The Book Review

By The New York Times

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 Jul 18, 2018

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The world's top authors and critics join host Pamela Paul and editors at The New York Times Book Review to talk about the week's top books, what we're reading and what's going on in the literary world.

Episode Date
A More Perfect Union
01:02:35

“The Engagement,” by Sasha Issenberg, recounts the complex and chaotic chain reaction that thrust same-sex marriage from the realm of conservative conjecture to the top of the gay political agenda and, eventually, to the halls of the Supreme Court. On this week’s podcast, Issenberg talks about the deeply researched book, which covers 25 years of legal and cultural history.

“What they have done, ultimately,” he says of those who won the victory, “is helped to enshrine, both in the legal process and in American culture, a sense that marriage is a unique institution. And the language they used to talk about it — about love and commitment — is so particular, I think, to the dynamic between two people that in a certain respect marriage is a more central institution in American life now than it was 30 years ago, because we went through this political fight over it.”

J. Hoberman visits the podcast to discuss his piece about 10 books that, taken together, tell the story of Hollywood. He talks, among other subjects, about why the only celebrity memoir on his list is “Lulu in Hollywood,” by Louise Brooks, who acted in the 1920s and ’30s and published her memoir much later in life.

“She was a remarkably cleareyed observer of what was going on,” Hoberman says, “and embarked on the whole star-making thing with a healthy degree of ambivalence. So she’s able to write about herself and about the conditions under which movies were made and the people she met in Hollywood and so on, in a way that’s both personal and detached. There aren’t too many other memoirs like this.”

Also on this week’s episode, Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history as it celebrates its 125th anniversary; and Elisabeth Egan and Andrew LaVallee talk about what they’ve been reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“Libertie” by Kaitlyn Greenidge

“Malibu Rising” by Taylor Jenkins Reid

“On Juneteenth” by Annette Gordon-Reed

Jun 11, 2021
Reimagining the Aftermath of a Wartime Attack
00:49:25

Francis Spufford’s new novel, “Light Perpetual,” is rooted in a real event: the rocket attack on a Woolworth’s in London, killing 168 people, toward the end of World War II. Spufford fictionalizes the tragedy and invents five children who survive it, trailing them through the ensuing decades to discover all they might have done and seen if they had lived. On this week’s podcast, Spufford says that he settled on this real-life incident for intentionally arbitrary reasons.

“The ordinariness is kind of the point,” he says. “I wanted something that was terrible but not exceptional. Something which was one tree in a wartime forest of bad things happening, which I could select out and then follow out the long-term consequences of through time.”

Egill Bjarnason visits the podcast to talk about “How Iceland Changed the World: The Big History of a Small Island.”

“The title is maybe the opposite of humble,” he says, “but I went into this project wanting to write about the history of Iceland. I have always found that really compelling, because unlike other European nations, we can tell our history almost from the beginning. But I figured that people who don’t have high stakes in that story may not be so interested. So I wanted to tell the history of Iceland through our impact on the outside world, by looking at where we have shaped events in some way or another.”

Also on this week’s episode, Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history as it celebrates its 125th anniversary this year; and Dwight Garner and Parul Sehgal talk about books they’ve recently reviewed. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“A Ghost in the Throat” by Doireann Ni Ghriofa

“Languages of Truth” by Salman Rushdie

Jun 04, 2021
A Desperate Writer Steals 'The Plot'
01:04:55

Jake Bonner, the protagonist of Jean Hanff Korelitz’s “The Plot,” writes a novel based on someone else’s idea. The book becomes a big hit, but Jake has a hard time enjoying it because he’s worried about getting caught. On this week’s podcast, Korelitz says that Jake’s more general anxieties about his career as a writer are relatable, despite her own success (this is her seventh novel).

“Jake is all of us,” Korelitz says. “I used to regard other people’s literary careers with great curiosity. I used to have this little private parlor game: Would I want that person’s career? Would I want that person’s career? And those names have changed over the years as careers have faltered, disappeared. I’ve been publishing for a very long time, and my contemporaries in the 1990s were people with massive successes who have not been heard of now for 10, 15 years. So it’s very much a tortoise and hare kind of thing, in my own case.”

Elizabeth Hinton visits the podcast to discuss her new book, “America on Fire,” a history of racial protest and police violence that reframes the civil rights struggle between the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968 and the widespread demonstrations after the murder of George Floyd in 2020. Hinton writes about major uprisings, but also focuses on lesser-known examples of systemic violence against Black communities in places like York, Pa., and Cairo, Ill.

“Part of the reason why the violence in both of those cities was so extreme was the deep entanglement between white vigilante groups and white power groups and the police department and political and economic elites in both cities,” Hinton says. “So in many ways, what happened, in Cairo especially, is a warning to all of us about what the consequences are when officials decide to use the police to manage the material consequences of socioeconomic exclusion and poverty.”

Also on this week’s episode, Elizabeth Harris has news from the publishing world; Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history as it celebrates its 125th anniversary this year; and Gregory Cowles and John Williams talk about what they’ve been reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“Dispatches” by Michael Herr

“The Emigrants” by W.G. Sebald

“Lenin” by Victor Sebestyen

May 28, 2021
Maggie O’Farrell on ‘Hamnet’
00:56:55

Maggie O’Farrell’s “Hamnet,” one of last year’s most widely acclaimed novels, imagines the life of William Shakespeare, his wife, Anne (or Agnes) Hathaway, and the couple’s son Hamnet, who died at 11 years old in 1596. On this week’s podcast, O’Farrell says she always planned for the novel to have the ensemble cast it does, but that her deepest motivation was the desire to capture a sense of the young boy at its center.

“The engine behind the book for me was always the fact that I think Hamnet has been overlooked and underwritten by history,” she says. “I think he’s been consigned to a literary footnote. And I believe, quite strongly, that without him — without his tragically short life — we wouldn’t have the play ‘Hamlet.’ We probably wouldn’t have ‘Twelfth Night.’ As an audience, we are enormously in debt to him.”

Judith Shulevitz visits the podcast to discuss Rachel Cusk’s new novel, “Second Place,” and to analyze Cusk’s literary style.

“In this review, I quote Isaac Babel: ‘No iron spike can pierce a human heart as icily as a period in the right place.’ There’s this kind of clinical accuracy to her writing,” Shulevitz says, “that she brings to bear on both the physical world and on the emotional world that is almost scary. Which is what I like.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history as it celebrates its 125th anniversary this year; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Dwight Garner and Jennifer Szalai talk about books they’ve recently reviewed. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed by the Times’s critics this week:

“The Life She Wished to Live” by Ann McCutchan

“Dedicated” by Pete Davis

May 21, 2021
Louis Menand on 'The Free World'
01:09:35

Louis Menand’s new book, “The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War,” covers the interchange of arts and ideas between the United States and Europe in the decades following World War II. On this week’s podcast, Menand talks about the book, including why he chose to frame his telling from the end of the war until 1965.

“What I didn’t get right away was the extent to which, what happened in American culture, both at the level of avant-garde art, like John Cage’s music, and at the level of Hollywood movies, was influenced by countries around the world,” Menand says. “When American culture comes into its own — because before 1945, I think, nobody really thought of America as a central player in world culture; that changes in the ’60s — but when that happens, culture becomes global, becomes international.”

Phillip Lopate has edited many acclaimed anthologies throughout his career, but his latest project might be his most ambitious: three volumes of American essays from colonial times to the present day. “The Glorious American Essay” was published last year; “The Golden Age of the American Essay” arrived last month; and “The Contemporary American Essay” will be available this summer.

“I’m really trying to expand the notion of what an essay is,” Lopate says on the podcast. “So I’ve included essays that are in the form of letters, like Frederick Douglass’s letter to his master; I’ve included essays in the form of sermons, like Jonathan Edwards, the Puritan preacher; I’ve included essays in the form of rants. I’m just trying to get people to see the essay as occurring in many, many different forms.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Elizabeth Harris has news from the publishing world; and Gal Beckerman and Gregory Cowles talk about what they’re reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“The Committed” by Viet Thanh Nguyen

“The Big Sleep” by Raymond Chandler

“Beijing Payback” by Daniel Nieh

“Yoga” by Emmanuel Carrère

May 14, 2021
Michael Lewis on 'The Premonition'
01:05:38

In 2018, Michael Lewis published “The Fifth Risk,” which argued, in short, that the federal government was underprepared for a variety of disaster scenarios. Guess what his new book is about? Lewis visits the podcast this week to discuss “The Premonition,” which recounts the initial response to the coronavirus pandemic.

“It wasn’t just Trump,” Lewis says. “Trump made everything worse. But there had ben changes in the American government, and changes in particular at the C.D.C., that made them less and less capable of actually controlling disease and more and more like a fine academic institution that came in after the battle and tried to assess what had happened; but not equipped for actual battlefield command. The book doesn’t get to the pandemic until Page 160. The back story tells you how the story is going to play out.”

The historian Annette Gordon-Reed visits the podcast to talk about her new book, “On Juneteenth,” which combines history about slavery in Texas with more personal, essayistic writing about her own family and childhood.

“This is a departure for me, but it is actually the kind of writing that I always thought that I would be doing when I was growing up, dreaming about being a writer,” Gordon-Reed says. “I’ve always been a great admirer of James Baldwin, and Gore Vidal’s essays I thought were wonderful, better than the novels, and that’s the kind of thing that I wanted to do. So it was sort of a dream come true for me to be able to take this form and talk about some things that were very important to me.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Parul Sehgal and John Williams talk about the latest in literary criticism. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed by the critics this week:

“The Secret to Superhuman Strength” by Alison Bechdel

“Jackpot” by Michael Mechanic

May 07, 2021
Amy Klobuchar on 'Antitrust'
01:06:56

In her new book, “Antitrust,” Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota explores the history of fighting monopoly power in this country, and argues that the digital age calls for a renewed effort.

“I think the best way to do this right now is to have our laws be as sophisticated as the companies that we’re dealing with,” Klobuchar says on this week’s podcast. To her, that means “switching the burden for the big, big mergers or for the big exclusionary conducts of the companies that are the largest, and say, ‘Instead of the government having to prove that it hurts competition, you guys have to prove that it doesn’t hurt competition.’” She continues: “You’ve got to look backwards, just like they did with AT&T or some of the big cases — Standard Oil — they looked backwards and said, ‘Wait a minute, this has gotten out of hand.’ It doesn’t mean that we’re going to make this company go away. The chairman of AT&T, after the breakup, said they got stronger because they had to compete.”

Andrew Solomon visits the podcast to talk about Katie Booth’s “The Invention of Miracles: Language, Power, and Alexander Graham Bell’s Quest to End Deafness.” Bell was a proponent of oralism, a theory that pressured deaf people to learn speech and, more important, not to learn sign language.

“He thought that sign language was a secondary, second-rate thing,” Solomon says of Bell. “He learned it very fluently, and could use it very well, but he didn’t find any beauty in it, and he didn’t really recognize it as another language of equal validity. His underlying belief was that if you could be someone who passed for hearing, you were doing well, and that was what he was trying to teach people. And of course, the deaf politics movement, which had already begun in his day, though it had not reached the strength it’s reached now, said that actually, while it was nice to be able to interact with people who were hearing, and convenient and helpful, that there was a great beauty in sign.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Elizabeth Harris has news from the publishing world; and Gregory Cowles and John Williams talk about what they’re reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“Despair” by Vladimir Nabokov

“A Fan’s Notes” by Frederick Exley

“So Much for That” by Lionel Shriver

“How Beautiful We Were” by Imbolo Mbue

Apr 30, 2021
Patrick Radden Keefe on ‘Empire of Pain’
01:02:43

Patrick Radden Keefe’s new book, “Empire of Pain,” is a history of the Sacklers, the family behind Purdue Pharma, the creator of the powerful painkiller OxyContin, which became the root of the opioid crisis in the United States. One of the subjects covered in Keefe’s investigative work is what the company knew, and when, as the crisis began to unfold.

“One thing I was able to establish very definitively in the book is that, in fact, there is this paper trail, really starting in 1997, so just a year after the drug is released, of sales reps sending messages back saying, ‘Hey, we’ve got a problem here. People are abusing this drug,’” Keefe says. “And there’s very high-level discussion by senior executives at the company, some of whom subsequently testified under oath that they didn’t know anything about this until early 2000. In terms of the timeline, it’s very hard to reconcile what they have always said publicly and what I was able to substantiate with internal documents.”

Elisabeth Egan, an editor at the Book Review, is on the podcast this week to discuss “What Comes After,” by JoAnne Tompkins, the latest pick for Group Text, our monthly column for readers and book clubs. The novel starts with the deaths of two high school students, and becomes a mystery when we meet Evangeline McKensey, a pregnant 16-year-old with a connection to the dead boys.

“I am the mother of three teenagers, and I’m constantly looking for the book that makes me feel a little better about how little I know about what’s running through my kids’ heads at any given time,” Egan says. “There was something about this book that felt reassuring to me, as strange as that sounds because it begins with this terrible tragedy. But it’s really, actually a book about life.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary, and Lauren Christensen and John Williams talk about what they’ve been reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“Crusoe’s Daughter” by Jane Gardam

“The Secret Lives of Church Ladies” by Deesha Philyaw

“True Grit” by Charles Portis

“Klara and the Sun” by Kazuo Ishiguro

Apr 23, 2021
Celebrating Our 15th Anniversary
01:16:25

We’ve been in celebration mode all week as the Book Review’s podcast turns 15 years old. Pamela Paul shared 15 of her favorite episodes since she began hosting in 2013. We chose 10 other memorable conversations from the show’s full archives, and did a bit of digging to tell the story of the podcast’s earliest days.

Now, appropriately, we cap things off with a new episode dedicated to the milestone. This week, Paul speaks with Sam Tanenahus, her predecessor and the founding host, and Dwight Garner, now a critic for The Times who came up with the idea to do the podcast when he was the senior editor at the Book Review. Jocelyn Gonzales, a former producer of the show, and Pedro Rosado, its current maestro, talk about their favorite and unusual memories from over the years. (Did one guest really call in from a submarine? It’s uncertain.) And Paul answers questions about what it’s been like to host the show, sharing a few clips of Robert Caro and others discussing their work.

We also conduct some business as usual this week, with Tina Jordan looking back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary and Alexandra Alter discussing news from the publishing world.

Apr 16, 2021
Blake Bailey on Writing His Life of Philip Roth
01:01:09

Blake Bailey’s long-awaited biography of Philip Roth has generated renewed conversation about the life and work of the towering American novelist who died at 85 in 2018. Bailey visits the podcast this week to take part in that conversation himself.

“Most of Philip’s life was spent in this little cottage in the woods of Connecticut, standing at a desk and living inside his head 12 hours a day,” Bailey says. “This is not unique to Philip. This is a phenomenon that I experienced vis-à-vis my other subjects, too. They don’t see people very clearly. They sort of see themselves projected out, they see what they want to see. And Philip needed to understand that — though I was very fond of him, I was — I had a job to do. So our relationship was constantly teetering on the cusp between professional and friendship, and that could be an awkward dynamic. But for the most part I was extremely fond of Philip.”

Julia Sweig visits the podcast to discuss her new book, “Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight.”

“I wanted to write a book about women and power,” Sweig says. “And to be truthful, I didn’t have a subject when I got into this, and discovered that Lady Bird had kept this immense record of her time in the White House. And of course, Lady Bird Johnson is married to the American president of the 20th century perhaps most associated with the word ‘power.’ So the doors, once they opened, just showed a huge opportunity to discover somebody who I thought I had some feel for, but really did not.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Dwight Garner and Parul Sehgal talk about books they’ve recently reviewed. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed by The Times’s critics this week:

“Places of Mind: A Life of Edward Said” by Timothy Brennan

“Francis Bacon: Revelations” by Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan

Apr 09, 2021
Carl Zimmer on Defining Life
00:57:11

In his new book, “Life’s Edge,” Carl Zimmer asks the modest questions: What is life? How did it begin? And by what criteria can we define things as “living”? On this week’s podcast, Zimmer, a science columnist for The Times, talks about just how difficult it can be to find answers.

“There are actually philosophers who have argued that maybe we should just try not to define life at all, in fact; that maybe we’re getting ourselves into trouble,” Zimmer says. “If you look for a definition of life from scientists, you will find hundreds of them; hundreds of published definitions that are different from each other. And every year a new one comes out, or maybe two, and they just keep going. there was a paper I read not too long ago that said that there are probably as many definitions of life as people who are trying to define life.”

Paulina Bren visits the podcast to discuss her new book, “The Barbizon,” an account of the storied hotel for women that first opened in 1928.

“It went through all sorts of incarnations,” Bren says. “This hotel really follows in so many ways not just the history of women in the 20th century, but truly the ups and downs, the history, of New York.”

Also on this week’s episode, Elisabeth Egan and John Williams talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“Visitors” by Anita Brookner

“Firekeeper’s Daughter” by Angeline Boulley

“I Am, I Am, I Am” by Maggie O’Farrell

Apr 02, 2021
Tillie Olsen and the Barriers to Creativity
01:03:20

A.O. Scott, The Times’s co-chief film critic, returns to the Book Review’s podcast this week to discuss the work of Tillie Olsen, the latest subject in his essay series The Americans, about writers who give a sense of the country’s complex identity. Olsen, who died in 2007 at 94, was known best as the author of “Tell Me a Riddle,” a collection of three short stories and a novella published in 1961. She also wrote rigorous depictions of working-class families, conveying the costs of living for burdened mothers, wives and daughters.

“I think people should read her now for a few different reasons,” Scott says. “I was really drawn to this idea of the difficulty of writing, and the ways that our other responsibilities and the fatigue of living can make it hard to write. I think I related to this very much in this year. One of the themes in her stories is tiredness, is just the physical and mental fatigue of being alive and how hard that can make it to create anything.”

Wendy Lower visits the podcast to discuss “The Ravine: A Family, a Photograph, a Holocaust Massacre Revealed.” In the book, Lower, a historian of the Holocaust, considers a photograph taken in October 1941 that shows several men shooting a woman who holds the hand of a small boy.

“Most people think that we know all there is to know about the Holocaust,” Lower says, “and this is an important example of how these records are just being declassified now from various countries that were involved in the Holocaust or occupied by the Nazis.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Parul Sehgal and Jennifer Szalai talk about books they’ve recently reviewed. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed by The Times’s critics this week:

“100 Boyfriends” by Brontez Purnell

“Until Justice Be Done” by Kate Masur

Mar 26, 2021
Four Decades of Downs and Ups in New York City
00:52:49

There’s nothing wrong with your eyes: The title of Thomas Dyja’s new book is “New York, New York, New York.” (The triplicate is inspired by the urbanist Holly Whyte’s answer when he was asked to name his three favorite American cities.) On this week’s podcast, Dyja discusses how he went about organizing this sweeping look at the past four decades in the city’s history.

“I love timelines,” Dyja says. “I make huge charts to take themes through, so this had an eight-foot-long thing on my wall that basically took certain themes and wove them through all those years.” With all that material, “having to make tough choices was just basic," and "there are things that are on the cutting room floor that I kind of miss. But at the end of the day, I think it conveys that subway-express-train-blasting-along-from-stop-to-stop experience of New York.”

The magician, writer and theatrical performer Derek DelGaudio visits the podcast to talk about his new book, “Amoralman: A True Story and Other Lies,” which is told in two parts: The first covers his childhood in Colorado, and the second the time he spent doing a very unusual job.

“When I was in my 20s, I worked as what’s known as a bust-out dealer, which is a professional card cheat hired by the house to cheat its customers,” DelGaudio says. “And what I experienced at that house, and what I recognized, I thought was something worth sharing.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Gal Beckerman and Dave Kim talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“An Empire of Their Own” by Neal Gabler

“My Heart” by Semezdin Mehmedinovic

“Le Freak” by Nile Rodgers

Mar 19, 2021
Imbolo Mbue on Writing Her Second Novel
01:03:10

Imbolo Mbue first began writing her new novel, “How Beautiful We Were,” in 2002. The book concerns the impact of an American oil company’s presence on a fictional African village. She eventually put the idea aside to work on what turned into her acclaimed debut novel, “Behold the Dreamers.” When she began working again on the earlier idea, it was 2016. On this week’s podcast, she says that returning to the novel at that moment changed the way she approached writing it.

“Flint, Michigan, had happened, and Sandy Hook had happened a few years before,” she says. “So I was thinking a lot about children. I was thinking a lot about what it means to be a child growing up in a world in which you don’t understand why things are happening and nobody is doing something about it. And that was what gave me the inspiration to tell the story mostly from the point of the view of the children. That definitely changed a huge part of the story.”

Annalee Newitz visits the podcast to discuss “Four Lost Cities: A Secret History of the Urban Age.” In the book, Newitz gleans lessons about urban living from four cities that no longer exist: Pompeii; Angkor, a metropolis of medieval Cambodia; Cahokia, an urban sanctuary that sprawled across both sides of the Mississippi River a thousand years ago; and Catalhoyuk, a city that existed 9,000 years ago above the plains of south-central Turkey.

“It’s a tragedy because for us now, in the present day, looking back, a lot of us would love to know more about what life was like in these places and be able to visit them in their prime,” Newitz says. “So it’s sad because we can’t go and see them alive. But I also think that in many cases, people left these cities for good reason. The abandonment, it’s a rejection of something that’s gone wrong, and I think it’s good that we have these examples.”

Also on this week’s episode, Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Dwight Garner and Jennifer Szalai talk about books they’ve recently reviewed. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed by the Times’s critics this week:

“Lucky: How Joe Biden Barely Won the Presidency” by Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes

“The Empathy Diaries” by Sherry Turkle

Mar 12, 2021
Kazuo Ishiguro and Friendship With Machines
01:10:54

Kazuo Ishigruo’s eighth novel, “Klara and the Sun,” is his first since he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2017. It’s narrated by Klara, an Artificial Friend — a humanoid machine who acts as a companion for a 14-year-old child. Radhika Jones, the editor of Vanity Fair, talks about the novel and where it fits into Ishiguro’s august body of work on this week’s podcast.

“How human can Klara be? What are the limits of humanity, in terms of transferring it into machinery? It’s one of the many questions that animate this book,” Jones says. “It’s not something that’s oversimplified, but I do think it’s very poignant because the truth is that Klara is our narrator. So as far as we’re concerned, she’s the person whose inner life we come to understand. And the question of what limits there are on that, for a being that is artificial, is interesting.”

Mark Harris visits the podcast to discuss “Mike Nichols: A Life,” his new biography of the writer, director and performer whose many credits included “The Graduate” and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” 

“He was remarkably open,” Harris says of his subject. “There are few bigger success stories for a director to look back on than ‘The Graduate,’ and I was asking Mike about it 40 years and probably 40,000 questions after it happened. But I was so impressed by his willingness to come at it from new angles, to re-examine things that he hadn’t thought about for a while, to tell stories that were frankly not flattering to him. I’ve never heard harsher stories about Mike’s behavior over the years than I heard from Mike himself. He was an extraordinary interview subject.”

Also on this week’s episode, Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Gregory Cowles and John Williams talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“No One Is Talking About This” by Patricia Lockwood

“The View From Castle Rock” by Alice Munro

“The Turn of the Screw and Other Ghost Stories” by Henry James

Mar 05, 2021
Lauren Oyler Talks About Deception Online
01:08:00

Lauren Oyler’s debut novel, “Fake Accounts,” features a nameless narrator who discovers that her boyfriend has a secret life online, where he posts conspiracy theories. The novel is about that discovery, but also more broadly about how the time we spend online — especially on social media — transforms our personalities.

“The book is about various modes of deceit or lying or misdirection, and the ways we deceive each other in various ways, both on the internet and off,” Oyler says on this week’s podcast.

Stephen Kearse visits the podcast to discuss the work of Octavia Butler, who “committed her life,” as Kearse recently wrote, “to turning speculative fiction into a home for Black expression.”

But despite Butler’s groundbreaking career, “I wouldn’t want to overstate how different she was,” Kearse says, “because she was very much interested in the things that golden age sci-fi authors were interested in — so, space travel and human extinction and aliens visiting. But I think her innovations were on the level of craft and even just concept. She saw alien stories as very connected to colonization. She saw time travel as escapist. She was able to think about how these tropes rely on certain ideas of privilege and access and really just dive in deeper.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Elizabeth Harris has news from the publishing world; and Dwight Garner asks questions of Pamela Paul, the editor of the Book review and the podcast’s host.

Feb 26, 2021
Writing About Illness Without Platitudes
01:07:58

At 22 years old, Suleika Jaouad was a recent college graduate who had moved to Paris, looking forward to everything life might offer. Then she received a diagnosis of leukemia. In her new memoir, “Between Two Kingdoms,” Jaouad writes about the ensuing years. On this week’s podcast, she discusses her experience with the disease and her effort, in writing the book, to avoid the many platitudes that surround serious illness.

“When you’re sick, you get bombarded with all kinds of bumper-sticker sayings,” she says. “You’re told to find the silver lining, that everything happens for a reason, or — the one that I hated the most — that God doesn’t give you more than you can handle, because in my case it certainly felt like I had been given more than I could handle. So I was really focused on writing toward the silence and toward the shadows, and writing about the experiences that maybe aren’t as palatable but that, from my perspective, needed to be unveiled.”

The Times’s comedy critic, Jason Zinoman, visits the podcast to discuss his favorite memoirs by comedians, including books by Harpo Marx, Joan Rivers and Tina Fey, and to discuss the genre as a whole.

“The comedy memoir is the worst genre of book that I can’t get enough of,” Zinoman says. “I gobble up comedy memoirs, even though the vast, vast majority of them are terrible.” One reason for that, Zinoman says, is because “you don’t need to make a great book to become a best seller. It’s the same with political books; most books by politicians are bad because they don’t need to be good to be successful, and the same logic applies here.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Gregory Cowles and John Williams talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“Let Me Tell You What I Mean” by Joan Didion

“Her First American” by Lore Segal

“A Promised Land” by Barack Obama

Feb 19, 2021
This Land Is Whose Land?
01:01:42

When Simon Winchester takes on a big subject, he takes on a big subject. His new book, “Land: How the Hunger for Ownership Shaped the Modern World,” travels through centuries and to places like Ukraine, New Zealand, Scotland, the United States and elsewhere. On this week’s podcast, he talks about the history of private land ownership and a few of the many aspects of this history that caught his attention.

“The whole notion of trespass I find absolutely fascinating,” Winchester says. “There is this pervasive feeling — it’s not uniquely American, but it is powerfully American — that once you own it, you put up posted signs, you put up barbed wire, you put up fences, to keep people off. Because one of the five ‘bundle of rights,’ lawyers call it — when you buy land, you get these rights — is that you have an absolute right of law to exclude other people from your land. In Sweden, in Norway, in Denmark, you can’t do that.” 

The journalist Amelia Pang visits the podcast to talk about her new book, “Made in China,” in which she investigates the brutal system of forced labor that undergirds China’s booming export industry. She tells the story of one average American woman who bought a cheap Halloween decoration during a clearance sale after the holiday one year.

“She didn’t really need it,” Pang says. “It actually sat in her storage for about two years before she remembered to open it. And so she was very shocked to find this SOS message written by the prisoner who had made this product when she finally opened it. It just goes to show the trivialness of a lot of the products that are made in these camps. In my book, I try to go into: Do we as Americans actually need so much of this stuff? And how much is our shopping habits and consumer culture contributing to factors that compel Chinese factories to outsource work to labor camps?”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Dwight Garner and Parul Sehgal talk about books they’ve recently reviewed and how they approach reading the classics. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed by Times critics this week:

“My Year Abroad” by Chang-rae Lee

“Gay Bar” by Jeremy Atherton Lin

Feb 12, 2021
Chang-rae Lee on His New Novel: ‘It’s Kind of a Crazy Book.’
01:07:12

Chang-rae Lee’s new novel, “My Year Abroad,” is his sixth. On this week’s podcast, Lee says that his readers might be surprised by it.

“It’s kind of a crazy book, and particularly I think for people who know my work,” Lee says. “I’m sure my editor was surprised by what she got. I didn’t quite describe it the way it turned out.” The novel follows a New Jersey 20-year-old named Tiller, who is at loose ends, as he befriends a very successful Chinese entrepreneur. “They go traveling together,” Lee says. “They have what we might call business adventures, but those adventures get quite intense.”

Maurice Chammah visits the podcast to talk about his densely reported first book, “Let the Lord Sort Them,” which is a history, as the subtitle has it, of “the rise and fall of the death penalty.”

“One of the fascinating parts of researching this book was revisiting a time that I kind of dimly remembered when the death penalty had a role in the culture war pantheon, along with gun control and abortion,” Chammah says. “Starting around the year 2000, it feels like that was a high-water mark where something broke, and over the 20 years since, the death penalty has declined, both in the number of people who support it, but I think more importantly, in relevance. It’s less of a thing that people feel matters to their daily lives.”

Also on this week’s episode, Tina Jordan looks back at Book Review history during this year of its 125th anniversary; Elizabeth A. Harris has news from the publishing world; and Tina Jordan and John Williams talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

The books of John le Carré

“Read Me” by Leo Benedictus

“Nine Perfect Strangers” by Liane Moriarty

“Dear Child” by Romy Hausmann

“Winterkeep” by Kristin Cashore

Feb 05, 2021
Navigating the Maze of Paying for College
01:09:14

Ron Lieber’s new book, “The Price You Pay for College,” aims at helping families with, as the book’s subtitle puts it, the biggest financial decision they will ever make. Lieber, a personal financial columnist for The Times, visits the podcast this week to discuss it. Among other subjects, he addresses all the ways in which the price to attend a particular college can vary from student to student, similar to how the cost of seats on one airplane flight can vary.

Michael J. Stephen visits the podcast to discuss his new book, “Breath Taking: The Power, Fragility, and Future of Our Extraordinary Lungs.” Stephen, a pulmonary expert at Thomas Jefferson University, talks about what we’ve learned about the lungs during the coronavirus crisis, and more generally about the wonders and perplexities of this organ.

Also on this week’s episode, Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and the Times’s critics talk about books they’ve recently reviewed. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed by the critics this week:

“The Lives of Lucian Freud: Fame, 1968-2011” by William Feaver

“The Liar’s Dictionary” by Eley Williams

“1984” by George Orwell

Jan 29, 2021
The Ethics of Adoption in America
01:03:23

In “American Baby,” the veteran journalist Gabrielle Glaser tells the story of one mother and child, and also zooms out from there to consider the ethics of adoption in this country. Our reviewer, Lisa Belkin, calls the book “the most comprehensive and damning” account of the “growing realization that old-style adoption was not always what it seemed.” Glaser visits the podcast this week to talk about it.

Kenneth R. Rosen visits the podcast to discuss his new book, “Troubled: The Failed Promise of America’s Behavioral Treatment Programs.” The book is an examination of the “tough-love industry” of wilderness camps and residential therapeutic programs for young people. Rosen himself, as a troubled teen, spent time at a few of these places, and his book strongly criticizes their methods.

Also on this week’s episode, Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Gregory Cowles and Tina Jordan talk about what they’ve been reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed in this week’s “What We’re Reading”:

“Summer Cooking” by Elizabeth David

“Never Let Me Go” by Kazuo Ishiguro

“The Soul of a New Machine” by Tracy Kidder

“Just Mercy” by Bryan Stevenson

Jan 22, 2021
James Comey and Truth in Government
01:03:55

James Comey’s “Saving Justice,” arrives three years after his first book, “A Higher Loyalty.” Joe Klein reviews it for us, and visits the podcast this week to discuss, among other subjects, how the new book is different from the first.

“It doesn’t differ very much at all, actually,” Klein says, “except for one thing: He rehearses all of the confrontations he had with Donald Trump in both books, but in the second book he places that in the context of the need for truth and transparency in government, which I think is a valuable thing. The book is a repetition of the first book, but it’s not an insignificant repetition because of the context that he’s now placed it in.”

Elisabeth Egan, an editor at the Book Review, is on the podcast to discuss the latest selection for our monthly column Group Text: “A Lie Someone Told You About Yourself,” by Peter Ho Davies.

“What I found especially compelling about this book in this moment, when we’re all still kind of confined to our houses,” Egan says, “is that it was very reassuring to read about parental worry in a moment when we’re all flying blind. But you have this worry with a lot of funny lines and funny observations about parenthood.”

Also on this week’s episode, Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Parul Sehgal and Jennifer Szalai talk about books they’ve recently reviewed. Pamela Paul is the host.

Here are the books discussed by the Times’s critics this week:

“Kill Switch” by Adam Jentleson

“The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Jan 15, 2021
Charles Yu Talks About ‘Interior Chinatown’
00:55:15

Charles Yu’s “Interior Chinatown,” which won the National Book Award for fiction in November, is a satire about Hollywood’s treatment of Asian-Americans. It features an actor named Willis Wu, who has a very small role in a TV show. On this week’s podcast, Yu, himself a writer for TV as well as a novelist, discusses the book and why he wrote it. 

David S. Brown visits the podcast to discuss his new biography of Henry Adams, “The Last American Aristocrat.” Adams was the great-grandson of John Adams, the grandson of John Quincy Adams and the author of “The Education of Henry Adams,” a posthumously published memoir that is widely considered one of the greatest nonfiction works of the 20th century.

Also, Alexandra Alter answers questions from listeners about the publishing industry, and Gregory Cowles, John Williams and the show's host, Pamela Paul, discuss what they're reading. The books discussed on "What We're Reading" this week: 

“Just Like You” by Nick Hornby

“The Watch Tower” by Elizabeth Harrower

“The Last Million” by David Nasaw

Jan 08, 2021
Fareed Zakaria on Life After the Pandemic
00:58:16

The author and CNN host Fareed Zakaria calls the coronavirus pandemic “the most transformative event of our lifetimes.” He says: “What has happened over the last 50 years is, we have gotten increasingly confident about the power of science and medicine, so we’ve kind of lost sight of the effect that something like a plague, a pandemic, has. And I think this was a mistake."

The historian Margaret MacMillan visits the podcast to discuss her most recent book, “War: How Conflict Shaped Us,” one of the Book Review’s 10 Best Books of 2020. MacMillan has written about specific wars in the past, but here she looks more broadly at the subject throughout human history, which led her to some new conclusions. “What I hadn’t really got involved in or really understood,” MacMillan says, “was the debate about whether war is something that’s biologically driven — are we condemned to war because of something that evolution has left us with, or is war the product of culture?”

Also on this week’s episode, Gregory Cowles and John Williams talk about what they’re reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jan 01, 2021
The Listeners’ Episode: Editors and Critics Answer Your Questions
01:13:38
We respond to questions about criticism, reading habits, favorite stories and more.
Dec 25, 2020
Agents of Change
00:49:06
Kerri Greenidge discusses two books about African-Americans in the years before the Civil War, and Neal Gabler talks about “Catching the Wind,” his biography of Edward Kennedy.
Dec 18, 2020
Jo Nesbo Talks About 'The Kingdom'
01:00:12
Nesbo discusses his latest novel, and David Michaelis talks about his new biography of Eleanor Roosevelt.
Dec 11, 2020
David Sedaris on a Career-Spanning Collection
01:04:28

Sedaris talks about “The Best of Me” and his life as an essayist.

Dec 04, 2020
Talking About the 10 Best Books of 2020
01:09:30

On a special episode of the podcast, taped live, editors from The New York Times Book Review discuss this year's outstanding fiction and nonfiction.

Nov 27, 2020
Joy Williams and Unique Views of America
01:01:51

A.O. Scott talks about Williams’s fiction, and Nicholas Christakis discusses his new book about the coronavirus, “Apollo’s Arrow.”

Nov 20, 2020
David Byrne on Turning 'American Utopia' Into a Book
00:49:21

Byrne talks about his work with the artist Maira Kalman on his latest book, and Brittany K. Barnett discusses "A Knock at Midnight."

Nov 13, 2020
The Birth of the Animal Rights Movement
00:50:27

Ernest Freeberg talks about “A Traitor to His Species,” and the illustrator Christian Robinson discusses his career in picture books.

Nov 06, 2020
A Writing Career Among Trailblazing Music Stars
00:59:19

Peter Guralnick talks about “Looking to Get Lost,” and Alex Ross discusses “Wagnerism.”

Oct 30, 2020
Real-Life Political Violence Fuels Fiction in ‘The Abstainer’
00:53:59

Ian McGuire talks about his new novel, and Elisabeth Egan discusses Romy Hausmann’s “Dear Child.”

Oct 23, 2020
The Ottoman Empire’s Influence on the Present Day
01:03:08

Alan Mikhail talks about “God’s Shadow,” and Benjamin Lorr discusses “The Secret Life of Groceries.”

Oct 16, 2020
The Fate of Refugees After World War II
01:03:17

David Nasaw talks about “The Last Million,” and Carlos Lozada discusses “What Were We Thinking.”

Oct 09, 2020
Hari Kunzru on Writing ‘Red Pill’
01:05:00

Kunzru talks about his new novel, and Ben Macintyre discusses “Agent Sonya,” his latest real-life tale of espionage.

Oct 02, 2020
C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War
01:06:39

Scott Anderson discusses “The Quiet Americans,” and Peter Baker and Susan Glasser talk about “The Man Who Ran Washington.”

Sep 25, 2020
Ayad Akhtar on Truth and Fiction
00:59:47

Akhtar discusses "Homeland Elegies," and Marc Lacey talks about "Cry Havoc," by Michael Signer, and "The Violence Inside Us," by Chris Murphy.

Sep 18, 2020
Brian Stelter on Fox News and Reed Hastings on Netflix
00:57:49

Stelter talks about "Hoax: Donald Trump, Fox News and the Dangerous Distortion of Truth" and Reed Hastings discusses "No Rules Rules: Netflix and the Culture of Reinvention."

Sep 11, 2020
Jeffrey Toobin on Writing About Trump
00:57:25

Toobin talks about “True Crimes and Misdemeanors,” and Dayna Tortorici discusses Elena Ferrante’s “The Lying Life of Adults.”

Sep 04, 2020
Kurt Andersen on ‘Evil Geniuses’
00:57:49

Andersen talks about his new book, and Lesley M.M. Blume discusses “Fallout.”

Aug 28, 2020
The Life of a Brilliant, Suffering Scientist
00:47:43

Samanth Subramanian discusses “A Dominant Character,” his biography of J. B. S. Haldane, and Patrik Svensson talks about “The Book of Eels.”

Aug 21, 2020
The Fictional World of Edward P. Jones
01:02:20

A.O. Scott talks about Jones’s work and the American experience, and Eric Jay Dolin discusses “A Furious Sky.”

Aug 14, 2020
Isabel Wilkerson Talks About 'Caste'
00:55:16

Wilkerson describes the ideas about race in America that fuel her new book, and David Hill discusses “The Vapors.”

Aug 07, 2020
The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism
00:54:28

Anne Applebaum discusses "Twilight of Democracy," and Barbara Demick talks about "Eat the Buddha."

Jul 31, 2020
The Yearning for the Unexplained
00:51:58

Colin Dickey talks about “The Unidentified,” and Miles Harvey discusses “The King of Confidence.”

Jul 24, 2020
Newt Gingrich and the Start of an Era
01:05:20

Julian E. Zelizer talks about "Burning Down the House," and Lacy Crawford talks about "Notes on a Silencing."

Jul 17, 2020
David Mitchell's Vast and Tangled Universe
01:02:09

Daniel Mendelsohn discusses Mitchell's career and new novel, "Utopia Avenue," and Maria Konnikova talks about "The Biggest Bluff."

Jul 10, 2020
Jules Feiffer on His Long, Varied Career
00:55:39

Feiffer talks about his new picture book and more, and Steve Inskeep discusses "Imperfect Union."

Jul 02, 2020
A Short Guide to 'The World'
01:06:24

Richard Haass talks about his new primer on global affairs, and Abhrajyoti Chakraborty on new novels in translation.

Jun 26, 2020
André Leon Talley on 'The Chiffon Trenches'
00:59:48

Talley talks about his new memoir; Claudia Rankine and Jericho Brown read new poems; and Megha Majumdar discusses her debut novel, "A Burning."

Jun 18, 2020
Stephen Fry on Reimagining the Greek Myths
01:01:50

Stephen Fry

Jun 12, 2020
A.O. Scott on the Work of Wallace Stegner
00:58:58

Scott discusses his first in a series of essays about American writers, and David Kamp talks about "Sunny Days: The Children’s Television Revolution That Changed America."

Jun 05, 2020
A Manhunt on the 17th Century’s High Seas
01:07:26

Steven Johnson talks about “Enemy of All Mankind,” and Gilbert Cruz offers a guide to Stephen King’s work.

May 29, 2020
Immigration Reform, Past and Present
00:59:29

Jia Lynn Yang talks about “One Mighty and Irresistible Tide,” and Judith Newman talks about books that help simplify life.

May 22, 2020
One Young Mother and the Homelessness Crisis
01:15:20

Lauren Sandler talks about “This Is All I Got,” and Sarah Weinman discusses classic mysteries.

May 15, 2020
The Angry Children Are Our Future
00:57:33

Lydia Millet talks about “A Children’s Bible,” and Barry Gewen discusses “The Inevitability of Tragedy.”

May 08, 2020
Lawrence Wright on Researching a (Fictional) Pandemic
01:01:06

Wright talks about “The End of October,” and Dalia Sofer discusses “Man of My Time.”

May 01, 2020
The Great Alaska Quake of 1964
00:49:59

Jon Mooallem talks about “This Is Chance!” and Elisabeth Egan discusses Charlie Mackesy’s “The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse.”

Apr 24, 2020
Samantha Irby Talks About ‘Wow, No Thank You’
00:56:23

Irby on her new essay collection, and Jon Meacham discusses three books about leadership during times of crisis.

Apr 17, 2020
Robert Kolker Discusses 'Hidden Valley Road'
00:54:11

Kolker talks about a large family beset by schizophrenia, and Elisabeth Egan discusses Lily King's "Writers & Lovers."

Apr 10, 2020
Parenting When the Family Is Locked Inside
01:12:02

The clinical psychologist Lisa Damour discusses the specific challenges of raising children during the pandemic, and Dwight Garner asks Pamela Paul about putting together the Book Review.

Apr 03, 2020
From the Archives: Colson Whitehead and Jeffrey Toobin
00:54:05

Whitehead discusses “The Underground Railroad,” and Toobin talks about “American Heiress.”

Mar 27, 2020
From the Archives: Robert Caro on How He Does It
01:03:12

The acclaimed biographer of Lyndon Johnson and Robert Moses talks about his book “Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing.”

Mar 20, 2020
From the Archive: Michael Lewis and Tana French
00:55:37

Lewis discusses "The Fifth Risk," and French talks about "The Witch Elm."

Mar 13, 2020
James McBride Talks About ‘Deacon King Kong’
00:57:19

McBride discuss his latest novel, and Rebecca Solnit talks about “Recollections of My Nonexistence.”

Mar 06, 2020
The Ties That Bind Deutsche Bank and Donald Trump
01:08:20

David Enrich discusses "Dark Towers," and Kiran Millwood Hargrave talks about "The Mercies."

Feb 28, 2020
Unjust America
01:01:41

Adam Cohen talks about “Supreme Inequality,” and Madeline Levine discusses “Ready or Not.”

Feb 21, 2020
A History of Seduction
00:42:47

Clement Knox talks about “Seduction,” and Elisabeth Egan discusses Amina Cain’s “Indelicacy.”

Feb 14, 2020
Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill’s ‘Weather’
01:09:35

Jamison talks about Offill’s new novel, and Courtney Maum talks about “Before and After the Book Deal.”

Feb 07, 2020
The Paradoxes of Nuclear War
01:02:41

Fred Kaplan discusses “The Bomb,” and Sarah Lyall talks about new thrillers.

Jan 31, 2020
Andrea Bernstein on 'American Oligarchs'
01:00:40

Bernstein discusses her new book about the Trumps and Kushners, and David Zucchino talks about “Wilmington’s Lie.”

Jan 24, 2020
Americans on a Financial 'Tightrope'
00:56:33

Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn talk about their new book, and Daniel Susskind discusses “A World Without Work.”

Jan 17, 2020
Life in Tech’s ‘Uncanny Valley’
00:54:24

Anna Wiener discusses her new memoir, and Elisabeth Egan talks about Group Text, a new monthly feature from the Book Review.

Jan 10, 2020
Medicine in the Middle Ages
00:53:06

Jack Hartnell talks about “Medieval Bodies,” and Matt Dorfman talks about his work as the Book Review’s art director.

Jan 03, 2020
Ralph Ellison’s Life in Letters
00:49:31

Saidiya Hartman talks about Ellison’s correspondence, and Olaf Olafsson discusses his new novel, “The Sacrament.”

Dec 27, 2019
Times Critics Talk About Their Year-End Lists
00:41:53

Dwight Garner, Parul Sehgal and Jennifer Szalai on the top books of 2019.

Dec 20, 2019
Poems About the Challenges of Life After Prison
00:57:42

Reginald Dwayne Betts talks about “Felon,” and Jung Chang discusses “Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister.”

Dec 13, 2019
The Life of Mike Nichols
01:00:46

Ash Carter and Sam Kashner discuss their new oral history of the director, and Alexandra Jacobs talks about her biography of Elaine Stritch.

Dec 06, 2019
10 Best Books of 2019
01:14:07

On a special episode of the podcast, taped live, editors from The New York Times Book Review discuss this year’s outstanding fiction and nonfiction. Read more details about the books discussed on this episode here.

Nov 26, 2019
The Authorized Life of the Iron Lady
01:09:02

Charles Moore discusses the final volume of his biography of Margaret Thatcher, and Adrienne Brodeur talks about her memoir, “Wild Game.”

Nov 22, 2019
Revisiting Baldwin vs. Buckley
01:06:47

Nicholas Buccola talks about “The Fire Is Upon Us,” and Saeed Jones discusses “How We Fight for Our Lives.”

Nov 15, 2019
Among the Trolls
01:03:22

Andrew Marantz talks about “Antisocial,” and Gail Collins discusses “No Stopping Us Now.”

Nov 08, 2019
The Life of Thomas Edison
00:54:15

David Oshinsky talks about Edmund Morris’s “Edison,” and Tina Jordan discusses new memoirs by Demi Moore, Julie Andrews and Carly Simon.

Nov 01, 2019
John Lithgow on His Satirical Poems
01:03:02

The actor talks about "Dumpty: The Age of Trump in Verse," and Leigh Bardugo discusses "Ninth House."

Oct 25, 2019
Thomas Chatterton Williams on ‘Unlearning Race’
01:12:48

Williams talks about his new memoir, “Self-Portrait in Black and White,” and Stephen Kinzer discusses “Poisoner in Chief: Sidney Gottlieb and the CIA Search for Mind Control.”

Oct 18, 2019
Are Cheap Clothes Ruining the Planet?
00:49:59

Dana Thomas discusses “Fashionopolis,” and Steven Greenhouse talks about “Beaten Down, Worked Up.”

Oct 11, 2019
Ben Lerner's New Novel and the Politics of Language
01:02:25

Garth Risk Hallberg talks about Lerner's "The Topeka School," and Bari Weiss discusses "How to Fight Anti-Semitism."

Oct 04, 2019
Samantha Power on What She's Learned
01:07:04

Power talks about her new memoir, "The Education of an Idealist," and Craig Johnson discusses his Longmire mysteries.

Sep 27, 2019
Two Times Reporters on ‘The Education of Brett Kavanaugh’
01:06:13

Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly discuss their new book, and Tim Winton talks about his most recent novel, “The Shepherd’s Hut.”

Sep 20, 2019
Bringing Down Harvey Weinstein
01:04:26

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey talk about their new book, “She Said,” and Ian Urbina discusses “The Outlaw Ocean.”

Sep 13, 2019
Trump, TV and America
01:00:24

James Poniewozik discusses “Audience of One,” and Bina Venkataraman talks about “The Optimist’s Telescope.”

Sep 06, 2019
The Ruining of the American West
00:59:55

Christopher Ketcham talks about “This Land,” and Gretchen McCulloch discusses “Because Internet.”

Aug 30, 2019
The Politicization of Academic Life
00:51:26

Anthony Kronman talks about “The Assault on American Excellence,” and Christopher Benfey discusses “If,” his new book about Rudyard Kipling.

Aug 23, 2019
Jia Tolentino on Life With the Internet
00:54:21

Tolentino talks about “Trick Mirror,” and John Taliaferro discusses “Grinnell,” his biography of a pioneering conservationist.

Aug 16, 2019
Toni Morrison's Legacy
01:07:23

Wesley Morris, Parul Sehgal and Dwight Garner talk about Morrison’s career, and Sarah M. Broom talks about her debut memoir, “The Yellow House.”

Aug 09, 2019
The Fight for the Supreme Court
00:57:45

Carl Hulse talks about “Confirmation Bias,” and De’Shawn Charles Winslow discusses “In West Mills.”

Aug 02, 2019
Fiction About Unprecedented Situations
01:03:21

Ted Chiang talks about “Exhalation,” and Helen Phillips discusses “The Need.”

Jul 26, 2019
Colson Whitehead Talks About 'The Nickel Boys'
00:52:48

The Pulitzer Prize winner discusses his new novel, and Jon Gertner talks about “The Ice at the End of the World.”

Jul 19, 2019
George F. Will on Conservatism’s Homelessness
00:57:12

Will discusses “The Conservative Sensibility,” and David Maraniss talks about “A Good American Family: The Red Scare and My Father.”

Jul 12, 2019
Picking the Best Memoirs Since 1969
00:51:07

The Times’s book critics talk about choosing the best 50 memoirs of the past 50 years, and Daniel Okrent discusses “The Guarded Gate.”

Jul 05, 2019
Taffy Brodesser-Akner Talks About Her First Novel
01:02:20

Brodesser-Akner discusses “Fleishman in Trouble,” and Katherine Eban talks about “Bottle of Lies: The Inside Story of the Generic Drug Boom.”

Jun 28, 2019
Jill Lepore on the 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing
01:03:31

Lepore discusses several new books about the Apollo 11 mission, and Julie Satow talks about the history of the Plaza Hotel.

Jun 21, 2019
The World's Far Corners and Deepest Depths
00:57:35

Robert Macfarlane talks about "Underland," and Julia Phillips discusses "Disappearing Earth."

Jun 14, 2019
Rethinking the Epidemic of Domestic Violence
00:59:26

Rachel Louise Snyder talks about “No Visible Bruises,” and Josh Levin discusses “The Queen.”

Jun 07, 2019
Thrillers for Summer
00:54:03

Vanessa Friedman talks about this season’s notable thrillers, and Liesl Schillinger discusses new books about travel.

May 31, 2019
A Trilogy About the American Revolution Begins
01:12:00

Rick Atkinson talks about “The British Are Coming,” and Brenda Wineapple discusses “The Impeachers.”

May 24, 2019
Harper Lee's Unwritten True-Crime Book
00:54:30

Casey Cep discusses "Furious Hours," and Eliza Griswold talks about "Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America."

May 17, 2019
The Real Life of a Diplomat, Told Like a Novel
01:06:16

George Packer talks about “Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century,” and Lori Gottlieb discusses “Maybe You Should Talk to Someone.”

May 10, 2019
Laila Lalami on 'The Other Americans'
00:57:08

Lalami discusses her latest novel, and Jenny Odell talks about "How to Do Nothing."

May 03, 2019
Connecting the Dots Between Reconstruction and Jim Crow
01:02:15

Henry Louis Gates Jr. talks about “Stony the Road” and “Dark Sky Rising,” and David Wallace-Wells discusses “The Uninhabitable Earth.”

Apr 26, 2019
Robert Caro on How He Does It
01:12:21

The acclaimed biographer of Lyndon Johnson and Robert Moses talks about his new book, "Working: Researching, Interviewing, Writing."

Apr 19, 2019
Ruth Reichl's Delicious New Memoir
01:08:55

Reichl discusses "Save Me the Plums," and Emily Bazelon talks about "Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration."

Apr 12, 2019
The Chernobyl Disaster in Full
00:54:56

Adam Higginbotham talks about his sweeping new history of the nuclear accident and its aftermath, and Nellie Bowles discusses Clive Thompson's "Coders."

Apr 05, 2019
Preet Bharara on the Rule of Law
00:55:23

Bharara discusses “Doing Justice,” and Senator Doug Jones talks about “Bending Toward Justice.”

Mar 29, 2019
The Life of Sandra Day O'Connor
01:05:21

Evan Thomas talks about “First,” his new biography of O’Connor, and Mitchell S. Jackson discusses “Survival Math.”

Mar 22, 2019
Isaac Mizrahi on His New Memoir
01:04:54

The fashion designer discusses “I.M.,” and David McCraw talks about “Truth in Our Times.”

Mar 15, 2019
A Violent Summer in Chicago
00:59:03

Alex Kotlowitz discusses “An American Summer: Love and Death in Chicago,” and John Lanchester talks about his new novel, “The Wall.”

Mar 08, 2019
A Gripping Political Mystery in Northern Ireland
01:05:30

Patrick Radden Keefe talks about “Say Nothing,” and Frans de Waal discusses “Mama’s Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us About Ourselves.”

Mar 01, 2019
Seeking Silence
00:51:18

Gal Beckerman discusses “How to Disappear,” by Akiko Busch, and “Silence,” by Jane Brox; and Steve Luxenberg talks about “Separate.”

Feb 22, 2019
A Class in ‘Dreyer’s English’
01:03:09

Benjamin Dreyer discusses his best-selling book about writing, and Thomas Mallon discusses “Landfall,” his new novel about the presidential administration of George W. Bush.

Feb 15, 2019
Marlon James Talks About His Epic New Trilogy
00:50:00

James discusses "Black Leopard, Red Wolf," and Stephanie Land talks about "Maid."

Feb 08, 2019
Assessing the Facebook Problem
00:57:32

Roger McNamee talks about "Zucked," and Charles Finch discusses the season's best thrillers.

Feb 01, 2019
Dani Shapiro on Her Surprising 'Inheritance'
01:09:27

Shapiro talks about her new best-selling memoir, and David Treuer discusses “The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee.”

Jan 25, 2019
A New Novel Conjures Liv Ullmann and Ingmar Bergman
00:50:32

A. O. Scott talks about Linn Ullmann’s “Unquiet,” and Judith Newman discusses new books about anxiety, mental illness and grief.

Jan 18, 2019
How Curses Function in Literature
01:10:24

Julian Lucas talks about the role of curses in contemporary African literature, and Abby Ellin discusses "Duped: Double Lives, False Identities, and the Con Man I Almost Married."

Jan 11, 2019
Fugitive Slaves and the Road to the Civil War
00:57:05

Andrew Delbanco discusses “The War Before the War,” and Rob Dunn talks about “Never Home Alone.”

Jan 04, 2019
Tyranny in Rome and Fake Drugs in Fiction
01:01:50

Yascha Mounk discusses Edward J. Watts's "Mortal Republic," and Jonathan Lethem talks about the surge of fictional psychotropic drugs in novels.

Dec 28, 2018
Isabel Wilkerson Talks About Michelle Obama’s Memoir
01:03:08

The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian discusses the former first lady’s story, and Helen Schulman talks about her novel “Come With Me.”

Dec 21, 2018
Poetry & Politics
00:58:27

The Book Review’s poetry editor, Gregory Cowles, discusses Tracy K. Smith’s essay about political poetry and more from this week’s special issue; and Maria Russo discusses the best children's books of 2018.

Dec 14, 2018
Immaturity in American Politics
00:50:17

Alan Wolfe discusses “The Politics of Petulance,” and Nadja Spiegelman talks about two newly published books by Lucia Berlin, “Evening in Paradise” and “Welcome Home.”

Dec 07, 2018
Talking About the 10 Best Books of 2018
00:55:50

On a special episode of the podcast, taped live, editors from The New York Times discuss the Book Review’s list of the year’s outstanding fiction and nonfiction.

Nov 30, 2018
The Epic Tragedy of Vietnam
00:56:59

Max Hastings discusses his new history of the war, and Sue Prideaux talks about the life of Friedrich Nietzsche.

Nov 21, 2018
The Past, Present and Future of Jews in America
01:03:54

Gal Beckerman discusses several new books about the state of Judaism in this country, and Kiese Laymon talks about his new memoir, “Heavy.”

Nov 16, 2018
Big New Biographies of Two Big American Lives
00:54:24

David W. Blight talks about “Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom,” and Bob Spitz talks about “Reagan: An American Journey.”

Nov 09, 2018
Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah on “Friday Black”
01:05:22

“Black people being murdered is unfortunately a constant in this country. Murdered with impunity. It’s something that’s constantly on my mind,” Adjei-Brenyah says. “So some of these stories respond to that very specifically.” Plus, Joseph Ellis discusses his new book, “American Dialogue.”

Nov 02, 2018
Lisa Brennan-Jobs on 'Small Fry'
00:54:18

In a special episode of the Book Review's podcast, taped in front of a live audience, Brennan-Jobs talks about her memoir, and Gary Shteyngart discusses "Lake Success."

Oct 26, 2018
Susan Orlean on a Great Library Fire
00:57:19

Orlean discusses “The Library Book,” and Reid Hoffman talks about “Blitzscaling.”

Oct 19, 2018
Barry Jenkins and Meg Wolitzer on Two of This Season's Novels on Screen
00:51:25

Jenkins talks about his adaptation of James Baldwin's "If Beale Street Could Talk," and Wolitzer discusses the adaptation of her novel "The Wife."

Oct 16, 2018
Michael Lewis and Tana French on Their Latest Books
01:02:22

Lewis talks about "The Fifth Risk," and French discusses "The Witch Elm."

Oct 12, 2018
Kate Atkinson on 'Transcription'
00:50:05

Atkinson talks about her new novel, and Shane Bauer discusses "American Prison."

Oct 05, 2018
The End of the ‘Struggle’
01:01:20

Daniel Mendelsohn discusses Karl Ove Knausgaard’s “My Struggle,” and Jill Lepore talks about “These Truths: A History of the United States.”

Sep 28, 2018
Esi Edugyan on Her Booker-Shortlisted 'Washington Black'
00:59:02

Edugyan talks about her new novel, and Lisa Margonelli talks about “Underbug: An Obsessive Tale of Termites and Technology.”

Sep 21, 2018
A Memoir From the Hard-Working ‘Heartland’
00:59:26

Sarah Smarsh talks about her new book, and Allan Lichtman discusses "The Embattled Vote in America."

Sep 14, 2018
'The Most Secretly Interesting Place in America'
01:14:40

Sam Anderson talks about “Boom Town,” his new book about Oklahoma City; and David Enrich and Andrew Ross Sorkin discuss finance in fiction, including in Gary Shteyngart’s new novel, “Lake Success.”

Sep 07, 2018
The Uses and Misuses of Identity
01:12:58

Kwame Anthony Appiah talks about “The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity,” and Jonathan Haidt discusses “The Coddling of the American Mind.”

Aug 31, 2018
Interrogating the Change Makers
00:53:49

Anand Giridharadas talks about his new book on the world of a global elite, and Kim Brooks discusses “Small Animals: Parenthood in the Age of Fear.”

Aug 24, 2018
Rethinking the 'Tangled Tree' of Life
01:02:17

David Quammen discusses his new book about the science of evolution, and Andrea Gabor talks about “After the Education Wars.”

Aug 17, 2018
Lydia Millet on 'Fight No More'
00:56:51

Millet discusses her new collection of stories, and Alexandra Jacobs talks about Jamie Bernstein’s “Famous Father Girl: A Memoir of Growing Up Bernstein.”

Aug 10, 2018
Beth Macy on 'Dopesick'
00:57:52

Macy discusses her new book about the opioid crisis; Lovia Gyarkye talks about Chibundu Onuzo’s “Welcome to Lagos”; and Jennifer Schuessler discusses a controversy in the world of poetry.

Aug 03, 2018
Drawing History
00:50:44

Hillary Chute talks about new graphic books that address serious issues, and Nicole Lamy discusses her Match Book column, in which she helps readers find books they'll love.

Jul 27, 2018
True Crime Starring the Creator of Sherlock Holmes
00:57:08

Margalit Fox talks about “Conan Doyle for the Defense,” and Tina Jordan discusses this season’s thrillers.

Jul 20, 2018
Making a Killing
00:20:20

In this special bonus episode of the Book Review’s podcast, best-selling thriller writers Lee Child, Megan Abbott, Meg Gardiner, Lisa Gardner and Lisa Scottoline discuss the tricks of their best-selling trade.

Jul 19, 2018
From Transcribing for Obama to Writing Her Own Story
01:10:08

Beck Dorey-Stein discusses “From the Corner of the Oval,” and Caroline Weber talks about “Proust’s Duchess: How Three Celebrated Women Captured the Imagination of Fin-De-Siècle Paris.”

Jul 13, 2018
An Inside View of Putin
01:04:19

Michael McFaul discusses "From Cold War to Hot Peace: An American Ambassador in Putin’s Russia," and Ottessa Moshfegh talks about her new novel, "My Year of Rest and Relaxation."

Jul 06, 2018
The Latest in Cyberwarfare
01:04:44

David E. Sanger talks about “The Perfect Weapon,” and Stacy Horn discusses “Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad & Criminal in 19th-Century New York.”

Jun 29, 2018
The Life of Atticus Finch
00:59:03

Joseph Crespino talks about his biography of Harper Lee's fictional character, and Philip Dray talks about “The Fair Chase: The Epic Story of Hunting in America.”

Jun 22, 2018
The Things We Inherit
01:09:50

Carl Zimmer discusses “She Has Her Mother’s Laugh,” and Henry Alford talks about “And Then We Danced.”

Jun 15, 2018
Michael Pollan on His Acid Test
01:00:11

Michael Pollan talks about “How to Change Your Mind,” and Edward Tenner discusses “The Efficiency Paradox.”

Jun 08, 2018
Dinosaurs, the Master of Horror and Philip Roth
01:05:43

Steve Brusatte talks about “The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs”; Victor Lavalle and Gilbert Cruz discuss the work of Stephen King; and Dwight Garner, A.O. Scott and Taffy Brodesser-Akner talk about the legacy of Philip Roth.

Jun 01, 2018
David Sedaris on ‘Calypso’
01:19:23

Sedaris talks about his latest book, and Alisa Roth discusses “Insane: America’s Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness.”

May 25, 2018
Lost at Sea
01:10:53

Rachel Slade talks about “Into the Raging Sea,” and Clemantine Wamariya discusses “The Girl Who Smiled Beads.”

May 18, 2018
Amy Chozick on 'Chasing Hillary'
01:03:23

Chozick discusses her time covering Hillary Clinton on the campaign trail, and Sloane Crosley talks about her new collection of essays, “Look Alive Out There.”

May 11, 2018
There Is Nothin' Like a Tune
01:06:25

Todd S. Purdum talks about “Something Wonderful: Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Broadway Revolution,” and Fran Leadon discusses “Broadway: A History of New York City in Thirteen Miles.”

May 04, 2018
Julian Barnes on 'The Only Story'
01:13:49

Barnes talks about his latest novel, and Lawrence Wright discusses “God Save Texas.”

Apr 27, 2018
Jo Nesbo Reimagines ‘Macbeth’
01:04:24

James Shapiro discusses Nesbo’s new novel, and Leila Slimani talks about “The Perfect Nanny.”

Apr 20, 2018
Parenting in the Age of Omnipresent Screens
00:53:25

Pamela Druckerman discusses “The Art of Screen Time” and “Be the Parent, Please,” and Ben Austen talks about “High-Risers: Cabrini-Green and the Fate of American Public Housing.”

Apr 13, 2018
Tara Westover on 'Educated'
01:07:32

Westover discusses her best-selling memoir, and Mark Weinberg talks about "Movie Nights With the Reagans."

Apr 06, 2018
All in the Family
00:52:06

Luis Alberto Urrea talks about his new novel, “The House of Broken Angels,” and Martin Doyle discusses “The Source: How Rivers Made America and America Remade Its Rivers.”

Mar 30, 2018
'Just the Funny Parts'
00:52:47

Nell Scovell discusses her new memoir, and Joanne Lipman talks about "That's What She Said."

Mar 23, 2018
Impeachment, Then and Now
00:58:59

Cass R. Sunstein talks about “Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide” and “Can It Happen Here?”; and Kathryn Hughes discusses “Victorians Undone.”

Mar 16, 2018
Ronen Bergman on Israel’s Targeted Assassinations
00:51:31

Bergman talks about “Rise and Kill First,” and Felix Salmon discusses Chris Hughes’s “Fair Shot.”

Mar 09, 2018
A Marine’s Inventive Memoir
00:56:55

Matt Young discusses “Eat the Apple,” and A. O. Scott talks about Martin Amis’s “The Rub of Time.”

Mar 02, 2018
Tayari Jones on 'An American Marriage'
00:56:43

Jones talks about her new novel, and J. Randy Taraborrelli discusses “Jackie, Janet & Lee.”

Feb 23, 2018
Lisa Halliday on 'Asymmetry'
00:58:06

Halliday discusses her debut novel, and Naomi Novik and Gerald Jonas remember the life and work of Ursula K. Le Guin.

Feb 16, 2018
Laura Lippman on 'Sunburn'
00:42:32

Lippman talks about her new novel, and Tina Jordan discusses new romance novels.

Feb 09, 2018
Rose McGowan on 'Brave'
00:58:37

McGowan talks about her new memoir, and Katie Kitamura discusses Tom Malmquist’s new novel, “In Every Moment We Are Still Alive.”

Feb 02, 2018
Twilight's Last Gleaming?
01:01:39

David Frum talks about “Trumpocracy,” and Helen Thorpe discusses “The Newcomers.”

Jan 26, 2018
'Off the Charts'
00:56:43

Ann Hulbert discusses her new book about child prodigies, and Sam Graham-Felsen talks about his debut novel, “Green.”

Jan 19, 2018
Some Assembly Required
00:53:03

Alexander Langlands discusses “Craeft: An Inquiry Into the Origins and True Meaning of Traditional Crafts,” and Max Boot talks about “The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam.”

Jan 12, 2018
What to Read About North Korea
00:57:38

Nicholas Kristof discusses the best books about the secretive country, and Tui Sutherland talks about the graphic novel edition of “Wings of Fire.”

Jan 05, 2018
The Fire Next Time
00:46:38

Brendan I. Koerner talks about “Megafire” and “Firestorm,” and Henry Fountain discusses “The Great Quake.”

Dec 29, 2017
'The Story of the Jews' Continues
00:50:15

Simon Schama talks about “Belonging: 1492-1900,” and Christopher de Hamel discusses “Meetings With Remarkable Manuscripts.”

Dec 22, 2017
Mary Beard on 'Women & Power'
00:53:58

Beard talks about her new manifesto, and Hillary Chute discusses “Why Comics? From Underground to Everywhere.”

Dec 15, 2017
'The Second Coming of the KKK'
01:08:40

Linda Gordon talks about “The Second Coming of the KKK”; Scott Kelly discusses “Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery”; and editors from the Book Review talk about our 10 Best Books of 2017.

Dec 08, 2017
The History of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone
00:46:29

Joe Hagan discusses "Sticky Fingers," and Simon Winchester talks about "The Taste of Empire" and "A Thirst for Empire."

Dec 01, 2017
O Pioneers!
00:52:56

Caroline Fraser talks about “Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder,” and Tiya Miles discusses “The Dawn of Detroit.”

Nov 21, 2017
Mother Knows Best?
01:04:31

James Wolcott talks about “Raising Trump” and “The Kardashians,” and Tina Brown discusses “The Vanity Fair Diaries.”

Nov 17, 2017
Kurt Andersen on Channeling President Trump
01:00:06

Andersen talks about "You Can't Spell America Without Me"; Liza Mundy discusses “Code Girls”; and Maria Russo on the season's children’s books.

Nov 10, 2017
The American Revolution in Six Lives
00:53:39

Russell Shorto talks about “Revolution Song,” and Richard Aldous discusses his new biography of Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.

Nov 03, 2017
Marilyn Stasio on True Crime
00:44:08

Stasio discusses new books about real crimes, and Dave Eggers talks about his two new illustrated books.

Oct 27, 2017
From Podcast to Book with Marc Maron
01:11:38

Marc Maron discusses “Waiting for the Punch,” and Victor Sebestyen talks about his new biography of Lenin.

Oct 20, 2017
Ron Chernow on 'Grant'
01:08:07

Chernow talks about his new biography of Ulysses S. Grant, and Mike Wallace discusses “Greater Gotham: A History of New York City From 1898 to 1919.”

Oct 13, 2017
Jennifer Egan Talks About 'Manhattan Beach'
00:55:20

Egan discusses her new novel, and Franklin Foer talks about “World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech.”

Oct 06, 2017
Recent Romances
00:46:06

Robert Gottlieb talks about new romance novels, and Celeste Ng discusses her new novel, “Little Fires Everywhere.”

Sep 29, 2017
Jesmyn Ward on 'Sing, Unburied, Sing'
01:02:01

Ward discusses her new novel; David Dobbs on five new books about Darwin; and Kristin Cashore talks about “Jane, Unlimited.”

Sep 22, 2017
Jill Abramson on the 2016 Presidential Campaign
01:16:34

Abramson discusses Katy Tur's "Unbelievable" and Hillary Clinton's "What Happened."

Sep 15, 2017
'Gorbachev: His Life and Times'
00:48:55

William Taubman discusses his biography of Mikhail Gorbachev, and N. K. Jemisin talks about reading, writing and reviewing science fiction and fantasy.

Sep 08, 2017
An American Abroad
00:43:19

Suzy Hansen discusses “Notes on a Foreign Country,” and David Thomson talks about “Warner Bros: The Making of an American Movie Studio.”

Sep 01, 2017
The Joys of Children’s Literature
00:47:15

Bruce Handy talks about “Wild Things,” and Adrian Owen discusses “Into the Gray Zone.”

Aug 25, 2017
Analyzing Freud
00:46:01

George Prochnik discusses “Freud,” and Nancy MacLean talks about “Democracy in Chains.”

Aug 18, 2017
New Books About Parenting
00:47:13

Judith Newman discusses new parenting books, and Bill Goldstein talks about “The World Broke in Two: Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, E.M. Forster, and the Year That Changed Literature.”

Aug 11, 2017
Amy Schumer on ‘Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo’
00:47:12


Amy Schumer discusses her memoir, and Gregory Cowles talks about the Book Review's special poetry issue.



Aug 04, 2017
'Lights On, Rats Out'
00:47:57

Cree LeFavour talks about her new memoir, and Andrew Sean Greer discusses his new novel, "Less."

Jul 28, 2017
Steve Bannon's Road to the White House
00:58:17

Joshua Green talks about “Devil’s Bargain”; Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich discusses “The Fact of a Body”; and Laura Dassow Walls on her new biography of Thoreau.

Jul 21, 2017
The World of Jane Austen Fans
00:47:28

Deborah Yaffe talks about “Among the Janeites,” and Robert Ferguson discusses “Scandinavians: In Search of the Soul of the North.”

Jul 14, 2017
The History of the London Zoo
00:47:39

Isobel Charman discusses "The Zoo," and R. L. Stine talks about scary stories for children.

Jul 07, 2017
Silk on a Stick
00:44:05

Aaron Retica talks about Tim Marshall’s “A Flag Worth Dying For,” and Jill Eisenstadt discusses her new novel, “Swell.”

Jun 30, 2017
'The Boy Who Loved Too Much'
00:43:14

Jennifer Latson talks about “The Boy Who Loved Too Much”; Daniel Menaker discusses two new books about how to understand others and make ourselves understood.

Jun 23, 2017
China's World
00:46:17

Howard W. French talks about “Everything Under the Heavens,” and Judith Newman discusses new books about how to grieve and how to die.

Jun 16, 2017
Al Franken on Life in the Senate
00:55:24

Franken discusses his new political memoir; Thomas E. Ricks talks about “Churchill and Orwell”; and Dav Pilkey on the movie adaptation of “Captain Underpants” and more.

Jun 09, 2017
David Sedaris Talks About His Diaries
00:43:45

Sedaris discusses "Theft by Finding," and Christopher Knowlton talks about "Cattle Kingdom: The Hidden History of the Cowboy West."

Jun 02, 2017
Paris, London and New York in the Age of Revolution
00:40:47

Mike Rapport discusses "The Unruly City," and Dan Egan talks about "The Death and Life of the Great Lakes."

May 26, 2017
Joshua Ferris on ‘The Dinner Party’
00:45:43

Ferris talks about his new collection of stories, and Jonathan Taplin discusses “Move Fast and Break Things: How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy.”

May 19, 2017
Elizabeth Warren on Fighting for the Middle Class
00:47:17

Elizabeth Warren talks about “This Fight Is Our Fight,” and Doree Shafrir discusses her debut novel, “Startup.”

May 12, 2017
Gabourey Sidibe and Neil deGrasse Tyson
00:49:22

Gabourey Sidibe talks about her memoir, "This Is Just My Face," and Neil deGrasse Tyson discusses "Astrophysics for People in a Hurry."

May 05, 2017
Sheryl Sandberg on Life After Tragedy
00:56:33

Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant talk about “Option B,” and Annie Jacobsen discusses “Phenomena.”

Apr 28, 2017
'Hamlet Globe to Globe'
00:44:31

Dominic Dromgoole talks about “Hamlet Globe to Globe”; and Judith Newman discusses new books about sex and relationships.

Apr 21, 2017
Power and Punishment
00:48:25

Chris Hayes discusses "A Colony in a Nation," and Jason Zinoman talks about "Letterman: The Last Giant of Late Night."

Apr 14, 2017
Lives on the Line
00:49:43

Elisabeth Rosenthal talks about “An American Sickness”; and Jill Filipovic discusses “Unwanted Advances,” by Laura Kipnis, and “The Campus Rape Frenzy,” by KC Johnson and Stuart Taylor Jr.

Apr 07, 2017
The Charm of 'The Idiot'
00:50:37

Elif Batuman talks about her first novel, “The Idiot,” and David Bellos discusses “The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of ‘Les Misérables.’ ”

Mar 31, 2017
'Ties' to Ferrante?
00:48:19

Domenico Starnone and Jhumpa Lahiri talk about “Ties”; Mary Otto discusses “Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality, and the Struggle for Oral Health in America.”

Mar 24, 2017
The Definition of Adulthood
01:00:22

Jami Attenberg talks about her new novel, “All Grown Up,” and Bonnie Rochman discusses “The Gene Machine.”

Mar 17, 2017
Points of No Return
01:09:30

Mohsin Hamid talks about his new novel, “Exit West,” and Gillian Thomas discusses Marjorie J. Spruill’s “Divided We Stand.”

Mar 10, 2017
Happy Trails
00:50:41

Florence Williams discusses “The Nature Fix,” and Jennifer Szalai talks about new Argentine fiction.

Mar 03, 2017
The History of Race and Racism in America
00:48:40

Ibram X. Kendi discusses the history of books about race and racism in America; Bill Schutt talks about "Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History."

Feb 24, 2017
Neil Gaiman's Myths
01:02:34

Neil Gaiman discusses "Norse Mythology"; Sarah Lyall talks about Ali Smith's "Autumn"; and Nick Bilton on two new books about Silicon Valley.

Feb 17, 2017
George Saunders on Lincoln and Lost Souls
00:46:01

George Saunders talks about “Lincoln in the Bardo”; Alan Burdick on “Why Times Flies”; and Maria Russo discusses Laura Ingalls Wilder and the “Little House” books.

Feb 10, 2017
A Brave Look at Depression
00:48:16

Daphne Merkin talks about “This Close to Happy,” and Min Jin Lee discusses her new novel, “Pachinko.”

Feb 03, 2017
From Brooklyn to the Gulag
00:48:27

Sana Krasikov talks about her debut novel, "The Patriots"; and Michael Sims discusses "Arthur and Sherlock: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes."

Jan 27, 2017
Barack Obama's Legacy
00:43:01

Jonathan Chait talks about "Audacity: How Barack Obama Defied His Critics and Created a Legacy That Will Prevail," and Randall Fuller discusses "The Book That Changed America: How Darwin’s Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation."

Jan 20, 2017
Edward Snowden: Hero, Traitor or Spy?
00:49:06

Nicholas Lemann talks about Edward Jay Epstein's "How America Lost Its Secrets: Edward Snowden, the Man and the Theft," and James Ryerson discusses new books about how to be civil in an uncivil world.

Jan 13, 2017
Should You Stop Eating Sugar?
00:44:58

Gary Taubes discusses "The Case Against Sugar," and Anthony Gottlieb talks about a new biography of Casanova.

Jan 06, 2017
How Octopuses Are Like Aliens
00:44:09

Peter Godfrey-Smith discusses “Other Minds,” and Jeff Howe talks about “Whiplash: How to Survive Our Faster Future.”

Dec 29, 2016
The Year in Reading
00:38:56

Editors at the Book Review discuss what many notable people were reading in 2016, and Will Schwalbe talks about "Books for Living."

Dec 23, 2016
Michael Lewis and Arianna Huffington
00:44:45

Michael Lewis discusses his new book, "The Undoing Project," and Arianna Huffington talks about "Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less," by Alex Soojung-Kim Pang.

Dec 16, 2016
The 10 Best Books of 2016
00:50:56

Stefan Hertmans talks about "War and Turpentine"; editors at the Book Review talk about the year's best books; and Ian McGuire discusses "The North Water."

Dec 09, 2016
100 Notable Books of 2016
00:42:17

Editors at the Book Review discuss the year's notable books; Ronald H. Fritze talks about "Egyptomania," and Matthew Schneier on "Vanity Fair's Writers on Writers."

Dec 02, 2016
Thomas Friedman on 'Thank You for Being Late'
00:45:55

Thomas Friedman discusses "Thank You for Being Late," and David France talks about "How to Survive a Plague."

Nov 25, 2016
Michael Chabon Talks About 'Moonglow'
00:48:11

Michael Chabon discusses his new novel, and Blanche Wiesen Cook talks about the third volume in her biography of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Nov 18, 2016
War Stories
00:52:31

Thomas Ricks discusses new books about military history, and Maria Russo talks about the season's best new children's books.

Nov 11, 2016
John Grisham on 'The Whistler'
00:43:16

John Grisham talks about his latest novel, and Ben Macintyre discusses "Rogue Heroes."

Nov 04, 2016
Thrillers and True Crime
00:43:14

Charles Finch talks about the season’s thrillers; and Marilyn Stasio discusses new true-crime books.

Oct 29, 2016
Beth Macy’s ‘Truevine’
00:45:49

Beth Macy talks about “Truevine”; Calvin Trillin and Roz Chast discuss “No Fair! No Fair! And Other Jolly Poems of Childhood”; and Molly Young on “Bridget Jones's Baby.”

Oct 21, 2016
The Rise of Hitler
00:57:55

Adam Kirsch discusses Volker Ullrich's new biography of Hitler; Billy Collins talks about his latest collection of poems; and iO Tillett Wright on his new memoir, "Darling Days."

Oct 14, 2016
'Sing for Your Life'
00:38:41

Daniel Bergner talks about "Sing for Your Life," and Maria Semple discusses "Today Will Be Different."

Oct 07, 2016
American Apartheid
00:48:58

Patrick Phillips talks about “Blood at the Root”; Ethan Gilsdorf discusses three new books about gaming; and Melissa Clark on the season’s best new cookbooks.

Sep 30, 2016
Simon Schama's 'The Face of Britain'
00:47:57

Simon Schama talks about “The Face of Britain: A History of the Nation Through Its Portraits,” and Robert Gottlieb discusses “Avid Reader.”

Sep 23, 2016
Maureen Dowd on Clinton and Trump
00:46:55

Maureen Dowd talks about “The Year of Voting Dangerously,” and Lauren Collins talks about “When in French.”

Sep 16, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Mark Thompson's 'Enough Said'
00:49:27
Sep 09, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: The Attica Uprising
00:40:46

This week, Heather Ann Thompson talks about "Blood in the Water"; Seth Mnookin discusses "Patient H.M."; feedback from readers; and Gregory Cowles and John Williams on what we're reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Sep 02, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘ADHD Nation’
00:53:25

This week, Alan Schwarz talks about “ADHD Nation”; Raina Telgemeier discusses “Ghosts”; Nicholson Baker talks about “Substitute”; and Gregory Cowles, Jennifer Schuessler and John Williams on what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Aug 26, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘I Contain Multitudes’
00:46:05

This week, Ed Yong talks about “I Contain Multitudes”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Meghan Daum discusses Egos, her new column about memoirs; and Gregory Cowles and John Williams on what we’re reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Aug 19, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Colson Whitehead and Jeffrey Toobin
00:52:40

This week, Colson Whitehead discusses his new novel, “The Underground Railroad,” and Jeffrey Toobin talks about “American Heiress,” his new book about Patty Hearst. Pamela Paul is the host.

Aug 12, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘How to Be a Person in the World’
00:44:16

Heather Havrilesky discusses her new collection of advice columns, and Jessica Winter talks about her debut novel, “Break in Case of Emergency.”

Aug 05, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Colson Whitehead
00:02:36

In a sneak preview of next week’s podcast, Colson Whitehead talks about what he read (and couldn’t read) while writing “The Underground Railroad.”

Aug 05, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Megan Abbott’s ‘You Will Know Me’
00:45:27

Megan Abbott discusses “You Will Know Me”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Marilyn Stasio talks about several new true-crime books; feedback from readers; and Gregory Cowles and John Williams on what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 29, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘We Are Not Such Things’
00:47:15

This week, Justine van der Leun talks about “We Are Not Such Things”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; David Goldblatt discusses “The Games: A Global History of the Olympics”; feedback from readers; and Gregory Cowles and John Williams on what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 22, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: The Life of Helen Gurley Brown
00:43:23

This week, Moira Weigel discusses new biographies of Helen Gurley Brown; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Juliet Nicolson talks about “A House Full of Daughters”; and Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal on what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 15, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘You’ll Grow Out of It’
00:45:09

This week, Jessi Klein discusses her new essay collection; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Antonio García Martinez talks about “Chaos Monkeys”; and Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal on what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 10, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Hogs Wild’
00:44:02

This week, Ian Frazier talks about “Hogs Wild”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Barry Friedman discusses two new books about law enforcement; and John Williams, Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal on what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 01, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Why Populism Now?
00:53:55

This week, Sam Tanenhaus talks about new political books; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Calvin Trillin discusses “Jackson, 1964”; listeners share some of their favorite summer reading memories; and Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal on what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jun 24, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Susan Faludi’s ‘In the Darkroom’
00:45:12

This week, Susan Faludi discusses her new memoir, “In the Darkroom”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; James Lee McDonough talks about his new biography of William Tecumseh Sherman; listeners share some of their favorite summer reading memories; and Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal on what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jun 17, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘First Dads’
00:41:35

This week, Joshua Kendall talks about “First Dads”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Judith Warner discusses “The End of American Childhood”; and Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jun 10, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Before the Fall’
00:46:39

This week, Noah Hawley talks about “Before the Fall”; Andrew Solomon discusses “Far and Away”; Marjorie Ingall on the season’s new Y.A. novels; and Parul Sehgal and Gregory Cowles talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jun 03, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets’
00:51:29

This week, Adam Hochschild talks about Svetlana Alexievich’s “Secondhand Time”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Stephanie Danler discusses her debut novel, “Sweetbitter”; Jojo Moyes talks about the film adaptation of her novel “Me Before You”; and Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

May 27, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Romanovs’
00:42:23

This week, Simon Sebag Montefiore discusses his new history of the Romanovs; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Laura Miller talks about new audiobooks of childhood favorites; and Parul Sehgal and Gregory Cowles discuss what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

May 23, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Romanovs’
00:42:30

This week, Simon Sebag Montefiore discusses his new history of the Romanovs; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Laura Miller talks about new audiobooks of childhood favorites; and Parul Sehgal and Gregory Cowles discuss what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

May 20, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Gene’
00:45:53

Siddhartha Mukherjee talks about “The Gene”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Jennifer Szalai discusses two books about taste; and Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal talk about what people are reading.

May 13, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Pumpkinflowers’
00:55:56

This week, Matti Friedman discusses “Pumpkinflowers: A Soldier’s Story”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Judith Shulevitz talks about Angela Duckworth’s “Grit”; Sherman Alexie and Yuyi Morales discuss “Thunder Boy Jr.”; and Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal discuss what people are reading.

May 06, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Celebrating 10 Years
00:46:25

On this special episode of the podcast, Pamela Paul, Sam Tanenhaus, Dwight Garner and Gary Shteyngart discuss the history of the show, which started in 2006.

May 05, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Listen, Liberal’
00:32:48

Thomas Frank talks about “Listen, Liberal”; Lydia Millet discusses her new novel, “Sweet Lamb of Heaven”; and Parul Sehgal and Gregory Cowles talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Apr 29, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Old Age: A Beginner’s Guide’
00:40:09

This week, Michael Kinsley discusses “Old Age”; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Eric Fair talks about “Consequence”; Viet Thanh Nguyen discusses his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel; and Gregory Cowles and Parul Sehgal talk about what people are reading. Pamela Paul is the host.

Apr 22, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘At the Existentialist Café'
00:39:55

This week, Sarah Bakewell discusses her new book about the existentialists; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Liesl Schillinger talks about a new biography of Blanche Knopf; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Apr 15, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: The Life of Louisa Adams
00:34:29

This week, Louisa Thomas talks about “Louisa”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Hope Jahren discusses “Lab Girl”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Apr 08, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Spain in Our Hearts’
00:43:28

This week, Adam Hochschild talks about “Spain in Our Hearts”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Anna Quindlen discusses “Miller’s Valley”; John Williams talks about James McBride and his new biography of James Brown; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Apr 01, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Girls and Sex’
00:32:51

This week, Peggy Orenstein talks about “Girls and Sex”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; John Williams discusses “The Throwback Special”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Mar 25, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: American Eugenics
00:41:43

This week, Adam Cohen talks about “Imbeciles”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Ellen Fitzpatrick discusses “The Highest Glass Ceiling”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Mar 18, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Profiteers’
00:45:28

This week, Sally Denton talks about “The Profiteers”; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Jack Viertel discusses “The Secret Life of the American Musical”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Mar 11, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘All the Single Ladies’
00:52:27

This week, Rebecca Traister talks about “All the Single Ladies”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Ben Ratliff discusses “Every Song Ever”; Richard Armitage discusses his audiobook recording of “David Copperfield”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Mar 04, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘A Mother’s Reckoning’
00:34:33

This week, Sue Klebold talks about her new memoir; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Matthew Desmond discusses “Evicted”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Feb 26, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘West of Eden’
00:39:57

This week, Maria Russo discusses Jean Stein’s “West of Eden,” A. O. Scott talks about “Better Living Through Criticism” and Parul Sehgal has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Feb 19, 2016
Can the American Dream Survive?
00:39:21

Robert Gordon, author of “The Rise and Fall of American Growth,” and Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, debate whether the era of strong economic growth is over, or whether innovation can revive America’s future.

Feb 18, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Love and Death
00:47:44

This week, Andrew Solomon discusses five new books about death and dying; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Alexandra Fuller talks about Olga Grushin’s “Forty Rooms”; readers recommend books for Valentine’s Day; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Feb 12, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Infinite Jest’ at 20
00:47:27

This week, Michael Pietsch and Tom Bissell talk about David Foster Wallace’s “Infinite Jest”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Chris Jennings discusses “Paradise Now”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Feb 05, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Bill Bryson on Britain
00:43:55

This week, Bill Bryson talks about “The Road to Little Dribbling”; Jennifer Schuessler has news from the literary world; Molly Young discusses new books about productivity; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jan 29, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Dark Money’
00:44:59

This week, Jane Mayer discusses “Dark Money”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; David Greenberg talks about “Republic of Spin”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jan 24, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘City of Thorns’
00:35:44

This week, Ben Rawlence discusses “City of Thorns”; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Janice Y. K. Lee talks about “The Expatriates”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jan 15, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Defender’
00:40:39

This week, Brent Staples discusses “The Defender” and the history of the black press; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Maria Konnikova talks about “The Confidence Game”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jan 08, 2016
Inside The New York Times Book Review: You, New and Improved
00:28:55

This week, Heather Havrilesky talks about Amy Cuddy’s “Presence” and Shonda Rhimes’s “Year of Yes,” and Michael Ian Black discusses “Navel Gazing.” Pamela Paul is the host.

Dec 31, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: The Year in Poetry
00:39:22

This week, Parul Sehgal and Gregory Cowles discuss the year in poetry; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; George Saunders talks about children’s books; and Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Dec 24, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: From Movement to Mainstream
00:39:54

This week, Sam Tanenhaus discusses two new books about the history of American conservatism; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Lori Gottlieb talks about Courtney Jung’s “Lactivism”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Dec 18, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Reading ‘Pride and Prejudice’
00:49:54

This week, Rosamund Pike talks about recording “Pride and Prejudice” as an audiobook; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Kaiama Glover discusses the work of Patrick Modiano; James Shapiro on “The Year of Lear”; feedback from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Dec 11, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: The 10 Best Books of 2015
00:58:48

This week, editors at the Book Review discuss the year’s best books; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Matthew Schneier discusses facial hair and a treatise on men’s style; Bee Wilson talks about “First Bite”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Dec 04, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs’
00:40:10

This week, Lisa Randall talks about “Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Louisa Lim discusses five new memoirs about fleeing North Korea; and John Williams has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Nov 27, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: David Hare’s Memoir
00:40:43

This week, David Hare discusses “The Blue Touch Paper”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Sarah Vowell talks about “Lafayette in the Somewhat United States”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Nov 20, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: The Life of George H. W. Bush
00:44:01

This week, Jon Meacham discusses his biography of the 41st president; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Dan Ephron talks about “Killing a King”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Nov 13, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Putin’s Reign
00:50:39

This week, Steven Lee Myers talks about “The New Tsar”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Amy Ellis Nutt discusses “Becoming Nicole”; Maria Russo talks about the season in children’s books; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Nov 06, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Michael Connelly’s ‘The Crossing’
00:41:19

This week, Michael Connelly discusses his new novel; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Joseph Kanon talks about a new biography of John le Carré and a memoir by Frederick Forsyth; feedback from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Oct 30, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Doomed to Succeed”
00:30:18

This week, Scott Anderson and Roger Lowenstein.

Oct 25, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Doomed to Succeed”
00:30:18

This week, Scott Anderson discusses “Doomed to Succeed”; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Roger Lowenstein talks about “America’s Bank”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Parul Sehgal, filling in for Pamela Paul, is the host.

Oct 25, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Richard McGuire’s ‘Here’
00:33:22

This week, Richard McGuire talks about “Here”; John Williams has news from the literary world and feedback from readers; Simon Parkin discusses two new books about gaming; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Parul Sehgal, filling in for Pamela Paul, is the host.

Oct 16, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Rosemary: The Hidden Kennedy Daughter’
00:45:07

This week, Kate Clifford Larson discusses the life of Rosemary Kennedy; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Larissa MacFarquhar talks about “Strangers Drowning”; feedback from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Oct 09, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Niall Ferguson’s ‘Kissinger’
00:37:13

This week, Niall Ferguson discusses his biography of Henry Kissinger; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Sloane Crosley talks about “The Clasp”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Oct 02, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Black Silent Majority’
00:40:19

This week, Khalil Gibran Muhammad talks about Michael Javen Fortner’s “Black Silent Majority”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Hanna Rosin discusses David Brock’s “Killing the Messenger”; feedback from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Sep 25, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Court and the World’
00:51:09

This week, John Fabian Witt talks about Stephen Breyer’s new book; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Mira Jacob discusses three new coming-of-age novels; Sam Tanenhaus reminisces about the podcast; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Sep 18, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Fates and Furies’
00:41:25

This week, Lauren Groff talks about her new novel, “Fates and Furies”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Scott Shane discusses “Objective Troy”; feedback from listeners; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Sep 11, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Bill Clegg’s Debut Novel
00:35:41

This week, Bill Clegg talks about “Did You Ever Have a Family”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Kathryn J. Edin discusses "$2.00 a Day”; feedback from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Sep 04, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Give Us the Ballot’
00:27:46

This week, Ari Berman and Simon Winchester.

Aug 30, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Give Us the Ballot’
00:27:45

This week, Ari Berman and Simon Winchester.

Aug 30, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘NeuroTribes’
00:52:13

This week, Steve Silberman talks about “NeuroTribes” and autism; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Elisabeth Egan discusses “A Window Opens”; questions from readers; Maria Russo talks about the season’s children’s books; and Parul Sehgal has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Aug 21, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Vu Tran’s ‘Dragonfish’
00:35:33

This week, Vu Tran discusses his debut novel, “Dragonfish”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Ruth Franklin talks about Lucia Berlin’s stories; listeners share what they’ve been reading; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Aug 14, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Katrina: After the Flood’
00:37:55

This week, Gary Rivlin discusses “Katrina: After the Flood”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Joe Domanick talks about “Blue: The LAPD and the Battle to Redeem American Policing”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Aug 07, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Conservative Heart’
00:35:57

This week, Arthur C. Brooks discusses “The Conservative Heart”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Susan Southard talks about “Nagasaki”; readers offer changes to the literary canon; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 31, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘What Pet Should I Get?’
00:27:33

This week, Maria Russo and Alexandra Alter talk about Dr. Seuss; Jill Ciment discusses “The Hand That Feeds You”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 24, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Barbarian Days’
00:41:03

This week, William Finnegan talks about “Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Peter Moore discusses “The Weather Experiment”; questions from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 17, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Michael B. Oren’s ‘Ally’
00:34:23

This week, Jacob Heilbrunn discusses Michael B. Oren’s “Ally”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Julia Pierpont talks about her debut novel, “Among the Ten Thousand Things”; questions from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 10, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Skyfaring’
00:36:52

This week, Mark Vanhoenacker and Kristen Green.

Jul 05, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Skyfaring’
00:36:52

This week, Mark Vanhoenacker talks about “Skyfaring: A Journey With a Pilot”; Alexandra Alter has notes from the publishing world; Kristen Green discusses “Something Must Be Done About Prince Edward County”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jul 03, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: The Art Issue
00:39:57

This week, Holland Cotter discusses four new books and the contemporary art scene; Alexandra Alter has notes from the publishing world; Jonathon Keats talks about art theft and forgeries; questions from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jun 26, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: When I Grow Up
00:39:48

This week, Heather Havrilesky and Meghan Daum discuss new books about bringing up children and redefining adulthood; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Vendela Vida talks about her new novel, “The Diver’s Clothes Lie Empty”; questions from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jun 19, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Stalin’s Daughter’
00:43:51

This week, Rosemary Sullivan talks about “Stalin’s Daughter”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Eugenia Cheng discusses “How to Bake Pi”; Judd Apatow on his reading habits; questions from listeners; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jun 12, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: “Reagan: The Life”
00:36:19

This week, Jeff Shesol discusses H. W. Brands’s new biography of Ronald Reagan; Alexandra Alter has notes from the publishing world; Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs talks about her new biography of Jonas Salk; questions from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Jun 05, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Judy Blume’s ‘In the Unlikely Event’
00:45:11

This week, Judy Blume talks about her new novel; Liesl Schillinger rounds up new travel books; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Vanessa Grigoriadis discusses Wednesday Martin’s memoir, “Primates of Park Avenue”; feedback from readers; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

May 29, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Shakespeare in Love
00:36:04

This week, Alan Riding discusses two new books about Shakespeare’s women characters and his personal life; Parul Sehgal and John Williams have news from the literary world; Michelle Orange talks about five new essay collections; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

May 22, 2015
Matthew Weiner On the End of ‘Mad Men’
00:34:41

In a special supplement from The Times’s culture desk, Mr. Weiner, the creator of “Mad Men,” discusses the coming conclusion of the series with Dave Itzkoff, a reporter for The Times.

May 15, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: The Future of Work
00:34:17

This week, Barbara Ehrenreich discusses “Rise of the Robots” and “Shadow Work”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Andrew Solomon talks about Oliver Sacks’s new memoir, “On the Move”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

May 15, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘A God in Ruins’
00:28:55

This week, Tom Perrotta discusses Kate Atkinson’s “A God in Ruins”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Ruth Franklin talks about Shirley Jackson; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

May 08, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Life of Saul Bellow’
00:46:42

This week, Sam Tanenhaus talks about Zachary Leader’s new biography of Saul Bellow; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Emily Bazelon discusses Jon Krakauer’s “Missoula”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

May 01, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: Mass Murder in Norway
00:37:47

This week, Eric Schlosser discusses Asne Seierstad’s “One of Us”; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Meghan O’Rourke talks about Elizabeth Alexander’s “The Light of the World”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Apr 24, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Spinster’ and Public Shaming
00:41:28

This week, Kate Bolick discusses “Spinster”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Jon Ronson talks about “So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Apr 17, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Brothers,’ About the Boston Marathon Bombers
00:44:55

This week, Masha Gessen discusses “The Brothers”; Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; Gretchen Rubin talks about “Better Than Before”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Apr 10, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Becoming Steve Jobs’
00:40:08

This week, “Becoming Steve Jobs” and three new books about neuroscience.

Apr 03, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘Becoming Steve Jobs’
00:40:08

This week, Brad Stone talks about “Becoming Steve Jobs”; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Amanda Schaffer discusses three new books about neuroscience; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Apr 03, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Folded Clock’
00:44:13

This week, Heidi Julavits discusses “The Folded Clock”; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Jeffrey Lieberman talks about “Shrinks”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Mar 27, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Folded Clock’
00:44:13

This week, Heidi Julavits and Jeffrey Lieberman.

Mar 27, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Opposite of Spoiled’
00:38:49

This week, Ron Lieber discusses “The Opposite of Spoiled”; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Harris Irfan talks about “Heaven’s Bankers”; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.

Mar 20, 2015
Inside The New York Times Book Review: ‘The Last Flight of Poxl West’
00:37:07

This week, Daniel Torday discusses “The Last Flight of Poxl West”; Alexandra Alter has news from the literary world; Frank Bruni talks about Barney Frank’s new memoir; and Gregory Cowles has best-seller news. Pamela Paul is the host.