Policy Forum Pod

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Policy Forum Pod is the podcast of Policy Forum.net - Asia and the Pacific's platform for public policy debate, analysis and discussion. Policy Forum is based at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University.

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Episode Date
The loss and damage consensus at COP27
55:05

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Siobhan McDonnell and George Carter join us to share their experiences inside the COP27 negotiations in Egypt and why the agreement on a ‘loss and damage’ fund was a landmark moment in global climate change discussions.


What does the historic agreement to establish a ‘loss and damage’ fund at this United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) in Egypt mean for small island developing states, particularly in the Pacific? How can negotiating parties ensure the fund is operationalised by COP28 in Dubai, rather than allowing countries to stall - as has been seen with previous initiatives? And with Australia looking to co-host the 2026 instalment of the conference with Pacific Island nations, what impact would a successful bid have on the region and the Australian public? Dr Siobhan McDonnell and Dr George Carter, who negotiated on behalf of Pacific Island countries at COP27, join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss the talks and to look ahead to the next conference in Dubai.

 

Siobhan McDonnell is a legal anthropologist with over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous people in Australia and the Pacific on land use, gender, and climate change. She is a Senior Lecturer at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and Chief Investigator for the Australian Research Council’s Discovery Project on Climate Change and Gender in the Pacific.


George Carter is a Research Fellow in Geopolitics and Regionalism at ANU Department of Pacific Affairs and Director of ANU Pacific Institute.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.

 

Image: IAEA Imagebank on Flickr. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Dec 02, 2022
Justice for First Nations Australians
56:15

Valerie Cooms from The Australian National University joins us on this episode to discuss justice reinvestment, the importance of the whole Australian community embracing First Nations languages, and progress towards a constitutionally-enshrined Voice to Parliament.


Is the allocation of $81.5 million for justice reinvestment initiatives in the recent federal budget a step in the right direction when it comes to reducing the high rates of incarceration of First Nations peoples? And why is truth-telling about Australia’s colonial history so important for reconciliation? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Director of ANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research Professor Valerie Cooms joins Professor Sharon Bessell to examine the First Nations justice measures in the recent federal budget and the need for bravery from policymakers to ensure Australia achieves genuine reconciliation.


Valerie Cooms is Director and Professor of Indigenous Policy at ANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Find full show notes on policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can find us on Twitter at @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 25, 2022
Addressing the housing affordability crisis
55:13

In the final instalment in our series on housing, Executive Director of Anglicare Australia Kasy Chambers joins us to discuss the dire state of housing affordability and how policymakers can turn things around.


Housing affordability, particularly in Australia’s private rental market, is an issue of major concern for people on low incomes. According to Anglicare’s annual Rental Affordability Snapshot, less than 10 rentals across the entire country were affordable for a single person looking for work on the JobSeeker payment on a weekend in March 2022. So what can policymakers do to turn this crisis around? What impact does the current policy framework, which incentivises wealth generation over welfare in the housing market, have on affordability? And will the government’s new National Housing Accord make a difference? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Executive Director of Anglicare Australia Kasy Chambers joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss how to improve housing affordability in Australia.


Kasy Chambers is Executive Director of Anglicare Australia - a network of 45 agencies, 38,000 staff and volunteers, working with over 502,000 clients annually across Australia.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes on policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can find us on Twitter at @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 18, 2022
Not every house is a home
43:01

Joel Dignam from Better Renting and Farzana Choudhury from Canberra Community Law join us to discuss housing accessibility and justice on this episode of Policy Forum Pod


How do poor housing conditions affect people’s health and wellbeing, particularly in the context of a cost-of-living crisis? How can policymakers ensure all Australians have access to safe, affordable, and healthy homes? And what role could anti-discrimination laws play in protecting people who might be experiencing homelessness or poverty? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, solicitor at Canberra Community Law, Farzana Choudhury, and Executive Director of Better Renting, Joel Dignam, join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss how to improve housing accessibility.


Farzana Choudhury is a community lawyer and human rights advocate, specialising in poverty, homelessness and disability rights. She is Supervising Solicitor (Disability Law) at Canberra Community Law and President of the ACT Law Society.


Joel Dignam is the Executive Director of Better Renting, a community of renters working together for stable, affordable, and healthy homes. He has a background in organising and campaigning across non-profits, unions, and electoral politics.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes on policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can find us on Twitter @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 11, 2022
Housing in a changing climate
48:36

To kick off a new bundle of episodes on housing, we discuss the impact of climate change on planning and housing policy with Barbara Norman, Emeritus Professor of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Canberra.


As the global population heads towards at least nine billion and pressure on the natural environment increases, how must policymakers adapt their plans for housing and the built environment? Do Australian governments need to introduce stricter regulations around where development can take place as the climate continues to change? And what lessons can Australian cities and towns learn from climate-sensitive planning decisions made abroad? On this episode, Emeritus Professor Barbara Norman from the University of Canberra joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to launch our new mini-series on housing policy.


Barbara Norman is Emeritus Professor of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Canberra and author of the new book, Urban Planning for Climate Change.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Correction: Anthony Albanese was Minister for Infrastructure and Transport during the period referred to in the discussion, never Minister for Climate Change.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 04, 2022
Building a new architecture of fairness
1:02:44

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, John Falzon joins Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta to examine the new Australian government’s first budget and what it means for equity and wellbeing.


What does the new government’s budget mean for the millions of Australians living below the poverty line? Does the government have the political will to build a new architecture of fairness? And how could a wellbeing economic framework support all Australians? Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita, Dr John Falzon OAM, joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss what this federal budget does, what it doesn’t do, and what it signals for the future.


John Falzon OAM is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 28, 2022
Reimagining the future of higher education
1:12:06

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, higher education and public policy leaders Helen Sullivan and Janine O'Flynn join us to discuss Australia’s higher education system and how universities can change to better foster fearless future leadership. 


What role do universities play in our contemporary, globalised world? How can universities advance equity and diversity among students and staff? And how can we create a more sustainable and equitable higher education system for the whole university community? Dean of the College of Asia and the Pacific at The Australian National University Professor Helen Sullivan and Incoming School Director of Crawford School of Public Policy Professor Janine O’Flynn join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to reimagine the future of Australian universities. 


Helen Sullivan is Dean of the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific. She has published widely on public policy, and public governance.


Janine O’Flynn is Director of Education, Melbourne School of Government, on secondment at The Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG). In 2023, she will commence as School Director at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Show notes | The following were mentioned during this episode:


Feed Wonder, Helen Sullivan 2021 


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 13, 2022
Playtime: transforming teaching and learning
51:50

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we speak to former teacher Alice Garner and award-winning author and educator Pasi Sahlberg about transforming the teaching profession in Australia.


What needs to change so that teaching is a respected, valued profession in Australia - on par with medicine and law? How can policymakers better support teachers to do the critical work of educating children? And how can schools encourage more play and creativity in the classroom? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter are joined by researcher and former ‘career change’ teacher, Dr Alice Garner, and Finnish education expert based at Southern Cross University, Professor Pasi Sahlberg.


Pasi Sahlberg is Finnish educator, teacher, author, and Professor of Education at Southern Cross University.


Alice Garner is a historian, writer, performer, and a former French and humanities teacher in the Victorian secondary school system. She has published in social, environmental and educational history and is currently based in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.

 

Full show notes are available at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 07, 2022
Providing an inclusive 21st century education
59:07

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, education experts Kitty te Riele and Jennifer Skattebol join us to discuss how the education system can ensure all children have access to high quality education.


How can policymakers ensure students with challenging behaviours and their teachers are receiving enough care and support in the classroom? What role should alternative schools play in the education system? And should suspensions and expulsions be used as a way to manage student behaviour, or do these strategies do more harm than good? Deputy Director of the University of Tasmania’s Peter Underwood Centre for Educational Attainment Professor Kitty te Riele and Dr Jennifer Skattebol from the University of New South Wales join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss creating an inclusive, equitable, and supportive education system for all Australian children and young people.


Kitty te Riele is Deputy Director (Research) and Professor at the University of Tasmania's Peter Underwood Centre for Educational Attainment.


Jennifer Skattebol is a Senior Research Fellow at the Social Policy Research Centre at University of New South Wales, Sydney. Her expertise is designing research with children, young people and their families in contexts of disadvantage.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 30, 2022
Changing childcare
59:33

To kick off our new series of episodes on education, Deborah Brennan and Leonora Risse join us to discuss how to create a world-class childcare and early education system.


How could the Australian government provide universal childcare, making it available and affordable for all? What can the country do for the early education and care workforce to ensure they receive fair pay and recognition that goes beyond platitudes? And how can policymakers engage with children to put their needs at the centre of policy reform? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Deborah Brennan from the University of New South Wales’ Social Policy Research Centre and economist Dr Leonora Risse from RMIT University join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss Australia’s early education and care sector.


Deborah Brennan is a Professor at the Social Policy Research Centre at the University of New South Wales. Deborah is a member of the US Studies Centre's International Academic Advisory Committee and a leading researcher in comparative welfare, children’s services, and family policy. 


Leonora Risse is an economist who specialises in gender equality. She is a Research Fellow with the Women’s Leadership Institute Australia, and is a co-founder of the Women in Economics Network (WEN) in Australia, currently serving as the WEN National Chair.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 22, 2022
The art of living together
50:48

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, political economist Katherine Trebeck and author and advocate Tim Hollo join us to discuss reshaping political and economic systems that help us to better care for ourselves, each other, and the planet.

 

To deal with the major challenges that society faces, will small policy adjustments shift the status quo, or is deep systemic change necessary? How can policymakers ensure that wellbeing is at the heart of government decision-making? And how can democracies better involve their citizens in the project of building a common future? Co-founder of the Wellbeing Economy Alliance Katherine Trebeck and Executive Director of the Green Institute Tim Hollo join Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss living democracy and wellbeing economics. 


Katherine Trebeck is New Economics Senior Fellow at the ZOE Institute, a Fellow of The Leaders Institute, a Distinguished Fellow of the Schumacher Institute, and co-founder of the Wellbeing Economy Alliance, which works to amplify the work of others in the movement for a wellbeing economy.


Tim Hollo is Executive Director of the Green Institute and author of Living Democracy: An ecological manifesto for the end of the world as we know it.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 16, 2022
Waste and reward: low-value health care and its impact on patients
42:40

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we discuss how ‘low-value’ health care is causing harm to patients and what policymakers can do to address it.


How can policymakers and health professionals reduce ‘low-value care’, improve outcomes for patients, and address the health system’s carbon footprint? What is the impact of waste and inefficiency on the wellbeing of healthcare workers? And how can the policy debate be reframed so that patients - and meaningful relationships - are at the centre of health care? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Rachelle Buchbinder AO from Monash University and Kylie Woolcock, Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association, join Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss low-value care and transforming the health system.


Rachelle Buchbinder AO is a rheumatologist, a clinical epidemiologist, and Professor in the Monash University Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine.


Kylie Woolcock is Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association, Australia’s national peak body for public and not-for-profit hospitals and healthcare providers.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 09, 2022
Navigating the mental health system
1:01:21

General practitioner Louise Stone and psychiatrist Philip Keightley join us to discuss Australia’s mental health system, the wellbeing of health workers, and what policymakers can do to improve outcomes for patients on this episode of Policy Forum Pod.


Why is it ‘no longer' possible to provide best practice mental health care for everybody in Australia’s public health system? What needs to change to improve the wellbeing of healthcare workers? And how can policymakers ensure there is greater equity for patients in terms of access to quality mental health care? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Louise Stone and Dr Philip Keightley from The Australian National University (ANU) Medical School join Dr Arnagretta Hunter and Professor Sharon Bessell to examine what changes are needed in Australia’s mental health system.


Louise Stone is a general practitioner with clinical, research, education and policy expertise in mental health, and a Clinical Associate Professor in the Social Foundations of Medicine group at ANU Medical School.


Philip Keightley is a Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School and works clinically in perinatal psychiatry. He has clinical and research interests in psychotherapy in the medically ill, clinician wellbeing, and perinatal psychiatry.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


If you, or anyone you know needs help you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or via http://www.lifeline.org.au/ or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36 or via https://www.beyondblue.org.au/.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 01, 2022
Taking the temperature of Australian health care
55:00

This week on Policy Forum Pod, Clare Skinner and Lesley Russell join us to explore where the opportunities exist for meaningful reform of Australia’s healthcare system, especially in emergency medicine. 


What factors have contributed to Australia’s healthcare system being under-funded, under-resourced, under-staffed, and sometimes under-valued? Is the current funding model fit for purpose as patients’ requirements become increasingly complex? And where should the government start when it comes to widescale reform? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Clare Skinner and Dr Lesley Russell join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss why Australia’s healthcare system is on the brink of crisis and what policymakers can do to address the challenges the sector faces. 


Clare Skinner is President of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, the not-for-profit organisation responsible for training emergency physicians and advancement of professional standards in emergency medicine, and a Senior Staff Specialist in Emergency Medicine.


Lesley Russell is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Menzies Centre for Health Policy at the University of Sydney. She was a health policy adviser to the federal Australian Labor Party and as health policy adviser on the Energy and Commerce Committee in the United States House of Representatives. She was also a Senior Policy Adviser to the US Surgeon-General during the Obama Administration.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 25, 2022
Australia’s drinking water divide
51:30

According to a new study, Australia needs a national drinking water quality database - we speak to Paul Wyrwoll and Evie Rose, two authors of the study, about why on this episode of Policy Forum Pod.


How many Australians lack access to safe and good-quality drinking water? What does it mean for people’s lives to not have access to water that meets Australian health and aesthetic standards for water quality? And how can policymakers ensure people in regional and remote Australia have agency and power in decision-making around their water services? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Paul Wyrwoll and Evie Rose join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss their new research about water access in Australia.


Paul Wyrwoll is a Research Fellow at the ANU Institute for Water Futures and Crawford School of Public Policy. He works on water economics and policy in Australia and the Asia-Pacific, with a focus on drinking water provision, large water infrastructure, and nature-based solutions to flood and water quality control.


Evie Rose is a PhD Candidate at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University researching the policy challenges of drinking water security and quality in remote Aboriginal communities in Central Australia.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Full show notes available at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 19, 2022
Australia’s road to a sustainable and equitable energy future
57:29

This week on Policy Forum Pod, the ANU Energy Change Institute’s Thomas Longden and RegNet’s Lee White join Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter to discuss the importance of equitable energy policies and survey the terrain ahead for Australia’s energy policymakers.


As Australia grapples with transitioning to renewable energy, how is the country integrating affordable, reliable, and clean power sources into its energy system? What roadblocks stand in the way? And how do policymakers ensure equitable access to energy as they look to accelerate that transition? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Thomas Longden and Lee White join Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter to discuss Australia’s complex relationship with fossil fuels and its journey to a greener energy grid.


Thomas Longden is a Fellow working on the ANU Energy Change Institute’s Grand Challenge – Zero-Carbon Energy for the Asia-Pacific, based at the Crawford School of Public Policy. 


Lee White is a Research Fellow with the Zero-Carbon Energy for the Asia-Pacific Grand Challenge at the School of Regulation and Global Governance.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 12, 2022
A penguin gets lost in the Australian desert
57:39

This week on Policy Forum Pod, David Lindenmayer joins us to discuss Australia’s dire biodiversity trajectory and what policymakers need to achieve in the five years until the next State of the Environment Report.


Why is environmental monitoring so important? How effective are biodiversity offsets in Australia and around the world? And what could the next State of the Environment Report look like in 2026 if Australia changes its trajectory on conservation and biodiversity? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, David Lindenmayer joins Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter to discuss a hypothetical penguin farm in the Australian desert and what it reveals about our country’s ‘nothing short of disgraceful’ approach to its environment. 


David Lindenmayer is a Professor at the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society and is widely regarded as one of the world's leading forest and woodland ecologists and conservation biologists.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 05, 2022
The state of the environment
52:36

This week on Policy Forum Pod, Mark Howden joins Arnagretta Hunter and Sharon Bessell to discuss the recent state of the environment report and the growing strain on the most important system of all - the planet. 


With a general public demanding action on climate change, how can the government start delivering on its targets? Just how much leadership, and what legislative and policy responses will be enough to protect our environment? And can Australia move beyond the political polarisation that has historically dominated its climate policy? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Mark Howden joins Arnagretta Hunter and Sharon Bessell to explore the current state of Australia’s environment and outline a pathway forward.


Mark Howden is the Director of the Institute for Climate, Energy & Disaster Solutions at ANU and Vice Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He is also the Chair of the ACT Climate Change Council.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 29, 2022
Making empathy unconditional: changing the story on poverty and inequality
56:55

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, John Falzon, Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter discuss the serious impact inequality has on Australians, especially children, and how policymakers can reverse the marginalisation and demonisation of people experiencing poverty.


What does the experience of living with poverty mean for the lives of Australian children? Is the new government’s move to create a ‘wellbeing budget’ a step in the right direction when it comes to measuring the strength of the Australian economy and society? And should policymakers change the focus of Australia’s social security system, dumping the framework of ‘mutual obligation’ in favour of one built on mutual respect? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr John Falzon, Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter discuss vulnerability, insecurity and poverty in the context of Australia’s cost of living crisis.


John Falzon OAM is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 22, 2022
The price of a healthy life
58:51

This week on Policy Forum Pod, Sharon Friel joins Arnagretta Hunter and Sharon Bessell to look at the health impacts of the cost of living acrisis.


How is the current cost of living crisis impacting the health and wellbeing of Australians? How do the social determinants of health play out in the community? And how might policymakers respond to future socio-economic crises without compromising people’s health? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Sharon Friel joins Arnagretta Hunter and Sharon Bessell to explore the impacts of the current economic environment on health and wellbeing. 


Sharon Friel is an ARC Laureate Fellow, Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at The Australian National University School of Regulation and Global Governance.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.





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Jul 14, 2022
Economic sovereignty for First Nations Australians
52:44

This week on Policy Forum Pod, Vice-President First Nations at The Australian National University Peter Yu joins us in the second episode in our new mini-series on the social impacts of rising costs of living and the inflation crisis.


What would an economic self-determination framework look like in Australia? What can we learn from First Nations’ experiences around the world, particularly from New Zealand and Canada? And can our current economic system empower and create pathways for self-determination and First Nations’ economic sovereignty? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Peter Yu joins Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter to discuss creating pathways for economic self-determination for First Nations Australians.


Peter Yu AM is a Yawuru Man from Broome in the Kimberley region in North West Australia with 40 years experience in Indigenous development and advocacy, and is the inaugural Vice-President (First Nations) at The Australian National University. He was a key negotiator on behalf of the Yawuru Native Title Holders with the Western Australian State Government over the 2010 Yawuru Native Title Agreement. 


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 07, 2022
Back to basics - the economy and us
51:13

This week on Policy Forum Pod, Warwick McKibbin and Kristen Sobeck join us in the first episode in our new mini-series on the social impacts of rising costs of living and the inflation crisis.


What global and local factors have contributed to the rising cost of living and inflation? What is the role of the Reserve Bank in managing monetary policy? And what should policymakers consider when addressing these complex issues? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Warwick McKibbin and Kristen Sobeck join Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter to go back to basics and unpack the current state of our economic environment.


Warwick McKibbin AO is a Distinguished Professor of Economics and Public Policy and Director of the ANU Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis at Crawford School of Public Policy. He is also Director of Policy Engagement and ANU Node Leader at the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research.


Kristen Sobeck is a Senior Research Officer at Crawford School's Tax and Transfer Policy Institute. She has worked as an economist at the International Labour Organization at its headquarters in Geneva and the Argentina country office.


Sharon Bessell is a Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 04, 2022
Healing from the heart
59:36

This week on Policy Forum Pod, Virginia Marshall joins us to discuss the Uluru Statement from the Heart and Australia’s pathway towards healing. 


How can Australia place kindness and care at the centre of its policy-making? What do First Nations’ knowledge systems tell us about protecting the land, waterways, and environment? And can implementing the Uluru Statement from the Heart spark the truth-telling and healing Australia needs? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Virginia Marshall joins us to discuss the future of First Nations’ policy and Australia’s journey to a fuller expression of its nationhood.


Virginia Marshall is the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Regulation and Global Governance and the Fenner School of Environment and Society. She is also a lawyer and solicitor and has been a regular guest and occasional host of Policy Forum Pod and Democracy Sausage. 


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Show notes | The following were mentioned during this episode:


Australian species on the brinkPolicy Forum Pod, (2022) 


Close the GapAustralian Human Rights Commission, (2022)


Food, water and energy for allPolicy Forum Pod, (2022)


The meaning of Country, Policy Forum Pod, (2021)


The Uluru Statement, The Uluru Dialogue, (2017)


Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jun 24, 2022
Food, water and energy for all
1:07:30

This week on Policy Forum Pod, Professor of Economics and Convenor of the Water Justice Hub Quentin Grafton joins us to discuss the environmental challenges and policy opportunities to ensure food, water and energy for all. 


How does climate change impact our relationship to food, water and energy? How can truth-telling support a more equitable and sustainable approach to managing resources? And how do we need to think about global governance to ensure food, water and energy for all? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor of Economics at the Crawford School of Public Policy, Quentin Grafton joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss the current ‘triple threat’ and options for policymakers in Australia.

 

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics, Convenor of the Water Justice Hub and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy at the Crawford School of Public Policy.  He was recently appointed the Lead Expert and Commissioner of the Global Commission on the Economics of Water.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.



Show notes | The following were mentioned during this episode:


Globalisation and the search for common good, Policy Forum Pod, (2022)


Pandemic, prices, and poverty, World Bank Blogs, (2022)


The water-climate change emergency, Policy Forum, (2022)


White House Action Plan on Global Water Security, The White House, (2022)


Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jun 17, 2022
Can Australia’s new parliament ‘set the standard’?
51:41

This week on Policy Forum Pod, youth advocate Yasmin Poole and expert on gender-sensitive parliaments Sonia Palmieri join us to discuss Australia’s most diverse parliament in history and what it might mean for gender sensitive policy-making in the future.


What should the major parties learn from the election outcome about gender diversity and intersectionality? What must the new government do to ensure women are safe in parliamentary workplaces? And has Australia learnt from the sexist treatment of Australia’s first woman prime minister, Julia Gillard, so it will be different for the next woman who holds that office? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, youth advocate and Plan International National Ambassador Yasmin Poole and contributor to Australia’s ‘Set the Standard’ report into parliamentary workplaces Dr Sonia Palmieri join Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss diversity and women’s safety in parliament, and whether the changes at this election will lead to more gender-sensitive policy.


Sonia Palmieri is a Gender Policy Fellow with the Department of Pacific Affairs. Sonia works on understanding and improving women’s political leadership and participation, and was a contributor to Set the Standard: Report on the Independent Review into Commonwealth Parliamentary Workplaces.


Yasmin Poole is a public speaker, board director and youth advocate. Yasmin is currently Plan International’s National Ambassador and an advocate for girls’ rights to be recognised around the world.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, family or domestic violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Image: JJ Harrison on wikimedia commons (CC-BY-SA-3.0).


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jun 09, 2022
Australia’s Pacific diplomacy
59:34

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, George Carter and Siobhan McDonnell join us to talk about Australia’s diplomacy in the Pacific, and if the new Australian government can become the region’s “partner of choice”. 


How important is strong action on climate change to Australia’s security relationships in the Pacific? What lessons does China’s failure to strike a multilateral security and trade agreement with Pacific Island countries hold for Australia? And how could Oceanic and First Nations diplomacy lead to deeper, lasting cooperation? Dr George Carter, Research Fellow at ANU Department of Pacific Affairs, and Dr Siobhan McDonnell, Senior Lecturer at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss climate action, security, and Australia’s Pacific diplomacy.


This episode was recorded on the morning of Wednesday 1 June, before Australian Foreign Minister Penny Wong visited Samoa and Tonga.


George Carter is a Research Fellow in Geopolitics and Regionalism at ANU Department of Pacific Affairs and Director of the ANU Pacific Institute.


Siobhan McDonnell is a legal anthropologist with over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous people in Australia and the Pacific on land use, gender, and climate change. She is a Senior Lecturer at Crawford School of Public Policy and Chief Investigator for the Australian Research Council’s Discovery Project on Climate Change and Gender in the Pacific.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


For full show notes visit policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jun 03, 2022
Australia’s post-election policy priorities
56:11

This week on Policy Forum Pod, public policy experts Helen Sullivan and Sara Bice join us to discuss the outcome of the federal election and what it might mean for Australia’s policy future.


Last Saturday, Australia elected a new government, emphatically voting out the Liberal-National coalition that had been in power since 2013. In his victory speech, new Prime Minister Anthony Albanese highlighted a number of policy changes, including a commitment to implement the Uluru Statement of the Heart in full and to end the ‘climate wars’. But how should the new government go about pursuing its vision of “no one left behind” and “no one held back”? How can it build trust in the Australian community? And what challenges might it face in pursuing its policy and legislative agenda? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dean of ANU College of Asia and the Pacific Professor Helen Sullivan and Director of the Policy and Governance program at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy Professor Sara Bice join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss the potential policy implications of the federal election result.


Sara Bice is Professor and Foundation Director of the Institute for Infrastructure in Society at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, where she also serves as Head, Policy and Governance Program.


Helen Sullivan is Dean of the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific. She has published widely on public policy, and public governance.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 27, 2022
A care collective
56:52

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, economist at King’s College London Alfredo Saad-Filho joins us to talk about neoliberalism, its impact on care and community, and the prospect of a new economic and social paradigm in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.


What is neoliberalism, and how has it come to shape policy and politics? Is it possible to eliminate poverty in a neoliberal society? And how can communities begin to reshape politics so that humanity, hope, and care are valued and prioritised? In the final episode in our mini-series on care, Professor Alfredo Saad-Filho joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss the possibility of a new economic paradigm with caring at its core.


Alfredo Saad-Filho is Professor of Political Economy and International Development and Head of the Department of International Development at King's College London.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 20, 2022
The future of healthcare
54:22

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, physician and researcher James Trauer and Acting Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association Kylie Woolcock join us to talk about the future of healthcare in Australia.


Since early 2020, health policy-making has been in the spotlight like never before, as Australian governments scrambled to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. But with Australia moving to an endemic approach to controlling the virus, and a federal election campaign underway, are policymakers missing a golden opportunity for reform? How can the sector better care for healthcare workers, as they do their best to care for their patients? And what might a new policy approach for the health sector look like? Monash University’s Associate Professor James Trauer and Kylie Woolcock from Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss creating a more caring health system on this episode of Policy Forum Pod.


Kylie Woolcock is Acting Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association, Australia’s national peak body for public and not-for-profit hospitals and healthcare providers.


James Trauer is a practising respiratory, sleep, general and public health physician, and head of the Epidemiological Modelling Unit for the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash University.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Join Mark Kenny and the Democracy Sausage team on Wednesday 18 May for our final live show before polling day. Refreshments will be served from 5.30pm and the show starts at 6.30pm. Tickets are free but registrations are essential.


For full show notes, visit policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 13, 2022
LIVE SHOW | Election policy peril
59:44

In this live Democracy Sausage and Policy Forum Pod crossover episode, Nicholas Biddle joins Sharon Bessell, Arnagretta Hunter and Mark Kenny to talk about what issues matter to voters and why good policy so often gets lost in translation in Australia’s political system.


How can political candidates and policymakers address long term, intergenerational issues like climate change? What do voters mean when they report being concerned about cost of living? And what might it mean for the legislature if Australians voted in a significant number of independents and members of minor parties at this federal election? Associate Director of The Australian National University (ANU) Centre for Social Research and Methods Professor Nicholas Biddle joins Professor Sharon Bessell, Dr Arnagretta Hunter and Professor Mark Kenny for this special live election crossover episode.


Nicholas Biddle is Associate Director of the Centre for Social Research at ANU. He previously held a Senior Research Officer and Assistant Director position in the Methodology Division of the Australian Bureau of Statistics.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 05, 2022
Hope for aged care
57:11

On the fourth episode in our mini-series on care, Diane Gibson and Kasia Bail from the University of Canberra join us to discuss what policymakers can do to fix the systemic issues that have plagued Australia's aged care sector.


Will this federal election campaign lead to change the way aged care is valued in Australia? How do ageism, sexism, and racism intersect and influence the sector? And how can policymakers translate the principles of dignity, care and respect into meaningful action? Distinguished Professor of Health and Ageing at the University of Canberra Diane Gibson and Associate Professor of Gerontological Nursing at the University of Canberra and ACT Health Kasia Bail join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter for the fourth episode in our mini-series on care.


Join us for our Policy Forum Pod x Democracy Sausage election live show on Wednesday 4 May at The Australian National University! Tickets are free but registration is essential.


Visit policyforum.net for full show notes. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 28, 2022
The right to a healthy environment
49:15

Newly-appointed United Nations Special Rapporteur Dr Ian Fry joins us to discuss the human rights impacts of climate change.


How has climate diplomacy evolved in recent decades, especially in the Pacific? In the face of increasingly frequent and severe disasters, how can people’s human rights be protected? And what implications might climate displacement have on cultural identity? In the third episode of our mini-series on care, Dr Ian Fry - who’s soon to take up the position of United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights in the Context of Climate Change - joins us to discuss protecting people’s right to a healthy environment.


Ian Fry is an international environmental law and policy expert, Senior Lecturer at The Australian National University, and the new United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights in the Context of Climate Change.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.




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Apr 22, 2022
A bittersweet budget?
1:01:59

On the second episode in our new mini-series, John Falzon from Per Capita and Kasy Chambers from Anglicare Australia join us to look at the Australian federal budget through the lens of care.


Did this federal budget provide real assistance for people in the face of the climbing cost-of-living pressures, or was it too focused on one-off sugar hits? What should the Australian Government be doing in terms of structural change to ensure people are supported in difficult times? And how can policymakers put ‘care’ at the centre of their work? Executive Director of Anglicare Australia, Kasy Chambers, and Per Capita’s Dr John Falzon join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter for the second episode in our mini-series on care.


Kasy Chambers is executive director of Anglicare Australia – a network of 45 agencies, 38,000 staff and volunteers, working with over 502,000 clients annually across Australia.


John Falzon OAM is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


For full show notes, visit policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 07, 2022
Preserving public goods
47:04

Millie Rooney joins Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter on the 250th episode of Policy Forum Pod to discuss rethinking the public good and to launch our new mini-series on care.


How can valuing care enhance policy outcomes? Do policymakers need to expand the way they think about infrastructure to include social benefits rather than just roads and bridges? And how do the public want governments to play a role in protecting public goods? On this, our 250th episode of Policy Forum Pod and the first instalment in our mini-series on care, Millie Rooney from Australia ReMADE joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss the organisation’s new report, Reclaiming our Purpose: It’s time to talk about the public good.


Millie Rooney is the National Coordinator for Australia ReMADE, an independent, non-profit leadership network where Australian civil society leaders can collaborate with one another and engage in long-term proactive agenda-setting.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 31, 2022
Australian species on the brink
48:24

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Conservation Foundation Kelly O’Shanassy joins us to talk about habitat destruction, the future of Australia’s threatened species, and why governments must do more to protect biodiversity.


Since colonisation, Australia’s native species have lived under enormous strain. In the two centuries since, some 30 Australian mammals have been made extinct, accounting for more than a third of global mammal extinctions since 1500. Despite this, the Australian Government has been approving development projects resulting in habitat destruction at an alarming rate, according to a new report by the Australian Conservation Foundation. So, what should policymakers be doing to reverse this disturbing trend? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Kelly O’Shanassy, Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Conservation Foundation, joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss the urgent need to protect Australia’s native species.


Kelly O’Shanassy is Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Conservation Foundation. Previously, she was Chief Executive Officer of Environment Victoria.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 24, 2022
Planning for the worst on climate change
51:03

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Barbara Norman and Mark Howden join us to discuss the urgent need for more comprehensive climate change adaptation measures in Australia.


In recent years, climate disasters in Australia - from the Black Summer of 2019-20 to the floods across the east coast in recent weeks - have been dramatic in terms of their intensity, severity, and levels of destruction they’ve created. So, how exposed is Australia to the interconnected, cascading risks that are expected to worsen as a result of climate change? And what are all levels of government doing, or not doing, to help communities adapt? Professor Barbara Norman, Foundation Chair of Urban and Regional Planning and Director of Canberra Urban and Regional Futures at the University of Canberra, and Professor Mark Howden, joint 2007 Nobel Prize recipient for his work with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, join us on this episode of Policy Forum Pod to discuss climate adaptation in Australia.


Barbara Norman is the Foundation Chair of Urban and Regional Planning and Director of Canberra Urban and Regional Futures at the University of Canberra, Chair of the ACT Climate Change Council, and a Visiting Fellow at The Australian National University.


Mark Howden is Director of the Institute for Climate, Energy and Disaster Solutions at The Australian National University.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 17, 2022
Women and the social security system
45:09

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Elise Klein from The Australian National University and Kay Cook from Swinburne University join us to discuss how to improve Australia’s social security system, especially how it serves women.


Is Australia’s social security system serving women in the way it should be? How is care work valued within the system? And what policy responses are needed to ensure it’s improving people’s lives rather than doing harm? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Associate Professor Elise Klein and Professor Kay Cook join hosts Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss these questions and more.


Elise Klein OAM is Associate Professor of Public Policy at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. Her research focuses on development policy and social policy with a specific interest in work, redistribution, decoloniality and care.


Kay Cook is Professor and Associate Dean, Research in the School of Social Sciences, Media, Film and Education at Swinburne University of Technology.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 10, 2022
Globalisation and the search for common ground
58:08

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Anthea Roberts and Nicolas Lamp - authors of The Six Faces of Globalization: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Why it Matters - join us to discuss the need for empathy in the debates about economic globalisation.


For decades, the principles of economic globalisation have been key to shaping public policy, but the status quo assumption that globalisation is good for all is being seriously challenged. How can we all better understand the different narratives surrounding globalisation, from the ‘establishment narrative’ to the rise of right-wing populist critiques? What role do international organisations have to play into the future? And how can policymakers encourage constructive, good-faith conversations about what’s best for all? Professor Anthea Roberts from The Australian National University (ANU) and Associate Professor Nicolas Lamp from Queen’s University in Canada join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss these crucial questions.


Anthea Roberts is a Professor at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), an interdisciplinary researcher, and legal scholar. Anthea also chairs the ANU Working Group on Geoeconomics.


Nicolas Lamp is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at Queen’s University.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


The Six Faces of Globalization: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Why It Matters by Anthea Roberts and Nicolas Lamp is published by Harvard University Press.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 03, 2022
Preventing violence against women and girls with disabilities
45:21

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Patty Kinnersly from Our Watch and Jen Hargrave from Women with Disabilities Victoria join us to discuss the Changing the landscape report, a new national resource to prevent violence against women and girls with disabilities.


Australian women and girls with disabilities are twice as likely to experience violence than women and girls without disabilities. How can policymakers address ableism and gender inequality, two intersecting drivers of this violence? Why is co-design so important to policy-making in this area? And what role do all Australians have to play in preventing this violence from taking place? Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter are joined by Patty Kinnersly, Chief Executive Officer of Our Watch, and Jen Hargrave, Senior Policy Officer at Women with Disabilities Victoria, to discuss their new Changing the landscape report.


Patty Kinnersly is CEO of Our Watch, an independent not-for-profit organisation and national leader in the primary prevention of violence against women and their children in Australia.


Jen Hargrave is Senior Policy Officer at Women with Disabilities Victoria and Research Assistant at the University of Melbourne’s School of Population Health.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, family or domestic violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000.


The Changing the landscape report, summary, and associated resources are available on the Our Watch website.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 24, 2022
All ears? Communication and the key to a correct diagnosis
42:37

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Maria Dahm and Carmel Crock join hosts Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter to discuss the importance of communication to reaching a correct diagnosis.


Diagnostic error is a major issue in Australia, with up to 140,000 people experiencing it every year. But according to new research, the key to changing may not simply be improving doctors’ understanding of disease, but actually improving communication between health professionals and patients. So could improving communication actually reduce stress and burnout in the health workforce? And how can the health system and policymakers better respond to these issues? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Mary Dahm from The Australian National University (ANU) and Associate Professor Carmel Crock from the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital and the University of Melbourne join us to discuss how to improve the diagnostic process in Australia.


Maria Dahm is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Communication in Health Care at The Australian National University and an Honorary Research Fellow at the Centre for Health Systems and Safety Research at Macquarie University.


Carmel Crock OAM is Emergency Department Director at The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Chair of the Quality and Patient Safety Committee of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, and Chair of the Australia and New Zealand affiliate of the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Find full show notes at policyforum.net. Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 17, 2022
Who decides? The push to lower Australia’s voting age
1:05:14

On our first episode of Policy Forum Pod for 2022, we’re joined by Faith Gordon and Rob Watts to talk about lowering Australia’s voting age to 16 years old, the rights of children and young people, and the future of Australian democracy.

 

The election day tradition in Australia is one most Australians are familiar with. You go to your polling place on a Saturday, stand in line, and get your ‘democracy sausage’ on the way out. But not everybody actually gets to vote. The voting age in Australia is currently 18 years, but the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Government is currently considering a bill that would lower the voting age to 16, at least for the territory election. To kick-off 2022, Associate Professor Faith Gordon from The Australian National University (ANU) and Professor Rob Watts from RMIT University join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss this proposal on Policy Forum Pod.


Faith Gordon is an Associate Professor in Law at ANU College of Law at The Australian National University. Faith has international expertise and research experience in youth justice, media representations, children’s rights, criminal law, digital technologies, and media regulation.


Rob Watts is Professor of Social Policy at RMIT University. Rob teaches policy studies, politics, the history of ideas, and applied human rights and is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for the ANU Medical School.


The full submission to the ACT Government by Judith Bessant, Rob Watts, Faith Gordon, Sharon Bessell and others is available for download. Full show notes are available at Policy Forum.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 10, 2022
Big vision, small politics, and why we must #ValueCaring
57:25

Health equity scholar Sharon Friel and regular hosts Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter join Angus Blackman to reflect on some of the ‘brain-changing conversations’ on the pod in 2021, and to look forward at what’s needed in terms of leadership and policy as Australia heads into an election year.


Has Australia learnt the right lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of health and wellbeing, or is the country falling back to business-as-usual? And what do Australians need to see from their leaders as the country approaches an election in the first half of 2022? In the final episode of Policy Forum Pod for the year, Professor Sharon Friel, Professor Sharon Bessell, Dr Arnagretta Hunter and Angus Blackman look back on some of the lessons from the year, our favourite conversations on the pod, and the issues policymakers must address in the new year.


Sharon Friel is Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Angus Blackman is Editor of Policy Forum and Executive Producer of Policy Forum Pod and Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Dec 10, 2021
Trouble at the register
38:13

On this Policy Forum Pod, Ariadne Vromen and Briony Lipton join us to talk about the increase in customer abuse and job insecurity Australian retail workers are facing during the pandemic, and what government and industry can do to ensure staff are protected.


Retail workers have played a critical role throughout the pandemic, ensuring essential food, medicine and other goods have been available in this incredibly difficult period. But according to a new study, retail workers have faced job insecurity, customer abuse, and increased stress from enforcing COVID-19 rules. So what are the reasons behind this disturbing trend, and what can policymakers do to ensure staff are safe at work and have access to secure jobs into the future? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, two of the study’s authors - Professor Ariadne Vromen and Dr Briony Lipton - join Professor Sharon Bessell to discuss the impact of the pandemic on retail workers, and what lessons need to be learned by policymakers and industry.


Ariadne Vromen is Sir John Bunting Chair of Public Administration at Crawford School of Public Policy and Deputy Dean (Research) at the Australia and New Zealand School of Government.


Briony Lipton is a post-doctoral research associate within the Women, Work and Leadership Research Group at the University of Sydney Business School.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Dec 03, 2021
Inside COP26
49:46

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, climate negotiator Dr Siobhan McDonnell and disaster risk expert Dr Robert Glasser join us to look back at what was achieved at COP26, what wasn’t, and what comes next.


It was billed as an extraordinary climate conference - the ‘last chance saloon’ according to Prince Charles - but in the end how different was COP26 from previous conferences? What do the outcomes of the conference mean for climate-vulnerable nations, especially in the Pacific? And what needs to happen over the next 12 months to ensure that COP27 in Egypt is a success? Dr Siobhan McDonnell from ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and Dr Robert Glasser from the Australian Strategic Policy Institute join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to examine what the outcomes in Glasgow mean for the global fight against climate change.


Robert Glasser is Head of the Climate and Security Policy Centre at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) and Honorary Associate Professor at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Siobhan McDonnell is a legal anthropologist with over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous people in Australia and the Pacific on land use, gender, and climate change. She is a Senior Lecturer at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 26, 2021
Building a creative country
37:40

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Kate Fielding from arts and culture think tank A New Approach and Kim Cunio from ANU School of Music join us to talk about why arts and culture matters for Australian society, and why investment in the sector offers such good value for money. 


Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Australians have relied on the arts - from binging shows on Netflix to rediscovering the music of our younger years. But the pandemic has put enormous pressure on so many artists and communities, especially those in the live scene, depriving them of the audience that allows them to make a living. So what mark will the pandemic leave? Will it leave a long-term scar, or is there an opportunity for the industry and government to come together to ensure the sector is allowed to flourish for decades to come? Kate Fielding, Chief Executive Officer of arts and culture think tank A New Approach, and Associate Professor Kim Cunio, ‘activist composer’ and Head of ANU School of Music, join Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss arts and cultural policy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Kim Cunio is an Associate Professor and Head of the School of Music at The Australian National University.


Kate Fielding is Chief Executive Officer of A New Approach – an Australian arts and culture think tank. Prior to this, Kate was the Chair of the Goldfields-Esperance Development Commission in Kalgoorlie, and a member of the Board of the Australia Council for the Arts.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 18, 2021
Focusing on our footprint
46:58

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, the Australian Capital Territory’s Climate Change Commissioner Sophie Lewis and Member for Ginnenderra Jo Clay join us to talk about a unique approach to measuring carbon emissions and what it means for our lives and societies.


Climate change has been in the headlines in recent weeks as a result of COP26, with much of the conversation focusing on the politics of the negotiations and the steps countries need to accelerate the transition to renewable energy. But much less attention is given to the carbon emissions of our everyday lives. From food to fashion to construction materials, all have a footprint. On this Policy Forum Pod, Dr Arnagretta Hunter and Professor Sharon Bessell speak with Dr Sophie Lewis and Jo Clay MLA about a Australian Capital Territory Government report on ‘Scope 3’ emissions, and what governments and individuals can do about them.


Sophie Lewis is Commissioner for Sustainability and the Environment for the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and the 2019 ACT Scientist of the Year. Her research has focused on links between climate change and extreme weather events and she has been a lead author on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports.


Jo Clay is a Member for Ginninderra in the Australian Capital Territory. She was elected in 2020. She is the ACT Greens spokesperson for transport, active travel, parks and conservation, animal welfare, arts and culture, circular economy, science, and women.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 12, 2021
The future of the public servant
41:36

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Helen Sullivan, Helen Dickinson, and Hayley Henderson join us to discuss the changing role of the public servant, the importance of integrity and accountability, and public services in a time of major disruption.


What role does history play in shaping the values of a particular civil service? How do public servants negotiate issues of integrity and ethics when political leaders are under investigation for unethical or corrupt behaviour? And what does the future look like for the public service? Professor Helen Sullivan, Professor Helen Dickinson, and Dr Hayley Henderson - contributors to the new Palgrave Handbook of the Public Servant - join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter on this episode of Policy Forum Pod.


Helen Sullivan is Dean of the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific.


Helen Dickinson is Professor of Public Service Research and Director of the Public Service Research Group at the School of Business at University of New South Wales, Canberra.


Hayley Henderson is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University. Her research is focused on collaboration in urban policymaking and governance.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group



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Nov 05, 2021
COP26 and climate justice for the Pacific
45:46

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Siobhan McDonnell and George Carter join us for a powerful, confronting conversation about the impact of climate change in the Pacific Island region ahead of COP26 in Glasgow.


Despite being at an enormous disadvantage in terms of resources and delegation size, what strategies have Pacific Island countries used to be so effective in international climate negotiations? How will Pacific negotiators approach the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, or COP26, amidst enormous challenges from the COVID-19 pandemic and the increasing urgency of the global climate situation? And has the Australian Government been guilty of ‘double-speak’ by delivering one set of messaging in regional negotiations and another in global forums? Dr Siobhan McDonnell and Dr George Carter, both scholars at The Australian National University (ANU) and negotiators for Pacific Island delegations at COP26, join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss these questions and more.


George Carter is a Research Fellow in Geopolitics and Regionalism at ANU Department of Pacific Affairs. In 2019 he became a Co-Director of ANU Pacific Institute.


Siobhan McDonnell is a legal anthropologist with over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous people in Australia and the Pacific on land use, gender, and climate change. She is a Senior Lecturer at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group



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Oct 29, 2021
Will COP26 be a turning point?
42:38

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, climate experts Mark Howden and Frank Jotzo join us to discuss Australia’s climate policy, energy transitions, and the upcoming United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow.


In just over a week’s time, world leaders and climate negotiators will gather in Glasgow, Scotland for the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference - or COP26. It’s been billed as a critical moment in global efforts to tackle climate change, with this year’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change saying urgent action is required if global temperature rises are to be kept at 1.5 degrees Celsius. But as we approach the summit, there have been worrying signs, with domestic politics and the COVID-19 pandemic acting as obstacles for a number of countries. On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Mark Howden and Professor Frank Jotzo join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss the science, the prospect for stronger national contributions, and whether COP26 can lead to major progress in the global fight against climate change.


Frank Jotzo is Professor of Environmental Economics and Climate Change Economics at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, where he directs the Centre for Climate and Energy Policy, and Head of Energy at ANU Institute for Climate, Energy and Disaster Solutions.


Mark Howden is Director of the ANU Institute for Climate, Energy and Disaster Solutions. He was a major contributor to the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports, for which he shares a Nobel Peace Prize.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for the ANU Medical School.


The podcast series, COP26: we got this, produced by ANU Centre for Climate, Energy & Disaster Solutions and King's College London, is available on Acast.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 22, 2021
Feeling the heat
40:58

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, climate researcher Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick and health professional Simon Quilty join us to discuss the “health crisis” that awaits Australia if global temperature increases continue.


With global temperatures rising, what sorts of scenarios are likely to unfold over the coming decades in terms of extreme heat? What does this mean for vulnerable communities on the margins of major cities and in regional and rural Australia? And what advice do negotiators need to hear in the lead-up to the upcoming United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow? Dr Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick from the University of New South Wales, Canberra and Dr Simon Quilty, general physician at Alice Springs Hospital and Visiting Fellow at ANU Research School of Population Health, join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter on this episode of Policy Forum Pod.


Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick is a Senior Lecturer and Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow at the School of Science at University of New South Wales, Canberra. Sarah is currently a chief investigator with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes.


Simon Quilty is a Visiting Fellow at the Research School of Population Health at The Australian National University. His research examines the relationship between environmental heat and wellbeing in the Northern Territory.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for the ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 15, 2021
Breaking with convention - human rights in the Asia Pacific
45:31

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, scholars Mathew Davies and Susan Harris Rimmer join us to look at the complex human rights landscape in Southeast Asia and throughout the Asia-Pacific region, and what role the international community can and should play.


What is the current status of human rights, especially for women and girls, throughout the Asia Pacific? How have recent events in Myanmar and Afghanistan impacted people in the region? And what responsibilities does Australia and the rest of the international community have to promote human rights? Dr Mathew Davies from ANU Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs and Professor Susan Harris Rimmer from Griffith University join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter on this episode of Policy Forum Pod.


Susan Harris Rimmer is the Director of the Griffith University Policy Innovation Hub and co-convenor of the Griffith Gender Equality Research Network. She also leads the Climate Justice theme of the new Griffith Climate Action Beacon.


Mathew Davies is Deputy Director - Education at the Department of International Relations at The Australian National University (ANU) Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for the ANU Medical School.


For more insights on the region, Policy Forum's new In Focus: Developing Asia feature section is available online.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 08, 2021
What’s at stake at the Glasgow climate conference?
47:57

On this Policy Forum Pod, we discuss climate change, security, and the upcoming UN Conference of the Parties in Glasgow with Robert Glasser. 


What’s been achieved so far in international climate change negotiations? What lessons need to be learnt from both Australia’s Black Summer and the most recent wildfire season in North America? And what’s at stake at the upcoming UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow? This week on Policy Forum Pod, Head of the Climate and Security Policy Centre at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute Dr Robert Glasser joins Dr Arnagretta Hunter and Professor Sharon Bessell to discuss these questions and more.


Robert Glasser is Head of the Climate and Security Policy Centre at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) and Honorary Associate Professor at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for the ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 01, 2021
Ending violence against women and their children
43:22

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Chief Executive Officer of Our Watch Patty Kinnersly joins us to discuss the role all Australians have in ending violence against women and their children.


What are the drivers of men’s violence against women and their children? What key elements should be included in the new national plan to address the crisis? And what role can individuals, institutions and communities play in ensuring that violence and all forms of discrimination against women are brought to an end? Patty Kinnersly, CEO of Our Watch - a national leader in the primary prevention of violence against women and their children in Australia - joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss these questions and more.


Patty Kinnersly is CEO of Our Watch, an independent not-for-profit organisation and national leader in the primary prevention of violence against women and their children in Australia.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a Human Futures Fellow for the ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for the ANU Medical School.


If you or anyone you know needs help you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36. If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, family or domestic violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 24, 2021
Growing up in the shadow of the pandemic
52:07

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, child psychiatrist Karen Gaunson and child protection scholar Tim Moore join us to discuss the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on children, both now and into the future.


The COVID-19 pandemic is casting many shadows - for many individuals and families, livelihoods have been snatched away. One issue that was initially given very little attention is the impact on the psychological welfare of children. So what barriers were children facing before the pandemic, and how can policymakers ensure the last 18 months don’t leave lasting scars? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Karen Gaunson and Associate Professor Tim Moore join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss how society can give children a sense of hope in such a challenging time.


Tim Moore is Deputy Director (Practice Solutions) at the Australian Centre for Child Protection at the University of South Australia.


Karen Gaunson is a parent-infant, child, adult, and family psychiatrist working in multiple settings including clinical practice and the Children's Court. Her research interests include reducing rates of child neglect and maltreatment.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


If you or anyone you know needs help you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 [http://www.lifeline.org.au/] or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36 [https://www.beyondblue.org.au/]. If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, family or domestic violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 16, 2021
Time for work to change
50:31

In the final episode of our Policy Forum Pod mini-series on work, Lyndall Strazdins and John Falzon join us to discuss time inequity and how to reimagine the world of work to create a happier and more sustainable society.


Why does society still imagine work as distinct from everyday life? How can policymakers rethink how time is allocated to address gender inequity and improve population health? And can we create a world of work that generates a surplus of things that people really need - of education, culture, care and love? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter are joined by Professor Lyndall Strazdins from The Australian National University (ANU) and Dr John Falzon from Per Capita to think about the future of work and conclude our mini-series.


Lyndall Strazdins is a Professor and Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, The Australian National University.


John Falzon OAM is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 10, 2021
Protecting Australians at work with Michele O’Neil
54:32

On the penultimate episode of our Policy Forum Pod mini-series on work, we speak to President of the Australian Council of Trade Unions Michele O’Neil about workers’ rights and how to build a fairer, more equitable world of work.


What are some of the major challenges facing Australian workers in terms of their access to fair pay and decent conditions? How can policymakers ensure people are safe at work as the impacts of climate change become more pronounced? And what action can be taken to ensure people are valued at work, both through the COVID-19 crisis and beyond? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod - the fifth in our special mini-series on work - President of the Australian Council of Trade Unions Michele O’Neil joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter.

 

Michele O'Neil is President of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU).


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 02, 2021
The value of the commons with Guy Standing
57:23

On this episode in our Policy Forum Pod mini-series on work, author and researcher Guy Standing joins Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter to discuss changing class structures and the universal basic income.


Do policymakers need to stop worshipping the ‘false god’ of economic growth? Are changes in the world of work leading to disenfranchisement and the creation of a new underclass? And what are the prospects of a universal basic income being introduced in a number of countries in the coming years? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Guy Standing joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter for the fourth instalment in our mini-series on work.


Guy Standing is a Professorial Research Associate at SOAS University of London and a founding member and honorary co-president of the Basic Income Earth Network, a non-governmental organisation that promotes a basic income for all.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 26, 2021
Ensuring decent work and social protection for all
45:18

On the third episode in our Policy Forum Pod mini-series on work, Shahra Razavi from the International Labour Organization joins us to discuss the importance of universal social protection and how policymakers can do more to ensure people have access to decent work.


What does decent work for all look like – and how far are governments around the world from achieving that? Is economic growth the path to achieving this or is it time to decouple growth and decent work? And what global efforts are underway to uphold the right to social security and social protection? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod - the third instalment in our mini-series on work - Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter are joined by Shahra Razavi, Director of the Social Protection Department at the International Labour Organization.


Shahra Razavi is Director of the Social Protection Department at the International Labour Organization. Previously, she was Research Coordinator at the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development. Shahra specialises in the gender dimensions of social development, with a particular focus on livelihoods and social policies.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 19, 2021
What we value with Marilyn Waring
54:33

On the second instalment in our Policy Forum Pod mini-series on work, principal founder of the field of feminist economics Marilyn Waring joins us to talk about what society values and why. 


Gross domestic product (GDP) is often held up as the key metric of national economic performance, despite decades of criticism over the extractive, gendered model it represents. So how can policymakers better understand the value of what GDP often excludes, such as the natural environment and unpaid work? How can Australia and New Zealand have a more inclusive conversation about economics? And will time become the baseline for a new economic paradigm? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, public policy scholar, environmentalist, and former New Zealand parliamentarian Dame Marilyn Waring joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter.


Marilyn Waring is a New Zealand feminist, former politician, author, academic, and activist for female human rights and environmental issues.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 13, 2021
Work with James Suzman
1:04:51
In the first episode of our Policy Forum Pod mini-series on work, anthropologist and author James Suzman joins us to look at the history of work and its profound impact on society.Understanding the role of work in our lives, the impact it has, and the inequities it often perpetuates may provide some of the solutions to the major challenges facing society - from environmental destruction to the undervaluing of care. In this new Policy Forum Pod mini-series Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter explore work from a range of angles and seek solutions to these issues with an amazing line-up of guests. On the first episode in the series, Dr James Suzman, anthropologist and author of Work: A history of how we spend our time, joins us to discuss how contemporary society’s understanding of economics is changing the way we work, live, and relate to our natural environment. James Suzman is an anthropologist and author of the books Work, A History of How We Spend Our Time and Affluence Without Abundance and Director of Anthropos Ltd, a think tank that applies anthropological methods to solving contemporary social and economic problems.Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

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Aug 06, 2021
Running on empty
54:32

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, mental health researcher Luis Salvador-Carulla and Cassandra Goldie join us to look at the impacts of the COVID-19 crisis and the importance of adequate financial support for people’s sense of dignity and wellbeing. 


What impact has the COVID-19 crisis had on the mental health and wellbeing of Australians? What can policymakers do to improve access and the efficiency of mental health services? And with financial support for those in lockdown areas falling short of meeting their needs, what does this mean for some of the country’s most economically vulnerable citizens? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Council of Social Service Dr Cassandra Goldie and Head of the Centre for Mental Health Research at The Australian National University Professor Luis Salvador-Carulla join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter.


Cassandra Goldie is Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Council of Social Service, a national voice for Australians experiencing poverty and inequality and peak body for the community welfare sector.


Luis Salvador-Carulla is Head of the Centre for Mental Health Research at the Research School of Population Health at The Australian National University. He has been advisor to the Government of Catalonia in Spain, the Spanish Ministry of Health, the European Commission, and the World Health Organization on mental health and disability policy.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 29, 2021
The future of political leadership
44:08

On the final episode in the Policy Forum Pod mini-series on leadership, author and former senator Scott Ludlam joins us to discuss challenging the political status quo and why more distributed forms of leadership might be an effective way to create change.


What do Australia’s climate policy failures reveal about the country’s political system and leadership? Can a move to a more distributed, decentralised form of leadership lead to substantial change? And what role can non-traditional forms of leadership - from investor activism to school climate strikes - play in achieving better outcomes for Australia’s environment and society? Former Senator for Western Australia Scott Ludlam joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter on the final episode in our Policy Forum Pod mini-series to look at the future of leadership and democracy, and to reflect on the challenging and inspiring conversations on the pod over the past four episodes.


Scott Ludlam was Senator for Western Australia in the Australian Senate from 2008 to 2017, and served as Deputy Leader of the Australian Greens. In May 2021 he authored Full Circle: A search for the world that comes next, published by Black Inc.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


The episode of Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny featuring Scott Ludlam is available here. Scott’s new book, Full Circle: A search for the world that comes next, is published by Black Inc.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 22, 2021
Women in leadership with Natasha Stott Despoja
55:09

In the penultimate episode of our Policy Forum Pod mini-series on leadership and democracy, Natasha Stott Despoja - former Senator for South Australia and member of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women - joins us to discuss women in leadership in Australia.


Australia is still a long way from reaching gender parity in politics, with the country ranking 51st in terms of the percentage of parliamentarians who are women. Revelations throughout 2021 have also shone a light on the serious, disturbing challenges facing women in parliament, and the toxic culture that’s been allowed to flourish. With research showing few are interested in a career in politics, how can policymakers ensure that there are pathways into politics for young women? What needs to change to ensure women in parliament are safe and respected? And how can greater diversity in parliament drive both policy and cultural change across the country? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Natasha Stott Despoja AO joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss women’s political leadership in Australia, talk through some of the challenges, and chart ways forward.


Natasha Stott Despoja AO is the founding Chair of the Board of Our Watch, a foundation to prevent violence against women and their children, and was previously the Australian Ambassador for Women and Girls. She was Senator for South Australia representing the Australian Democrats from 1995 to 2008.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 16, 2021
Local leadership and the democratic process
45:55

In the second episode of our mini-series on leadership and democracy, political scientist Carolyn Hendriks and community leader Denis Ginnivan join us to discuss political action at the local level and why Australia needs a process of democratic repair.


Are governments losing touch with their constituents, particularly in regional areas? And in a society that’s becoming increasingly polarised around a number of issues, how can local actors bring their communities together to find common ground? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Carolyn Hendriks from ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and social worker and community leader Denis Ginnivan join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss leadership at the local level and how that interacts with formal political systems.


Denis Ginnivan is a committee member of Totally Renewable Yackandandah and a former President of Voices for Indi, a community group based in northeast Victoria which seeks to encourage citizens to engage and participate in politics and democracy.


Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance at Crawford School of Public Policy.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 09, 2021
Political leadership in Australia
52:36

In this first episode in our mini-series on leadership and democracy, historians Chris Wallace and Frank Bongiorno join us to examine the resistance to change among Australia’s political class and whether the country’s current crop of leaders are up to the task of providing good governance.


In an increasingly uncertain world, the call for effective political leadership is a loud one. But are Australia's present-day leaders responding? How are outdated stereotypes about leadership influencing Australia’s political culture? And how do country’s current leaders compare to those of recent history and from around the world? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Frank Bongiorno from The Australian National University and Chris Wallace from the University of Canberra take a look at the history of Australian political leadership to kick off our mini-series on leadership and democracy.


Chris Wallace is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra. Entering the history profession after a first career as an economic and political journalist in the Canberra Press Gallery, her work focuses on political, international and global history with special reference to leadership.


Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History and Professor at The Australian National University (ANU). He is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 02, 2021
Learning from the Black Summer
44:50

It’s an experience no Australian wants to relive, but bushfire seasons like that of 2019/2020 are likely to increase in frequency due to climate change. On this Policy Forum Pod, defence expert Brendan Sargeant, emergency law scholar Michael Eburn, forestry academic Peter Kanowski, and health professional Arnagretta Hunter discuss the bushfire royal commission and how policymakers should be preparing to manage more severe bushfires. 


The 2019/2020 bushfire season was a traumatic experience for so many Australians, but are the country’s policymakers learning the right lessons from the Black Summer? Are the recommendations of the Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements being taken seriously? And, with Australia facing the prospect of increasingly severe weather patterns due to climate change, how can governments, emergency services, and citizens work together to protect their communities? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Brendan Sargeant, Honorary Associate Professor Michael Eburn, and Professor Peter Kanowski join Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss what policymakers and citizens should learn from Australia’s Black Summer. 


Michael Eburn is Honorary Associate Professor in the College of Law at The Australian National University. He is a leading researcher in emergency services, emergency management, and the law.


Brendan Sargeant is Head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre and Professor of Practice in Defence and Strategic Studies at The Australian National University.


Peter Kanowski is Professor of Forestry in the Fenner School of Environment and Society at The Australian National University. His work focuses on forest and environmental policy, sustainability, policy learning and development, and community engagement when it comes to forest-related issues.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


The Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements report is available online, as are recordings of the workshops run by ANU Institute for Climate, Energy and Disaster Solutions. Brendan Sargeant’s recent Centre of Gravity paper, ‘Challenges to the Australian Strategic Imagination’, is available via ANU Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to 


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Jun 25, 2021
Why policymakers need to value caring
54:25

It’s the glue that holds society together, but existing economic and policy systems find care so hard to place a value on. On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, social security researcher Elise Klein and community advocate Millie Rooney join us to discuss valuing care in public policy.


How does Australian policy value different forms of care compared to what’s been considered to be ‘productive’ work? What would happen if the country made caring a central tenet of its policy-making rather than a secondary consideration? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Elise Klein, Senior Lecturer at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, and Dr Millie Rooney, National Coordinator at Australia reMADE, join hosts Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss how and why Australian policymakers should place greater value on care.


Elise Klein OAM is a Senior Lecturer of Public Policy at Crawford School of Public Policy whose research interests include Indigenous policy, development interventions, women’s economic empowerment, and economic rights.


Millie Rooney is the Coordinator for Australia reMADE, an independent, non-profit leadership network where Australian civil society leaders can collaborate with one another.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jun 17, 2021
Caring for older Australians
49:56

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, aged care expert Diane Gibson and social researcher Nicholas Biddle join us to discuss the impact of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety and whether governments are on the right track to make the changes the sector desperately needs.


Some of the most devastating images to come out of Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic so far have emerged from aged care facilities. Unfortunately, the situation Australia has watched unfold in aged care during the pandemic is just another in a series of tragedies that have beset the system. While the federal government announced a nearly $18 billion package in the recent budget, will this lead to transformational change? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Diane Gibson from the University of Canberra and Professor Nicholas Biddle from The Australian National University join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to talk about policy solutions to Australia’s aged care crisis.


Diane Gibson is Distinguished Professor (Health and Ageing) at University of Canberra and Chair of the ACT Ministerial Advisory Council on Ageing.


Nicholas Biddle is Associate Director of the Centre for Social Research at ANU. He previously held a Senior Research Officer and Assistant Director position in the Methodology Division of the Australian Bureau of Statistics.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jun 11, 2021
A statement of values? Australia’s falling foreign aid budget
54:33

On the new episode of Policy Forum Pod, experts Stephen Howes and Sally Moyle join Sharon Bessell to take a closer look at foreign aid in the recent federal budget and whether Australia is doing its part to assist communities in need beyond its borders. 


In Australia, there has been a downward trend in the foreign aid budget since 2014-15 and aid spending per capita has dropped since 1995. So what is the impact of this on the reach and effectiveness of Australia’s aid program? What do these trends reveal about Australian values? And how can the country’s political leaders make the case for international development assistance and communicate its benefits, both in the region and for Australia’s national interests? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Stephen Howes and Honorary Associate Professor Sally Moyle join Professor Sharon Bessell to discuss these questions and more.


Stephen Howes is Professor of Economics at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the Director of the Development Policy Centre.


Sally Moyle is an Honorary Associate Professor at ANU Gender Institute. Sally has had extensive experience in international development policy and practice, and almost 20 years’ experience addressing gender issues both domestically and in international development.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jun 04, 2021
India’s COVID-19 nightmare
47:13

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, The Australian National University’s Assa Doron and Azad Singh Bali join Sharon Bessell to examine the devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in India and the key lessons policymakers must learn so the country isn’t rocked by further waves of the virus.


How did the COVID-19 crisis in India get so out of control? And what can policymakers in the country and around the region learn from the responses so far to ensure this isn’t followed by further waves of infections? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Assa Doron and Dr Azad Singh Bali join Professor Sharon Bessell to chart the country’s responses since the beginning of the pandemic, examine what role religious and other divisions have played in inhibiting an effective response, and what policymakers must learn from this awful situation to ensure it doesn’t repeat in the coming months.


Assa Doron is Professor of Anthropology at the College of Asia and the Pacific's School of Culture, History, and Language at The Australian National University.


Azad Singh Bali is Senior Lecturer in Public Policy and holds a joint appointment at Crawford School of Public Policy and ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 28, 2021
Successes and setbacks in the Pacific
50:45

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Pacific experts Meg Keen and Henry Ivarature join Arnagretta Hunter to discuss how Papua New Guinea is dealing with its current COVID-19 outbreak, the region’s successes and setbacks during the pandemic, and some of the other key security issues facing the Pacific.


What have been the successes and setbacks in the Pacific Island region’s management of the COVID-19 crisis? What is slowing down the vaccine rollout in many countries in the region? And with geostrategic competition increasing in the Pacific, what are the prospects for the region’s economic recovery? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Meg Keen and Dr Henry Ivarature from the Australia Pacific Security College join Dr Arnagretta Hunter to examine how the Pacific Island region is responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and how geostrategic competition, climate change, and economic vulnerabilities are impacting the region.


Meg Keen is Professor and Director at the Australia Pacific Security College at The Australian National University.


Henry Ivarature is a Pacific Fellow at Australia Pacific Security College at The Australian National University.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 21, 2021
Social policy and the federal budget
54:07

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, sociologist John Falzon and Anglicare Australia head Kasy Chambers join Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter to discuss this year’s federal budget and what it means for social policy.


This week, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg announced Australia’s 2021/22 federal budget, which included some significant spending on social services. But is this a budget seeking to drive transformative change on social policy? Is the government paying sufficient attention to long term challenges? And how will the budget impact Australians who are experiencing disadvantage? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, hosts Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter discuss these questions and more with Anglicare Australia Executive Director Kasy Chambers and Per Capita Senior Fellow Dr John Falzon.


Kasy Chambers is executive director of Anglicare Australia - a network of 45 agencies, 38,000 staff and volunteers, working with over 502,000 clients annually across Australia.


John Falzon OAM is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 14, 2021
A vision for a healthy Australia
54:23

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, experts in the social determinants of health Sharon Friel and Sandro Demaio join hosts Arnagretta Hunter and Sharon Bessell to discuss realising the vision of a healthy Australia by 2030.


Has the COVID-19 pandemic forced Australian policymakers to address the social determinants of health? Instead of focusing on ‘vulnerable populations’, should the public debate instead focus on the conditions that create disadvantage, and stop transferring a sense of shame to individuals? Is now the time to reset and make the achievement of health for all by 2030 a real possibility? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, health equity expert Professor Sharon Friel and Dr Sandro Demaio, medical doctor and globally-renowned public health advocate, join Dr Arnagretta Hunter and Professor Sharon Bessell to discuss these questions and more.


Sandro Demaio is Chief Executive Officer of VicHealth, a medical doctor, co-host of the ABC television show Ask the Doctor, and a globally-renowned public health expert and advocate.


Sharon Friel is Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


The special supplement of the Medical Journal of Australia, ‘Australia in 2030: what is our path to health for all?’, is available free online.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 07, 2021
Australia’s climate narrative after the Biden summit
39:50

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, our expert panel - Professor Mark Howden and Dr Imran Ahmad from The Australian National University and ACT Commissioner for Sustainability and the Environment Dr Sophie Lewis - join us to discuss the Biden climate summit and Australia’s climate policy debate.

 

How significant was the recent climate summit hosted by United States President Joe Biden? What has been the international reaction to Australia’s focus on “technology not taxes”? And can Australian policymakers translate this US-led push to do more into rapid change in Australia’s policy landscape? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Arnagretta Hunter speaks to leading climate experts Professor Mark Howden, Dr Sophie Lewis, and Dr Imran Ahmad about the Biden summit and Australia’s climate policies.


Sophie Lewis is Commissioner for Sustainability and the Environment for the Australian Capital Territory and the 2019 ACT Scientist of the Year. Her research has focused on links between climate change and extreme weather events and she has been a lead author on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports.


Imran Ahmad is Founding Director of Future Earth Australia, former Director of East-Asia and Pacific at the Global Green Growth Institute, and an Honorary Associate Professor at the Fenner School of Environment and Society.


Mark Howden is Director of ANU Institute for Climate, Energy and Disaster Solutions. Mark was a major contributor to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports for the United Nations, for which he shares a Nobel Peace Prize.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 30, 2021
Doing democracy differently – young Australians and politics
46:45

In many countries around the world young people are turning away from democracy, but are young Australians following suit? On this Policy Forum Pod, researchers Intifar Chowdhury and Ariadne Vromen join us to discuss how young Australians are participating in Australian democracy.


Why do fewer younger Australians believe democracy is important for them compared with the rest of the population? What impact does Australia’s system of compulsory voting have on how young people engage with the political system? Have new digital platforms, especially social media channels, offered young people new spaces to engage politically outside of the formal institutions of government? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Intifar Chowdhury from ANU School of Politics and International Relations and Professor Ariadne Vromen, Sir John Bunting Chair of Public Administration at Crawford School of Public Policy, join Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss these questions and more.


Ariadne Vromen is Sir John Bunting Chair of Public Administration at Crawford School of Public Policy and Deputy Dean (Research) at The Australia and New Zealand School of Government.


Intifar Chowdhury is a PhD candidate at The Australian National University's School of Politics and International Relations. Her thesis focuses on young people and aversion towards democratic participation.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 23, 2021
Assuming new roles - gender, the pay gap, and violence against women
46:03

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, economist Robert Breunig and gender, work, and employment expert Rae Cooper join Sharon Bessell to discuss the gender pay gap and disturbing new findings about domestic violence and gender income balance.


New research shows that domestic violence is committed on female partners in heterosexual couples significantly more frequently when the woman earns more than the man. What does this mean for the assumption that increased economic security would lead to reducing violence? How can policymakers challenge the gender norms that underlie so much inequality, in the workplace and elsewhere? What does the research show about what young women and men want from work, and what does that reveal about the gender pay gap? On the new episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Sharon Bessell speaks with ANU Crawford School of Public Policy’s Professor Robert Breunig and University of Sydney’s Professor Rae Cooper about these questions and more.

 

Rae Cooper is Professor of Gender, Work and and Employment Relations and Co-Director of the Women, Work and Leadership Research Group at University of Sydney.


Robert Breunig is a Professor at Crawford School and the director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute. He conducts research in three main areas: economics of the household, empirical industrial organisation, and statistical and econometric theory.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, family or domestic violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000. You can also find a list of support resources here.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 16, 2021
Bushfires, inequality, and planning for the future
46:08

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Quentin Grafton and Arnagretta Hunter join Sharon Bessell to discuss what governments need to do to protect Australia’s most vulnerable citizens amidst the threat of increasingly severe bushfires.


In the summer of 2019/2020, Australia burned, temperatures soared, and smoke blanketed much of the southeast of the country. It was dubbed ‘unprecedented’, but as global temperatures rise extreme weather events like these are set to become more common. So what does this mean for Australians experiencing socio-economic disadvantage? What do policymakers need to do to protect the most vulnerable? And how should governments engage with local communities to ensure the right decisions are made? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Quentin Grafton and Dr Arnagretta Hunter join Professor Sharon Bessell to discuss the impact of bushfires on vulnerable Australians.


Quentin Grafton is Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy, Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 09, 2021
On life’s lottery with Glyn Davis
46:34

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we hear from public policy expert Professor Glyn Davis who joined Professor Helen Sullivan live at The Australian National University to take a big picture look at inequality in Australia.


It’s a common refrain that Australia is the land of the ‘fair go’. Despite the pervasiveness of this national myth, so many aspects of people’s lives are determined by chance - whether it’s where they’re born or the socio-economic circumstances they’re born into. On this special live-recorded episode of Policy Forum Pod, author of On Life’s Lottery Professor Glyn Davis joins Crawford School of Public Policy Director Professor Helen Sullivan to discuss what our obligations are to each other in a world of inequality.


Glyn Davis is a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Crawford School, Chair of the Australia and New Zealand School of Government Research Committee, and CEO of the Paul Ramsay Foundation, Australia's largest philanthropic trust.


Helen Sullivan is Director of ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. She has published widely on public policy, and public governance.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


This podcast was recorded live at The Australian National University.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 26, 2021
Marching for justice
51:39

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Kim Rubenstein, Sharon Bessell, and Arnagretta Hunter reflect on the March4Justice protests and the policy changes Australia needs to make to end violence against women.


After people took to the streets to protest violence against women in Australia, how can the country and its policymakers create a more gender-just and equal society? Is now the time to explore ideas like quotas and job-sharing in Australian Parliament to enable greater diversity? And what is needed from the country’s leaders to ensure real progress is made? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Co-Director of the 50/50 by 2030 Foundation at the University of Canberra Professor Kim Rubenstein, regular host-turned-guest Professor Sharon Bessell, and Dr Arnagretta Hunter discuss the recent March4Justice protests and whether this is a turning point in the fight to end violence against women.


Kim Rubenstein is a Professor in the Faculty of Business, Government and Law and Co-Director of the 50/50 by 2030 Foundation at the University of Canberra.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, family or domestic violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000. You can also find a list of support resources here.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 19, 2021
Insecure work, unemployment, and Australia after the COVID-19 crisis
49:58

On this Policy Forum Pod, social policy researcher Peter Whiteford and expert in public health responses to humanitarian crises Kamalini Lokuge join us to discuss supporting Australians out of work, in vulnerable or insecure jobs, and what policymakers must learn from the COVID-19 crisis.


With insecure workers among the most at risk during the COVID-19 crisis, what policy changes would provide this growing number of Australians with greater support and strengthen Australia’s social model? Why has the Australian Government allowed unemployment benefits to drop so substantially relative to the poverty line? And what are the key lessons policymakers must learn in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Whiteford and Associate Professor Kamalini Lokuge speak with hosts Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter about why Australia must further increase unemployment payments and provide greater support to people in insecure work.


Peter Whiteford is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy. He works on child poverty, family assistance policies, welfare reform, and other aspects of social policy, particularly ways of supporting the balance between work and family life. He has published extensively on various aspects of the Australian and New Zealand systems of income support.


Kamalini Lokuge OAM is an expert in public health responses to humanitarian crises and Senior Fellow at the Research School of Public Health at The Australian National University, where she leads the Humanitarian Research Program.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 12, 2021
Ending gender-based violence and harassment at work
1:02:43

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod ahead of International Women’s Day, we’re joined by philosopher Fiona Jenkins and lawyer and labour rights advocate Lisa Heap to discuss how to end gender-based violence and harassment in the workplace.


Despite Australia’s Sex Discrimination Act, gender-based violence and harassment remain far too common in workplaces the country over. Rape allegations by a young woman against a former colleague at Parliament House have shone a spotlight on this confronting issue. But what can workplaces do to tackle gender-based violence and harassment? How can policymakers support workplaces in this endeavour? And what should change actually look like? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Associate Professor Fiona Jenkins from ANU School of Philosophy and Lisa Heap from RMIT University join Dr Arnagretta Hunter and Professor Sharon Bessell to discuss how to make workplaces safe for all.


Lisa Heap is a labour lawyer with over 20 years of experience. She is a member of the Centre for People, Organisation and Work (CPOW) at RMIT University, where she is researching new regulatory approaches designed to prevent gendered violence in the workplace.


Fiona Jenkins is a philosopher and Associate Professor at the ANU Centre for Moral, Social and Political Theory and Convenor of the ANU Gender Institute.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, family or domestic violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000. You can also find a list of support resources here.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 05, 2021
Reimagining social security
39:55

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Elise Klein joins Sharon Bessell to discuss the Australian Government’s permanent increase to JobSeeker, punitive policies, and reframing the debate around the country’s social security system.


This week the Australian Government announced the first permanent increase to the country’s unemployment benefit in decades. But many from the social services sector and people out of work have expressed dismay and fear at the size of the increase, which amounts to less than $4 a day. On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Sharon Bessell is joined by social policy researcher Dr Elise Klein OAM. They discuss what this policy change will mean for people without work, who will soon lose access to the higher rate afforded through the coronavirus assistance package, as well as why those receiving benefits are subject to increasing controls and surveillance.


Elise Klein OAM is a Senior Lecturer of Public Policy at Crawford School of Public Policy whose research interests include Indigenous policy, development interventions, women's economic empowerment, and economic rights.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 26, 2021
Education, Indigenous wellbeing, and the future of Australia
46:22

On our 200th episode of Policy Forum Pod, Indigenous education expert and proud descendant of the Guumilaroi and Euahlayi First Nations Tony Dreise joins Arnagretta Hunter to discuss Australia's education system and learning from the country’s history.


Are Australian schools being supported sufficiently to bring Indigenous perspectives to life in the nation’s classrooms? How can policymakers move from a deficit discourse in regards to Indigenous education and wellbeing to one focused on the strength and wisdom of Indigenous Australians? And what role can Australia’s education institutions play in the country’s reconciliation journey? Joining us on the 200th episode of Policy Forum Pod is Professor Tony Dreise, Director of ANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.


Tony Dreise is Professor of Indigenous Policy Research and Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR).


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 19, 2021
Speaking from the heart
56:33

This week on Policy Forum Pod, Aboriginal health advocate and Alyawarre woman Patricia Anderson AO joins us to discuss the Uluru Statement from the Heart, Australia’s path towards reconciliation, and why acknowledging its history is crucial for the country’s future.


Why is a constitutionally-enshrined Voice to Parliament critical to Australia’s journey towards reconciliation? Will Australia accept the ‘gift’ that is the Uluru Statement from the Heart? And is acknowledging history (and learning from it) an opportunity to build a more inclusive, more truly Australian national identity? On the second episode in our mini-series on Indigenous wellbeing, co-chair of the Prime Minister’s Referendum Council Pat Anderson AO joins hosts Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter for a remarkable conversation about healing, history, and having the courage to call for change.


Pat Anderson AO is an Alyawarre woman and national and international advocate for the health of Australia’s First Nations people. She has extensive experience in Aboriginal health, including community development, policy formation, and research ethics.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 12, 2021
The meaning of Country
54:35

To kick-off 2021, we listen to the voices of leading Indigenous Australians, who join us on Policy Forum Pod to discuss wellbeing. On the first episode, water expert Virginia Marshall speaks about what policymakers can learn from Indigenous knowledge of Country.


What is Country and why is it significant for Indigenous Australians? Will Australian governments recognise First Nations Australians as the key decision-makers and knowledge holders of environmental management? And what impact would better policy in this area have on the wellbeing of Indigenous people? On this first episode in our mini-series on Indigenous wellbeing, lawyer, legal scholar, and water expert Dr Virginia Marshall discusses these questions and more with hosts Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter.


Virginia Marshall is the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow with The Australian National University’s School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the Fenner School of Environment and Society. She is a Wiradjuri Nyemba woman from New South Wales.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 05, 2021
The wellbeing economy - lessons for the future
58:49

On the final episode of Policy Forum Pod for 2020, Martyn Pearce is joined by Arnagretta Hunter, Sharon Bessell and John Falzon to look back on the year, and our special mini-series on the wellbeing economy.


It’ll go down as the year everybody is very happy to see the back of. But what have we learnt from 2020? And what can policymakers do to ensure 2021 is a whole lot better? On our last episode of Policy Forum Pod for the year, Martyn Pearce hosts his final podcast for Policy Forum and is joined by Professor Sharon Bessell, Dr Arnagretta Hunter, and Dr John Falzon to reflect on the conversations we’ve had in our special mini-series on the wellbeing economy. They discuss the importance of an ethic of care, the end of the neoliberal model, the crisis of precariousness, and much more. The team also make some special announcements about the future of the podcast in 2021.


John Falzon OAM is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita. He is also a sociologist, poet, and social justice advocate, and was national CEO of the St Vincent de Paul Society from 2006 to 2018.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Dec 18, 2020
The wellbeing economy - democratic repair in disconnected times
55:27

On this episode in our special Policy Forum Pod mini-series on the wellbeing economy, Carolyn Hendriks and Millie Rooney join us to discuss how people and communities are bypassing politicians and policymakers to pursue a positive vision for Australia’s future. 


Throughout 2020, with all its trials and tribulations, many people have felt a strong sense of disconnection. But amidst this isolation, some community groups are banding together to try and tackle some of the major issues of our time. So can the broader Australian community find a path to genuine democratic repair within these examples? On the penultimate episode in our special Policy Forum Pod mini-series on the wellbeing economy, social scientist Associate Professor Carolyn Hendriks and Dr Millie Rooney from Australia reMADE join us to take a look at the future of Australian democracy.


Dr Millie Rooney is the Coordinator for Australia ReMADE, an independent, non-profit leadership network where Australian civil society leaders can collaborate with one another.


Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance at Crawford School of Public Policy.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Dec 10, 2020
The wellbeing economy - a healthier human future
1:01:04

The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated how deeply interconnected health and economics are. But can policymakers put health front-and-centre of economic conversations beyond the pandemic? Joining us on this episode of Policy Forum Pod to discuss health, equity and the wellbeing economy is Professor Sharon Friel.


How does Australia’s economic system affect our health? And in the wake of the devastating coronavirus pandemic, what practical steps can policymakers take to ensure health and wellbeing are central to the country’s economic decision-making in the long term? On this episode in our special Policy Forum Pod mini-series on the wellbeing economy, Professor Sharon Friel joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss health, equity, and the wellbeing economy.


Sharon Friel is Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance. She is also Co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Dec 04, 2020
The wellbeing economy - a glimpse of the good life
1:06:13

Rather than returning to the status quo, many are calling for a change in thinking (and in policy) as societies around the world grapple with the coronavirus crisis. One such advocate for change is global development expert David Hulme, who joins Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter for a fascinating discussion on the wellbeing economy in this instalment in our special mini-series. 


Why doesn’t economic growth necessarily lead to increased development? What impact is the COVID-19 crisis having on the world’s most vulnerable communities? And how can societies in developed and developing nations recover from COVID-19 and build a more equitable future with wellbeing at the core of policy decisions? On the fourth episode of our special Policy Forum Pod mini-series on the wellbeing economy, Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter discuss development in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis with Professor David Hulme, Executive Director of the Global Development Institute.


David Hulme is Professor of Development Studies at the University of Manchester where he is Executive Director of the Global Development Institute and CEO of the Effective States and Inclusive Development Research Centre.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 26, 2020
The wellbeing economy: universal basic income with Guy Standing
1:02:22

On the third episode in our special mini-series on the wellbeing economy, Arnagretta Hunter and Sharon Bessell are joined by Guy Standing, economist and author of The Precariat: The New Dangerous Class.


With more and more people being forced into insecure work, many are calling for a more lasting solution for precariousness. One often-suggested solution is a ‘universal basic income’, so what might be the benefits of this concept? What policy settings might be needed to make such a scheme successful? And how do political systems that are so focused on jobs and economic growth create space for change? On this episode - the third in our special mini-series on the wellbeing economy - renowned economist Dr Guy Standing joins Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter to discuss work, basic income, and how some of the economic structures developed in the last century may no longer be in our best interests.


If you or anyone you know needs help, you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 [http://www.lifeline.org.au/] and Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36 [https://www.beyondblue.org.au/].


Guy Standing is a Professorial Research Associate at SOAS University of London and a founding member and honorary co-president of the Basic Income Earth Network, a non-governmental organisation that promotes a basic income for all.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU).


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 20, 2020
A post-carbon world
55:23

Can we use economics to solve climate change? In this second episode of our Policy Forum Pod mini-series on the wellbeing economy, top climate experts Mark Howden and Tim Hollo join Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter.


Climate change has been front-and-centre of public debate following the presidential election in the United States. President-elect Biden has committed to rejoining the Paris Agreement and, closer to home, an ex-Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull made headlines for criticising News Corp’s “shocking legacy” on climate change. So is the world now moving closer to more meaningful action on climate change? What broader societal and cultural changes are needed to move to a genuinely post-carbon economy? And how can policymakers ensure such a transition is equitable and just for women and other marginalised groups in society? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter continue our mini-series on the wellbeing economy with this excellent discussion on climate change, featuring ANU Climate Change Institute Director Professor Mark Howden and highly-respected environmentalist Tim Hollo.


Tim Hollo is Executive Director of the Green Institute and Visiting Fellow at The Australian National University's School of Regulation and Global Government (RegNet), where he leads thinking around ecological political philosophy and practice, and drives policy discussion around Rights of Nature, Universal Basic Income and participatory democracy.


Mark Howden is Director of the ANU Climate Change Institute. Mark was a major contributor to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports for the United Nations, for which he shares a Nobel Peace Prize.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU).


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 12, 2020
Wellbeing and reimagining the Australian economy
51:43

On this Policy Forum Pod, Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter kick off our mini-series on the wellbeing economy by getting back to first principles with economist John Quiggin.


The concept of a ‘wellbeing economy’ has gained momentum in recent years, but how might this work in practice? In the first episode in our mini-series on the wellbeing economy, Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter speak to leading Australian economist, Professor John Quiggin. They discuss whether the neoliberal paradigm is still the dominant force, the feasibility of a Universal Basic Income, and the economics of health and wellbeing. We also pay tribute to Mark Zanker, long-time listener to the podcast and active member of our Policy Forum community, who sadly passed away over the weekend. 


John Quiggin is a Professor in Economics at The University of Queensland and is prominent both as a research economist and as a commentator on Australian economic policy.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU).


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for The Australian National University Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 06, 2020
School’s out - the COVID-19 crisis and school education
45:12

On this Policy Forum Pod, our panel - education expert Lawrence Saha, ACT education union boss Glenn Fowler, and Indigenous education scholar Marnie O’Bryan - examine the impact of the coronavirus crisis on school students, parents, and teachers.


The coronavirus pandemic has caused unprecedented disruption for school students the world over, with 1.5 billion pupils impacted by school closures at its height. So what impact will this have on students in the long-term? Is the gap between advantaged and disadvantaged students now widening? And with this pandemic far from over, how can policymakers ensure our school communities are safe and that students are getting the best possible education? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we discuss these issues with The Australian National University’s Professor Lawrence Saha and Dr Marnie O’Bryan, and Australian Education Union ACT Branch Secretary Glenn Fowler.


Lawrence Saha is Emeritus Professor at ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences. His areas of expertise include the sociology of education and education policy.


Marnie O'Bryan is Honorary Research Fellow at ANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.


Glenn Fowler is Branch Secretary of the Australian Education Union ACT Branch.


Angus Blackman is Associate Editor of Policy Forum and a presenter for Policy Forum Pod.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 30, 2020
Fact or fiction? The US election and the psychology of misinformation
37:23

Why do people believe the falsehoods they read online, and what impact is this having on politics and policy? On this special Policy Forum Pod in the lead-up to the United States election, we look at misinformation and disinformation in the ‘land of the free’.


The Internet and social media has revolutionised the way people access and share information. But unfortunately, not all information was created equal, and information revolution has also led to an explosion of rumours, half-truths and even straight-out lies that can spread at lightning speed, shared unknowingly (and sometimes knowingly) by users all around the world. But why do people believe so much of what they see online? What impact is misinformation and ‘fake news’ having on our political systems? And what can policymakers do to tackle it? On this special episode of Policy Forum Pod ahead of the United States presidential election, we’re joined by cognitive psychologist Dr Eryn Newman and national security expert Dr Jennifer Hunt to discuss these questions and more.


Jennifer Hunt is a Lecturer at the National Security College and a Research Associate at the US Studies Centre.


Eryn Newman is a Lecturer at ANU Research School of Psychology. Eryn’s research focuses on distortions of memory and cognition, looking at how people can succumb to ‘truthiness’ – using feelings and pseudo-evidence to decide what is real, instead of drawing on facts.


Angus Blackman is Associate Editor of Policy Forum and a presenter for Policy Forum Pod.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 28, 2020
The future of work in the wake of COVID-19
49:08

This week on Policy Forum Pod, we’re joined by politician and economist Andrew Leigh, workplace researcher Carys Chan, and consultant Ben Hamer to discuss the impact of COVID-19 on the working lives of Australians.


For many people their working patterns have changed dramatically in 2020, with more working from home, an increased reliance on internet and online communication, and some additional flexibility. But what will the world of work look like after the crisis passes? How can policymakers assist individuals and businesses adjust to these changes? And what do these changes mean for some of Australia’s most vulnerable citizens? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we discuss the COVID-19 crisis and the future of work with economist and Shadow Assistant Minister for Treasury and Charities Dr Andrew Leigh, lecturer at Griffith University’s School of Applied Psychology Dr Carys Chan, and Director and Future of Work Lead at PwC Australia Dr Ben Hamer.


Ben Hamer is Director and Future of Work Lead at PwC Australia. He is also an Adjunct Fellow at Swinburne University.


Carys Chan is a Lecturer in Organisational Psychology at the School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University in Brisbane and an Early Work Fellow at the Work and Family Researchers Network.


Andrew Leigh MP is the Member for Fenner in the ACT and Shadow Assistant Minister for Treasury and Charities. Prior to his election in 2010, Andrew was a professor of economics at The Australian National University.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 22, 2020
Clear and present failure - climate policy in Australia
53:55

On this Policy Forum Pod, top climate researcher Mark Howden, social scientist Bec Colvin, and science writer Ketan Joshi examine the past and present struggles of Australia’s climate policies, and how policymakers can put the country on the right track.


Does this Federal Budget represent another missed opportunity for Australia to take meaningful action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? Despite poll after poll showing Australians want to see action on climate change, why is there still such a gap between government policy and public opinion? And how can policymakers clear this blockage and ensure they are creating evidence-based policy? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, ANU Climate Change Institute Director Professor Mark Howden, Crawford School of Public Policy’s Dr Bec Colvin, and science writer Ketan Joshi examine the Federal Budget, the so-called ‘gas-led recovery’, and the history of Australian climate policy.


Mark Howden is Director of the ANU Climate Change Institute. Mark was a major contributor to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports for the United Nations, for which he shares a Nobel Peace Prize.


Bec Colvin is a Lecturer at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy with the Resources, Environment & Development Group. Prior to joining Crawford, she was a knowledge exchange specialist for the ANU Climate Change Institute.


Ketan Joshi is a science writer. His most recent book is Windfall: Unlocking a fossil-free future, which discusses the speed with which emissions could have been lowered if it weren't for a series of policy disasters.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 16, 2020
Making the invisible, visible - COVID-19 and poverty
18:13

In the final episode of our special Policy Forum Pod bonus mini-series, Professor Sharon Bessell examines the health and economic impacts of the coronavirus crisis on those already experiencing deprivation.


While the impact of the COVID-19 crisis has been felt all around the world, people already experiencing poverty face some of the most severe challenges in the wake of the pandemic. From the health impacts of not having private access to clean water and sanitation, to the economic consequences of job losses during lockdowns - particularly in countries with limited social safety nets - the future is deeply uncertain for many of the world’s most vulnerable people. On the sixth and final episode in our Making the invisible, visible bonus mini-series on poverty, Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty (IMMP) project lead Professor Sharon Bessell joins us to examine the ramifications for those most in need, and why addressing poverty should be front-of-mind for policymakers in the context of the coronavirus crisis.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU).


Aarti Betigeri is a multi-platform journalist and former foreign correspondent. She is a correspondent for Monocle and contributes to various other local and international media outlets.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 13, 2020
Vision deficit? The federal budget and Australia’s future
55:33

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, our panel - Sharon Bessell, Arnagretta Hunter, and John Falzon - examine Australia’s first budget in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis and ask whether it lays the groundwork for a more prosperous and just nation.


The Australian government may have spent big in this federal budget, but does it deliver the right outcomes for the country’s long-term future? Has the government missed a once-in-a-generation chance to address some of the structural challenges Australia faces, particularly in regards to climate and inequality? And what other options might Treasurer Josh Frydenberg have considered in perhaps the most important budget in the lifetimes of most Australians? On this Policy Forum Pod, we’re joined by pod regulars Professor Sharon Bessell, cardiologist and Clinical Senior Lecturer at ANU Medical School Dr Arnagretta Hunter, and sociologist Dr John Falzon to discuss the budget and whether this was a missed opportunity to create a more just nation.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU).


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for The Australian National University Medical School.


John Falzon OAM is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita. He is also a sociologist, poet, and social justice advocate, and was national CEO of the St Vincent de Paul Society from 2006 to 2018.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 09, 2020
Making the invisible, visible - poverty and disability
18:20

On the penultimate episode in our Policy Forum Pod bonus mini-series on poverty, Helen Suich and Angie Bexley join us to discuss what their research shows about the intersection of poverty and disability, and why policymakers must recognise that people with disability have rights, not just needs.


There is a growing understanding that the experiences of people with disability are nuanced and diverse, but there’s still a dearth of data in many countries. Research through the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty (formerly known as the Individual Deprivation Measure) project has shone a light on deprivation and disability in Indonesia and South Africa. So what has it revealed about patterns of poverty, how these two countries are responding, and what policymakers can do better? In the fifth episode in our ‘Making the invisible, visible’ bonus mini-series, Dr Helen Suich and Dr Angie Bexley from the IMMP join host Aarti Betigeri to talk about poverty among people with disability.


Dr Helen Suich led the Individual Deprivation Measure South Africa country study, working as a Senior Research Fellow at the Crawford School of Public Policy at the time.


Dr Angie Bexley is the Deputy Director of the Children’s Policy Centre and Senior Research Fellow at the Poverty and Inequality Centre. Angie was lead author of the Individual Deprivation Measure (now known as IMMP) Indonesia reports.


Aarti Betigeri is a multi-platform journalist and former foreign correspondent. She is a correspondent for Monocle and contributes to various other local and international media outlets.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

 



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Oct 06, 2020
TikTok - the platform, the people, and the politics
57:52

On this special Policy Forum Pod live event, we're joined by prominent TikToker Ricky Chainz, national security expert Dr James Mortensen, and digital anthropologist Dr Crystal Abidin to discuss TikTok culture and the national security concerns about the platform.

 

It’s the latest social media craze to sweep the world, and has been the entertainment platform of choice for many during COVID-19 lockdown periods, but TikTok has become entangled in political controversy and debate about cybersecurity. So, what makes TikTok different to other social media platforms? What impact has it had on how young people around the world participate in social movements? And how concerned should policymakers be about the potential for data privacy and national security breaches coming through the platform? On this Policy Forum Pod live event, we’re joined by researchers Dr James Mortensen and Dr Crystal Abidin, and TikToker Ricky Chainz, to discuss one of the world’s most popular social media platforms.


Dr Crystal Abidin is a socio-cultural anthropologist of vernacular internet cultures, particularly young people's relationships with internet celebrity, self-curation, and vulnerability.


Dr James Mortensen is a Research Fellow at the Research School of Computer Science at The Australian National University.


Ricky Chainz is a Sydney-based content creator on TikTok with more than five million followers on the platform.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


This live event was run in partnership with ANU Learning Communities.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 02, 2020
Making the invisible, visible - understanding poverty in Indonesia
20:56

In this episode in our special bonus series on poverty, Dr Angie Bexley joins us to discuss Indonesia’s recent progress on poverty reduction, and what the findings of the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty reveal about deprivation in the country’s remote eastern provinces.


Southeast Asia’s largest economy, Indonesia, has made major strides in poverty reduction in recent decades. But official measures, which rely on household income alone, can only tell policymakers part of the story. New research through the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty (IMMP) project has provided a much more in-depth view of poverty in the country’s eastern regions. So what does this study tell us about patterns of poverty in Indonesia? And how can policymakers use this information to ensure no-one gets left behind? In the fourth episode in our ‘Making the invisible, visible’ bonus series, Dr Angie Bexley from the IMMP joins host Aarti Betigeri to talk about the dimensions of deprivation in the world’s fourth most populous nation.


Dr Angie Bexley is the Deputy Director of the Children's Policy Centre and Senior Research Fellow at the Poverty and Inequality Centre. Angie was lead author of the Individual Deprivation Measure (now known as IMMP) Indonesia reports.


Aarti Betigeri is a multi-platform journalist and former foreign correspondent. She is a correspondent for Monocle and contributes to various other local and international media outlets.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 29, 2020
A trip down memory lane
1:08:31

On this episode, we look back on some of our favourite Policy Forum Pod moments ahead of this year’s Australian Podcast Awards.


Over recent weeks, the Policy Forum Pod team has been busily preparing our submission for the Australian Podcast Awards. In this time, we’ve had the chance to listen back through some of our favourite moments on the pod since the beginning of 2019. We all know happiness grows when it’s shared, so in this episode we invite you to join us on a little trip down memory lane, re-visiting some of our most engaging, emotional, and insightful discussions. From this year’s bushfire crisis, to drug policy, to Indigenous health, to the beginning of the COVID-19 crisis, we hope you enjoy this long-list of our favourite Policy Forum Pod moments from the last year and a half.

 

Dr Siobhan McDonnell is a legal anthropologist with over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous people in Australia and the Pacific on land use, gender, and climate change. She is a Lecturer at Crawford School of Public Policy and the lead negotiator on climate change for the Vanuatu government.


Dr John Falzon is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita. He was national CEO of the St Vincent de Paul Society from 2006 to 2018.


Professor Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU).


Professor Ian Chubb was Vice-Chancellor of both Flinders University and The Australian National University. He served as Australia’s Chief Scientist from 2011 to 2016, is a Companion of the Order of Australia, and is an Emeritus Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy.


Philip Alston is John Norton Pomeroy Professor of Law at New York University and served as United Nations Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights.


Professor Desmond Manderson is founding Director of the Centre for Law, Arts, and the Humanities in the College of Law at ANU.


Dr David Caldicott is an emergency consultant at the emergency department at Calvary Hospital and Senior Lecturer in the College of Health and Medicine at ANU.


Dr Tracy Beck Fenwick is the Director of the Australian Centre for Federalism and Senior Lecturer in the School of Politics in the College of Arts and Social Sciences at ANU.


Dr Paul Wyrwoll is an environmental and resources economist at Crawford School. Previously, Paul was General Manager of the FE2W Network and Managing Editor of the Global Water Forum.


Julie Tongs OAM is the Chief Executive Officer of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services. Julie has more than 30 years’ experience working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs and was the ACT Indigenous Person of the Year.


Dr Virginia Marshall is the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow with the ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet).


Dr Sue Regan is a Lecturer at Crawford School of Public Policy. Sue joined Crawford School in 2012 as Social Policy Program Leader of the HC Coombs Policy Forum. In February 2020, Sue also became Policy Manager at Volunteering Australia.


Julian Burnside AO QC is an Australian barrister. He is also a human rights and refugee advocate, and author. Julian stood as a candidate for the Greens in his local electorate of Kooyong in the 2019 federal election.


Anooshe Mushtaq is the founder and Chair of the Raqib Taskforce, a Muslim-led organisation that builds social inclusion...


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Sep 25, 2020
Making the invisible, visible - poverty in South Africa
16:03

In episode three of our ‘Making the invisible, visible’ bonus series, Aarti Betigeri chats with Dr Helen Suich about what research through the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty project has revealed about patterns of poverty in South Africa.


Poverty in South Africa has historical roots, with the prospects of the majority of the population curtailed by Apartheid throughout much of the 20th century. So what impact has the country’s segregationist past had on contemporary patterns of poverty? And how does deprivation differ across the many dimensions of poverty? In the third episode in our ‘Making the invisible, visible’ bonus series, South Africa lead on the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty project Dr Helen Suich discusses patterns of poverty in the Rainbow Nation with host Aarti Betigeri.


Dr Helen Suich led the Individual Deprivation Measure South Africa country study, working as a Senior Research Fellow at the Crawford School of Public Policy at the time.


Aarti Betigeri is a multi-platform journalist and former foreign correspondent. She is a correspondent for Monocle and contributes to various other local and international media outlets.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 22, 2020
Unmuting the muses
47:02

On this episode, we’re joined by Kim Cunio, Denise Ferris, and Clive Barstow to discuss the value of Australia’s arts sector and what policymakers can do to support artists in their time of need.


They are the people society turns to in times of crisis to provide an entertaining distraction or salve, but the coronavirus crisis has left many in Australia’s already vulnerable arts sector on the brink. So what can policymakers do to ensure Australian artists are appropriately valued? How can the sector reorganise to give itself the most effective possible political voice? And does Australia need a Chief Artist as well as a Chief Scientist? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Denise Ferris, Associate Professor Kim Cunio, and Professor Clive Barstow chat about arts policy in Australia and the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the sector.


Associate Professor Kim Cunio researches composition and musicology in the School of Music of The Australian National University. He is an accomplished researching composer and performer and was awarded an ABC Golden Manuscript Award in recognition of his work with traditional music.


Professor Clive Barstow is Executive Dean of Arts and Humanities at Edith Cowan University, Honorary Professor of Art at the University of Shanghai Science and Technology China, Honorary Professor of Design at Guangdong Baiyun University China, and global faculty member of Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey.


Professor Denise Ferris is Head of the School of Art and Design at The Australian National University. She has been in this position at ANU since 2013, where she has lectured in photography since 1987. Professor Ferris is also Chair of the Australian Council of University Art & Design Schools (ACUADS), the peak body representing over thirty Australian universities in visual arts, craft and design.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 18, 2020
Making the invisible, visible - gender and poverty
18:43

In episode two in our ‘Making the invisible, visible’ bonus mini-series, Janet Hunt and Sharon Bessell join us to get behind the data from the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty project, and discuss what this tells us about the gendered dimensions of poverty.


For 12 years, researchers from Crawford School of Public Policy have been working on an ambitious project to redefine how poverty is measured. Now known as the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty (IMMP) project, this research has revealed some insightful information about patterns of poverty, particularly in regards to gender. So how do women experience poverty differently from men? And what does this mean for policymakers involved in the global mission to eradicate poverty? In the second episode of this ‘Making the invisible, visible’ bonus mini-series, IMMP researchers Associate Professor Janet Hunt and Professor Sharon Bessell join us to examine the gendered dimensions of poverty.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU).


Aarti Betigeri is a multi-platform journalist and former foreign correspondent. She is a correspondent for Monocle and contributes to various other local and international media outlets.


Janet Hunt is Associate Professor at ANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research in the College of Arts and Social Sciences.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 15, 2020
Activism, social justice, fighting for a fairer Australia
53:51

On this episode, guest host Kim Cunio speaks with writer and social activist Stephanie Dowrick and Northern Territory-based paediatrician Paul Bauert about fighting for social justice in Australia.


What does it take to be an activist for policy change? How can governments and Australian society more broadly do more to advocate for social justice? And what role can professionals like artists and health specialists play in the policy space? In the second episode of Associate Professor Kim Cunio’s Policy Forum Pod takeover, he speaks with writer and social activist Stephanie Dowrick and Northern Territory-based paediatrician Paul Bauert about ethics and policymaking in an uncertain world.


Associate Professor Kim Cunio researches composition and musicology in the School of Music of The Australian National University. He is an accomplished researching composer and performer and was awarded an ABC Golden Manuscript Award in recognition of his work with traditional music.


Dr Paul Bauert OAM is a pediatrician at Royal Darwin Hospital with a lifetime involvement in Indigenous health. A lifetime menber of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, he has won numerous awards for his passionate and persistent advocacy for improvements in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.


Reverend Dr Stephanie Dowrick is an author, activist, and inter-faith minister. She was the first Managing Director of the influential British publishing house The Women's Press. Some of her books include Intimacy and Solitude, Everyday Kindness, and Seeking the Sacred and has written for the Sydney Morning Herald for many years.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 10, 2020
Making the invisible, visible – episode 1
18:18

In the first episode in our ‘Making the invisible, visible’ bonus mini-series, Professor Sharon Bessell joins us to discuss the limitations of the international poverty line and what new research has revealed about the gendered, multidimensional nature of poverty.


It has been 20 years since the Millennium Development Goals were first conceptualised, and in that time a significant number of people have been lifted out of poverty. But with poverty defined narrowly, using household income alone, does that provide a true picture of global poverty at the individual level? For over a decade, researchers from Crawford School of Public Policy have been working on an ambitious project to redefine how poverty is measured, taking an innovative, rights-based and people-centred approach. This research, now ongoing through the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty project, didn’t just assess how many people are poor, but rather how they experience poverty. Regular Policy Forum Pod episodes will still be released every Friday as usual, but over the next six weeks our bonus ‘Making the Invisible, Visible’ mini-series will shed light on the issue of poverty by breaking down the figures provided by this new Measure, getting behind the data, and seeing how it can help policymakers better direct resources. In this first episode, host Aarti Betigeri is joined by Professor Sharon Bessell to chat about why the way poverty is measured matters, plus some of the project’s key findings.


Professor Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU).


Aarti Betigeri is a multi-platform journalist and former foreign correspondent. She is a correspondent for Monocle and contributes to various other local and international media outlets.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 08, 2020
Water, decolonisation, and connections to Country
51:54

On this episode, guest host Kim Cunio is joined by Kathleen Harriden and Jessica Weir to talk about the importance of Indigenous knowledge, the deep connection of Indigenous people to Country, and how to decolonise Australian institutions.


Are the disciplinary boundaries used by universities and the policymaking apparatus to understand challenges and distribute resources actually preventing society from effectively tackling complex issues like water policy? Does the desire to learn about Indigenous fire management practices in the wake of Australia’s terrible bushfire season represent a turning point in non-Indigenous understanding of Indigenous knowledge? And how can key national institutions place greater value on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander practices and knowledge that have maintained environmental balance across the continent for tens of thousands of years? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Associate Professor Kim Cunio is joined by multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary researcher and advocate Kathleen Harriden and environmental management researcher Dr Jessica Weir to discuss breaking down our disciplinary and policymaking boundaries.


Associate Professor Kim Cunio researches composition and musicology in the School of Music of The Australian National University. He is an accomplished researching composer and performer and was awarded an ABC Golden Manuscript Award in recognition of his work with traditional music.


Dr Jessica Weir is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Culture and Society, Western Sydney University, and a Visiting Fellow at ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society.


Kathleen Harriden is a PhD student at ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society, and is particularly interested in including traditional ecological knowledge in urban water management practices and policy development.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 04, 2020
Can policymakers detoxify social media?
45:59

On this episode, our panel - Dr Jenny Davis, Dr Jennifer Hunt, and Yun Jiang - join us to discuss online hate, anti-social behaviour on digital platforms, and what policymakers can do about it.

 

There’s little doubt social media can, at times, become very unpleasant. From run of the mill rudeness all the way to hate speech, there is no shortage of social media horror stories from users. Women and people from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds - especially those in the public eye - are often subject to vile abuse online. But does it have to be this way? Can policymakers and the social media platforms do more to encourage greater civility and ensure people’s safety? And what can governments do to tackle hate speech and coordinated disinformation campaigns? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, our expert panel - Dr Jenny Davis, Dr Jennifer Hunt, and Yun Jiang - join us to discuss what we can do to make social media platforms safer, more respectful spaces. 


Dr Jennifer Hunt is a Lecturer at the National Security College and a Research Associate at the US Studies Centre.


Dr Jenny Davis is a Senior Lecturer at The Australian National University's School of Sociology. Her research focuses on status, stigma, and identity, along with technology and the politics of digital design.


Yun Jiang is a researcher at the Australian Centre on China in World and Co-Editor of China Neican, a newsletter that decodes China issues with concise, timely, and policy-focused analysis. Her research interests include geo-economics, Australia-China relations, and Chinese-Australians.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 20, 2020
More than just a flesh wound
58:43

Some 13.9 per cent of Australians aged 20-24 are unemployed, and that’s likely to get worse the longer the coronavirus crisis continues. How will the crisis and the recession to come impact their future careers and prospects? On this week’s Policy Forum Pod we take a look at economic scarring – what it is, how it impacts people, and what policymakers can do about it.


While we’re still learning much about COVID-19, one thing has become increasingly clear – it’s impact will be with us all for years to come, and could disproportionately impact young people. This week on Policy Forum Pod a superb panel of experts – labour economist Professor Bob Gregory, social policy expert Professor Matthew Gray, and Professor of political sociology Ariadne Vromen – take a look at the issue of economic scarring, and whether the wounds being inflicted on young people through the coronavirus crisis will heal or leave a long-term mark on their futures. 


Professor Ariadne Vromen is Sir John Bunting Chair of Public Administration at Crawford School of Public Policy and Deputy Dean (Research) at The Australia and New Zealand School of Government.


Emeritus Professor Bob Gregory worked in the Research School of Economics at The Australian National University (ANU) and is a former member of the Reserve Bank of Australia Board. His research has focused on economic development and growth, comparative economy systems, and welfare economics.


Professor Matthew Gray is Director of the Centre for Social Research and Methods in the ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 14, 2020
Talking with the tax team about policy
40:55

On this week’s Policy Forum Pod we lift the lid on one of the most hotly-contested policy areas – taxes – and speak to the authors of a new report on how we can create a tax system that eases the unfair burden on younger Australians.

 

Despite repeated calls for reform – including Ken Henry’s Tax Review of 2008 – Australia’s tax system remains complex. But according to the authors of a new report, it’s not just complicated and hard to understand, but also a system that unfairly penalises younger people while giving older, wealthier Australians concessions. So, what’s going wrong in Australia’s tax system, why have we found it so politically problematic to get substantial change, and what would a fairer tax system for all look like? This week on Policy Forum Pod we speak to two of the report’s authors, Professor Robert Breunig and Kristen Sobeck.


The report, The taxation of savings in Australia: theory, current practice and future policy directions is written by Peter Varela, Kristen Sobeck, and Professor Robert Breunig at Crawford School’s Tax and Transfer Policy Institute. It is available to download here.


Professor Robert Breunig is the director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute. He conducts research in three main areas: economics of the household, empirical industrial organisation, and statistical and econometric theory.


Kristen Sobeck is a Senior Research Officer at Crawford School of Public Policy's Tax and Transfer Policy Institute.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 06, 2020
A precarious position - Indonesia’s workers in the pandemic
1:02:21

On this episode, we hear from leading Indonesia experts about the impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having on jobs, particularly on vulnerable workers in the country’s massive informal sector.


As elsewhere in the world, Indonesia’s devastating COVID-19 health crisis is having a major impact on the country’s economy. The Indonesian government projects that five and a half million of its citizens could lose their jobs as a result of reduced economic activity, with many of these being workers from the country’s massive informal sector. With limited access to social security or healthcare, this crisis will leave many of Indonesia’s most vulnerable people on the brink. But with reported infections recently exceeding 100,000 and some of the lowest testing rates in the world, the future remains deeply uncertain for many in the Southeast Asian nation. On this episode, we hear from leading Indonesia experts - special adviser to the Indonesian Minister of Finance Dr Titik Anas, Dr Chris Manning, and Joanna Octavia - who discuss the impact the crisis is having on jobs in the country.

 

This episode is based on a live recording of an event at Crawford School of Public Policy’s Indonesia Project, ‘Jobs and pandemic: the case of Indonesia’. You can access the full recording at Crawford.anu.edu.au or on the Crawford School of Public Policy YouTube channel.


Dr Titik Anas is a Special Adviser to the Indonesian Minister of Finance and a Lecturer at Universitas Padjadjaran. Her research interests lie in international trade issues, macroeconomics, industrial organisation, investment policy and small-scale business development.


Joanna Octavia is a PhD scholar at the Warwick Institute for Employment Research at University of Warwick and a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies in Indonesia.


Dr Chris Manning is an Honorary Associate Professor in Crawford School of Public Policy's Arndt-Corden Department of Economics at The Australian National University. His research focuses on labour markets. regional development, poverty, and economic development in Indonesia and Southeast Asia.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the 


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Jul 31, 2020
The future of healthcare and the fight against COVID-19
47:43

On this episode, we’re joined by top health practitioners and policy experts to tackle the elimination versus suppression debate, plus why a comprehensive approach to health and wellbeing is so important for our future.


With another outbreak of COVID-19 in Victoria, and the threat of more cases emerging across state borders weighing heavily on the minds of the Australian population, the country’s suppression strategy has been called into question. But is eliminating the virus a possibility as case numbers globally skyrocket? In the second edition of Dr Arnagretta Hunter’s ‘human futures’ Policy Forum Pod takeover, infectious diseases expert Dr Ashwin Swaminathan draws on his first-hand experience treating COVID-19 cases as Clinical Director of General Medicine at Canberra Hospital to shed light on the situation. Plus returning pod guest Sharon Friel, Professor of Health Equity at The Australian National University (ANU), joins us to talk about why our future health and wellbeing requires a comprehensive approach from government that goes beyond just primary healthcare.


Dr Ashwin Swaminathan is a physician and infectious diseases specialist. In addition to his clinical work he has completed a PhD at The Australian National University looking at climate change and infectious diseases, and has research interest in environmental epidemiology. He is also Clinical Director, General Medicine at Canberra Hospital.


Dr Sharon Friel is Professor of Health Equity and Director of Menzies School for Health Governance at The Australian National University


Dr Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 24, 2020
Food for thought
48:44

On this special ‘human futures’ episode, Dr Arnagretta Hunter takes the reins and is joined by Dr Robyn Alders and Dr Tayanah O’Donnell to discuss a rethink in how we value food, and why mitigation and adaptation to climate change are key to building a better future.


Food is at the heart of how we live and where we live. But around the world, agricultural systems are being challenged, food producers are often not reaping the fruits of their labour, and obesity is on the rise in highly developed nations. Joined by Future Earth’s Dr Tayanah O’Donnell and Professor Robyn Alders AO, guest presenter Dr Arnagretta Hunter looks why food is at the heart of our future, why policymakers must provide the frameworks to simultaneously mitigate and adapt to climate change, and asks whether constant growth is really the only way for humans prosper.


Dr Tayanah O'Donnell is a lawyer, human geographer, and Executive Director of Future Earth Australia.


Robyn Alders AO is an Honorary Professor with the Development Policy Centre at The Australian National University (ANU), a Senior Scientific Advisor with the Chatham House Centre on Global Health Security, and Chair of the Kyeema Foundation.


Dr Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 17, 2020
Pacific policy responses to COVID-19
40:50

On this episode, we speak with The Australian National University’s Meg Keen, Henry Ivarature, and Nicole Haley about the successes and struggles in the Pacific Island region as it manages the coronavirus crisis.


Despite so far avoiding widespread COVID-19 infections, the risk of a major outbreak in the Pacific Island region remains real while the virus continues to wreak havoc around the world. In addition to the ongoing health threat, the region is dealing with the devastating economic impacts of the pandemic. With tourism representing a major component of the regional economy prior to the crisis, how are governments and donors in the region supporting people now out of work? What impact has the crisis had on policymakers’ ability to address other challenges in the region, like the deadly rise of non-communicable diseases? And is Australia delivering on its promised ‘step-up’? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we chat with Professor Meg Keen, Dr Henry Ivarature, and Associate Professor Nicole Haley about how the region is managing the crisis, what has worked in the response so far, and what else needs to be done as the pandemic rolls on.


Dr Nicole Haley is Head of the Department of Pacific Affairs and Associate Professor at The Australian National University.


Professor Meg Keen is Director of Australia Pacific Security College at The Australian National University. She has also a been senior policy fellow in the State, Society and Governance in Melanesia program at ANU.


Dr Henry Ivarature is a Pacific Lecturer at Australia Pacific Security College at The Australian National University.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. Image: Michael Coghlan on Flickr.



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Jul 10, 2020
Tackling the loss of local news
33:28

Even before COVID-19 struck, local news was struggling, with newspapers moving online or disappearing completely. So is there a role for policy in protecting and supporting the essential role local news plays in our democracy? We’re joined by Caroline Fisher and Carolyn Hendriks to get the headlines and check the small print.


New research has revealed that while rural and regional Australians value local news, about a quarter have no local news at all. Journalists, meanwhile, are being asked to cover expanded geographical areas, and having to apply their skills well beyond writing articles. So what effect is this squeeze on local news having on communities, what are communities doing to tackle it, and is there a role for policy that ensures communities are informed? Joining us to talk about her new research is Associate Professor Caroline Fisher of the University of Canberra, and Associate Professor Carolyn Hendriks of Crawford School of Public Policy.


Caroline Fisher is an Associate Professor in journalism at the University of Canberra. She is a member of the News & Media Research Centre and co-author of the annual Digital News Report-Australia.


Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance at The Australian National University's Crawford School of Public Policy.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 03, 2020
Ask Policy Forum Episode III (part two)
54:38

In part two of our special episode of Ask Policy Forum, the panel tackles your tough questions, from the struggling arts sector, to how health systems around the world are coping with the COVID-19 crisis, to the serious business of lockdown snacks.


Led by Professor Mark Kenny, we take you on a fairly raucous ride, discussing health, education, technology, and the arts, in part two of our special edition of Ask Policy Forum. Responding to your questions from the past few months, the team is also joined for the first time by a live online audience of our pod squad.

 

You can get early access to this series, the chance to join our live audience in future editions, and chat with pod hosts and panellists about new episodes by joining our Policy Forum Pod Facebook group


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Elizabeth Ames is an international trade policy expert. She is the National Director of the Britain Australia Society and an international trade policy expert with a strong background in senior business and financial advisory. She is also Trustee of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London.


Dr Kim Cunio is a Senior Lecturer in composition and musicology in the School of Music of The Australian National University. He is an accomplished researching composer and performer and was awarded an ABC Golden Manuscript Award in recognition of his work with traditional music.


Professor Sharon Bessell is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team at Crawford School of Public Policy. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.


Dr David Caldicott is an emergency consultant at the emergency department of the Calvary Hospital in Canberra and a Senior Lecturer in the College of Health and Medicine at ANU.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook.

 



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Jun 29, 2020
Ask Policy Forum Episode III (part one)
47:03

On this episode, we bring you part one of our first-ever online live recording of Ask Policy Forum, the podcast where you ask the questions.


This week we’re bringing you something a little special on today’s Policy Forum Pod. With an all-star panel of pod regulars, plus one or two new faces, we tackled your questions in the third edition of our Ask Policy Forum series. From hard-hitting policy queries on the health and economic impacts of the COVID-19 crisis, to the serious business of lockdown snacks, our panel answered the questions that matter to you - and had a good laugh along the way. The team is also joined for the first time by a live online audience of our pod squad. So kick-back, relax, and enjoy the Ask Policy Forum ride.

 

You can get early access to this series, the chance to join our live audience in future editions, and chat with pod hosts and panellists about new episodes by joining our Policy Forum Pod Facebook group.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Elizabeth Ames is an international trade policy expert. She is the National Director of the Britain Australia Society and an international trade policy expert with a strong background in senior business and financial advisory. She is also Trustee of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London.


Dr Kim Cunio is a Senior Lecturer in composition and musicology in the School of Music of The Australian National University. He is an accomplished researching composer and performer and was awarded an ABC Golden Manuscript Award in recognition of his work with traditional music.


Professor Sharon Bessell is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team at Crawford School of Public Policy. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.


Dr David Caldicott is an emergency consultant at the emergency department of the Calvary Hospital in Canberra and a Senior Lecturer in the College of Health and Medicine at ANU.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook.



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Jun 26, 2020
Economic uncertainty, COVID-19, and the mental health of younger Australians
28:29

On this episode, we’re joined by Associate Professor Ben Edwards to discuss why the mental health of younger Australians has been so severely impacted during the COVID-19 crisis.


New research from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed a spike in severe psychological distress in young Australians under 35 since the start of the pandemic. But why is COVID-19 impacting the mental health of younger Australians so seriously? What role does economic insecurity brought on by the crisis play in the emotional wellbeing of this group? How do these impacts compare with other nations? And what can policymakers do to address the challenges younger Australians are facing? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Associate Professor Ben Edwards from ANU joins us to talk about his new research on the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 crisis, and why more younger Australians are experiencing serious psychological distress. 


Ben Edwards is an Associate Professor of Child and Youth Development at ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


If you or anyone you know needs help you can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 and Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36 for support. Both Lifeline and Beyond Blue also both have information specifically for looking after your mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jun 18, 2020
Pandemic policy perspectives (part two)
42:03

In part two of this special Policy Forum Pod, we hear personal perspectives and COVID-19 policy prescriptions from Sara Bice, Matthew Sussex, and Libby Hackett.


What are the qualities of successful institutions and leaders during a crisis? How can governments improve their public messaging and arrest a trend of declining trust? And how are globalised educational institutions coping and adapting to the major ruptures caused by the coronavirus crisis? On this Policy Forum Pod, we hear from three experts from ANU Crawford School of Public Policy - Sara Bice, Matthew Sussex, and Libby Hackett - about public policy, leadership, and political communication in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Matthew Sussex is an Associate Professor and Academic Director at the National Security College. His main research specialisation is on Russian foreign and security policy.


Libby Hackett is Principal at Nous Group, an international management consultancy people working across Australia, the United Kingdom and Canada. Libby is a recognised expert in higher education policy and strategy in Australia and the UK.


Sara Bice is Co-Director of Research Translation at the Melbourne School of Government and Senior Research Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


You can check out all the COVID-19 analysis from Crawford School of Public Policy here.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jun 12, 2020
Pandemic policy perspectives
40:49

This week on Policy Forum Pod we get some personal perspectives on some of the many policy problems that the pandemic presents from Quentin Grafton, Helen Sullivan, and Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt.


The coronavirus crisis has raised some big questions for policymakers and shone a light on policy problems around the world. On this special Policy Forum Pod, we hear some personal perspectives on the policy challenges that matter to Professor Quentin Grafton, Professor Helen Sullivan, and Professor Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt – from how to get better leadership, to creating an economy that works for everyone, and ensuring that post-crisis policy doesn’t make life even worse for those already struggling.


This week’s pod is the first in a two-part special where we look at some of the perspectives shared on Crawford School’s new COVID-19 micro-site. The micro-site brings together contributions from academic and professional staff reflecting on the coronavirus crisis, what they think are the key issues that need addressing, how a public policy school can go about helping provide some of those solutions, and even how their work has been changed by the crisis.


Professor Helen Sullivan is Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. She has published widely on public policy, public governance and public service reform, and in 2013 established the Melbourne School of Government.


Professor Quentin Grafton is Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy, Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.


Professor Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt is a Professor in the Resource, Environment and Development Program at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


The pieces discussed in this week’s podcast are:

Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt – Livelihoods, workers, and COVID-19 in India

Helen Sullivan – Leading in and out of the crisis

Quentin Grafton – Economic justice for all


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us 


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Jun 05, 2020
Indigenous health and the ongoing march for a more equal Australia
58:36

On this special episode during National Reconciliation Week, we speak to Dr Virginia Marshall and Professor Tony Dreise about Indigenous health, listening to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices, and the ongoing march for equality.


With outcomes on many key indicators of Indigenous health falling short of those for non-Indigenous Australians, how can policymakers better listen to Indigenous voices and improve community wellbeing? How will the economic crisis brought on by the coronavirus pandemic impact Indigenous Australians? And what does National Reconciliation Week mean for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the context of ongoing policy failure? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Sharon Bessell speaks with Dr Virginia Marshall and Professor Tony Dreise about Indigenous health policy, the COVID-19 crisis, and what’s needed for Australia to achieve genuine reconciliation.


Dr Virginia Marshall is an Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow with the ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the Fenner School of Environment and Society.


Tony Dreise is Professor of Indigenous Policy Research and Director of the ANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR).


Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 28, 2020
JobSeeker payments and the approaching unemployment cliff
33:10

With the $550 coronavirus supplement set to expire in September, we speak with Professor Peter Whiteford about the future of Australia’s JobSeeker program as calls grow for a permanent raising of the rate.


Prior to the coronavirus crisis, there were calls from all sides of politics for the Australian government to increase the rate of its unemployment benefit, formerly known as Newstart. The Morrison government long resisted this pressure, but the economic cataclysm brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic brought about major, albeit temporary, policy change. While the government insisted that the new coronavirus supplement is a short-term option, some of the 1.6 million people on JobSeeker, and the additional 6.1 million people on JobKeeper, may face the prospect of extended unemployment if the promised economic ‘snapback’ fails to materialise. But what will happen to those still unemployed, and the economy as a whole, if/when the supplement ends? And, if the government is to raise the rate, by how much should it do so? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we’re joined by ANU Crawford School of Public Policy academic, Professor Peter Whiteford, to examine Australia’s JobSeeker scheme.

 

Peter Whiteford is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy. He works on child poverty, family assistance policies, welfare reform, and other aspects of social policy, particularly ways of supporting the balance between work and family life. He has published extensively on various aspects of the Australian and New Zealand systems of income support.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

 

Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 21, 2020
Taken for granted? Volunteering in the COVID-19 crisis and beyond
34:22

In this episode, we look at the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on perhaps one of Australia’s most underappreciated sectors, volunteering.


Despite often going under the radar, the volunteering sector makes a huge contribution to society. From our rural fire-fighting services, to our local sports organisations, and beyond, volunteers play a bigger part in Australian life than many probably realise. But what has been the impact of the current crisis on volunteers? And what can policymakers do to better support and value volunteering? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we speak to The Australian National University’s Professor Nicholas Biddle and CEO of Volunteering Australia Adrienne Picone about how COVID-19 has re-shaped volunteering in Australia.


Professor Nicholas Biddle is Associate Director of the ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods and Director of the newly created Policy Experiments Lab.


Adrienne Picone is the Chief Executive Officer of Volunteering Australia.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 17, 2020
Can infrastructure get Australia’s economy back on track?
39:59

In this episode, we discuss the importance of infrastructure in Australia’s economic recovery and what the future holds for major projects in the wake of COVID-19.


It was key to Australia’s economic recovery from the Global Financial Crisis, but what is the role of infrastructure as the country manages the recovery from the coronavirus pandemic? With delays, cancellations, and mothballing costing billions, how can policymakers ensure they consult appropriately to get projects right? And with suburbia acting as the new CBD due to health restrictions and business closures, what will future infrastructure projects look like as we all continue to live with the impacts of COVID-19? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we speak to Associate Professor Sara Bice and Kirsty O’Connell about how to get infrastructure policy right, and its importance in post-coronavirus economic recovery.


Dr Sara Bice is Co-Director of Research Translation at the Melbourne School of Government and Senior Research Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy.


Kirsty O'Connell is Industry Director for the Next Generation Engagement Program and Director of The Engagement People.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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May 07, 2020
Securing our human future
41:47

In this episode, we chat to Dr John Hewson and Dr Arnagretta Hunter about the catastrophic and existential risks facing humanity, and what we can do to ensure our future.


With people around the world suffering at the hands of COVID-19, the virus has shone a spotlight on our vulnerability to a global disease outbreak. But pandemics like COVID-19 are far from the only serious risks threatening citizens and nations across our planet. A new report from the Commission for the Human Future (CHF) identifies 10 catastrophic and existential risks facing humanity. So what are the risks, and what can be done to address them? In the new episode of Policy Forum Pod, CHF Chair Dr John Hewson and CHF Board Member Dr Arnagretta Hunter join us to discuss these risks, and the future of humanity.


Dr Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for The Australian National University Medical School.


Dr John Hewson AM is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy. He is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system. Dr Hewson joined ANU in 2014 and is Chair of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 30, 2020
WHO’s to blame? International organisations in the COVID-19 crisis
50:14

In this episode, Professor Helen Sullivan and Dr Christian Downie examine the role of international organisations in the fight against COVID-19.


The United States government’s decision to withdraw funding from the World Health Organization (WHO) over its handling of the coronavirus crisis has brought simmering tension sharply to the surface. So have international organisations, such as the WHO and G20, handled the crisis effectively? With the economic impacts of the virus set to be truly enormous, what is the future of the global architecture of institutions, many of which function on fine margins financially? And how can Australia and other small and medium-size nations ensure these organisations are working for the global public good, rather than as vehicles for major power competition? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, The Australian National University’s Professor Helen Sullivan and Dr Christian Downie join us to discuss the response of international organisations to COVID-19, what the future might hold for them after the crisis, and the importance of global leadership.


Professor Helen Sullivan is Director of ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. She has published widely on public policy, and public governance.


Dr Christian Downie is an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow in the School of Regulation and Global Governance at The Australian National University.


Professor Sharon Bessell is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team at Crawford School of Public Policy. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 23, 2020
Hope and life after COVID-19 - health, politics, and people power
52:10

In this episode, we discuss what long-term changes the coronavirus crisis might bring about in healthcare, politics, and citizen engagement.


Will the pandemic change how society values essential workers, especially in the healthcare sector? Rather than ‘snapping back’ to business as usual, will the Australian government persist with a selection of the ostensibly temporary interventions that are aiding the health and wellbeing of Australians? Will the newfound spirit of cooperation between the federal and state and territory governments continue after the crisis? And how will citizens engage with politics and their communities after a prolonged period of isolation? In the second and final part of our special episode on hope and life after COVID-19, we speak to Professor Sharon Friel and Associate Professor Carolyn Hendriks about the future of Australia’s health and political systems.

 

Professor Sharon Friel is Director of School of Regulation and Global Governance at The Australian National University. Sharon is also a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia, an ANU Public Policy Fellow and an Australian Council of Social Services Policy Advisor.


Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University. Carolyn’s work examines the democratic aspects of contemporary governance, particularly with respect to participation, deliberation, inclusion and representation.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


You can listen to Professor Sharon Friel’s new podcast series, Dinner Ladies Save the World, on Apple Podcasts and Soundcloud.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 17, 2020
Hope and life after COVID-19 - the economy with John Hewson
36:23

In part one of this special two-part episode we discuss Australia’s economic future after the coronavirus pandemic with former Federal Opposition Leader Dr John Hewson.


It’s often said in politics that you ‘should never waste a good crisis’. But does the coronavirus crisis signal that it’s time to make major structural changes in the Australian economy? Should the government take a stake in businesses like airlines to ensure they survive? And after the crisis, will the government be able to wind back measures that are likely to receive broad public support, such as free childcare and an increase to unemployment benefits? In part one of our special two part episode on hope and life after COVID-19, we speak to Dr John Hewson about Australia’s economy after the pandemic.


Dr John Hewson AM is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy. He is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system. Dr Hewson joined ANU in 2014 and is Chair of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 16, 2020
Public health, family violence, and COVID-19
49:50

This week we discuss whether Australia’s coronavirus prevention measures are fit for purpose and take a look at the challenges facing victims of family violence who are stuck at home due to the pandemic.


Are Australia’s COVID-19 prevention measures sustainable? How can policymakers get the balance right in the coming months and maybe years while the world searches for a vaccine? And what has been the impact of the pandemic on those living in abusive relationships? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Sharon Bessell chats with infectious diseases expert Professor Peter Collignon AM about Australia’s COVID-19 prevention measures, before Dr Bianca Calabria joins us to discuss family violence during the pandemic.


Professor Peter Collignon AM is an infectious diseases physician and microbiologist at the Canberra Hospital. He is currently Executive Director of ACT Pathology and a Professor at The Australian National University Medical School.


Dr Bianca Calabria is a Research Fellow at the Research School of Population Health at The Australian National University and a Conjoint Lecturer at the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at University of New South Wales. She also works as a psychologist, with people who have experienced trauma, particularly survivors of domestic violence.


Professor Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Apr 09, 2020
The psychology of uncertainty and talking to kids about COVID-19
33:29

This week we discuss how policymakers and individuals can manage uncertainty during the coronavirus pandemic, plus how best to speak to children about the virus and its impacts.


The COVID-19 pandemic has created huge amounts of uncertainty for people across the globe, in both their personal and professional lives. But how can governments and experts communicate effectively to reduce people’s anxiety around these kinds of upheavals? What can individuals do to cope with this uncertainty? And how can parents talk to their children about the crisis in an age-appropriate way? In this episode, we talk to Professor Michael Smithson about the psychology of uncertainty in the pandemic, before Nicola Palfrey joins us to discuss how adults can talk about COVID-19 with children.


Nicola Palfrey is Operations and Research Manager at The Australian National University Medical School and Director of the Australian Child and Adolescent Trauma, Loss, and Grief Network. She is also a clinical psychologist and a Churchill Fellow.


Professor Michael Smithson is a Professor and Associate Director (Research) in the Research School of Psychology at ANU and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. He received his PhD from the University of Oregon and his primary research interests are in judgment and decision making under uncertainty, statistical methods for the social sciences, and applications of fuzzy set theory to the social sciences.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


If you or anyone you know needs help:

  • Lifeline on 13 11 14 [http://www.lifeline.org.au/]
  • Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36 [https://www.beyondblue.org.au/]


Lifeline [https://www.lifeline.org.au/get-help/topics/mental-health-and-wellbeing-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak] and Beyond Blue [https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/looking-after-your-mental-health-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak] also both have information specifically about looking after your mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on...


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Apr 02, 2020
Coping in isolation - mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic
43:41

On this episode, we discuss how to care for mental health during an unprecedented period of community isolation due to the coronavirus.


While the world is focused on tackling the immediate danger from COVID-19, the physical isolation required to stop the spread can have a significant impact on people’s mental health. Serious financial pressures, job losses, and anxiety about the future have made it hard for many to cope. So, with Australia’s mental health system struggling before the crisis, how will it cope with any increased demand? What role can telehealth play in alleviating some of the burden? And what are ordinary members of the community doing to support each other in this challenging time?


On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, our panel - Luis Salvador-Carulla and Sebastian Rosenberg - discusses how policymakers can support the population’s mental health, and how people can maintain a sense of social connection during this period of isolation.


Professor Luis Salvador-Carulla is Head of the Centre for Mental Health Research at the Research School of Population Health at The Australian National University. He has been advisor to the Government of Catalonia in Spain, the Spanish Ministry of Health, the European Commission, and the World Health Organization on mental health and disability policy.


Dr Sebastian Rosenberg is a Fellow in the Learning and Development Unit at ANU Centre for Mental Health Research and Senior Lecturer at the Brain and Mind Centre at the University of Sydney. He was a public servant for 16 years, working in health in both state and federal governments.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


If you or anyone you know needs help:

  • Lifeline on 13 11 14 [http://www.lifeline.org.au/]
  • Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36 [https://www.beyondblue.org.au/]


Lifeline [https://www.lifeline.org.au/get-help/topics/mental-health-and-wellbeing-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak] and Beyond Blue [https://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/looking-after-your-mental-health-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak] also both have information specifically for looking after your mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to 


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Mar 26, 2020
Australia's gambling problem and its impact on women
36:39

The normalisation of gambling in Australian life has had devastating results for many people across the country. On this week’s pod, we talk to authors of new research on gambling harm in Australia and its impact on women.


While as many as 200,000 Australians have a high-level problem with gambling, new research from The Australian National University shows that the impact of gambling harm goes well beyond individual gamblers. So how are loved ones, particularly women, harmed by gambling behaviour?


On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we’re joined by researchers Dr Megan Whitty and Dr Marisa Paterson from The Australian National University to discuss their new study on the issue, and what policymakers should be doing to tackle this major challenge.


Dr Marisa Paterson is the Director of the Centre for Gambling Research at The Australian National University. Marisa specialises in qualitative research methods, with a particular research focus on gambling policy and regulation. She leads a broad range of projects relating to many different aspects of gambling.


Dr Megan Whitty is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Gambling Research at ANU. Her research interests lie in the area of public health, particularly gambling, Indigenous health, and behavioural addiction.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


You can access the Gambling Support Study and videos from the pod here, and if you or anyone you know needs help with gambling problems, support is available at the following places:


Lifeline on 13 11 14

Gambling Help Online on 1800 858 858

Beyond Blue on 1300 22 46 36


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 19, 2020
Transforming policy for the greater good
25:35

In light of the Australian government’s announcement to focus on technology – such as hydrogen and carbon capture – to mitigate the impacts of climate change, we talk to an innovation policy expert about what Australia could learn from the Netherlands’ Topsector approach.


Following the dramatic bushfires, Australia’s policy is more than ever in need of grand transformations – but how can policymakers best go about that and ensure that businesses are on board? The Dutch Topsector approach might give us some pointers. Launched in 2010, the policy creates so called Topsectors - businesses and knowledge institutes that work together with government to drive innovation and solve societal issues at the same time. In this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we talk to Dr Matthijs Janssen about this transformative policy, and what lessons Australia could draw from it.  


Dr Matthijs Janssen is an Assistant Professor at the Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development at University of Utrecht, investigating innovation policy and strategy.


Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 12, 2020
Where are the women?
35:29

In this episode, we mark International Women’s Day with a special pod looking at women in leadership, from the boardroom to the front bench. 

 

From business to politics to higher education, women are still hugely under-represented in the upper echelons of a range of sectors. While many have made a clear case for the benefits of gender diversity in terms of organisational performance and culture, women still face significant barriers which are preventing them from reaching the top in their fields. So why is this, and what can be done to bring about much-needed change? On this week’s pod, our panel - Julie Hare, Professor Sharon Bell, Sophia Hamblin Wang and Caitlin Figueiredo - talk about the bold changes that are needed in order to disrupt the status quo.


Professor Sharon Bell is Dean of the College of Asia and the Pacific at The Australian National University.


Sophia Hamblin Wang is the Chief Operations Officer of Mineral Carbonation International, a technology platform that transforms carbon dioxide into building materials and other valuable industrial products.


Caitlin Figueiredo is the founder of Jasiri and is an Australia Global gender equality activist. She was named 2018 ACT Young Australian of the Year and was recognised on the Forbes under 30 list for her work on parliamentary gender equality through the Girls Takeover Parliament Program.


Julie Hare is Editor of BroadAgenda, part of the 50-50 by 2030 Foundation at the University of Canberra.


Dr Sue Regan is a Lecturer at Crawford School of Public Policy. In February 2020, Sue also became Policy Manager at Volunteering Australia.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Mar 05, 2020
Climate change and the high price of doing nothing
45:26

In this episode of Policy Forum Pod, our expert panel counts the cost of inaction on climate change.


In recent times, much attention has been paid to the costs of new climate change policies. From job losses, to higher electricity prices, to new taxes, these tolls have been touted far and wide. But what about the cost of inaction? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we’re joined by an expert panel - Professor Quentin Grafton, Dr Arnagretta Hunter, and Honorary Associate Professor Imran Ahmad - to ask what Australians are paying, and likely to pay into the future, if the country continues on its current trajectory.


Dr Imran Ahmad is Founding Director of Future Earth Australia, former Director of East-Asia and Pacific at the Global Green Growth Institute, and an Honorary Associate Professor at the Fenner School of Environment and Society.


Dr Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for The Australian National University Medical School.


Professor Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 27, 2020
Public service productivity and popping the Canberra bubble
38:00

On this week’s episode, we’re joined by Professor Patrick Dunleavy to talk about ‘robodebt’, department mergers, and why this very ‘Canberra’ issue has a big impact throughout the country.


Will the government’s proposed departmental merger make the Australian Public Service more efficient? And as big data and artificial intelligence play a bigger role in the delivery of public services, are issues like the ‘robodebt’ scandal a harbinger of things to come? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Sharon Bessell speaks with political scientist and public policy guru Professor Patrick Dunleavy about increasing public service productivity for the benefit of all.


Patrick Dunleavy is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy within the Government Department of the London School of Economics. He is also Co-Director of Democratic Audit and Chair of the LSE Public Policy Group and Centenary Research Professor at the Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis, University of Canberra.


Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.


Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 20, 2020
Ask Policy Forum: The podcast where you ask the questions
1:01:38

Join us at the pod squad members’ lounge as we field your questions on all sorts of issues, from how countries are performing on emissions reduction to which politician you’d least like to be stuck in conversation with at the annual Midwinter Ball.


On the first episode of our special Ask Policy Forum series, regular hosts and special guests crack a beverage and chat about what you want to know. Led by Chris Farnham of the National Security Podcast, kick back as Mark Kenny of Democracy Sausage, Martyn Pearce of Policy Forum Pod, Professor Mark Howden, Associate Professor Carolyn Hendriks and Dr Arnagretta Hunter field your questions on life, the universe and everything.


Future episodes of Ask Policy Forum will be released only to members of our Policy Forum Pod Facebook group, so make sure you jump online and join to get access to this exclusive monthly pod.


Mark Howden is Director of the ANU Climate Change Institute. Mark was a major contributor to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports for the United Nations, for which he shares a Nobel Peace Prize.


Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance, at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. Her work examines the democratic aspects of contemporary governance.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for The Australian National University Medical School.


Mark Kenny is the presenter of Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny and a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Chris Farnham is the presenter of the National Security Podcast. He joined the National Security College in June 2015 as Policy and Events Officer. His career focus has been on geopolitics with experience working in and out of China for a number of years as well as operating in Australia and Southeast Asia.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook



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Feb 20, 2020
Coronavirus and a state of unease
49:57

This week on Policy Forum Pod, we tackle key questions about the novel coronavirus outbreak – what is the virus, how are countries responding, and how do we address the spread of misinformation when public tensions are running high.


The coronavirus outbreak is rapidly evolving, with new information coming to light each day. With the level of uncertainty about the disease, misinformation is also spreading fast. While orchestrating major public health responses is difficult at the best of times, how can authorities ensure the public are well informed when falsehoods are spread so easily via social media? How appropriate and effective are the responses we’ve seen from international governments so far? And how important is it to maintain strong multilateral institutions to address global health crises? On this week’s pod, we speak to two public health experts – Professor Martyn Kirk and Dr Nick Coatsworth – and a China scholar – Yun Jiang – to unpack these issues.

 

Martyn Kirk is a National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Fellow and Professor of applied epidemiology at The Australian National University Medical School. He has worked for over 20 years in state, territory, and federal health departments in the areas of infectious disease surveillance and investigation.


Nick Coatsworth is a Consultant Physician in infectious disease medicine at Canberra Hospital, a Clinical Senior Lecturer in Medicine at The Australian National University Medical School, and a PhD scholar at ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet). He was President of Medecins Sans Frontieres Australia from 2010 to 2011.


Yun Jiang is a researcher at the Australian Centre on China in World and Co-Editor of China Neican, a newsletter that decodes China issues with concise, timely, and policy-focused analysis. Her research interests include geo-economics, Australia-China relations, and Chinese-Australians.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 13, 2020
From the ashes: social security and Australia’s bushfire recovery
50:05

While hundreds of bushfires still burn throughout Australia, some communities are beginning the enormous task of rebuilding. While the fires didn’t discriminate as they tore through towns around the country, the recovery process is especially difficult for those who were already struggling even before the disaster. People on low incomes, those living with a disability, rough sleepers, and other marginalised groups now face a huge task to recover.

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, our expert panel - Professor Sharon Bessell, Dr John Falzon and Professor Peter Whiteford - join us to discuss how best to support those who need it most.

Peter Whiteford is Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy. He previously worked as a Principal Administrator in the Directorate of Employment, Labour and Social Affairs of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in Paris.

Dr John Falzon OAM is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita. He is also a sociologist, poet, and social justice advocate, and was national CEO of the St Vincent de Paul Society from 2006 to 2018. John’s current work focuses on social security reform, housing and homelessness, workers’ rights, and rebuilding the concept of the common good across society.

Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Feb 06, 2020
Caring for burning Country
40:45

Public interest in Indigenous fire management practices like ‘cool burning’ has grown significantly in the wake of Australia’s unprecedented bushfire crisis. But what is cool burning, and what does the attention it has received tell us about how Indigenous knowledge is valued in Australia? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Dr Virginia Marshall and Dr Annick Thomassin join us to talk about the impact of the bushfires on Aboriginal people, why Indigenous knowledge should be central to policy-making, and the state of reconciliation in Australia.

Annick Thomassin is a Post-doctoral Fellow at the ANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research. She is the primary investigator of the Seachange: Aboriginal marine pathways to social inclusion project, a grassroots, research-action initiative developed in collaboration with Mogo and Batemans Bay Local Aboriginal Land Councils.

Virginia Marshall is an Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow with the ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the Fenner School of Environment and Society.

Sue Regan is a PhD Scholar and tutor at Crawford School of Public Policy. Previously, Sue was Chief Executive of the Resolution Foundation, a UK-based research institute focusing on the well-being of low earners.

Policy Forum Pod is available on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook.

If you’d like to help with the recovery effort or contribute to firefighting services, here’s how you can donate to bushfire appeals.



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Jan 30, 2020
Climate change - policy perfect vs policy possible
46:59

Australia’s federal government is coming under increasing pressure to change course on its climate policies, but will it lead to tangible policy change? This week on Policy Forum Pod an expert panel - Professor Frank Jotzo, Professor Quentin Grafton, Dr Tayanah O’Donnell and Meegan Fitzharris – take a look at how the events of the last couple of months have shifted public views and how that might, or might not, translate into policy change.

Frank Jotzo is Professor at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, and Director of the Centre for Climate Economics and Policy.

Tayanah O’Donnell is Director of Future Earth Australia, based at the Australian Academy of Science.

Meegan Fitzharris is a Senior Fellow in Health Policy and Leadership at ANU College of Health and Medicine. She is a former Labor Member of the Legislative Assembly for Molonglo and Yerrabi and was the ACT government’s Minister for Health and Wellbeing.

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, UNESCO Chair in Water Economics and Transboundary Water Governance, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

 



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Jan 23, 2020
Managing bushfires (part two)
52:35

On this second episode of our two-part podcast, our expert panel dive deeper into the physical and mental health impacts of the fires and discuss what lessons policymakers can really draw from a potential Royal Commission into the bushfires. 

Having discussed the link between climate change and the bushfires and shared their personal experiences in part one, our expert panel – Dr Liz Hanna, Professor Stephen Dovers, Professor Janette Lindesay, and Dr Siobhan McDonnell – return for part two of this special Policy Forum Pod episode on Australia’s bushfires. Our presenters Dr Paul Wyrwoll and Martyn Pearce pick up where we left off asking the panel about the far-reaching mental and physical health impacts of the fires, look at whether a Royal Commission is needed, and discuss what better policy might look like.

Stephen Dovers is Emeritus Professor with the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society and works on the policy of climate change adaptation, disasters, and sustainable development.

Janette Lindesay is a climatologist, a Deputy Director of the ANU Climate Change Institute, and Emeritus Professor at the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society.

Liz Hanna is an Honorary Fellow at ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society. Her research investigates the health impacts of climate change.

Siobhan McDonnell is a legal anthropologist with over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous people in Australia and the Pacific on land use, gender, and climate change. She is a Lecturer at Crawford School of Public Policy, and the lead negotiator on climate change for the Vanuatu government.

Paul Wyrwoll is an environmental and resources economist at Crawford School. Previously, Paul was General Manager of the FE2W Network and Managing Editor of the Global Water Forum.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jan 19, 2020
Managing bushfires (part one)
37:22

Stephen Dovers is Emeritus Professor with the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society and works on the policy of climate change adaptation, disasters, and sustainable development.

Janette Lindesay is a climatologist, a Deputy Director of the ANU Climate Change Institute, and Emeritus Professor at the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society.

Liz Hanna is an Honorary Fellow at ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society. Her research investigates the health impacts of climate change.

Siobhan McDonnell is a legal anthropologist with over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous people in Australia and the Pacific on land use, gender, and climate change. She is a Lecturer at the Crawford School of Public Policy, and the lead negotiator on climate change for the Vanuatu government.

Paul Wyrwoll is an environmental and resources economist at Crawford School. Previously, Paul was General Manager of the FE2W Network and Managing Editor of the Global Water Forum.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jan 16, 2020
The gift of policy
58:45

Looking for a great podcast to keep you entertained on the drive home for Christmas dinner? Our joyful Policy Forum Pod team have got you covered. On this special end-of-year episode, from people power beyond the ballot box to an in-depth chat on poverty and climate change with Philip Alston, we present our favourite episodes for your listening pleasure, with a special appearance from some of our listeners. If you need some inspiration for your New Year’s resolutions, you might just find that too, as our presenters share their own ideas for the coming year.

Paul Wyrwoll is an environmental and resources economist at Crawford School. Previously, Paul was General Manager of the FE2W Network and Managing Editor of the Global Water Forum.

Sue Regan is a PhD Scholar and tutor at Crawford School of Public Policy. Previously, Sue was Chief Executive of the Resolution Foundation, a UK-based research institute focusing on the well-being of low earners.

Liam Hughes is a listener of Policy Forum Pod. He is a student at the University of Queensland.

Mark Zanker is a listener of Policy Forum Pod. He is a retired lawyer who worked in Australian Government Attorney General’s Department from 1983 to 2009, principally in bankruptcy and then international law.

Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Dec 06, 2019
Revitalising urban areas with Helen Sullivan
48:53

Despite the fact that more people are moving to cities globally, some places are increasingly struggling with slower population growth, lower incomes and higher unemployment rates. One example of such urban decline is Dandenong, a diverse multicultural suburb of Melbourne, that has been facing a number of social and economic challenges. On this episode, we talk to Crawford School Director Professor Helen Sullivan about her research into the revitalisation of Dandenong, and the story it tells about cultural pluralism and the importance of collaboration between different levels of government. Helen also discusses why policymakers must pause and listen first if they want to create successful revitalisation plans.

Pod presenters Sue Regan and Martyn Pearce also dive into some of your questions and comments and welcome new members to our Facebook Podcast group.

Helen Sullivan is Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. She has published widely on public policy, public governance and public service reform, and in 2013 established the Melbourne School of Government.

Sue Regan is a PhD Scholar and tutor at Crawford School of Public Policy. Previously, Sue was Chief Executive of the Resolution Foundation, a UK-based research institute focusing on the well-being of low earners.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 28, 2019
Andrew Leigh - Innovation + Equality
37:34

Amazing new technologies in the areas of artificial intelligence and genetics have benefitted societies and greatly rewarded their innovators, but access to resources that help people innovate is not equal. On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we invited Andrew Leigh MP to the pod bridge to talk about his new book, find out why Australians seem to fear innovation failure, and how we can support the next generation to explore the universe of innovations. We also touch upon the role of universities in building stronger partnerships between students and businesses, and discuss why excellent innovations first need excellent teachers.

Our pod presenters Sue Regan and Martyn Pearce also tackle some of your questions and comments.

Andrew Leigh is the Shadow Assistant Minister for Treasury and Charities and Member for Fenner. Prior to his election in 2010, Andrew was a professor of economics at The Australian National University. Andrew's new book, Innovation + Equality: How to Create a Future That Is More Star Trek Than Terminator, written with Joshua Gans, was published in October by MIT Press.

Sue Regan is a PhD Scholar and tutor at Crawford School of Public Policy. Previously, Sue was Chief Executive of the Resolution Foundation, a UK-based research institute focusing on the well-being of low earners.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 21, 2019
Beyond declaring a climate emergency
1:00:21

As the nation is ravaged by bushfire and drought, and as yet another political row breaks out over the role of climate change in all this, our Great Green Debate all-star team comes back for the second leg of the Great Green Debate cup clash. On this episode, Shane Rattenbury MLA, Dr Liz Hanna, and Dr Imran Ahmad take on a wide range of audience-submitted questions from our recent live event, looking at why it is high time to speak about climate change in the context of Australia’s dramatic bushfires, how we can ensure a just energy transition, and what peaceful protests can really do to spur climate action.

Imran Ahmad is Founding Director of Future Earth Australia, former Director of East-Asia and Pacific at the Global Green Growth Institute, and an Honorary Associate Professor at the Fenner School of Environment and Society.

Shane Rattenbury is the ACT government’s Minister for Climate Change and Sustainability.

Liz Hanna is a Fellow in the ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment and Chair of the Environmental Health Working Group, World Federation of Public Health Associations.

Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Podcast: Great Green Debate

Climate emergency rejected by Australia’s Parliament

Super-Power (Ross Garnaut)

Bushfires in Australia

Democracy Sausage: David Speers

Review of Labor’s 2019 Federal Election Campaign

Hazelwood power station closure

Declaring a water emergency - Quentin Grafton and John Williams (Policy Forum)

The Great Stink

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 14, 2019
People power beyond the ballot box
47:56

Trust in democracy is falling in Western countries – including Australia. On one side, we see growing protests about the government’s response to climate change, while at the other extreme people are feeling increasingly disengaged by politics. So on this week’s Policy Forum Pod we ask, how can we make sure that the voice of citizens is heard in policy? To tackle this question, we’re joined by Associate Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment, Associate Professor Carolyn Hendriks, and Peter Martin. The panel also discuss Scott Morrison’s clampdown on environmental protesters, and why social media has hampered rather than helped productive political dialogue.

Pod presenters Professor Quentin Grafton and Julia Ahrens also discuss the reaction to Quentin’s call for Australia to declare a ‘water emergency’, welcome some of our new Facebook group friends, and look at some of your questions and comments.

Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance, at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. Her work examines the democratic aspects of contemporary governance.

Jennifer Lees-Marshment is an Associate Professor in political science at The University of Auckland in New Zealand. Author/editor of 13 books, she is a world expert in political marketing with additional research interests in public input, leadership, and governance.

Peter Martin is a Visiting Fellow at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation. A former Commonwealth Treasury official, he has worked as economics correspondent for the ABC, as economics editor of The Age, and as host of The Economists on ABC Radio National.

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Declaring a water emergency - Quentin Grafton and John Williams (Policy Forum)

Scott Morrison on climate protesters

Richard Nixon on ‘forgotten Americans’

The Ministry of Public Input (Jennifer Lees-Marshment)

Inquiry into the Economics of Energy Generation (NSW)

Podcast: Illicit drug policy - more harm than good?

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook...


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Nov 07, 2019
Illicit drug policy - more harm than good?
59:20

Australia’s illicit drug policies are complex and vary between states and territories. Despite recent pushes to decriminalise cannabis in the Australian Capital Territory or to minimise harm through pill-testing at festivals - both of which have been opposed by the federal government - attempts to regulate illicit drug use have mostly been pursued through prohibition.

On this Policy Forum Pod, we talk to David Caldicott, Desmond Manderson, and Tracy Fenwick about why ‘zero tolerance’ policies are causing more harm than good, and how states and territories can act as policy laboratories to develop better solutions. They also discuss why the legalisation of cannabis always needs to go hand in hand with effective quality controls for marijuana crops.

Pod presenters Paul Wyrwoll and Julia Ahrens also discuss the government’s new expert panel appointed to find ways to cut emissions and take a look at your comments, questions and suggestions for future episodes of Policy Forum Pod.

Desmond Manderson is a Professor in the College of Law at The Australian National University. He is founding Director of the Centre for Law, Arts, and the Humanities.

Tracy Fenwick is the Director of the Australian Centre for Federalism and Senior Lecturer in the School of Politics in the College of Arts and Social Sciences at ANU.

David Caldicott is an emergency consultant at the emergency department of the Calvary Hospital in Canberra and a Senior Lecturer in the College of Health and Medicine at ANU.

Paul Wyrwoll is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Climate and Energy Policy in the Crawford School at ANU. He is an environmental and resources economist who works on energy, water, and climate change.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Climate Solutions (Emissions Reduction) Fund

New cannabis use laws in ACT

Beau Kilmer’s research (Rand Corporation) 

National Drug Strategy Household Survey

Canada’s Cannabis 2.0

ACEM Annual Scientific Meeting (Hobart)

Japan’s pivot to sport - Simon Chadwick (Policy Forum)

Podcast: A sense of social insecurity

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 31, 2019
A sense of social insecurity
1:12:34

Compared to its OECD peers, Australia has an above-average poverty rate, and couples this with rising rates of homelessness, an increasingly casualised workforce, and dole rates so low that a chorus of voices from across the political spectrum are calling for an increase in Newstart payment.

But has the country really got the measure of poverty rates and their impacts? What’s life really like on the breadline? And what policies do we need to ensure a social welfare system that protects the most vulnerable in society? This week on Policy Forum Pod a brilliant panel - Nicole Wiggins, Dr John Falzon, and Professor Matthew Gray - tackle these questions and more.

Pod presenters Professor Sharon Bessell and Martyn Pearce also discuss Australia’s Anti-Poverty Week, Australia’s Women of Influence, whether writing to MPs is an effective way of changing policy, and last week’s Great Green Debate live event.

Professor Matthew Gray is Director of the Centre for Social Research and Methods at The Australian National University. He was previously Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, Director of Research for the ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences, and Deputy Director of the Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Dr John Falzon OAM is Senior Fellow, Inequality and Social Justice at Per Capita. He is also a sociologist, poet, and social justice advocate, and was national CEO of the St Vincent de Paul Society from 2006 to 2018. John’s current work focuses on social security reform, housing and homelessness, workers’ rights, and rebuilding the concept of the common good across society.

Nicole Wiggins is Director of the Early Morning Centre. The Early Morning Centre is a community hub supporting Canberra people who are experiencing, or at risk of experiencing, homelessness and those experiencing social isolation.

Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

MyCause page for supporting Canberra community charities

Podcast: Great Green Debate

The Early Morning Centre

Poverty in Australia 2018 (ACOSS and UNSW)

Australia’s unemployment benefit lowest amongst OECD countries

Senate Inquiry into the Adequacy of Newstart

Senate Inquiry into the Adequacy of Newstart in 2012

Harmer Review (Pension Review Report)

Podcast: Julian Burnside - Changing attitudes towards refugees and asylum seekers


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Oct 24, 2019
Extra: Tayanah O’Donnell - Transforming our cities
22:45

Our cities are changing rapidly giving rise to a plethora of sustainability challenges. On this Policy Forum Pod extra, we chat to Tayanah O’Donnell about what Future Earth does in the urban context, and why governments, industry, researchers, and citizens must work together to shape our future cities in a sustainable way.

We also talk to Tayanah about the climate strike protests, and she shares her thoughts on whether Australia should declare a climate emergency.

Tayanah O’Donnell is Director of Future Earth Australia, based at the Australian Academy of Science.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Future Earth Australia

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 23, 2019
The Great Green Debate – live!
1:25:21

This week on Policy Forum Pod we head out of the studio for our first ever live pod, as a stellar cast of experts tackle a burning question – Should Australia declare a climate emergency. Our panel – John Hewson, Imran Ahmad, Liz Hanna, and Shane Rattenbury – share their views on what it would mean, how it might help, and what the barriers to making it work might be.

This event was recorded at The Australian National University on Thursday 17 October. It was the annual Great Green Debate organised by ANU Learning Communities – a student-led organisation dedicated to bringing people together in areas of common interest. The panel was co-hosted by Policy Forum Pod’s Professor Sharon Bessell and Martyn Pearce.

Imran Ahmad is Founding Director of Future Earth Australia, former Director of East-Asia and Pacific at the Global Green Growth Institute, and an Honorary Associate Professor at the Fenner School of Environment and Society.

Shane Rattenbury is the ACT government's Minister for Climate Change and Sustainability.

John Hewson is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system. In 2014, Dr Hewson joined ANU as Professor at the Crawford School, and Chair of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute.

Liz Hanna is a Fellow in the ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment and Chair of the Environmental Health Working Group, World Federation of Public Health Associations.

Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Sir Nicholas Stern on climate change being a market failure

Labor announcement to declare a climate emergency

Climate emergency 

Canberra transitions to 100% renewable electricity

The Guardian changes language changes concerning the environment

climate health alliance

Theresa May announces Climate Change Act

UK Parliament declares climate emergency

Adani (Carmichael) coal mine in Australia

Health Care Without Harm (Green and Healthy Hospitals)

Prosperity Without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet (book by Tim Jackson; ‘decoupling’)

Australian local councils declare climate emergency


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Oct 18, 2019
Julian Burnside: Changing attitudes towards refugees and asylum seekers
59:06

Despite international criticism, asylum seekers and refugees have been labelled as ‘illegals’, and painted as threats to Australia’s security. On this very special Policy Forum Pod, we talk to Julian Burnside AO QC about why politicians seem to be so unwilling to engage in honest discussions about refugees, and what lessons we can draw from history to change public attitudes and refocus on the value of human rights.

Pod presenters Sharon Bessell and Julia Ahrens also discuss Donald Trump’s support for Turkey, Germany’s plans to introduce higher taxes on flight tickets, and look at some of your comments and suggestions for future episodes of Policy Forum Pod.

Julian Burnside is an Australian barrister. He is also a human rights and refugee advocate, and author. Julian stood as a candidate for the Greens in his local electorate of Kooyong in the 2019 federal election.

Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Trump’s tweets on Turkey

Germany increases plane ticket prices

Tampa affair

Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)

Manus Island

Lawless World: Making and Breaking Global Rules (book by Philippe Sands)

East West Street (book by Philippe Sands) 

Shaun Hann’s on ‘man on Nauru’ 

Can science diplomacy with non-liberal countries be justified?

Democracy Sausage podcast: The next generation

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Oct 10, 2019
Living with the city
56:31

With an estimated 68 per cent of the world’s population predicted to be living in cities by 2050, policymakers and urban planners have myriad challenges to tackle. On this Policy Forum Pod, Paul Wyrwoll leads a discussion with Jasmine Ha, Sharon Friel, and Glenn Withers, about why migrants – both from rural areas and overseas – are flocking to cities, and how to ensure that inequality, environmental and health issues don’t dominate urban areas. They also discuss why we might move beyond city living in the future, and how to maintain prospects for rural areas.

Pod presenter Julia Ahrens also talks to Hayley Boxall about her research into domestic violence and the strategies that women who experience this employ to keep safe. You can read more about her work here.

Jasmine Ha is Research Fellow in the School of Demography at The Australian National University. Her research focuses on understanding the impacts of migration policies.

Sharon Friel is Professor of Health Equity and Director of School of Regulation and Global Governance at The Australian National University. Sharon is also a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Australia, an ANU Public Policy Fellow and an Australian Council of Social Services Policy Advisor.

Glenn Withers is Professor of Economics in the Research School of Economics and was founding CEO of Universities Australia. Glenn has served as chair of various Australian government bodies, including the National Population Council.

Hayley Boxall is a Principal Researcher at the Australian Institute for Criminology and a PhD student at the Centre for Social Research and Methods at The Australian National University. Her research is focused on domestic violence.

Paul Wyrwoll is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Climate and Energy Policy in the Crawford School, ANU. He is an environmental and resources economist who works on energy, water, and climate change.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny (podcast) 

Australian police deal with domestic violence every two minutes (ABC article)

KPMG report on the cost of violence against women in Australia

ABS Personal Safety Survey 2016 

Participate in ‘Ending domestic violence: the role and experiences of women in mens’ behaviour change’ study

My Dad Wrote A Porno (podcast)

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us...


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Oct 03, 2019
Pilots, but no plane – landing better mental health policies
1:06:30

Despite greater openness about mental health, the stigma attached to, for example, depression and anxiety disorders still runs deep in our society. At this rate, problems are starting to outrun the solutions, with mental health disorders becoming more and more prevalent – an issue that disproportionately affects Indigenous people.

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we have a powerful conversation with Julie Tongs, Sebastian Rosenberg, and Stewart Sutherland about whether more plans equals better policy, and how forced separation and institutional racism still affect Australia’s Indigenous communities.

Pod presenters Sharon Bessell and Martyn Pearce also go over some of your suggestions for future episodes of Policy Forum Pod and give some details about the upcoming Great Green Debate which will be recorded live for Policy Forum Pod. You can register for that event here.

Before you listen to the discussion, we’d like to issue a warning, particularly to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander listeners. This episode includes discussion on the death of indigenous peoples. Some people might find the content of this episode distressing.

If you or your loved ones are struggling with mental health, know that there is help. You can reach out to Lifeline Australia’s crisis support at 13 11 14 - available 24/7.

Julie Tongs is the Chief Executive Officer of Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services. Julie has more than 30 years’ experience working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs and was the ACT Indigenous Person of the Year.

Stewart Sutherland is a Lecturer at The Australian National University College of Health and Medicine. For over a decade he has worked in Indigenous health focusing on identity and mental health particularly Social and Emotional Wellbeing of the Stolen Generations.

Sebastian Rosenberg is a Research Fellow at ANU and Senior Lecturer at the Brain and Mind Centre at the University of Sydney. He was a public servant for 16 years, working in health in both state and federal governments.

Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing - 1997 and 2007

Winnunga

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan

First National Mental Health Plan (1993)

Suicide Prevention in New Zealand

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or...


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Sep 26, 2019
Katherine Trebeck - What makes a good life?
52:13

Economic growth has brought great prosperity to people in developed nations, but with it also comes great challenges. From debt, inequality and climate change to troubling politics all around the globe, our societies are facing strong headwinds. In a climate like this, how can policymakers ensure that everyone benefits from growth and can live a good life?

On this week’s Policy Forum Pod, we talk to Katherine Trebeck about her new book The Economics of Arrival, and how to bridge the gap between what communities really need and what politicians currently deliver.

Together with Katherine, pod presenters Sharon Bessell and Martyn Pearce also discuss waste management and recycling, language teaching, and look at some of your suggestions for future podcasts.

Katherine Trebeck is the Policy and Knowledge lead at the Wellbeing Economy Alliance, which works to amplify the work of others in the movement for a wellbeing economy. Her book The Economics of Arrival was published in January 2019.

Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Pauline Hanson as deputy chair of Family Court

ACT government phasing out natural gas

Podcast: Driving electric vehicle policy

Wellbeing Economy Alliance

The Economics of Arrival: Ideas for a Grown-up Economy (Katherine Trebeck)

BBC World Service (podcast)

ABC Late Night Live with Philllip Adams (podcast)

LSE Public lectures and events (podcast)

Podcast: Can Australia make its waste work?

Podcast: Language barriers

Policy Forum Pod is available on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 19, 2019
Richard Baldwin - The Globotics Upheaval
32:02

Around the world, people’s work and workplaces are being transformed by globalisation and the rise of automation, robotics, and AI. That transformation brings significant challenges to policymakers, and to people who see their lives and livelihoods transformed, often in negative ways. So how can we make sure this dramatic transformation benefits humankind?

On this week’s special episode of Policy Forum Pod, we hear from Richard Baldwin about his book The Globotics Upheaval: Robotics, Globalisation and the Future of Work and how policymakers can ensure society benefits from this transformation. We also talk to Professor Sharon Bessell about being listed as one the Australian Financial Review’s 100 Women of Influence 2019 and hear about her research on poverty.

Pod presenter Martyn Pearce also discusses some of your comments and suggestions, and looks at a sudden surge in demand for Policy Forum Pod mugs.

Richard Baldwin is Professor of International Economics at the Graduate Institute, Geneva. He advises governments and international organisations around the world and is the author of numerous books and articles on international trade, globalisation, regionalism, and European integration.

Sharon Bessell is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, where she is co-leader of the ANU Individual Deprivation Measure (IDM) team. The IDM is a new, gender-sensitive and multidimensional measure of poverty.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Sharon Bessell named as one of Australian Financial Review’s 100 Women of Influence 2019

The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics, and the Future of Work (Richard Baldwin)

Quentin Grafton wins Austarlian Laureate

2019 Human Development and Capability Association Conference 

The Capability Approach

Planetary Health Platform

Individual Deprivation Measure 

Podcast: Language barriers

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 12, 2019
Language barriers
38:59

Language is a powerful tool in increasing engagement, communication, and cross-cultural understanding, and could play a vital role in fostering relations between Australia and the Asia-Pacific. So how can we make sure we’re giving students the language skills and experience they need? On this week’s Policy Forum Pod an expert panel – Associate Professor Angela Scarino, Grazia Scotellaro, and Luke Courtois – discuss policy to encourage the study of Asian languages and whether is doing enough in the Asian Century.

Our presenters – Professor Quentin Grafton, and Lydia Kim – also discuss what the latest twists and turns in the Brexit saga tell us about the state of democracy in the UK, tackle some of your questions and comments, and welcome some new members of our Facebook group.

Angela Scarino is an Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics in the School of Communication, International Studies and Languages at the University of South Australia and is the Director of the Research Centre for Languages and Cultures. She was visiting ANU to take part in the Innovative Language Education Symposium, organised by the School of Culture, History, and Language.

Grazia Scotellaro is the Digital Learning Advisor for the College of Asia and the Pacific at The Australian National University and has a background in Technology Enhanced Language Learning.

Luke Courtois recently graduated from The Australian National University with a Bachelor of International Security Studies completing a double major in International Security/Thai language.

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.

Lydia Kim is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Brexit news section on The Guardian
National Policy on Languages - Making multicultural Australia

List of Indigenous Australia languages

‘Australia in the Asian Century’ White Paper

University of South Australia Research Centre for Languages and Cultures

ANU School of Culture, History & Language

Early Learning Languages Australia (ella)

Podcast: Can Australia make its waste work?

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Sep 05, 2019
Can Australia make its waste work?
44:44

In 2017, China cracked down on foreign waste processing by banning the import of many recyclable materials. It was a move that created huge challenges for many countries across the world – including Australia – that had previously been dependent on China for their recycling. This decision has raised major concerns about the future of waste management. With insufficient onshore processing facilities, Australia urgently needs to resolve its waste woes. On this Policy Forum Pod, we hear from Leo Dobes, Esther Hughes and Ron Wainberg about the challenges presented by waste management and recycling, and how governments and individuals can tackle them.

Presenters Paul Wyrwoll and Professor Sharon Bessell lead the discussion and tackle some of your questions and comments as well.

Leo Dobes is an Honorary Associate Professor of Crawford School and teaches a Masters course in Cost-Benefit Analysis. He worked almost 30 years in the Australian public service in many Senior Executive Service level roles.

Esther Hughes is an Environmental Consultant at MRA Consulting Group and the former Environmental Consultant to Blacktown City Council.

Ron Wainberg is the Technical Director of MRA Consulting Group and a fellow of the Institute of Chemical Engineers. He is also a member of the International Solid Waste Association.

Sharon Bessell is the Director of the Children’s Policy Centre in Crawford School and the ANU lead on the Individual Deprivation Measure project. She currently teaches the courses Global Social Policy and Development Theories and Themes at Crawford School.

Paul Wyrwoll is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Climate and Energy Policy based in Crawford School. He is an environmental and resources economist who works on energy, water, and climate change.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Most of us are hypocrites on climate change. Maybe that’s progress. (The Washington Post) - Kate Cohen

Scott Morrison doesn’t attend UN climate summit

Effects of China’s National Sword Policy

Australian federal government commits $20 million to recycling innovation

War on Waste (SBS TV show)

Slip! Slop! Slap! (Australian SunSmart Campaign)

Australia’s waste levies 

Democracy Sausage podcast: Boris Johnson and Brexit Britain

This episode has been produced by the team at Policy Forum, with executive production by Martyn Pearce, writing by Lydia Kim and Lilliana Cazabon-Mitchell, and editing by Branko Cvetojevic.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher,


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Aug 29, 2019
Food, farming, and climate change
43:29

A recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) looked at the role that food systems are playing in contributing to global greenhouse emissions, and drew attention to the ways climate change is threatening the future of food production and food security. On this Policy Forum Pod, we hear from Professor Mark Howden and Professor Michael Roderick on the complex relationship between land, food, and the climate and what governments and individuals can do to tackle the issues identified in the report.

Presenters Professor Quentin Grafton and Lydia Kim also discuss water policy and the Barwon-Darling river system, and tackle some of your questions and comments.

Mark Howden is Director of the ANU Climate Change Institute. Mark was a major contributor to the IPCC reports for the UN, for which he shares a Nobel Peace Prize.

Michael Roderick is a Professor in Research School of Earth Sciences at The Australian National University. He is a Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes.

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.

Lydia Kim is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

The Fitzgerald Inquiry

Climate Change and Land - IPCC

Green Revolution

Bradfield Scheme

Podcast: Stepping up in the Pacific

Fijian prime minister’s comments on Australia

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Aug 22, 2019
Stepping up in the Pacific
1:03:36

In November, Prime Minister Scott Morrison promised to take Australia’s engagement with the Pacific to a new level, announcing five new diplomatic missions, and a $2 billion infrastructure financing facility. But the country’s relationship with the Pacific is increasingly being overshadowed by its lack of serious action on climate, with Pacific leaders warning that the step up will fail, unless Australia takes meaningful action to address the issue.

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, host Mark Kenny is joined by Katerina Teaiwa, Pichamon Yeophantong, and Graeme Smith to discuss why the step up needs go beyond securing Australia’s backyard, while focusing on human security and climate change. They also look at why people in the Pacific don’t want to become pawns in a new power game, and how good relations can be built without spending big bucks.

Pod presenter Julia Ahrens also hears from Avery Poole about the internationalisation of university curricula, and the two of them tackle some of your questions and comments.

Avery Poole is a Senior Fellow at The Australia and New Zealand School of Government and an Honorary Senior Lecturer at the Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU.

Graeme Smith is a fellow in the ANU Department of Pacific Affairs. He also hosts the Little Red Podcast with the Australian Centre for China in the World.

Katerina Teaiwa is Associate Professor at the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific's School of Culture, History & Language. She is also Vice-President of the Australian Association for Pacific Studies.

Pichamon Yeophantong is an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow and Senior Lecturer in the UNSW Canberra School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Australian Defence Force Academy.

Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

The Australia-Indonesia Centre

‘Australia in the Asian Century’ White Paper

Scott Morrison at the Pacific Islands Forum

A climate plea to Scott Morrison from a churchman of the Pacific’s sinking nations (SMH) - Rev James Bhagwan

Australia’s Pacific Step-up

Push for Asia literacy in Australia

How to Defend Australia - Hugh White

The Free and Open Indo-Pacific strategy: a way forward - Simi Mehta

Political Gabfest (podcast)

FiveThirtyEight (podcast)

The Party Room (podcast)

Chat 10 Looks 3 (podcast)

Game of Drones...


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Aug 15, 2019
Addressing human rights in Southeast Asia
51:08

From the violence against the Rohingya in Myanmar, to President Duterte’s support for extrajudicial killings in the Philippines, to intensifying efforts in Cambodia to curtail political freedom – Southeast Asia has seen many human rights violations in the past few years. And it seems that international and regional organisations, as well as third countries, have had a hard time addressing these acts of state-sanctioned violence.

On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we talk to our panel – Catherine Renshaw, Cecilia Jacob, and Hunter Marston – about ASEAN’s quiet diplomacy approach, why the UN didn’t apply more pressure on Myanmar, and what role China and the US play in shaping human rights in the region.

Our presenters Paul Wyrwoll and Julia Ahrens also look at some of your comments and suggestions for future podcasts.

Cecilia Jacob is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of International Relations at the Coral Bell School. Her work focuses on civilian protection, mass atrocity prevention, and international human protection norms.

Hunter Marston is a PhD candidate at the Coral Bell School. His research focuses on great power competition in Southeast Asia. Prior to joining the ANU, Hunter worked as a Senior Research Assistant at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, in the Center for East Asia Policy Studies.

Catherine Renshaw is Deputy Head of the Thomas More Law School. Her research focuses on human rights and democracy in Southeast Asia and she has recently carried out fieldwork in Myanmar and Thailand.

Paul Wyrwoll is an environmental and resources economist. His research considers the design and application of water pricing to hydropower management.

Julia Ahrens is a Marketing and Communications Coordinator at the Crawford School of Public Policy and a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Donald Trump condemns racism and bigotry

Dayton shooting

Right to bear arms (US)

Christchurch shooting

NRA history and US gun laws

Radiolab: More Perfect – The Gun Show

Duterte’s extrajudicial killings

Myanmar and Bangladesh on Rohingya repatriation

ASEAN and Rohingya crisis

China’s Belt and Road Initiative

China-Myanmar border disputes

Vietnam PM visits Whitehouse

Policy Forum Podcast: Philip Alston – poverty as a political choice


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Aug 08, 2019
Promoting private investment in the Pacific
1:05:39

In November last year, Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced the establishment of an Australian Infrastructure Financing Facility for the Pacific worth $2 billion. Despite its well-intentioned goal, the initiative has also attracted criticism for not considering the private sector enough in its strategic approach. On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, we hear from three private investment experts – Frank Yourn, Sally McCutchan, and Milissa Day – about the massive infrastructure needs of the Pacific in the face of climate change, and why the role of governments should be focused on enabling private investment instead of crowding it out. We also ask the panel about what projects they would fund in Pacific Island nations if they had $3 billion to spend.

Pod hosts Jill Sheppard and Julia Ahrens also chat to Roland Rich about voter suppression – what it is, why parties do it, and how to tackle it. They also discuss some of your comments and suggestions for future episodes.

Milissa Day is Regional Representative for East Asia and the Pacific at the International Finance Corporation. She supports investment across fragile, conflict-affected, and poor countries across the East Asia and Pacific region, and leads Pacific business development. She is also the representative for countries in the Pacific including Vanuatu and Solomon Islands.

Sally McCutchan is Executive Director and CEO at Impact Investing Australia. She has extensive experience in finance, funds management, and strategy, and has spent many years working in and understanding Asia Pacific markets.

Frank Yourn is Executive Director at the Australia-Papua New Guinea Business Council, the Australia-Fiji Business Council, and the Australia-Pacific Islands Business Council. Previously, he served in the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade where his service included overseas postings in Egypt, Japan, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, and Fiji, as well as assignments in Canberra and in the Department’s Victorian State Office.

Paul Wyrwoll is an environmental and resources economist at Crawford School. Previously, Paul was General Manager of the FE2W Network and Managing Editor of the Global Water Forum.

Roland Rich is Assistant Teaching Professor at Rutgers University. He was Executive Head of the UN Democracy Fund and Director of the UN Office for Partnerships.

Jill Sheppard is a political scientist at the School of Politics and International Relations at the ANU. Her research focuses on why people participate in politics, what opinions they hold and why, and how both are shaped by political institutions and systems.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were referred to in this episode:

Republicans and restrictions on voting in the US

Asia-Pacific countries amongst most vulnerable to the effects of climate change

Australian infrastructure development bank for the Pacific

Solomon Islands and hydro-power

Pacific Investment Forum

2040 (documentary)

Democracy Sausage podcast: Transparency, trust, and talking politics with children


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Aug 01, 2019
Philip Alston - poverty as a political choice
39:48

Professor Philip Alston accused the Trump administration of being driven by “contempt, and sometimes even hatred for the poor,” compared the UK’s post-GFC austerity welfare policies to Victorian workhouses, and warned the country’s poor faced lives that were “solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.” In return, he’s been accused of bias by the US, warned he’d be the subject of a formal complaint to the UN from the UK government, and seen his report blasted by a UK newspaper as an “insult to our national intelligence.” In this very special Policy Forum Pod, Alston talks about tackling climate change, Brexit and Boris Britain, and why the “gloves need to come off.”

Philip Alston is John Norton Pomeroy Professor of Law at New York University. He is currently UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights. In 2014, he was a member of the Security Council-established commission of inquiry on the Central African Republic. He previously served as Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial executions, as well as Chairperson of the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. During the drafting of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, he was UNICEF’s Legal Adviser.

Sharon Bessell is Director of the Children’s Policy Centre at Crawford School, the ANU lead on the Individual Deprivation Measure Project, and Editor of Policy Forum’s Poverty: In Focus section.

Martyn Pearce is Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode:

Four Corners: Murray-Darling Basin Plan Cash Splash

The role of the private sector in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

World Economic Forum Global Risks Report 2019

Global Dialogue on Trade

UN Global Compact

Private Participation in Infrastructure database

Democracy under threat in Nauru

Podcast: Fixing the NDIS

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 25, 2019
Business and the Sustainable Development Goals
50:10

How are the world’s business leaders adapting to the Sustainable Development Goals? That’s the topic for this week’s Policy Forum Pod, where we hear from John Denton, the Secretary General of the International Chamber of Commerce. Pod hosts Julia Ahrens and Quentin Grafton also discuss the challenges facing the Murray-Darling Basin and tackle some of your questions and comments.

John Denton AO is the Secretary-General of the International Chamber of Commerce.

Lydia Kim is an Associate Editor at Policy Forum. She is currently completing a Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics alongside a Bachelor of Finance at the Australian National University.

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode:

United Nations (UN) report on climate change and poverty

Climate change causing homelessness

Women disproportionately impacted by climate change

London may be the same temperature as Barcelona by 2050

Poverty figures in the UK

Brexit’s economic impact

America’s ‘punitive’ social policies

Universal basic income

UN Social Protection Floor initiative

Criticism of Philip Alston’s austerity report

War on poverty

Sustainable Development Goals’ role in reducing poverty

This podcast was produced with the support of the ANU Australian Crawford Leadership Forum, held on 24/25 June. The Forum brought together 150 international and domestic speakers to discuss the theme of ‘Rebuilding trust’.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 18, 2019
Fixing the National Disability Insurance Scheme
1:07:03

The National Disability Insurance Scheme is a significant policy. Launched in 2016, the NDIS provides support to Australians with a disability, their families, and their carers. But while it has been broadly welcomed, its implementation has not been without significant challenges. This week on Policy Forum Pod we hear from former Labor government Minister Jenny Macklin, Dr Gemma Carey, and Clare Moore about what it will take to fix the NDIS. Pod hosts Sara Bice and Martyn Pearce also chat to Carolyn Hendriks about the ‘Stomping Grounds’ project and how it could change the way our cities and towns are used, and discuss some of your questions and suggestions for future pods.

Gemma Carey is the Research Director of the Centre for Social Impact UNSW and an NHMRC Fellow. She holds a PhD in social policy and population health from the University of Melbourne and a Masters in Anthropology from the University of Adelaide. Her current research is concerned with the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Clare Moore is the Chief Executive Officer of WWDACT, Women with Disabilities ACT, an advocacy organisation that promotes the human rights of women and girls with a disability in the Canberra region. WWDACT are passionate about intersectionality, health care, housing and education.

Jenny Macklin was the Minister for Disability reform under the Gillard and Rudd Labor governments. Jenny was instrumental in the national roll-out for the NDIS, overseeing the design and implementation of the Scheme.

Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance, at Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University. She has taught and published widely on the application and politics of inclusive and deliberative forms of citizen engagement.

Tess McGirr is a Sir Roland Wilson PhD scholar at Crawford School researching how social services can complement welfare reform to improve employment outcomes. Tess has a long-held passion for social policy.

Sara Bice is a Senior Research Fellow at the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, and leads the Next Generation Engagement Program based at the school.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode:

Four Corners: Cash splash (Murray-Darling Basin)

Labor’s position on NDIS

Scott Morrison on NDIS

Budget underspending on NDIS

Lack of accessibility to NDIS

Distinction between health and disability in NDIS is ambiguous


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Jul 11, 2019
Hold the front page – media policy and problems
1:02:07

Fake news, global media moguls flexing their political muscles, getting people to pay for journalism, and the challenge posed by social media companies – the problems facing the media and journalism are many. In our panel discussion this week, Gideon Rachman of the Financial Times, Siddharth Varadarajan of The Wire, and Amy Remeikis of The Guardian Australia talk to Mark Kenny and Jill Sheppard about the future of the media. Pod hosts Sara Bice and Martyn Pearce also chat to Professor Mirya Holman about getting more women in political leadership positions, how female political candidates use Twitter, and the connection between pandemics and the politics of climate change.

Amy Remeikis is Guardian Australia's political reporter. She has covered federal politics, Queensland politics, crime, court, and garden shows during her career, working for radio and newspapers, most recently for Fairfax Media. She was an inaugural nominee of the Young Walkley awards.

Gideon Rachman became chief foreign affairs columnist for the Financial Times (FT) in July 2006. He joined the FT after a 15-year career at The Economist, which included spells as a foreign correspondent in Brussels, Washington, and Bangkok. He also edited The Economist’s business and Asia sections. His particular interests include American foreign policy, the European Union, and globalisation.

Siddharth Varadarajan is an Indian-American journalist, editor, and academic. He is the founding Editor of The Wire and the former Editor of The Hindu. He has reported on the NATO war against Yugoslavia, the destruction of the Bamyan Buddhas by the Taliban regime in Afghanistan, the war in Iraq, and the crisis in Kashmir. Siddharth has edited a book titled Gujarat: The Making of a Tragedy which is about the 2002 Gujarat riots.

Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. He is the presenter of the Democracy Sausage podcast.

Jill Sheppard is a political scientist at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her research focuses on why people participate in politics, what opinions they hold and why, and how both are shaped by political institutions and systems.

Sara, Martyn, and Mirya also go over some of your questions, comments, and suggestions for future podcasts, discuss the danger of swooping birds, and make a very special announcement about a new course teaching podcasting skills to policymakers.

Mirya Holman is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Tulane University and a Visiting Fellow at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her research interests focus on political leadership, local politics, gender and politics, research methods, and environmental politics.

Sara Bice is a Senior Research Fellow at the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, and leads the Next Generation Engagement Program based at the school.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode:

Mosquito-borne illnesses in Louisiana

Climate change and infectious diseases

Gender inequality in Coalition Cabinet

Elizabeth...


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Jul 04, 2019
In the public service we trust?
59:43

In March, the Australian Public Service review set out four priorities for change to future-proof the public service. But will those changes be enough to tackle the significant challenges ahead and rebuild declining trust in institutions? We hear from the review’s Chair David Thodey in conversation with Helen Sullivan and get the thoughts of review panel member and fellow policy podcaster Glyn Davis.

David Thodey is Chair of the Australian Public Service review, Chair of the Commonwealth Science, Industry & Research Organisation, the national research organisation for Australia, and the Chair of JobsNSW, the NSW independent organisation responsible for the creation of 150K new jobs through to 2020. He was formerly the Chief Executive Officer and Executive Director of Telstra.

Glyn Davis is a Distinguished Professor at the Crawford School of Public Policy. He was previously Vice-Chancellor at the University of Melbourne from 2005 to 2018, and is renowned as one of Australia’s finest higher education leaders, whose academic work has shaped the thinking of public servants at all levels of government. He is also the Chief Executive Officer of the Paul Ramsay Foundation, Australia’s largest philanthropic trust. He was the presenter on the Policy Shop podcast.

Helen Sullivan is the Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. Her research and teaching explore the changing nature of state-society relationships; including the theory and practice of governance and collaboration, innovative forms of democratic participation, new thinking about public policy and the practice of public service reform.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this podcast:

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis (podcast)

The Essay (BBC podcast)

Gertie’s Law (podcast)

Decline in trust in the APS

PM Scott Morrison promises to “drain the swamp”

New National Indigenous Australian Agency

ANZSOG submission to the review of the Australian Public Service

Ken Wyatt appointed as first Indigenous Minister for Indigenous Affairs

Democracy Sausage podcast

A policy wish list (podcast)

Refugee Week

Seeking recognition before refuge – Rebecca Hingley

Are there climate change refugees in the Pacific – Ian Fry

Policy File: Climate refugees – where to next? – Patrick Cooney

This podcast was produced with the support of the ANU Australian Crawford Leadership Forum, held on...


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Jun 27, 2019
Getting science into policy, politics, and public discussion
1:09:00

Australians support science and having policy informed by the best scientific evidence, but in the recent federal election campaign, science was in short supply. So what more should scientists and the scientific community do to encourage evidence-based policy to tackle the big issues of our time? What responsibilities to scientists have to engage directly with the public, particularly in the frequently hostile environment of social media? And how can we tackle the rise of anti-science? On this Policy Forum Pod, we’re joined by two of nation’s leading scientists – Anna-Maria Arabia and Ian Chubb – to put science and science policy under the microscope.

Our expert panel also discuss why science isn’t always at the forefront of national debates, the importance of moving away from short-termism when it comes to implementing robust science policy, and how science is presented and debated.

Anna-Maria Arabia is Chief Executive of the Australian Academy of Science. She was Principal Adviser to the Hon Bill Shorten. She has worked in senior policy roles in both social and economic portfolios.

Ian Chubb was Vice-Chancellor of both Flinders University and the Australian National University, and has been made a Companion of the Order of Australia. He served as Australia’s Chief Scientist from 2011 to 2016, and is an Emeritus Fellow at Crawford School.

Our presenters this week – Quentin and Martyn – also discuss how the recent raids on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation have underscored the importance of transparency and public debate. What’s more, they also go over how you – our listeners – can win a mug. Get listening!

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this podcast:

Raid on ABC studios

ABC journalists’ home raided

Whistleblowers and public interest disclosure

Democracy Sausage Podcast

Paris Agreement

Australia’s research funding is among the lowest in OECD

Fish kills Murray Darling Basin

Labor’s campaign on energy policy

Kyoto credits

Water buybacks in Australia


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Jun 19, 2019
A policy wish list
58:37

If you could have your wishes granted and have Australia’s government implement three policies that would change the country for the better, what would you choose? That’s the question we put to our panel this week. Our experts – Helen Sullivan, Inala Cooper, and Janine O’Flynn give us their wish lists in conversation with Sharon Bessell.

Helen Sullivan is the Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. Her research and teaching explore the changing nature of state-society relationships; including the theory and practice of governance and collaboration, innovative forms of democratic participation, new thinking about public policy and the practice of public service reform.

Inala Cooper is a Yawuru woman from Broome in The Kimberley, WA, and is an advocate for Indigenous rights, social justice, and human rights. She is also the Relationships and Engagement Lead at Atlantic Fellows for Social Equity at the University of Melbourne, and is Director on the Board of Culture Is Life.

Janine O’Flynn is Professor of Public Management at the University of Melbourne and at ANZSOG. Her expertise is in public management, with particular focus on reform and relationships.

Our presenters – Sharon and Martyn – take a closer look into rising tensions between the US and Iran, indigenous incarceration rates in Australia, and the FIFA Women’s World Cup hosted in France this year. Martyn and Julia also discuss some of the suggestions you’ve left us for future episodes.

Sharon Bessell is Director of the Children’s Policy Centre at Crawford School, the ANU lead on the Individual Deprivation Measure Project, and Editor of Policy Forum’s Poverty: In Focus section.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Martyn Pearce is Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this podcast:

Iran and US interactions over drone

Darling Murray water buybacks

Violation of children’s rights in juvenile detention in Queensland

First Indigenous Minister for Indigenous Affairs (Ken Wyatt)

NZ wellbeing budget

Intergenerational inequality in Australia

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) failures

Industrial decline in UK

Australian universities costs

Democracy Sausage...


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Jun 19, 2019
Driving electric vehicle policy
1:07:22

For a brief moment during Australia’s recent election campaign, everyone’s attention was turned towards electric vehicles – and rightfully so. Electric vehicle sales are booming around the world, and the motor industry is rapidly rolling out electric car models and setting significant sales targets. But with Labor’s electric vehicle policy now barely visible in the rear-view mirror, will policymakers ever take the wheel, or is Australia’s electric vehicle policy in need of roadside assist? On this Policy Forum Podcast, our panel – Michael De Percy, Liz Hanna, and James Prest – drive a discussion about the kind of government intervention and infrastructure Australia needs, ways to incentivise and familiarise consumers when it comes to new technologies, and the crossroads between electric vehicles and health.

Michael De Percy is a Senior Lecturer in Political Science in the School of Government and Policy, Fellow of the National Security Institute, and Academic Fellow of IGPA at the University of Canberra.

Liz Hanna is a Fellow at the ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment and Chair of the Environmental Health Working Group, World Federation of Public Health Associations.

James Prest is a Senior Lecturer at the ANU College of Law, specialising in environmental law with interests in administrative law and litigation. He is a Member of the Executive of the ANU Energy Change Institute.

Our presenters – Sara Bice and Martyn Pearce – also discuss Trump's Twitter spat with London Mayor Sadiq Khan during his visit to the UK, as well as the TV series Chernobyl and the issues it brings up about nuclear power. Several bad dog puns later – in efforts to inform listeners on ways to get their paws on a mug – they also go over some comments and suggestions our audience have recently left us.

Sara Bice is a Senior Research Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy, and leads the Next Generation Engagement Program based at the school.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode: 

Slow adoption of EVs in Australia

Queensland Electric Super Highway

Queensland EV charging stations

Toyota in the EV market

Volkswagen diesel scandal

ClimateWorks recommendations for EVs in Australia

Climate and Health Alliance in Australia

Policy Forum Pod is available on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to


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Jun 06, 2019
Reconciliation Week 2019 – Honesty is the best policy
54:55

This year, Australia’s National Reconciliation Week theme is ‘Grounded in Truth: Walk Together with Courage’. But just how courageous has Australia’s Indigenous policy been, and what will it take to get it right? Will Ken Wyatt’s appointment as the first Indigenous minister for Indigenous Affairs bring the change that Australia needs? On this episode, we hear from Tony Dreise on the ups-and-downs of Indigenous policies past and present, and get his suggestions for policies for the future. We also consider government spending and whether it’s been proportionate to the levels of disadvantage felt across Indigenous communities.

Tony Dreise is Professor of Indigenous Policy Research and Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR) at the Australian National University. He is nationally and internationally recognised as a First Nations leader in policy, evaluation, and research in the field of education.

Our presenters – Sharon Bessell and Martyn Pearce – also chat about New Zealand’s recent wellbeing budget and how to measure societal success. What’s more, they also reveal a new way for our listeners to win Policy Forum’s highly coveted mugs – so listen up!

Sharon Bessell is Director of the Children’s Policy Centre at Crawford School, the ANU lead on the Individual Deprivation Measure Project, and Editor of Policy Forum’s Poverty: In Focus section.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this podcast:

New Zealand’s wellbeing budget

Gross Happiness National Index

Child poverty in New Zealand

Social Inclusion Index

Reconciliation Week in Australia

Indigenous communities and wellbeing

The Council for Aboriginal Reconciliation

Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (ANU)

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Commission (ATSIC)

Native Title Act

Recognition of Aboriginal rights in the form of native titles

Kevin Rudd’s national apology (2008)

Uluru Statement from the Heart

Paul Keating’s Redfern Park speech

The Whispering in Our Hearts – Henry Reynolds

Morrison Government’s budget allocation


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May 31, 2019
The Auspolicy issue – what the country voted for
1:03:26

Australia’s election result took many by surprise. The polls may have been predicting a win for the Labor Party, but instead it is the Coalition led by Scott Morrison that was returned to government. But with Australia dealing with some of the most serious issues it’s faced in decades, will the Coalition’s policy platform be able to provide the reform the country needs?

Our stellar panel – Liz Allen, Paul Burke, John Hewson, and Warwick McKibbin – give us their thoughts on the policy commitments and the challenges ahead for the nation. Will the government have to completely rethink its climate policy? How important is framing when it comes to conversations around migration policy? Can Australia’s economy balance revenue uncertainty with the certainty of the promised budget cuts? Tune in for an excellent discussion.

Dr Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University.

Associate Professor Paul Burke is an economist focusing on energy, the environment, transport, and developing countries, particularly in the Asia-Pacific. His research includes policies for zero-carbon energy in the Asia-Pacific and Australia’s energy transition.

Dr John Hewson is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system. In 2014, Dr Hewson joined the Australian National University as Professor at the Crawford School, and Chair of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute.

Professor Warwick McKibbin is the Director of the Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis in the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and is a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington.

Presenters Bob Cotton, Quentin Grafton, and Julia Ahrens also take a look at Trump’s provocative tweets aimed at Iran, India’s massive elections, and the National Disability Insurance Scheme. They also discuss several excellent suggestions left for us by you on the Policy Forum Pod Facebook group – keep them coming!

Bob Cotton is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School. He has a strong interest in public policy issues, including Australia’s engagement in the Asia Pacific Region. He is a mentor at the National Security College.

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.

Julia Ahrens is a presenter on Policy Forum Pod.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode:

Trump’s tweet against Iran

Policy Forum Pod Facebook group

Democracy Sausage: How did the polls get it so wrong?

SARDI Climate Applications Science Program

Shergold Report

Coalition government’s tax cut promises

Fair Share (book) – Michael Keating, Stephen Bell

Australia’s hidden economy review

Gonski Review...


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May 23, 2019
Can Australia spark an energy change?
56:23

Over the past decades, Australia has lacked stability in its climate policy even as climate change becomes impossible for the world to ignore. With Australian voters heading to the polls this Saturday, does the country have the policy promises it needs to spark an energy change? On this episode of Policy Forum Pod, Ken Baldwin, Kylie Catchpole, and Mark Kenny look at how Australia can transition to renewables even without a strong policy framework to lead the way.

Ken Baldwin is Director of the Energy Change Institute at ANU, and Deputy Director of the Research School of Physics and Engineering. Since 2011, he has been a member of the Project Steering Committee for the Australian Energy Technology, and since 2014, he has been a Board member of the South East Region of Renewable Energy Excellence.

Kylie Catchpole is at the Research School of Engineering at the Australian National University. Her research interests are in nanotechnology and new materials for solar cell applications. She has a physics degree from the ANU, winning a University Medal, and a PhD from the ANU.

Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times. He is also the presenter of Policy Forum's Democracy Sausage podcast.

Our presenters – Quentin Grafton and Martyn Pearce – also discuss the upcoming election, and the difficulties in understanding multiple policies when trying to cast an informed vote. They also go through some of your recent comments and pod topic suggestions.

Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode:

Dividend Imputation Credits (franking credits and tax system proposed by Labor Party)
Labor Party’s Fair Go Action Plan
Even greater budget surplus revealed by Labor
Democracy Sausage podcast: Voter fatigue and the fight to the finish line
Policy Forum Pod Facebook Group
Australia’s 2030 climate change target
Worldwide student climate strike
Greta Thunberg at World Economic Forum in Davos
Lowy Institute poll on attitudes towards climate change
National Energy Guarantee (NEG)
Tony Abbott scraps carbon tax
Emissions intensity scheme removed by Turnbull...


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May 16, 2019
Extra: First 100 days of the next government (live event)
1:32:35

In a 24-hour news cycle, the first 100 days of government have remarkable influence on the perceived success or failure of the incoming Ministry. With regards to policy, there are no shortage of suggestions of tweaks, wholesale changes, and shelving of initiatives. 

In this special Policy Forum Pod extra, a panel from The Australian National University looks at what crucial changes the incoming government needs to make in its first 100 days.

Panellists:

Professor Russell Gruen is the Dean of the ANU College of Health and Medicine. A surgeon, he is an expert in the care of critically injured people, and the development of high performing regional trauma systems.

Professor John Hewson is Chair of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute. He is an economic and financial expert with careers in academia, business, government, media and the financial system.

Professor Anna Moore is Director of the ANU Institute for Space, and Director of the Advanced Instrumentation and Technology Centre at Mount Stromlo Observatories in Canberra. Professor Moore was a member of the Australian government's Space Expert Reference Group that led to the formation of the Australian Space Agency in July 2018.

Professor Helen Sullivan is the Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. Helen is a public policy scholar whose work has shaped understanding of the changing nature of state-society relationships and its implications for public governance, policy and practice.

Professor Michael Wesley is Professor of International Affairs and Dean of the College of Asia and the Pacific at the Australian National University. He has previously worked at the University of New South Wales and Griffith University; was Assistant Director-General for Transnational Issues at the Office of National Assessments; and Executive Director of the Lowy Institute for International Policy.

Moderator :

Catherine McGrath is a giant of the Australian media and a well-known Canberra identity, keynote speaker, MC, writer and businesswoman. Catherine spent 30 years reporting for the ABC and SBS in both Australia and overseas. She was political editor for both public broadcasters and was the ABC's South East Asia Correspondent based in Singapore.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher, and wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook.

This podcast extra is part of Policy Forum’s Australian Election coverage, and published in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 16, 2019
Extra: Australia’s place in the world (live event)
1:33:06

In an age of ever-growing interconnectedness amongst countries, Australia finds itself having to face different obstacles and opportunities relating to trade, international security, and international law. But the changing nature of global dynamics has also encouraged greater discourse around inequality within countries’ own borders.

All things considered, the upcoming federal election could well be the deciding moment for Australia’s future. In this special Policy Forum Pod extra, a panel from The Australian National University looks at how Australia might chart a course through the challenges of a globalised world.

Panellists:

Shiro Armstrong is the Director of the Australia-Japan Research Centre and Director of the East Asian Bureau of Economic Research at ANU. He is also a Co-Editor and Co-Founder of both the East Asia Forum and East Asia Forum Quarterly.

Sharon Bessell is the Director of the Children’s Policy Centre at Crawford School, the ANU lead on the Individual Deprivation Measure Project, and Editor of Policy Forum’s Poverty: In Focus section.

Jacinta Carroll is the Director of National Security Policy at the ANU National Security College. She was previously the inaugural Head of ASPI’s Counter-Terrorism Policy Centre.

Meg Keen is Associate Professor at the Department of Pacific Affairs at ANU. She is also a senior policy fellow in the State, Society and Governance in Melanesia program at the university.

Moderator:

Catherine McGrath is one of Australia’s most experienced international affairs analysts and political commentators. Catherine was Chief Political Correspondent for SBS TV. She joined SBS after a 26-year award-winning career as foreign correspondent, political editor and ABC Asia Editor.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher, and wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or find us on Facebook.

This podcast extra is part of Policy Forum’s Australian Election coverage, and published in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 14, 2019
When good policy communication goes bad
57:47

From accidentally liking your own social media posts to celebrating in the wake of announcing a budget emergency, policy and political communication are challenging and when done badly can be catastrophic. On this week’s Policy Forum Pod we dig into the alchemy of policy communication – where it’s been done well, when it’s been done badly, and how it can be done better – with our expert panel Frank Bongiorno, Fiona Benson, Andrew Hughes, and Pamela Kinnear. It’s essential listening for anyone involved in the policymaking process.

This week’s policy panel are:

Fiona Benson is founder of FJ Partners Strategic Advisory. She is a former press secretary to two federal cabinet ministers, and specialises in devising innovative stakeholder engagement, media, and communications strategies.

Professor Frank Bongiorno is the Head of the School of History at ANU and is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian. His books include The Eighties: The Decade That Transformed Australia; The People’s Party: Victorian Labor and the Radical Tradition 1875-1914; and The Sex Lives of Australians: A History. He was co-editor of Elections Matter: Ten Federal Elections that Shaped Australia.

Dr Andrew Hughes is a lecturer in marketing in the ANU Research School of Management, where he teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Pamela Kinnear is the principal of Kinnford Consulting. Her consultancy work is grounded in a successful 20-year career at senior leadership levels across government, non-government and research sectors, backed up by a strong academic background.

Our presenters for this episode – Bob Cotton and Martyn Pearce – also discuss the recent UN report on biodiversity loss, tackle some of your comments and suggestions for future pods, and tell you how you can win a very limited edition Policy Forum Pod mug!

Bob Cotton is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School. He has a strong interest in public policy issues, including Australia’s engagement in the Asia Pacific Region. He is a mentor at the National Security College.

Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

Show Notes | The following were mentioned in this episode:

UN report warns about one million species going extinct

Crawford School of Public Policy

Make a suggestion on the Policy Forum Pod Facebook group

Gough Whitlam’s ‘It’s Time’ campaign

Timeline of William McMahon’s prime ministership

John Howard: “But we will decide who comes to this country…”

Labor election promise on childcare and pensioner dental

Julia Gillard’s first interview as PM with Kerry O’Brien (transcript)

Bill Shorten defends his mother

Franklin Dam and the Greens

Kevin Rudd: How we staved off recession and the GFC (Financial Review)


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May 09, 2019
Extra: Wicked problems - domestic policy (live event)
1:25:49

Many of the big challenges in Australian policy seem intractable. How the country responds – or doesn’t – will shape society for decades to come. In this live panel event, recorded on 30 April 2019, experts discuss how to tackle big issues the country faces and whether the election commitments made so far are likely to succeed in addressing them. This panel event is the second in the ANU federal election series.

Panellists:

Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University.

Robert Breunig is a Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University. He conducts research in three main areas: economics of the household; empirical industrial organisation; and statistical and econometric theory.

Tony Dreise is Professor of Indigenous Policy Research and Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR). He is nationally and internationally recognised as a First Nations leader in policy, evaluation and research in the field of education.

Mark Howden is Director of the ANU Climate Change Institute. Mark was a major contributor to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports for the UN, for which he shares a Nobel Peace Prize.

Moderator:

Catherine McGrath is one of Australia’s most experienced international affairs analysts and political commentators. Catherine is the Chief Political Correspondent for SBS TV. She joined SBS after a 26 year award-winning career as foreign correspondent, political editor and ABC Asia Editor.

Policy Forum Pod is available on Spotify, iTunes, Stitcher, and wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us