ArtCurious Podcast

By Jennifer Dasal/Art Curious

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Category: Visual Arts

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Subscribers: 244
Reviews: 2


 May 4, 2020


 Nov 19, 2019

Description

Think art history is boring? Think again. It's weird, funny, mysterious, enthralling, and liberating. Join us as we cover the strangest stories in art. Is the Mona Lisa fake? Did Van Gogh actually kill himself? And why were the Impressionists so great? Subscribe to us here, and follow us at www.artcuriouspodcast.com for further information and fun extras. © 2020 Jennifer Dasal // Find us on Twitter and Instagram: @artcuriouspod

Episode Date
Our Book is Out!
862
It’s finally here! ArtCurious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art History, from Penguin Books, is now available in a bookstore near you! To order the book: Penguin Random House Target Indiebound Amazon Barnes and Noble Secure your signed copy from my local favorite Quail Ridge Books (note your request for a signed copy in the "special instructions" section at checkout) For the audiobook, narrated by me: Audible Google Play Libro.fm For the ebook: Penguin Random House Barnes and Noble Quail Ridge Books Amazon Apple Books VIRTUAL EVENT ALERT: join me and my favorite local bookstore, Quail Ridge Books here in Raleigh, North Carolina, on Wednesday, September 23, 2020 - from 7:00pm to 8:00pm, eastern. It’s a FREE event and open to anyone anywhere in the world, but you must register online for the event. And finally, a little request from me. Please snap a picture of yourself with your book, when you receive it--or listening to your audiobook, or reading it on your kindle or ipad--and share it! Please post it on your social media pages and tag me--I’m at artcuriouspod--or email me (jennifer@artcuriouspodcast.com) your picture so that I can share it on my pages, too. Thank you! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 15, 2020
Listener Favorites--Number 4: The Semi-Charmed Life of Elisabeth Vigeé Le Brun (Season 1, Episode 3)
2923
You voted, and we listened! For the next couple of months, we’re replaying your top five favorite episodes of ArtCurious. Thanks to the many who voted! Up this week, it’s our fave lady, back from Season 1— it’s Episode #3, all about Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun. ~Heart eyes emojis!~ Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! SPONSORS Kaboonki.com--Our producer of podcasts, videos, and more. Contact them for your own projects! ArtCuriousbook.com-- Our first book is coming out TOMORROW! Pre-order your copy now for the lowest price! Acorn TV: Try Acorn TV free for 30 days using my promo code artcurious Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 14, 2020
Listener Favorites--Number 3, Part 2: Is the Mona Lisa a Fake? (Season 1, Episode 1)
2034
You voted, and we listened! For the next couple of months, we’re replaying your top five favorite episodes of ArtCurious. Thanks to the many who voted! Up this week— our very first episode, from 2016, about the theft(s) of the iconic Mona Lisa. This is the second part of this episode-- go back and listen to last week's show if you're just tuning in. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! SPONSORS Kaboonki.com--Our producer of podcasts, videos, and more. Contact them for your own projects! ArtCuriousbook.com-- Our first book is coming out in two weeks! Pre-order your copy now for the lowest price! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 07, 2020
Listener Favorites--Number 3, Part 1--Is the Mona Lisa a Fake? (Season 1, Episode 1)
1553
You voted, and we listened! For the next couple of months, we’re replaying your top five favorite episodes of ArtCurious. Thanks to the many who voted! Up this week— our very first episode, from 2016, about the theft(s) of the iconic Mona Lisa. This is the first half of the episode-- tune in next week for the second part. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! SPONSORS Kaboonki.com--Our producer of podcasts, videos, and more. Contact them for your own projects! ArtCuriousbook.com-- Our first book is coming out in two weeks! Pre-order your copy now for the lowest price! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 31, 2020
Listener Favorites #4: Shock Art: Gentileschi's Judith Slaying Holofernes (Season 4, Episode 3)
1965
You voted, and we listened! For the next couple of months, we’re replaying your top five favorite episodes of ArtCurious. Thanks to the many who voted! Up first this week— Episode #42 from our fourth season, all about Gentileschi’s Judith Slaying Holofernes. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Sponsors: Native: Use our slink or use promo code artcurious at checkout for 20% off your first order. Acorn TV: Try Acorn TV free for 30 days using my promo code artcurious Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 17, 2020
Listener Favorites--Number 5: Shock Art: Sargent's Madame X (Season 4, Episode 1)
1807
You voted, and we listened! For the next couple of months, we’re replaying your top five favorite episodes of ArtCurious. Thanks to the many who voted! Up first this week— Episode #40 from our fourth season, all about Sargent’s Madame X. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! SPONSORS Campfire Poetry: Support independent artists in their endeavor to bring poetry to new audiences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 03, 2020
Episode #68: The Coolest Artists You Don't Know: Katsushika Ōi (Season 7, Episode 8)
1578
For most Americans, there’s a list of arts that they might be able to rattle off if pressed to name them off the top of their heads. Picasso. Michelangelo. Leonardo da Vinci. Name recognition does go a long way, but such lists also highlight what many of us don’t know-- a huge treasure trove of talented artists from decades or centuries past that might not be household names, but still have created incredible additions to the story of art. It’s not a surprise that many of these individuals represent the more diverse side of things, too-- women, people of color, different spheres of the social or sexual spectrum. This season on the ArtCurious podcast, we’re covering the coolest artists you don’t know. This week: Katsushika Ōi. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: Enjoy a free trial of The Great Courses Plus's entire library Campfire Poetry: Support independent artists in their endeavor to bring poetry to new audiences Indeed: Try Indeed out with a free $75 credit Native: Use our slink or use promo code artcurious at checkout for 20% off your first order. PREORDER OUR BOOK! ArtCurious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art History is available for preorder now. The book will be released on September 15, 2020. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 13, 2020
BONUS: Wondery presents Business Wars: Playboy vs Penthouse
210
Bonus episode this week! We'll be back in your feed next week with the final episode of the season. Listen to Business Wars: Playboy vs Penthouse, a Wondery+ exclusive, on the Wondery app. Download it today to join Wondery+ with a free trial to enjoy ad free listening, exclusives, binges and early access. Get it here: https://wondery.app.slink/TpmaC6vYI7 We live in a time where you can watch the most explicit content on the same phone you use to call your mother. In our new exclusive series, Business Wars is taking you after-dark. To the heyday of the 1970s, when Playboy and Penthouse ruled the adult genre - and the line between sexy and obscene started just below a woman’s belly button. But when it comes to the boundaries of good taste, how are will founders Hugh Hefner and Bob Guccione go to expand their erotic empires? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 06, 2020
Episode #67: The Coolest Artists You Don't Know: Romaine Brooks (Season 7, Episode 7)
1772
For most Americans, there’s a list of arts that they might be able to rattle off if pressed to name them off the top of their heads. Picasso. Michelangelo. Leonardo da Vinci. Name recognition does go a long way, but such lists also highlight what many of us don’t know-- a huge treasure trove of talented artists from decades or centuries past that might not be household names, but still have created incredible additions to the story of art. It’s not a surprise that many of these individuals represent the more diverse side of things, too-- women, people of color, different spheres of the social or sexual spectrum. This season on the ArtCurious podcast, we’re covering the coolest artists you don’t know. This week: Romaine Brooks. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: Enjoy a free trial of The Great Courses Plus's entire library MOVA Globes: use code "ARTCURIOUS" for 10% off your order PREORDER OUR BOOK! ArtCurious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art History is available for preorder now. The book will be released on September 15, 2020. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 29, 2020
Episode #66: The Coolest Artists You Don't Know: Henry Darger (Season 7, Episode 6)
1543
For most Americans, there’s a list of arts that they might be able to rattle off if pressed to name them off the top of their heads. Picasso. Michelangelo. Leonardo da Vinci. Name recognition does go a long way, but such lists also highlight what many of us don’t know-- a huge treasure trove of talented artists from decades or centuries past that might not be household names, but still have created incredible additions to the story of art. It’s not a surprise that many of these individuals represent the more diverse side of things, too-- women, people of color, different spheres of the social or sexual spectrum. This season on the ArtCurious podcast, we’re covering the coolest artists you don’t know. This week: Henry Darger. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: Enjoy a free trial of The Great Courses Plus's entire library MOVA Globes: use code "ARTCURIOUS" for 10% off your order PREORDER OUR BOOK! ArtCurious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art History is available for preorder now. The book will be released on September 15, 2020. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 15, 2020
Episode #65: The Coolest Artists You Don't Know: Edmonia Lewis (Season 7, Episode 5)
1851
For most Americans, there’s a list of arts that they might be able to rattle off if pressed to name them off the top of their heads. Picasso. Michelangelo. Leonardo da Vinci. Name recognition does go a long way, but such lists also highlight what many of us don’t know-- a huge treasure trove of talented artists from decades or centuries past that might not be household names, but still have created incredible additions to the story of art. It’s not a surprise that many of these individuals represent the more diverse side of things, too-- women, people of color, different spheres of the social or sexual spectrum. This season on the ArtCurious podcast, we’re covering the coolest artists you don’t know. This week: Edmonia Lewis. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: Enjoy a free trial of The Great Courses Plus's entire library MOVA Globes: use code "ARTCURIOUS" for 10% off your order PREORDER OUR BOOK! ArtCurious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art History is available for preorder now. The book will be released on September 15, 2020. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 01, 2020
Episode #64: The Coolest Artists You Don't Know: Rosa Bonheur (Season 7, Episode 4)
1864
For most Americans, there’s a list of arts that they might be able to rattle off if pressed to name them off the top of their heads. Picasso. Michelangelo. Leonardo da Vinci. Name recognition does go a long way, but such lists also highlight what many of us don’t know-- a huge treasure trove of talented artists from decades or centuries past that might not be household names, but still have created incredible additions to the story of art. It’s not a surprise that many of these individuals represent the more diverse side of things, too-- women, people of color, different spheres of the social or sexual spectrum. This season on the ArtCurious podcast, we’re covering the coolest artists you don’t know. This week: Rosa Bonheur. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: Enjoy a free trial of unlimited content Objective Wellness: Get 20% off your first order with promo code ARTCURIOUS PREORDER OUR BOOK ArtCurious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art History is available for preorder now! The book will be released on September 15, 2020. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 18, 2020
Episode #63: The Coolest Artists You Don't Know: Henry Ossawa Tanner (Season 7, Episode 3)
1593
For most Americans, there’s a list of arts that they might be able to rattle off if pressed to name them off the top of their heads. Picasso. Michelangelo. Leonardo da Vinci. Name recognition does go a long way, but such lists also highlight what many of us don’t know-- a huge treasure trove of talented artists from decades or centuries past that might not be household names, but still have created incredible additions to the story of art. It’s not a surprise that many of these individuals represent the more diverse side of things, too-- women, people of color, different spheres of the social or sexual spectrum. This season on the ArtCurious podcast, we’re covering the coolest artists you don’t know. This week: Henry Ossawa Tanner. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: Enjoy a free trial of unlimited content Care/Of: Get 50% off your first vitamin/supplement purchase Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 04, 2020
BONUS: A HUGE Announcement from ArtCurious!
260
ArtCurious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art History Coming September 15, 2020 from Penguin Books Preorder at our website: artcuriouspodcast.com/book Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 01, 2020
Episode #62: The Coolest Artists You Don't Know: Jusepe de Ribera (Season 7, Episode 2)
1384
For most Americans, there’s a list of arts that they might be able to rattle off if pressed to name them off the top of their heads. Picasso. Michelangelo. Leonardo da Vinci. Name recognition does go a long way, but such lists also highlight what many of us don’t know-- a huge treasure trove of talented artists from decades or centuries past that might not be household names, but still have created incredible additions to the story of art. It’s not a surprise that many of these individuals represent the more diverse side of things, too-- women, people of color, different spheres of the social or sexual spectrum. This season on the ArtCurious podcast, we’re covering the coolest artists you don’t know. This week: Jusepe de Ribera. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: Enjoy a free trial and pay only $10 a month when you sign up for a quarterly plan Objective Wellness: Get 20% off your first order with promo code ARTCURIOUS Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 20, 2020
Episode #61: The Coolest Artists You Don't Know--Angelica Kauffman (Season 7, Episode 1)
1534
For most Americans, there’s a list of arts that they might be able to rattle off if pressed to name them off the top of their heads. Picasso. Michelangelo. Leonardo da Vinci. Name recognition does go a long way, but such lists also highlight what many of us don’t know-- a huge treasure trove of talented artists from decades or centuries past that might not be household names, but still have created incredible additions to the story of art. It’s not a surprise that many of these individuals represent the more diverse side of things, too-- women, people of color, different spheres of the social or sexual spectrum. This season on the ArtCurious podcast, we’re covering the coolest artists you don’t know. This week: Angelica Kauffman. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: listeners will receive 3 full months of unlimited access for just $30 The Gabriel Method: try this 12-week weight loss solution from Jon Gabriel Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 06, 2020
CURIOUS CALLBACK Episode #51: Shock Art: Gericault's The Raft of the Medusa (Season 5, Episode 5)
1568
Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" Gericault’s The Raft of the Medusa. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! SPONSORS Indeed: get a free sponsored job upgrade on your first post The Gabriel Method: try this 12-week weight loss solution from Jon Gabriel Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 16, 2020
CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #44, Shock Art: Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son (Season 4, Episode 5)
1254
Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago. Today's work of "shock art:" Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram Sponsors The Great Courses Plus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 17, 2020
CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #36: Rivals- Turner vs. Constable (Season 3, Episode 5)
1969
In 19th century England, landscape painting transitioned into being something lovely and comparatively calm, and transformed into a personal and stylistic battleground. Landscape: pristine and idealized, or rough, ready, and turbulent? Which one would better express the heart of 19th century British painting? Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS: The Great Courses Plus: Get three months of unlimited access for just $30 Prose: get your personalized hair consultation and 20% off your first order Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 20, 2020
Episode #60: True Crime/Fine Art: Man Ray and the Black Dahlia Connection
2041
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: it’s our season finale, and this is the story we have been DYING (sorry) to tell you. Did Man Ray inspire the infamous (and infamously unsolved) Black Dahlia murder? Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS Audible: enjoy a special offer of 53% off your first 3 months of Audible by visiting audible.com/artcurious or text ARTCURIOUS to 500-500. Feals: Become a member today by going to feals.com/artcurious and you'll get 50% off your first order with free shipping. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 23, 2019
BONUS: Listen to Wondery's Bad Batch Podcast
364
In Wondery's new series Bad Batch, host Laura Beil (Dr. Death) investigates the multi-billion dollar underregulated industry of stem cell therapy where greed and desperation collide. When a group of patients wind up in a Texas hospital in critical condition, the trail leads back to one stem cell company and its charismatic CEO. What happens when a supposed miracle cure leaves you worse off than before? Listen to Bad Batch at wondery.fm/BadBatchArtCurious. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 19, 2019
Episode #59: True Crime/Fine Art: Eadweard Muybridge, Photo Pioneer and Jealous Husband
1831
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a photo pioneer goes off the jealousy deep end. It’s Eadweard Muybridge time! Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get an entire month of courses FREE Away: Visit awaytravel.com/ARTCURIOUS and order by 11:59 on 12/15 for free ground shipping with guaranteed free delivery by 12/20. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 09, 2019
Episode #58: True Crime/Fine Art: The Mysterious Death of Ana Mendieta (and #MeToo)
1918
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a contemporary art conundrum. Who is responsible for the death of Ana Mendieta? Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get a free UNLIMITED trial EverlyWell: get 25% off an EverlyWell at-home lab test (use promo code ARTCURIOUS25) Super Chewer: get 50% off your first Super Chewer box when you visit superchewer.com/ARTCURIOUS and subscribe to a 6 or 12 month plan Audible: get 3 months of Audible for just $6.95 a month.  Visit audible.com/artcurious or text ARTCURIOUS to 500-500. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 25, 2019
Episode #57: True Crime/Fine Art: Was Walter Sickert Actually Jack the Ripper? PART 2 (Updated)
2055
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a revisiting of our popular two-parter from season 1. Was British painter Walter Sickert actually Jack the Ripper? (Part Two) Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get an entire month of courses FREE Thrive Causemetics: get 15% off your first order (use code ARTCURIOUS) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 11, 2019
Episode #56: True Crime/Fine Art: Was Walter Sickert Actually Jack the Ripper? PART 1 (Updated)
2083
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a revisiting of our popular two-parter from season 1. Was British painter Walter Sickert actually Jack the Ripper? Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram SPONSORS The Great Courses Plus: get an entire month of courses FREE Away: get $20 off your order (use promo code ARTCURIOUS) Backblaze: get a fully-featured 15-day free trial EverlyWell: get 15% off an EverlyWell at-home lab test (use promo code ARTCURIOUS) Charles and Colvard: get 20% off your first purchase Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 28, 2019
Episode #55: True Crime/Fine Art: Caravaggio the Murderer, and Murdered?
1946
This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. Today’s show: a look into our favorite bad-boy artist, Caravaggio— he was a known murderer, but was he himself murdered?



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Backblaze: get a fully-featured 15-day free trial

Charles and Colvard: get 20% off your first purchase








Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 14, 2019
Episode #54: True Crime/Fine Art: Otto Dix and the Plot to Kill Hitler
2097
Welcome to Season 6 of the ArtCurious Podcast! This season we’re learning that true crime and art history are two genres that have smashed together with some fascinating results. First up: a “degenerate” painter much-hated by Hitler and fingered for his near-murder. Did Otto Dix plot to kill Hitler?

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AUrate: get 15% off your first AUrate purchase (use promo code ARTCURIOUS)

Phlur: get 20% off your first custom Phlur sample set

Backblaze: get a fully-featured 15-day free trial

EverlyWell: get 15% off an EverlyWell at-home lab test (use promo code ARTCURIOUS)





Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 30, 2019
BONUS EPISODE: Meet Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven
1513

We’re back for a bonus episode related to one of our “shock art” shows this past season: who is really responsible for creating the infamous urinal readymade, Fountain? Welcome to one of the art world’s latest scandals, and meet a truly unforgettable woman: the Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven.

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SPONSORS

The Great Courses Plus (get a free month using our link)

ThirdLove (use our link to get 15% off)

UTEP (for more details, check out the link)

 

Jul 22, 2019
Episode #53: Shock Art: Courbet's The Origin of the World (Season 5, Episode 7)
2278

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Courbet’s The Origin of the World.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

 

SPONSORS

The Great Courses (85% off digital course Leonardo da Vinci and the Italian High Renaissance, and more)

Skillshare (get two months of unlimited courses FREE with our link)

ThirdLove (get 15% off your first order with our link)

The Citizenry (get a $50 gift voucher for any purchase of $200 or more with promo code ARTCURIOUS)

Jun 24, 2019
Episode #52: Shock Art: Balthus' Thérèse Dreaming (Season 5, Episode 6)
1519

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Balthus’ Thérèse Dreaming.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

SPONSORS

The Great Courses  (85% off digital course Leonardo da Vinci and the Italian High Renaissance, and more)

Kaboonki: learn what our production partner can do for you!

 

Jun 10, 2019
Episode #51: Shock Art: Gericault's The Raft of the Medusa (Season 5, Episode 5)
1701

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Gericault’s The Raft of the Medusa.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

 

SPONSORS

Skillshare (get two months of unlimited courses FREE with our link)

ThirdLove (get 15% off your first order with our link)

May 27, 2019
Episode #50: Shock Art: Duchamp's Fountain (Season 5, Episode 4)
1681

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Duchamp’s Fountain.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

 

SPONSORS

The Great Courses  (85% off digital course The Genius of Michelangelo, and more)

The Thing About France Podcast

 

May 13, 2019
BONUS EPISODE: Banksy's Exit Through the Gift Shop LIVE Q&A at the Alamo Drafthouse
1755

BANKSY! Love him or loathe him, he’s a contemporary art dynamo, an icon of street art success. He’s also an enigma, a playful mystery. Last week-- on April 30, 2019-- I was asked to participate in a special screening of the 2010 Banksy documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop at the Alamo Drafthouse in Raleigh, North Carolina. Exit was part of Alamo’s Film Club series, curated by Jackson Cooper, and after the film I sat down with Jackson to record a special conversation/Q&A about the film, Banksy, and the legacy of street art. Enjoy— and we’ll be back next week with an all-new episode of ArtCurious.

Just a note that there are some spoilers in terms of the fact that we talk about the documentary in general, as well as Banksy himself and the other artist profiled in the doc, a man called Mr. Brainwash.

 

SPONSOR

Myro (use promo code ARTCURIOUS at checkout for 50% off and to get started for just $5)

 

May 06, 2019
Episode #49: Shock Art: David's The Death of Marat (Season 5, Episode 3)
1780

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" David's The Death of Marat.

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Apr 29, 2019
Episode #48: Shock Art: Eakins' The Gross Clinic (Season 5, Episode 2)
1512

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Eakins' The Gross Clinic

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SPONSORS

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Apr 15, 2019
Episode #47: Shock Art: Caravaggio's Sick Bacchus (Season 5, Episode 1)
1443

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Caravaggio's Sick Bacchus

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SPONSORS

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Apr 01, 2019
BONUS EPISODE: The Wild and Wonderful World of Weegee
2279

In this bonus episode, we’re revisiting one of our favorite weirdos—Weegee!— whom we featured in Episode 5, alongside Andy Warhol. Today, Weegee gets his full due with a deep dive into his life and work.

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SPONSORS

Care/Of — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS50” for 50% off your first month’s purchase

Curiosity Stream — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your free 30-day trial

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Mar 18, 2019
CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #2: Was Van Gogh Accidentally Murdered? (PART TWO)
2156

This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 29, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. If you haven't listened to part one, please go back and do so. Enjoy!

Vincent Van Gogh's suicide is a huge part of the mythology surrounding him: as much as the famous tale of the cut-off ear is. This so-called "tortured genius," it is said, was so broken down by life and failure that he had no choice but to end his life. Right? But in 2011, two Pulitzer Prize-winning authors published a book titled Van Gogh: The Life that stunned the art world. Therein, Gregory White Smith and Stephen Naifeh state that the artist didn't actually commit suicide.

No, they say: he was actually murdered.

 

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Feb 18, 2019
CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #2: Was Van Gogh Accidentally Murdered? (PART ONE)
1861

This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 29, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. Enjoy!

Vincent Van Gogh's suicide is a huge part of the mythology surrounding him: as much as the famous tale of the cut-off ear is. This so-called "tortured genius," it is said, was so broken down by life and failure that he had no choice but to end his life. Right? But in 2011, two Pulitzer Prize-winning authors published a book titled Van Gogh: The Life that stunned the art world. Therein, Gregory White Smith and Stephen Naifeh state that the artist didn't actually commit suicide.

No, they say: he was actually murdered.

 

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

 

SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus —for a free 30-day trial

Care/Of — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS50” for 50% off your first month’s purchase

Curiosity Stream — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your free 30-day trial

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Shout-out to Art and Object

 

Feb 04, 2019
CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #1: Is the Mona Lisa a Fake? (UPDATED Season 1, Episode 1) PART TWO
2087

This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 10, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. If you haven’t already listened to part one, please go back and do so. Enjoy!

The inaugural episode of the ArtCurious Podcast explores the world's most famous work of art: Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. It is iconic, incredible, and unforgettable-- but is the work on view in Paris's Louvre Museum today the real deal? Host Jennifer Dasal uncovers the story of the Mona Lisa from its creation in the 16th century through its 1911 theft and to its current status as untouchable superstar, breaking down the strange stories and rumors swirling around it.

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SPONSORS:

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Poshmark (use invite code ARTCURIOUS)

Zola

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Shout-out to Art and Object

Jan 21, 2019
CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #1: Is the Mona Lisa a Fake? (PART ONE)
1404

This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 10, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. Enjoy!

The inaugural episode of the ArtCurious Podcast explores the world's most famous work of art: Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. It is iconic, incredible, and unforgettable-- but is the work on view in Paris's Louvre Museum today the real deal? Host Jennifer Dasal uncovers the story of the Mona Lisa from its creation in the 16th century through its 1911 theft and to its current status as untouchable superstar, breaking down the strange stories and rumors swirling around it.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus

Poshmark: use invite code ARTCURIOUS for $5 off your first purchase

Kaboonki

Shout-out to Art and Object

Jan 07, 2019
Episode #46: Shock Art: Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (Season 4, Episode 7)
1455

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.

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Sponsors

Art and Object

The Great Courses Plus

Kaboonki

Dec 24, 2018
A Little Curious #6: The Discovery of Pompeii
899

Welcome to A Little Curious, a series of special episodes that will provide you will short and sweet bonus content about the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in art history. A Little Curious will publish in our season's "off" weeks. Enjoy!

This week’s topic: a snapshot at the discovery of the city of Pompeii.

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Art and Object

BetterHelp

 

Dec 17, 2018
Episode #45: Shock Art: Michelangelo's The Last Judgment (Season 4, Episode 6)
1618

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Michelangelo's The Last Judgment.

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SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus

Kaboonki

Audible

Shout out to Art and Object

Shout out to The Simple Sophisticate

Dec 10, 2018
A Little Curious #5: Disastrous Inspiration behind Munch's The Scream?
686

Welcome to A Little Curious, a series of special episodes that will provide you will short and sweet bonus content about the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in art history. A Little Curious will publish in our season's "off" weeks. Enjoy!

This week’s topic: the potential disastrous inspiration behind Munch's The Scream

 

Sponsors

Art and Object

BetterHelp

Dec 03, 2018
Episode #44: Shock Art: Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son (Season 4, Episode 5)
1404

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son.

 

Sponsors

The Great Courses Plus

Kaboonki

Shout out to Art and Object

Shout out to The Simple Sophisticate

 

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Nov 26, 2018
A Little Curious #4: Leonardo's Hidden Masterpiece
867

Welcome to A Little Curious, a series of special episodes that will provide you will short and sweet bonus content about the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in art history. A Little Curious will publish in our season's "off" weeks. Enjoy!

This week’s topic: Leonardo's hidden masterpiece.

SPONSORS:

Art and Object

BetterHelp

Nov 19, 2018
Episode #43: Shock Art: Dürer's Self-Portrait (Season 4, Episode 4)
1575

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Dürer's Self-Portrait.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

 

Sponsors

The Great Courses Plus

CAA, the College Art Association

BetterHelp (discount code: ARTCURIOUS)

Shout out to Art and Object

Shout out to The Simple Sophisticate

Nov 12, 2018
A Little Curious #3: The Pope's Secret Sexy Bathroom
610

Welcome to A Little Curious, a series of special episodes that will provide you will short and sweet bonus content about the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in art history. A Little Curious will publish in our season's "off" weeks. Enjoy!

This week’s topic: The Pope’s secret sexy bathroom.

Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. 

More details at our blog for this episode.

Nov 05, 2018
Episode #42: Shock Art: Gentileschi's Judith Slaying Holofernes (Season 4, Episode 3)
1761

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Gentileschi's Judith Slaying Holofernes.

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Poshmark: invite code "ARTCURIOUS"

Green Chef: greenchef.us/artcurious

Oct 29, 2018
A Little Curious #2: Donatello's Mary Magdalene
548

Welcome to A Little Curious, a series of special episodes that will provide you will short and sweet bonus content about the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in art history. A Little Curious will publish in our season's "off" weeks. Enjoy!

This week’s topic: Welcome to A Little Curious, a series of special episodes that will provide you will short and sweet bonus content about the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in art history. A Little Curious will publish in our season's "off" weeks. Enjoy!

This week’s topic: Donatello’s rule-breaking Mary Magdalene

Today’s Sponsors

Kaboonki

Poshmark (use invite code ARTCURIOUS)

Oct 22, 2018
Episode #41: Shock Art: Edouard Manet's Olympia (Season 4, Episode 2)
1610

Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Edouard Manet's Olympia.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

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Oct 15, 2018
Introducing: A Little Curious #1: Michelangelo and Vittoria Colonna
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Welcome to A Little Curious, a series of special episodes that will provide you will short and sweet bonus content about the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in art history. A Little Curious will publish in our season's "off" weeks. Enjoy!

This week’s topic: the deep relationship between Michelangelo Buonarotti, and a sweet arts patron and poet, Vittoria Colonna.

Oct 08, 2018
Episode #40: Shock Art: Sargent's Madame X (Season 4, Episode 1)
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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Sargent's Madame X.

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Oct 01, 2018
Bonus Episode: When Disney Met Dalí
1150

Today, we’re uncovering the bizarre artistic love child of Walt Disney and Salvador Dali with their incredible short film, Destino. This is a special bonus episode of the ArtCurious Podcast, exploring the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in Art History.

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Sep 09, 2018
Bonus Episode: CuriousTalk #2 (Recap of Season 3, Part 2)
1582

Loved being a part of ArtCurious's third season? Listen in to hear more in our new BONUS segment, CuriousTalk, for behind-the-scenes goodies, listener questions, and more. This episode recaps details from the last four episodes of the season.

CuriousTalk is hosted by Josh Dasal, from ArtCurious's production partner, Kaboonki. Learn more about Kaboonki's video and marketing capabilities here.


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Aug 27, 2018
Bonus Episode: CuriousTalk #1 (Recap of Season 3, Part 1)
1443

Loved being a part of ArtCurious's third season? Listen in to hear more in our new BONUS segment, CuriousTalk, for behind-the-scenes goodies, listener questions, and more. This episode recaps details from the first four episodes of the season.

CuriousTalk is hosted by Josh Dasal, from ArtCurious's production partner, Kaboonki. Learn more about Kaboonki's video and marketing capabilities here.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

Aug 13, 2018
Episode #39: Rivals- Picasso vs. Matisse (Season 3, Episode 8)
1830

This episode receives additional support from Reynolda House Museum of American Art, where you can find one of the nation's most highly regarded collections of American art on view in a unique domestic setting - the restored 1917 mansion of R. J. and Katharine Reynolds surrounded by beautiful gardens and peaceful walking trails. You can browse Reynolda's art and decorative arts collections and see what's coming next at their website,  reynoldahouse.org

The beginning of the Twentieth Century was a glittering time of hope and innovation. It was one of the golden ages of art, particularly in Paris, the glamorous capital of all things cultural, where writers such as Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein hobnobbed and debated ideas with painters like Salvador Dali, Georges Braque and many others who filled the bars, cafes, and salons, working and discussing politics and their idyllic fantasies about what art could be. Thinking and dreaming BIG was the norm-- and collaboration and sharing in each others’ concepts and victories was, too. But there was a shadowy side to such sharing, where friendships and support could morph into jealousy and competitiveness, as the drive to become the best took ultimate control. It is within this sparkling Parisian backdrop that what is possibly the greatest rivalry of art history played out-- what IS modern art, and what should it be?

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Episode Credits

3Vh-WP98_400x400.jpg

Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. Additional writing and research by Stephanie Pryor. 

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits

"Splash In The Ocean" by Daniel Birch is licensed under BY 4.0; "Beach" by Komiku is licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal; "Tundra" by Scanglobe is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0 ; "Trace Hunters Departement (ID 281)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "La neige tiède" by Fourmi is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; Ad Music: "I Was Waiting for Him" by Lee Rosevere is licensed under BY 4.0; "Hey Mercy" by Pierce Murphy is licensed under BY 4.0; "The Valley" by Dee Yan-Key is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "'Steve Combs Through' Theme" by Steve Combs is licensed under BY 4.0

Links and further resources

Matisse and Picasso: The Story of Their Rivalry and Friendship, Jack Flam

The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art, Sebastian Smee

In Montmartre: Picasso, Matisse and the Birth of Modernist Art, Sue Roe

Smithsonian Magazine: "Matisse & Picasso"

The Art Story: Pablo Picasso

PabloPicasso.org: Picasso and Matisse

Slate: Matisse vs. Picasso

The Art Story: Henri Matisse

The Guardian: Quiz: Are You a Picasso or a Matisse?

Pablo Picasso, Self-Portrait, 1907
Pablo Picasso, Self-Portrait, 1907 Henri Matisse, Self-Portrait, 1906
Henri Matisse, Self-Portrait, 1906 Pablo Picasso, Guernica, 1937
Pablo Picasso, Guernica, 1937 Henri Matisse, Woman with a Hat, 1905
Henri Matisse, Woman with a Hat, 1905 finch7-30-10-1.jpg
Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, 1907
Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, 1907 Henri Matisse, Le Dessert (Harmony in Red), 1908
Henri Matisse, Le Dessert (Harmony in Red), 1908

Jul 23, 2018
Episode #38- Rivals: Manet vs. Degas (Season 3, Episode 7)
1987

This episode receives additional support from Reynolda House Museum of American Art, where you can find one of the nation's most highly regarded collections of American art on view in a unique domestic setting - the restored 1917 mansion of R. J. and Katharine Reynolds surrounded by beautiful gardens and peaceful walking trails. You can browse Reynolda's art and decorative arts collections and see what's coming next at their website,  reynoldahouse.org

Gift-giving: it’s one of the primary ways to solidify a relationship. But what happens when gifting goes suddenly wrong, and alters a friendship for good?

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

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Episode Credits

This is the third  of three episodes in collaboration with Sartle. Sartle encourages you to see art history differently, and they have a plethora of incredibly fun and informative videos, blog posts, and articles on their website.

3Vh-WP98_400x400.jpg

Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits

"Misterioso" by Dee Yan-Key is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Turkey Vulture" by Chad Crouch is licensed under BY-NC 3.0 ; "Bond Band" by Yan Terrian is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "Galamus (piano solo)" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Simple Life" by Anton Khoryukov is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Facing It" by Komiku is licensed under CC0 1.0. Ad Music: "Lonely Chicken Inside Shopping Mall (ID 122)" by KieLoKaz is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "The Valley" by Dee Yan-Key is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Pillow Tree: Version 2" by UncleBibby is licensed under BY 4.0

Links and further resources

Manet and the Family Romance, Nancy Locke

Olympia: Paris in the Age of Manet, Otto Friedrich

The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art, Sebastian Smee

The Telegraph: "Did Manet Have a Secret Son?"

The Art Story: Edgar Degas

The New York Times: "Degas and Mrs. Manet"

Edouard Manet, Self-Portrait with Palette, 1878–1879
Edouard Manet, Self-Portrait with Palette, 1878–1879 Edgar Degas, Self-Portrait, 1855 (detail)
Edgar Degas, Self-Portrait, 1855 (detail) Edouard Manet, Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe (Luncheon on the Grass), 1862-1863
Edouard Manet, Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe (Luncheon on the Grass), 1862-1863 Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874
Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874 Edouard Manet, The Absinthe Drinker, 1859 (detail)
Edouard Manet, The Absinthe Drinker, 1859 (detail) Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet and Mme. Manet, 1868-69
Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet and Mme. Manet, 1868-69 Edouard Manet, Olympia, 1863
Edouard Manet, Olympia, 1863

Jul 09, 2018
Episode #37: Rivals- Vigée Le Brun vs. Labille-Guiard (Season 3, Episode 6)
1850

The Great Courses Plus - 4563_PPA_Generic_Perspective.jpg

This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus. Get a FREE month of unlimited access to over 9,000 lectures presented by engaging, award-winning experts on everything from art to physics, interior design and world languages. Sign up today at thegreatcoursesplus.com/ART

There’s an old quote that I’m sure you’ve heard referenced in a million sitcoms or Looney Tunes cartoons- though it actually stems from a 1932 western-- where one character, all flinty-eyed, turns to another, and declares, “This town ain’t big enough for the both of us.” It’s an order meant to scare someone away, but it’s also a declaration of the feelings of rivalry, of jealousy, as if it shouldn’t be allowed that two people of similar stature could be functioning-- or even flourishing-- in the same place and time. After all, you couldn’t possibly have two star quarterbacks on the team, or two top valedictorians. Someone always has to be the best, or even more importantly, to be seen by the public as the best.  But was this true in the case of the two top female painters in Revolutionary-era France?

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Episode Credits

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Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Logo by Dave Rainey. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. Additional writing and research by Adria Gunter. 

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits: "Yellow-rumped Warbler" by Chad Crouch is licensed under BY-NC 3.0 ; "Circles (Instrumental)" by Greg Atkinson is licensed under BY 3.0; "Stronger" by Alan Špiljak is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Desktop Hall" by Yan Terrian is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "Beijing 2008" by Anton Khoryukov is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0. Ad Music:  "I Was Waiting for Him" by Lee Rosevere is licensed under BY 4.0; "Streetworker Jack (ID 844)" by Lobo Loco  is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Comedie" by Jahzzar is licensed under BY-SA 4.0

Links and further resources:

ArtCurious Episode 3: The Semi-Charmed Life of Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun

Harvard Magazine: Adélaïde Labille-Guiard

Adélaïde Labille-Guiard: Artist in an Age of Revolution, by Laura Auricchio

Metropolitan Museum Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Adélaïde Labille-Guiard

Le Grand Palais: Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun and Female Competition

Jacques-Louis David: New Perspectives, by Dorothy Johnson

 

Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, Peace Bringing Back Abundance, 1780
Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, Peace Bringing Back Abundance, 1780 Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, Self Portrait with Two Pupils, 1785
Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, Self Portrait with Two Pupils, 1785 Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, Self-Portrait, 1790
Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, Self-Portrait, 1790

Jun 25, 2018
Episode #36: Rivals- Turner vs. Constable (Season 3, Episode 5)
1961

This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus. Get a FREE month of unlimited access to over 10,000 lectures presented by engaging, award-winning experts on everything from art to physics, interior design and world languages. Sign up today at thegreatcoursesplus.com/ART

In 19th century England, landscape painting transitioned into being something lovely and comparatively calm, and transformed into a personal and stylistic battleground. Landscape: pristine and idealized, or rough, ready, and turbulent? Which one would better express the heart of 19th century British painting?

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Episode Credits

This is the second of three episodes in collaboration with Sartle. Sartle encourages you to see art history differently, and they have a plethora of incredibly fun and informative videos, blog posts, and articles on their website.

3Vh-WP98_400x400.jpg

Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. 

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits

"Western Tanager" by Chad Crouch is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Not the end" by Alan Špiljak is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "More Than Friendship - Geglaettet (ID 814)" by Lobo Loco  is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Fuzzy Lines" by Yan Terrian is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "Full of Stars" by Philipp Weigl is licensed under BY 4.0; "Phase 1" by Xylo-Ziko is licensed under  BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Whimsical Theme #2" by David Hilowitz is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; Ad Music: "Repeater Station - Observation (ID 204)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under  BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Electric Silence" by Unheard Music Concepts is licensed under BY 4.0

Links and further resources

Memoirs of the Life of John Constable, C.R. Leslie

John Constable: A Kingdom of His Own, Anthony Bailey

The Life of J.M.W. Turner, Volume 2, Walter Thornbury

Turner: The Extraordinary Life and Momentous Times of JMW Turner, Franny Moyle

Standing in the Sun: A Life of JMW Turner, Anthony Bailey

The Daily Mail: "Why Britain's Two Greatest Painters Hated Each Other's Guts: And now Turner and Constable Are Going Toe-to-Toe Once More"

The Telegraph: "JMW Turner's Feud with John Constable Unveiled at Tate Britain"
 

Joseph Mallord William Turner, Self-Portrait, c. 1799
Joseph Mallord William Turner, Self-Portrait, c. 1799  John Constable, Self-Portrait, c. 1799-1804
John Constable, Self-Portrait, c. 1799-1804 John Constable, The Hay Wain, 1821
John Constable, The Hay Wain, 1821 JMW Turner, Rain, Steam and Speed, 1844
JMW Turner, Rain, Steam and Speed, 1844 John Constable, The Opening of Waterloo Bridge, 1832
John Constable, The Opening of Waterloo Bridge, 1832 JMW Turner, Helvoetsluys, 1832
JMW Turner, Helvoetsluys, 1832

Jun 11, 2018
Episode #35: Rivals- Lee Krasner and Elaine de Kooning vs. Their Husbands (Season 3, Episode 4)
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This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus. Get a FREE month of unlimited access to over 9,000 lectures presented by engaging, award-winning experts on everything from art to physics, interior design and world languages. Sign up today at thegreatcoursesplus.com/ART

This episode is also sponsored by HelloFresh. For $30 off your first box of delicious, fresh ingredients and easy step-by-step recipes, please visit HelloFresh.com/artcurious30 and enter the promo code "artcurious30." 

Anyone familiar with Abstract Expressionism will tell you that this art movement was one where all the insiders or practitioners were more closely involved than many other art movements.  Such close confines also made for some serious rivalries, too. But there were other artists who were more intimately involved with one another and their artistic process-- they were married, or were lovers. Such is the case with both Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning --both of whom married women who were incredible artists in their own right. Interestingly, and sadly, when these two spouses are mentioned, it’s very rare that we are treated to sincere commentary just about their works of art. More often than not, we are, instead, given explanations of how these women measure up to their (admittedly more famous) husbands, and are relegated either to a supporting role, or just plain seen as not good enough in comparison. Why is it that such talented women continue to have their posthumous careers and stories marked and shaped by their husbands?  

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Episode Credits

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Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. Additional research and writing for this episode by Patricia Gomes.

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits

"Song Sparrow" by Chad Crouch is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Converging Lines" by David Hilowitz is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Today, Tomorrow, & The Sun Rising" by Julie Maxwell is licensed under BY-ND 4.0; "Is everything of this is true?" by Komiku is licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal License; "Fantasy in my mind" by Alan Špiljak is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0. Ad Music: "Hello September" by Proviant Audio is licensed under BY-NC-ND 3.0 US; "The Valley" by  Dee Yan-Key is licensed under  BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Galaxies" by Split Phase is licensed under BY-NC-SA 3.0 US

Links and further resources

Ninth Street Women: Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler: Five Painters and the Movement That Changed Modern Art, Mary Gabriel

The Art Story: Lee Krasner

Artsy: "The Emotionally Charged Paintings Lee Krasner Created After Pollock's Death"

Smithsonian Magazine: "Why Elaine de Kooning Sacrificed Her Own Amazing Career for Her More Famous Husband's"

National Portrait Gallery Blog: "Elaine de Kooning's JFK" 

NPR: "For Artist Elaine de Kooning, Painting was a Verb, not a Noun"

Elaine de Kooning in her studio, 1963
Elaine de Kooning in her studio, 1963 Elaine de Kooning, Self-Portrait, 1946
Elaine de Kooning, Self-Portrait, 1946 Lee Krasner in her studio, date unknown
Lee Krasner in her studio, date unknown Lee Krasner, Self-Portrait, c. 1929
Lee Krasner, Self-Portrait, c. 1929 Elaine de Kooning, John F. Kennedy, 1963
Elaine de Kooning, John F. Kennedy, 1963 Lee Krasner, Untitled (Umber Series), c. 1960
Lee Krasner, Untitled (Umber Series), c. 1960

May 28, 2018
Episode #34: Rivals- Pollock vs. de Kooning (Season 3, Episode 3)
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This episode receives additional support from Reynolda House Museum of American Art, where you can find one of the nation's most highly regarded collections of American art on view in a unique domestic setting - the restored 1917 mansion of R. J. and Katharine Reynolds surrounded by beautiful gardens and peaceful walking trails. You can browse Reynolda's art and decorative arts collections and see what's coming next at their website,  reynoldahouse.org.

The art world is a man’s world- or, at least, it used to be entirely one. This shouldn’t be surprising to anyone who is a longtime listener of the ArtCurious Podcast, because we’ve touched multiple times on the difficulties that have faced women who have sought careers as artists.  Now, thankfully, in the age of #metoo, the male-heaviness of the art world is changing a bit, as it is in other facets of society. But turning back the clock to any other era in history, and the reality is that it was totally a man’s game. And the absolute manliness of it all was compounded intensely in one particular time and place: post-war America, where it was all about brusque machismo, the biggest innovations, and the biggest splash. It was a measuring contest like none other, and two larger-than-life characters were at the center of it all.

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. Additional research and writing for this episode by Stephanie Pryor.

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits

"The Walk" by Dee Yan-Key is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Catching Glitter" by Split Phase is licensed under BY-NC-SA 3.0 US; "Aquasigns" by Tagirijus  is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "You know why" by Loyalty Freak Music is licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal License; "Tethered" by Nctrnm  is licensed under BY 4.0. Based on a work at https://soundcloud.com/nctrnm/; "Dancing on the Seafloor (KieLoKaz ID 110)" by KieLoBot  is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Attempt 7" by Jared C. Balogh is licensed under BY-NC-SA 3.0

Ad music: "Ground Cayenne" by The Good Lawdz is licensed under BY-SA 3.0 

Links and further resources

The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art, Sebastian Smee

The New York Times: "Ruth Kligman, Muse and Artist, Dies at 80"

Jackson Pollock: An American Saga, Steven Naifeh and Gregory Smith

De Kooning: A Retrospective, John Elderfield

Willem de Kooning and his wife, Elaine, photograph by Hans Namuth, 1952.
Willem de Kooning and his wife, Elaine, photograph by Hans Namuth, 1952. Jackson Pollock and his wife, Lee Krasner, photograph by Hans Namuth, 1950.
Jackson Pollock and his wife, Lee Krasner, photograph by Hans Namuth, 1950. Willem de Kooning, Excavation, 1950
Willem de Kooning, Excavation, 1950 Jackson Pollock, Stenographic Figure, c. 1942
Jackson Pollock, Stenographic Figure, c. 1942 Willem de Kooning, Woman I, 1950-1952
Willem de Kooning, Woman I, 1950-1952 Jackson Pollock, Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), 1950
Jackson Pollock, Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), 1950 Jackson Pollock painting on panes of glass, Hans Namuth documentary stills, 1950.
Jackson Pollock painting on panes of glass, Hans Namuth documentary stills, 1950.

May 14, 2018
Episode #33: Rivals- Raphael vs. Michelangelo (Season 3, Episode 2)
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One pair of incredible Renaissance artists experienced a particularly epic rivalry. Both were vying for the same patrons, and their professional contempt very quickly got ultra-personal. Today, explore the intense conflict between Michelangelo and Raphael, both seeking approval and projects from one of the most innovative patrons: Pope Julius II.

This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus. Get a FREE month of unlimited access to over 9,000 lectures presented by engaging, award-winning experts on everything from art to physics, interior design and world languages. Sign up today at thegreatcoursesplus.com/ART

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki.  Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

Additional music credits may be found on our website

Apr 30, 2018
Episode #32: Rivals- Judith Leyster vs. Frans Hals (Season 3, Episode 1)
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Rivalries are inherently fascinating, because they typically affect not only the individual rivals themselves, but also a whole ecosystem that can grow up around a rivalry-- spurring it on, and enabling it.  Some of the greatest artists in history have engaged in some seriously curious conflicts. What causes these rivalries is fascinating and vast-- is it art and creativity? Is it money and patronage? Or is it simply ego? And are the artists really in conflict with one another, or does it just appear that way, to us, or to their communities? How have rivalries impacted art?

Today, we are starting an all-new season of episodes dealing with some of the wildest and most complicated rivalries in art history, beginning with the purported feud between Northern European heavyweights Judith Leyster and Frans Hals.  

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Episode Credits

This is the first of three episodes in collaboration with Sartle. Sartle encourages you to see art history differently, and they have a plethora of incredibly fun and informative videos, blog posts, and articles on their website.

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Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits

"Gravity" by Borrtex is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Vivace solenne" by Dee Yan-Key is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Alternative Facts" by David Hilowitz is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Lost Forest" by Julie Maxwell's Piano Music is licensed under BY-ND-4.0; "Storm Passing" by Podington Bear is licensed under BY-NC-3.0; "La tapa del viernes" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC-3.0; Ad music: "Little Lily Swing" by Tri-Tachyon is licensed under BY 4.0

Links and further resources

Special Visions: Profiles of Fifteen Women Artists from the Renaissance to the Present Day, Olga S. Opfell

Female Gazes: Seventy-Five Women Artists, Elizabeth Martin and Vivian Meyer

Frans Hals Biography, The Leiden Collection website

Judith Leyster Biography, National Gallery of Art website

Dictionary of Women Artists, edited by Delia Gaze

"A Light in the Galaxy," essay by Frima Fox Hofrichter, from Singular Women: Writing the Artist, edited by Kristen Frederickson and Sarah E. Webb 

Judith Leyster: A Dutch Master in Her World, edited by Pieter Welu and James A. Biesboer

Tulipmania: Money, Honor, and Knowledge in the Dutch Golden Age, Anne Goldgar

Herstory: Women who Changed the World, Deborah Gore Ohrn

The New York Times: "A Career Woman's Short but Sweet Career in the 17th Century"

Broad Strokes: 15 Women Who Made Art and Made History (In That Order), Bridget Quinn

Judith Leyster, Self-Portrait, 1633
Judith Leyster, Self-Portrait, 1633 Follower of Frans Hals, Copy of a Self-Portrait by Frans Hals, c. 1650s
Follower of Frans Hals, Copy of a Self-Portrait by Frans Hals, c. 1650s Frans Hals, Gypsy Girl, 1628
Frans Hals, Gypsy Girl, 1628 Judith Leyster, Boy Playing the Flute, early 1630s
Judith Leyster, Boy Playing the Flute, early 1630s Jan Miense Molenaer, The Duet: A Self-Portrait of the Artist with his Wife, Judith Leyster, Probably Their Marriage Portrait), c. 1636
Jan Miense Molenaer, The Duet: A Self-Portrait of the Artist with his Wife, Judith Leyster, Probably Their Marriage Portrait), c. 1636 Judith Leyster, The Proposition. 1631
Judith Leyster, The Proposition. 1631 Judith Leyster, Jolly Toper, 1629
Judith Leyster, Jolly Toper, 1629 Frans Hals, The Jolly Toper, c. 1628-1630
Frans Hals, The Jolly Toper, c. 1628-1630

Apr 16, 2018
BONUS: Jennifer Dasal on "Genius" at CreativeMornings RDU (August 2017)
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We're thrilled to bring a bonus episode to you today. Last August, Jennifer Dasal was asked to speak on the topic of "genius" at CreativeMornings RDU. So what does genius have to do with madness? And how about suffering and sadness? Join Jennifer as she discusses this topic with the poster child for all suffering artists: Vincent Van Gogh.

Want to WATCH this episode instead of listen to it? See the video of this lecture here!

Learn more about CreativeMornings and get involved in a chapter near you.

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Many thanks to CreativeMornings RDU for this recording!

 

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Feb 26, 2018
Episode #31: Season Finale, Art and WWII- The Long Shadow (Season 2, Episode 11)
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World War Two was the bloodiest, biggest, and most destructive war of all time, decimating entire countries and taking the lives of millions. And as we have learned over the last 10 episodes of the ArtCurious Podcast this season, art was affected in many different ways due to the impact of the war. Art was used to document the experience of soldiers in battle; created to shape public opinion, values, and inspire the war effort; and to fight the enemy. It was a failed dream of Adolf Hitler, leading us to ask how art could have changed the course of history. And it was a victim in many ways, destroyed, looted, or impossibly altered during the course of events. But after the war ended in 1945 and the dust settled throughout Europe and other theaters of war, the effect of war on the art world lessened and the connections between the two softened. Right? Actually, that’s not what happened at all. And the effects of the Second World War are still being felt throughout the art world today.

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

Additional music credits:

"Cold War Echo" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY 4.0; "Temple+1" by Chuzausen is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Told You So" by Ketsa is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "still" by Dlay is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Our Future" by Sergey Cheremisinov is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; Ad music: "Off to Osaka" by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under BY 3.0

Dec 25, 2017
Episode #30: Art and Remembrance (Season 2, Episode 10)
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It's interesting that literature seems to have cornered the market on artistic depictions of those who experienced the Holocaust firsthand. We think of The Diary of Anne Frank or Elie Wiesel’s Night first and foremost when we think of how war has been creatively represented by those who survived it-- or didn’t survive it. But it turns out that there were many artists who made visual representations of their experiences, too-- and lots of these individuals were prisoners, like Anne eventually became, in concentration camps.

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Episode Credits

Additional writing and research by Patricia Gomez. Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

Additional music credits:

"Bittersweet" by Podington Bear is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Petite pièce minime No 2 - Batifol" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Dreams Are For Living" by Daniel Birch is licensed under BY 4.0; "Galamus" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Parting" by Alex Mason & the Minor Emotion is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "daedalus" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY 4.0; "Thistle Blossom Blue" by Axletree is licensed under BY 4.0;  Ad music: "Off to Osaka" by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under BY 3.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below for our sources and further reading, and purchase any item from Barnes and Noble via our links (above):

BBC: 'Haunting' art by Jewish children in WW2 concentration camp

CNN:  Auschwitz's Forbidden Art

New York Times: ‘Art From the Holocaust’: The Beauty and Brutality in Forbidden Works

Yad Vashem: The World Holocaust Remembrance Center

United States Holocaust Museum: Nazi Concentration Camps introduction

University of South Florida: A Teacher's Guide to the Holocaust, Art of the Ghettos & Camps

Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum: Works of Art 

Remember.org: Paintings by Jan Komski

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Prisoner-made box found at Auschwitz
Prisoner-made box found at Auschwitz Franciszek Jaźwiecki, Prisoner Portrait
Franciszek Jaźwiecki, Prisoner Portrait Franciszek Jaźwiecki, Prisoner Portrait
Franciszek Jaźwiecki, Prisoner Portrait Jan Komski, The Roll Call
Jan Komski, The Roll Call Jan Komski, Hanging and Eating
Jan Komski, Hanging and Eating Malvina Lowova's image of her family's expulsion by pitchforked Nazis
Malvina Lowova's image of her family's expulsion by pitchforked Nazis Ruth Cechova's
Ruth Cechova's "sunbathing" drawing
Dec 11, 2017
Episode #29: The Monuments Men (Season 2, Episode 9)
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Ah, Hollywood. Nothing goes further than a big celebrity-studded movie to grab your pop-culture attention and to inspire countless articles and think-pieces about a particular topic. A really solid blockbuster can raise a niche book to bestseller status or inspire hopeful imitators. And it can lead to a renewed interest in a certain time period or subject matter. In the case of the 2014 film, The Monuments Men, all of this was certainly true. With superstar George Clooney directing and acting alongside Matt Damon, Cate Blanchett and American treasure Bill Murray, among others, The Monuments Men was almost a guaranteed hit when it was released in February 2014.  But if your knowledge of the incredible individuals known as The Monuments Men stems only from this movie--well, then, I’m sorry. And I say that with no disrespect to Mr. Clooney and his team, but honestly? This cinematic take is a well-meaning but saccharine mess. The real story of the men--and women--who risked their own lives to save thousands of works of art is far more fascinating, dangerous, and important, even today.

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

Additional music credits:

"The Things We Save" by Podington Bear is licensed under BY-NC 3.0 - Based on a work at http://soundofpicture.com; "Walk to Nowhere" by Daniel Birch is licensed under BY 4.0; "Phoenix" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Battalion" by krackatoa is licensed under BY-NC-SA 3.0 US; "Big Street Gang (ID 517)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "The Solencia Library" by Art of Escapism is licensed under BY 4.0; "winter smoke" by The Owl is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Otis Walks into the Woods" by Mary Lattimore is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0

 ___________________________________________________________________

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below for our sources and further reading:

We are hugely indebted to Robert Edsel's The Monuments Men for images and information.

U.S. Army website: The Art of War and the War of Art

Vanity Fair: The Monuments Men: A Story So Good, Burt Lancaster Told It 50 Years Ago

Slate: How Accurate is The Monuments Men?

Huffington Post: The Real Story Behind the 'Monuments Men' Goes Far Deeper Than the Blockbuster Movie

The Guardian: The Ghent Altarpiece: The Truth About the Most Stolen Artwork of All Time

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Soldiers pose with a looted painting by Manet discovered in a mine by men of the U.S. Army's 90th Division April 7, 1945. COURTESY JOHN PROVAN
Unidentified military personnel unload some of the art treasures recovered from Hermann Goering's cave in the mountain side at Konigsee in May 1945. Keystone Pool via AP file
American GIs, under the supervision of Capt. James Rorimer, carry paintings down the steps of Neuschwanstein Castle in southern Germany. Courtesy National Archives and Records Administration
The Nazis used everything, including churches — like this one in the city of Ellingen --€” to stash everything from stolen art to the regime's records. National Archives & Records Administration
Sgt. Harry Ettlinger (right) and Lt. Dale Ford helped repatriate a Rembrandt found among a trove of art in a German salt mine. National Archives and Records Administration
George Stout, pictured here at age 47, is the art-conservation expert who inspired the character Clooney plays. Walker Hancock Collection
Everett Parker Lesley, Jr. (left) returning Leonardo da Vinci's
Stephen Kovalyak, George Stout and Thomas Carr Howe transporting Michelangelo's sculpture Madonna and child, July 9, 1945
Nov 27, 2017
Episode #28: The Ghost Army (Season 2, Episode 8)
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In a time where the arts are ever-undervalued, it is increasingly important for us not just to support the arts in our communities, but to look back through periods of history where artists were applauded for making a significant difference. And in the case of one very special American troop in the midst of World War Two, artists and creative types were tasked specifically with using their skills to preserve people. Art here became a life-saving force- literally. A force for good, even through multiple means of deception.

We are indebted to ghostarmy.org for their images, information, and wonderful documentary!

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

Additional music credits:

"Silent Movie Car Chase (ID 709)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Tethered" by Nctrnm is licensed under BY 4.0 - Based on a work at https://soundcloud.com/nctrnm/; "So Low" by Art of Escapism is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "Makie Elkino" by William Ross Chernoff's Nomads is licensed under BY 4.0; "Leaping Leopards" by Ash Turner is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Poldoro" by Milton Arias is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "Trombone Trio for Trombone Quartet" by Curtis Hasselbring is licensed under BY 4.0

 ___________________________________________________________________

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

The Ghost Army documentary and official site: ghostarmy.org

The Atlantic: The Ghost Army: The Inflatable Tanks that Fooled Hitler

Smithsonian Magazine: When an Army of Artists Fooled Hitler

Hyperallergic: The Artist-Filled Shadow Army of World War II

Atlas Obscura: A Visual Guide to the Fake Fleets and Inflatable Armies of World War II

History Channel: Push Renewed to Award WWII Ghost Army with Congressional Gold Medal

 

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

A rare color photo of a Ghost Army inflatable tank
A Ghost Army encampment from above
Bill Blass (left) while at work for the Ghost Army
A cardboard tank prototype
Ghost Army soldier setting up a speaker system for
A sketch from a Ghost Army soldier of their camp being
Group photo: The Ghost Army
Nov 13, 2017
Episode #27: CURIOUS CALLBACK: What Happened to the Amber Room? (Season 2, Episode 7)
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This is a rebroadcast of our eighth episode, which originally aired on November 4, 2016.  It's a fan favorite, and it ties in rather nicely to the theme of our current season! Even if you've listened to this episode before, you're not going to want to miss this, as it updates our show based on new information.

One of the most awe-inspiring sights in and around St. Petersburg, Russia, is the Catherine Palace, a rococo summer residence for the imperial family of yore. Up until World War II, The Catherine Palace housed something so incredible, so coveted, and so gorgeous that for hundreds of years, travelers fro all over the world flocked to admire it, referred to as the "Eighth Wonder of the World." And then, in the early 1940s with the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union, this priceless creation was stolen. And to this day, it has still never been found.

What happened to the Amber Room?

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

Additional music credits:

"Hermitage" by Dee Yan-Kee is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Rumbo de grises" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "modum" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY 4.0; "Trush Nightingale (ID 608)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0Like the sky" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under BY 4.0; "The Warm Shoulder" by Mary Lattimore is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Seven Lights" by Sergey Cheremisinov is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Our Giant's Alone" by Art of Escapism is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "owl's secret" by The Owl is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Gardarike" by Tri-Tachyon is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Remember Trees?" by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under BY 4.0 - Based on a work at http://chriszabriskie.com 

 

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

The Mystery of the Nazis and the Vanished Amber Room

Could Long-Lost Amber Room Be Stashed in a Nazi Bunker in Poland?

A Brief History of the Amber Room

Mystery of the Amber Room: Video

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Copy of St. Petersburg, taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
Copy of St. Petersburg, taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
Copy of Statue of Peter the Great, St. Petersburg, taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
Copy of J.-M. Nattier, Portrait of Peter the Great, 1717
Copy of The Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
Copy of The Catherine Palace at Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
Copy of Interior shot of the Amber Room, by jeanyfan on Wikimedia Commons - Own work, Public Domain
Copy of Interior shot of the Amber Room, by Wikimedia Commons user jeanyfan - Own work, Public Domain
Copy of Interior shot of the Amber Room, by jeanyfan on Wikimedia Commons - Own work, Public Domain
Copy of Medallion-shaped relief depicting Andreas Schlüter in the entrance hall of Hamburg's City Hall, ca.1890. Photo by James Steakley - Eigene Fotografie (own photography), CC BY 3.0,
Copy of Baltic amber samples with varying color and clarity. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons user By PrinWest Handelsagentur J. Kossowski - Own work, CC BY 3.0
Copy of Baltic Amber
Copy of Fyodor Rokotov, Portrait of Empress Catherine the Great
Copy of The
Copy of Koningsburg Castle prior to World War II
Copy of Vladimir Putin and others celebrate the opening of the reconstructed Amber Room, 2003

Oct 30, 2017
Episode #26: Hitler's Führermuseum (Season 2, Episode 6)
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This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!

One of the reasons that I decided to center this second season of the ArtCurious Podcast around art and World War Two is that there are so many different stories that we can tell about how art and war intersect-- especially and most critically during this war to end all wars. As I discussed in episode #21, the first of the season, it may seem on the surface that there aren’t many direct correlations between World War Two and the arts, but in fact, there were many very tangible connections-- and you can even say that there were physical connections between the two as well. Because while the lives of millions were in the balance during the run of the war, so were those of the visual arts as well. Thousands of paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints, once safely ensconced in homes or collections, were suddenly uprooted at the whim of one man, with one very particular museum in mind for them. Today, we’re digging into the story behind one of the most significant museums never built-- Hitler’s Fuhrermuseum-- and was it really going to be as great as it purported to be?

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

Additional music credits: "Lädschad" by Dee Yan-Kee is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "La brise" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Arrival" by Misha Dioxin is licensed under BY 4.0; "Rise" by Kyle Preston is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "The Signals" by Sergey Cheremisinov is licensed under BY-NC 4.0

___________________________________________________________________

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the link below:

Daily Beast: Inside Hitler's Fantasy Museum

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

 A view of Linz, Austria-- the proposed location of Hitler's cultural capitol
 An architectural model of Linz and the Fuhrermuseum, among other buildings
 Hitler (seated) admires the plans for Linz alongside his architect, Herman Gisler (left)
 A rare color image of Hitler viewing the Linz model
 Hitler is presented with a confiscated painting
 Hitler inspects confiscated art
 Vermeer's The Astronomer , one of the most famous paintings destined for Hitler's museum
Oct 16, 2017
Episode #25: The Draft, Doctrine, and The Duck (Season 2, Episode 5)
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This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!

When I was a kid growing up in the 1980s, one of my favorite things to do was watch old Mickey Mouse cartoons-- I loved seeing Mickey interact with Pluto and Goofy, and could probably have watched hours of these cartoons, if you let me. But one character especially stood out for me, and quickly became my favorite--  I loved the scrappy and grumpy Donald Duck. I still do. And while some of my best-loved episodes revolved around Donald’s skirmishes with Chip and Dale, or around the exploits of his nephews, Huey, Dewey and Louie, I still remember seeing numerous cartoons featuring Donald as a soldier during World War Two. Looking back on my childhood, it seems funny and bizarre to me now that I was exposed to American World War Two propaganda. But it’s true-- and it happened with somewhat regularity for someone like me, who had consistent access to the Disney Channel.  Of course, as a child, I didn’t really think much of it- it just seemed like yet another Donald Duck cartoon to me. But now, I look back and find myself really curious. How did the Walt Disney and his team, especially a blustery cartoon duck, get involved so specifically in wartime propaganda?

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

Music Credits: "Back to the Grindstone" by Dee Yan-Kee is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Jessie Cave Duo (ID 479)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-NC 4.0; "Assembly line work" by Dee Yan-Kee is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "King of the air march" by Charles Daab is licensed under BY-NC 3.0 US; "Silent Park Inside Your Soul" by Alex Mason & The Minor Emotion is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Bindweed (Instrumental Version)" by Axletree is licensed under BY 4.0

___________________________________________________________________

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

Time Magazine: How WWII Changed Walt Disney

Open Culture: Donald Duck’s Bad Nazi Dream and Four Other Disney Propaganda Cartoons from World War II

Der Spiegel: Donald Versus Hitler: Walt Disney and the Art of WWII Propaganda

The Telegraph: How Donald Duck helped win Second World War – and beat Mickey to the job

Complex: The Most Racist Moments in Disney Cartoons

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

 Donald Duck's wartime animation lead-in card, 1940s
Walt Disney in the 1940s
 Promotional poster for The Spirit of '43
 Promotional poster for Der Fuehrer's Face
 Animation still from Der Fuehrer's Face , featuring Donald as a Nazi
 Animation still from Der Fuehrer's Face , featuring racist caricatures of real-life figures, like Japanese Emperor Hirohito
 Holiday card for U.S.S. Housatonic, featuring propaganda by Walt Disney
 Combat insignia designed by Disney animators, 1942
Sep 25, 2017
Episode #24: American Propaganda Posters of WWII (Season 2, Episode 4)
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This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!

If I was to choose the single most recognizable figure from World War Two for an average American to identify, I would ask you to picture a brunette with an arched eyebrow,  her hair tied up neatly in a red-and-white polka-dot kerchief, flexing her right arm, baring her bicep, and fiercely making eye contact with the viewer. The words “We can do it!” blare in a dark blue word bubble over her head to confirm her determination. Yep. You know her. You love her. She’s colloquially referred to as “Rosie the Riveter,” even though the term is a misnomer here, and her image was created by illustrator J. Howard Miller in 1943 for the Westinghouse Electric corporation as a design to boost morale internally. Today, it is one of the most widely recognizable and widely disseminated images of the 20th century. 

The funny thing about the “We Can Do It” poster is that its current ubiquity is in contrast with its actual usage back in the 1940s. It was only one of the posters printed for Westinghouse Electric’s morale-boosting campaign, each poster-- about 40 in all-- were only on display in the Westinghouse factories in Pittsburgh and in midwestern Cities for two weeks. Two weeks- that’s not a very long time to have a motivational poster up on display. This makes it almost an oddity, compared to other propaganda posters in the United States during the Second World War. And that’s not all-- it’s also one of the calmer and more positive, both in terms of message and in gender politics, than most-- because as we’re about to see, others were more graphic, more manipulative...and sometimes, far more terrifying.

On this episode, we're going to take on American World War Two propaganda posters: what they were, who created them, and how America was fighting the war via words and pictures, as well as manpower.

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

"Coffee and Time" by P C III is licensed under BY 4.0 (Based on a work at www.pipechoir.com); "Onistwave" by P C III is licensed under BY 4.0; "Pulsars" by Podington Bear is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "The Soul Leaves The Body In Eternal Glory" by Jozef van Wissem is licensed under BY-NC-ND-3.0; "soli" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0

___________________________________________________________________

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

Oberlin College: Representations of Women in WWII Propaganda

Women of WWII: Recruitment Posters

Museum of Modern Art: Press release for War Poster Exhibition

Museum of Modern Art: National War Poster Competition (1942-43)

Museum of Modern Art: The Museum and the War Effort

National Archives Exhibition: Powers of Persuasion: Poster Art from World War Two

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

American Propaganda Poster, J. Howard Miller,
American Propaganda Poster, John Whitcomb,
American Propaganda Poster, John Falter,
American Propaganda Poster, creator unknown,
Canadian Propaganda Poster, Gordon Odell,
American Propaganda Poster, Creator Unknown,
Sep 11, 2017
Episode #23: Combat Artists of WWII (Season 2, Episode 3)
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Today's episode is brought to you by Audible - get a FREE audiobook download and 30 day free trial at www.audibletrial.com/artcurious. Over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player. 

In the winter of 1945, a World War II infantryman for the United States would be supplied with gear that was to be carried and trekked from location to location, regardless of weather, ailment, or occurrence. All of this gear alone could easily weigh a good 50 to 60 pounds. Add on a rifle or pistol, bullets and any appropriate add-ons needed to maintain, clean, and restock a weapon, and you are talking a serious load to haul around. To a handful of these men, however, it wasn’t their guns, their helmets, or their first aid kits that were the most significant pieces of equipment that they transported to the battlefield. No-  there was a more specialized tool of utter importance. As one soldier, Edward Reep, noted, quote, “I fought the war more furiously perhaps with my paintbrush than with my weapons.”

Today, we're discussing a group of dedicated and talented artists who threw themselves in the middle of war in order to capture the experience and create art about it.

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.

Twitter / FacebookInstagram

___________________________________________________________________

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

PBS: They Drew Fire Documentary resources

Smithsonian: Edward Reep Biography

Historynet.com: Fire for Effect: The Price

El Paso Times: Coverage of Tom Lea exhibition  (2016)

Hektoen Journal: Peleliu as a Paradigm for PTSD: The Two-Thousand Yard Stare

Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. 

Music credits: "Lacrima D'esperide" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under ; "Hope" by Borrtex is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Demonstrations (ID 526)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-NC 4.0; "Broken Photosynthesis" by Kyle Preston is licensed under BY-NC 4.0

 

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Photograph of George Biddle at Work, 1930s
Edward Reep, Soldier Taking a Bath
Combat Artist Sketching (date unknown)
Richard M. Gibney, Sketch of Dead Soldiers, date unknown
Franklin Boggs, Race Against Death, 1944
Tom Lea, The Price, 1944. Oil on canvas
Tom Lea's The Price as presented in Life Magazine, 1944
Tom Lea, The 2,000-Yard Stare, 1944. Oil on canvas.
Aug 28, 2017
Episode #22: Hitler the (Failed) Artist (Season 2, Episode 2)
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This episode is also sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!

Please note that some might find this episode offensive. I discuss Adolf Hitler as a person and have opted to show images of his artworks here. Note that by no means do I condone Hitler as a person, but I simply choose to place his interest in art in historical context. 

In June 2015, an auction house in Nuremberg, Germany, made headlines for a group of 14 small works sold for a sum of around $450,000. But when it comes to art and art auctions, we have to face a truth: a grand total of four hundred and fifty thousand dollars, spread out over the sale of fourteen separate pieces of mediocre quality, at a small auction house in Europe? Really, that isn't a fantastic haul, and shouldn't have garnered too much media interest. And yet it was a big deal. Why? What was so great about them? Well, it actually wasn't about quality or greatness at all. It was more about notoriety, because the artist was one of the most abhorrent human beings in all of history. The artist was Adolf Hitler.

In this episode, we contemplate the way that fine art inspired, affected, and ultimately molded the man who would become the biggest architect of terror in the 20th century. 

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.

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Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

Artnet.com: Hitler's Artwork Sells for $450,000 at Nuremburg Auction

Hyperallergic: Hitler’s Failed Art Portfolio Goes to Auction

LA Times Blog: Would You buy this painting by Adolf Hitler?

The Telegraph: Hitler Sketches that Failed to Secure His Place at Art Academy to be Auctioned

The Telegraph: Adolf Hitler Art Portfolio to Be Auctioned (Pictures) 

Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. 

Music: "Maroon" by Misha Dixon is licensed under BY-NC 4.0 (edited for time); "Like the sky" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under BY 4.0; "Utopia's Darkness" by Julie Maxwell's Piano Music is licensed under BY-ND 4.0 (based on a work at http://www.juliemaxwell.com); "Chance" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "Realness" by by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Adolf Hitler, The Courtyard of the Old Residency in Munich, 1914, watercolor on paper, originally from: Adolf Hitler: Bilder aus dem Leben des Führers
Adolf Hitler, Neuschwanstein, undated, watercolor on paper. Photo: Weidler
Adolf Hitler, Vase Mit Blumen, 1912, oil on paper. Photo: Nate D. Sanders Fine Autographs and Memorabilia
Adolf Hitler, Munich City Hall, 1914, watercolor on paper.
Detail of signature from Munich City Hall.
Aug 14, 2017
BONUS EPISODE: Happy Birthday, ArtCurious Podcast!
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Today marks the one year anniversary since we launched our very first episode! This is a special episode for you, our listeners. Many of you called, emailed, and contacted us on social media to ask questions big and small. Here are some of my favorites.

Most of all, thank you. I do this for you, and without your ears, we wouldn't be here. Thank you for a year of love and support!

Bonus images referred to in this episode: Pablo Picasso's masterpiece, Guernica, from 1937:

IMG_1958.JPG

Artist unknown (School of Fontainebleau), Portrait présumé de Gabrielle d'Estrées et de sa soeur la duchesse de Villars, circa 1594: 

Aug 10, 2017
Episode #21: Season Prologue- The Relationship Between Art and War (Season 2, Episode 1)
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This episode is sponsored by Audible: get a free audiobook download and a free 30-day trial here. Thank you for supporting our show!

It was the most widespread war in history, involving the participation of more than one hundred million people from around the world, including the greatest powers across the globe: the United States, Great Britain, France, Germany, China, Japan, Italy, and the Soviet Union. It affected life in myriad ways: economically, politically, industrially, scientifically, ideologically. And its reach was one of the most horrible. Between the deaths on the battlefield and the mass killings of civilians, an estimated 50 to 85 million fatalities occurred, making it the deadliest conflict in all of recorded human history.  And yet, at the same time, it spurred on glimpses of positivity in the midst of this darkness: giving rise to the so-called Greatest Generation, and leading to advances in medicine and aviation, in information technology, and many other sectors.

This was World War Two. But what did the war have to do with art? And how are the effects of the war still being felt today?

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on iTunes.

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Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

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ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki Creative. Theme music by Alex Davis. Research assistance by Stephanie Pryor. Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. 

"The heaven is far" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under BY 4.0; "machinery" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "aspirato" by Kai Engel is licensed under BY-NC 4.0; "бить настоящим" by Kosta T is licensed under BY 4.0; "Dancing Sparrows A (ID 609)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-NC 4.0; "world of ruin" by Damiano Baldoni is licensed under BY 4.0

 

The Alexander Mosaic, by Philoxenus of Eretria (presumed), 101 BCE, 272 cm × 513 cm (8 ft 11 in × 16 ft 9 in), National Archaeological Museum, Naples (since 1843), House of the Faun, Pompeii
Eugène Delacroix, Massacre at Chios, oil on canvas, 1824, The Louvre
Francisco Goya, The Disasters of War, 1810-1820, plate 4: Las mujeres dan valor (The women are courageous). A struggle between civilians and soldiers
Francisco Goya, The Disasters of War, Plate 3: Lo mismo (The same). A man about to cut off the head of a soldier with an axe.
Francisco Goya, The Disasters of War, 1810-1820, plate 62: Las camas de la muerte (The beds of death). A woman walks past dozens of wrapped bodies awaiting burial.
Marcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917–1917, ceramic
Piet Mondrian, Composition C (No.III) with Red, Yellow and Blue, 1935, Tate Modern © 2007 Mondrian/Holtzman Trust c/o HCR International, Warrenton, VA
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Self Portrait as an Artist, 1915, Oil on canvas. Oberlin College, Ohio.
Jul 31, 2017
Announcements from ArtCurious!
148

Hi ArtCurious listeners,  I’m so excited to announce that I’m coming back to you with a whole new season of episodes beginning on Monday, July 31st. I’ve loved working on this project and can’t wait to share it with you, so mark your calendars now and be sure to subscribe to us on iTunes or the podcatcher of your choice to guarantee that you don’t miss this or any of our future episodes.

I also have another exciting opportunity for you. Next month,  we will be celebrating our one year anniversary! To commemorate it, I’ll be releasing a special “ask me anything” mini-episode, and YOU are invited to participate. Send me any questions or comments that you like, and I will try and answer as many as I can. And you get a chance to be part of our history!

Here’s how it’s done:

1. Email me at artcuriouspodcast@gmail.com with "AMA" in the subject line

2. Contact us via the website

3. Hit us up on Twitter or Instagram @artcuriouspod, or leave us comments on our Facebook site

4.  If you want to leave us a voice message (and possibly hear your own voice on the show), call and leave a message at area code 919-526-0212.

DEADLINE: July 26

Thank you, all, for an exciting first year and a thrilling second season. Looking forward to sharing more with you soon.

 

Jul 14, 2017
CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #5: Death and Disaster, Warhol and Weegee
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This is a rebroadcast of our fifth episode, which was originally released on October 13, 2016. Subscribe now to the podcast so that you don't miss our new episodes beginning in late July.

Death has always been a part of art history. That's one of the beautiful things about art-- it can detail and document and celebrate every facet of our existence. And so much of the great art that we know and love today works in the capacity to stave off one of the terrible side effects death-- being forgotten. Portraits, stone monuments, ancient coins-- they all aim to ensure that the subjects depicted will be remembered and revered for all eternity.

But Andy Warhol’s take on mortality wasn't about memorializing. He instead focused on the direct causes of death, or the aftermath of a terrible accident. His series, Death and Disaster, is one of the most well-known and polarizing of his career. But Warhol wasn't the first artist to focus on the everyday tragedy of death as a subject to quite this revealing and exploitative extent. No, that honor might very well belong to someone else-- an immigrant photographer working in Manhattan in the 1930s and 1940s.

 In this episode, we discover the subject matter and motivations behind Andy Warhol's Death and Disaster series, and relate them to the work of the greatest crime scene photographer in history, Weegee. 

//SUBSCRIBE and review us on iTunes HERE

And follow us on Twitter and on Instagram for more artsy goodness:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

Weegee as Witness

The Original Nightcrawler

Weegee's Day at the Beach

Art Portfolio: Weegee

Death and Death and Death by Warhol

Andy Warhol, the Death and Disaster Series and Prestige

Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Self Portrait
Weegee's Photo Credit
Weegee perched on a fire escape, New York. Photo by Leigh Wiener.
Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Girl jumped out of car, and was killed, on Park Ave., circa 1938
Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Their First Murder, c. 1941
Andy Warhol, 32 Soup Cans, 1961-62 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two canvases, each 50.8 x 40.6 cm. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
New York Mirror front page, inspiration for Warhol's 129 Die in Jet
Andy Warhol, 129 Die in Jet, 1962, acrylic and pencil on canvas, 100 x 72 in. (254 x 182.9 cm.)
Andy Warhol, Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster), 1963, acrylic screenprint on canvas, 8 by 13 feet, private collection.
Andy Warhol, 5 Deaths, 1963, stamped 'Andy Warhol' (on the overlap), silkscreen ink and acrylic on canvas 44 x 33 in.
Marilyn Monroe, Still from Niagara
Gold Marilyn Monroe Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987) 1962. Silkscreen ink on synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 6' 11 1/4
An original photo of Marilyn, distorted by Weegee's plastic lens, c. 1960
Andy Warhol, 16 Jackies, 1964, acrylic screenprint on canvas
Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Andy Warhol Distortion, c. 1965, 8 3/8 x 6 3/4 in, International Center for Photography, New York
Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Andy Warhol Distortion, c. 1967, Image: 6 3/8 x 6 in. International Center for Photography, New York
Weegee (Arthur Fellig) (American, 1899-1968). Self Portrait with Andy Warhol, 1965. Gelatin silver photograph, Image: 10 3/8 x 10 15/16 in. (26.4 x 27.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum
Jun 19, 2017
CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #3: The Semi-Charmed Life of Elisabeth Vigeé Le Brun
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This is a rebroadcast of our third episode, which was originally released on September 12, 2016. Subscribe now to the podcast so that you don't miss our new episodes beginning in late July.

Marie Antoinette, Queen of France, had an image problem: she was seen as frivolous, silly, and out-of-touch. In order to combat her poor press, the royal court commissioned a series of portraits of the queen to make her more relatable and sympathetic. Such images act as excellent propaganda machines, giving Marie Antoinette a much-needed positive spin. But what is even more marvelous is the backstory of the artist who created these portraits-- because the painter who was chosen to portray the highest woman in the land was… another woman.

Talk about a revolution. 

In the third episode of the ArtCurious Podcast, we'll look at the lucky and semi-charmed life of Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun, one of the most popular painters of 18th-century France and the official court painter of Marie Antoinette. 

//SUBSCRIBE and review us on iTunes HERE

And follow us on Twitter and on Instagram for more artsy goodness:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun's memoirs

 She Painted Marie Antoinette (and Escaped the Guillotine)

The Praise and Prejudices Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun Faced in her Exceptional 18th-Century Career

Vigée Le Brun: Woman Artist in Revolutionary France

 

Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Marie Antoinette and her Children
Detail of Marie Antoinette and Her Children, 1787
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Self-Portrait, 1790, oil on canvas, Uffizi Gallery
Elisabeth Vigeé Le Brun, Self-Portrait, circa 1781-1782, oil on canvas, Kimbell Art Museum
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Marie Antoinette, 1778, oil on canvas, Kunsthistoriches Museum
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Self-Portrait, after 1782, oil on canvas, National Gallery, London
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Self-Portrait with her Daughter, Julie, 1786, oil on panel, Musée du Louvre
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Self Portrait with Her Daughter, 1789, oil on canvas, Musée du Louvre
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Peace Bringing Back Abundance, ca. 1798, oil on canvas, Musée du Louvre
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Marie Antoinette in a Muslin Dress, 1793, oil on canvas, Schloss Wolfsgarten
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Hubert Robert, 1788, oil on canvas, Musée du Louvre
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Portrait of Countess Golovine, 1797-1800, oil on canvas, University of Birmingham
Jun 05, 2017
Episode #20: Sofonisba Anguissola: Great (Woman) Artist (Season 1, Episode 20)
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Earlier this spring, I saw a hashtag making the rounds online, especially on Twitter and Instagram. Half the time, I only just vaguely pay attention to the trending terms on social media, but this one hit me right away. For a lot of people, including myself, it was like seeing an old beloved friend again- because this isn’t a new hashtag. It’s over a year old and was initiated originally by the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with Women’s History Month, celebrated every year in March.  It read #5WomenArtists and was meant as a kind of dare. As the museum’s digital editorial assistant, Emily Haight, posted on their blog, “Ask someone to name five artists and responses will likely include names such as Warhol, Picasso, van Gogh, Monet, da Vinci—all male artists. Ask someone to name five women artists, and the question poses more of a challenge.”

It’s a sad, but true, statement. Can many of us--especially those without in-depth artistic training or interest-- really name five or more women artists? Maybe, if you’re lucky, you can remember Frida Kahlo or Georgia O’Keeffe. And bonus points if you can recall our previous discussion on Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun. But especially in terms of artists who were around prior to the 20th century, the game grows much harder.

Why? What’s the problem of the woman artist? And how can we fix it?  Today, we’re talking about women artists-- the historical difficulties in becoming an artist, the challenges present therein, and the limitations and legacies of one very important Renaissance painter.

Today’s special episode of ArtCurious is the end result of a collaboration with art historian Ellen Oreddson and her excellent blog, How to Talk About Art History. Ellen has her own contribution to this topic on her site, where she lists five artists, inspired by the five women artists hashtag, and briefly discusses why each has been left out of the traditional art historical canon. Don't miss this insightful and fascinating post!

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

Italy Magazine: Sofonisba Anguissola- A Renaissance Woman

Smarthistory: Sofonisba Anguissola

ArtNews: Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

National Museum of Women in the Arts Blog: Challenge Accepted: Can You Name Five Women Artists?

Sofonisba Anguissola, Self-portrait, 1554. Oil on canvas.
Sofonisba Anguissola, Self-Portrait holding a medallion with the Letter's of her Father's Name, early 1550s.
Sofonisba Anguissola, Self-Portrait, 1556. Oil on canvas.
Sofonisba Anguissola, The Chess Game, 1555. Oil on canvas.
Sofonisba Anguissola, Portrait of Elizabeth of Valois Holding a Portrait of Philip II, 1561 - 1565. Oil on canvas.
Sofonisba Anguissola, Philip II, 1573. Oil on canvas.
Anthony van Dyck, sketchbook page featuring drawing of Sofonisba Anguissola, 1624.
Anthony van Dyck, Sofonisba Anguissola, 1624. Oil on panel.

May 22, 2017
Episode #19: Conservation and Controversy (Season 1, Episode 19)
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Conservators are art heroes: they transform damaged or dirty works of art into beautiful, fresh works for public consumption. Then why is it that conservation has been at the center of some of the biggest art historical controversies of the last fifty years? What does a conservator really do, and what happens when conservation goes too far?          

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!

Many thanks to the incredible Stephanie Pryor for research assistance!

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

NPR: Art Conservators at Work: A Living Exhibit

Smithsonian Magazine: "True Colors"

Hyperallergic: With Its Own Arts Center, Beast Jesus Rises Again

Huffington Post: “Elderly Woman’s Hilarious Failed Attempt At Restoring A 19th Century Fresco In Borja, Spain.”

ArtNet News: “Appalling Restoration Destroys Giotto Frescoes at the Basilica of Saint Francis in Assisi Parts of the priceless medieval frescoes are now lost forever.”

Does your family Bible look like this? I'd recommend calling a conservator.
The Parthenon Today, Athens, Greece
Computer Simulation of the Original Appearance of the Parthenon, Ancient Greece
The Sistine Chapel, Post-Restoration
Michelangelo's Daniel, before restoration (left) and after restoration (right)
Michelangelo's Creation of Adam, comparative images pre- and post-restoration
Michelangelo's Jesse Spandrel from the Sistine Chapel-- note that some details, including Jesse's eyes, are now missing, post-restoration (right)
Elias Garcia Martinez, Ecce Homo comparison-- original, before restoration, and after

May 08, 2017
BONUS EPISODE: What is Art? (With A Thousand Things to Talk About)
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We are incredibly thrilled to release a bonus episode with our friend, Andrea Parrish, at A Thousand Things to Talk About! This daily podcast is the perfect start to your morning, with a brief 2-3 minute episode with thought-provoking questions and research. A Thousand Things to Talk About also offers the occasional "deep dive," and we're so excited to be a part of this one-- What is Art? It's a question that seems simple, but in reality, is it?

Listen here, and subscribe and review A Thousand Things to Talk About. Follow the show at the links below! And don't forget to  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show along the way, too!

@musetopics on Twitter

@musetopics on Instagram

@musetopics on Facebook

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

The Art Story on Dada

The New York Times: Is it Art? Is it Good? And Who Says So?

The Brooklyn Rail: Is it Possible to Define Art?

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: The Definition of Art

First Principles: The Treasonous Clerk: St. Augustine and the Meaning of Art

Book recommendation: Mosche Barasch, Modern Theories of Art 2: From Impressionism to Kandinsky

MoMA: "But is it Art?" Constantin Brancusi vs. the United States

Obscenity Case Files: Miller vs. California

Art on Trial: The Arts, the 1st Amendment, and the Courts

Claude Monet, Impression: Sunrise, 1872, oil on canvas (Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris)
Marcel Duchamp, 'Fountain' 1917, replica 1964, urinal and black paint
Constantin Brancusi, Bird in Space, series from 1923-1940, polished brass (this example: Guggenheim Museum, New York)
Apr 29, 2017
Episode #18: Diagnosis: Art History (Season 1, Episode 18)
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Over the centuries, there have been numerous examples of fine artists creating works of art that deliberately work with and within contemporaneous medical thought, portraying people with particular ailments or diseases. But what about if we turn that concept around a little bit? What happens when those in the medical field turn to paintings or sculptures from the past and retroactively investigate the health of the individuals depicted therein? What happens when art history turns into a diagnosis?                

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

Boston Globe: Monet? Gaugin? Using Art to Make Better Doctors

New York Times: Studying Art with the Eye of a Physician

Wall Street Journal: Doctors Enlist Paintings to Hone Skills

The Guardian: The Fine Art of Medical Diagnosis

The Guardian: Did the Mona Lisa Have Syphilis?

 

Théodore Géricault, Portrait of a Kleptomaniac, 1822, oil on canvas, 61 x 50 cm (Museum of Fine Arts, Ghent)
Théodore Géricault, Portait of a Woman Suffering from Obsessive Envy (The Hyena), 1822, oil on canvas, 72 x 58 cm (Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyons)
Detail of Night, Michelangelo, Tomb of Giuliano di Lorenzo de' Medici with Night and Day, 1533, Florence, Italy
Quentin Massys, The Ugly Duchess (c. 1513), Oil on wood, 64.2 × 45.5 cm. National Gallery, London
 Vincent Van Gogh, Sunflowers Arles, 1888, oil on canvas, 92.5 x 73 cm, Vincent van Gogh Foundation / National Museum Vincent van Gogh, Amsterdam
Vincent van Gogh, The Starry Night, 1889, oil on canvas, 73.7 x 92.1 cm. (The Museum of Modern Art)
Vincent van Gogh, Portrait of Dr. Gachet, 1890, Oil on canvas, 23.4 in × 22.0 in, Private collection
Piero di Cosimo, The Death of Procris c. 1500 Oil on panel, 65 x 183 cm
Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa (La Joconde), c. 1504, Oil on poplar wood, 76.8 × 53 cm (30.2 × 20.9 in), Musée du Louvre, Paris

Apr 24, 2017
Episode #17: The Casino of the Spirits (Season 1, Episode 17)
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Venice-- it's the most serene and beautiful city in Italy, and possibly the whole world. But Venice at night-- all darkened and quiet-- takes up the most space in my imagination. I seriously love the depictions of Venice as enigmatic, shadowy, and even dangerous. Without cars or streetlights or other modern comforts, you might feel like you’ve stepped back in time and that around any given corner, you could find… anything. All of this lends Venice this air of inscrutability and mystery. And over time, locals and visitors alike have reveled in this sensation as fodder for myth-making and storytelling. Some stories really stick, lasting for centuries and becoming embedded into the city itself, through its buildings, monuments, and specific locations. And there’s one building that has had plenty of legends built around it. This particular elegant structure had an illustrious past, having once been a meeting place where Italian Renaissance artists discussed their craft, caroused, and gambled. But it’s also the location where relationships soured, crimes were committed, and death inevitably followed. Today, some people won’t even enter this particular building because it is feared to be haunted, cursed… or both.

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

Glory of Venice exhibition at the North Carolina Museum of Art

Read Vasari's take on Morto da Feltre

Wikipedia's Entry on Morto da Feltre

Mysterious Venice: The Casino of the Spirits (In Italian)

Italian Mysteries: Haunted Venice

The Casino degli Spiriti, as seen from the water, Venice, Italy
The Casino degli Spiriti, as seen from the back garden, Venice, Italy
Carlo Lasino, after Lorenzo Luzzo, Portrait of Morto da Feltre, color mezzotint, ca. 1789
Morto da Feltre, Virgin and Child, Virgin and Child, Civic Museum of Feltre
Giorgione, Self-Portrait, 1510
Giorgione, Madonna and Child between Saint Nicasius and Saint Francis, also known as Castelfranco Madonna, c. 1502, tempera on panel
Detail of the Castelfranco Madonna, based on Cecilia

Apr 10, 2017
Episode #16: The Muse (Season 1, Episode 16)
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Sometimes when I am looking at a particularly fascinating work of art, I find myself overwhelmed with awe-- for the creative act itself and the technical prowess that was needed to bring it to fruition. I’ve often had those moments where I have thought to myself, “Wow. How did this all come about? What is the inspiration behind this piece?” And any conversation about inspiration in the arts inevitably brings up a discussion about muses. This episode looks at the relationship--and occasional romance-- between artists and their muses, with a particular emphasis on one woman whose connection to two brothers illustrates this exchange in a compelling way. 

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!       

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

Artventures Blog: Manet and Morisot: The Tale of Love and Sadness in the Portraits

Saper Galleries: The Women of Pablo Picasso

Huffington Post: Ten Amazing Female Artists and Their Male Muses

The Telegraph: Picasso's Muses

Projection Systems Blog: The Origin of Painting

 

Joseph Wright of Derby, The Corinthian Maid, 1782–1784
Artist and Model, photography, c.1900
Giulio Romano's depiction of the Muses in Dance of Apollo and the Muses, 1540
Pablo Picasso, Girl Before a Mirror, 1932
Pablo Picasso, The Dream, 1932
Photograph of Édouard Manet, c. 1875
Photograph of Berthe Morisot, c. 1875
Édouard Manet, Berthe Morisot with a Bouquet of Violets (in mourning for her father), 1872
Édouard Manet, The Repose, 1870
Édouard Manet, The Balcony (Le balcon), 1868
Berthe Morisot, Eugene Manet on the Isle of Wight, 1875
Berthe Morisot, Julie and Eugene Manet

Mar 27, 2017
Episode #15: Hans-Joachim Bohlmann and Serial Art Vandalism (Season 1, Episode 15)
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A few months ago, I began looking into occurrences of art vandalism-- the purposeful destruction or harm of works of art that have occurred consistently, especially throughout the 20th century. As I read up, I saw that most of these events were one-offs: single moments where one person made a rash and ridiculous choice to lash out at a particular work of art. But then, I began to notice one name popping up over and over again- a German man who, over his lifetime, damaged over fifty works of art, creating a name for himself and a lasting impression on the art world. This episode, in a continuation of our Bigger Picture series, digs deeper into art attacks and examine the life and legacy of the vandal Hans-Joachim Bohlmann.

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!            

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission.                                              

Hans-Joachim Bohlmann
Paul Klee, The Goldfish, 1925
Rembrandt van Rijn, Jacob Blessing the Sons of Joseph, 1656
Rembrandt van Rijn, Self-Portrait, 1654
Rembrandt's 1654 Self-Portrait, after Bohlmann's vandalism
Lucas Cranach the Elder (workshop), Diptych with the Portraits of Luther and his Wife, 1529
Albrecht Durer, Lamentation over the Dead Christ, c. 1500
Bartholomeus van der Helst, Banquet of the Amsterdam Civic Guard in Celebration of the Peace of Münster, 1648

Mar 16, 2017
Episode #14: Samuel F. B. Morse's Gallery of the Louvre (Season 1, Episode 14)
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How many know that the inventor of the telegraph and co-creator of Morse code--Samuel F. B. Morse-- was a successful artist, too? And crazily enough, one of his paintings in particular, foreshadowed his interest in communication tools, providing the impetus for revolutionizing communication--and, indeed, the world as we know it. Listen in for details on Morse's masterpiece, Gallery of the Louvre.               

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show—we can’t thank you enough! Check our website for images from today’s show, as well as information about our other episodes. And come find us on Twitter and Instagram!       

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want more art-historical goodness? Check out the links below:

The National Gallery of Art's exhibition page: with video, exhibition brochure, and more great info

The History Blog's Profile on Morse the Artist

Samuel Morse's Other Masterpiece: Smithsonian Magazine

Samuel Morse's Early Works

Six Things You May Not Know about Samuel Morse: History.com

Samuel Morse website for more details: Samuelmorse.net                                                              

Photograph of Samuel Morse
1800s print depicting the telegraph
Portrait of John Adams, 1816, by Samuel Morse
Dying Hercules by Samuel Morse, 1812
Salon Carré, the Louvre, as seen today
Samuel F. B. Morse's Gallery of the Louvre, 1831-1833
Detail of the Mona Lisa in The Gallery of the Louvre
Johann Zoffany, Tribuna of the Uffizi, 1772-1778
Print of Morse delivering the first telegraph message
Daniel Terra, of the Terra Foundation, posing with The Gallery of the Louvre upon its purchase

Feb 27, 2017
Episode #13: Diego and Frida, Part 2 (Season 1, Episode 13)
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Glamour. Curiosity. Excitement. A love story for the ages. Such are the types of descriptors that you hear when you ponder the life and love of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Truly, in the pantheon of great artistic relationships, they are one of the top couples out there. And they had the great fortune, or whatever you want to call it, of living their exciting lives in front of the camera, as well as on canvas. Google them, and all kinds of lovey-dovey images come up-- images of Diego nuzzling Frida, images of them kissing, of her embracing him around his wide middle section. But what some people neglect, or possibly even forget, is that their relationship was by no means perfect. There were great ups, of course, but the downs? Incredible. Even Diego Rivera himself was aware of this fact, later writing, quote, “If I ever loved a woman, the more I loved her, the more I wanted to hurt her. Frida was the most obvious victim of this disgusting trait.” Harsh words. But would they always be that way?                       

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Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

http://kcur.org/post/tempestuous-relationship-between-frida-kahlo-and-diego-rivera#stream/0

http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/1995/09/frida-kahlo-diego-rivera-art-diary

The
Frida Kahlo, Portrait of My Sister Cristina, 1928
Frida Kahlo (right) with her sister, Cristina
Frida Kahlo and Leon Trotsky, January 1937.
Frida Kahlo, Self Portrait Dedicated to Leon Trotsky, 1937
Frida Kahlo, Self Portrait with Curly Hair, 1935
Paulette Goddard with Diego Rivera
Paulette Goddard with Diego Rivera's portrait of her, executed 1940-41
Frida (left) and Paulette (right) featured in Diego Rivera's Pan American Unity mural
Unknown photographer, Frida and Diego kissing following their second wedding after signing their marriage certificate, San Francisco, 1940
Frida Kahlo, painting in bed
Frida and Diego in front of his mural,
Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera photographed by Emmy Lou Packard, 1941

Feb 13, 2017
Episode #12: Diego and Frida, Part 1 (Season 1, Episode 12)
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There’s something a little strange about the pairing of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. Certainly it’s the surprise of a pairing of seeming opposites, at least from a physical standpoint-- she the small, seductive, and somewhat frail painter whose subject matter referred to the most intimate sides of her own life; he, the large and somewhat brutish muralist whose large-scale works touched upon revolution and justice and larger issues of Mexican history. There’s almost a Beauty and the Beast quality there, and for many of us, the relationship between these two artists is just as intriguing as their creative output. And especially when it comes to Frida’s art, it’s very hard to separate their love from their artistic legacy. But how did it begin? And what is it about these two that makes them so fascinating, even 60 years later?

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Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                            Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

http://kcur.org/post/tempestuous-relationship-between-frida-kahlo-and-diego-rivera#stream/0

http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/1995/09/frida-kahlo-diego-rivera-art-diary

Diego Rivera, The Flower Carrier, 1935
Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait Dedicated to Dr. Eloesser, 1940
Diego Rivera, Portrait of Frida Kahlo, 1939
Diego Rivera, Self Portrait Dedicated to Irene Rich, 1941
Frida and Diego's wedding portrait, 1929
Frida Kahlo, Frida and Diego Rivera, 1931
Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo in Mexico, 1933, Photograph by Martin Munkácsi
Frida and Diego, circa 1937
Frida Kahlo, Self Portrait as a Tehuana, 1943 (also known as Diego on my Mind)
Clifford Wight, Frida Kahlo, Wilhelm Valentiner, and Diego Rivera, Detroit, ca. 1932

Jan 30, 2017
Episode #11: Art Attack! (Season 1, Episode 11)
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Throughout art history, there have been multiple occasions where people have entered into a museum or gallery with the explicit intention of harming or outright destroying a work of art. And some of the most iconic and greatest works of art in the world have been the targets of these disastrous missions. The big question, though, is why? What motivates people into a full blown art-attack?   

//SUBSCRIBE and review us on iTunes HERE

 And follow us on Twitter and on Instagram for more artsy goodness:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

The Top 12 Most Horribly Defaced Art Pieces of All Time

Art Abuse: 11 Vandalized Works of Art

Mugged: How the Mona Lisa was Attacked

Vatican Marks Anniversary of 1972 Attack on Michelangelo's Pieta

Whatever Happened to Laszlo Toth?

The Attack on the Pieta: An Archetypal Analysis (Access to JSTOR required)

Having an Art Attack: A Brief Look at Stendhal Syndrome

Stendhal Syndrome: Overdosing on Beautiful Art

The accidental Taiwanese casualty-- child damaging the Porpora canvas
The many protective features of the Mona Lisa today include bulletproof glass, a visitor railing, and more
Laszlo Toth, 1972
Laszlo Toth during the 1972 Pieta attack
Laszlo Toth, during the 1972 Pieta attack
Michelangelo's Pieta-- before and after Laszlo Toth's attack
Rindy Sam
Rindy Sam's lipstick stain on an all-white Cy Twombly
What is Stendhal Syndrome? Is too much art a bad thing?
Is Florence, Italy, the most dangerous place to view art?
French author Marie-Henri Beyle, known as Stendhal
Santa Croce Cathedral, Florence-- the church that inspired Stendahl's fit of madness

Jan 16, 2017
Episode #10: When Statues Cry (Season 1, Episode 10)
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Nearly ten years ago, my then-boyfriend, now husband, and I were backpacking through the Balkans region of Europe. After arriving in Bosnia, we opted to take a day trip to a small town called Medjugorje, in Herzegovina. We had heard that it was a popular place with tourists from all over the world, and we were eager to check it out. But what we didn't quite expect were the reasons why the town was so well-known. And the reasons are twofold: first, it was the location of a sighting in 1981 of the Virgin Mary, who was said to have appeared to a group of teenagers there. As such, the town became a holy pilgrimage site, particularly for Catholics around the world. Even though the vision of the Virgin hasn't been promoted or officially accepted by the Vatican, it hasn't stopped the flow of visitors clamoring for the chance to visit this seemingly holy place. In remembrance of the miraculous vision, a beautiful church was erected. And in the church’s garden, a bronze statue of the risen Christ was also placed.   But here's the further reason for the pilgrimage- since 2000, that statue has had a so-called weeping knee- miraculously producing a clear fluid each and every day for the last 16 years.

We saw this statue with our own eyes. We touched it, and we watched as dozens of people collected the clear fluid- not water, not oil, but something else- into souvenir bottles that were sold all over the town. Still, I didn't know what to think, or how to react. Was this statue for real? I think that belief and faith are beautiful, incredible things. But I also felt skeptical, too. I found myself torn in the middle- religious yet unbelieving, living in a gray area. But like Fox Mulder, I want to believe.

In honor of the holiday season, we are going to look into the phenomenon of the miraculous in art, focusing on weeping statues and bleeding icons. 

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Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

The Mystery of the Weeping Statues

Science Debunks Miracle of Weeping Madonna

Mary Statue in California Appears to Weep Miraculous Tears

Miraculous Microbes: They Can Make Holy Statues "Bleed"-- and Can Be Deadly, Too

Tourists examining the
A Virgin Mary statue weeping
From a skeptic's website: An
Collecting fluid from the
View over Medugorje, Hercegovina
The Virgin of Akita
Historical photo of the Weeping Madonna of Syracuse, Sicily, 1950s

Dec 19, 2016
Episode #9: The CIA/AbEx Connection (Season 1, Episode 9)
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If there is one thing that’s true in this world, it’s that there sure isn't a lack of conspiracy theories out there. Think about it: almost every big mystery or question has a slough of alternative explanations involving everything from Big Brother to the Illuminati to the Masons...and of course we can’t overlook aliens. Oswald wasn’t the lone gunman; the Apollo moon landing never happened and was filmed instead on a Hollywood sound stage; the government is hiding proof of alien life; the Mona Lisa on view at the Louvre is a fake.  Every day we might hear a new, wacky  theory, even in the art world, like how the CIA funneled money into the arts, towards revolutionary painters like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, in order to fight the Cold War. Crazy, right? I mean, what a bizarre way to attempt to covertly bring down the Russians?

Except that this last one isn't a crazy conspiracy theory at all. It’s actually a true story of propaganda, secrets, lies, and fine art. The pen is mightier than the sword, the saying goes. Well, it turns out that the same could be said about the paintbrush.

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Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

How the CIA Spent Secret Millions Turning Modern Art into a Cold War Arsenal

Unpopular Front

A Visit to the CIA's "Secret" Abstract Art Collection

BBC Culture: Was Modern Art a Weapon of the CIA?

Jackson Pollock, Autumn Rhythm (#30), 1950, enamel on canvas
Nelson Rockefeller examining a painting at MoMA, 1950s
Mark Rothko, White Center, 1950, Private Collection
Mark Rothko in the 1950s
Jackson Pollock in action
A prime example of Russian Socialist art: Viktor Ivanov, Family, 1964-5
The Abstract Expressionists profiled for Life Magazine's

Dec 05, 2016
Episode #8: What Happened to the Amber Room? (Season 1, Episode 8)
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One of the most awe-inspiring sights in and around St. Petersburg, Russia, is the Catherine Palace, a rococo summer residence for the imperial family of yore. Up until World War II, The Catherine Palace housed something so incredible, so coveted, and so gorgeous that for hundreds of years, travelers fro all over the world flocked to admire it, referred to as the "Eighth Wonder of the World." And then, in the early 1940s with the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union, this priceless creation was stolen. And to this day, it has still never been found.

What happened to the Amber Room?

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And follow us on Twitter and on Instagram for more artsy goodness:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                            Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

The Mystery of the Nazis and the Vanished Amber Room

Could Long-Lost Amber Room Be Stashed in a Nazi Bunker in Poland?

A Brief History of the Amber Room

Mystery of the Amber Room: Video

St. Petersburg, taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
St. Petersburg, taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
Statue of Peter the Great, St. Petersburg, taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
J.-M. Nattier, Portrait of Peter the Great, 1717
The Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
The Catherine Palace at Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), taken September 2016 by Jennifer Dasal
Interior shot of the Amber Room, by jeanyfan on Wikimedia Commons - Own work, Public Domain
Interior shot of the Amber Room, by Wikimedia Commons user jeanyfan - Own work, Public Domain
Interior shot of the Amber Room, by jeanyfan on Wikimedia Commons - Own work, Public Domain
Medallion-shaped relief depicting Andreas Schlüter in the entrance hall of Hamburg's City Hall, ca.1890. Photo by James Steakley - Eigene Fotografie (own photography), CC BY 3.0,
Baltic amber samples with varying color and clarity. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons user By PrinWest Handelsagentur J. Kossowski - Own work, CC BY 3.0
Baltic Amber
Fyodor Rokotov, Portrait of Empress Catherine the Great
The
Koningsburg Castle prior to World War II
Vladimir Putin and others celebrate the opening of the reconstructed Amber Room, 2003

Nov 14, 2016
Episode #7: Was Walter Sickert Actually Jack the Ripper? PART TWO (Season 1, Episode 7)
2042

Back in 2002, I was browsing a new releases table at my local bookstore when a particular book caught my eye. It seemed like yet another crime novel, one among hundreds. And so, I moved on, until I saw the subtitle of the book: Jack the Ripper: Case Closed. In it, the author released a bombshell statement: she had purportedly solved the mystery of Jack the Ripper's identity, which had evaded researchers, historians, and police for over one hundred years. 

Jack the Ripper, she said, was the English painter Walter Sickert. 

If you are just tuning in to the ArtCurious Podcast for the first time, please stop and listen to Episode #6 to get the backstory on Jack the Ripper's crimes. 

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Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out hereNot to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

Portrait of a Killer: 6 Chilling Jack the Ripper Theories

Patricia Cornwell Says She Has "Cracked" the Jack the Ripper Mystery

Does this Painting by Walter Sickert Reveal the Identity of Jack the Ripper?

Walter Sickert was Jack the Ripper? Ridiculous! He was Actually Dracula

 

Photograph of Walter Sickert
Walter Sickert, Minnie Cunningham, 1892, oil on canvas, 76.5 x 63.8 cm, Tate London
Walter Sickert, L'Affaire de Camden Town, 1909, Private collection
Walter Sickert, The Camden Town Murder or What Shall We Do about the Rent? c.1908, Yale Center for British Art
Walter Sickert, detail from Le Lit de Cuivre, c. 1906, Tate London
Walter Sickert, Jack the Ripper's Bedroom, c. 1907, oil on canvas, 50.8 x 40.7 cm. Manchester City Gallery.

Oct 31, 2016
Episode #6: Was Walter Sickert Actually Jack the Ripper? PART ONE (Season 1, Episode 6)
1851

Much was made of crime in Victorian London. The Victorians were terrified of the lower-classes, particularly down-and-out men living in the crowded outskirts of the city who, they thought, were lurking in the shadows, just waiting for the opportunity to arise for a well-timed theft, brawl, or even worse. Life, for most, was hard. But in 1888, Londoners clamoring for a bit of excitement to spice up the drudgery of their lives got far more than they bargained for. They got weeks of abject terror surrounding a madman who slaughtered women in London's East End... who was never identified or caught. And more than 100 years later, we are still no closer to really identifying one of the most terrible killers of all time. 

Or are we?

In this first half of our special two-part Halloween episode, we are going to delve into a theory that identifies Jack the Ripper as the English painter Walter Sickert. And come back next week to hear the second half of our show and see images of Sickert's work. 

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Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

BBC History of Jack the Ripper

How Jack the Ripper Worked

FBI Case File on Jack the Ripper

http://www.jack-the-ripper.org/

Whitechapel, east London, in the 1880s
Newspaper broadsheet, printed after the murder of Annie Chapman
Woodcut illustration of the discovery of one of Jack the Ripper's victims (circa 1888).
Bucks Row, London, where the body of Mary Ann Nichols was discovered.

The Vigilance Committee tailing a possible Ripper suspect. Image taken from Illustrated London News. Originally published in London, 1888.
The Infamous
Illustration shows the police discovering the body of one of Jack the Ripper's victims, probably Catherine Eddowes, London, England, late September 1888.

Oct 24, 2016
Episode #5: Death and Disaster, Warhol and Weegee (Season 1, Episode 5)
2785

Andy Warhol's take on mortality wasn't about memorializing. He instead focused on the direct causes of death, or the aftermath of a terrible accident. His series, Death and Disaster, is one of the most well-known and polarizing of his career. But Warhol wasn't the first artist to focus on the everyday tragedy of death as a subject to quite this revealing and exploitative extend. That honor might very well belong to someone else: an immigrant photographer working in Manhattan in the 1930s and 1940s. 

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Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

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Weegee as Witness

The Original Nightcrawler

Weegee's Day at the Beach

Art Portfolio: Weegee

Death and Death and Death by Warhol

Andy Warhol, the Death and Disaster Series and Prestige

Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Self Portrait
Weegee's Photo Credit
Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Girl jumped out of car, and was killed, on Park Ave., circa 1938
Weegee perched on a fire escape, New York. Photo by Leigh Wiener.
Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Their First Murder, c. 1941
Andy Warhol, 32 Soup Cans, 1961-62 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two canvases, each 50.8 x 40.6 cm. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
New York Mirror front page, inspiration for Warhol's 129 Die in Jet
Andy Warhol, 129 Die in Jet, 1962, acrylic and pencil on canvas, 100 x 72 in. (254 x 182.9 cm.)
Andy Warhol, 5 Deaths, 1963, stamped 'Andy Warhol' (on the overlap), silkscreen ink and acrylic on canvas 44 x 33 in.
Andy Warhol, Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster), 1963, acrylic screenprint on canvas, 8 by 13 feet, private collection.
Marilyn Monroe, Still from Niagara
Gold Marilyn Monroe Andy Warhol (American, 1928–1987) 1962. Silkscreen ink on synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 6' 11 1/4
An original photo of Marilyn, distorted by Weegee's plastic lens, c. 1960
Andy Warhol, 16 Jackies, 1964, acrylic screenprint on canvas
Weegee (Arthur Fellig) (American, 1899-1968). Self Portrait with Andy Warhol, 1965. Gelatin silver photograph, Image: 10 3/8 x 10 15/16 in. (26.4 x 27.6 cm). Brooklyn Museum
Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Andy Warhol Distortion, c. 1965, 8 3/8 x 6 3/4 in, International Center for Photography, New York
Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Andy Warhol Distortion, c. 1967, Image: 6 3/8 x 6 in. International Center for Photography, New York

Oct 13, 2016
Episode #4: The Problem of Michelangelo's Women (Season 1, Episode 4)
2239

There are lots of questions that come up in every art history classroom. We hear them over and over again. What is art, really, and how can you define it? Why is the Mona Lisa smiling? What happened to the Winged Victory's arms? And then there's one that you'll hear, or that you'll even think yourself, especially if you are a fan or scholar of Renaissance art.  Why, people ask. Why are Michelangelo's women so... un-womanly?

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Jill Burke's blog: Men With Breasts (Or Why Are Michelangelo's Men So Muscular?) Part 1

Jill Burke's blog: Men With Breasts (Or Why Are

Michelangelo's Men So Muscular?) Part 2

Jacopino del Conte, Portrait of Michelangelo at 60, after 1535
Michelangelo, David, 1501-1504, Galleria dell'Accademia
Michelangelo, Pietà - 1499-1500, Saint Peter's Basilica, Rome
Michelangelo, Madonna with child, 1501-1504, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwkerk, Bruges, Belgium
Michelangelo, Bacchus, 1496–1497, Bargello, Florence, Italy
Michelangelo, Cumaen Sibyl from the Sistine Chapel Ceiling, painted 1508-1512
Michelangelo, Libyan Sibyl from the Sistine Chapel Ceiling, painted 1508-1512
Michelangelo, Studies for the Libyan Sibyl, ca. 1510–11, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Michelangelo, the Temptation of Adam and Eve from the Sistine Chapel Ceiling, painted 1508-1512
Michelangelo, Doni Tondo, c. 1503–6. Uffizi, Florence, Italy
Raphael, St. Catherine of Alexandria, 1508, National Gallery, London, U.K.
Michelangelo, Study of a Nude Woman, Musée du Louvre, France
Michelangelo, Tomb of Giuliano di Lorenzo de' Medici with Night and Day, 1533, Florence, Italy
Detail of Night
Michelangelo, Tomb of Lorenzo di Piero de' Medici with Dusk and Dawn, 1533, Florence, Italy
Detail of Dawn

Sep 26, 2016
Episode #3: The Semi-Charmed Life of Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun (Season 1, Episode 3)
2972

Marie Antoinette, Queen of France, had an image problem: she was seen as frivolous, silly, and out-of-touch. In order to combat her poor press, the royal court commissioned a series of portraits of the queen to make her more relatable and sympathetic. Such images act as excellent propaganda machines, giving Marie Antoinette a much-needed positive spin. But what is even more marvelous is the backstory of the artist who created these portraits-- because the painter who was chosen to portray the highest woman in the land was… another woman.

Talk about a revolution. 

In the third episode of the ArtCurious Podcast, we'll look at the lucky and semi-charmed life of Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun, one of the most popular painters of 18th-century France and the official court painter of Marie Antoinette. 

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Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

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Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun's memoirs

 She Painted Marie Antoinette (and Escaped the Guillotine)

The Praise and Prejudices Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun Faced in her Exceptional 18th-Century Career

Vigée Le Brun: Woman Artist in Revolutionary France

Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Marie Antoinette and Her Children, 1787, oil on canvas, Palace of Versailles
Detail of Marie Antoinette and Her Children, 1787
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Self-Portrait, 1790, oil on canvas, Uffizi Gallery
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Self-Portrait, circa 1781-1782, oil on canvas, Kimbell Art Museum
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Marie Antoinette, 1778, oil on canvas, Kunsthistoriches Museum
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Self-Portrait, after 1782, oil on canvas, National Gallery, London
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Self-Portrait with her Daughter, Julie, 1786, oil on panel, Musée du Louvre
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Self Portrait with Her Daughter, 1789, oil on canvas, Musée du Louvre
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Peace Bringing Back Abundance, ca. 1798, oil on canvas, Musée du Louvre
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Marie Antoinette in a Muslin Dress, 1793, oil on canvas, Schloss Wolfsgarten
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Hubert Robert, 1788, oil on canvas, Musée du Louvre
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Portrait of Countess Golovine, 1797-1800, oil on canvas, University of Birmingham

Sep 12, 2016
Episode #2: Was Van Gogh Accidentally Murdered? (Season 1, Episode 2)
3366

Vincent Van Gogh's suicide is a huge part of the mythology surrounding him: as much as the famous tale of the cut-off ear is. This so-called "tortured genius," it is said, was so broken down by life and failure that he had no choice but to end his life. Right? But in 2011, two Pulitzer Prize-winning authors published a book titled Van Gogh: The Life that stunned the art world. Therein, Gregory White Smith and Stephen Naifeh state that the artist didn't actually commit suicide.

No, they say: he was actually murdered. 

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Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

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Van Gogh Museum: 125 Questions

Van Gogh Museum: The End of a Difficult Road

Vincent Van Gogh's Letters available online in their entirety

CBS News: The Life and Death of Vincent Van Gogh (video)

Self-Portrait as an Artist, 1888, oil on canvas, Van Gogh Museum
The Potato Eaters, 1885, oil on canvas, Van Gogh Museum
Entrance Hall of Saint-Paul Hospital, 1889, Black chalk, brush and thinned oil on pink paper, Van Gogh Museum
Starry Night, 1889, oil on canvas, Museum of Modern Art
Portrait of Dr. Gachet, 1891, oil on canvas, Musée d'Orsay collection
Wheatfield with Crows, 1890, oil on canvas, Van Gogh Museum
The Auberge Ravoux, where Vincent Van Gogh died
Tombstones of Vincent and Theo Van Gogh

Aug 29, 2016
Episode #1: Is the Mona Lisa a Fake? (Season 1, Episode 1)
3142

The inaugural episode of the ArtCurious Podcast explores the world's most famous work of art: Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. It is iconic, incredible, and unforgettable-- but is the work on view in Paris's Louvre Museum today the real deal? Host Jennifer Dasal uncovers the story of the Mona Lisa from its creation in the 16th century through its 1911 theft and to its current status as untouchable superstar, breaking down the strange stories and rumors swirling around it.

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Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

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CNN.com: And the World's Top Museum Is...

The Louvre's Page on the Mona Lisa

Saturday Evening Post: 100 Years Ago: The Mastermind Behind the Mona Lisa Theft

CNN.com: Did the Nazis Also Steal the Mona Lisa?

What do you think: is the Mona Lisa fake? Leave your comments below and chime in on this little-discussed topic!

 Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa (or La Joconde, La Gioconda) . Begun c. 1503/1504, oil on poplar wood, 76.8 × 53 cm (30.2 × 20.9 in). Musee du Louvre.
 Detail of Mona Lisa 's smile, including craquelure
 Leonardo da Vinci, Presumed Self-Portrait, c. 1512, red chalk on paper, 333 x 213 mm, Biblioteca Reale, Turin.
 Louis Béroud, Mona Lisa au Louvre , 1911
 Salon Carré with the Mona Lisa Missing, 1911  
 Vincenzo Peruggia's mug shot
 The Mona Lisa on display in the Uffizi Gallery, in Florence (Italy). Museum director Giovanni Poggi (right).
 The Mona Lisa, or La Gioconda , Attributed to Louis Béroud (Lyon 1852-1930), After Leonardo da Vinci, 
 View of the Mona Lisa at the Louvre today.

Aug 10, 2016