absorb through the concrete or the asphalt into the ground, and so you just get enormous volumes of stormwater runoff running across streets and into storm drains.  That really separates water from the natural cycle and causes water pollution and is very expensive to treat and manage.” Resources: National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) Urban Street Stormwater Guide NACTO Overview of the Urban Street Stormwater Guide Island Press Urban Resilience Project Download the Island Press APP! Learn more about the APP here and find it on Google Play and App...
Sep 07, 2017
Equitable Civic Engagement
Topic: National Engagement Starts with Local Engagement In This Episode: 01:18  Guest Mindy Romero is introduced. 02:14  Mindy shares if there’s a resurgence of civic engagement. 05:52  Mindy talks about whether there’s an opportunity to translate national engagement to local level engagement. 08:48  Mindy speaks about building trust with communities with local policymakers that aren’t demographically reflective. 12:26  Mindy shares if she’s seen strategies where communities have attempted to create more accessible pathways. 17:10  Mindy gives her thoughts on how trust plays into voter turnout and if there are strategies to increase voter turnout. 22:07  Mindy addresses how to measure the quality of the engagement. 27:08  Do events like what happened in Charlottesville make us stronger? 30:06  Mindy provides where listeners can find out more about her work. Co-Host: Kate Meis joins the Infinite Earth Radio as the co-host for this episode. Kate Meis is the Executive Director of the Local Government Commission (LGC). Kate is a champion for local governments; a recognized leader in local climate change adaptation, mitigation and clean energy efforts; and an ardent coalition builder. She obtained a Masters of Science degree in Community and Regional Development from the University of California, Davis, and has a Sociology Bachelor’s degree from California State University, Sonoma. Guest & Organization: Mindy Romero, Ph.D. is the founder and director of the UC Davis California Civic Engagement Project (CCEP).  Romero is a political sociologist and holds a B.A. in Political Science and Sociology, as well as an M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from UC Davis.  Her research focuses on political behavior and race/ethnicity, and seeks to explain patterns of political underrepresentation.    Romero has been invited to speak about civic engagement and political rights in numerous venues, testifying before the National Commission on Voting Rights and the California Legislature, among others.  Her research has been cited in major news outlets, including The New York Times, Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Sacramento Bee, Politico and the Huffington Post.  She has also been a frequent guest on National Public Radio, Capital Public Radio, and several other NPR-affiliated stations in California.  She is a regular op-ed contributor to the Sacramento Bee.    Romero works with a wide array of policymakers, elected officials, voter education groups and community advocates to strengthen political participation and representation.  To this end, she has served on a number of boards and commissions.  She is currently a member of the Public Policy Institute Statewide Survey Advisory Committee, President of the Board of the non-profit organization, Mutual Housing California, and Vice-Chair of the Social Services Commission for the City of Davis. The California Civic Engagement Project (CCEP) is a non-partisan civic engagement research and outreach initiative for the state of California and the U.S. Founded and directed by Mindy Romero, it is housed at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change. The CCEP provides data and analysis to inform public dialogue about representative governance. We believe that inclusive civic engagement can help overcome disparities in social and economic well-being, and can improve health, education and employment outcomes for all Californians. The CCEP has become a go-to source for electoral and civic engagement research, including the examination of nationally relevant election reforms such as automatic voter registration, online voter registration and vote centers. Legislators, public agencies, advocates, researchers, media (state and national) and community leaders use its pioneering research to track disparities and opportunities in civic participation by place and population. Take Away Quotes: “I think it’s important, no matter what the numbers actually look like,
Aug 31, 2017
Ethnodrama and Youth Leadership
Topic: Inviting People to Share Their Stories In This Episode: 01:26  Guests Sahdiyah Simpson and Sarah Hobson are introduced. 01:39  Sarah describes Community Allies, ethnodrama, and the STL Youth Smart Growth Leaders program. 04:40  Sahdiyah shares her experience with the STL Youth Smart Growth Leaders program. 05:59  Sahdiyah states what her topic was. 06:19  Sarah explains the mechanics of the program. 07:38  Sahdiyah talks about the time commitment required for the program. 08:47  Sarah provides how the program makes difficult conversations easier to have. 10:49  Sahdiyah gives her thoughts about the drama part of the program. 12:00  Are the drama performances used as a tool to help people understand what those in the program learned? 14:12  Sahdiyah tells about her school. 15:09  Why would this program be valuable in schools or communities that aren’t doing something like this? 18:18  Sarah states how people can learn more about her work. Guest and Organization: Dr. Sarah Hobson, founder and President of Community Allies, LLC. received her Ph.D. in Reading, Writing, and Literacy from the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. She served as an Assistant Professor in Adolescence English Education at The State University of New York at Cortland where she taught courses in language acquisition, grammar, the teaching of writing, and digital literacies. She is currently teaching literacy assessment at the University of Missouri St. Louis. Educational institutions are products of systemic policies that for years have contributed to various discriminatory practices that affect youth and communities similarly and differently. Dr. Hobson’s ethnodramatic programming, researched for over 10 years, helps youth acquire sophisticated understandings of societal processes that hinder progress. Throughout the programming, youth gain communication skills that help them begin to interrupt these practices as they learn where and how they can advocate for themselves and others. Schools and communities in turn access new ways of learning from youth the ethical complexities they have inherited. As students use their research to teach others, administrators, teachers, parents, and communities access much-needed healing.Dr. Hobson’s ethnodrama programs are multi-faceted. They are the result of years of teaching and research and must be implemented with multi-dimensional educational knowledge and care. They require institutional support, staff support, careful collaborative research and documentation, and constant reflection and interrogation. When implemented with the right support and investment, they help transform institutionalized cultures, opening up new possibilities for teaching and learning that expand youth, teacher, and administrator agency and advocacy. Community Allies is available to school districts, educational leaders, administrators, teachers, parents, and students for short or long-term mentoring of educators in culturally relevant, student-centered curriculum enrichment. Our mentoring comes in a variety of formats primarily focused in two areas: professional development for administrators and teachers and after-school programs for students. We help you integrate student-centered real-world research into any grade, school-wide inquiry, or subject area.  We help you increase student retention, academic and college and career success through dynamic, real-world literacy learning opportunities. Take Away Quotes: “The mission of Community Allies is to bring people together across the county and the city…as part of that program, I’ve done after-school programs focused on ethnodrama, which is a program around which students become youth leaders by collecting a variety of stories and using those stories to open power-packed conversations in their communities about issues that are really pertinent to their lives.”—Sarah “The program is about…us talking about what we would like to...
Aug 24, 2017
Reimagining Retail
Topic: Reusing and Revitalizing Retail Spaces In This Episode: 02:57  Guest Michele Reeves is introduced. 04:03  Michele talks about the impact she’s seeing from the decline of retail. 06:52  Michele shares her thoughts about what to do with vacant retail spaces and what some of the obstacles are. 10:48  Michele addresses huge parking lots. 13:32  Michele expresses her thoughts regarding retail space based on sales tax revenue rather than need, and market studies. 18:16  Michele describes strategies to make community corridors a destination. 21:56  Michele shares what local businesses can do to have a more dynamic experience that can compete or complement e-commerce offerings. 28:54  Michele states how people can get in touch with her and her firm, Civilis Consultants. Co-host: Kate Meis joins the Infinite Earth Radio as the co-host for this episode. Kate Meis is the Executive Director of the Local Government Commission (LGC). Kate is a champion for local governments; a recognized leader in local climate change adaptation, mitigation and clean energy efforts; and an ardent coalition builder. She obtained a Masters of Science degree in Community and Regional Development from the University of California, Davis, and has a Sociology Bachelor’s degree from California State University, Sonoma. Guest and Organization: Michele E. Reeves is an urban strategist with significant private sector experience revitalizing districts.  Her qualifications, derived from over 16 years of work in various facets of renewal, include facilitating public/private partnerships, marketing unknown or undesirable districts, pre-development consulting, siting manufacturing facilities, strategizing acquisitions and development with private sector investors, and creating retail leasing plans. Michele founded Civilis Consultants to assist mixed-use districts, small businesses, property owners, and public sector organizations to recognize and leverage their strengths, identify and accomplish economic development goals, and craft their unique stories to create compelling, multi-faceted brands. Michele has a bachelors degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Follow Michele on Twitter Take Away Quotes: “It’s kind of funny.  Even that phrase — ‘decline of retail’ — I would call it sort of a change in retail.  And I think one of the things I would just say fundamentally about retail — there’s kind of a saying we have inside retail that retail is about reinvention, and that’s always true.  Retail is always changing, and it’s always finding new avenues and expression for itself.”   “I think the biggest impact that these changes in retail are having is that it’s leaving us — it’s a retail problem and a real estate problem because one of the biggest things it’s doing is leaving us with these really challenging land-use issues and a lot of vacant buildings that are, in some cases, difficult to reuse.” “A lot of times the biggest obstacle to reusing these spaces as mixes of different kinds of space, whether it’s church space — which is another common reuse of old Walmarts or Kmarts — or whether it’s manufacturing or light manufacturing, or wholesale, or Internet sales and distributorship, is mostly the zoning often stops these spaces from being something else.” “Everything that you do that’s brick and mortar, everything that is in person is really going to have to have fundamental elements of a really positive experience, expertise and knowledge, and service that you can’t get through the online experience.” Resources: CIVILIS Consultants Local Government Commission CivicSpark Program 2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference – February 1-3, 2018
Aug 17, 2017
Building Communities for an Aging Population
Topic: Planning and Creating Age-Friendly Communities In This Episode: 00:57  Co-host Paul Zykofsky and guests Kathy Sykes and Bill Armbruster are introduced. 01:24  Kathy shares why she’s interested in the field of aging and public health. 01:47  Bill discusses why he’s interested in the field of aging and public health. 02:56  Why is planning for an aging population so important? 04:43  What can we learn from the change in how communities have developed and from the past generation? 06:57  Kathy states what the USEPA’s interest is in this issue of an aging population. 07:49  What are some aspects of the issue of rural versus urban communities? 10:48  Does AARP or the USEPA have a guide for communities on how to think about, and what they should be doing, in terms of planning for an aging population? 14:05  Are there examples of places that have embraced planning for an aging population? 17:07  How does one get started in planning an age-friendly community? 20:36  How much could be saved in seniors’ health costs if age-friendly communities were created?   Co-host: Paul Zykofsky directs the Local Government Commission’s (LGC) programs related to land use and transportation planning, community design, and health and the built environment. In the past 20 years, he has worked with over 300 communities to improve conditions for infill development, walking, bicycling, and transit. Mr. Zykofsky provides technical assistance to communities throughout the nation on issues related to smart growth, infill development, transit-oriented development, street and sidewalk design, health and the built environment, and public participation in the planning process. Mr. Zykofsky is a co-author of Building Livable Communities: A Policymaker’s Guide to Transit Oriented Development and Emergency Response: Traffic Calming and Traditional Neighborhood Streets. In 2006, Mr. Zykofsky co-wrote (with Dan Burden of Walkable Communities) the section on “walkability” in the American Planning Association’s Planning and Urban Design Standards. Guests and Organizations: Bill Armbruster manages the AARP Network of Age-Friendly Communities, which is a program within AARP Livable Communities. He has been with AARP since 2000, joining as an associate state director for AARP New York. In that role he served the upstate and western region of the Empire State and was responsible for the development, implementation and assessment for community outreach programming. That body of work included livable and age-friendly communities initiatives, partner development and grassroots volunteer organizing for a 30 county region both near and far from his Rochester home base. In addition to his work at AARP, Bill has extensive experience in corporate wellness programs, occupational rehabilitation and ergonomics, pain treatment and physical therapy. Kathy Sykes is Senior Advisor for Aging and Public Health at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Since 1983, Kathy has held policy positions in the U.S. Senate and Congress and in federal agencies: U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, with Congressman Obey and at the NIOSH within CDC and for almost 20 years at the Environmental Protection Agency, where she developed the Aging Initiative that focused on environmental health issues and the built environment. She also serves on Washington, D.C.'s the Mayor's Age-Friendly Task Force. She is a fellow of the GSA and currently Chair of the Social Research Policy and Practice Section. Ms. Sykes holds a master's degree in Public Policy and Administration and a certificate in Health Services Administration from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Take Away Quotes: “We’ve got a huge demographic shift that’s occurring right now.  I’m part of the baby boomers, and there’s an awful lot of us, and our population over 65 will double by the year 2050.”—Kathy “I think a lot of communities aren’t ready.  A lot of communities plan for the 35-year-old,
Aug 10, 2017
Bottom Up Water Solutions
Topic: Fresh Water, Climate Change, and Community Resilience In This Episode: 02:10  Guest Rebecca Wodder is introduced. 03:19  Rebecca expresses how the first Earth Day impacted her life and career path. 05:06  Rebecca tells if fresh water has always been the focus of her environmental career. 05:48  Rebecca talks about how water affects climate change. 09:18  Rebecca explains the degree to which our fresh-water supply is being threatened. 11:28  Rebecca describes the Clean Water Rule. 14:41  Rebecca shares which industries are most impacted by the 2015 Clean Water Rule. 16:26  Rebecca addresses natural capital and social capital. 18:33  Rebecca speaks about New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. 21:39  Rebecca states where people can learn more about her work (check out the Resources section below!). 23:10  Rebecca mentions the wisdom she would pass along to her younger self on Earth Day 1970. 25:52  Rebecca talks about whether she’s more hopeful now than she was in the past. Guest and Organization: Rebecca Wodder is a nationally known environmental leader whose conservation career began with the first Earth Day. As president of the national advocacy organization, American Rivers, from 1995 to 2011, she led the development of community-based solutions to freshwater challenges. From 2011 to 2013, she served as Senior Advisor to the Secretary of the Interior. Previously, Rebecca was Vice President at The Wilderness Society, and Legislative Assistant to Senator Gaylord Nelson. In 2010, she was named a Top 25 Outstanding Conservationists by Outdoor Life Magazine. In 2014, she received the James Compton Award from River Network. In her writing and speaking, Rebecca explores how communities can enhance their resilience to climate impacts via sustainable, equitable approaches to rivers and freshwater resources.  She serves on the boards of River Network, the Potomac Conservancy, and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Take Away Quotes: “When the first Earth Day came along…my high school chemistry teacher asked if I would organize this event for the community.  We really didn’t know what it was supposed to be about, but we knew it was intended to engage people and help them recognize the environmental issues that were so prominent at the time…The first Earth Day was just a great event in my life because it showed me how I could  combine my passion for making a difference with my academic interests in science and biology.” “Water is the way that we experience weather, and weather is the way we experience climate change in our daily lives.” “Ultimately, the reason that we have a blue planet, the reason there is life on this planet is because of water.  It is the fundamental reason for life.”    “One of the things that is so important about small streams is that they are the head waters, they are the sources of our drinking water, and something like one-third of all Americans get their drinking water—it starts with these small streams.” Resources: Fight the attempt to kill the Clean Water Rule The Community Resilience Reader: Essential Resources for an Era of Upheaval  Resilience Matters: Forging a Greener, Fairer Future for All  (Free e-book!) River Network Island Press Urban Resilience Project
Aug 03, 2017
Market-Driven Water Conservation – AquaShares
Topic: Innovative Solutions for Resilient Water Management In This Episode: 02:43  Guest James Workman is introduced. 03:42  James talks about his book and what motivated him to travel to Africa. 07:13  James shares why he created programming based on what he saw in Africa. 08:50  James describes AquaShares. 11:51  What measures are people taking to reduce their water use? 13:37  James talks about AquaShares’ partners and the incentives for homeowners. 16:43  How many people have signed on to participate in the program? 19:07  James shares what success looks like for this program and for water resilience in general. 23:05  James states where people can go to learn more about AquaShares. Guest and Organization: James Workman creates conservation markets for water and marine life. He wrote the award-winning Heart of Dryness: How the Last Bushmen Can Help Us Endure the Coming Age of Permanent Drought, and is co-author with Amanda Leland of the forthcoming Sea Change: How Fishermen Are Irreversibly Restoring Life Offshore – and On. Workman studied at Yale & Oxford, taught at Wesleyan & Whitman, but his real education came blowing up dams, releasing wolves, restoring wildfires, guiding safaris, smuggling water to dissidents, breaking down in Africa's Kalahari Desert, and becoming a dad. An investigative journalist, he served as White House appointee to U.S. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, later joining the World Commission on Dams under Nelson Mandela. In San Francisco, he writes for Environmental Defense Fund, edits the International Water Association’s magazine, The Source, and is founder of AquaShares Inc., the world’s first online water savings market. Follow James Workman on Twitter Take Away Quotes: “A lot of problems, especially environmental problems, can be solved by regulation alone. You just say, okay, that factory over there is pouring its waste, its sewage, its pollution into the air, into the water; we’ve got to just put a cap on that, lock that. But what do you do with the 50,000 people who are all competing with each other for the same resource? And that’s the tragedy that…makes all, to me, conservation issues interesting.” “The approach of AquaShares is to give people a sense that they’re not just renting access to as much water as they want, as cheap as they want, but they have an ownership stake, that they’re stewards of that water that they save, and that they can profit from saving water, not just feel good about it.” “One of the biggest water users in every city is the city itself. There’s lots of water loss, in some cases, 10, 20, 30 percent, and while, for more than a decade or more, utilities have been pointing a finger at families and firms, saying, ‘You should save water, you should save water,’ utilities themselves had real no incentive to spend $100,000 to systematically find and fix their leaks, manage their water pressure, and address that, because it might only save a few thousand dollars’ worth of water.” “It’s a crazy business model for me, but success is when we go out of business; there’s no need for AquaShares anymore because everyone is autonomous, they’re using the bare-minimum water, there’s nothing left to trade, there’s no more water that can go towards a higher-value use.” Resources: AquaShares Smart Markets 2018 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference – February 1-3, 2018
Jul 27, 2017
Local Leadership
Topic: Creating Successful Communities Through Positive and Determined Leadership In This Episode: 02:36 Guest Mayor Rey Leon is introduced. 02:56 Mayor Leon describes his community. 05:54 Mayor Leon tells how long he’s been mayor. 07:16 Mayor Leon conveys what he would like to accomplish during his time as mayor. 19:20 Mayor Leon gives the status of three projects. 21:38 Mayor Leon identifies some of the challenges he faces as a mayor in a small community. Guest and Organization: Rey Leon is the Mayor of Huron, California. He was born in Fresno and raised in the Huron area.  Mr. León is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley where he obtained a BA in Chicano Studies with an emphasis in public health.  He is the founder and Executive Director of the San Joaquin Valley Latino Environmental Advancement & Policy Project (Valley LEAP), a Latino Valley based environmental non-profit organization.  Mr. León is based in Fresno for the Valley and focuses on environmental and transportation justice, air quality, climate change, energy, green jobs and community development.  Mr. Leon has been working to ensure that environmental justice principles are advanced in the regions institutions and culture. Rey is founder of the San Joaquin Valley Regional Green Jobs Coalition which counts on 300+ members and co-founder of the Central Valley Air Quality Coalition.  As Co-chair of CVAQ, Leon helped advance some of the greatest victories for air quality in the Valley including the ending of agriculture industry’s exemption from the clean air act and the placement of two public members, a doctor and a scientist, onto the region’s air pollution control district. Mr. León sits on various boards and committees including the Center on Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies (CEERT) and member of the California Air Resources Board Environmental Justice AB 32 Advisory Committee.   Mr. León has been organizing in the Valley for the past twenty years and for the past eleven years has been advocating and successfully building coalitions, community capacity, advancing public policy; placement of the first PM 2.5 air quality monitor on the West Side of the Valley, systems change; developing the first ever environmental justice strategy and committees for both the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District and the Fresno County Council of Governments. Most recently, Valley LEAP has completed an Environmental Justice Planning Project and Report for the farmworker community of Huron where over 30 projects to improve mobility, access and safety were identified.  Through Valley LEAP, Rey continues to organize with the grassroots, grasstops, agencies and other partners to promote sustainable development, clean energy alternatives, green jobs and reduction of pollution & GHG’s in concentrated clusters of poverty in the central San Joaquin Valley.  Mr. Leon successfully works with Valley communities to achieve environmental and climate justice. Take Away Quotes: “Huron is a farm-worker city. It’s got the highest rate of Latinos for an incorporated city in the nation...And, of course, it’s a small community, around 7,000 on paper. I venture to say that there’s at least 10,000 residents. We, having an agricultural base and being a farm-worker community, we have a population that good amount of folks that are, I would say, economic refugees… It’s a community that speaks a good nine languages at least, which, to me, is amazing.” “[A plaza is] just a magical space where you’re able to bond with the rest of the folks in your community, some way, somehow. It’s where young men, young women meet their mates; it’s where entertainment is shared; it’s where farmers’ markets happen; it’s where you do some exercise out there; it’s just ’the’ place.” “The vision, the goal, my dream...is making Huron the greenest farm-worker city in the country.” Resources: “Changing Huron for the Better” ValleyLEAP
Jul 20, 2017
World Bank — Turning Down the Heat
Topic: Carbon and the Paris Agreement In This Episode: 03:10 Guest Tom Kerr is introduced. 03:26 Tom explains what the World Bank is. 05:00 Tom describes the kind of work that the climate change group does. 07:37 Tom talks about the changes he’s seen since Kim Yong became the World Bank’s president. 09:27 Tom speaks of his work at the IFC in engaging the private sector. 12:20 What has the response been to President Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris Agreement? 14:11 Tom shares his thoughts on if there will be a ripple effect from the U.S. pulling out of the Agreement. 16:21 Tom talks about whether there is a financial-commitment hole that the U.S. will no longer fill with regard to developing countries. 18:43 Tom gives his thoughts about the upcoming bond talks and if ambition will be there. 21:27 Tom provides his sense of where the Trump administration is going to end up with regard to carbon. 22:39 Host Mike and co-host Michael discuss the Paris Agreement. 23:48 Mike states what he noticed this week in the news. 24:31 Michael identifies what he noticed this week in the news. 25:18 Mike and Michael discuss the economy of renewable energy and the Paris Agreement. Guest and Organization: Tom Kerr has worked for 20 years designing and implementing public/private efforts that transform markets for resource-efficient climate business solutions. He currently leads the IFC’s private sector climate policy engagement, which involves working with emerging economy governments and major corporations to develop investor- and climate-friendly national strategies; designing coalitions to advance carbon pricing and performance standards; and providing private sector input into international policy processes such as the G20 and the United Nations climate talks. Mr. Kerr was previously the director of climate change initiatives at the World Economic Forum in Geneva, where he worked with international organizations, government leaders, and industry executives to advance practical solutions via platforms such as the G20, the United Nations, and the Forum’s Annual Meeting at Davos. While at the Forum, he designed and led the Green Growth Action Alliance, a public-private coalition launched at the 2012 G20 with over 60 leading companies developing solutions to unlock private investment for sustainable growth. From 2006-10, he worked in Paris for the International Energy Agency, leading the development of global reports, including the Technology Roadmap series, the flagship Energy Technology Perspectives publication, and the Clean Energy Progress Report. Mr. Kerr started his career with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, where he designed and launched a suite of innovative voluntary programs such as Energy STAR, Green Power, and methane programs that today continue to engage thousands of businesses to adopt clean, efficient technologies and practices. Take Away Quotes: “Where I sit is the IFC - the International Finance Corporation is the private-sector arm of the Bank, so we work in developing countries, lending to private-sector clients and helping them to find profit in development, and in my particular group, trying to find profit in climate business. So we work across the world and emerging markets to really try to tackle poverty—that’s the main mission; then, development—make it smarter; and then, in my case in particular, we try to make profits out of climate business.” “[Kim Yong, president of the World Bank] wanted to know what the current problem was, and once he found out, he got quite alarmed and made it a top priority for him personally and raised attention externally and also within the World Bank’s priorities. So, we’ve always been doing this, but he put an increased urgency behind it and really tried to push the agenda.” “The [Paris] Agreement is…190 plus countries making their own national commitments, and so other than the U.S.,
Jul 13, 2017
Autodesk: Climate Change and Equity as Design Challenges
Topic: Using Design to Create Positive Impacts In This Episode: 01:29 Guest Lynelle Cameron is introduced. 01:39 Lynelle describes Autodesk. 02:48 Lynelle shares her career journey. 04:06 Lynelle discusses Paul Hawken’s new book, Drawdown. 05:17 Lynelle tells about the Autodesk Foundation. 06:41 Lynelle defines the term “design.” 07:08 Lynelle talks about climate change through the lens of design. 09:58 Lynelle states how the Foundation provides support to companies and organizations. 14:03 Lynelle gives examples of organizations working domestically on issues of urban design and social and environmental justice. 15:44 Lynelle provides where people can learn more about Autodesk Foundation’s work. 16:07 Lynelle explains how investing at an intellectual-capital level has impacted Autodesk and its culture. 19:00 Lynelle speaks to the benefit of Autodesk employees’ ability to make a positive impact in the world. 20:57 What is the current state of corporate social responsibility and what is the outlook  for sustainability and equity being a part of a business’ core mission? 22:40 Lynelle provides her thoughts on whether the current administration’s roll back of the climate progress that was made will have an impact on the business community. 24:05 Lynelle share how people who might benefit from the Autodesk Foundation’s programs can get more information. 25:17 Lynelle mentions whether there is an effort to share the lessons, or best practices, that have been learned. Guest & Organization: Lynelle Cameron is president and CEO of the Autodesk Foundation and vice president of Sustainability at Autodesk. She established both to invest in and support people who are designing solutions to today's most pressing social and environmental challenges. Under Cameron’s leadership, Autodesk created the Sustainability Workshop, an online learning platform for sustainable design that has reached over 2 million students and professionals worldwide, and launched two software donation programs: the Technology Impact program for nonprofit organizations and the Entrepreneur Impact program for early-stage clean-tech and social-impact companies around the world. Cameron has also led the company in setting ambitious science-based greenhouse-gas-reduction targets, committing to 100 percent renewable energy and integrated reporting. Since Cameron joined nine years ago, Autodesk has received numerous awards for sustainability leadership and innovation. A published author and regular speaker, Cameron has degrees from Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, University of Michigan, and Middlebury College. Take Away Quotes: “Autodesk is a leading provider of 3D design software that is used to make quite literally anything on the planet. Whether you’re building a car, a highway, a building, or even a whole city, there’s a good chance that you use one of Autodesk’s products.” “The turning point for me was reading a book called 'The Ecology of Commerce'  by Paul Hawken, and that’s when I realized to really make the kind of transformative change that I was looking for, I needed to go work from within the private sector.” “We launched the Autodesk Foundation about three years ago, and we have historically as a company always given back to communities where we work. So the idea of philanthropy was not new for the company, although the actual foundation is … As a foundation, we invest in people and organizations who are using design to address, initially, a whole range of social and environmental challenges.” “Design is the creation, the idea, and then the actual making of anything, quite literally, on the planet…it’s all about imagining and creating things that, in our mind, are going to make the world a better place for billions of people.” Resources: Autodesk Drawdown—The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming
Jul 06, 2017
Leadership in a Time of Change
Topic: Adjusting to the Rapid Pace of Change In This Episode: 02:20 Guest Carl Guardino is introduced. 03:03 Carl talks about what is being done to stay relevant in technology and innovation. 05:45 Carl describes what leaders can do to be resilient and to continue to come up with innovative ideas. 08:05 Carl informs us if this administration’s tax reform proposal is where we need to go in response to the changing economy. 09:06 Carl shares if this administration is more responsive in terms of listening to the business community. 12:34 How has congestion impacted business in Silicon Valley, and how have you responded? 16:34 How are you addressing the housing crisis, and how is it impacting local businesses? 18:40 Carl speaks about the region’s response to the evolving workforce. 21:41 Carl shares what cities can do to retain and attract businesses. 25:10 Carl describes what current leaders should do to prepare and what types of innovation are on the horizon. 27:21 Kate shares what caught her attention during Carl’s interview. 28:28 Mike supplies what caught his attention. 29:14 Kate mentions what she noticed this week in the news. 33:15 Mike talks about what he read this week in the news. Guest and Organization: Carl Guardino, one of Silicon Valley’s most distinguished business and community leaders, is the President and CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, a public policy trade association that represents nearly 400 of Silicon Valley’s most respected employers. In February 2007, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger appointed Guardino to a four-year term on the California Transportation Commission, and he has been reappointed twice by Governor Jerry Brown. Known throughout the region as a consensus builder, Guardino has championed a number of successful ballot measures, especially in the areas of transportation and housing. Guardino was born and raised in San Jose and received his Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from San Jose State University, where he is a Distinguished Alumnus. Carl is married to Leslee Guardino. In their spare time, they compete in marathons, triathlons, and duathlons. Take Away Quotes: “What we try to explain to executives constantly is, we have a choice as executives: we can be engaged, or we can be enraged. And it’s much more productive and positive to actually be engaged with policymakers making incredibly difficult decisions in their difficult processes. And we, again, try to remind executives, if you’re just going to sit on the sidelines and be frustrated and wring your hands, not only are you not going to be successful in explaining to policymakers the ramifications of a product or services, but you are probably going to end up as dinner rather than at the dinner table when those decisions are made.” “It has been since 1986 — 31 years ago — since our federal government has made major changes in federal tax law. Thirty-one years ago. eBay didn’t exist, PayPal didn’t exist, Google didn’t exist, Facebook didn’t exist…Airbnb, Uber, and Lyft — none of those companies even existed, let alone a twinkling in our eye of the technologies that they would be creating, and the tax laws haven’t changed in a major way in this nation for three decades.” “In the Silicon Valley and Bay Area, when we ask individuals about the concerns they talk about in their living rooms, or we’re asking CEOs and senior officers about the concerns that they face as companies here in the region in their boardrooms, the common themes are the same, and they’re the flip side of the same coin: housing and traffic.” “When it comes to education, we always try to remember in Silicon Valley, it’s cradle through career; from the moment we’re born to the moment we retire, we have to focus on education.” Resources: Silicon Valley Leadership Group Silicon Valley Competitiveness and Innovation Project Infinite Earth Radio Episode 076: Bike Boom with Carlton Reid
Jun 29, 2017
People’s Climate March
Topic: The People's Climate March, the Economy, and Policy Making In This Episode: 01:40 Vernice Miller Travis is introduced. 02:14 Vernice tells about the Climate March. 04:50 Vernice gives her thoughts regarding the amount of press coverage of the Climate March. 07:23 Vernice describes the impacts of the various recent marches. 10:55 Is there evidence of impact on the direction the government is taking? 12:13 Vernice shares if there will be a change for various groups who have overlapping agendas but who don't work well together. 16:58 Are we doing enough to overcome "tribalism"? Or are we working with other "tribes" just because it's expedient? 25:35 Mike speaks about the modern economy. 26:48 Vernice talks about the possibility of future climate marches. Co-Host/Guest: Infinite Earth Radio Co-host Vernice Miller Travis is a nationally recognized expert in brownfields redevelopment, community revitalization, collaborative problem solving, multi-stakeholder design and planning and environmental justice. Her interests have focused on economic and environmental restoration and the inclusion of low-income, people of color and indigenous communities in environmental and economic decision making at the federal, state, local, and tribal levels. Vernice enjoys listening to and singing gospel music, visiting her family in the Bahamas, traveling with her husband, and eating Maryland blue crabs and barbecue. Take Away Quotes: “There’s an initiative that is training young people, particularly young women of color, to run for elected office…it’s really to get a new generation of people engaged in the electoral process and to really put themselves out there, because a lot of the hard-core politics of our country, particularly the electoral national politics, have really rubbed a lot of people the wrong way and really pushed a lot of good people away from ever thinking that they may run for office. Whether it’s a local school board or a county council or a planning commission or, certainly, any higher office than that. People say, ‘I don’t want to be a part of that’ but if they’re not a part of that, you get folks in office, making decisions that actually adversely hurt people.” “You cannot continue to operate and try to affect national policy by representing the top 10% of wage earners and mostly affluent and middle-class white communities—those are not the only communities in the United States—and if you want to have broad-based impact, you’ve really got to reach a much broader, much deeper constituency that really is activating and doing things and trying to drive change in their local communities.” “We talk about shutting down coal-fired power plants, but I don’t hear any environmentalists talking about what happens to the people who work in the power plants, or who work feeding the stock digging the coal.” Resources: Kentuckians For The Commonwealth
Jun 22, 2017
Bike Boom
Topic: The Future of Cycling as a Mode of Transportation In This Episode: 01:59 Guest Carlton Reid is introduced. 02:49 Carlton explains the history of the bike boom. 07:24 Carlton tells why there was a bike boom in the early ’70s. 09:18 Carlton talks about cycling as a mode of transportation, not just for recreation. 10:32 Carlton informs us of the degree to which bicycling is popular in the U.S. 13:07 Carlton addresses the percentage of modal sharing in the Netherlands compared to the U.S. 14:34 Carlton discusses having the bicycle infrastructure be more favored than the auto infrastructure. 19:58 Carlton mentions his support for cycleways. 22:05 Carlton gives his thoughts on the unpopularity of cycling among women, ethnic minorities, and the urban poor. 24:21 Carlton addresses Mike’s comment about the trend that may reverse the number of cars on the road and individual car ownership. 27:20 Carlton answers the question, what is the future of biking? Guest and Organization: Carlton Reid is executive editor of BikeBiz magazine and is writing a book about the recent history of roads. He is author of Roads Were Not Built For Cars and Bike Boom: The Unexpected Resurgence of Cycling. He also writes adventure travel articles for publications such as National Geographic Traveller and The Guardian – his forte is cycle touring. Founder and rider-manager of the first ever British mountain bike team – which competed in the World Championships in France in 1987 –Reid was inducted into the MBUK Mountain Bike Hall of Fame in 2008, one of the first 20 inductees. He has ridden solo in the Sahara and Kalahari deserts and, from his mountain bike in 1994, he researched the first guidebook to Lebanon since the end of that country’s civil war. A digital native, Reid’s then one-man website BikeBiz.com tied for second with BBC.co.uk in theEuropean Online Journalism Awards of 2000. Working for the Bicycle Association of Great Britain he also commissioned the world’s first cycle-specific 3D satellite navigation, which has since been through a number of upgrades and can now direct cyclists on bike paths via beeps and wrist-buzzes on the Apple Watch. Take Away Quotes: “I would say the book is very much more interested in the advocacy side of cycling, the getting around as an everyday form of transport form of cycling, because at the end of the day, that’s actually what keeps cycling afloat.” “Cities who want to increase their cycling modal share have, pretty much, got to bite the bullet and restrict the use of motoring.” “It’s inescapable that many communities don’t see the bicycle as an aspirational form of transport; it’s very much the opposite of an aspirational form of transport. The white, hipster cycling thing is a thing because it’s genuinely a thing. Cycling, for some strange reason, now is this relatively middle-class, white activity.” Resources: Island Press Urban Resilience Project Island Press – Bike Boom Bike Biz Bike Boom
Jun 15, 2017
Put a Price on It
Topic: The State of Carbon Pricing In This Episode: 05:41 Michael shares what brought him to working on carbon pricing. 08:12 Michael addresses how people would feel the impact of a carbon tax. 10:38 How would putting a price on carbon play out? 12:17 Michael comments on the cost of carbon pricing. 13:19 How is carbon pricing implemented at the state level? 14:38 Is there a proposal in the state of Massachusetts to implement carbon pricing? 16:00 How close is Massachusetts to implementing the proposal? 17:18 Michael shares if other states or governmental entities have passed putting a price on carbon. 19:37 Michael states how close the vote was in the state of Washington. 20:26 Michael explains how British Columbia’s system works. 23:06 Michael talks about whether any of the proposals in Massachusetts are modeled after the one in British Columbia. 23:42 How does Massachusetts compare with other states in relation to passing carbon pricing? 25:08 Michael addresses the concern of making a state less competitive than others. 26:32 What is California’s stance on carbon pricing? 27:42 Michael gives his thoughts on where we’ll first get some form of carbon pricing. 29:50 Michael shares what he noticed this week in the news. 31:12 Mike tells what he noticed this week in the news. Guest/CoHost: Michael Green is the Executive Director of the Climate Action Business Association (CABA). He is also co-host here on Infinite Earth Radio. Michael is a seasoned advocate for climate policy and environmental action and has played strategic roles in several of the largest national, as well as international campaigns dedicated to fighting climate change. Since 2012, he has served as a representative to the United Nations focusing on international climate science and policy. As an activist, he has played strategic roles in several of the largest national, as well as international campaigns dedicated to fighting climate change. In his role at CABA, Michael manages staff and oversees the development of all program areas. He sits on the Board of Boston area non-profits as well as a policy advisor to national business associations on topics ranging from energy policy to climate adaptation. Michael is a Northeastern University graduate with degrees in international affairs and environmental studies, course work at the University of Edinburgh’s MSc Program in Environmental Protection and Management and Harvard Business School’s CORe Program. Organization: Climate Action Business Association (CABA) is a membership-based organization in Boston, Massachusetts, that helps businesses take targeted action on climate change. We provide our member businesses with the resources and tools needed to work within their business on sustainability efforts, political advocacy and building a community of shared values. Take Away Quotes: “My original goal, going into college, was that I wanted to be a forest ranger. I’m from upstate New York and really wanted to be working out and preserving our forests and the Adirondack mountains. As I learned more about the challenges of climate change, I realized that being way out in the woods wasn’t going to be enough to really protect our natural habitat.” “If people are starting to respond to a carbon tax because it’s already implemented, then, essentially, we’re losing the fight already because what it’s going to mean is it’s going to mean more expensive reliance on fossil fuels. So for those who are not able to make the transition, or are not willing to make the transition, they’re going to see an increase in cost.” “We’re also going to create huge market signals for renewable-energy development and financiers who are questioning whether or not these transition technologies and opportunities stand to gain financially over time. So as much as we would see a price on our fossil-fuel reliance, at the same time you’re going to see a rapid decrease in cost in other technologies and other opportuniti...
Jun 08, 2017
Broadband for All — Part 2
Topic: Broadband Access in Rural Communities In This Episode: 02:04 Mike gives a recap of part 1 of the Broadband for All series. 03:53 Guest Cecilia Aguiar-Curry is introduced. 04:51 Cecilia talks about why the issue of broadband is important to her. 06:19 Cecilia explains the relationship between under-connected communities and Internet access. 07:55 Cecilia talks about AB-1665, the broadband-access bill. 10:42 Cecilia discusses federal-level discussions regarding infrastructure services in rural areas. 12:49 Cecilia expresses the role broadband plays in agriculture. 14:33 Cecilia shares the application she sees in helping people access state government in relation to smart-city applications and open-data portals. 16:10 Cecilia states her thoughts on how to continue innovation in smart technology, without leaving rural communities behind. 17:55 Cecilia addresses the decline of retail. 22:39 Kate shares what she noticed this week in the news. 25:54 Mike states what he noticed this week in the news. CoHost: Kate Meis joins the Infinite Earth Radio as the co-host for this episode. Kate Meis is the Executive Director of the Local Government Commission (LGC). Kate is a champion for local governments; a recognized leader in local climate change adaptation, mitigation and clean energy efforts; and an ardent coalition builder. She obtained a Masters of Science degree in Community and Regional Development from the University of California, Davis, and has a Sociology Bachelor’s degree from California State University, Sonoma. ... Guest & Organization: Cecilia Aguiar-Curry is an American politician who has been elected to the California State Assembly. She is a Democrat representing the 4th Assembly District, encompassing Wine Country and parts of the Sacramento Valley. Cecilia grew up in western Yolo County and has long served her community. After going to school and working in the Bay Area for several years, she moved back to her hometown of Winters where she almost immediately became active in the local community and a regional leader on several issues. She first served as planning commissioner and then was elected to the city council eventually serving as the first female mayor of Winters. While growing up, Cecilia was surrounded by agriculture. As a youth, she cut apricots in the packing shed and helped her father in the walnut orchards in the area. She is still involved in local agriculture to this day as she and her brothers own an 80-acre walnut orchard. Take Away Quotes: “It was really important for me to make sure that the families had the digital literacy training. I didn’t want anybody, ever, left behind, and I don’t think anybody in a rural community, as well as urban community, should be left behind and not be able to be part of the digital age.” “People always said, well, in a rural community, you don’t have, necessarily, an educated population to be able to take on this digital literacy. I say that’s wrong. And the problem is that you’re not exposed to these opportunities. So bringing this kind of education to the forefront in our schools, in our libraries, in our community, is really important to all of us — it helps with the economic development, it helps with telehealth, it helps with so many things.” “We wanted to make sure that the rural communities were connected, because it’s very easy to say the state of California, 95 percent of the people had Internet capabilities, but quite frankly, that 95 percent could be just taken up with the populations of the San Diegos, the Los Angeles’, the Silicon Valleys, the San Franciscos — the bigger communities — but rural communities weren’t included in that, so on this bill, it was really important that we included rural communities had to have the connectivity the same as 98 percent as everyone else had throughout the state.” “Many people know that I farm 80 acres of walnuts, with my brothers,
Jun 01, 2017
Broadband for All — Part 1
Topic: Broadband Access Impacts Environment, Health, Agriculture, and Jobs In This Episode: 01:20 Co-host Kate Meis is introduced. 02:04 Kate talks about the Local Government Commission (LGC). 03:11 Kate shares the LGC’s upcoming events. 05:00 Kate introduces the next two podcast guests and what the podcast topics will be. 06:43 Mike mentions that access to broadband is a national issue. 07:56 Kate comments about how cutting some of the services in the infrastructure makes broadband access that much more important. 09:47 Guest Trish Kelly is introduced. 11:23 Trish tells how she became involved in the broadband-access issue. 12:18 Trish provides some statistics on who’s being left behind in the digital divide. 13:50 Trish defines the term “underserved”. 14:32 Trish talks about the demographic breakdown of underserved communities. 16:22 Trish shares the economic-development impacts of the rapid changes in the workforce. 19:11 Trish highlights the connection between broadband and the environment. 22:21 Trish comments on the use of technology in agriculture. 24:38 Trish states some steps to position communities for job opportunities. 27:07 What we should be asking from our community leaders? 29:34 Trish speaks to the accessibility of information and people feeling more connected in their community. 31:52 Trish tells how people can learn more about her work and Valley Vision. 32:46 Kate talks about what she noticed this week in the news. 36:42 Mike adds his thoughts to Kate’s observations from this week. CoHost: Kate Meis joins the Infinite Earth Radio as the co-host for this episode. Kate Meis is the Executive Director of the Local Government Commission (LGC). Kate is a champion for local governments; a recognized leader in local climate change adaptation, mitigation and clean energy efforts; and an ardent coalition builder. She obtained a Masters of Science degree in Community and Regional Development from the University of California, Davis, and has a Sociology Bachelor’s degree from California State University, Sonoma. ... Guest & Organization: Trish Kelly is the Managing Director of Valley Vision. Trish joined Valley Vision as Senior Vice President in 2014, having been involved with Valley Vision on several projects over the years. As a consultant, Trish has contributed to Valley Vision initiatives in such areas as regional food systems and agriculture, broadband, economic vitality, and quality of life indicators. She is managing Valley Vision’s agriculture and food system projects and the Connected Capital Area Broadband Consortium, and is supporting other Valley Vision regional leadership efforts. Trish has a passion for projects that provide strong research and accessible information as the basis for engaging community leaders, stakeholders and partner organizations in collaborative, solution-driven strategies that will ensure a Triple-Bottom Line for the region – with shared opportunity, environmental quality and economic prosperity for all. Valley Vision is a leadership organization dedicated to making the Sacramento region a great place to live, work, and recreate. Take Away Quotes: “In the 21st century, high-speed Internet access is no longer a luxury amenity but rather an essential service for homes and businesses in this interconnected world. No other technology has produced as much innovation, competition, and economic growth.”—Congressional letter to the new administration “I started this process more than 10 years ago. We were working with the governor’s cabinet, looking at issues that really impeded or affected rural economic vitality, and broadband kept coming up as the number-one issue. So that led to a series of activities which have culminated, for many of us in the regions, in a program that’s supported through the Public Utilities Commission, that provides funding for regional broadband consortium and then also funding for infrastructure and other opportunities to hel...
May 25, 2017
Charting the National Healthy Communities Platform
Topic: Incorporating Public Health Considerations in the Local Government Planning Process In This Episode: 02:40 Co-host Paul Zykofsky is introduced. 02:48 Guests Miguel Vazquez and Erik Calloway are introduced. 03:10 Miguel tells how he came to be working on healthy-communities issues. 04:13 Erik tells how he came to be working on healthy-communities issues. 05:02 Erik describes ChangeLab Solutions. 05:41 Miguel describes the Riverside University Health System. 09:09 Miguel shares about the National Healthy Communities Platform. 09:44 Why is there a need for a National Healthy Communities Platform? 11:13 Erik evaluates the state of the healthy-communities movement. 12:25 Miguel gives his evaluation of the state of the healthy-communities movement. 13:42 Miguel identifies what he hopes will come out of the National Healthy Communities Platform. 15:04 Erik comments on the breakdowns of the social determinants of health. 15:51 Erik supplies his recommendations of how to get started to address the issues of the social determinants of health. 18:30 Miguel shares the challenges he thinks will be encountered as the healthy-communities movement is pushed forward. 20:45 Erik describes what he thinks the challenges will be. CoHost: Paul Zykofsky directs the Local Government Commission’s (LGC) programs related to land use and transportation planning, community design, and health and the built environment. In the past 20 years, he has worked with over 300 communities to improve conditions for infill development, walking, bicycling, and transit. Mr. Zykofsky provides technical assistance to communities throughout the nation on issues related to smart growth, infill development, transit-oriented development, street and sidewalk design, health and the built environment, and public participation in the planning process. Mr. Zykofsky is a co-author of Building Livable Communities: A Policymaker’s Guide to Transit Oriented Development and Emergency Response: Traffic Calming and Traditional Neighborhood Streets. In 2006, Mr. Zykofsky co-wrote (with Dan Burden of Walkable Communities) the section on “walkability” in the American Planning Association’s Planning and Urban Design Standards. Guests & Organizations: As a senior planner at ChangeLab Solutions, Erik Calloway focuses on the links between the built environment and health. He conducts research, prepares strategies, and develops tools to help communities support healthy living and sustainability. Prior to joining ChangeLab Solutions, Erik worked for 13 years as an urban design consultant. He has led multidisciplinary teams on streetscape and public space design, district and corridor restructuring, city planning, neighborhood development, and downtown revitalization projects. Learn More About Erik Miguel Vazquez, currently serves as the Healthy Communities Planner for the Riverside University Health System-Public Health (RUHS-PH) (formerly known as Riverside County Department of Public Health) in California. Our work directly impacts the quality of life of 2.2 million people living in 28 cities and the unincorporated area of Riverside County. For the past five years, my leadership role has focused on the integration of planning and health through policy, programs and outreach. Learn More About Miguel’s Career Journey as a Planner Take Away Quotes: “My journey has been kind of strange in a sense that I’m an urban planner, but urban planners typically don’t work for public-health departments. Now, a conference like the New Partners for Smart Growth Conference has provided an open door for everyone to understand each other, so my boss saw that connection of public health and planning, and at some point he decided to hire a planner. So, somebody said, hey, there’s an opportunity, would you be interested in applying for it; so I went for it, and here I am.”—Miguel “ChangeLab Solutions is a nonprofit organization.
May 18, 2017
Coal Blooded — Coal Power Plants as a Civil Rights Issue
Topic: Coal, Coal-Fired Power Plants, and the Impacts on Communities In This Episode: 01:58 Mike shares information about Island Press and Infinite Earth Radio's series on urban resilience. 03:18 Mike talks about the topic of today’s podcast. 05:15 Vernice identifies why the EPA has been focused on regulating the emissions from coal-fired power plants. 10:50 Guest Jacqueline Patterson is introduced. 11:31 Jacqueline defines the term “urban resiliency.” 12:49 Jacqueline shares what she thinks motivated the NAACP to create the energy and climate-justice program. 14:34 Jacqueline discusses the reactions to the NAACP beginning to take on environmental issues. 15:53 Jacqueline expresses whether there is a legal advantage to viewing environmental issues as civil-rights issues. 17:02 Jacqueline talks about the NAACP’s “Coal Blooded” report. 19:41 Jacqueline shares her thoughts on the seeming lack of conversation around the negative impacts on communities of color and people living near power plants. 21:30 Jacqueline discusses why uninterrupted energy service should be looked at as a civil-rights issue. 25:35 Jacqueline addresses how to alleviate the hardship for people who can’t pay their utility bill. 28:55 Jacqueline states what she’d like to see accomplished in the public-policy conversation. 31:14 Mike shares what he noticed this week in the news. 32:10 Vernice conveys what caught her attention this week in the news. Guest/Organization: Jacqueline Patterson is the Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program. Since 2007 Patterson has served as coordinator & co-founder of Women of Color United. She has worked as a researcher, program manager, coordinator, advocate and activist working on women‘ s rights, violence against women, HIV&AIDS, racial justice, economic justice, and environmental and climate justice. Patterson served as a Senior Women’ s Rights Policy Analyst for ActionAid where she integrated a women’ s rights lens for the issues of food rights, macroeconomics, and climate change as well as the intersection of violence against women and HIV & AIDS. Environmental injustice, including the proliferation of climate change, has a disproportionate impact on communities of color and low-income communities in the United States and around the world. The NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program was created to support community leadership in addressing this human and civil rights issue. Take Away Quotes: “The reason that EPA was so focused on trying to regulate the emissions from coal-fired power plants is that those emissions create huge pollution issues that then create and trigger huge public-health challenges…the combustion of coal has a lot of adverse impacts.” “Resilience, I guess in any context…would be the ability of a community to withstand disturbances, basically, to life and living. And as we define resilience in our work as a civil- and human-rights organization, we look at the structural inequities that make certain communities more vulnerable—whether it’s disasters or sea-level rise or other types of shifts—and as we build resilience, it includes eliminating those vulnerabilities.” “Communities of color; low-income communities; women, to some extent; and other groups are being disproportionately impacted by the environmental injustices—whether it’s exposure to toxins, air pollution, water pollution, land contamination, etc.—to the effect that these communities do hold these pre-existing vulnerabilities that make them more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, including sea-level rise, extreme weather events, shifts to the agricultural yields, etc.” “The price of poverty should never be death.” Resources: Island Press Urban Resilience Project NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program Coal Blooded Report Lights Out in the Cold: Reforming Utility Shut-Off Policies as if Human Rights Matter
May 11, 2017
Years of Living Dangerously
Topic: Putting a Price on Carbon In This Episode: 01:37 Co-host Michael Green is introduced. 02:23 Mike and Michael talk about the series, “Years of Living Dangerously.” 04:50 Mike and Michael mention the Put a Price on It campaign. 06:44 Guest Camila Thorndike is introduced. 07:22 Camila shares the origin and goal of the Put a Price on It campaign. 08:39 Camila describes how the partnership with the “Years of Living Dangerously” team came about. 12:12 Camila reflects on carbon-pricing stories that she’s heard. 17:53 Camila expresses if celebrity involvement is an advantage in terms of communicating the climate-crisis message. 21:42 Camila shares her response to the question, “What can I do?” 26:30 Camila tells where people can go to connect with Our Climate and the Put a Price on It campaign. 28:33 Camila provides how she stays positive while dealing with climate-change issues. 32:06 Michael identifies what caught his eye this week in the news. 33:40 Mike talks about what caught his eye this week in the news. Guest: Camila Thorndike has been an environmental advocate and social entrepreneur for 10 years. At Whitman College, she led the largest campus club and founded a tri-college leadership network. After graduating with honors in 2010, Camila directed outreach for a regional urban planning project in Arizona; advanced green jobs for the mayor of D.C.; worked at the U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution; and co-founded COAL, a nationwide musical theater project about fossil fuels. She is a Udall Scholar, Fellow of the Center for Diversity and the Environment, Sitka Fellow, Mic50 Awardee, and member of the 2016 class of the Young Climate Leaders Network. Organization: Our Climate mobilizes and empowers the generations most affected by climate change to pass inclusive, science-based climate policy through creative civic engagement. Take Away Quotes: “It takes a lot of education and encouragement to make sure that young people, especially, feel confident advocating for the policy, but once they’re hooked, it’s amazing what they’ve been pulling off.” “We’re finally getting more creative in how we bring people in, and there’s nothing more powerful than story. It’s not unique to the efforts around carbon pricing, but I think the climate and sustainability movements as a whole have really gotten the memo that you can’t just broadcast facts and figures and graphs and charts—it won’t resonate emotionally—and that when you don’t have that emotional link, then you can’t expect folks to prioritize this above their grocery list or paying the bills or whatever it might be.” “Something that young people everywhere need to realize is that you don’t wait until some magical moment—that you have this right title or the right position—to speak out on something that you care about. It is actually your youth and your perspective of being in the most imperiled generation and facing down the barrel of this gun that is the core message that will resonate and move the rest of society, and, in fact, if you don’t speak out, you’re missing this incredible opportunity which is going to fade with time.” “…more and more people are waking up and taking action, and I think that comes from refusing to take no as an answer and doing the hard work of honing your skills and your knowledge base and, again, making use of this precious time that we have when we’re alive on this earth to advance something that we believe in, whether or not we win. The victory is not guaranteed, but the effort is in your hands.” Resources: Our Climate Years of Living Dangerously Watch Years of Living Dangerously Find #putapriceonit online Follow #putapriceonit on Facebook
May 04, 2017
The Play Everywhere Challenge
13:08
Topic: The Importance of Play In This Episode: 01:50 Aisha Alexander is introduced. 02:02 Aisha shares what KaBOOM! is. 02:40 Aisha provides why play opportunities are so important. 04:06 Aisha explains why access to play is an issue. 06:02 Aisha describes the Play Everywhere Challenge. 09:08 Aisha states how people can learn more about KaBOOM! and the Play Everywhere Challenge. 09:38 Mike comments how playspaces have dual benefits. 10:16 Aisha expresses how kids are indicator species for cities. Guest/Organization: ... Aisha Alexander is a Director of External Affairs for KaBOOM!, where she leads efforts promote the creation of kid-friendly cities. She attended Hampton University, where she earned her BA in English and Early Childhood Education; and Temple University, earning a Master of Social Work, concentrating in Community and Policy Practice. Before joining KaBOOM!, she worked in municipal government, most recently for the City of Charlotte, where she managed the city’s neighborhood improvement programs. Aisha is an expert in community engagement, neighborhood quality of life and social sector innovation. ... ... Take Away Quotes: “KaBOOM! is a national nonprofit organization that’s committed to making sure that all kids have the access to the play opportunities they need to thrive.” “There’s lots of reasons that play is really important. Number one, we believe that play is a fundamental right of childhood; it is the work of children.” “We realized through our community-built playgrounds that we could not address the problem at scale, and so we worked with Ideas42, a behavioral research firm, to figure out what are the barriers to play, and when we looked at those barriers, we found out that what needs to happen to be able to give access to all kids is to really make play everywhere.” “We really wanted to have this Play Everywhere Challenge to help spur these types of ideas of how you can infuse play into everyday spaces where kids and families are already spending time.” Resources: Infinite Earth Radio Episode 053: Civil Rights and Access to Recreation and Open Space (Re-release) with Robert Garcia Play Everywhere Challenge The Play Everywhere Playbook KaBOOM
Apr 27, 2017
Resiliency: New Buzzword or New Normal
Topic: Expanding the Conversation of Community Resiliency In This Episode: 01:50 Co-host Kif Scheuer is introduced. 01:54 Guest John Zeanah is introduced. 02:05 John shares how he became involved in community resiliency 04:20 John explains what he thinks the word resiliency means. 05:31 John talks about how communities across and within jurisdictional boundaries are responding to resiliency. 09:58 John relates the kind of conversation that takes place within the community he works in. 14:40 John comments on energy-cost burdens and how costs are factored into response strategies. 18:09 Is resiliency is just another word for disaster preparedness? 20:29 John addresses how to have the conversation of investing money for the benefit of something that won’t happen, like a flood. 23:28 John identifies the pieces of his plan that will continue beyond the grant. 27:07 John mentions how people find more information and take a look at Shelby's resilience plan. Guest/Organization: John Zeanah is the Deputy Director of the Memphis and Shelby County Division of Planning and Development. In this role, Mr. Zeanah assists the direction of planning functions including land use, comprehensive planning, sustainability and resilience, transportation, housing, and development services. Prior to this role, Mr. Zeanah served in the roles of program manager and administrator for the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Sustainability, coordinating various program areas including energy efficiency, waste reduction and recycling, green infrastructure, and sustainable food systems. Recently, Mr. Zeanah led the development of the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan, a unified vision for a regional network of green space connecting across the Greater Memphis area, and Shelby County's Greenprint for Resilience initiative, which received over $60 million in HUD's National Disaster Resilience Competition. Mr. Zeanah holds a BA in Political Science from Rhodes College and a Master of City and Regional Planning from the University of Memphis. Take Away Quotes: “I think the evolution of resilience is pushing people to think beyond just, how do you bounce back from a flood, or how do you build back from a hurricane, but also as you’re building back, as you’re bouncing back, how are you doing that in a way that’s addressing so many of the social and economic issues that your community may face.” “I don’t know that the way that we’ve thought about disaster preparedness as a practice has taken in, at least to the degree that we’ve seen in the last few years around resilience, this concept of focusing on co-benefits, focusing on the multiple benefits, and ensuring that what we do around a preparedness initiative or project in a community has benefits throughout the year.” “My advice for any community out there is think about when you have a disaster, whether it’s a flood or something else, what are the systems that have to get in place to be able to prevent damage from happening? What are the cleanup efforts that have to take place? What’s the dollar value of those things?” Resources: Learn More about Shelby County’s Resilience Efforts Resilient Shelby – Resilience Plan Shelby County Planning and Development Mid-South Regional Greenprint Infinite Earth Radio Episode 045 Radical Innovation and Resilient Infrastructure—Climate Adaptation with Shalini Vajjhala
Apr 20, 2017
Sales Tax Distribution – Equity and Sustainability
Topic: Sales Tax Issues and Impacts In This Episode: 02:27 Guests Bob Lewis, Jim Brasfield, and Sarah Coffin are introduced. 02:57 Jim shares why he’s interested in sales tax and distribution equity. 03:18 Bob tells why he’s interested in sales tax and distribution equity. 03:52 Bob talks about his role as Principal at Development Strategies. 04:13 Sarah speaks about why she’s interested in sales tax and distribution equity. 04:55 Bob gives his view of what sales tax distribution equity is. 06:13 Jim explains where sales tax money goes and what it pays for. 08:15 Sarah shares what the negatives of sales tax distribution are. 09:43 Bob speaks about how the sales tax system drives land-use decisions. 11:30 Who decides who is a point-of-sale city? 12:54 Mike speaks of the incentives for more commercial development than housing development. 13:51 Sarah comments about the zoning decisions made by local governments and the affordable-housing issue. 14:48 How do we fix the problem of poorer communities going to rich communities to shop and the rich communities taking the sales tax? 16:26 Is there any property tax sharing or is it just the sales tax? 17:31 Mike mentions the challenges of too many local governments and overlapping jurisdictions. 18:02 Bob adds to the conversation of sharing the costs. 18:55 Sarah reflects on how St. Louis County supports its cultural districts. 20:23 Are there any words of wisdom for other parts of the country that aren’t doing sales tax sharing? Guests/Organizations: Jim Brasfield is Emeritus Professor of Management at the George Herbert Walker School of Business and Technology at Webster University, and former Chair of the Department of Management for nineteen years. He has been on the faculty of Webster University since 1976. He has a Ph.D. in political science from Case Western Reserve University (1973) and MA in Political Science from St. Louis University. He was Mayor of the City of Crestwood from 1996 to 2002 and on the Crestwood Board of Alderman from 1978 to 2006. He has been President of the St. Louis County Municipal League and the President of the Board of the Greater St. Louis Health System Agency.    Since 2000 he has been a member of the Government Relations Committee of the Gateway Chapter of the MS Society. He was President of the Webster University Faculty Senate from 2001 to 2007. Currently he is a member of the Municipal Parks Grant Commission and the Board of Directors of Voyce. He is a past President of the Organized Section on Health Politics and Policy of the American Political Science Association, and was Book Review Editor of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law from 2010 to 2016.   In 2011 his book Health Policy: The Decade Ahead was published by Lynne Rienner Publishers.  Learn more about Jim. Dr. Sarah Coffin is an associate professor of urban planning at Saint Louis University in the School of Social Work where she directs the masters in Urban Planning and Development Program. Trained as an urban planner, Dr. Coffin’s work focuses on the impacts of brownfields on weak market economies and examining the role that common development tools like tax increment financing and tax credits play in local economic development planning practice in these post-industrial regions. Her work draws on both primary and secondary data sources, focusing primarily on property data. She has published work that examines the impacts of brownfields, vacant properties, and more recently development incentives on weak market economies and whether new ways of framing the redevelopment question might provide positive benefits for distressed communities. In addition, Dr. Coffin served as the principal investigator for the university team that supported data support for the St Louis Region’s sustainability plan, OneSTL. In that role she lead the effort to establish a regional data portal called the St Louis Regional Data Exchange as a means to promote further open...
Apr 13, 2017
Food Security—Growing Food Connections
Topic: Making Sure All People Have Access to Affordable Food In This Episode: 02:16 Mike gives some background on the topic for today's episode. 02:38 Julia Freedgood is introduced. 02:47 Julia tells about the American Farmland Trust. 03:08 Julia shares why farmland and food equity are important. 04:19 Julia explains what food equity is. 05:40 Julia talks about whether food insecurity is a real problem. 06:50 Julia reflects on what needs to be done to attack the problem of food insecurity. 09:08 Julia gives examples of communities that are making progress in the issue of food insecurity. 11:28 Julia provides information about resources on the Growing Food Connections website. 13:44 Julia shares how to access the Community Guide to Planning for Agriculture and Food Systems. 15:00 Julia identifies some of the issues that are creating an obstacle to food security and food equity. 19:45 Julia communicates what the average person can do to be supportive of more food security for other people. 23:23 Mike mentions the book “The New Grand Strategy.” Guest: Julia Freedgood is the Assistant Vice President of Programs for the American Farmland Trust and oversees federal, state and local program and policy efforts to support farmland protection and agricultural viability. Organization: American Farmland Trust is dedicated to preserving the nation's farm and ranch land – and critical natural resources like soil and water. They also make sure to never forget that it is people – our family farmers and ranchers – who feed us and sustain America. Take Away Quotes: “The American Farmland Trust is a national nonprofit organization. We were founded in 1980 to protect farmland for farming, so our mission is to save the land that sustains us by protecting farmland, promoting sound farming practices, and keeping farmers on the land.” “For us, in the context of the project that I was talking about, which is a project American Farmland Trust is part of called Growing Food Connections, and the goal of that project is to strengthen community food systems by supporting small and midsize farmers who are growing food within their communities and regions, and also by improving food access, food security, or food equity. And so for the food-equity piece, we’re really looking at making sure that all people in a community have access to affordable food that’s culturally appropriate, the kind of food they’re familiar with and like to eat, and that it’s readily available.” “Fifty million people in the country are affected by food insecurity, and so that means lack of access to food on a regular basis. It doesn’t mean that they’re starving, necessarily, but it does mean that they don’t have food access every day, three meals a day, healthy food. It’s gotten a little bit better in the last few years, but it’s still worse than it was before the Great Recession, and it’s still a problem that we need to work on. And you find it especially in low-wealth communities and communities of color and rural communities.” “Through the project [Growing Food Connections], we studied what we call Communities of Innovation, and so these would be places across the country that have really addressed food-system issues through planning and policy and building partnerships and making investments.” Resources: American Farmland Trust Farmland Information Center Growing Food Connections “The New Grand Strategy”
Apr 06, 2017
#Carbon Series: Conservative Republicans Propose a Carbon Tax
Topic: Climate Change and Putting a Price on Carbon In This Episode: 01:10 Carbon series co-host Michael Green is introduced. 01:40 Michael shares what he hopes to bring to this #carbon podcast series. 02:22 Mike shares his excitement for sustainability and equity at the sub-national level. 02:48 Michael tells about CABA’s (Climate Action Business Alliance) expansion efforts to help state-based networks. 03:31 Mike mentions the list of diverse topics that he and Michael have come up with for this new series and introduces what today’s episode will be about. 04:32 Michael conveys his thoughts regarding the Republican party’s view on climate change. 05:01 Mike describes the carbon tax proposal. 08:28 Catrina Rorke is introduced and talks about R Street. 10:44 Catrina elaborates on carbon pricing. 11:24 Michael agrees with carbon pricing and says that they will be talking about what to do with the revenue. 11:49 Catrina answers the question of whether carbon pricing and the idea of putting a market signal on an externality is a conservative idea. 13:06 Catrina speaks about the idea of a direct rebate to taxpayers. 14:37 Catrina explains how the R Street approach would work and if it would be fair to those who are paying taxes. 17:19 Catrina expresses her thoughts on putting a price on carbon. 19:12 Catrina shares if climate change is a populist-enough issue for the Republican party. 20:28 Catrina gives her insights of how effective a carbon tax would be. 24:53 Catrina comments on the increase of the carbon tax and how to ensure an environmental outcome from a price signal. 28:03 Michael discusses information on what he’s been following regarding sustainability, the future of climate change, and the outdoor-sports industry. 30:22 Mike talks about an article he read about the Alberta tar sands and the Keystone XL pipeline. 32:24 Michael provides information about his interest in the pipeline. 32:54 Mike shares what he knows about ExxonMobil and supplies an issue with the tar sands. 33:33 Michael mentions that Canada is going to be putting a price on carbon. Guest: Catrina Rorke is senior fellow and energy policy director for the R Street Institute. She founded and leads the institute’s energy program, which works to clarify a well-defined and limited role for government in shaping decisions about infrastructure, wholesale and retail electricity, research and development, fuel choice and diversity, and climate adaptation and mitigation. Follow Catrina on Twitter Organization: The R Street Institute is a non-profit, non-partisan, public policy research organization (“think tank”). Our mission is to engage in policy research and outreach to promote free markets and limited, effective government. Take Away Quotes: “As an organization that’s dedicated to conservative free-market principles, the carbon tax sort of checked the boxes, and so R Street has long advocated for a revenue-neutral form of a carbon price, especially one that includes preemption for regulatory programs that currently try to price carbon into the market.” “It’s certainly a conservative idea to use the lightest touch possible to correct a market failure. So, when you look at a role for government, as a conservative you don’t want government to expand beyond addressing substantive market failures, where the market isn’t addressing problems on its own. And climate change is a really perfect example of this. We know that there’s risk related to anthropogenic emissions, the market isn’t pricing that on its own, and so without the ability to enforce reductions to emissions, I guess through property rights…and then, that’s not working, so how do we address reducing emissions? There should be a role for telling the market that there’s this failure, and we’ve traditionally depended on government to fill that role. So I don’t want to say that a carbon tax is a conservative idea, but the idea of using a light touch to address externalities,...
Mar 30, 2017
Urban Agriculture—Infrastructure and Impact
Topic: The Impact Domino Effect: From Neighborhoods to Cities to Regions In This Episode: 01:19 Rachel Deffenbaugh is introduced. 01:29 Rachel shares how she became involved in urban agriculture and why urban agriculture is important to her. 02:15 Rachel states what Gateway Greening is. 02:31 What is the difference between community gardening and urban agriculture? 03:19 How should urban agriculture be looked at in terms of it being a system within a community.=? 04:58 Rachel talks about why we should focus energy on urban agriculture. 07:25 Rachel shares her thoughts on the direct economic benefits of urban agriculture. 10:49 Mike comments that urban settings can make the food system more economically viable. 12:13 Rachel speaks about the consumer side of food. 13:11 Mike mentions the book The Two-Income Trap by Elizabeth Warren and talks about the other things in our economy that are more expensive than food. 14:16 Rachel talks about what Gateway Greening is doing to make St. Louis more of an urban agricultural place. 17:50 Rachel describes the goals and vision of Gateway Greening. 20:33 How can listeners support the work of Gateway Greening? 21:24 Rachel shares resources for those who do not live in the St. Louis area. Guest: Rachel Deffenbaugh managed the Gateway Greening Urban Farm for over 6 years, during which time she developed and implemented dynamic employment and therapeutic programming for individuals struggling with homelessness, mental illness, and/or addiction. She has a diverse background in sustainable agriculture and therapeutic horticulture. She recently transitioned to supervising the Therapeutic Horticulture program at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Organization: Gateway Greening isn’t just about gardens and plants. It’s about working together to create something beautiful — safer, more colorful neighborhoods for our children; food for the underprivileged and opportunities for the homeless; and a city that embodies our vision of sustainability and hope. Gateway Greening is a community of gardeners, neighbors, friends and volunteers. And we believe that by educating and empowering our community through gardening and urban agriculture, we can continue to grow St. Louis into the city we know it to be. Take Away Quotes: “For me, community gardening has a very localized effect. So it’ll be a garden in a neighborhood, or at a church, that is really focused on whatever community is connected to that garden, which is really significant and impactful for that community. Urban agriculture has a much bigger focus. Maybe it’s a whole city that is impacted by the programing and the produce that is grown there, or potentially even a whole region. So it’s really kind of the scale of what you’re working with.” “Urban agriculture can be easily integrated into any sort of community with intention behind it… in the case of where I work, it might look like a big—we have a two-and-a-half acre urban farm in downtown St. Louis; and we operate a lot of different programs and impact people struggling with homelessness; we bring in volunteers from all different walks of life, all different communities; we have a teen-employment program. So that’s a very centralized, kind of top-down approach to urban agriculture, which I don’t think is bad by any means, but there’s also the bottom-up approach that is out there as well.” “Another thing that urban agriculture can be if you’re a city planner or developer or something is tucking in agricultural elements into what you’re already doing. So if you’re redesigning the streetscape in some cute little neighborhood or something, rather than using nonfood-producing trees, use apple trees, pear trees, whatever kind of trees fit your climate best, but some sort of food-producing tree. They take the same level of maintenance and care as any other tree, but the community can benefit that, and it’s no more effort than anything else,
Mar 23, 2017
Heart and Soul—A Barn-Raising Approach to Community Wealth
Topic: People Taking Charge of Their Own Community In This Episode: 01:20 Jane LaFleur is introduced. 01:28 Jane shares what interests her about community development and how she got involved in community-development work. 02:30 Jane provides some of the economic challenges. 03:33 Jane defines community wealth. 04:13 Jane states what “a barn-raising approach to community wealth” means. 06:06 Jane tells more about the Heart and Soul approach. 07:31 Jane mentions how long she’s been doing the Heart and Soul approach. 08:14 Jane gives a success story of the Heart and Soul approach. 11:14 Mike discusses the problem of getting people engaged in their communities. 11:41 Jane provides another success story of the Heart and Soul approach. 13:26 Mike states his thoughts about the disconnect between government and the people. 13:40 Jane informs that the Heart and Soul approach is about what communities can do for themselves. 15:00 Mike shares his view of what governance is. 15:48 Jane says how people can learn more about her work. 16:04 Jane speaks about the inclusiveness of the Heart and Soul process. 16:58 Mike clarifies which website to go to, depending on your state of residence. 17:33 Jane discusses whether community wealth is an economic-development process. 18:52 Mike mentions focusing on social capital. 19:32 Jane conveys that social capital is a part of asset-based planning and that businesses are attracted to a community that knows what its values are. Guest: Jane LaFleur is the Senior Program Director of Lift360, a state-wide organization that inspires leadership, builds stronger leaders, and equips those leaders to tackle the critical issues facing Maine. Lift360 works to strengthen leaders, organizations and communities through its work with cities and towns, non-profit organizations and community members. Jane served as the Executive Director of Friends of Midcoast Maine (FMM), a regional smart growth, planning and civic engagement organization for 13 years until joining Lift 360 in September 2016. She developed The Community Institute, a program of Friends of Midcoast Maine and has been named a coach and champion on the Orton Family Foundation Heart & Soul planning program. Jane grew up in Lewiston, Maine and has been a city and regional planner since 1981. Her work has received the Maine Associations of Planners Plan of the year award in Damariscotta, Maine and in South Burlington Vermont and in 2015 she was named The Professional Planner of the Year by both the Maine Association of Planners and the Northern New England Chapter of APA. Jane is a sought after lecturer and trainer on planning and civic engagement topics at the local level as well as at national and state conferences including NNECAPA, APA, New Partners for Smart Growth, Community Matters, and MAP Annual Meetings. She has recently published an article in the “Communities and Banking” magazine of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston as well as other publications. Jane graduated from the University of Maine and received her master’s degree in City and Regional Planning from Harvard University and lives within Camden, Maine. Organization: Lift360 focuses on leadership every day – for individuals, in organizations, and throughout communities.Their mission is to inspire leadership, build stronger leaders, and to equip those leaders to tackle the critical issues faced in Maine. That focus takes them into communities and boardrooms, reaching all sectors and all areas of the state. They deliver programs and services working side by side with organizational and community leaders. The impact of their work and the stories they hear from those they collaborate with is an incredible reward. It’s their way to make Maine an even better place to live and work. Take Away Quotes: “I’m a city planner by training, and I’ve been involved with communities since about 1980, when I got out of graduate school,
Mar 16, 2017
Tiny Homes and Smart Infill Housing—Improving Housing Choices
Topic: Spurring Community Revitalization In This Episode: 01:36 Co-host Kate Meis is introduced. 01:44 Guest Darin Dinsmore is introduced. 01:53 Darin shares how he ended up working on affordable-housing and infill-housing issues. 02:24 Darin explains what smart infill housing is. 02:50 Darin describes what infill and smart growth look like in rural communities like Truckee, California. 03:54 Darin provides information on his tiny-home project. 06:04 Darin discusses the zoning ordinance for the tiny-home project in Arizona. 06:50 Kate mentions that with the growing interest in tiny homes, local governments are having to figure out how to keep the zoning updated. 07:23 Mike comments on the dynamic of minimal residential house size and people who are living in hotel rooms. 08:11 Darin speaks about micro-units and single-room occupancy units. 08:46 Darin tells about the infill score and revitalization roadmap tool. 09:27 Darin states where people can go to take the infill-readiness test. 09:48 Darin describes the Crowdbrite tool. 11:25 Darin shares where people can go to access the Crowdbrite tool. 11:39 Darin mentions where the Crowdbrite tool is being used. 12:06 Darin supplies some of the things communities can do to be infill ready. 13:01 Mike adds to the discussion that there’s a public-approval issue. 13:24 Kate conveys that most Americans prefer smart growth. 13:33 Darin provides some of the challenges cities face in becoming infill ready. Co-Host: Kate Meis joins the Infinite Earth Radio as the co-host for this episode. Kate Meis is the Executive Director of the Local Government Commission (LGC). Kate is a champion for local governments; a recognized leader in local climate change adaptation, mitigation and clean energy efforts; and an ardent coalition builder. She obtained a Masters of Science degree in Community and Regional Development from the University of California, Davis, and has a Sociology Bachelor’s degree from California State University, Sonoma.   Guest: Darin Dinsmore is an urban planner & landscape architect with over 25 years of experience in community-based planning and design. He launched Crowdbrite in 2010 to bring plans to life and find solutions to improve civic engagement. His award-winning interactive online tools (www.crowdbrite.net) has helped more than 500k people design their city while leveraging more than $2.5b of new investment.  The Crowdbrite team helps build the natural, social and financial capital to strengthen neighborhoods and revitalize communities.  We were awarded app of the year 2016 by the Lincoln Land Institute with projects featured in Fast Company Magazine. To help create more sustainable and vibrant communities he launched a suite of SMART planning tools including www.infillscore.com and the Community Revitalization Program, used by more than 400 communities.  In 2017 Darin is working to create new jobs and innovative housing solutions with a Tiny House demonstration project. Organization: Crowdbrite's mission is to work with cities and developers to help build more affordable, vibrant and walkable communities. In the first 12 months since launch Crowdbite has 400+ cities engaged in 47 states and 7 countries, won a national planning award, and have started a movement toward cities taking a proactive approach to SMART infill. You can help Crowdbrite reach their goal of 1,000 cities in the next 3 months, to support a data driven approach community revitalization. Your Challenge: Step 1 - explore the 30 SMART Strategies here Step 2 - Read About Infillscore & Watch the www.infillscore.com video Step 3 - Take 7 minutes to complete www.infillscore.com for your community To learn about Crowdbrite's consulting services for community revitalization please contact Darin at darin@crowdbrite.com Take Away Quotes: “I’m originally a planner from Canada, came to the United States, came to California, back in 1999.
Mar 09, 2017
Plan4Health: Fighting Deadly Chronic Diseases Through Better Planning
Topic: How community design impacts lives   In This Episode: 01:31 Elizabeth Hartig is introduced. 01:40 Elizabeth shares how she became involved in planning for health issues. 02:23 Elizabeth tells about the American Planning Association (APA). 03:02 Are there specific objectives for the Plan4Health initiative? 04:08 Elizabeth discusses the degree to which community design impacts health versus access to healthcare. 05:05 How can we move to more healthy community design? 07:18 Elizabeth shares her thoughts on what needs to be done to get the healthy-community movement moving at a faster rate. 08:36 Elizabeth provides the degree to which her work focuses on communities that have a lower quality of health outcomes and what needs to be done for those communities to be healthier. 10:54 What needs to be done to get the people who are building communities to be more responsive to the urban, walkable community market demand. 12:37 Where can people learn more about Plan4Health? 13:53 Elizabeth provides the first steps to making healthier communities. 15:38 Mike and Elizabeth talk about the biggest mistakes planners make. 16:59 Elizabeth mentions if there is an expected end to the Plan4Health program or if it’s ongoing. Guest: Elizabeth Hartig joined the American Planning Association (APA) as a project coordinator for the Planning and Community Health Center in January 2015. Immediately prior, Elizabeth was a program officer with the Chicago Foundation for Women, leading the foundation’s volunteer grantmaking committee, managing the final evaluation plan for each proposal and supporting the foundation’s grantee community. Elizabeth received her master of arts in social administration from the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration and has worked in a variety of direct service and administrative positions.    . Organization: Plan4Health is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The American Planning Association’s Planning and Community Health Center is an awardee of the CDC’s National Implementation and Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention funding opportunity. Plan4Health is one community within the larger project — sharing lessons learned and expertise with the American Heart Association; the National Women, Infants, and Children; Society for Public Health Education; and Directors of Health Promotion and Education. Take Away Quotes: “My background is actually in social work, so I worked with a community foundation in Chicago, really thinking about how we can reach vulnerable populations, how we can support families and women and girls, and a lot of our work focused around places, so where people were and how that impacted their lives and their health and their choices. So when the opportunity to work with a Plan4Health project came up, I was really excited to take this to a deeper level and really think about how the design of our communities can impact our lives.” “APA is a membership organization. We have about 38,000 members across the country. Our members are working at all different levels, with local communities, in regions, really thinking about how we can create healthy, vibrant communities.” “APA was awarded a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in September of 2014, so we are in our second-and-a-half year of the project, and, really, the goal of the award and the goal of our overall project is to prevent chronic disease. So, how do we do that? We can make it easier to walk and bike and increase opportunities for physical activity, and we can also make it easier to get healthy food.” “I think a lot of times we think about health equalling healthcare, but, really, most of your health is not happening at the doctor’s office, it’s happening in your daily life.” Resources: Infinite Earth Radio Episode 09: Blue Zones and the Secret to Living to 100 with Dan Burden Plan4Health
Mar 02, 2017
Is the Smart-Growth Movement at an Inflection Point?
Sustainability and Economic Opportunity and Inclusion
Feb 23, 2017
Affordable Housing-Walking the Inclusionary-Zoning Tightrope
Serving Lower-Income Families Through Inclusionary Housing
Feb 17, 2017
Entrepreneurship and Place-Based Economic Development
A Successful Approach to Community Reinvention
Feb 09, 2017
Missing Middle Housing: Responding to the Demand for Walkable Urban Living
What’s Driving the Affordability Problem
Feb 02, 2017
Autonomous Vehicles—The Future Much Sooner Than You Think
The Inevitable Future of Transportation
Jan 26, 2017
Solving the Affordable Housing Crisis
What’s Driving the Affordability Problem
Jan 19, 2017
New Partners for Smart Growth 2017
Leaving a Lasting, Tangible Impact
Jan 12, 2017
Civil Rights and Access to Recreation and Open Space (Re-release)
Advancing Racial, Social, and Environmental Equality
Jan 05, 2017
Affordable Housing and Employment Patterns in the San Francisco Bay Area (Re-release)
How High-Wage Jobs Affect Affordable Housing
Dec 29, 2016
Come Hell or High Water-Climate Equity, Part 2
The Story of Turkey Creek: Self-Determination and Resilient Communities
Dec 22, 2016
Surviving and Thriving in the Face of Rising Seas, Climate Equity Part 1
How Climate Change is Impacting Low-Income Communities
Dec 15, 2016
The Future of “Infinite Earth Radio” and Sustainability and Equity in the Trump Era
One Year of Spurring Innovation for the Future of Sustainability and Equity
Dec 08, 2016
Regenerative Agriculture with John Roulac of Nutiva: Voting for a Sustainable Future Three Times Per Day
What You Eat Can Help Save the Planet
Dec 01, 2016
Encore Careers in Sustainability and Energy—Transferring Knowledge, Experience, and Wisdom
Retirees Improving Communities for an Optimistic Future
Nov 24, 2016
Food Security, Clean Water, and Economic Development in Southern Colorado
Food Justice and Self-Empowerment
Nov 17, 2016
Radical Innovation and Resilient Infrastructure—Climate Adaptation
Finance Strategies, Sustainable Development, and Future Benefits
Nov 10, 2016
Moving Vulnerable Communities from Surviving to Thriving, Part 5
Transitioning Out of a Toxic, Unsustainable Industry
Nov 03, 2016
Moving Vulnerable Communities from Surviving to Thriving, Part 4
Worker Training and Workforce Development
Oct 27, 2016
Moving Vulnerable Communities from Surviving to Thriving, Part 3
The Workforce Development Component
Oct 20, 2016
Moving Vulnerable Communities from Surviving to Thriving, Part 2
Opportunities Through Alternative Energy
Oct 13, 2016
Moving Vulnerable Communities from Surviving to Thriving, Part 1
Strengthening and Revitalizing Communities
Oct 06, 2016
Cap and Trade, Where Do We Go From Here? – Climate Adaptation Series, Part 4
Building Support and Communication
Sep 29, 2016
Cap and Trade, Where Do We Go From Here? – Climate Adaptation Series, Part 3
Finding Equity Around Funding and Financing
Sep 22, 2016
Cap and Trade, Where Do We Go From Here? – Climate Adaptation Series, Part 2
Finding Equity Around Funding and Financing
Sep 15, 2016
Making the Global Local – Climate Adaptation Series
The Local Impacts of Climate Change
Sep 08, 2016
Water Resiliency in the Inland Empire-CivicSpark Fellows
Water Conservation with Inland Empire Utilities Agency and Santa Ana Watershed Project Authority
Sep 01, 2016
Urban Heat Island and Public Health in LA County – CivicSpark Fellows
Addressing Climate Change at the Los Angeles County Health Department
Aug 25, 2016
Climate Justice as an Encore Career
Environmental Justice, Equity, and Livability in California
Aug 18, 2016
Regional Sustainability Indicators in Southern California – CivicSpark Fellows
Supporting the Development of Sustainable Practices
Aug 11, 2016
Civil Rights and Access to Recreation and Open Space
Advancing Racial, Social, and Environmental Equality
Aug 04, 2016
A Carbon-Neutral Santa Monica by 2050—CivicSpark Fellows
The Experience and Work of the CivicSpark Fellowship Program
Jul 28, 2016
Redefining Water Infrastructure
Forests and Our Water Supply
Jul 21, 2016
CivicSpark Fellows—Making the Central Valley More Sustainable
Bringing New Economic Opportunities to Disadvantaged Communities
Jul 14, 2016
Businesses Acting on Rising Seas
Small Businesses, Climate Change, and Preparedness
Jul 07, 2016
Mobility and the Sharing Economy
The Shared-Use Strategy of Transportation
Jun 30, 2016
Power of Small—A Housing Revolution
The Multi-Generational Housing Model Movement
Jun 23, 2016
"The New Grand Strategy: Restoring America’s Prosperity, Security, and Sustainability in the 21st Century"
Addressing the Economy, Climate Change, and the Challenge of Global Unsustainability
Jun 16, 2016
Using Nature to Combat Climate Change—The Nature Conservancy
Enhancing Resilience of Human and Natural Communities
Jun 09, 2016
Race, Ethnicity, and Urban Land Use Decision-Baltimore Ecosystem Study
History of an Unlevel Playing Field
Jun 02, 2016
When a Climate Change HERO Comes Along
Providing Turnkey Sustainability Programs
May 26, 2016
Fair Trade and the World’s Largest Coffee Break
The Impact of Trade Deals in America
May 19, 2016
Taking Back the Power – Community Choice Aggregation
The Next Frontier in Community Energy
May 12, 2016
The Future of Transportation: Mobility as a Service
Reducing Single-Occupancy-Vehicle (SOV) Commuting
May 05, 2016
Community Benefits Agreements: A Vital Tool for Equitable Community Reinvestment
Equalizing the Balance of Power
Apr 28, 2016
The California Endowment: Empowering Grassroots Communities
Giving People a Voice
Apr 21, 2016
A Holistic Approach to Drinking-Water Infrastructure [U.S. Water Crisis Part Three]
Water Sustainability in Urban Areas
Apr 14, 2016
Climate Change and Storm Water Utilities [U.S. Water Crisis Part Two]
Integrated Water Resource and Infrastructure Management
Apr 07, 2016
Access to Safe Drinking Water in Rural America [U.S. Water Crisis Part One]
Water Infrastructure in Rural Communities
Mar 31, 2016
Youth Perspective-How to Engage the Next Generation in Decision-Making
Young Women and Youth for Smart Growth
Mar 24, 2016
Affordable Housing and Employment Patterns in the San Francisco Bay Area
How High-Wage Jobs Affect Affordable Housing
Mar 17, 2016
Authentic Community Engagement in Gentrifying Communities
Making Sure That Underrepresented Communities Are Heard
Mar 10, 2016
Blue Zones and the Secret to Living to 100
Making the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice
Mar 03, 2016
Beyond Talk: A Tool for Planning and Evaluating Equitable Development Projects and Plans
Moving Equity from a Buzzword to a Metric
Feb 25, 2016
Revitalizing Baltimore in the Wake of the Freddy Gray Tragedy
Revitalization in Baltimore after Freddie Gray
Feb 18, 2016
The Philadelphia Land Bank and Equitable Community Development
Building Strong Neighborhoods and Communities
Feb 18, 2016
Community Wealth Building, a Superior Economic Development Model
Anchor Institutions and Community Wealth Building
Feb 11, 2016
Smart Growth as a Driver of Equity
Equitable Opportunities for All People and Communities
Feb 11, 2016
Investing in Opportunity
Investing in Opportunity
Feb 04, 2016
Environmental Justice and Smart Growth
Incorporating Environmental and Economic Justice and Equitable Development
Feb 04, 2016
From Unemployed Berkeley Dropout to Climate Change Warrior, the Tyi Johnson and Rising Sun Energy Story
The Green Economy and Workforce Development
Jan 28, 2016
Green Job Training and Workforce Development
The Green Economy, Youth Employment and Workforce Development
Jan 28, 2016
Renewable Energy and Taking Control of Your Future
Renewable Energy
Jan 28, 2016
Local Food Systems and Food Justice
Local Food Systems
Jan 21, 2016
Equitable Development and Economic Growth
Intertwined Crises in America
Jan 21, 2016
The Future of Smart Growth
Smart Growth and Sustainability in Communities in the U.S.
Jan 20, 2016
Portland is a Movable Side Yard Feast
Providing Local Food to the Local Community
Jan 17, 2016
Food Waste in America – The Beauty in Ugly Food
Decreasing Food Waste Through the Real Good Produce Program
Jan 17, 2016
Hunger in America – Thinking Outside the Food Pantry
Taking a Look at Food Insecurity
Jan 13, 2016