The Daily

By The New York Times

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 Oct 27, 2020

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 Oct 14, 2020
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 Sep 18, 2020


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 Jul 29, 2020

Description

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.


Episode Date
The Field: The Shy Biden Voters Among Florida’s Seniors
00:40:07

Florida’s seniors played an important role in President Trump’s victory there in 2016. Older voters, who are mostly conservative, make up around 25 percent of the swing state’s electorate and turn out in astonishing numbers.

They are also disproportionately affected by the pandemic, and polling suggests that Joe Biden is making inroads with Republican-leaning older voters.

In Florida’s conservative retirement communities, however, the decision to switch from Mr. Trump can have consequences and many stay quiet for fear of reprisals.

Some of these consequences are obvious: One resident who erected a sign in support of Mr. Biden woke up to “Trump” written in weedkiller on his lawn. Other effects are more personal, and more insidious.

Today, Annie Brown, a senior audio producer at The Times, speaks to some of Florida’s seniors about their voting intentions — including one, Dave Niederkorn, who has turned his back on Mr. Trump and almost lost a close friend in the process.

Guests: Annie Brown, a senior audio producer for The New York Times; and Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief of The Times, who covers Florida and Puerto Rico. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 30, 2020
The Field: The Specter of Political Violence
00:48:51

This episode contains strong language.

With an election in which uncertainty may abound, concerns are swirling around the possibility of political violence. Experts and officials — including those charged with the security of polling stations and ballot counting facilities — have been taking extra precautions.

Americans across the political spectrum appear to be preparing themselves for this possibility, too: Eight of the 10 biggest weeks for gun sales since the late 1990s took place since March this year. Many of those sales were to people buying guns for the first time.

Today’s episode examines these anxieties from two perspectives.

Andy Mills, a senior audio producer for The New York Times, speaks to patrons of gun stores in Washington State about their motivations and sits down with a first-time gun owner who relays his anxiety, ignited by the unrest and protests in Seattle over the summer.

And Alix Spiegel, a senior audio editor for The Times, visits three women of color in North Carolina, one of whom says the scenes in Charlottesville, the killing of Black people at the hands of the police and the threat of white militias have encouraged her to shift her anti-gun stance. 

Guests:  Andy Mills, a senior audio producer for The New York Times; Alix Spiegel, a senior audio editor for The Times; and Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 29, 2020
A Partisan Future for Local News?
00:34:05

Local news in America has long been widely trusted, and widely seen as objective. But as traditional local papers struggle, there have been attempts across the political spectrum to create more partisan outlets.

Few can have been as ambitious or widespread as the nationwide network of 1,300 websites and newspapers run by Brian Timpone, a television reporter turned internet entrepreneur.

He has said that he sees local news as a means of preserving American civil discourse. But a Times investigation has found that Republican operatives and public relations firms have been paying for articles in his outlets and intimately dictating the editorial direction of stories.Today, we speak to the Times journalists behind the investigation.

Guests: Davey Alba, a technology reporter for The New York Times covering online misinformation and its global harms; and Jack Nicas, who covers technology for The Times from San Francisco. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 28, 2020
The Shadow of the 2000 Election
00:33:28

What does the specter of the 2000 election mean for the upcoming election? The race between George W. Bush and Al Gore that year turned on the result in Florida, where the vote was incredibly close and mired in balloting issues. After initially conceding, Mr. Gore, the Democratic nominee, contested the count.

What followed was a flurry of court cases, recounts, partisan fury and confusion. It would be months until — after a Supreme Court decision — Mr. Bush would become the 43rd president of the United States.

The confrontation held political lessons for both sides. Lessons that could be put to the test next week in an election likely to be shrouded in uncertainty: The pandemic, the volume of mail-in voters and questions around mail delivery could result in legal disputes.

Today, we take a look back at the contest between Mr. Gore and Mr. Bush.

Guest: Jim Rutenberg, a writer-at-large for The New York Times and The Times Magazine. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 27, 2020
The Field: Why Suburban Women Changed Their Minds
00:36:25

In America’s increasingly divided political landscape, it can be hard to imagine almost any voter switching sides. One demographic group has provided plenty of exceptions: white suburban women.

In the past four years, the group has turned away from the president in astonishing numbers. And many of them are organizing — Red, Wine and Blue is a group made up of suburban women from Ohio hoping to swing the election for Joe Biden. The organization draws on women who voted for the president and third parties in 2016, as well as existing Democratic voters.

In today’s episode, Lisa Lerer, who covers campaigns, elections and political power for The New York Times, speaks to white suburban women on the ground in Ohio and explores their shifting allegiances and values.

Guest: Lisa Lerer, a reporter for The New York Times covering campaigns, elections and political power.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 26, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'My Mustache, My Self'
00:38:48

During months of pandemic isolation, Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The New York Times, decided to grow a mustache.

The reviews were mixed and predictable. He heard it described as “porny” and “creepy,” as well as “rugged” and “extra gay.”

It was a comment on a group call, however, that gave him pause. Someone noted that his mustache made him look like a lawyer for the N.A.A.C.P.’s legal defense fund.

“It was said as a winking correction and an earnest clarification — Y’all, this is what it is,” Wesley said. “The call moved on, but I didn’t. That is what it is: one of the sweetest, truest things anybody had said about me in a long time.”

On today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Wesley Morris’s story about self-identity and the symbolic power of the mustache.

This story was written by Wesley Morris and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Oct 25, 2020
Sudden Civility: The Final Presidential Debate
00:37:04

At the start of Thursday night’s debate its moderator, Kristen Welker of NBC News, delivered a polite but firm instruction: The matchup should not be a repeat of the chaos of last month’s debate. 

It was a calmer affair and, for the first few segments, a more structured and linear exchange of views. 

President Trump, whose interruptions came to define the first debate, was more restrained, seemingly heeding advice that keeping to the rules of the debate would render his message more effective. 

And while there were no breakthrough moments for Joseph R. Biden Jr., the former vice president managed to make more of a case for himself than he did last month, on issues such as the coronavirus and economic support for families and businesses in distress. 

Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent, gives us a recap of the night’s events and explores what it means for an election that is just 11 days away. 

Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 23, 2020
A Peculiar Way to Pick a President
00:31:45

The winner-take-all system used by the Electoral College in the United States appears nowhere in the Constitution. It awards all of a state’s electors to the candidate with the most votes, no matter how small the margin of victory. Critics say that means millions of votes are effectively ignored.

The fairness of the Electoral College was seriously questioned in the 1960s. Amid the civil rights push, changes to the system were framed as the last step of democratization. But a constitutional amendment to introduce a national popular vote for president was eventually killed by segregationist senators in 1970.

Desire for an overhaul dwindled until the elections of 2000 and 2016, when the system’s flaws again came to the fore. In both instances, the men who became president had lost the popular vote.

Jesse Wegman, a member of The Times’s editorial board, describes how the winner-take-all system came about and how the Electoral College could be modified.

Guest: Jesse Wegman, a member of The New York Times’s editorial board.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 22, 2020
A Misinformation Test for Social Media
00:24:36

Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have invested a significant amount of time and money trying to avoid the mistakes made during the 2016 election.

A test of those new policies came last week, when The New York Post published a story that contained supposedly incriminating documents and pictures taken from the laptop of Hunter Biden. The provenance and authenticity of that information is still in question, and Joe Biden’s campaign has rejected the assertions.

We speak to Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The Times, about how the episode reveals the tension between fighting misinformation and protecting free speech.

Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 21, 2020
A Pivotal Senate Race in North Carolina
00:26:32

In the struggle to control the U.S. Senate, one race in North Carolina — where the Republican incumbent, Thom Tillis, is trying to hold off his Democratic challenger, Cal Cunningham — could be crucial.

North Carolina is a classic purple state with a split political mind: progressive in some quarters, while firmly steeped in Southern conservative tradition in others.

Two bombshells have recently upended the race: Mr. Tillis fell ill with the coronavirus after attending an event for Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination without a mask. And Mr. Cunningham’s image was sullied by the emergence of text messages showing that he had engaged in an extramarital affair.

Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The Times, talks us through the race and examines the factors that could determine who prevails.

Guest: Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • North Carolina is a linchpin in the 2020 election — the presidency and the Senate could hinge on results in the state.
  • Here’s how the critical senate race was engulfed in chaos in a single night.
Oct 20, 2020
The Field: A Divided Latino Vote in Arizona
00:39:51

This episode contains strong language. 

In the last decade, elections have tightened in Arizona, a traditionally Republican stronghold, as Democrats gain ground.

According to polls, Joe Biden is leading in the state — partly because of white suburban women moving away from President Trump, but also because of efforts to activate the Latino vote.

Will that turn states like Arizona blue? And do enough Hispanic voters actually want Mr. Biden as president?

To gauge the atmosphere, Jennifer Medina, a national politics reporter for The New York Times, spoke to Democratic activists and Trump supporters in Arizona.

Guests: Jennifer Medina, a national politics reporter for The Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 19, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'Jim Dwyer, About New York'
00:21:24

Jim Dwyer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist for The New York Times, died earlier this month. He was 63.

Throughout his nearly 40-year career, Jim was drawn to stories about discrimination, wrongly convicted prisoners and society’s mistreated outcasts. From 2007, he wrote The Times’s “About New York” column — when asked whether he had the best job in journalism, he responded, “I believe I do.”

Dan Barry, a reporter for The Times who also wrote for the column, has called Jim a “newsman of consequence” and “a determined voice for the vulnerable.” Today, he reads two stories written by Jim, his friend and colleague.

These stories were written by Jim Dwyer and read by Dan Barry. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Oct 18, 2020
The Candidates: Joe Biden’s Plans
00:29:24

In the second of a two-part examination of the presidential candidates’ policies, we turn to Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s agenda and how he plans to govern a nation wracked by a public health and economic crisis.

The themes of Mr. Biden’s Democratic primary campaign were broad as he eschewed the policy-intensive approach of opponents like Senator Elizabeth Warren. But the onset of the pandemic helped shape and crystallize his policy plans.

His approach stands in stark contrast to that of President Trump: Mr. Biden wants to actively mobilize federal resources in addressing the pandemic, an expansion to health care that he hopes will endure beyond the coronavirus.

Today, we speak to Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent, about Mr. Biden’s plans for dealing with the current crisis and beyond.

Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political reporter at The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 16, 2020
The Candidates: Donald Trump’s Promises
00:36:40

In a two-part examination of the policies of the president and of the man seeking to replace him, Joe Biden, we first take a look at what Donald Trump said he would do four years ago — and what he’s actually accomplished.

On some of the big issues, Mr. Trump has been the president he told us he was going to be, keeping commitments on deregulation, taxes, military spending and the judiciary.

But other potent promises — such as replacing Obamacare, draining “the swamp” in Washington and forcing Mexico to pay for a border wall — have withered.

Today, we speak to Peter Baker, The Times’s chief White House correspondent, about Mr. Trump’s record. Tomorrow, we scrutinize Mr. Biden’s plans for the presidency.

Guest: Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 15, 2020
The Confirmation Hearing of Amy Coney Barrett
00:26:12

It was a 12-hour session. Twenty-two senators took turns questioning Judge Amy Coney Barrett on her record and beliefs.

Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California, evoked personal experience of life before Roe v. Wade and asked Judge Barrett whether she would vote to overturn abortion rights.

On that question, Judge Barrett demurred — an approach she would take to other contentious issues, including whether she would recuse herself if a presidential election dispute came before the court.

With Judge Barrett’s confirmation all but certain, Democratic senators pressed her more with the election in mind than out of any hope of derailing her rise.

Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times, gives us a rundown of the second day of the hearings.

Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In declining to detail her legal views, Judge Barrett said she would not be “a pawn” of President Trump.
  • With the hearing taking place closer to an election than any other Supreme Court confirmation — and with the Senate Republican majority at real risk — the proceeding was riddled with electoral politics.
  • Judge Barrett’s testimony was a deft mix of expertise and evasion. She demonstrated easy familiarity with Supreme Court precedents but said almost nothing about whether they should stand.
Oct 14, 2020
The Politics of Pandemic Relief
00:29:24

In March, Congress pushed through a relief package that preserved the U.S. economy during the pandemic. It felt like government functioning at its best.

But now, that money is running out and bipartisanship has given way to an ideological stalemate.

While Republicans balk at plans for further significant government spending — even those coming from the White House — Democrats are holding out for more money and a broader package of measures.

The absence of a deal could have dire consequences. One economist estimates that without a stimulus package, there could be four million fewer jobs next year.

We talk to Jim Tankersley, who covers the economy for The Times, about what’s getting in the way of an agreement.

Guest: Jim Tankersley, who covers economic and tax policy for The New York Times.


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 13, 2020
Why the Left Is Losing on Abortion
00:35:18

Most Americans say that abortion should be legal with some restrictions, but President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett, signed a statement in a 2006 newspaper advertisement opposing “abortion on demand.” Her accession would bolster a conservative majority among the justices.

How did that happen? According to Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America, abortion rights advocates have for too long taken Roe v. Wade for granted.

Ms. Hogue describes how Republican attacks on abortion were not countered forcefully enough. “I think most people in elected positions had been taught for a long time to sort of ‘check the box’ on being what we would call pro-choice and then move on,” she said.

Guest: Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America.


For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 12, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'David's Ankles'
00:54:07

“We are conditioned to believe that art is safe,” Sam Anderson, a staff writer for The New York Times Magazine, explained in this week’s The Sunday Read. “Destruction happens in a number of ways, for any number of reasons, at any number of speeds — and it will happen, and no amount of reverence will stop it.”

Today, Sam explores his personal relationship with Michelangelo's David and the imperfections that could bring down the world’s most “perfect” statue.

This story was written by Sam Anderson and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.


Oct 11, 2020
The Field: The Battle for Pennsylvania’s White Working Class
00:28:04

This episode contains strong language.

Over the summer, Dave Mitchko started a makeshift pro-Trump sign operation from his garage. By his estimate he has handed out around 26,000 signs, put together with the help of his family.

Mr. Mitchko might seem like the kind of voter Joseph R. Biden Jr. wants to peel away from the Republicans in November. He had always been a Democrat — he voted for Barack Obama twice — but opted for Donald Trump in 2016.

Today, we speak to voters and politicians on the ground in northeastern Pennsylvania, exploring the factors that swung former Democratic strongholds toward Mr. Trump and asking whether Mr. Biden can win them back.  

Guest: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 09, 2020
Plexiglass and Civility: The Vice-Presidential Debate
00:32:29

During most campaigns, the job of the vice-presidential candidates focuses on boosting the person heading the ticket. Proving their suitability for the top job is secondary.

But this year is different. The president is 74 and spent much of the past week in the hospital, and his Democratic rival is 77. So it was vital for their running mates, Vice President Mike Pence and Senator Kamala Harris, to show in Wednesday night’s debate that they would be capable of stepping up if necessary.

We speak to Alexander Burns, a Times national political correspondent, about the candidates’ strategies and whether anything new emerged four weeks before the election.

Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 08, 2020
Where Is This Pandemic Headed?
00:25:58

The pandemic has killed more than one million people around the world, at least 210,000 in the United States alone. The illness has infiltrated the White House and infected the president.

Today, we offer an update on measures to fight the coronavirus and try to predict the outbreak’s course.

Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 07, 2020
How a Small Bar Battled to Survive the Coronavirus
00:44:15

This episode contains strong language. 

Jack Nicas, a technology reporter for The New York Times, moved to Oakland, Calif., five years ago. When he arrived, he set out to find a bar of choice. It quickly became the Hatch.

Unpretentious, cheap and relaxed, the Hatch was a successful small business until the coronavirus hit.

After the announcement in March that California would order bars and restaurants to shut down, Jack decided to follow the fortunes of the Hatch. Over six months, he charted the struggle to keep the tavern afloat and the hardship suffered by its staff.

“I can’t afford to be down in the dumps about it,” Louwenda Kachingwe, the Hatch’s owner, told Jack as he struggled to come up with ideas to keep the bar running during the shutdown. “I have to be proactive, because literally people are depending on it.”

Guest: Jack Nicas, a technology reporter for The Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 06, 2020
The Latest on the President’s Health
00:29:10

On Saturday morning, the doctors treating President Trump for the coronavirus held a news conference outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center — a show of strength, aimed at reassuring the American public that he was in capable hands.

But instead of allaying concern, it raised questions, casting doubt on the timeline of the president’s illness and the seriousness of his condition.

We speak to Maggie Haberman and Peter Baker, White House correspondents for The Times, about the efforts to control the narrative, and pick through what is known about the president’s condition a month before the election.

Guest:Maggie Haberman and Peter Baker, White House correspondents for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 05, 2020
One Million Lives
00:25:12

They came from Tel Aviv, Aleppo and a “small house by the river.” They were artists, whiskey drinkers and mbira players. They were also fathers, sisters and best friends.

Today, we hear people from around the world reflect on those they’ve lost. 

For more information on today's episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Oct 04, 2020
Special Edition: The Pandemic Reaches the President
00:19:07

He assured the country the pandemic would “disappear” soon. Then he tested positive. We explore how President Trump testing positive for the coronavirus could affect the last days of the 2020 race — and consider what might happen next.

Guests: Peter Baker and Maggie Haberman, White House correspondents for The Times.

For more information about today's episode, visit: nytimes.com/thedaily.

Oct 02, 2020
The Field: The Fight For Voting Rights in Florida
00:43:42

This episode contains strong language. 

During much of this election cycle, Julius Irving of Gainesville, Fla., spent his days trying to get former felons registered to vote.

He would tell them about Florida’s Amendment Four, a ballot initiative that extended the franchise to those who had, in the past, been convicted on felony charges — it added an estimated 1.5 million people to the electorate, the nation’s largest voting expansion in four decades.

On today’s episode, Nicholas Casey, a national politics reporter, spends time with Mr. Irving in Gainesville and explores the voting rights battle in Florida.

Guest: Nicholas Casey, a national politics reporter for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 02, 2020
A User’s Guide to Mail-In Voting
00:25:25

The pandemic will mean that many more Americans vote by mail this year.

All 50 states require people to register before they can cast a mail-in vote. But from there, the rules diverge wildly.

And a lot could still change. Our correspondent Luke Broadwater, a reporter in Washington, says there are more than 300 challenges to voting-related rules winding through courts across the country.

Americans should probably brace for a different kind of election night — it could be days or longer before the full picture of results emerges.

Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Oct 01, 2020
Chaos and Contempt: The First Presidential Debate
00:31:50

This episode contains strong language.

Both presidential candidates had clear goals for their first debate on Tuesday.

For Joseph R. Biden Jr., the contest was an opportunity to consolidate his lead in polls before Election Day. President Trump’s task was, politically, a taller order — to change the course of a race that he seems to be losing. His tactics for doing that emerged quickly: interrupt and destabilize.

The result was a chaotic 90-minute back-and-forth, an often ugly melee in which the two major party nominees expressed levels of acrid contempt for each other.

We speak to our correspondent Alexander Burns about the mood and themes of the debate and whether any of it moved the dial for the election.


Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 


Background reading: 

Sep 30, 2020
The President’s Taxes
00:29:10

Russ Buettner and Susanne Craig, investigative reporters for The Times, have pored over two decades and thousands of pages of documents on Donald J. Trump’s tax information, up to and including his time in the White House.

What they found was an existential threat to the image he has constructed about his wealth and lifestyle. The tax documents consistently appeared to call into question the business acumen he has cited in his presidential campaign and throughout his public life.

The records suggest that whenever Mr. Trump was closely involved in the creation and running of a business, it was more likely to fail. They show no payments of federal income taxes in 11 of 18 years that The Times examined, and reveal a decade-long audit by the Internal Revenue Service that questions the legitimacy of a $72.9 million tax refund. They also point to a reckoning on the horizon: The president appears to be personally on the hook for loans totaling $421 million, most of which is coming due within four years.

We speak to Russ and Susanne about their findings and chart President Trump’s financial situation.

Guest: Russ Buettner and Susanne Craig, investigative reporters for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Sep 29, 2020
The Past, Present and Future of Amy Coney Barrett
00:30:43

Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s pick to fill the empty seat on the Supreme Court, is a product of the conservative legal movement of the 1980s. She clerked for Justice Antonin Scalia, a giant of conservative jurisprudence, and his influence is evident throughout her judicial career.

Opponents of abortion, in particular, are hoping that her accession to the Supreme Court would be a crucial step forward for their movement.

Her nomination ceremony in the Rose Garden this weekend appeared unremarkable. But it took place just weeks from a presidential election and barely eight days after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Republicans have the votes in the Senate to confirm Judge Barrett and a timetable that suggests that they would be able to do so before Election Day. With her path seemingly clear, we reflect on Judge Barrett’s career and her judicial philosophy.

Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Sep 28, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'How Climate Migration Will Reshape America'
00:44:25

In August, Abrahm Lustgarten, who reports on climate, watched fires burn just 12 miles from his home in Marin County, Calif.

For two years, he had been studying the impact of the changing climate on global migration and recently turned some of his attention to the domestic situation.

Suddenly, with fires raging so close to home, he had to ask himself the question he had been asking other people: Was it time to move?

This week on The Sunday Read, Abrahm explores a nation on the cusp of transformation.

This story was written by Abrahm Lustgarten and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Sep 27, 2020
The Field: Policing and Power in Minneapolis
00:40:49

This episode contains strong language. 

In June, weeks after George Floyd was killed by the police, a veto-proof majority of the Minneapolis City Council expressed support for dismantling the city’s police department.

The councilors’ pledges to “abolish,” “dismantle” and “end policing as we know it” changed the local and national conversation about the police.

President Trump has wielded this decision and law-and-order arguments in his campaigning — Midwestern states like Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota may be decisive in the general election.

He has claimed that Joseph R. Biden Jr. wants to defund the police — which he does not — and told voters that they would not be safe in “Biden’s America.”

On the ground in Minneapolis, Astead Herndon, a national politics reporter, speaks to activists, residents and local politicians about the complexities of trying to overhaul the city’s police.

Guest: Astead W. Herndon, a national politics reporter for The New York Times, speaks to Black Visions Collective co-director, Miski Noor; Jordan Area Community Council executive director, Cathy Spann; and Minneapolis City Council president, Lisa Bender. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Across America there have been calls from some activists and elected officials to defund, downsize or abolish police departments. What would efforts to defund or disband the police really mean?
  • In the wake of George Floyd’s killing, some cities asked if the police are being asked to do jobs they were never intended to do. Budgets are being re-evaluated.
Sep 25, 2020
On the Ground in Louisville
00:23:32

This episode contains strong language.

Breonna Taylor’s mother and her supporters had made their feelings clear: Nothing short of murder charges for all three officers involved in Ms. Taylor’s death would amount to justice.

On Wednesday, one of the officers was indicted on a charge of “wanton endangerment.” No charges were brought against the two officers whose bullets actually struck Ms. Taylor.

In response, protesters have again taken to the streets to demand justice for the 26-year-old who was killed in her apartment in March.

We speak to our correspondent Rukmini Callimachi, who is on the ground in Louisville, Ky., about the reaction to the grand jury’s decision.

Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, a correspondent for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Sep 24, 2020
A Historic Opening for Anti-Abortion Activists
00:35:01

President Trump appears to be on course to give conservatives a sixth vote on the Supreme Court, after several Republican senators who were previously on the fence said they would support quickly installing a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

In our interview today with Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the anti-abortion Susan B. Anthony List, she says she senses a turning point. “No matter who you are, you feel the ground shaking underneath,” she said. “I’m feeling very optimistic for the mission that our organization launched 25 years ago.”

In pursuit of that mission, the Susan B. Anthony List struck a partnership with Mr. Trump during the 2016 election. The group supported his campaign and provided organizational backup in battleground states in exchange for commitments that he would work to end abortion rights.

Ms. Dannenfelser described the partnership as “prudential.”

“Religious people use that term quite a lot because it acknowledges a hierarchy of goods and evils involved in any decision,” she said. “and your job is to figure out where the highest good is found.”

Guest: Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • The transformation of groups like the Susan B. Anthony List from opponents of Mr. Trump early in the 2016 campaign into proud and unwavering backers of his presidency illustrates how intertwined the conservative movement has become with the president — and how much they need each other to survive politically.
  • For months, abortion has been relegated to a back burner in the presidential campaign. The death of Justice Ginsburg and the battle to replace her has put the issue firmly back on the agenda.
Sep 23, 2020
Swing Voters and the Supreme Court Vacancy
00:31:18

The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the ensuing battle to fill her seat is set to dominate American politics in the lead up to the election. A poll conducted for The New York Times before Justice Ginsburg’s death found voters in the battleground states of Arizona, Maine and North Carolina placed greater trust in Joseph R. Biden Jr. than in President Trump to fill the next Supreme Court vacancy.

Now that it’s longer a hypothetical scenario, what impact will the vacant seat have on the thinking of swing voters?

We take a look at the polling and ask undecided voters whether the death of Justice Ginsburg and the president’s decision to nominate another justice have affected their voting intention.

Guest: Nate Cohn, a domestic correspondent for The Upshot at The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In surveys before Justice Ginsburg’s death, Joe Biden led by a slightly wider margin on choosing the next justice than he did over all against President Trump.
Sep 22, 2020
Part 1: The Life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg
00:38:54

When Ruth Bader Ginsburg graduated from law school, she received no job offers from New York law firms, despite being an outstanding student. She spent two years clerking for a federal district judge, who agreed to hire her only after persuasion, and was rejected for a role working with Justice Felix Frankfurter because she was a woman.

With her career apparently stuttering in the male-dominated legal world, she returned to Columbia University to work on a law project that required her to spend time in Sweden. There, she encountered a more egalitarian society. She also came across a magazine article in which a Swedish feminist said that men and women had one main role: being people. That sentiment would become her organizing principle.

In the first of two episodes on the life of Justice Ginsburg, we chart her journey from her formative years to her late-life stardom on the Supreme Court. 

Guest: Linda Greenhouse, who writes about the Supreme Court for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg died in her home in Washington on Friday. She was 87. The second woman appointed to the Supreme Court, Justice Ginsburg’s pointed and powerful dissenting opinions made her a cultural icon.
  • “Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s life and landmark opinions moved us closer to a more perfect union,” former President Bill Clinton, who nominated her for the court, wrote on Twitter. Other tributes have poured in from leaders on all sides of the political spectrum.
Sep 21, 2020
Part 2: The Battle Over Her Seat
00:29:44

In the second episode of a two-part special, we consider the ramifications of Justice Ginsburg’s death and the struggle over how, and when, to replace her on the bench.

The stakes are high: If President Trump is able to name another member of the Supreme Court, he would be the first president since Ronald Reagan to appoint three justices, tipping the institution in a much more conservative direction.

Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, a congressional editor for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • President Trump’s determination to confirm a replacement before the election set lawmakers in Congress on a collision course.
Sep 21, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Agency'
01:01:06

According to Ludmila Savchuk, a former employee, every day at the Internet Research Agency was essentially the same.

From an office complex in the Primorsky District of St. Petersburg, employees logged on to the internet via a proxy service and set about flooding Russia’s popular social networking sites with opinions handed to them by their bosses.

The shadowy organization, which according to one employee filled 40 rooms, industrialized the art of “trolling.”

On this week’s Sunday Read, Adrien Chen reports on trolling and the agency, and, eventually, becomes a victim of Russian misinformation himself.

This story was written by Adrian Chen and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Sep 20, 2020
Special Episode: ‘An Obituary for the Land’
00:10:31

“Nothing comes easily out here,” Terry Tempest Williams, a Utah-based writer, said of the American West. Her family was once almost taken by fire, and as a child of the West, she grew up with it.

Our producer Bianca Giaever, who was working out of the West Coast when the wildfires started, woke up one day amid the smoke with the phrase “an obituary to the land” in her head. She called on Ms. Williams, a friend, to write one.

“I will never write your obituary,” her poem reads. “Because even as you burn, you throw down seeds that will sprout and flower.”

Guest: Bianca Giaever, a producer for The New York Times, speaks to the writer Terry Tempest Williams.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Sep 18, 2020
A Messy Return to School in New York
00:31:40

Iolani teaches dual-language kindergarten in Washington Heights in New York City, where she has worked for the last 15 years.

She, like many colleagues, is leery about a return to in-person instruction amid reports of positive coronavirus cases in other schools. “I go through waves of anxiety and to being hopeful that it works out to just being worried,” she told our producer Lisa Chow.

On top of mixed messaging from the city about the form teaching could take, her anxiety is compounded by a concern that she might bring the coronavirus home to her daughter, whose immune system is weaker as a result of an organ transplant.

Today, we look at how one teacher’s concerns in the lead up to the first day back illustrates issues around New York City’s reopening of public schools. 

Guest: Lisa Chow, a producer for The New York Times, speaks to a kindergarten teacher in New York City.  

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Sep 18, 2020
The Forgotten Refugee Crisis in Europe
00:28:09

Among the olive groves of Moria, on the Greek island of Lesbos, a makeshift city of tents and containers housed thousands of asylum seekers who had fled conflict and hardship in Africa, the Middle East and elsewhere.

Already frustrated at the deplorable conditions, inhabitants’ anger was compounded by coronavirus lockdown restrictions. The situation reached a breaking point this month when fires were set, probably by a small group of irate asylum seekers, according to the authorities. The flames decimated the camp and stranded nearly 12,000 of its residents in the wild among tombstones in a nearby cemetery and on rural and coastal roads.

We chart the European refugee crisis and the events that led up to the blaze at Moria.

Guest: Matina Stevis-Gridneff, who covers the European Union for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • The fires at the Moria camp have intensified what was already a humanitarian disaster. Originally built to hold 3,000 newly arrived people, it held more than 20,000 refugees six months ago
  • The camp’s inhabitants had for years resented the squalid conditions and the endless delays in resolving their fates. Those frustrations collided with the restrictions imposed to combat the coronavirus, and the combination has proved explosive.
Sep 17, 2020
Quarantine on a College Campus
00:31:13

This episode contains strong language.

Infected with the coronavirus and separated from their peers in special dorms, some college students have taken to sharing their quarantine experiences on TikTok.

In some videos posted to the social media app, food is a source of discontent; one student filmed a disappointing breakfast — warm grape juice, an unripe orange, a “mystery” vegan muffin and an oat bar. Others broach more profound issues like missed deliveries of food and supplie.

It was within this TikTok community that Natasha Singer, our business technology reporter, found 19-year-old Zoie Terry, a sophomore at the University of Alabama, who was one of the first students to be sequestered at her college’s isolation facility.

Today, we speak to Ms. Terry about her experience and explore what it tells us about the reopening of colleges. 

Guest: Natasha Singer, a technology reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Zoie Terry, a sophomore at the University of Alabama. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Sep 16, 2020
A Deadly Tinderbox
00:27:37

“The entire state is burning.” That was the refrain Jack Healy, our national correspondent, kept hearing when he arrived in the fire zone in Oregon.

The scale of the wildfires is dizzying — millions of acres have burned, 30 different blazes are raging and thousands of people have been displaced.

Dry conditions, exacerbated by climate change and combined with a windstorm, created the deadly tinderbox.

The disaster has proved a fertile ground for misinformation: Widely discredited rumors spread on social media claiming that antifa activists were setting fires and looting.

Today, we hear from people living in the fire’s path who told Jack about the toll the flames had exacted.

Guest: Jack Healy, a national correspondent for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading:

Sep 15, 2020
Inside Trump’s Immigration Crackdown
00:25:32

This episode contains strong language.

After Donald Trump was elected president, two filmmakers were granted rare access to the operations of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Since Mr. Trump had campaigned on a hard-line immigration agenda, the leaders of the usually secretive agency jumped at a chance to have their story told from the inside. Today, we speak to the filmmakers about what they saw during nearly three years at ICE and how the Trump administration reacted to a cut of the film.

Guests: Christina Clusiau and Shaul Schwarz, the filmmakers behind the six-hour documentary series “Immigration Nation.”

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 


Sep 14, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Children in the Shadows'
01:30:41

Prince is 9 years old, ebullient and bright; he has spent much of the pandemic navigating the Google Classroom app from his mother’s phone.

The uncertainty and isolation of the coronavirus lockdown is not new to him — he is one of New York City’s more than 100,000 homeless schoolchildren, the largest demographic within the homeless population.

Families like Prince’s are largely invisible.

Samantha M. Shapiro, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, has spent the last two years speaking with over a dozen homeless families with children of school age. On this week’s The Sunday Read, she explores what their lives are like.

This story was written by Samantha M. Shapiro and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Sep 13, 2020
A Self-Perpetuating Cycle of Wildfires
00:24:24

When many in California talk about this year’s wildfires, they describe the color — the apocalyptic, ominous, red-orange glow in the sky.

The state’s current wildfires have seen two and a half million acres already burned.

Climate change has made conditions ripe for fires: Temperatures are higher and the landscape drier. But the destruction has also become more acute because of the number of homes that are built on the wildland-urban interface — where development meets wild vegetation.

The pressures of California’s population have meant that towns are encouraged to build in high-risk areas. And when a development is ravaged by a fire, it is often rebuilt, starting the cycle of destruction over again.

Today, we explore the practice of building houses in fire zones and the role insurance companies could play in disrupting this cycle. 

Guest: Christopher Flavelle, who covers the impact of global warming on people, governments and industries for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading: 

  • “People are always asking, ‘Is this the new normal?’” a climate scientist said. “I always say no. It’s going to get worse.” If climate change was an abstract notion a decade ago, today it is all too real for Californians.
  • Research suggests that most Americans support restrictions on building homes in fire- or flood-prone areas. 


Sep 11, 2020
The Killing of Breonna Taylor, Part 2
00:30:53

This episode contains strong language. 

“So there’s just shooting, like we’re both on the ground,” Kenneth Walker, Breonna Taylor’s boyfriend, said of the raid on her home. “I don’t know where these shots are coming from, and I’m scared.”

Much of what happened on the night the police killed Ms. Taylor is unclear.

As part of an investigation for The New York Times, our correspondent Rukmini Callimachi and the filmmaker Yoruba Richen spoke to neighbors and trawled through legal documents, police records and call logs to understand what happened that night and why.

In the second and final part of the series, Rukmini talks about her findings. 

Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, a correspondent for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Run-ins with the law by Jamarcus Glover, Ms. Taylor’s ex-boyfriend, entangled her even as she tried to move on. An investigation involving interviews, documents and jailhouse recordings helps explain what happened the night she was killed and how she landed in the middle of a deadly drug raid.
Sep 10, 2020
The Killing of Breonna Taylor, Part 1
00:27:32

At the beginning of 2020, Breonna Taylor posted on social media that it was going to be her year. She was planning a family with her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker; she had a new job and a new car. She had also blocked Jamarcus Glover, a convicted drug dealer with whom she had been romantically involved on and off since 2016, from her phone.

But forces were already in motion. The Louisville Police Department was preparing raids on locations it had slinked to Mr. Glover — and Ms. Taylor’s address was on the target list.

In the raid that ensued, Ms. Taylor was fatally shot. Her name has since become a rallying cry for protesters. Today, in the first of two parts, we explore Ms. Taylor’s life and how law enforcement ended up at her door.

Guests: Rukmini Callimachi, a correspondent for The Times, and Yoruba Richen, a documentary filmmaker, talk to Ms. Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer; her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker; and her cousin, Preonia Flakes.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Sep 09, 2020
What Happened to Daniel Prude?
00:29:03

This episode contains strong language.

In March, Daniel Prude was exhibiting signs of a mental health crisis. His brother called an ambulance in the hopes that Mr. Prude would be hospitalized, but he was sent back home after three hours without a diagnosis.

Later, when Mr. Prude ran out of the house barely clothed into the Rochester night, his brother, Joe Prude, again called on the authorities for help, but this time it was to the police.

After a struggle with officers, Daniel Prude suffered cardiac distress. It would be days before Joe Prude was able to visit him in the hospital — permitted only so he could decide whether to take his brother off life support — and months before the family would find out what had happened when he was apprehended.

Today, we hear from Joe Prude about that night and examine the actions taken by the police during his brother’s arrest, including the official narrative that emerged after his death.

Guest: Sarah Maslin Nir, a reporter for The New York Times, who spoke to Daniel Prude’s brother, Joe Prude.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In the minutes after Mr. Prude’s heart briefly stopped during a struggle with officers, an unofficial police narrative took hold: He had suffered a drug overdose. But the release of body camera footage complicated that version of events.
  • The Monroe County medical examiner ruled Mr. Prude’s death a homicide caused by “complications of asphyxia in the setting of physical restraint.” Seven Rochester police officers have now been suspended.
Sep 08, 2020
Bringing the Theater Back to Life
00:26:04

Three months into Broadway’s shutdown because of the coronavirus pandemic, Michael Paulson, a theater reporter for The New York Times, got a call from a theater in western Massachusetts — they planned to put on “Godspell,” a well-loved and much-performed musical from 1971, in the summer.

Today, we explore how, in the face of huge complications and potentially crushing risks, a regional production attempted to bring theater back to life.

Guest: Michael Paulson, a theater reporter for The Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Sep 04, 2020
Jimmy Lai vs. China
00:32:47

This episode contains strong language.

Jimmy Lai was born in mainland China but made his fortune in Hong Kong, starting as a sweatshop worker and becoming a clothing tycoon. After the Tiananmen massacre in 1989, he turned his attention to the media, launching publications critical of China’s Communist Party.

“I believe in the media,” he told Austin Ramzy, a Hong Kong reporter for The New York Times. “By delivering information, you’re actually delivering freedom.”

In August, he was arrested under Hong Kong’s new Beijing-sponsored national security law.

Today, we talk to Mr. Lai about his life, his arrest and campaigning for democracy in the face of China’s growing power.

Guests: Austin Ramzy, who covers Hong Kong for The New York Times, spoke with Jimmy Lai, a pro-democracy media tycoon and founder of Apple Daily.  

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In August, Mr. Lai, his two sons and four executives from Apple Daily were arrested under the new national security law. The publication was a target and a test case for the government’s authority over the media.
Sep 03, 2020
A High-Stakes Standoff in Belarus
00:36:48

Aleksandr Lukashenko came to office in Belarus in the 1990s on a nostalgic message, promising to undo moves toward a market economy and end the hardship the country had endured after gaining independence from the Soviet Union. As president, he acquired dictatorial powers, removing term limits, cracking down on opposition and stifling the press.

In recent years, however, economic stagnation has bred growing discontent. And when Mr. Lukashenko claimed an implausible landslide victory in a presidential election last month, he found himself facing mass protests that have only grown as he has attempted to crush them.

Today, we chart Mr. Lukashenko’s rise to power and examine his fight to hold on to it. 

Guest: Ivan Nechepurenko, a reporter with the Moscow bureau of The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Sep 02, 2020
Joe Biden’s Rebuttal
00:26:46

Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s plan for winning the presidential election relies on putting together African-American voters of all ages, including younger Black people who are less enthusiastic about him, and white moderates who find President Trump unacceptable.

At last week’s Republican National Convention, the Trump campaign appeared to be sowing discord within that coalition. By framing the response to unrest in cities as binary — you are either for violence or for the police — Republicans seemed to be daring Mr. Biden to challenge young Black voters.

In a speech in Pittsburgh yesterday, Mr. Biden rejected that choice. Instead, he recognized the grievances of peaceful protesters, while denouncing “the senseless violence of looting and burning and destruction of property.”

Today, we examine whether the speech worked — and what it means for the rest of the election campaign.

Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Sep 01, 2020
‘Who Replaces Me?’
00:41:40

This episode contains strong language.

As a police officer in his hometown of Flint, Mich., Scott Watson has worked to become a pillar of the community, believing his identity has placed him in a unique position to do his job. He has given out his cellphone number, driven students to prom and provided food and money to those who were hungry.

After watching the video of the killing of George Floyd, his identity as a Black police officer became a source of self-consciousness instead of pride.

Today, we speak to Mr. Watson about his career and the internal conflicts that have arisen from his role.

Guest: Scott Watson, a Black police officer in Flint, Mich. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 31, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'In the Line of Fire'
00:32:04

Many American states use the labor of inmates to help fight its fires, but none so more than California. Using incarcerated firefighters saves the state’s taxpayers an estimated $100 million a year.

The women that choose to enter the firefighting camps are afforded better pay, by prison standards, and an improved quality of time served. However, the money they earn from putting their lives on the line is dwarfed by the salaries of the civilian firefighters they work alongside — one woman reports to earn $500 a year, compared with the $40,000 starting salary on the outside.

On today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Jaime Lowe explores California’s invisible line of defense against wildfires.

This story was written by Jaime Lowe and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Aug 30, 2020
Donald Trump Jr.’s Journey to Republican Stardom
00:34:21

For much of his life, Donald Trump Jr. has been disregarded by his father. He played only a bit part in the 2016 campaign and when the team departed for Washington, he was left to oversee a largely unimportant part of the Trump Organization. But after The New York Times revealed that he had played an integral role in organizing the Trump Tower meeting between campaign officials and Russians promising information on Hillary Clinton, the younger Mr. Trump struck back hard at his father’s detractors and the media, finding a voice and an audience. Aggressive, politically incorrect and with an instinctual understanding of the president’s appeal, he has become a conservative darling and his father’s most sought-after surrogate. Today, we look at his rise to prominence. Guest: Jason Zengerle, a writer at large for The New York Times Magazine. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 28, 2020
On the Ground in Kenosha
00:29:51

This episode contains strong language.

The shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black father from Kenosha, Wis., by a white police officer has reverberated through the city, fueling protests and unrest. There have been marches and demonstrations, as well as instances of destruction: businesses and property set alight, fireworks launched at the police.

On Tuesday night, a group of armed men, who claimed to be there to protect the community, arrived. Three protesters were shot, two of whom died. Kyle Rittenhouse, a white 17-year-old from Illinois, is suspected of being the gunman.

We speak with Julie Bosman, a national correspondent for The Times, about what is happening in her hometown.

Guest: Julie Bosman, a national correspondent for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 27, 2020
Trump’s Suburban Strategy
00:32:17

At the 1968 Republican National Convention, Richard Nixon made an appeal to voters in the suburbs concerned about racial unrest across the United States after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. They helped deliver him the presidency that year, cementing suburbanites’ role as an integral voting bloc.

The 2020 election is also taking place against a backdrop of mass protests and unrest over racial justice. And speaker after speaker at the Republican National Convention has used the themes and language of 1968 to play on the perceived fears of suburban voters — cities on fire, the need to restore law and order.

But a strategy that worked for Richard Nixon in 1968 might not be effective for Donald Trump in 2020.

Today, we speak to Emily Badger about the power of the suburban vote and explore whether Republican messaging on the Black Lives Matter protests and law and order will land.

Guest: Emily Badger, who covers cities and urban policy for The New York Times

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 26, 2020
Where We Stand on the Pandemic
00:25:12

In the U.S., emergency-use authorization has been granted for convalescent plasma, the efficacy of which is yet to be robustly tested. For some, this echoes the situation with hydroxychloroquine and the government’s subsequent U-turn on its rollout.

Meanwhile, America’s infection rate appears to be flattening out — but at tens of thousands of cases per day. This stands in stark contrast to China, where daily cases are under 40.

Overseas, a Hong Kong resident has been reinfected with the virus, the first recorded instance of a second bout. And Russia and China have begun distributing vaccines, sidestepping Phase 3 safety trials to the incredulity of immunologists and vaccine executives.

We check back in with Donald G. McNeil Jr. on the coronavirus and the impact of these developments.

Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 25, 2020
A Surge in Shootings
00:30:48

Gun violence is on the rise in New York City. By the end of July, there had been more shootings in 2020 than in all of 2019. Shootings have risen in other metropolises, too, including Atlanta, Chicago, Denver and Houston.

Several theories have been advanced about why. Experts on crime say the coronavirus outbreak has deepened the endemic problems that often underlie gun violence, including poverty, unemployment, housing instability and hunger.

Police leaders also cite budget cuts and a political climate that has made officers reluctant to carry out arrests because of what they see as unfair scrutiny of their conduct.

Today, we look at how the various diagnoses could influence activists’ calls for the police to be defunded.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 24, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'Sweatpants Forever'
00:50:41

Much of the fashion industry has buckled under the weight of the coronavirus — it appears to have sped up the inevitable.

This story was written by Irina Aleksander and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Aug 23, 2020
A Pandemic-Proof Bubble?
00:29:11

When the coronavirus hit the United States, the N.B.A. was faced with a unique challenge. It seemed impossible to impose social distancing in basketball, an indoor sport with players almost constantly jostling one another for more than two hours. However, there was a big financial incentive to keep games going: ending the 2019 season early would have cost the league an estimated $1 billion in television revenue.

The solution? A sealed campus for players, staff and selected journalists at Disney World in Florida.

Marc Stein, who covers the N.B.A. for The New York Times, has been living out of a hotel room in the complex for the last 40 days. Today, we speak to him about what life is like inside the bubble.

Guest: Marc Stein, a sports reporter for The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 21, 2020
Joe Biden’s 30-Year Quest
00:33:29

Joseph R. Biden Jr. first ran for president in 1988, when his campaign was cut short after he made a series of blunders. After six terms in the Senate, he tried again in 2008 but failed to gain any traction in a contest won by Barack Obama. In the current political landscape, however, his focus on personal integrity and experience, which were also centerpieces of his previous campaigns, has proved much more compelling. Today, we chart Mr. Biden’s political journey and explore the baggage he will carry into the November election. Guest: Matt Flegenheimer, a national politics reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading:

Aug 20, 2020
The President, the Postal Service and the Election
00:24:15

The installation of Louis DeJoy as postmaster general has caused alarm. Since taking up the role in June, he has enacted a number of cuts to the Postal Service: ending overtime for workers, limiting how many runs they can make in a day, reassigning more than 20 executives and, from the perspective of the unions, speeding up the removal of mail-sorting machines.

The actions of Mr. DeJoy, a Republican megadonor and Trump ally, have been interpreted by many Democrats as an attempt to sabotage the election in concert with President Trump, who has himself admitted to wanting to limit funding that could help mail-in voting.

Today, we explore to what extent Mr. Trump is using the post office, and the postmaster general, to influence the election.

Guest: Luke Broadwater, a congressional reporter at The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 19, 2020
A Dinner and a Deal
00:29:38

In March 2018, Mark Landler — then a White House correspondent at The New York Times — attended a dinner party hosted by the United Arab Emirates’ ambassador, Yousef al-Otaiba, at a Washington restaurant. There he witnessed a chance encounter between the ambassador and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel — one the ambassador asked to keep private. Two years after that delicate conversation, Israel and the United Arab Emirates have agreed to normalize diplomatic and trade relations. Today, we speak to Mr. Landler about the Trump administration’s role in the agreement, what normalization means for Palestinians and what it says about the Middle East’s political climate. Guest: Mark Landler, London bureau chief at The New York Times. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 18, 2020
Inside Operation Warp Speed
00:25:33

Operation Warp Speed has in some ways lived up to its name: The U.S. government has awarded almost $11 billion to seven different companies to develop vaccines, three of which — Moderna, AstraZeneca and Pfizer — are in late-stage trials.

Things are going according to the most aggressive schedule.

However, accelerating the development process has increased the likelihood of cronyism and undue political influence.

Today, we ask whether the White House’s defiance of the timelines that have long governed the development of vaccines is working.

Guest: Katie Thomas, a reporter at The New York Times who covers the health care sector, with a focus on the drug industry.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • There is a lot of optimism surrounding the coronavirus vaccine and its potential to usher in a return to normality in the near future — but doctors warn that those expectations ought to be tempered.
  • With thousands dying, economic tumult and a looming election, the U.S. government is eager to start vaccinating as soon as possible. Experts worry that the Trump administration will push the Food and Drug Administration to overlook insufficient data.
  • The vaccine effort has spelled big profits for corporate insiders.
Aug 17, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'Unwanted Truths'
00:54:31

What is the extent of Russia’s interest in the 2020 U.S. election? Last year, a classified report written by intelligence officials tried to answer this question.

In this episode, Robert Draper, a writer-at-large at The New York Times Magazine, explores what happened after the report — which stated that President Trump was Russia’s favored candidate in the upcoming election — was drafted.

This story was written by Robert Draper and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Aug 16, 2020
Protesting Her Own Employer
00:42:45

“As a Black woman who works at Adidas my experiences have never been business as usual.”

Julia Bond, an assistant apparel designer at the sportswear giant, says she had resigned herself to experiencing and witnessing racism at work — until she saw the George Floyd video.

Today, we speak to Ms. Bond, an assistant apparel designer at Adidas, who has brought the global racial reckoning to the company’s front door.

Wanting more than just schemes and targets, she has been protesting in front of the company’s Portland headquarters every day since June, awaiting an apology from leadership and an admission that they have enabled racism and discrimination. Guest: Julia Bond, Julia Bond, assistant apparel designer at Adidas, who has been protesting outside the company’s Portland headquarters for the last three months. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Aug 14, 2020
Why Teachers Aren’t Ready to Reopen Schools
00:26:25

With the possibility that millions or tens of millions of American children will not enter a classroom for an entire year, school districts face an agonizing choice: Do the benefits of in-person learning outweigh the risks it poses to public health in a pandemic? Today, we explore how teachers and their unions are responding to demands from some parents, and the president, to reopen their schools this fall. Guest: Dana Goldstein, a national correspondent for The New York Times, who covers the impact of education policies on families, students and teachers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 13, 2020
A Historic V.P. Decision
00:27:44

Joseph R. Biden Jr. picked Senator Kamala Harris of California as his running mate, making her the first Black woman and the first Asian American woman to run for vice president on a major party ticket. Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times, shares his thoughts on the decision. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 12, 2020
Cancel Culture, Part 2: A Case Study
00:32:11

Yesterday on “The Daily,” the New York Times reporter Jonah Bromwich explained how the idea of cancel culture has emerged as a political and cultural force in 2020. In the second of two parts, he returns with a case study. 

Guest: Jonah Engel Bromwich, who writes for the Styles section of The New York Times, spoke with Zeeshan Aleem about his experience of cancel culture. 

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 11, 2020
Cancel Culture, Part 1: Where It Came From
00:34:44

In the first of two parts, the New York Times reporter Jonah Bromwich explains the origins of cancel culture and why it’s a 2020 election story worth paying attention to. 

Guest: Jonah Engel Bromwich, who writes for the Styles section of The New York Times

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 10, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'A Speck in the Sea'
00:48:14

John Aldridge fell overboard in the middle of the night, 40 miles from shore, and the Coast Guard was looking in the wrong place. This is a story about isolation — and our struggle to close the space between us.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

This is the article read in this episode, written by Paul Tough.

Aug 09, 2020
Jack Dorsey on Twitter's Mistakes
00:39:58

It’s been four years since the 2016 election laid bare the powerful role that social media companies have come to play in shaping political discourse and beliefs in America.

Since then, there have been growing calls to address the spread of polarization and misinformation promoted on such platforms.

While Facebook has been slower to acknowledge a need for change, Twitter has embraced the challenge, acknowledging that the company made mistakes in the past. But with three months to go until the 2020 election, these changes have been incremental, and Twitter itself is more popular than ever.

Today, Jack Dorsey, Twitter’s C.E.O., discusses the platform’s flaws, its polarizing potential — and his vision for the future.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 07, 2020
The Day That Shook Beirut
00:22:29

A mangled yellow door. Shattered glass. Blood.

A devastating explosion of ammonium nitrate stored at the port in Beirut killed at least 135 people and razed entire neighborhoods on Tuesday. This is what our correspondent in the Lebanese capital saw when the blast turned her apartment “into a demolition site” — and what happened in the hours after.

Guest: Vivian Yee, our correspondent based in Beirut. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 06, 2020
‘Stay Black and Die’
00:41:35

Demonstrations against police brutality are entering their third month, but meaningful policy action has not happened. We speak with one demonstrator about her journey to the front lines of recent protests — and the lessons she’s learned about the pace of change.

Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter at The New York Times, spoke with Sharhonda Bossier, deputy director at Education Leaders of Color, an advocacy group.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 05, 2020
Is the U.S. Ready to Vote by Mail?
00:24:11

The United States is preparing to hold its first ever socially distant presidential election. But will it actually work?

Guest: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 04, 2020
Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm
00:25:48

Facial recognition is becoming an increasingly central component of police departments’ efforts to solve crimes. But can algorithms harbor racial bias?

Guest: Annie Brown, a producer for The New York Times, speaks with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter, about her interview with Robert Julian-Borchak Williams, who was arrested after being misidentified as a criminal by an algorithm. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Aug 03, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'On Female Rage'
00:33:28

In this episode, Leslie Jamison, a writer and teacher, explores the potentially constructive force of female anger — and the shame that can get attached to it.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Aug 02, 2020
A #MeToo Moment in the Military
00:28:40

The remains of Vanessa Guillen, an Army specialist, were discovered last month about 25 miles from Fort Hood in central Texas. She was the victim, officials said, of a fellow soldier. Now her death has attracted the attention of the nation — veterans, active-duty service members and civilians.

Today, we examine what some claim to be a pervasive culture of sexual harassment inside the U.S. military. Guest: Jennifer Steinhauer, a Washington reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Women from the military say the response to Specialist Guillen’s killing is their #MeToo moment and a prompt to examine racial inequities in the service.
Jul 31, 2020
The Big Tech Hearing
00:33:03

The C.E.O.s of America’s most influential technology companies — Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook — were brought before Congress to answer a question: Are they too powerful?

Today, we talk to our colleague who was in the room about what happened. Guest: Cecilia Kang, a technology and regulatory policy reporter for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In the hearing, the chiefs of Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook faced withering questions from Democrats about anti-competitive practices and from Republicans about anti-conservative bias.
Jul 30, 2020
Confronting China
00:26:16

A cooperative relationship with China has been a pillar of U.S. foreign policy for more than half a century. So why does the Trump administration think it’s time for a change? Guest: Edward Wong, a diplomatic correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 29, 2020
Why $600 Checks Are Tearing Republicans Apart
00:23:51

A fight has erupted among congressional Republicans over how long and how generously the government should help those unemployed during the pandemic. But what is that battle really about? Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 28, 2020
The Mistakes New York Made
00:31:05

A New York Times investigation found that surviving the coronavirus in New York had a lot to do with which hospital a person went to. Our investigative reporter Brian M. Rosenthal pulls back the curtain on inequality and the pandemic in the city.

Guest: Brian M. Rosenthal, an investigative reporter on the Metro Desk of The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • At the peak of New York’s pandemic, patients at some community hospitals were three times more likely to die than were patients at medical centers in the wealthiest parts of the city.
  • The story of a $52 million temporary care facility in New York illustrates the missteps made at every level of government in the race to create more hospital capacity.
Jul 27, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Accusation'
00:52:02

When the university told one woman about the sexual-harassment complaints against her wife, they knew they weren’t true. But they had no idea how strange the truth really was.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jul 26, 2020
The Battle for a Baseball Season
00:43:06

This episode contains strong language.

Today, we go inside the fraught weeks that led up to the opening game of the 2020 professional baseball season — from the perspective of the commissioner of Major League Baseball. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security for The New York Times, spoke with Rob Manfred, the commissioner of Major League Baseball. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 24, 2020
The Showdown in Portland
00:28:51

This episode contains strong language.

Federal agents dressed in camouflage and tactical gear have taken to the streets of Portland, Ore., unleashing tear gas, bloodying protesters and pulling some people into unmarked vans. Today, we go behind protest lines to ask why militarized federal authorities are being deployed to an American city. Guests: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, The New York Times’s homeland security correspondent, and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent for The Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 23, 2020
The Science of School Reopenings
00:25:04

Around the world, safely reopening schools remains one of the most daunting challenges to restarting national economies. While approaches have been different, no country has tried to reopen schools with coronavirus infection rates at the level of the United States. Today, we explore the risks and rewards of the plan to reopen American schools this fall. Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 22, 2020
The Vaccine Trust Problem
00:27:45

Public health officials and private researchers have vowed to develop a coronavirus vaccine in record time. But could that rush backfire? Guest: Jan Hoffman, a health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 21, 2020
The Life and Legacy of John Lewis
00:38:08

This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs.

Representative John Lewis, a stalwart of the civil rights era, died on Friday. We take a look at his life, lessons and legacy. 

Guest: Brent Staples, a member of the Times editorial board.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading: 

  • Mr. Lewis, a son of sharecroppers and an apostle of nonviolence who was bloodied at Selma, Ala., and across the Jim Crow South in the historic struggle for racial equality, and who then carried a mantle of moral authority into Congress, died on Friday. He was 80.
  • Bipartisan praise poured in for the civil rights leader, as friends, colleagues and admirers reached for the appropriate superlatives to sum up an extraordinary life.
  • Mr. Lewis risked his life for justice, The Times’s editorial board wrote.
Jul 20, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Man Who Cracked the Lottery'
00:44:26

When the Iowa Attorney General's office began investigating an unclaimed lottery ticket worth millions, an incredible string of unlikely winners came to light, and a trail that pointed to an inside job. Today, listen to a story about mortality — about our greed, hubris and, ultimately, humility.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jul 19, 2020
Tilly Remembers Her Grandfather, Three Months On
00:24:40

For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the pandemic to hear what’s happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.

Climbing on the roof to look at stars in the middle of summer. Making French toast and popcorn. Kind eyes. These are some of the memories Tilly Breimhorst has of her grandfather, Craig. We spoke with Tilly in May about losing her grandfather to coronavirus. Today, we check back in with her.

Guest: Matilda Breimhorst, a 12-year-old who recently lost her grandfather to the coronavirus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of jasmincollective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.
Jul 17, 2020
Reopening, Warily: Revisiting Jasmine Lombrage
00:31:07

For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.

As state stay-at-home orders expired, small business owners faced a daunting question: Should they risk the survival of their company, or their health? Today, we speak again with one restaurant owner about the decision she made.

Guest: Jasmine Lombrage, a restaurant owner in Baton Rouge, La. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of collective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.
Jul 16, 2020
One Meat Plant, One Thousand Infections: Revisiting Achut Deng
00:31:28

For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were aired.

One of the largest coronavirus outbreaks in the United States was inside the Smithfield pork factory in Sioux Falls, S.D. Today, we revisit our conversation with a worker at the plant, a refugee who survived civil war and malaria only to find her life and livelihood threatened anew — and ask her how she has been doing since. Guests: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times, and Achut Deng, a Sudanese refugee who works for Smithfield. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 15, 2020
'It's Like a War.' Revisiting Dr. Fabiano Di Marco.
00:24:08

For the remainder of this week, “The Daily” is revisiting episodes with people we met in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic to hear what has happened to them since our original conversations were first aired.

Italy was an early epicenter of the pandemic in Europe. In March, we spoke to a doctor who was triaging patients north of Milan about the road that might lie ahead for the United States. Today, we call him again to hear what it was like to discharge his last coronavirus patient while the American caseload soars. Guest: Dr. Fabiano Di Marco, a professor at the University of Milan and the head of the respiratory unit of the Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII in Bergamo. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Italy was one of the first countries in Europe to institute a nationwide lockdown and, later, to choose a cautious approach to reopening public spaces. Here is a comparison of how successful other countries have been in their subsequent responses to the pandemic.
Jul 14, 2020
A Turning Point for Hong Kong
00:25:05

After protests convulsed Hong Kong for much of the last year, the city’s pro-democracy movement has been chilled by a new law that some say may change the semiautomonous territory forever. Today, we examine why China chose this moment to assert control, and what the new law means for the city’s future. Guest: Austin Ramzy, a reporter in Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 13, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Decameron Project'
00:25:33

As the coronavirus pandemic swept the world, The New York Times Magazine asked 29 authors to write new short stories inspired by the moment — and by Giovanni Boccaccio’s “The Decameron,” which was written as a plague ravaged Florence in the 14th century. We’ve selected two for you to hear today.

These stories were written by Tommy Orange and Edwidge Danticat. They were recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jul 12, 2020
The Fate of Trump's Financial Records
00:25:38

The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that President Trump cannot block the release of his financial records. Today, we hear the story behind the cases the justices heard — and the meaning of their decisions.

Guests: David Enrich, the business investigations editor for The New York Times and Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 10, 2020
A Missed Warning About Silent Coronavirus Infections
00:30:32

At the end of January, long before the world understood that seemingly healthy people could spread the coronavirus, a doctor in Germany tried to sound the alarm. Today, we look at why that warning was unwelcome.

Guests: Matt Apuzzo, an investigative reporter for The New York Times based in Brussels.

Dr. Camilla Rothe, an infectious disease specialist at Munich University Hospital.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 09, 2020
Counting the Infected
00:29:29

For months, the U.S. government has been quietly collecting information on hundreds of thousands of coronavirus cases across the country. Today, we tell the story of how The Times got hold of that data, and what it says about the nation’s outbreak.

Plus: a conversation with three U.S. astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

Guests: Robert Gebeloff, a reporter for The New York Times specializing in data analysis.

Bob Behnken, Doug Hurley and Chris Cassidy, NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 08, 2020
‘Their Goal Is the End of America’
00:21:23

What President Trump’s divisive speech at Mount Rushmore reveals about his re-election campaign.

Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 07, 2020
Four New Insights About the Coronavirus
00:27:27

Infection rates broke records across the United States over the holiday weekend, with many of the most severe surges in areas that reopened fastest. One thing that seems to have played a factor: transmission indoors, such as in restaurants and bars. We break down the risk, and look at what else scientists have learned about the coronavirus and how it spreads. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Many scientists have been saying for months that the coronavirus lingers in the air indoors, infecting those nearby. But the World Health Organization has been slow to agree.
  • Black and Latino residents of the United States are nearly twice as likely to die from Covid-19 as their white neighbors, according to new data that provides the most comprehensive look yet at coronavirus patients in America.
Jul 06, 2020
What Went Wrong in Brazil
00:27:24

Brazil has a long, distinguished history of successfully navigating public health crises. But in recent weeks, it has emerged as one of the world’s most severe coronavirus hot spots, second only to the United States. What went wrong? 

Guest: Ernesto Londoño, The Times’s Brazil bureau chief

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 02, 2020
A Russian Plot to Kill U.S. Soldiers
00:21:32

A New York Times investigation has revealed evidence of a secret Russian operation to kill U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan — and of the failure of the Trump administration to act on that intelligence. As lawmakers from both parties react with fury, one of the journalists who first reported the story tells us what has come to light so far.

Guest: Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jul 01, 2020
A Major Ruling on Abortion
00:22:54

The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Louisiana law that could have left the state with a single abortion clinic. It was a setback for conservatives in the first major ruling on abortion since two Trump appointees joined the bench. We examine the implications for future challenges, and why — for the third time in two weeks — Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. sided with his four more liberal colleagues.

Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 30, 2020
A Conversation With a Police Union Leader
00:51:04

In the weeks since George Floyd was killed by the Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, Americans have been confronting hard questions about bias and racism within law enforcement — and what the role of the police should be.

In the process, many have asked whether the culture of policing can be changed or if the system needs to be reimagined entirely. Today, we talk to an officer at the center of that debate inside one of the country’s largest police unions.

Guest: Vince Champion, the southeast regional director of the International Brotherhood of Police Officers. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 29, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Man Who Saw America'
01:03:19

In this episode of The Sunday Read, we look at the complexity, diversity and humanity of America through the eyes of Robert Frank — one of the most influential photographers in history — who, through his camera, collected the world.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jun 28, 2020
A Bit of Relief: The Long Distance Chorus
00:15:02

Gregg Breinberg has been directing the chorus at Public School 22 on Staten Island for twenty years. He tells his fourth and fifth grade students that participation is not about whether they can sing on key or not. It’s about expressing the meaning of a song — and the music inside themselves. Today, we listen to the voices of P.S. 22 as they harmonize from afar.

Jun 27, 2020
A Dilemma in Texas
00:27:21

Texas has become the latest hot spot in the coronavirus pandemic, forcing its governor to pause the state’s reopening process after a surge of infections and hospitalizations. We speak with our Houston correspondent about the state’s dilemma. Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times’s bureau chief in Houston. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 26, 2020
The Voters Trump Is Losing
00:24:08

This fall’s presidential race is likely to be decided by a handful of battleground states won by President Trump in 2016. So how do voters in those states view the candidates? Guest: Nate Cohn, who covers elections, polling and demographics for The Upshot at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 25, 2020
The Epidemic of Unemployment
00:28:09

Three months after mass layoffs began across America, 20 million Americans remain out of work because of the pandemic. Federal employment benefits are about to run out, and Congress can’t agree on more financial help. We called people struggling with unemployment to hear how they are doing. Guest: Julie Creswell, Sabrina Tavernise and Ben Casselman, reporters at The New York Times, spoke with Nicolle Nordman, Analía Rodríguez and Nakitta Long about being laid off. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 24, 2020
The Battle Over the Democratic Party's Future
00:24:25

This episode contains strong language. 

Today’s Senate primary in Kentucky has been transformed by the outcry over police brutality. What can the election tell us about the future of Democratic politics? Guest: Jonathan Martin, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Amy McGrath was considered a safe bet in the Democratic primary in Kentucky. But the recent movement for racial justice has elevated the candidacy of her African-American rival, Charles Booker, in the race to defeat Mitch McConnell.
Jun 23, 2020
How Facebook Is Undermining Black Lives Matter
00:26:20

Companies like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have come out in support of Black Lives Matter and its mission. But are their platforms undermining the movement for racial justice? Guest: Kevin Roose, who covers technology, business and culture for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Kevin Roose explains why shows of support for Black Lives Matter from Facebook, Twitter and YouTube don’t address the way racists and partisan provocateurs have weaponized the platforms.
Jun 22, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'Facing the Wind'
00:28:00

In today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Carvell Wallace considers why, for his kids, a global pandemic that shut down the world was not news — it was the opposite of news. It was a struggle that had, in some ways, always been a part of their lives.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jun 21, 2020
The History and Meaning of Juneteenth
00:27:49

After 155 years, Juneteenth, a celebration of the emancipation of enslaved Americans, is being acknowledged as a holiday by corporations and state governments across the country. Today, we consider why, throughout its history, Juneteenth has gained prominence at moments of pain in the struggle for black liberation in America. We also ask: What does freedom mean now?

Guest: Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, a professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In a project examining the history and import of Juneteenth, we ask: What is freedom in America?
  • Opal Lee, 93, an activist and lifelong Texan, has campaigned to make June 19 a national holiday for years. This is her vision for honoring the emancipation of enslaved Americans.
Jun 19, 2020
The Latest: The Supreme Court Rules on DACA
00:08:21

In a 5-to-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that President Trump may not shut down Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, the program that shields immigrants brought to the United States as children from deportation. But is this the end of challenges to DACA?

“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories.

Host: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.

Background reading:

  • This is the reasoning Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. gave for reversing the Trump administration decision.
  • For thousands of “Dreamers,” as DACA recipients are known, following the ups and downs of the program’s fate has been a wild ride. Here’s why it’s not over yet.


Jun 18, 2020
Who Will Be Joe Biden’s Running Mate?
00:26:26

Joseph R. Biden Jr. is looking for a potential vice president in one of the most tumultuous moments in modern American history. His selection committee is attempting to winnow an exceptionally diverse field. So who’s on the list? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 18, 2020
The Killing of Rayshard Brooks
00:29:08

This episode contains strong language.

Rayshard Brooks fell asleep in his car at a Wendy’s drive-through. Soon afterward, he was shot. We look closely at what happened in the minutes in between — and at the unrest his killing has sparked in Georgia.

Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 17, 2020
A Landmark Supreme Court Ruling
00:21:51

The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay and transgender workers from workplace discrimination. We examine the three words the case hung on; what the written opinions had to say about bathrooms, locker rooms, sports, pronouns and religious objections to same-sex marriage; and the implications for the ruling. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times and Aimee Stephens, the lead plaintiff in a transgender discrimination case heard by the Supreme Court. Ms. Stephens died in May; she was 59. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Ms. Stephens was fired after she announced that she would live as a woman. She did not live to see the Supreme Court rule in her favor.
  • Until Monday’s decision, it was legal in more than half of the states to fire workers for being gay, bisexual or transgender.
  • The justices are confronting an unusually potent mix of political and social issues in the middle of both a presidential election year and a public health crisis. Here’s an overview of the major cases this year to get you up to speed.
Jun 16, 2020
What We’ve Learned About the Coronavirus
00:24:57

States are reopening. Parks are crowded. Restaurants are filling, again, with diners. But is this dangerous? Six months into the pandemic, we reflect on what we’ve learned about the virus — and ask how that knowledge should chart the course forward. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • As New York businesses reopened, Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned that a second wave of infections was almost inevitable if residents did not abide by social-distancing rules. “It will come,” he said. “And once it comes, it’s too late.” 
  • Restrictions are easing across the United States, but Arizona, Florida and Texas are reporting their highest case numbers yet. As of Saturday, coronavirus cases were climbing in 22 states.
Jun 15, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'Getting Out'
01:04:23

In this episode of The Sunday Read, one man reflects on what it was like to go to prison as a child and to attempt to become an attorney upon his release. In doing so, he asks: What is punishment in America? What is it for? And how should we think about it?

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jun 14, 2020
Special Episode: The Song That Found Me
00:21:06

The Times critic Wesley Morris had listened to Patti LaBelle’s live rendition of “If You Don’t Know Me by Now” over a hundred times before. But one recent Sunday, the song came on and he heard something new. “I heard her thinking through an ultimatum now being laid down in the streets of this country,” he went on to write. Soon after, he got a call from one Ms. Patti LaBelle.

Jun 13, 2020
The Struggle to Teach From Afar
00:30:17

Ronda McIntyre’s classroom is built around a big rug, where her students crowd together often for group instruction. But since March, when schools across the country shut down because of the coronavirus, she has had to try to create the same sense of community remotely. Her class, and her job, are not the same — and they may never be.

Guest: Ronda McIntyre, a grade-school teacher at Indianola Informal K-8 school in Columbus, Ohio. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 12, 2020
Georgia's Election Meltdown
00:24:45

A full-scale meltdown of new voting systems in Georgia is alarming Democratic leaders — and revealing a new national playing field — ahead of the general election in November. Today, we explore why voting access in Georgia has become a national issue for the party.

Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Long lines and malfunctioning voting machines marred Georgia primary elections, renewing attention on voting rights there, and raising questions about how to ensure access to voting in the general election.
  • With both Senate seats in play and President Trump up for re-election in November, Georgia Democrats are telling anyone who will listen: This time will be different.
Jun 11, 2020
‘I Want To Touch the World’
00:31:51

This episode contains strong language.

Nearly 30 years ago, George Perry Floyd Jr. told a high school classmate he would “touch the world” someday. We went to the funeral in Houston of an outsize man who dreamed equally big and whose killing has galvanized a movement against racism across the globe.

Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times’s bureau chief in Houston.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 10, 2020
The Case For Defunding the Police
00:24:22

This episode contains strong language.

Several major U.S. cities are proposing ways to defund and even dismantle their police departments. But what would that actually look like? Guest: John Eligon, a national correspondent covering race for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In protests across the country, pleas for changes in policing have ranged from reform to abolition. Some proposed measures include restricting police use of military-style equipment and requiring officers to face strict discipline in cases of misconduct.
  • Nine members of the Minneapolis City Council — a veto-proof majority — pledged to dismantle the city’s Police Department, promising to create a new system of public safety.
Jun 09, 2020
Why Are Police Attacking Protestors?
00:26:42

This episode contains strong language.

Across the country, the police have responded to protests over police brutality with more force. Today, we listen in on confrontations at demonstrations in New York. Guest: Ali Watkins, a crime and law enforcement reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Across the country, police officers have responded to growing protests over police brutality with increasingly violent crowd control techniques, using batons, tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets on protesters, bystanders and journalists.
  • In New York, officers have charged and swung batons at demonstrators after curfew with seemingly little provocation. The mayor said he would review any reports of inappropriate enforcement.
Jun 08, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Condition of Black Life Is One of Mourning’
00:24:30

Today on “The Sunday Read,” listen to Claudia Rankine reflect on the precariousness of being black in America. Her words were written five years ago after avowed white supremacist Dylann Roof killed nine black people at a Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina. We are revisiting them now that they have — yet again — been rendered relevant.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Jun 07, 2020
'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 8: 'We Go All'
00:35:20

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we’re sharing the series finale of “Rabbit Hole,” a Times podcast with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, we follow one QAnon believer’s journey through faith and loss — and what becomes of reality as our lives move online.

For more information on “Rabbit Hole” and today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole

Jun 06, 2020
Why They're Protesting
00:35:19

This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs.

They came together to protest the killing of George Floyd — and because what happened to him had echoes in their own experiences. Today, we speak with five protesters about the moments in their lives that brought them onto the streets.

Guests: Donfard Hubbard, 44, from Minneapolis; Rashaad Dinkins, 18, from Minneapolis; Joe Morris, 32, from Tallahassee, Fla.; Azalea Hernandez, 12, from Minneapolis; and Joyce Ladner, 76, from Washington. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Jun 05, 2020
The Showdown at Lafayette Square
00:29:37

This episode contains sounds of explosives and descriptions of violence.

Today, we go inside a high-stakes White House debate over how President Trump should respond to reports that he was hiding in a bunker while the nation’s capital burned. This is the story of what happened in Lafayette Square. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Our chief White House correspondent explains why, when the history of the Trump presidency is written, the clash with protesters that preceded President Trump’s walk across Lafayette Square may be remembered as one of its defining moments.
  • “He did not pray,” said Mariann E. Budde, the Episcopal bishop of Washington, said of Mr. Trump’s militarized visit to St. John’s church for a photo opportunity. “He did not mention George Floyd.”
Jun 04, 2020
The Mayor of Minneapolis
00:28:04

As nationwide protests about the death of George Floyd enter a second week, we speak with the leader of the city where they began. Guest: Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Mr. Frey came into office in 2018 on promises to fix the broken relationship between the community and law enforcement in the wake of two fatal police shootings. This is what he has done in the years since.
Jun 03, 2020
The Systems That Protect the Police
00:23:16

The Minneapolis police officer whose tactics led to George Floyd’s death had a long record of complaints against him. So why was he still on patrol? Guest: Shaila Dewan, a national reporter covering criminal justice for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Efforts to hold problem officers accountable often face resistance from unions, and juries are reluctant to second-guess police decisions.
  • Violence escalated overnight in protests across the country, with police officers under fire in St. Louis and Las Vegas. Here are the latest updates.
Jun 02, 2020
A Weekend of Pain and Protest
00:34:58

This episode contains strong language.

Demonstrations have erupted in at least 140 cities across the United States in the days since George Floyd, a black man, died in police custody in Minneapolis. We were on the ground in some of them, chronicling 72 hours of pain and protest. Guests: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine; John Eligon, a national correspondent who covers race for The Times; and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

Jun 01, 2020
'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 7: 'Where We Go One'
00:29:25

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we’re sharing Episode 7 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, our reporter investigates the QAnon conspiracy theories. The story of QAnon believers, united in a battle against what they see as dark forces of the world, reveals where the internet is headed.

For more information on “Rabbit Hole” and today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole.

May 30, 2020
Special Episode: The Latest From Minneapolis
00:17:34

As protests spread over the death of George Floyd, the former officer at the center of the case has been charged with murder. We listen in on the demonstrations, and examine why this tragedy — though too familiar — may be a turning point. Guest: Audra D. S. Burch, a national enterprise correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading:

May 30, 2020
One Hundred Thousand Lives
00:30:00

Barbara Krupke won the lottery. Fred Walter Gray enjoyed his bacon and hash browns crispy. Orlando Moncada crawled through a hole in a fence to reach the United States. John Prine chronicled the human condition. Cornelia Ann Hunt left the world with gratitude.

Over 100,000 people have died from the coronavirus in the United States. Today, we glimpse inside the lives of just a few of them.

Background reading: 

May 29, 2020
Space Travel, Privatized
00:26:35

After nearly a decade on the sidelines of space travel, Cape Canaveral is again launching a shuttle into space. But this time, a private company will be sending NASA astronauts into orbit. What does this moment mean for human exploration of the solar system? Guests: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

May 28, 2020
Can the Postal Service Survive the Pandemic?
00:30:31

The U.S. Postal Service has survived the telegraph, the fax machine and the dawn of the internet. But will it survive coronavirus? Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times and Derek Harpe, a Postal Service worker with a mail route in Mocksville, N.C. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • With the coronavirus threatening the Postal Service’s financial viability, a rescue for the organization has become a political battle.
May 27, 2020
The Story of Two Brothers From Mexico
00:44:13

Two brothers, Javier Morales, 48, and Martin Morales, 39, died of coronavirus within hours of each other in their adopted home of New Jersey. Their last wish was to be buried at home in Mexico, but, to make that happen, their family must navigate the vast bureaucracies of two countries, international airfare and the complications of a pandemic. Guest:Annie Correal, an immigration reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shaila and Melanie Cruz Morales, twin sisters from New Jersey who are the men’s nieces. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • In Mexico, being buried near home is a sacred rite. These are the obstacles the Morales family has faced as they try to return their uncles’ bodies home.
May 26, 2020
'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 6: Impasse
00:24:22

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we’re sharing Episode 6 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, we hear from PewDiePie, one of the biggest and most polarizing YouTube celebrities. He sat down with our reporter to discuss how he’s coming to grips with his influence — and looking to the future.

If you're tuning in to “Rabbit Hole” for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.

May 23, 2020
Genie Chance and the Great Alaska Earthquake
00:49:43

There are moments when the world we take for granted changes instantaneously — when reality is upended and replaced with the unimaginable. Though we try not to think about it, instability is always lurking, and at any moment, a kind of terrible magic can switch on and scramble our lives. 

You may know the feeling.

In 1964, it happened to Anchorage, Alaska, and to a woman named Genie Chance. Today, the author Jon Mooallem tells her story — and the story of the biggest earthquake to hit North America in recorded history — using sonic postcards from the past.

Guest: Jon Mooallem, author of the book “This Is Chance.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

May 22, 2020
A Teenager’s Medical Mystery
00:31:42

From the earliest days of the coronavirus outbreak, health officials believed that it was largely sparing children and teenagers. But the rise of a mysterious inflammatory syndrome — with symptoms ranging from rashes to heart failure — in children testing positive for the virus is challenging that belief. Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, spoke with Jack McMorrow, 14, and his parents in Queens about his experience contracting the coronavirus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • “If I send you home today, you’ll be dead by tomorrow.” This is what Jack heard after learning he had a mysterious illness connected to the coronavirus in children. “I would say that scared me to death but it more like scared me to life.”
  • The new syndrome has been compared to a rare childhood illness called Kawasaki disease. But doctors have learned that it affects the heart differently and is appearing mostly in school-age children, rather than infants and toddlers.
May 21, 2020
Why Is the Pandemic Killing So Many Black Americans?
00:29:45

Some have called the pandemic “the great equalizer.”  But the coronavirus is killing black Americans at staggeringly higher rates than white Americans. Today, we explore why. Guest: Linda Villarosa, a writer for The New York Times Magazine covering racial health disparities, who spoke to Nicole Charles in New Orleans, La. about the death of her husband, Cornell Charles, known as Dickey. He was 51. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

May 20, 2020
Trump’s Purge of the Watchdogs
00:22:27

It used to be rare for a president to fire an inspector general, a position created within government agencies after Watergate and assigned to fight waste and corruption. Today, we look at what President Trump’s pattern of replacing inspectors general reveals about the nature of the independent office — and about presidential power. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

May 19, 2020
Can Government Spending Save the Economy?
00:25:23

As the American economy plunges toward a recession, economists and policymakers are triaging proposals to stanch the bleeding. All of their ideas will cost money the government doesn’t have. That leaves Democrats and Republicans with two major questions: How much should be borrowed for bailouts — and what spending is needed to avoid permanent economic damage?  Guest: Ben Casselman, an economics reporter at The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

Background reading: 

  • Jerome H. Powell, the Federal Reserve chair, has urged Congress to spend more on economic relief — even if doing so means increasing the federal deficit. He warned that the United States was experiencing an economic hit “without modern precedent.”
May 18, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'Letters of Recommendation'
00:24:19

Our worlds have contracted; once expansive, our orbits are now measured by rooms and street blocks. But there are still ways to travel. Today, escape to the worlds contained in three letters — one about the summer of 1910, another describing an upended misconception and a third about how superstitions can offer release. We hope they can offer you some meaning — or at least a distraction.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

May 17, 2020
'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 5: The Accidental Emperor
00:34:40

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we’re sharing Episode 5 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, our reporter investigates how a Swedish gamer with a webcam grew to become the biggest YouTuber in the world. We follow PewDiePie’s path to megastardom — and the war that unfolds when his reign is threatened.

If you're tuning in to “Rabbit Hole” for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.

May 16, 2020
A Bit of Relief: Reruns, Rituals and Restaurants
00:16:59

On today’s “A Bit of Relief,” two critics at The Times share the home rituals that they're leaning on for comfort. For the television critic James Poniewozik, it’s binge-watching television with his family (“Experiencing good or even brilliantly dumb art is a form of self-care,” he reassures). And for the restaurant critic Tejal Rao, the act of rewatching cinematic food scenes is surprisingly delightful.

May 15, 2020
Reopening, Warily
00:31:01

When Louisiana’s stay-at-home order expires today, restaurants across the state can begin allowing customers back inside, at their own discretion. So how do restaurant owners feel about the decision they now face? For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  

Guest: Jasmine Lombrage, a restaurant owner in Baton Rouge, La. 

Background reading: 

May 15, 2020
The Saga of Michael Flynn
00:25:05

Federal prosecutors are asking a court to throw out their own criminal case against the former national security adviser Michael Flynn. We look at what led to that decision. Guest: Mark Mazzetti, a Washington investigative correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

May 14, 2020
The Constitutional Clash on a Conference Call
00:27:40

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court debated the nature of presidential power in two sets of cases regarding demands for President Trump’s personal records: one about his taxes, the other about claims that during his campaign he paid to silence women with whom he previously had affairs. This is what a constitutional clash on a conference call sounded like. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

May 13, 2020
Boris Johnson's Change of Heart
00:26:08

As Italy, France and Spain entered national lockdowns, Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain was still shaking hands with coronavirus patients in hospitals, and then joking about it on national television. Then he was hospitalized with the virus — and by the time he returned, both his attitude and his approach to the crisis were transformed. Today, we explore why the country that was most skeptical of the virus may be the slowest to reopen.  Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

May 12, 2020
The Shooting of Ahmaud Arbery
00:24:46

Ahmaud Arbery would have turned 26 on Friday. Instead of celebrating, a crowd of protesters, protected by masks, demanded justice for his death in front of a courthouse in Georgia. So what do we know about the killing of Mr. Arbery by two armed white men? Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

May 11, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Iceman in Winter'
00:51:09

He was Batman. He was Iceman. Until he wasn’t. So what happened to Val Kilmer?

In this weird, dark time, Taffy Brodesser-Akner tells a story about how sometimes, in the end, everything is different but everything is good.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

May 10, 2020
'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 4: Headquarters
00:39:31

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we’re sharing Episode 4 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, our reporter interviews the woman running the world’s largest and most influential video empire: Susan Wojcicki, the chief executive of YouTube.

"If you're tuning in to "Rabbit Hole" for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole

May 09, 2020
A Bit of Relief: Rick Steves' Travel Dreams
00:16:34

Rick Steves is a travel evangelist, always in motion, traversing faraway places and inspiring others to do the same. So when the world shuts down, and Rick Steves can no longer travel, then who is Rick Steves?

Sam Anderson, a writer for The Times Magazine, profiled the travel guru last year. Today, Sam asks Rick how he’s been expanding his horizons from home. Dreaming of travel, we learn, is nearly as sweet as the real thing.

May 08, 2020
The Arrival of the ‘Murder Hornet’
00:27:18

It came to the United States from Asia and first appeared in Washington State. The country was slow to recognize it. Deaths mounted as it circulated for weeks undetected. And now, if it’s not stopped, it could reshape populations and industries across the country. Today, we discuss the arrival of the Asian giant hornet. Guest: Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent for The New York Times who spoke with Ted McFall, a beekeeper in Washington State. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • The Asian giant hornet can kill humans with its stings. It also decapitates bees methodically. If the hornets spread across the United States and devastate bee populations, which we depend on for one out of every three bites of food we eat, our food supply could be threatened.
  • Although the Asian giant hornet kills honeybees in their hives, some bees have developed a remarkable defense: cooking the hornets alive.
May 08, 2020
The Chinese Lab Theory
00:21:31

Everyone wants to know where the coronavirus came from. In the absence of a clear explanation, several theories are circulating — including one, pushed by the Trump administration, that the pandemic started because of malpractice in a lab in Wuhan, China. But is that a secret the Chinese government is keeping, or a mystery no one knows the answer to? Guest: Julian E. Barnes, who covers national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Leaders in the intelligence community have said there is no indication the virus is man-made, but have yet to reach a conclusion on its origins. While many scientists say the virus most likely made the leap from an animal to a human in southern China, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and President Trump continue to link the outbreak to a government lab.
  • Some national security analysts are worried that pressure from senior Trump administration officials could distort assessments about the origin of the coronavirus and be used as a weapon in an escalating battle with China.
May 07, 2020
A Socially Distanced Senate
00:23:22

The congressional doctor expressed reservations about whether it was safe for the House and Senate to reconvene. Instead, only senators have returned to Capitol Hill, bringing our new normal — elbow bumps, masks and sanitizer — with them. So why was one chamber so determined to portray its members as essential workers in the pandemic? Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • With the Senate back in session, masked lawmakers, hushed corridors and socially distanced news conferences and hearings gave an eerie feel to the Capitol Hill routine.
  • The confirmation hearing for Representative John Ratcliffe, the president’s pick to lead the nation’s intelligence agencies, was the first to employ social distancing rules for senators since the coronavirus pandemic took hold.
May 06, 2020
Bursting the College Bubble
00:25:12

Universities across the United States have long prided themselves on bridging the differences between their students. How the coronavirus has instead reinforced inequalities that campus life can hide. Guest: Nicholas Casey, a national politics reporter at The New York Times, who spoke to faculty and students at Haverford College, a liberal arts school near Philadelphia. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • When the students were sleeping in the same dorms and eating the same dining hall food, the disparities in their backgrounds weren’t as clear as they are over video chat. Here’s a peek inside two students’ vastly different worlds.
May 05, 2020
One Meat Plant. One Thousand Infections.
00:29:54

One of the largest coronavirus outbreaks in the United States has been inside the Smithfield pork factory in Sioux Falls, S.D. Today, we speak with a worker at the plant, a refugee who survived civil war and malaria only to find her life and livelihood threatened anew. Guests: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times, spoke with Achut Deng, a Sudanese refugee who worked at Smithfield. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

May 04, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'Alone at Sea'
00:41:44

For Aleksander Doba, pitting himself against the wide-open sea — storms, sunstroke, monotony, hunger and loneliness — is a way to feel alive in old age. Today, listen to the story of one man who chose to paddle toward the existential crisis that is life, crossing the Atlantic alone in a kayak. Three times.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

May 03, 2020
'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 3: Mirror Image
00:28:22

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we’re sharing Episode 3 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, our reporter continues to trace the journey of a young man named Caleb. Five years into a rabbit hole on YouTube, Caleb discovers a parallel universe.

If you're tuning in to "Rabbit Hole" for the first time, start with the prologue. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole.

May 02, 2020
A Bit of Relief: Tea and Toast
00:16:11

In this week’s episode of “A Bit of Relief,” we turn to tea and toast for comfort. First, Kim Severson, a food writer at The Times, shares her love for buttered toast sprinkled in cinnamon and sugar. Then we hear Mark Thompson, C.E.O. at The Times, explain how to brew his ideal cup of British tea: using a stovetop kettle, loose black tea leaves, a strainer and a splash of milk. It's more complicated than you'd think.

May 01, 2020
Tilly Remembers Her Grandfather
00:23:39

Climbing on the roof to look at stars in the middle of summer. Making French toast and popcorn. Kind eyes. These are some of the memories 12-year-old Tilly Breimhorst has of her grandfather, Craig. Today, we talk to her about how she is processing sadness, anger and grief after losing him to coronavirus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • In personal and profound ways, the coronavirus crisis has created a sense of collective loss. Here are some ways to grieve.
May 01, 2020
Biden’s Campaign of Isolation
00:26:06

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is the first candidate in American history to wage a presidential campaign in quarantine. From his basement in Delaware, he has struggled to attain the same visibility as his opponent, President Trump. But is that a good thing? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 30, 2020
The Governor and the Protester
00:36:39

She ordered Michigan to stay on lockdown through mid-May. He thinks the measures are too extreme. Today, we speak to them both. 

Guests: Gov. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan and Phil Campbell, a vice president of a pest control company whose revenues have been halved during lockdown. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 29, 2020
The State of Testing
00:24:59

Across the United States, governors are weighing the difficult question of when, and how, to begin to lift lockdown restrictions. Without federal coordination, some are looking abroad to see what has worked in countries like New Zealand, Australia and South Korea, which have effectively controlled the spread of the virus. The answer? Widespread testing. Guest: Katie Thomas, a business reporter covering the health care industry for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 28, 2020
A Glut in Oil
00:27:23

Something weird happened last week. It was something that millions of people who have faced years of painful prices at the gas pump never expected: The cost of a barrel of oil dropped into the negatives. Today, we explore why this happened, and what it reveals about the state of the economy. Guest: Clifford Krauss, an energy correspondent for The Times based in Houston. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • The bizarre dip in oil prices was based on a quirk in the way barrels are traded, one that appears only when the market is “undergoing extreme stress.”
  • “I’m just living a nightmare,” one leader of a large petroleum association said. This is a look inside how the pandemic is decimating the oil industry.
Apr 27, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'Closing the Restaurant That Was My Life for 20 Years'
00:42:54

On today’s episode of “The Sunday Read,” one restaurateur reflects on closing the kitchen that saw her through 20 years of life — marriage and children and divorce and remarriage, with funerals and first dates in between. She doesn’t know if it will reopen.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Apr 26, 2020
'Rabbit Hole,' Episode 2: Looking Down
00:37:20

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Today, we’re sharing Episode 2 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose.

In this episode, we hear from a young man named Caleb who was pulled into a vortex on YouTube: “The truth is down there, and you’ve got to go down and dig for it.” What was he watching on the platform? And why was it so transfixing?

If you're tuning in to "Rabbit Hole" for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.

Apr 25, 2020
A Bit of Relief: I Forgive You, New York
00:10:13

Roger Cohen, a columnist for The Times, shares his experience of waking up to a ghostly version of New York City — the city with a hum that never ceases, until it did. On today’s episode, he writes to the city and asks for forgiveness.

Apr 24, 2020
A New Way to Mourn
00:44:13

He was a pastor. She was a poet. They found a second chance at love and traveled the world together, visiting Antarctica, Mount Sinai and Alaska. Today, we hear how he memorialized her life when she died in quarantine. Guest: Catherine Porter, an international reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Wayne Irwin, a retired minister of the United Church of Canada, about the loss of his wife, Flora May. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • The rituals of our lives have been transformed. An expert on gathering shares advice for birthdays and baby showers in our new audio series, “Together Apart.”
Apr 24, 2020
Getting Off Rikers Island
00:18:55

Across the United States, jails and prisons have become petri dishes for the coronavirus — dangerously cramped, unsanitary quarters where residents lack the resources to keep safe. This has prompted local governments to release thousands of inmates. But who got to go, and who had to stay? And how was that decision made?

Today, we hear the story of one inmate trying to get out of the second-largest jail in the country, the Rikers Island prison complex in New York. Guests: Alan Feuer, who covers criminal justice for The New York Times, and Mitch Pomerance, a resident of Rikers Island. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

For weeks, public defenders warned of a public health catastrophe if inmates weren't released and prisons weren’t sanitized to guard against the coronavirus. Now, the pandemic is hitting jail systems across the country.

Apr 23, 2020
Who’s Organizing the Lockdown Protests?
00:25:28

Across the United States, protests are erupting against orders to remain at home, close nonessential businesses and limit travel. So who is behind these protests? And what do they stand to gain? Guest: Jim Rutenberg, a writer-at-large for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 22, 2020
The Supreme Court Rules From Home
00:22:10

This week, the Supreme Court began rolling out a series of major rulings on the jury system, immigration, abortion rights and presidential power. In normal times, this would be a blockbuster week for the court. But these are not normal times. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • In one of their first decisions this week, the Supreme Court ruled against Montana landowners in their fight against an oil company over the cleanup of contaminated land.
  • Across the country, the coronavirus crisis is colliding with the culture wars. This is how issues like abortion, gun rights and religious freedom are being debated in public now.
Apr 21, 2020
The Next Year (or Two) of the Pandemic
00:24:55

As President Trump urges states to begin reopening their economies, a debate is raging over when and how to end lockdowns across the country. Our reporter spoke to dozens of public health experts to try to understand our path out of lockdown — and how our world will change in the meantime. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 20, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Woman Who Might Find Us Another Earth'
00:33:10

On today’s episode of “The Sunday Read,” we tell the story of a woman who has spent her life trying to find the light of other worlds. We hope it can offer an escape when our own feels so dark.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Apr 19, 2020
Introducing 'Rabbit Hole'
00:27:19

What is the internet doing to us? Today, we’re sharing the first episode of a new Times audio series called “Rabbit Hole.”

In the episode, “Wonderland,” we hear from a young man named Caleb, who finds escape and direction on the internet. We follow his journey into the YouTube universe.

“Rabbit Hole," a New York Times audio series with tech columnist Kevin Roose, explores what happens when our lives move online. You can find more information about it here.

Apr 17, 2020
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Progressivism and the Pandemic
00:34:09

Her mentor and political inspiration has dropped out of the presidential race, and her congressional district has been described as the “epicenter of the epicenter” of the pandemic in New York City. It’s one of the hardest-hit districts in the country, and many of her constituents are having to work outside their homes during the crisis.

Today, a conversation with Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • In a city ravaged by an epidemic, few places have been as hard hit as Ms. Ocasio-Cortez’s district. Here’s a look inside the crisis in Queens.
  • In a recent interview with The Times, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez revealed that she had never met Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee for president. Although she intends to support him, she said that the “process of coming together should be uncomfortable for everyone involved.”
Apr 17, 2020
Kicked Out of China
00:28:32

Note: This episode contains strong language.

The New York Times’s reporters working in China have been expelled by the Chinese government, alongside reporters covering China for The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post. Today, we speak with one of our correspondents about his experience learning that he would have to leave the place he has called home for the last decade — and about the last story he reported before he left. Guest: Paul Mozur, the Asia technology reporter for The New York Times, formerly based in Shanghai. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 16, 2020
24 Hours Inside a Brooklyn Hospital
00:24:17

Note: This episode contains strong language. 

More than a month since the onset of the coronavirus crisis, the majority of patients — some of whom are doctors themselves — in Brooklyn Hospital Center’s critical care unit have Covid-19. With permission from staff, patients and their families, we shadowed one doctor for a day to get a sense of what it is like on the front lines of the pandemic.

Guest: Sheri Fink, a correspondent for The New York Times covering public health, who spoke with Dr. Josh Rosenberg and his colleagues at Brooklyn Hospital Center’s intensive care unit.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Test kits and protective gear have been in short supply, doctors are falling sick, and every day gets more difficult. But the staff at Brooklyn Hospital Center keeps showing up.
  • On their shifts, medical workers throughout the hospital face unrelenting chaos. At one point while our reporter shadowed, three “codes” — emergency interventions when someone is on the brink of death — occurred at once.
Apr 15, 2020
Examining the Allegation Against Joe Biden
00:30:32

Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.

A former Senate aide to Joseph R. Biden Jr., the prospective Democratic presidential candidate, has accused him of sexually assaulting her in 1993. A Biden spokeswoman said the allegation was false, and people who had worked in Mr. Biden’s office did not recall talk of such an incident. Today, we examine what we know about the allegation, who Ms. Reade spoke to about her experience at the time and what her former colleagues say now. Guest: Lisa Lerer, a reporter at The New York Times who covers campaigns, elections and political power, who spoke with Ms. Reade. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Ms. Reade recently filed a report with the Washington, D.C., police, saying she was the victim of a sexual assault in 1993. While not naming Mr. Biden directly, Ms. Reade said the complaint was about him.
  • Last year, Ms. Reade and seven other women came forward to accuse Mr. Biden of kissing, hugging or touching them in ways that made them feel uncomfortable.
Apr 14, 2020
Voices of the Pandemic
00:26:19

Most of America is entering its second month of lockdown in an ongoing effort to contain the coronavirus. Still, our reporters are — as safely as they can be — spread across the country, doing their best to document this unique, and at times scary, moment in our lives. Today, we listen in as they ask people in Pittsburgh, Kansas City, New York and Seattle about their new realities. Guests: Campbell Robertson, John Eligon, Alan Feuer and Mike Baker, reporters for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Once-crowded American cities now feel abandoned, as if everyone suddenly moved out. There is no rush hour on the nation’s highways. “Closed” signs hang from the front doors of business after business. This was 24 hours in our new country.
Apr 13, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'Weird Al Yankovic’s Weirdly Enduring Appeal'
00:57:57

On this episode of “The Sunday Read,” staff writer Sam Anderson claims Weird Al Yankovic is not just a parody singer — he’s “a full-on rock star, a legitimate performance monster and a spiritual technician doing important work down in the engine room of the American soul.” In these absurd times, Sam reaches into his childhood to explain the enduring appeal of an absurd artist. 

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Apr 12, 2020
A Bit of Relief: 'Soup Is Soup'
00:13:30

Ali Jaffe and her grandmother Roslyn are self-quarantining 1,200 miles apart. Lately, they’ve been connecting — and coping — by cooking together virtually.

Ali is learning the recipes her grandmother cooked for her own kids in the 1960s, a period when she had limited time and resources (“Whatever the box says, that’s what I do,” Roslyn recalls). And through their FaceTime lessons, Ali learns their family stories.

Apr 11, 2020
'I Become a Person of Suspicion'
00:35:41

Note: This episode contains strong language.

As the death toll from the coronavirus rises in the U.S., so do reports of verbal and physical attacks against Asian-Americans, who say hostile strangers are blaming them for the pandemic. Today, one writer shares her story. Guest: Jiayang Fan, a staff writer at The New Yorker magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 10, 2020
On the Front Lines in New Orleans
00:25:39

The outbreak of the coronavirus in Louisiana has become one of the most explosive in the country. Today, we explore how New Orleans became a petri dish for the virus, why Mardi Gras was likely to have been an accelerator for the spread of infections and what it is like now inside the city’s hospitals. Guest: Yanti Turang, a nurse in New Orleans. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 09, 2020
The Latest: Bernie Sanders Drops Out
00:06:44

Bernie Sanders has suspended his 2020 presidential campaign, marking the end of a quest to the White House that began five years ago. We look at why Sanders is calling his campaign an ideological victory, and how he plans to champion his messages as a senator working with the Democratic Party.

“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

Apr 08, 2020
A Crisis Inside the Navy
00:23:20

Note: This episode contains strong language.

The upheaval and anguish caused by the pandemic led to a series of actions that cost both the captain of an aircraft carrier and the head of the Navy their jobs. Today, we explore how the coronavirus has created a crisis inside the service.

Guest: Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 08, 2020
Wisconsin's Pandemic Primary
00:29:26

Against the advice of public health officials and the wishes of its own governor, Wisconsin will hold its Democratic primary today — in the middle of a pandemic. So how did that happen? Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • The political and legal fight between Wisconsin’s conservative state legislature and its Democratic governor was only the first round of an expected national fight over voting rights during the coronavirus crisis.
Apr 07, 2020
A Historic Unemployment Crisis
00:24:05

To contain the pandemic, the U.S. government has brought the economy to a halt. Today, we explore one result of their containment efforts: one of the worst unemployment crises in American history. Guest: Jim Tankersley, a reporter covering economic and tax policy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 06, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Battle Over the Sea-Monkey Fortune'
00:33:01

On this week’s “Sunday Read,” the magazine writer Jack Hitt introduces his story of how one 1960s bondage-film actress waged legal combat with a toy company for ownership over her husband’s mail-order aquatic-pet empire. The story is as crazy as it sounds.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Apr 05, 2020
A Bit of Relief: Introducing 'Sugar Calling'
00:09:43

Today, we’re sharing an excerpt from a new Times audio series called “Sugar Calling,” hosted by the best-selling author Cheryl Strayed. Each week, Cheryl will call a writer she admires in search of insight and courage. She’s turning to some of the most prolific writers of our time — all over the age of 60 — to ask the questions on all our minds: How do we stay calm when everything has been upended? How do we muster courage when fear is all around us?

To start, Cheryl reaches out to the author George Saunders, her old friend and mentor.

"Sugar Calling" is a new podcast by The New York Times. You can listen to the full version of the first episode here.

Apr 03, 2020
The Return of the Governor
00:26:58

In recent years, governors have sat on the sidelines as the federal government has commanded most of the attention and airtime. Today, we explore how the pandemic has generated a revival of state and local politics — and made governors into national heroes. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 03, 2020
A Conversation With Dr. Anthony Fauci
00:28:52

Today, we speak with Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s leading expert on infectious diseases, about his experience in the trenches of the government’s response to the coronavirus crisis. “We are in a war. I mean, I actually think this is exactly what generals or leaders in real, you know, violent combat wars feel.”

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Dr. Fauci has been clear about the need to practice social distancing to contain the spread of the virus, but that stance has made him the target of online conspiracy theorists.
  • This week, scientists with the coronavirus task force used models to deliver an update on the expected spread of the disease, projecting the coronavirus could kill up to 240,000 Americans. They pledged to do everything possible to reduce that number.
Apr 02, 2020
The Race for a Vaccine
00:24:32

Scientists are racing to make a vaccine for the coronavirus, collaborating across borders in what is usually a secretive and competitive field. But their cooperation has been complicated by national leaders trying to buy first claim on any breakthrough. Today, we explore how the fight to own a future coronavirus vaccine is revealing the boundaries of international solidarity.

Guest: Katrin Bennhold, Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, spoke with Lidia Oostvogels, who researches infectious diseases with the German biotech company CureVac. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Apr 01, 2020
Why the U.S. Is Running Out of Medical Supplies
00:23:51

States and cities across the United States are reporting dangerous shortages of the vital medical supplies needed to contain the coronavirus. Why is the world’s biggest economy suffering such a scramble to find lifesaving equipment?

Guest: Sarah Kliff, an investigative reporter covering health care for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 31, 2020
Back From the Brink
00:31:49

Across the United States, many hospitals are confronting their first cases of coronavirus. Today, we speak to New Jersey’s first confirmed coronavirus patient, a medical professional, about what having the virus was like for him, what he learned from the experience and why he thinks, “America is not ready.”

Guests: Susan Dominus, a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, spoke with James Cai, a physician assistant. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • James Cai was told his test for coronavirus had not been completed. Then he heard from the governor on the news that he was the first confirmed case in New Jersey. Why states must ask knotty questions about how much to tell the public — and when.
  • President Trump, listening to his health advisers, has said that the country should be practicing social distancing until at least the end of April. Here are the latest updates.
Mar 30, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'What I Learned When My Husband Got Coronavirus'
00:24:34

After weeks of caring for her sick husband, our colleague wanted to write an essay about her family’s battle against the coronavirus — a warning to those in isolation who haven’t experienced the ravages of the virus intimately. Today, we read her letter from the future aloud.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Mar 29, 2020
A Bit of Relief: Jody's Playlist
00:16:36

Jody Rosen, a writer for The Times Magazine, transports us into his current soundtrack. From Alberta Hunter's “voice of longevity” to the “transfixing performance” of Missy Elliott, Jody shares the music that’s helping him find new rhythms — during these days stuck inside.


Music discussed:

  • “My Castle’s Rockin’” by Alberta Hunter
  • “I’ll Get By” by Nick Lucas
  • “Lick Shots” by Missy Elliott
  • “Simply Beautiful” by Al Green
Mar 27, 2020
A Kids’ Guide to Coronavirus
00:29:41

Over the last few weeks, children have called into “The Daily” with a lot of questions about the coronavirus: How did the virus get on earth? What color is coronavirus? And can dogs get it? Today, we try to answer them. Guest: Carl Zimmer, science reporter and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 27, 2020
A Historic Stimulus Bill
00:30:20

To rescue the American economy in the coronavirus crisis, Congress is on the verge of adopting the most expensive stimulus bill in U.S. history. But how much is the battle over this measure being influenced by the last financial crisis? Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, the congressional editor of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • The bill promises a $1,200 payout to millions of Americans, increased jobless aid and grants to save small businesses from permanent closure. Here’s what it means for you.
Mar 26, 2020
‘Raring to Go by Easter’
00:28:01

Last week, President Trump called himself a “wartime president” as he faced up to the threat caused by the coronavirus. But only days later — and with the crisis escalating — he has abandoned that message. What changed?

Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Despite the warnings, President Trump said he believed a crippled economy and forced social isolation would inflict more harm than the spread of the virus.
  • Mr. Trump is now facing a personal dilemma as he responds to the crisis: How can he save his campaign for re-election when so much is suddenly going so wrong?
  • The White House and Congress have reached a $2 trillion stimulus deal, the biggest such package in modern American history. The plan would offer jobless benefits to individuals and direct cash payments to taxpayers.
Mar 25, 2020
Why the American Approach Is Failing
00:28:57

So far, the United States has been losing the battle against the pandemic, with a patchwork of inconsistent measures across the country proving unequal to halting the spread of the virus. Today, we ask: What will it take to change the course of the crisis?

Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 24, 2020
The Pandemic and the Primary
00:27:47

Two weeks ago, the biggest story in the country was the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. Now, with the dramatic onset of the coronavirus crisis, the primary has largely gone off the radar. Today, we talk to Alexander Burns, a political reporter at The New York Times, about what happened when those two stories collided. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 23, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'The Mixed-Up Brothers of Bogotá'
01:20:05

On this special episode of “The Daily,” one magazine writer reflects on life’s unpredictability and shares her story of a hospital error that scrambled two pairs of Colombian identical twins. This is the story of how the four brothers found one another — and of what happened next.

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Mar 22, 2020
A Bit of Relief: Alone Together
00:06:37

On this special episode of “The Daily,” Kevin Roose, a tech reporter for The Times, shares what he’s realized after a week in self-isolation: The internet has become kinder. From virtual birthday parties and singalongs, to happy hours and yoga classes, people are pulling together on the internet, in real time, all over the world. We listen in on what that sounds like.

Mar 21, 2020
New York City Grinds to a Halt
00:35:14

Across America, businesses are scaling back, firing workers and shutting their doors because of the coronavirus. New York’s Chinatown has been experiencing a downturn for weeks as anxiety and discrimination affected business. Now, the state government has mandated nonessential businesses in the city keep 75 percent of their workers home. So what did it sound like as one of the busiest cities in the world ground to a halt? Five producers at “The Daily,” Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Jessica Cheung, Daniel Guillemette and Andy Mills, spoke to small business owners to find out. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 20, 2020
One City’s Fight to Stop the Virus
00:28:26

New Rochelle, a suburb north of New York City, has one of the largest clusters of coronavirus infections in the U.S. We visited the community to find out how the containment measures were being implemented and how successful they have been. On today’s episode: Sarah Maslin Nir, a breaking news reporter at The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 19, 2020
Gov. Andrew Cuomo: ‘It’s Making Sure We Live Through This.’
00:30:52

New York was one of the earliest states with confirmed cases of coronavirus, and it now has the most confirmed infections in the U.S. To control the outbreak, the authorities have begun taking increasingly drastic steps, including closing schools and businesses. Today, we talk with the governor, Andrew M. Cuomo, to hear about how he is handling the crisis.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Life in New York, a city of 8.6 million people and an economic engine for the country, is grinding to a shocking halt.
  • The White House issued plans for an economic stimulus that included sending $1,000 to every American. In Europe, leaders voted to seal the borders of 26 countries. Here are the latest updates on the spread of the virus.
Mar 18, 2020
The Latest: Why President Trump Changed His Tone on the Coronavirus
00:05:55

On Monday, President Trump announced sweeping new guidelines to control the spread of the coronavirus. Among them: encouraging Americans to work from home and to avoid gatherings of more than 10 people. We look at a report that may have inspired the president’s change in tone — and whether U.S. hospitals are prepared for the potentially staggering projections.

The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories.

Mar 17, 2020
‘It’s Like a War’
00:23:01

Italy has become the epicenter of the pandemic’s European migration, with nearly 30,000 infections and more than 2,000 deaths in just a few weeks. These numbers are soaring by the day, even after the government took extreme measures to lock down much of the country. Now, the U.S. surgeon general is warning that America is on a strikingly similar path. Today, we speak to one Italian doctor triaging patients north of Milan about the road that may lie ahead. Guest: Dr. Fabiano Di Marco, a professor at the University of Milan who is also the head of the respiratory unit of the Hospital Papa Giovanni XXIII in Bergamo, a nearby town. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 17, 2020
Why This Recession Will Be Different
00:24:33

In past financial crises, central banks across the world developed a time-tested tool kit to rescue national economies. So why don’t previous interventions seem to be working this time? Guest: Peter S. Goodman, who writes about the economy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • The Federal Reserve cut interest rates to near zero and said it would buy hundreds of billions of dollars in U.S. government debt, moves reminiscent of its actions during the 2008 financial crisis.
  • The coronavirus is upending life as we know it — and news is changing rapidly. Here are the latest updates on school closings, travel restrictions and governmental directives.
Mar 16, 2020
The Sunday Read: 'This Tom Hanks Story Will Make You Feel Less Bad'
00:35:37

On this special episode of “The Daily,” a magazine writer for The Times reflects on her experience interviewing Tom Hanks last fall — and on the generosity he showed her in a difficult personal moment. In this time of collective stress, we wanted to bring the story to you in audio as a reminder that “contagion is real, but it doesn’t just work for viruses,” our writer said. “It works for kind words and generous thoughts, and acts of selflessness and honesty.”

This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Mar 15, 2020
Special Episode: A Bit of Relief
00:09:55

We’re in a moment that feels scary, uncertain and unsettling, and may feel this way for a while. While we’ll continue to cover the coronavirus pandemic until it’s over, we realize that this time requires more than news and information. We also need release — and relief. And we’ll do our best to provide that in the coming weeks. To start, we asked a few of our colleagues at The Times to share what’s bringing them comfort right now. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Guests:

  • Taffy Brodesser-Akner reads from “Love in the Time of Cholera” by Gabriel García Márquez.
  • Wesley Morris reads from “In Pursuit of Flavor” by Edna Lewis.
  • Dean Baquet reads from “On Living in an Atomic Age” by C.S. Lewis.
Mar 14, 2020
Learning to Live With the Coronavirus
00:29:12

Now that the coronavirus is a pandemic, with both infections and deaths surging in many places across the world, we return to a reporter who has covered the story from the start and ask him how best to navigate this new reality. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • The World Health Organization now describes the coronavirus as a pandemic, and the number of cases continues to rise worldwide. These basic steps can help you reduce your risk of getting sick or infecting others.
  • The global pandemic is affecting many aspects of daily life. Here are the latest updates on school closures, social distancing measures and event cancellations.
Mar 13, 2020
Confronting a Pandemic
00:24:52

Global health officials have praised China and South Korea for the success of their efforts to contain the coronavirus. What are those countries getting right — and what can everyone else learn from them?

Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • While world leaders are finally speaking out about the gravity of the pandemic, their response lacks unity with the United States absent from its traditional conductor role in managing global crises. 
  • Stocks tanked again as the outbreak was officially declared a pandemic and policies to address its impact proved lacking or ineffective.
  • All flights to the U.S. have been suspended from Europe. Many schools announced they would close indefinitely, some nursing homes banned visitors, and workplaces across the country have urged their employees to work from home. Here are the latest updates.
Mar 12, 2020
Why the U.S. Wasn’t Ready for the Coronavirus
00:23:50

Developing a strategy for testing was supposed to be a relatively simple part of preparing for the coronavirus in the United States. So what went wrong? Guests: Sheri Fink, a correspondent for The Times reporting on global public health, and Dr. Helen Y. Chu, an infectious disease expert in Seattle. Dr. Chu was part of a research project that tried to conduct early tests for the coronavirus but failed to obtain state and federal support.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 11, 2020
The Latest: Joe Biden Takes Command
00:05:16

Last night was a make-or-break moment for Senator Bernie Sanders, who needed a comeback from a loss to former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. in the Super Tuesday primaries. After Mr. Sanders lost the primary in Michigan, a state he won in an upset in 2016, we ask: Is Mr. Biden now the presumptive Democratic nominee for president? And if not, what is Mr. Sanders’s path forward? The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories.

Mar 11, 2020
The Field: What Happened to Elizabeth Warren?
00:35:11

Today, millions of voters across six states will cast their ballots for the two viable Democratic candidates left: former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders. What began as a contest with historic diversity of race, gender and sexual orientation has come down to two heterosexual white men over 70.

Astead W. Herndon, who covered Senator Senator Elizabeth Warren for The New York Times, asks: How did we get here? With Austin Mitchell and Jessica Cheung, producers for “The Daily,” Mr. Herndon traveled to Massachusetts to find out. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 10, 2020
The Latest: Why Markets Crashed on Monday
00:07:39

Within minutes of the U.S. stock market opening on Monday, the S&P 500 sunk so swiftly that it triggered a 15-minute pause in trading, a rare event meant to prevent stocks from crashing. We look at why this happened and what it means for the U.S. economy.

“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

Mar 10, 2020
A Test for Abortion Rights
00:24:12

A case before the Supreme Court is the first big test of abortion rights since President Trump created a conservative majority among the justices. We traveled to the Louisiana health clinic at the center of the case to ask what was at stake in the decision. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times, spoke with Kathaleen Pittman, director of Hope Medical Group for Women in Shreveport, La. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • The justices are considering whether Louisiana can require doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. While the law is specific, their decision may be a test for the future of abortion rights in America more broadly.
  • Ms. Pittman remembers when there were 11 abortion clinics in Louisiana. Now there are only three, hers among them. After the Supreme Court’s upcoming ruling, there may be only one.
Mar 09, 2020
The Almost-Peace Deal
00:32:29

After years of false starts, the United States has signed a landmark deal with the Taliban to end the war in Afghanistan. We traveled to the front lines of the war — and to the signing ceremony in Doha, Qatar — to investigate whether peace is actually possible.

Guest: Mujib Mashal, senior correspondent for The New York Times in Afghanistan.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 06, 2020
The Coronavirus Outbreak in Washington State
00:28:22

A strategy of containment was supposed to protect Washington State from the coronavirus. It didn’t. So what led to the first major outbreak of the pathogen in the United States?

Guests: Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent for The New York Times and Bridget Parkhill, a woman whose 77-year-old mother is on lockdown inside a coronavirus-affected nursing facility in Kirkland, Washington. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 05, 2020
How Super Tuesday Unfolded
00:25:06

The results of Super Tuesday make clear that the race for the Democratic presidential nomination is increasingly a battle between former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders. Today, we explore what happened on the biggest night of the race so far. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Mr. Biden is back as front-runner after sweeping states across the south thanks to moderates and African-American voters, while Mr. Sanders harnessed the backing of liberals and young voters to claim California, the biggest delegate prize of the night.
  • Primary results are still coming in. Here are the latest updates and The Times’s live analysis.
Mar 04, 2020
Inside the Mind of a Super Tuesday Voter
00:33:07

In the weeks leading up to Super Tuesday, Senator Bernie Sanders was the only candidate to win across multiple states. With his more moderate competitors splitting the vote, his success was built on a coalition of union workers, Hispanics and the college-educated.

Then South Carolina happened. Now, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is banking on a different coalition — this time, of suburban, black and older voters. Is the contest for the Democratic nomination now a two-person race? Guest: Brian Keane, a 52-year-old Democratic voter from Arlington, Va, who spoke with Michael Barbaro about his experiences with Mr. Biden and his thoughts on the 2020 election. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 03, 2020
Joe Biden’s Big Win
00:23:42

For more than 30 years, over three presidential runs, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. has been waiting to notch a victory like the one he received in the South Carolina primary this weekend. The win also prompted former Mayor Pete Buttigieg to end his presidential bid, potentially resetting the race for the Democratic nomination. How did Mr. Biden do it? And what could his success mean for Super Tuesday?

Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Mar 02, 2020
The Field: Biden’s Last Hope
00:36:44

Former vice president Joseph R. Biden Jr. was once a clear front-runner in the race for the Democratic nomination. Now, he is fighting back from a string of losses and staking his candidacy on his ability to win tomorrow’s South Carolina primary, the first in a state with a large black population. But will he win, and if the margin isn’t as decisive as he hopes, can he stay in the race? Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times traveled to South Carolina with Clare Toeniskoetter and Annie Brown, producers on “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 28, 2020
The Coronavirus Goes Global
00:23:28

What began as a public health crisis in China is well on the way to becoming a pandemic. And while there is a lot of news about the coronavirus, there is also a lack of understanding about the severity of the threat. As officials warn of a potential outbreak in the U.S., we ask: How bad could the coronavirus get? Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 27, 2020
Why Russia Is Rooting for Both Trump and Sanders
00:22:30

U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that the Russian government is attempting to interfere in the 2020 presidential race — but it is doing so by supporting two very different candidates. So why is Russia rooting for both President Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders? Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent and a senior writer at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 26, 2020
The Latest: The South Carolina Debate
00:07:46

On the debate stage in Charleston, candidates went after Senator Bernie Sanders, painting his potential nomination as dangerous for the party and questioning his chances of winning against President Trump.

“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

Feb 26, 2020
The Weinstein Jury Believed the Women
00:23:04

Harvey Weinstein was found guilty on Monday of two felony sex crimes, and he now faces a possible sentence of between five and 29 years. We asked the reporters who first broke the story about the accusations of sexual misconduct against Mr. Weinstein to explain to us what the jurors in his Manhattan trial were asked to do — and what it means that they did it.

Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 25, 2020
Can Corporations Stop Climate Change?
00:25:06

In recent weeks, several of the largest and most profitable American companies have introduced elaborate plans to combat climate change. So why are they doing it now? And just how meaningful are their plans? Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 24, 2020
The Field: An Anti-Endorsement in Nevada
00:42:54

Note: This episode contains strong language.

Senator Bernie Sanders is a staunchly pro-union candidate. But he has found himself mired in an escalating battle over health care with the largest labor union in Nevada. With what some call “the best insurance in America” — the fruit of struggles including a six-year strike — members of the Culinary Workers Union have been reluctant to support Mr. Sanders’s “Medicare for All” plan. We went to Nevada to ask how what is effectively an anti-endorsement of Mr. Sanders from the union’s leaders may affect his support in the state’s caucuses on Saturday.

Guests: Jennifer Medina, who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The Times traveled to Nevada with Clare Toeniskoetter and Austin Mitchell, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 21, 2020
The Latest: The Nevada Debate
00:08:27

Last night, the Democratic debate in Nevada revealed more open hostility and made more personal attacks than in any of the previous six debates in the race for the nomination. Today, we explore what these attacks reflect about the state of the Democratic race and the urgency that the candidates are feeling.

“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

Feb 20, 2020
A Criminal Underworld of Child Abuse, Part 2
00:26:40

Yesterday on “The Daily,” we heard about the government’s failure to crack down on the explosive growth of child sexual abuse imagery online. In the second half of this series, we look at the role of the nation’s biggest tech companies, and why — despite pleas from victims — the illicit images remain online. Guest: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at the The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times, spoke with the mother and stepfather of a teenager who was sexually abused as a child. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 20, 2020
A Criminal Underworld of Child Abuse, Part 1
00:23:22

Note: This episode contains descriptions of child sexual abuse.

A monthslong New York Times investigation has uncovered a digital underworld of child sexual abuse imagery that is hiding in plain sight. In part one of a two-part series, we look at the almost unfathomable scale of the problem — and just how little is being done to stop it. Guests: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Last year, tech companies reported over 60 million online photos and videos of children being sexually abused. Lawmakers foresaw this crisis years ago, but enforcement has fallen short. Our reporters investigated the problem and asked: Can it be stopped?
  • Tech companies detected a surge in online videos of child sexual abuse last year, with encrypted social messaging apps enabling abusers to share images under a cloak of secrecy.
  • Here are six takeaways from The Times’s investigation of the boom in online child sex abuse.
Feb 19, 2020
Michael Bloomberg’s Not-So-Secret Weapon
00:32:08

Despite being a late entry into the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, Michael R. Bloomberg, the billionaire media tycoon and former mayor of New York City, has surged in the polls and is winning key endorsements before he’s even on the ballot. Today, we explore the hidden infrastructure of influence and persuasion behind his campaign — and the dilemma it poses for Democrats. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 18, 2020
The Post-Acquittal Presidency
00:26:09

Since his acquittal in the Senate, President Trump has undertaken a campaign of retribution against those who crossed him during the impeachment inquiry — while extending favors to those who have tried to protect him. Today, we explore what has happened so far in this new phase of his presidency. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 14, 2020
Fear, Fury and the Coronavirus
00:22:52

Note: This episode contains strong language in both English and Mandarin.

What started as a story about fear of a new and dangerous virus has become a story of fury over the Chinese government’s handling of an epidemic. Today, one of our China correspondents takes us behind the scenes of Beijing’s response to a global outbreak. Guest: Amy Qin, a China correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 13, 2020
The Results From New Hampshire
00:27:37

Senator Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire’s Democratic primary last night, with Pete Buttigieg and Senator Amy Klobuchar close behind in second and third. After two candidates once considered front-runners, Senator Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden, finished toward the back of the pack, we consider what Mr. Sanders’s win means for the rest of the race for the Democratic nomination. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • With his New Hampshire win, Mr. Sanders tightened his grip on the Democratic Party’s liberal wing, benefiting from a field that has divided moderate voters.
  • Here are the full results. Unlike in Iowa, where we have yet to declare an official winner, we can confidently say Mr. Sanders won in New Hampshire in a tight race with Mr. Buttigieg.
Feb 12, 2020
The Field: The Aftershocks of Iowa in New Hampshire
00:32:03

Voters in New Hampshire pride themselves on helping winnow the nomination field. While many polls show Senator Bernie Sanders leading in this year’s primary, the caucus debacle in Iowa meant no single candidate left that first contest with full momentum. We flew from Iowa to New Hampshire, following the campaign trail and talking to voters about whether Democrats who don’t support Sanders are coalescing around another choice.

Guests: Lisa Lerer, a reporter at The New York Times, covering campaigns, elections and political power, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Jessica Cheung, producers on “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading: 

Feb 11, 2020
The End of Privacy as We Know It?
00:29:59

A secretive start-up promising the next generation of facial recognition software has compiled a database of images far bigger than anything ever constructed by the United States government: over three billion, it says. Is this technology a breakthrough for law enforcement — or the end of privacy as we know it?

Guest: Annie Brown, a producer on “The Daily,” spoke with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 10, 2020
The Woman Defending Harvey Weinstein
00:31:58

Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.

In the trial of Harvey Weinstein, six women have taken the stand, each making similar accusations of rape and sexual assault against the movie producer. Throughout their testimony, Weinstein’s defense lawyers have portrayed those encounters as consensual and suggested that in many cases it was the women who wanted something from Mr. Weinstein. His lawyers have seized on the fact that the two women whose accounts are at the center of the criminal charges in his New York trial agreed to have sex and friendly contact with Mr. Weinstein after they were allegedly victimized. Today, one of The Times reporters who broke the story of Mr. Weinstein’s alleged abuse more than two years ago speaks with Donna Rotunno, the lawyer behind Mr. Weinstein’s legal strategy.

Guests: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement," spoke with Donna Rotunno, Harvey Weinstein’s lead defense lawyer. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 07, 2020
Mitt Romney’s Lonely Vote
00:28:51

President Trump was acquitted by the Senate on Wednesday of both articles of impeachment. While the vote largely fell along party lines, one senator crossed the aisle to vote to convict him. Today, we hear from Senator Mitt Romney about that choice.

Guest: Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, who spoke with Mark Leibovich, the Washington-based chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • In a speech before voting to convict, Mr. Romney grew emotional as he pronounced the president “guilty of an appalling abuse of public trust.”
  • “I think this is Senator Romney’s moment to shine,” Senator Amy Klobuchar said before the vote, “I hope he can bring some people with him.” Here’s a behind-the-scenes look at Mr. Romney’s isolation in the Senate and the expectations placed on him before his vote.
Feb 06, 2020
The State of the Union
00:24:32

Hours after Iowa kicked off the process to choose President Trump’s 2020 opponent, and just a day before the verdict is expected in his Senate impeachment trial, the president gave his third State of the Union address. Today, we take you to The New York Times’s Washington bureau, where we examined the speech — and the unique moment in which it was delivered.

Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 05, 2020
The Latest: What Happened in Iowa?
00:06:07

After a night of chaos and confusion at the Iowa caucuses, and nearly a full day since the results were initially expected, the state’s Democratic Party has announced only partial numbers, from 62 percent of precincts. We look at what the debacle in Iowa will mean for the results — when they’re finally released.

“The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.

Feb 05, 2020
A Very Long Night In Iowa
00:33:24

The kickoff to the 2020 voting was undercut Monday night by major delays in the reporting of the Iowa caucus results. We traveled to Johnston, Iowa, to tell the story of the day — from the perspective of one caucus in a middle school gym. Guests: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times and Reid J. Epstein, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 04, 2020
The Field: Iowa’s Electability Complex
00:37:05

With Iowa voters making their choice and the 2020 election getting underway, we’re introducing a new show: one covering the country and its voters in the lead up to Nov. 3. In our first episode of “The Field,” we ask Democratic caucusgoers how they’re feeling about the election. Traveling around the state, we found anxious Iowans asking one question over and over: Who can beat President Trump? Note: This episode contains strong language.

Guests: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times, and Austin Mitchell and Andy Mills, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Feb 03, 2020
The Latest: No Witnesses
00:06:11

In a 51-to-49 vote, Republicans shut down an effort by Democrats to bring new witnesses and documents into the Senate impeachment trial. As they cleared a path toward acquittal, some Republicans stepped forward to explain why they voted as they did — even though they believed what President Trump did was wrong.

“The Latest” is a series on the impeachment process, from the team behind “The Daily.” You can find more information about it here.

Feb 01, 2020
The Lessons of 2016
00:52:38

The media’s coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign has come to be criticized for operating under three key assumptions: that Hillary Clinton was certain to be the Democratic nominee, that Donald Trump was unlikely to be the Republican nominee, and that once Clinton and Trump had become their party’s nominees, she would win.

With voting for 2020 set to begin in Iowa on Monday, “The Daily” sat down with Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The New York Times, to discuss the lessons he — and the organization — learned from 2016. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Jan 31, 2020
A Virus’s Journey Across China
00:23:26

Nearly two decades ago, China was at the heart of a public health crisis over a deadly new virus. It said it had made lifesaving reforms since. So why is the Wuhan coronavirus now spreading so rapidly across the world? Our correspondent went to the center of the outbreak to find out. Guest: Javier C. Hernández, a New York Times correspondent based in Beijing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Jan 30, 2020
The Latest: The ‘Public Interest’
00:08:17

In the question-and-answer stage of the Senate impeachment trial, Alan Dershowitz, the celebrity lawyer on President Trump’s legal team, made an argument that stunned many who heard it. Say that Mr. Trump did extend a quid pro quo to Ukraine, and that he did it to improve his own re-election prospects. Says Mr. Dershowitz: What’s wrong with that?

“The Latest” is a new series on the impeachment inquiry, from the team behind “The Daily.” You can find more information about it here.

Jan 30, 2020
Chuck Schumer on Impeachment, Witnesses and the Truth
00:23:17

Today, we sit down with Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, to discuss what it’s like to be the leader of a party out of power at this moment in the impeachment trial of President Trump. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Jan 29, 2020
What John Bolton Knows
00:22:24

A firsthand account by John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser, directly linked President Trump to a quid pro quo in the Ukraine affair, undercutting a central plank of the defense’s argument. What could that mean for the final phase of the impeachment trial? Guests: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House and Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • A Times investigation revealed that Mr. Bolton privately expressed concern to the attorney general last year that the president was effectively granting personal favors to autocratic leaders around the world.
  • Republican senators had been ready to swiftly acquit President Trump. But Mr. Bolton’s revelations in the manuscript of his new book could change the calculus.
Jan 28, 2020
A Small Town’s Fight Over America’s Biggest Sport
00:31:08

Across the United States, parents and school districts have been wrestling with the question of whether the country’s most popular and profitable sport is too dangerous for children. Today, we explore how that dispute is playing out in one Texas town. Guests: Ken Belson, who covers the N.F.L. for The New York Times, spoke with Jim Harris and Spencer Taylor in Marshall, Texas. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

  • Repeated blows to the head while playing football have been linked to a degenerative brain disease called C.T.E.
  • Football is a powerful, cultural force in Marshall, a city of about 24,000 people in East Texas. But residents, coaches and educators have questioned the safety of a sport they cannot imagine living without.
Jan 27, 2020
The Swing Issue That Could Win a Swing State
00:31:46

Three Rust Belt swing states are critical to winning the presidency this year — Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. In Pennsylvania, there is one issue that could be decisive: fracking natural gas.

Opposition to fracking could be fatal for a candidate in the state, yet front-runners for the Democratic nomination have committed to banning fracking nationwide if elected. We went to western Pennsylvania, where fracking affects residents daily, to see whether electability in the state could really be reduced to this single issue.

Guests: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times, traveled to Pennsylvania with Andy Mills and Monika Evstatieva, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Jan 24, 2020
Harry and Meghan. (And Why Their Saga Matters.)
00:27:33

In a moment of national insecurity, with the future of the United Kingdom seemingly hanging in the balance, a new royal couple offered the vision of a unified, progressive future. But the same forces that pushed for Britain to leave the European Union have now pushed Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, to leave the country.

Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Jan 23, 2020
The Latest: ‘Let Us Begin’
00:05:10

Opening arguments in the Senate impeachment trial are underway. For House impeachment managers, that means an opportunity to formally make their case, uninterrupted, for three straight days. For President Trump’s lawyers and Republican allies, that means three straight days of sitting in the Senate chamber, bound by a vow of silence.

“The Latest” is a new series on the impeachment inquiry, from the team behind “The Daily.” You can find more information about it here.

Jan 23, 2020
The Moderates’ Impeachment Moment
00:23:35

After nearly 12 hours of vicious debate, the Senate voted early Wednesday to adopt the rules that will govern the rest of the impeachment trial. But in a Republican-controlled chamber, why weren’t they the rules that Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, had originally wanted?

Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, congressional editor for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading: 

Jan 22, 2020
Lessons From the Last Impeachment Trial
00:35:17

As President Trump’s impeachment trial resumes this afternoon, we look back two decades to a time when Google was in its infancy, Y2K was stoking anxiety and partisanship in Congress was not quite so entrenched. That year, 1999, was the last time the Senate considered whether a president had committed high crimes and misdemeanors. So what has changed since the Senate trial of President Bill Clinton, and why is this impeachment such a different story?

Guest: Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading: 

Jan 21, 2020
Bernie's Big Bet
00:36:47

The Obama coalition has become almost mythic within the Democratic Party for having united first-time voters, people of color and moderates to win the presidency in 2008. This year, Senator Bernie Sanders is betting that he can win with the support of young voters and people of color — but without the moderates.

To do that, he’s counting on winning over and energizing the Latino vote. The ultimate test of whether he will be able to do that is in California, where Latinos are the single biggest nonwhite voting bloc. While young Latinos in California overwhelmingly support Mr. Sanders, to become the Democratic nominee, he will need the support of their parents and grandparents as well.

Guests: Jennifer Medina, a national political correspondent who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The New York Times, traveled to California with Jessica Cheung and Monika Evstatieva, producers on “The Daily,” to speak with Latino voters. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Background reading: 

Jan 17, 2020
The Impeachment Trial Begins
00:25:12

The impeachment trial of President Trump begins this morning. Today, we answer all of your questions about what will happen next — including how it will work and what is likely to happen. Guest: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times.

For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Jan 16, 2020
The Russian Hacking Plan for 2020
00:23:42

At the heart of President Trump’s impeachment is his request that Ukraine investigate how his political rival, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., could be connected to an energy company called Burisma. New reporting from The Times suggests that Russian hackers may be trying to fulfill that request — and potentially hack into the 2020 election itself. Guests: Nicole Perlroth, who covers cybersecurity for The Times, spoke with Oren Falkowitz, a former analyst at the National Security Agency and co-founder of the cybersecurity company Area 1. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Jan 15, 2020
The Escape of Carlos Ghosn
00:27:29

Carlos Ghosn’s trial was poised to be one of the most closely watched in Japanese history — a case involving claims of corporate greed, wounded national pride and a rigged legal system. Then the former Nissan chief pulled off an unimaginable escape. Guest: Ben Dooley, a business reporter for The New York Times based in Japan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading: 

Jan 14, 2020
Why Australia Is Burning
00:26:40

Wildfires are devastating Australia, incinerating an area roughly the size of West Virginia and killing 24 people and as many as half a billion animals. Today, we look at the human and environmental costs of the disaster, its connection to climate change and why so many Australians are frustrated by Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s response. 

Guest: Livia Albeck-Ripka, a reporter for The Times in Melbourne a reporter for The Times in Melbourne who spoke with Susan Pulis, a woman who fled the fires with kangaroos and koalas in her car. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

Background reading: 

  • After Australia’s hottest and driest year on record, Mr. Morrison has minimized the connection between the wildfire crisis and climate change and declined to make moves to curb the country’s carbon emissions.
  • Many Australians entered the new year under apocalyptic blood-red skies as smoke from the fires choked the country’s southeastern coast. “I look outside and it’s like the end of the world. Armageddon is here,” one woman in Canberra said.
  • The fires have burned through dozens of towns, destroying at least 3,000 homes. Now, unbridled by continuous fire fighting, the blazes have returned to some scorched areas to level what is left. 
  • Rupert Murdoch controls the largest news company in Australia, and his newspapers have contributed to a wave of misinformation about the cause of the fires. 
Jan 13, 2020
The Case Against Harvey Weinstein, Part 2
00:33:17

Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence. 

Yesterday on “The Daily,” we heard the story of Lucia Evans, whose allegation of sexual violence against Harvey Weinstein helped launch his criminal trial in New York. After Ms. Evans was dropped from the case, questions were raised about how a man accused of sexual misconduct by more than 80 women could end up facing so few of them in court. In the second half of this series, what happened next in the case against Harvey Weinstein. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

Jan 10, 2020
The Case Against Harvey Weinstein, Part 1
00:38:29

The story of Harvey Weinstein is a story of patterns. Scores of women — more than 80 — have given eerily similar accounts of abuse and harassment by the powerful movie mogul.

This week, two years after those allegations were first reported in The New York Times, Mr. Weinstein’s trial opens in New York. In the first part of a two-part series, we investigate why the case went from 80 potential plaintiffs to two.

Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

Background reading:

  • Mr. Weinstein’s reputation preceded him as he stepped into a Manhattan courthouse this week to face charges of rape and criminal sexual activity, making it difficult to find jurors who did not already have strong opinions about the case.
  • The reporters who broke the first investigation into Mr. Weinstein explain why the trial rests on a narrow legal case with an already fraught back story and why the result is highly unpredictable.
  • On the first day of Mr. Weinstein’s trial, two other criminal allegations against him were released in Los Angeles.
Jan 09, 2020