The Uncertain Hour

By Marketplace

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: Government & Organizations

Open in Apple Podcasts


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 1326
Reviews: 3


 Apr 1, 2019

Wheeler
 Mar 25, 2019
Fantastic in-depth look at a topic per season. Long breaks between seasons, but always worth the wait.

Matt
 Jul 13, 2018
Great analysis of controversial topics, done with brains and heart. Fascinating storytelling.

Description

In “The Uncertain Hour” podcast, host Krissy Clark dives into one controversial topic each season to bust longstanding myths about our economy and shed light on opaque realities of the world we live in. Given that nothing is more uncertain than our present economic outlook due to COVID-19, the team is launching a new series of pop-up episodes to help listeners understand this moment. “A History of Now” explores the key economic themes that are impacting our lives in new ways due to COVID-19. From the history of quarantine to how we handle unemployment and the holes in our social safety net, the team unpacks complex topics to explain what’s happening in this economy and how income and class will likely determine your fate. Clark and producer Caitlin Esch of the Marketplace Wealth & Poverty Desk make a dynamic, experienced reporting team. Clark is an award-winning senior correspondent who brings curiosity, playfulness and empathy to the task of making sense of fundamental shifts in the U.S. economy, including the widening gap between rich and poor, and what this means for economic mobility and the American dream. Esch has deep roots in public media; her stories have aired on NPR news, NPR’s “Weekend All Things Considered,” KQED, KCRW and KPCC. She has a master’s degree in journalism from University of California, Berkeley, and a bachelor’s in English literature from George Washington University. Find “The Uncertain Hour” wherever you get your podcasts.

Episode Date
Answering your “History of Now” questions
00:29:06

We’ve spent the past five weeks trying to make sense of this moment, where the inequalities of our society have been suddenly set in high relief. In that time, you all have written in with a bunch of questions big and small. Today, we’re going to cap off this pop-up season by answering a few of them. Questions like: What would chicken cost if plant workers got better wages and benefits? And how did health insurance get tied to our jobs anyway? We’ll also look back at two very clear moments, both after pandemics, when economic inequality started to fall dramatically.

Thanks so much to everyone who listened and sent in questions. We’ll be back later this year with new episodes. Until, then, there’s always our first three seasons.

Jun 17, 2020
Without a home in a pandemic
00:43:01
On any given night last year, half a million people in the United States were experiencing homelessness, and more than 60% of them were staying in emergency shelters or transitional housing programs. Now, those same facilities are hot spots for COVID-19. It’s hard to social distance when you’re cramped, sharing bedrooms and sharing locker-room style communal showers. Today, we’ll look back at the history of how America has sheltered unhoused people, and how those approaches can make it hard for them to get back on their feet even when there’s not a pandemic going on.
Jun 11, 2020
There are cracks in the foundation of our housing system
00:33:20

The COVID-19 pandemic arrived at a moment when the gap between rich and poor in this country had hit a record high. One place that inequality is most visible is in the neighborhoods where we live. Generations of discriminatory housing policy, and lending practices that favored white borrowers, have entrenched segregation in American cities. This week, we’ll examine the housing policies that emerged from past economic crises, policies that excluded black people and other people of color, preventing them from building the wealth that middle class white families built.

Jun 03, 2020
Unemployment benefits are hard to get. That’s on purpose.
00:36:18
Millions of Americans who are out of work don’t receive unemployment benefits. That’s by design. Today, we’ll look at the history of the United States’ unemployment insurance system, how this country defines “unemployment,”and why the program was never intended to cover everyone who’s not working.
May 27, 2020
An unequal history of quarantines
00:29:08

As long as there’s been such a thing as quarantine, each person’s experience under it has depended largely on their economic status. On this week’s show, we take a tour of quarantines through history, from the bubonic plague outbreaks in 14th and 17th century Italy, to the a typhoid outbreak in New York in the early 1900s and a few other stops along the way. Those quarantines looked very different if you were, say, an immigrant, or a Jewish textile merchant, or a sex worker.

Crises like the COVID-19 pandemic shine a spotlight on all the inequalities already lurking in the system, and ideas of what the government owes to people in quarantine have changed over the centuries too. Long gone are the days of the government sending your family fennel sausage, cheese and wine to make it through.

May 20, 2020
You’re an essential worker. Do you get essential protections?
00:29:51

Chicken is America’s most popular meat. But chicken supply chains — in fact, many of our food supply chains — are in danger of breaking down. Part of the reason is the workers who process and package those goods are getting sick. In some cases, they’re dying.

For the first episode of our new season, “A History of Now,” we focused on America’s chicken supply chain because it raises a huge, looming question: How is it that essential workers don’t have essential protections? How do we get through a crisis — any crisis — if we can’t be sure our food-producing workforce is safe?

May 13, 2020
A History of Now: The Trailer
00:03:36

There’s not much more uncertain than our current moment. Our day-to-day lives and our economy have been upended by the coronavirus pandemic. On this season, “A History of Now,” we’re digging into the history and policies that help make sense of this current moment, a time where issues of wealth and poverty feel even more stark than usual. New episodes start May 13.

 

 

May 06, 2020
A new piece of the opioid crisis origin story, revealed
00:15:43

We just found the answer to a really big question that’s been bugging us for years, about why the opioid crisis has hit some places so hard while other places have been relatively protected. The answer comes in the form of new academic research, that builds upon our reporting. Specifically, a secret internal marketing document from Purdue Pharma that senior producer Caitlin Esch discovered in the bowels of a county court house. She’s on this bonus episode to talk about it.

Dec 19, 2019
George Bush’s infamous crack speech, 30 years later
0:45:37

On this day, 30 years ago, President George H.W. Bush gave his first address from the Oval Office. Bush held up a baggie of crack he said had been seized just outside the White House. Today, we’re revisiting our episode about that speech, the events that led up to it and the lives it affected. For more on America’s drug war, listen to season 3 of our show.

Sep 05, 2019
Introducing “This Is Uncomfortable”
00:03:48

We’re hard at work on the next season of “The Uncertain Hour,” but in the meantime, we’re excited to share a new podcast from Marketplace: “This Is Uncomfortable.” It’s a storytelling podcast, all about life and how money messes with it. Every Thursday, host Reema Khrais will dig into the unanticipated ways money affects relationships, shapes identities and often defines what it means to be an adult. The first episode is out now. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Jun 15, 2019
Kicking the habit
0:49:28
Apr 18, 2019
Supply
0:40:36
Apr 11, 2019
Welcome to Wise County
0:35:55
Apr 04, 2019
Sentencing
0:48:12
Mar 28, 2019
What happened to Keith?
00:32:38
Mar 22, 2019
George H.W. Bush and his baggie of crack
0:45:37
Mar 21, 2019
The Uncertain Hour Season 3: Inside America’s Drug War
0:02:27
Mar 07, 2019
“A mosquito in a nudist colony”
1:19:08
Mar 08, 2018
Law and Odor: a crime story about orchids, pig smell, refineries and you
1:08:57
Jan 26, 2018
Who’s regulating whom?
0:45:34
Jan 05, 2018
Your regulations questions, answered
0:27:28
Dec 21, 2017
The sentence that helped set off the opioid crisis
1:05:19
Dec 13, 2017
The peanut butter verdict
0:38:31
Nov 22, 2017
The Peanut Butter Wars
0:37:37
Nov 10, 2017
The Peanut Butter Grandma goes to Washington
0:33:26
Oct 26, 2017
The Uncertain Hour dives into red tape
0:04:10
Oct 03, 2017
The Album, “Work Makes the Difference”
0:14:08
Aug 17, 2016
The road not taken
00:43:05
Jul 07, 2016
“Pregnant? We can help.”
0:26:30
Jun 23, 2016
Everything but the kitchen sink
0:23:55
Jun 09, 2016
What’s love (styles) got to do with it?
0:34:23
May 26, 2016
White gloves, aluminum cans and plasma
0:34:01
May 11, 2016
The Magic Bureaucrat
0:41:07
Apr 28, 2016
Introducing ‘The Uncertain Hour’
00:03:20
Mar 08, 2016