Jesuitical

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Description

Welcome to Jesuitical, a podcast for young Catholics hosted by two young, lay editors at America—Zac Davis and Ashley McKinless. Each episode features a guest who offers a unique perspective on faith, culture or current events. We also bring you some of the top (and maybe more obscure) Catholic news of the week. And we'll ask: Where do we find God in all this?

Episode Date
Spiritual Wisdom from Father Richard Rohr
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This week’s guest hardly needs an introduction. Father Richard Rohr is a Franciscan priest, the author of several well-known books on spirituality, including his latest The Universal Christ, and the founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation in New Mexico. In this wide-ranging interview, we talk to Father Richard about the difference between “Jesus” and “Christ,” the dangers of tribal religion and how we should approach this most unusual Lenten season.  We wanted to give this conversation plenty of space (you’ll understand why when you listen), so no Signs of the Times this week.  Links from the show: Center for Action and Contemplation  The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe Lent reflections, podcasts and more from America's staff What’s on tap? Nothing! Our 40 days of abstinence from alcohol begins.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 19, 2021
Is a better abortion debate possible?
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Abortion “is not an argument anyone is going to win,” Caitlin Flanagan wrote in a December 2019 essay for The Atlantic. “The loudest advocates on both sides are terrible representatives for their cause.” Caitlin is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where she writes on politics and culture. She identifies as pro-choice. The hosts of this show identify as pro-life. But all of us yearn for a debate and conversation about hard issues like aboriton that isn’t dominated by the vitriol often demonstrated by the “loudest advocates” that Caitlin refers to. We model that and more in this week’s show. During Signs of the Times, we discuss the first woman to be nominated with the right to vote as undersecretary of the synod of bishops; we also get into the controversy over Abby Johnson, a popular pro-life speaker and supporter of President Trump, delivering a speech at the Catholic University of America. This episode of Jesuitical is brought to you by The Great Courses Plus. Sign up for The Great Courses Plus and get an entire month of unlimited access to thousands of video and audio courses from the world’s best professors by visiting http://thegreatcoursesplus.com/jesuitical. As always, thanks for listening. You can support the media ministry of America and unlock unlimited access to all our articles with a digital subscription for less than $1 per week. Subscribe here. And to get all that plus bonus content from Jesuitical, become a member of our Patreon community. Links from the Show: One woman can vote in next year’s synod. Others are ‘under consideration.’ Catholic University students object to pro-life speaker Abby Johnson, citing past comments on race The Dishonesty of the Abortion Debate What’s on tap? Michelob Ultra Seltzers Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 12, 2021
Father James Martin’s prayer guide (for everyone)
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Whether you are an agnostic seeker who’s curious about the whole “prayer” thing or a seasoned Catholic looking to deepen your relationship with God, James Martin, S.J., has a book for you—and everyone else. In his new book, Learning to Pray: A Guide for Everyone, Father Martin not only answers the question “Why pray?” and introduces readers to different types of prayer; he tackles what he considers “one of the most confusing parts about the spiritual life”: What happens when you pray? That is, what are you supposed to hear or feel when you close your eyes?   We talk to Father Martin about the most common barriers to prayer, how you can tell what’s coming from God in prayer and whether we’re thinking about “consolations and desolations” in the right way. Plus, we bring him the questions you, dear listeners, posted to the Jesuitical Facebook group. In Signs of the Times, we’ve got to stories from Pope Francis. First, in a meeting with Italian catechists, the pope made clear that the Second Vatican Council is part of church teaching, saying, “If you do not follow the council or you interpret it in your own way, as you wish, you are not with the church.” Over 50 years after Vatican II, why is its legacy still up for debate? Next, Pope Francis has declared the fourth Sunday of July (the feasts of Sts. Joachim and Anne) the World Day of Grandparents and the Elderly. We discuss what the coronavirus pandemic has revealed about the treatment of the elderly in our society—and what lessons the pope wants us to take forward. This episode of Jesuitical is brought to you by The Great Courses Plus. Sign up for The Great Courses Plus and get an entire month of unlimited access to thousands of video and audio courses from the world’s best professors by visiting http://thegreatcoursesplus.com/jesuitical.  As always, thanks for listening. You can support the media ministry of America and unlock unlimited access to all our articles with a digital subscription for less than $1 per week. Subscribe here. And to get all that plus bonus content from Jesuitical, become a member of our Patreon community. Links from the show Pope Francis: Vatican II must be taught as part of church teaching, or ‘you are not with the church’ Pope Francis establishes World Day of Grandparents and the Elderly God’s voice or mine? 7 tips on what to listen to in prayer Learning to Pray: A Guide for Everyone, by James Martin, S.J. What’s on tap? Sweatpants Sazerac (from The New Yorker’s “Seasonal Cocktails for Your Seasonal Depression”) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 05, 2021
The future of the pro-life movement is already here
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Every year, tens of thousands of students, priests, sisters and pro-life activists gather in Washington, D.C., around the anniversary of the Supreme Court’s decision in Roe v. Wade to witness against abortion. This year, the march looks different because of Covid-19. But it is also noteworthy for another reason: It is the first march of the “post-Trump era.”  Though he is no longer president, for many Americans, Donald Trump will remain the face of the pro-life movement for years to come. So where do we go from here? What can those of us who oppose abortion and the death penalty—who want Roe overturned and for our country to welcome refugees—do to change the conversation around life issues? Thankfully, we got one answer to that question back in 2019, when we talked with Destiny Herndon-De La Rosa, the founder of New Wave Feminists. Destiny became a mother at a young age, and her experience inspired her to to form the pro-life, feminist organization that gives women the support and resources needed to make motherhood a feasible option.  We wanted to share this conversation with you (again) because it’s people like Destiny who give us hope for the future of the pro-life movement.  This episode of Jesuitical was brought to you by The Great Courses (Plus). Sign up for The Great Courses (Plus) and get an entire month of unlimited access to thousands of video and audio lectures from the world’s best professors by visiting http://thegreatcoursesplus.com/jesuitical. As always, thanks for listening. You can support the media ministry of America and unlock unlimited access to all our articles with a digital subscription for less than $1 per week. Subscribe here. And to receive bonus content and swag from Jesuitical, check out our Patreon community. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 29, 2021
President Biden’s Very Catholic Inauguration
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On Wednesday, Jan. 20, Joe Biden was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States, only the second Catholic ever to hold the office. Zac and Ashley are joined by Matt Malone, S.J., to discuss their reactions to President Biden’s inauguration—including the prayers offered by other Jesuits throughout the day. Father Malone is the editor in chief of America, worked in politics before joining the Jesuits and brings a historical and personal eye to the events of the week. We’re happy to report that Pope Francis, Pope Emeritus Benedict and guests at the Vatican’s homeless shelter all received a vaccine for Covid-19, even as the Catholic Church, like the rest of the world, continues to lose leaders to the virus. Please consider supporting the show by subscribing to America, or by pledging on our Patreon page.  Links from the show:  Pope Francis sends greeting to President Biden, contrasting with sharper message from head of U.S. bishops Joe Biden begins Inauguration Day with Mass Read: The Invocation at the Inauguration of President Joe Biden Joe Biden knows the grief of losing family—and how our pain can have a purpose. Watch: Matt Malone, SJ interviews Joe Biden What’s on tap?  Cape Codder: Vodka and cranberry juice. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 22, 2021
The Capitol Hill rioters co-opted Jesus. How should Catholics respond?
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One of the most alarming aspects of the Jan. 6 assault on the U.S. Capitol by supporters of President Trump was the prevalence of Christian symbols and language. That the cross and the name of Jesus were used to justify a violent attack on our nation’s democratic institutions shows just how far the Christian community has fallen short, according to this week’s guest, the Rev. Bryan Massingale: “We’ve allowed Christianity, Christian symbols, Christian faith, Christian language to be hijacked in the cause of a human ideology of exclusion and division and division.”   Father Massingale teaches theological and social ethics at Fordham University in New York and is the author of Racial Justice and the Catholic Church. We talk with him about the toxic mix of racism, idolatry and spiritual emptiness on display on Capitol Hill and how Christians should respond.  In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis changed canon law this week to allow women to be officially installed as lectors and acolytes (i.e., those who do the readings, serve the altar and distribute Communion at Mass). Zac and Ashley discuss what this means for parishes and the place of women in the church. This episode of Jesuitical was brought to you by The Great Courses (Plus). Sign up for The Great Courses (Plus) and get an entire month of unlimited access to thousands of video and audio lectures from the world’s best professors by visiting http://thegreatcoursesplus.com/jesuitical.  As always, thanks for listening. You can support the media ministry of America and unluck unlimited access to all our articles with a digital subscription for less than $1 per week. Subscribe here. And to receive bonus content and swag from Jesuitical, check out our Patreon community. Links from the show: Impeach. Convict. Now. How Catholic Leaders Helped Give Rise to Violence at the U.S. Capitol Pope Francis changes canon law: ministries of acolyte and lector open to women Explainer: The history of women lectors and altar servers—and what Pope Francis has changed The Racist Attack on Our Nation’s Capitol What’s on tap? Johnny Walker Black Label, with a twist Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 15, 2021
A Very Jesuitical Christmas Special
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We don’t have to tell you that 2020 has been a really tough year. And yet we know that God is still with us, and we are still celebrating the birth of our savior on Christmas morning. To mark the coming of our Lord, we wanted to do something a little different on Jesuitical.  So, instead of covering the Catholic news of the week, we asked you, our listeners, to tell us where you found God in your life amid the loneliness, uncertainty and loss of the coronavirus pandemic. And Zac and Ashley share personal reflections about what Christmas means to them this year. As always, we are grateful to everyone who listens to and supports the show. Have a blessed Christmas season—and we’ll see you next year.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 24, 2020
What comedians and Catholics have in common: They need to tell the truth. Ep 162
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We all need a laugh. 2020 has been an absolutely awful year (no citation needed). But is it O.K. for us to take a step back and laugh at it all? We bring on professional funny man and former professional Catholic, Greg Iwinksi, to discuss. Greg is an Emmy-nominated comedy writer and performer, and he currently writes for “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver.” He’s previously written for “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” and worked with The Second City and iO theaters. We talk to Greg about the pandemic, the difference between “church” funny and “actual” funny and Trump Jokes. Greg also reminds us that comedy is serious business, and above all about telling the truth.  In Signs of the Times, we discuss the Vatican’s controversial Nativity and deliver a Jesuitical SOT-P.S.A. about the newly F.D.A.-approved Covid-19 vaccines. This is our last regular episode of 2020, but there is still time for you to help with our special Christmas edition of Jesuitical. Email a 60-second-or-less voice memo to jesuitical@americamedia.org describing a consolation from 2020. Get your consolation in by Monday, Dec. 21!  What’s on tap?  Hot Toddy Links from the show:  Greg’s Twitter Feed Greg’s new Star Wars podcast Why is Darth Vader in the Vatican’s Nativity scene? U.S. Catholic bishops: Getting a COVID-19 vaccine is an ‘act of charity’ Waiting for a Covid test is more than just standing in line. It’s an act of mercy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 18, 2020
Eat (a little), pray (a lot), love (God): Meet the beer-brewing Monks of Norcia Ep. 161
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“We’re all monks now” was an early refrain about life in coronavirus lockdown. Time slowed down as we kept to our houses and limited contact with family and friends. Of course, unlike monks, we also had Zoom calls and Netflix. Lots and lots of Netflix. So we wanted to talk to a monk and find out just how much our Covid quarantines resemble life in a monastery. Dom Benedict Nivakoff, O.S.B., is the prior of the Monastery of San Benedetto in Monte in Norcia, Italy, the birthplace of St. Benedict, considered the father of Western monasticism. We ask Father Prior about living under St. Benedict’s Rule and what advice he has for those us struggling to accept the limitations of pandemic life. And during Signs of the Times, Pope Francis has dedicated the next year to St. Joseph. Zac and Ashley share their takeaways from “Patris Corde,” the pope reflection on the foster father of Jesus. Next, the pope plans to visit Iraq in March, but can he do so without putting his and others’ health at risk? And you’ve heard of “Elf on the Shelf,” but what about “Mary on the Mantel”? The hosts debate the merits of a new Advent tradition. Finally, we need your help! 2020 has been a year like no other. It has been filled with suffering and longing, for sure, but also moments of grace. And we want to hear about yours. Send a short voice memo to jesuitical@americamedia.org describing a specific time in the last year when you found God working in your life. We hope to share your consolations in a special Christmas episode. Links from the show: Pope Francis proclaims a year dedicated to St. Joseph Patris Corde Pope Francis plans to visit Iraq in March after getting a Covid vaccine ‘Mary on the Mantel’? Think ‘Elf on the Shelf,’ but Catholic What’s on tap? Birra Nursia Blonde Ale (You can order it here. A great Christmas gift for the beer lovers in your life!) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 11, 2020
Why we need Advent now more than ever. Ep. 160
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This was bound to be an odd Advent. But as a lot of Catholics discovered during the odd Lent, Easter and Ordinary Time we experienced this year, there is also an invitation to develop new traditions and prayer practices. Our guest this week, Tsh Oxenreider, has been helping people connect in new ways and live more simply for a long time through her writing and podcasting. We talk to Tsh about her latest project, Shadow & Light: A Journey Into Advent, and her journey to make Advent meaningful for her family.  During Signs of the Times, Ashley and Zac discuss the 13 new cardinals that Pope Francis recently elevated, and what they want to see out of the pope’s closest advisers. They also look at misinformation around Covid vaccines.   What’s on tap?  Advent calendar wine, from Zac’s mom. Links from the show:  Shadow & Light: A Journey Into Advent tshoxenreider.com Pope Francis has made Wilton Gregory the first African-American cardinal U.S. bishops’ internal memo: Catholics can take Covid-19 vaccines Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 04, 2020
What makes a great Catholic writer?
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There are good writers, there are Catholic writers and then there are the Catholic literary greats like Flannery O’Connor, Cormac McCarthy, and to the surprise of some, Toni Morison. But what exactly makes their stories distinctly Catholic? And how do themes of incarnation, death and resurrection show up even while the artist has lapsed in their religious practice? Ashley and Zac settle in with the writer Nick Ripatrazone to talk about these literary giants and where the Catholic imagination comes alive in works of fiction. They also talk about Nick’s recently published book “Longing for an Absent God: Faith and Doubt in Great American Fiction.”  Links from the show: Longing for an Absent God Nick Ripatrazone Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 27, 2020
We need to talk about Clericalism
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The release of the McCarrick report has once again brought the church’s sex abuse crisis back to the headlines—and once again Catholics are asking: What is the root cause? Clericalism, writes Sam Sawyer, S.J., a Jesuit priest and our colleague at America Media. While we may not know what drive any individual person to abuse, he believes the McCarrick report confirms that clericalism explains how Theodore McCarrick was able to rise through the ranks of the hierarchy despite persistent rumors of sexual misconduct.  We ask Sam how clericalism plays both at the Vatican and in our own parishes, and what priests and laypeople alike can do to root it out.  In Signs of the Times, we discuss the U.S. bishops’ general assembly and the creation of a new working group to address what Archbishop José Gomez called the “difficult and complex situation” they see in Joe Biden—the second Catholic president in U.S. history. How should the bishops engage the Biden administration on issues like abortion and religious liberty? Links from the show: U.S. bishops express concern over a having a Catholic president who is pro-choice The McCarrick Report confirms it: Clericalism powered the sex abuse crisis. What’s on tap? Boulevardiers: 1 ½ ounces bourbon, ¾ ounce sweet vermouth, ¾ ounce Campari. Twist of orange peel, for garnish Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 20, 2020
Helping regular people navigate the health care industry is a ministry (and a podcast)
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Choosing your health insurance, going to the doctor, paying unexpected medical bills: these are facts of life that no one would describe as fun. But on his podcast “An Arm and a Leg,” Dan Weissmann explores the U.S. health care system and its costs for consumers in an entertaining—and empowering—way. This week, we talk to Dan about how to hold your own when you are slapped with an exorbitant medical bill, and ask: Why is the health care system so confusing?  In Signs of the Times, we briefly mark the occasion of the election of the second Catholic president in U.S. history (and celebrate the controversial song he quoted in his acceptance speech). Next, the Vatican published its much-anticipated report on the investigation into former cardinal Theodore McCarrick. We bring on Colleen Dulle of America’s “Inside the Vatican” podcast to breakdown the top takeaways from the report. Who knew what about McCarrick’s abuse—and should we trust an internal investigation, conducted by those with the most at stake? Links from the show: Joe Biden will be the second Catholic president. Here’s what you need to know about his faith. “On Eagle’s Wings”: The simple origin of the song that makes the world cry Top 5 Takeaways from the McCarrick Report An Arm and a Leg podcast What’s on tap? Trappist-made wine from New Clairvaux Vineyard Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 13, 2020
Interfaith work is crucial to overcoming our country’s divisions. Ep. 156
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By the time you listen to this episode, we may already know who the 46th president of the United States will be. But whoever wins, there is one thing we can say with certainty now: We remain a divided country. So this week, we wanted to talk to someone who has been working across divisions for over a decade: Dr. Eboo Patel. In 2002, Eboo founded the Interfaith Youth Core, an organization that works with colleges, governments and social service agencies to increase interfaith cooperation. He also served on President Barack Obama’s inaugural Advisory Council on Faith-Based Neighborhood Partnerships. Eboo believes that it is impossible to understand what is happening in our world—and in the 2020 election—without paying attention to and engaging with people’s diverse religious commitments. We ask Eboo what lessons he has learned from his interfaith work that might help us to heal the fractures of our body politic. With the election results very much still up in the air at recording time, we decided it didn’t make a lot of sense to try to read the signs of the times this week. But stick around after the interview for our (non-election related) Consolations and Desolations. A reminder that we are discussing Pope Francis’ latest encyclical, “Fratelli Tutti,” in reading groups (over drinks) with all members of our Patreon community throughout the month of November. Even if you missed the first meeting, there’s still time to sign up to support the show and guarantee a spot in the reading group.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 06, 2020
Stories from a real-life exorcist consultant Ep. 155
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Movies about demons and exorcisms are popular at this time of year, and are—let’s be honest—pretty scary. Well, real life demonic possession is even scarier—and nothing to mess around with. This week, we talk with someone who would know. Dr. Richard Gallagher is a board-certified psychiatrist, a leading expert in the field of exorcism and the author of Demonic Foes: My Twenty-Five Years as a Psychiatrist Investigating Possessions, Diabolic Attacks, and the Paranormal. Dr. Gallagher recounts hard-won lessons about the spiritual life as well as some of his most harrowing experiences with literal demons.  In “Signs of the Times,” we look at the 13 new cardinals that Pope Francis named over the weekend, including Washington’s Archbishop Wilton Gregory, who is set to become the first Black Cardinal in the United States.  A reminder that we’ll be discussing Pope Francis’ latest encyclical, “Fratelli Tutti” in reading groups (over drinks) with all members of our Patreon community throughout the month of November. It starts next week, but there’s still time to sign up to support the show and guarantee a spot in the reading group.  Links from the show:  Demonic Foes Dr. Richard Gallagher, Demonic Possession Expert, Isn't Trying to Convince You Pope Francis names 13 new cardinals, including Wilton Gregory, the archbishop of Washington D.C. How long will the Latino community have to wait for a cardinal in the United States? What’s on tap:Witches’ Brew, also known as a gin and tonic made with Empress Gin for spooky coloring.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 30, 2020
Voting Catholic: A queer, pro-life feminist on abortion
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We're dropping an episode from the Voting Catholic podcast in the Jesuitical feed! Voting Catholic is an original podcast series from America Media that explores the top voting issues in the United States, from abortion to immigration to racial justice, by sharing the voices of experts and activists on the front lines. Each episode tackles one issue through personal storytelling and socio-political analysis from a Catholic perspective. This episode is called "Abortion: It's more complicated than you think." The Catholic Bishops teach that abortion is a preeminent voting issue for Catholics, because it directly attacks life itself. Do Catholics agree? And should it take precedence over other life and death issues?  Aimee Murphy is the Executive Director of Rehumanize International. Visit her white paper and presentation here.  Learn more about Tricia Bruce’ study: “What Americans Really Think About Abortion” US Bishops teaching document on the political responsibility of Catholics: "Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship" Stay up-to-date with America Media's coverage of the 2020 election: www.americamagazine.org/newsletters You can support this media ministry at www.americamagazine.org/donate Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 26, 2020
Jeannie Gaffigan was told “Real Catholics vote for Trump.” Here’s how she responded. Ep. 154
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Do “real Catholics” have to vote for Donald J. Trump? That’s what Jeannie Gaffigan was hearing from Twitter trolls and loved ones alike following her husband Jim Gaffigan’s uncharacteristically profanity-laced tirade against the president and his supporters during the Republican National Convention.  This week, Jeannie, one half of the Gaffigan comedy duo and author of the book When Life Gives You Pears: The Healing Power of Family, Faith, and Funny People, takes us back to that night and the examination of conscience it inspired. What was it like as a Mass-going mother of five to have her commitment to life challenged? What’s the best way to engage with friends and family across political divides?  In “Signs of the Times,” we discuss two pieces of news that came out of a newly released documentary about Pope Francis: an endorsement of same-sex civil unions and a sharp critique of the Trump administration’s family-separation border policy from Francis. (We recorded the conversation on Wednesday afternoon. The story behind Pope Francis’ comments about civil unions has developed since then, and more coverage can be found at americamagazine.org.) A reminder that we’ll be discussing Pope Francis’ latest encyclical, “Fratelli Tutti” in reading groups (over drinks) with all members of our Patreon community throughout the month of November. There’s still time to sign up to support the show and guarantee a spot in the reading group.  Links from the show:  Jeannie Gaffigan: My loved ones told me ‘real’ Catholics vote for Trump. Here’s my response. Pope Francis declares support for same-sex civil unions for the first time as pope Pope Francis calls Trump’s family separation border policy ‘cruelty of the highest form’ Plot thickens over origins of Pope Francis’ civil union endorsement Check out The Imagine Society What’s on tap:“Irish Coffee,” which means very different things to both Zac and Ashley. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 23, 2020
How to pray for your (political) enemies: Advice from the Chaplain to the U.S. House. Ep. 153
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Father Pat Conroy has served as the 60th chaplain to the U.S. House of Representatives since 2011 (with a brief interruption thanks to former Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan). He’s a Jesuit priest, but that doesn’t mean he’s the Catholic chaplain—he’s chaplain to all 435 members.  We talk to Father Conroy about his role, what Americans don’t understand about their representatives and what his prayer for our country is as we head into a heated presidential election.  During Signs of the Times, Zac and Ashley discuss Carlo Acutis, who is on the way to becoming the first millennial saint, and ask why Pope Francis won’t wear a mask, even with rising Covid-19 cases at the Vatican.  If you haven’t had the time to read all of Pope Francis’ new encyclical, “Fratelli Tutti,” we have some good news. Jesuitical is sponsoring a virtual reading group happy hour (yes, that means over drinks) throughout the month of November for Patreon supporters. For more details about that and how to support the show, visit our Patreon page. Links from the show:  Jesuit House chaplain prays to expel ‘darker spirits’ from the U.S. Capitol Report: House chaplain, a Jesuit priest, was forced out by Speaker Paul Ryan Teen was ‘influencer for God,’ mother says on eve of son’s beatification Podcast: Covid cases are rising in Vatican City. Is Pope Francis at risk? What’s on tap?  Champagne + Prosecco, to celebrate some good news. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 16, 2020
Pádraig Ó Tuama: How language can be a sacrament. Ep. 152
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Our lives are shaped by language, even if most of us are not poets. But it helps to talk to one if you want to reflect deeply on how language, in the words of this week’s guest, can make or break a world, can fail us or save us. Pádraig Ó Tuama is an Irish poet and theologian and host of the podcast “Poetry Unbound” with On Being Studios. We speak with Pádraig about his love for words, the politics of poetry and the need for creativity in the work of peace and reconciliation. In Signs of the Times, Zac and Ashley discuss Pope Francis’ new encyclical of human fraternity, “Fratelli Tutti.” The hosts give their top three takeaways and share what part of this (very long) document spoke to them personally.     We cannot do this work without your support, whether that’s becoming a member of our Patreon community, leaving a review on Apple podcasts or telling your friends and family about the show. Links from the show Fratelli Tutti Pope Francis closes the door on the death penalty in ‘Fratelli Tutti’ America’s comprehensive coverage of “Fratelli Tutti” Poetry Unbound Voting Catholic  What’s on tap? Tea Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 09, 2020
The crisis that the church still needs to stay on top of. Ep. 151
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In the midst of a global pandemic, an economic recession and renewed unrest around racial injustice, it can feel overwhelming to highlight yet another crisis. But the Catholic Church is only two years removed from the summer of 2018, when the sexual abuse crisis came roaring back after the release of the Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report and the crimes of former Cardinal Theodore McCarick had come to light.  “Crisis,” a new podcast from The Catholic Project at The Catholic University of America, is trying to keep this issue on the minds and hearts of Catholics. This week, we talk to the show’s host, Karna Lozoya, about what has happened since 2018 and what the church still needs to do.  In Signs of the Times, we take a deeper look at the controversy around Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett’s religious affiliations, and ask whether or not the media and politicians need to learn to ask better questions about religion.  If you’re enjoying the show, please rate and review us on Apple Podcasts. If you’re feeling called to support the show financially, please check out our Patreon page.  Links from the show: Crisis Explainer: Amy Coney Barrett’s relationship with People of Praise Shakeup at St. Louis archdiocese over handling of immigration webinar What’s on Tap?  Pedialyte  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 02, 2020
Anthea Butler: Religion won’t save us from the sin of racism. Ep. 150
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For many, the killing of George Floyd was a turning point. People of every age and race poured into streets across the country, demanding justice for not only Mr. Floyd but Breonna Taylor, Jacob Blake, Ahmaud Arbery and countless other Black men and women victimized by racist structures. But for this week’s guest, Anthea Butler, this moment feels more like a precipice than a turning point. Dr. Butler is an associate professor of religion and Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania, who has been seeking to raise awareness about systemic racism in her students and the wider culture for years.  We talk to Dr. Butler about how she sees these protests in the context of U.S. history, racism among Catholics and evangelicals, and the role of academics in the fight for racial justice. In Signs of the Times, the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg has created an opening on the Supreme Court, and the two most likely judges to fill her seat are both Catholic women. Zac and Ashley discuss the history of Catholics on the court and why they have come to dominate the bench in the 21st century. Plus, we talk about the case of an Irish priest suspended from ministry in 2012 because of his support for women’s ordination and same-sex marriage and ask: What has and has not changed about how the Vatican disciplines dissenting priests under Pope Francis? This was our 150th episode! Thanks to everyone who has stuck with us over the past two-and-a-half years. Making this podcast is the best part of our jobs, and we couldn’t do it without this amazing community of listeners. And a special thanks to members of our Patreon group. If Jesuitical is an important part of your life as a Catholic, please consider supporting the show.  Links from the show Why do Catholics make up a majority of the Supreme Court? Suspended Irish priest Tony Flannery calls Vatican inquiry ‘unjust’ Dr. Anthea Butler’s website and Twitter What’s on tap? Birthday girl’s choice: Shots of Bulleit Bourbon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 25, 2020
NPR’s Scott Detrow on Trump, Biden and the Catholic vote. Ep. 149
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Yes, we know that you’re (probably) already sick of the presidential campaign. The next six weeks are going to be filled with television ads, yard signs, push notifications and Facebook flame wars among friends and family. Yet we know that Catholics have a duty to be in political conversations, so the solution at America is not to tune out but to be more discerning about what to tune in to.  That’s why this week we’re talking with one of the best political reporters in the business: Scott Detrow. Scott covers the presidential campaigns for NPR and co-hosts the NPR politics podcast. We talk to him about how he approaches covering both the Biden and Trump campaigns, how Catholics are influencing this election and what role Joe Biden’s Catholic faith plays in his campaign. In Signs of the Times, a new poll found that 36 percent of young Catholics say they will attend Mass less often after the pandemic. Zac and Ashley discuss what churches can do to keep young people in the pews. Plus, we bring on America’s editor in chief, Matt Malone, S.J., to talk about the magazine’s unprecedented editorial on President Trump and the 2020 election.  We cannot do this work without your support, whether that’s becoming a member of our Patreon community, leaving a review on Apple podcasts or telling your friends and family about the show.  Links from the show Cardinal Sarah to bishops: Facilitate Mass in person as soon as conditions permit New poll: 36 percent of young Catholics say they will attend Mass less often after pandemic America magazine: Donald Trump is a unique threat to the Constitution Scott’s first appearance on Jesuitical from 2017 What’s on tap? Margaritas, recommended by Scott Detrow: The true drink of 2020 is coffee. But my favorite drink this year—the go-to drink sitting in the backyard processing everything and relaxing—has been a stripped down margarita recipe. 2 oz white tequila, an ounce of simple syrup, and one squeezed lime all shaken up with salt on the rim. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 18, 2020
Pope Francis’ critics are dividing the church. Ep. 148
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Anyone who is familiar with “Catholic Twitter” or dives into the comments section of Catholic publications knows there are some ugly fights happening between Catholics on the internet—especially about Pope Francis. But is this just a social media phenomenon? This week’s guest doesn’t think so. Mike Lewis believes the pope’s most strident, reactionary critics are not just a fringe to be ignored or dismissed but an influential faction that is dividing the church and families. We talk to Mike about witnessing his own mother become convinced that Pope Francis was a heretic and how that affected his family and his faith. We ask why this pope has inspired such fierce opposition and what can bishops and the people in the pews do to promote unity within the church. In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis will sign a new encyclical on human fraternity, titled “Fratelli tutti,” on Oct. 3 at the tomb of St. Francis Assisi. Zac and Ashley discuss what solidarity means during (and after) the pandemic and what the document might say to young Catholics. Next, should your priest tell you how to vote? With the 2020 presidential race kicking into high gear, some Catholic leaders are publicly endorsing the candidates. We discuss what U.S. law and church teaching say about political advocacy from the pulpit.  We are so excited to be back in your feeds and are ready to dive into the big stories in the church and the world that are coming this fall. We cannot do this work without your support, whether that’s becoming a member of our Patreon community, leaving a review on Apple podcasts or telling your friends and family about the show.  Links from the show Pope Francis’ critics are dividing the church and families—including mine Where Peter Is Pope Francis will sign new encyclical on human fraternity at the tomb of St. Francis of Assisi Explainer: Can a priest or a member of a religious order publicly endorse a political candidate? What’s on tap? Stiegl Radler Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 11, 2020
Bishop Robert Barron on Internet ministry, Black Lives Matter, and the art of dialogue. Ep. 147
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Please tell us what you think about Jesuitical by filling out our listener survey! It takes about 10 minutes to fill out and can be found here. If you’ve spent any time looking for Catholic resources online, you have certainly come across the work of Bishop Robert Barron. The auxiliary bishop for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles is the founder of Word on Fire Ministries and has been called a “Fulton Sheen for the 21st century.” He reaches millions of people over social media and has spoken about God in the expected (seminaries, Cathedrals) and unexpected (Google headquarters, Reddit AMAs) places alike. We caught up with him to talk about his ministry during coronavirus, attracting controversy (yes, we talk about that Jordan Peterson interview), West Coast Catholicism and the recent Black Lives Matter protests. This is our final show before our summer break. We’ll be popping in the feed periodically to share some thoughts and conversations with you, but otherwise we will be hard at work improving Jesuitical so we can come back better than ever in the fall. But to do that, we need your help.  Please tell us what you think about Jesuitical by filling out our listener survey. It will help us make the show better and tell our sponsors more about who you are. It takes about 10 minutes to fill out and can be found here. Until then, please keep us in your prayers. We’ll be praying for you.   During the Covid-19 pandemic, the production of Jesuitical has been made possible, in part, by the generous support from American Bible Society. To learn more about American Bible Society and their amazing work visit www.americanbible.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 26, 2020
Systemic Racism, Covid-19 and the U.S. health care system. Ep. 146
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If you are paying attention to the news these days, you have probably heard the term “systemic racism” used to describe the conditions in this country that made something as horrific as the killing of George Floyd by a police officer in broad daylight possible. The disproportionate impact of the coronavirus on people of color has also been talked about as an issue of “systemic racism.” But what exactly does that mean? How does it play out in different parts of American society and in individual lives? How do history, individual prejudices, government policy and social arrangement conspire to devalue the lives of some Americans? This week, we explore those questions through a specific lens: health care. Sarah Kureshi is a doctor of family medicine who teaches a course at Georgetown University on racial bias in the health care system. We ask Dr. Kureshi about the root causes of health inequalities, what the medical community is doing to root out racism and what the coronavirus pandemic has revealed about what and who this country considers essential. In Signs of the Times, we discuss the Supreme Court’s decision to extend discrimination protections to L.G.B.T. workers and how the Catholic media should cover Archbishop Carlo  Maria Viganò’s conspiratorial letter to Donald J. Trump. Tell us what you thought about today’s show on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. And if Jesuitical has been an important source of information or nourishment for you during these trying times, please consider becoming a member of our Patreon community. We can’t make the show without your support. Thank you.   Links from the show Supreme Court says federal law protects L.G.B.T. workers from discrimination President Trump tweeted about Archbishop Viganò. So, who is he? Archbishop Viganò is aligning with Trump to stay in the spotlight. Pay him no attention. Inside the Vatican Podcast: Why is the Vatican silent on Archbishop Viganò?   What’s on tap? Aperol Spritz Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 19, 2020
Olga Segura on having frank conversations about race. Ep. 145
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In cities across the country, Americans are taking to the streets and plazas to express their outrage over the killing of yet another black man at the hands of a white police officer and to demand radical changes in how law enforcement is carried out in the United States. And at dinner tables and on social media platforms, many families and friends are haltingly, belatedly, beginning to have conversations about what the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and the countless victims of police brutality who preceded them say about the soul of this country—and our own role in the longstanding injustices now captured so vividly on cell phone cameras and streamed on screens around the world. These conversations are not easy to have, and we shouldn’t expect them to be. But it helps when you have someone as knowledgeable, passionate and patient as our friend and former co-host Olga Segura to help you work through the issues. This week, we ask Olga how she approaches conversations about racism with her only family, the role of the Catholic Church in the fight for racial justice and what white Catholics can do to become allies in that fight. We had a lot of ground to cover with Olga, so no Signs of the Times or Consolations and Desolations this week. If you found this conversation helpful, please share it with a friend or family member, and keep the conversation going on our Facebook page. If you’d like to support Jesuitical, consider becoming a member of our Patreon community.    Links from the show How can Catholics help lead the fight against racism? Remembering the NYPD Shooting of Dominican Immigrant Kiko García and What It Means During Today’s #BlackLivesMatter Movement Fordham’s Bryan Massingale: White Catholics need to sit with the discomfort of systemic racism Follow Olga on Twitter! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 12, 2020
Pete Holmes needed his life to fall apart to lose God (and find him again). Ep. 144
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Pete Holmes played the game. He followed the rules. He went to church, attended a Christian college and saved himself for marriage. He was ready for God to hold up his end of the deal and deliver happiness and success.  Then his wife (the one he saved himself for) had an affair. Pete’s life started to spiral, sending him on a spiritual journey through atheism, agnosticism, drugs, to what he now calls “Christ-leaning spiritual seeker.” Pete is also the host of the podcast, “You Made It Weird,” where he talks to celebrities and spiritual masters about life’s big questions, and recently wrote a two-part episode of “The Simpsons,” “Warrin’ Priests.” We talk to Pete about his journey, detailed in his memoir Comedy Sex God, his interest in Father Richard Rohr and make a not-so-subtle case for the Jesuits to him.  (The conversation went long, so no Signs of the Times or Consolations or Desolations this week.) Links from the show:  Comedy Sex God Warrin’ Priests You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 05, 2020
The impact of Covid-19 on immigrant workers
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“This is a group of people who are figuring out how to pay their bills every month. And now they’re going to be faced with a more difficult challenge, and the government isn’t coming in to help them.” J.D. Long-Garcia is a senior editor at America working out of Phoenix, Az. He covers the south west, where the Catholic Church is growing. During the Covid-19 pandemic, his writing has focused on immigrant workers, an especially vulnerable group to the current economic disruption. “In some sense today, social distancing is a privilege. It’s for the privileged class. And that’s not this group of people. If they social distance, they aren’t going to have any money.” J.D. also discusses his journalistic approach to covering communities that are a part of his own life and heritage, and explains how undocumented immigrants bring much more to America than they take away. Don’t forget to join Jesuitical’s Facebook group! We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And, thank you. Links from the show:  Follow J.D. on TwitterArticles by J.D.:Immigrant workers face economic uncertainty during Covid-19 shutdown Stimulus does little to stifle Covid-19 fears in the undocumented community U.S.-Mexico border humanitarians scramble to curb coronavirus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 02, 2020
What happens when your faith and health come into conflict? Ep. 143
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What do you do if God has commanded you to do something that could put your health and even life at risk? This is the wrenching question faced by thousands of Jewish women who visit mikvah’s, small, public pools, which women immerse themselves in as part of the purity ritual after having their period. Unlike the obligation to attend Mass on Sunday, this religious requirement cannot be dispensed or suspended. Emma Green, a staff writer at The Atlantic, spoke with some of these women about their struggle to reconcile their fidelity to God-given laws for sexual purity and their desire to keep their families and communities safe during the coronavirus pandemic. We ask Emma about this story as well as her insights into the reopening of houses of worship, how the pandemic will permanently change religious practice in the United States and the role of churches, synagogues and mosques in helping the nation to mourn. In Signs of the Times, on the fifth anniversary of the promulgation of “Laudato Si’,” Pope Francis called on Catholics and all people of goodwill to join him in a yearlong period of prayer and action for the protection of the environment. Next, in an interview with America’s national correspondent, Michael O’Loughlin, Dr. Anthony Fauci says even as churches reopen, Catholics should not receive Communion in either form for the time being. Finally, we talk with Angelo Jesus Canta (former Jesuitical engineer and graphic designer) about what he has learned from participating in lay-led, at-home liturgies during the coronavirus pandemic.  Have you taken up new spiritual practices during this time of quarantine? Tell us about it on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. And if Jesuitical has been an important source of information or nourishment for you during these trying times, please consider becoming a member of our Patreon community. We can’t make the show without your support. Thank you.   Links from the show Orthodox Jewish Women Are Facing an Impossible Choice Right Now Nuns vs. the Coronavirus Pope Francis announces year of reflection on “Laudato Si’” and prays for Catholics in China Dr. Anthony Fauci: To keep churches safe, use masks, limit singing and wait to resume Communion Learning to love lay-led liturgies in quarantine (while missing the Mass)   What’s on tap? Pineapple Gin & Tonics Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 29, 2020
Harry Potter, Soul Cycle and the Internet: say hello to America’s new religions. Ep. 142
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You’ve heard of the “nones.” It seems like every week there is a new book, article or survey trying to explain the increasingly large segment of millennials and Gen-Zers who check “none” when asked about their religious affiliation. Tara Isabella Burton, a theologian, author and journalist, is less interested in what these young people are leaving behind (institutional religion) than in how they are finding or making their own meaning. From Harry Potter fan forums to SoulCycle, Crossfit and witchcraft, Americans are forming niche communities that play the role traditionally filled by churches. We ask Tara about the origins of the trend, the dangers of picking and choosing our own beliefs and rituals and whether institutional religion has a chance of reaching what she calls religion “Remixers.” In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis celebrates a Mass with 100 worshippers for the centenary of St. John Paul II’s birth—the first large gathering at St. Peter’s Basilica since the coronavirus shut down churches in Italy. Next, we bring on America’s national correspondent, Michael O’Loughlin, to talk about the reopening of churches in the United States. Finally, we ask: Should Michael Jordan be a (secular) saint? Zac makes the case for hagiography in the church and the world of sports. Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week! Links from the show: Pope Francis celebrates St. John Paul II centenary: ‘God sent his people a prophet.’ U.S. Catholic dioceses release plans for reopening churches Michael Jordan and the problem (and necessity) of hagiography Strange Rites: New Religions for a Godless World Why you (yes you) should care about theology What’s on tap?Old Fashioned’s Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 22, 2020
What Pope Francis wants the world to look like post Covid-19
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Countries around the world are fighting the Covid-19 pandemic and Vatican City State is no exception. But since the coronavirus shut down Italy in early March, Pope Francis has pointed toward the world to come...on earth. The host of America’s “Inside the Vatican” podcast, Colleen Dulle, joins Ashley, Zac and Vivian to explain what Pope Francis has done to respond to the pandemic at the Vatican while calling on humanity to collaborate in building a new world that is more equitable and sustainable. Colleen also discusses the visionary life of Madeleine Delbrêl, “the French Dorothy Day,” as she is sometimes described. Colleen is currently working on a biography of the 20th century French activist, poet, mystic and visionary of lay leadership in the Catholic Church whom she describes as “the saint for Jesuitical listeners.” We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share your experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Links from the show:  Subscribe to “Inside the Vatican” on Spotify, Apple, Google Articles by Colleen Dulle:Who is Madeleine Delbrêl—the “French Dorothy Day” Pope Francis made venerable this weekend? Subway mysticism: How Madeleine Delbrêl transformed my commute Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 19, 2020
The first Catholic high school for teens struggling with substance abuse. Ep. 141
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For teens struggling with substance abuse and addiction, the typical pressures of high school can spill over into the realm of disastrous. Recovery high schools—with smaller class sizes, counseling and sober social activities—are designed to support students in recovery. The first recovery high school opened in 1979; today there are over 40 nationwide. But before Kolbe Academy, which opened last year in Bethlehem, Pa., none of the recovery schools were Catholic. This week we chat with the school’s (Jesuit-educated) founding principal, John Petruzzelli, about what makes Kolbe Academy unique and why he thinks it’s important for the church to be involved in supporting students in recovery. In Signs of the Times, we talk about Ashley’s feature article on Wyoming Catholic College and look at how Covid-19 has affected men and women religious and other vulnerable elderly populations. As always, thanks for listening and supporting our show. We’ll see you soon. Links from the show:  Kolbe Academy A visit to the rural Catholic college that has 171 students, 12 horses and zero textbooks Supreme Court tackles clash of Catholic schools, ex-teachers SOAR! What’s on tap? Water, carbonated (Ashley) and not (Zac).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 15, 2020
Living like monks in quarantine
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In every age there are a small number of Catholics who intentionally isolate themselves from society to serve God and the church through lives of “prayer and labor.”. They’re called monks. Gregory Hillis, an associate professor of theology at Bellarmine University in Louisville, Ky., knows one community of monks particularly well: the Cistercian monks at the Abbey of Gethsemani. In a recent essay for America, he shares some wisdom from the monks for living in solitude during a time of pandemic. Greg joins Ashley, Zac and Vivian in this bonus episode to explore the rigorous yet transforming practices of monastic life, the power of silence and letting go of a false sense of control over our lives. They also discuss the most famous monk of Gethsemani Abbey, the writer and mystic Thomas Merton. We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share your experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Links from the show:  “We’re all monks now,” by Gregory Hillis Books by Thomas Merton referenced by Greg Hillis: "The Intimate Merton: His Life from His Journals" "New Seeds of Contemplation" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 12, 2020
How will the Catholic Church change after the coronavirus pandemic? Ep. 140
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A 25-minute conversation between President Trump and hundreds of bishops and other Catholic leaders sparked an intense debate about the right way for Catholic leaders to engage in politics. While the conference call got a lot of attention, it is just one story among many affecting the church in the United States, and as the national correspondent for Crux, Chris White has to try to cover them all. We talk to Chris about how he broke the story of the conference call, what the church might look like after the coronavirus pandemic and how he understands the relationship between his identities as a “Catholic” and a “journalist.” In our weekly survey of Catholic news, we highlight the Franciscan spiritual master Richard Rohr’s cameo on “The Simpsons” and a study examining the efficacy of prayer on patients recovering from Covid-19. We also discuss the disproportionate effect that the coronavirus pandemic is having on black Americans.    Links from the show:Richard Rohr on The Simpsons Clinical Study Considers The Power Of Prayer To Combat COVID-19 U.S. Bishop Chairmen Issue Statement Urging State and National Leaders to Examine African American Communities by COVID-19 Trump says he’s ‘best president in history of the Church’ in call with Catholic leaders Chris White on Twitter What’s on tap? Margaritas (kind of) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 08, 2020
Father James Martin on praying in quarantine
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When the Covid-19 pandemic quarantined America’s editor at large, James Martin, S.J., he felt he had to offer some spiritual solace to people struggling with fear, isolation and uncertainty. So, he logged onto Facebook from his room in the America House Jesuit community and went live. Father Martin’s daily “faith sharings,” as he calls them, reach tens of thousands of people around the world who are cooped up at home because of the pandemic. They include Scripture readings and his personal reflections, scholarly commentary and live Q&A, including prayer requests. “Most of it is fun and upbeat. But in the comments from time to time you’ll see, ‘My father just died of coronavirus,’” Father Martin says. “It’s a sad time for so many people, but they’re desiring a sense of community, and that’s why so many people have tuned in.” Ashley, Zac and Vivian discuss with Father Martin how to pray in quarantine and what life is like in a small Jesuit community in Midtown Manhattan.  We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share your experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Links from the show:  Daily faith sharing with James Martin, S.J. James Martin's weekly newsletter “The Examen”, a podcast for daily prayer hosted by James Martin, S.J. “Jesus, A Pilgrimage” by James Martin, S.J. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 05, 2020
Meet the 30-year-old priest anointing coronavirus patients. Ep. 139
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Father Michael Trail had administered the anointing of the sick many times in his first three years as a priest in the Archdiocese of Chicago. Usually, he would sit at the bedside and hold the hand of a person nearing death while family and other loved ones gathered around to pray and say goodbye. In the time of the coronavirus pandemic, the essentials of the sacrament are the same but it looks very different. As part of the archdiocese’s task force of “priest-anointers” ministering to Covid-19 patients, Father Michael must now wear a gown, mask and gloves while administering the sacrament. There is no hand-holding, and no family members are allowed in the room. We ask Father Michael about the spiritual and emotional toll of ministering to patients and families in these difficult circumstances and how he thinks about the growing calls to reopen society given the suffering he has seen up close. In Signs of the Times, we discuss the meeting between President Trump and Catholic bishops and education leaders. Plus, a look at the annual survey of the priestly class of 2020 and how the coronavirus is affecting those without stable housing.    We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share your experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Links from the show StoriesTrump says he’s ‘best president in history of the Church’ in call with Catholic leadersCARA study on new ordinands spots trends worth watchingSeminaries must hire, involve more women, Cardinal Ouellet saysWhat will happen to people who are homeless as Covid-19 crisis continues? How you can helpCatholic Charities USA National Alliance to End Homelessness What’s on tap?Miscellaneous brews from our understocked bars Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 01, 2020
What it’s like to be pregnant during Covid-19
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When the staff at America realized that Covid-19 could overrun the United States, the idea of drafting an original prayer was put on the table.  The responsibility fell to executive editor Kerry Weber, who was experiencing more anxiety than most about the virus, especially on the train commuting into Manhattan from New Jersey. She is pregnant with her third child. “I got to take something that was, frankly, genuine fear and channel that into...a conversation that was between me and God.” That prayer has since been translated into multiple languages and made its way into the homes and hearts of hundreds of thousands of people. Today on the show, Kerry reveals the inspiration for the prayer and discusses the joys and anxieties of journeying through pregnancy during a global pandemic (something else she’s written about). We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share your experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Links from the show:  https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2020/03/02/coronavirus-prayer https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2020/04/09/hope-and-uncertainty-being-pregnant-during-coronavirus-pandemic Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 28, 2020
Lessons from West Africa’s Ebola response for Covid-19. Ep. 138
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In late February, when the coronavirus still seemed like a far-off threat to many Americans, officials in West African nations began to prepare their public health response: They brought out thermometers, protective equipment and handwashing stations. When the first cases arrived in large cities, schools and airports were quickly closed. These nations did not have a large number of cases (and still don’t). What they do have is the fresh memory of the Ebola crisis that hit the region in 2014-16, taking over 11,000 lives and crippling already impoverished countries. This week, we talk with Jennifer Overton, the regional director for West Africa for Catholic Relief Services, which has decades of experience providing emergency health services in the region. We ask Jennifer what the United States can learn from the West African response, how the experience of Ebola changed the people of the most affected nations and what the role of the church is during the current pandemic.  And in Signs of the Times: Ever wonder what a day in the life of the pope would be like? We discuss “Pope Simulator,” a computer game in development that lets you influence the course of world events soft papal power and “Bless units.” Next, a Catholic school uniform company is donating face masks made with that iconic Catholic plaid to health care workers. Finally, we introduce a new recurring segment, in which we take a deep dive into the different ways vulnerable populations are experiencing the coronavirus pandemic—and what we can do to help. This week, we cover the unique hardships faced by migrants in detention centers and abroad. Let us know what you thought about the show and where you found God this week on our Facebook page. We are committed to accompanying you all during these challenging times both through this podcast and the larger Jesuitical community. If you can support our work by becoming a member of our Patreon community, we would be most grateful.    Links from the show Stories Pope Simulator promises a 'realistic' depiction of life as the Supreme Pontiff Catholic school uniform company now making, donating face masks As coronavirus spreads amid deportations, bishops call for protection of migrants Trump to Temporarily Halt Immigration Into the U.S. Amid Coronavirus Crisis Congolese archbishop highlights double challenge of Ebola and coronavirus Learn more and give Catholic Relief Services Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. Kino Border Initiative Hope Border Institute Catholic Charities USA Covid-19 Resource Center What’s on tap? “The real holy water” (a.k.a., Scotch) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 24, 2020
A Jesuit reflects on coronavirus quarantine in Milan
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In early March, Patrick Gilger, S.J., boarded a plane in New York en route to Milan. He was on a research trip and going to study Italian in the historic cosmopolitan city located in Italy’s northern Lombardy region. The cross-Atlantic flight had only 12 passengers on it. When he arrived, the city had just been shuttered. Italy was on the verge of a brutal month of suffering and death at the hands of Covid-19. Outside of his window, in the otherwise empty piazza below, a group of teenagers sat casually, drinking and singing. “It feels different here,” he wrote in America, “It is as if Milan, under quarantine, has asked me to renounce the particular version of our American response to fear that I have made my own: the unceasing effort to control, to master, to define and thereby dictate what is really real and truly true. And thereby be secure.” In this bonus episode, “Father Paddy” as he’s known on the popular YouTube series “Jesuit Autocomplete,” reflects on his experience living in an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic, the humiliations (and humility!) that come with learning a new language and how his isolation has connected him to God and others. We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share both the joys and challenges you experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 21, 2020
The Friar who won “The Great American Baking Show”. Ep. 137
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Amateur chefs and wanna-be bakers have a lot more time to spend in the kitchen thanks to stay-at-home measures meant to slow the spread to the coronavirus. And this week’s guest has some great tips for upping your recipe game. Brother Andrew Corriente is a Franciscan Capuchin friar and the winner of the latest season of “The Great American Baking Show: Holiday Edition.” Brother Andrew gives a behind-the-scenes look at the beloved reality show, tells us about the spiritual benefits of baking and shares what he’s been making for his Franciscan community under quarantine. In Signs of the Times, we discuss Pope Francis’ Easter call for a “universal basic wage” and his decision to form a new commission to study women deacons. Plus, stories about how priests are ministering in hospitals and prisons during the coronavirus pandemic. Today, April 17, is America magazine’s 111th anniversary! If “Jesuitical” has been a source of community or spiritual accompaniment for you, please consider supporting us on our giving day. You can become a part of our Patreon community to help with the cost of producing Jesuitical or make a donation to America Media here. We are committed to bringing you the Catholic news of the week, informative and meaningful interviews and even bonus episodes during these uncertain times. We cannot do the work we love without your support. Thank you.   Links from the show In Easter message, Pope Francis proposes universal basic wage  Pope Francis has set up a new commission to study women deacons Cadre of Chicago-area priests trained to minister to dying coronavirus patients Related: English bishops: To lower risks, chaplains shouldn't give last rites U.S. bishop says cellphones cannot be used to administer sacraments Canadian priest volunteers to be incarcerated rather than leave inmates   What’s on tap?Prosecco. Christ is risen, and so are our glasses! What’s for dessert? Strawberry Chantilly! “I got the idea for a freeze-dried fruit Chantilly from Stella Parks of Serious Eats. I loved the idea and decided to play with the ratios and ended up with this recipe. Bright, sweet, and with a TON of strawberry flavor.” – Brother Andrew Corriente, O.F.M.Cap.  70 grams Freeze-dried Strawberries (Trader Joe’s brand) 100 grams Sugar 1/8 tsp Kosher Salt 675 grams Heavy Cream 1 tsp Pure Vanilla Extract Combine strawberries, sugar, and salt in a food processor and blend for about one minute. Pour in heavy cream and extract and scrape the bottom of the processor with a rubber spatula to properly mix in everything. Process until it becomes very thick and creamy. Scrape and process again to get any stray pieces. Ensure everything is homogeneous. Serve. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 17, 2020
Walking with Mary Magdalene to the tomb on Easter Sunday
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It’s early in the morning. Mary Magdalene is going to visit the tomb of Jesus. What does she look like? How does she feel right now? You decide to go with her. Last week we spoke to Tucker Redding, S.J., a Jesuit in formation and a producer of “Jesuitical.” He just wrapped up a 10-episode podcast series called “Imagine: A Guide to Jesuit Prayer,” in which he guides the listener through a pivotal story in the life of Jesus as described in the four Gospels. Today, we bring you the final episode in the series, in which you, the listener, accompany Mary Magdalene as she makes her way to the tomb on Easter morning and unexpectedly encounters the risen Jesus. “Imagine” is an emotionally charged experience grounded in a tried method of prayer handed down by the Jesuits. Happy Easter from Ashley, Zac and Vivian! We treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share both the joys and challenges you experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church and the world. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 14, 2020
The coronavirus poem that went viral. Ep. 136
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Laura Fanucci was up in the middle of the night with her 5-week-old newborn when the words came to her: “When this is all over....” She wrote the poem on her phone and when she posted it on Instagram the next morning it caught fire. Politicians, celebrities, corporate brands and influencers shared her words with millions of people hungry to imagine what life will look like on the other side of the coronavirus pandemic. When she is not going viral, Laura is an author and mother of five who writes about parenting, grief and the sacramentality of everyday life. We ask her why she thinks her poem resonated with so many people, what her experience losing twin girls in a miscarriage taught her about processing and sharing our grief and how she is celebrating Holy Week in her very full house. In Signs of the Times, we discuss the acquittal of Cardinal George Pell on charges of sexual abuse. What are the implications of the high-profile case in Australia for the wider church? Next, we talk about Holy Week at home: what we are (and aren’t) doing to mark the death and resurrection of our Lord in a time of closed churches and social distancing.  We want to see your modified Easter celebrations, too. Show and tell us what you’re doing this week over on our Facebook page. During these strange and difficult times, we are committed to accompanying you all through this podcast and the larger Jesuitical community. If you can support our work by becoming a member of our Patreon community, we would be most grateful. Thank you, and Happy Easter! Links from the show Australia’s high court overturns guilty verdict against Cardinal George Pell on final appeal Vatican responds with measure to Cardinal Pell’s acquittal and release from prison Easter Sunday Mass with America Media Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America Good Friday livestream “When This Is Over,” by Laura Fanucci  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 10, 2020
Picture this: What it’s like to walk with Jesus and the disciples
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What is it like to walk with the disciples through a vivid scene from the Gospels? It is possible through a spiritual practice called Ignatian contemplation that the Jesuits have been doing for centuries. That’s why our guest for this week’s bonus episode is Tucker Redding, S.J. He is the creator and writer of a new podcast retreat from America Media called, “Imagine: A Guide to Jesuit Prayer.” There is no better time than Holy Week to try this enriching spiritual practice! You can find it in “The Word” podcast feed wherever you listen to podcasts.  Plus, Assistant Editor Vivian Cabrera is back to co-host this bonus episode! It’s the “everything you wanted to know about Vivian” edition, including what she is reading and baking (sourdough bread) while living in self-quarantine. Now more than ever, we treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share both the joys and challenges you experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 07, 2020
How the Catholic Church adapted during the Black Plague. Ep. 135
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It’s not really fair or responsible to draw comparisons between the Black Plague and our current coronavirus pandemic. Our situation pales in comparison to 50 million deaths, or roughly 50% of Europe’s population alone in the mid-14th century. But what was true then is true now: The Catholic Church needed to change the way that it normally operated. And, as usual, history can be an illuminating teacher. Winston Black is a professor and medieval historian who focuses on the intersection of medicine and religion in the Middle Ages. We ask him to describe just how severe the Black Plague was, the church’s pastoral response and lessons the church can learn today. As we mentioned on the show, Jesuitical is going to try to increase our production during this time. That means you can expect more than one episode a week in your podcast feeds. You can listen to our first bonus conversation, featuring Matt Malone, S.J., president and editor in chief of America (a.k.a. our boss), now. We talk about developing a new appreciation for the Eucharist and what real political leadership looks like in this crisis. You can also connect with the show in our Facebook group, where members of the community are planning a Zoom meetup for other Jesuitical listeners.  Please pray for us, and know that we are praying for you.  Links from the show:  Signs of the Times:  Read: Pope Francis’ Urbi et Orbi address on coronavirus and Jesus calming the storm Podcast: Inside Pope Francis’ unprecedented Urbi et Orbi blessing for the end of coronavirus Site crashes as half million-plus watch England’s rededication to MaryCoronavirus forces Jerusalem's Holy Sepulchre to close its doors for first time since 1349: 'Very sad'For Shut-In Pilgrims, the World’s Holiest Sites Are a Click AwayCatholic leaders praise Colorado's repeal of death penalty Books by Dr. Black:  Medicine and Healing in the Premodern West: A History in Documents The Middle Ages: Facts and Fictions   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 03, 2020
Bonus Episode: Jesuit leadership lessons during a pandemic
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Running a Catholic media organization during a pandemic.Developing a new appreciation for the Eucharist from quarantine.What real political leadership should look like in a time of crisis. Matt Malone, S.J., the editor in chief of America Media (a.k.a. our boss), is the guest for this first bonus episode of Jesuitical during the coronavirus pandemic. We talk with him about running a media ministry in these unsettling times and how his role as a priest has changed since the suspension of public Masses. We also ask Father Malone what it’s like to live in quarantine with 13 other Jesuits and discuss the Jesuit roots of Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Lucky for us, Father Malone brings a special dispensation from our Lenten fast from alcohol! Cheers from away! Plus, Assistant Editor Vivian Cabrera (who sits between Zac and Ashley in the office keeping the peace) helps cohost the conversation. Welcome Vivian! Now more than ever, we treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share both the joys and challenges you experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 31, 2020
One bishop’s response to the coronavirus. Ep. 134
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No priest becomes a bishop imagining he will one day tell his people not to come to Mass. But across the United States and much of the world, bishops have had to make the heartrending decision to shutter their churches and cancel the public celebration of the Mass and other sacraments.  This week, we speak with Bishop John Stowe of Lexington, Ky., about how his ministry has changed amid the coronavirus pandemic. We ask how people in his diocese responded to his decision to suspend public Masses, the creative ways his priests are ministering to their parish communities and what he would want to say to Catholics who are struggling with their faith in this time of sorrow, fear and uncertainty.  On Signs of the Times, Kathleen McChesney, advocate for victims of clergy sex abuse, receives one of the U.S. church’s most prestigious awards. Plus we discuss the closure of a historic Catholic newspaper and the devastating effect of the coronavirus pandemic on parishes’ finance as well as the people who work for and are served by the local church. Finally, the creative ways priests are bringing the sacraments to their flock—and how the rest of us are keeping the faith alive at home.  Now more than ever, we treasure the community you all have helped to build on Jesuitical’s Facebook page. Don’t hesitate to share both the joys and challenges you experience during this difficult moment in the life of our church. We cannot make this show or grow this community without your support. Please consider giving through Patreon. And thank you. Links from the show Kathleen McChesney, advocate for abuse victims, to receive Laetare Medal Pittsburgh Catholic newspaper terminates all employees, comes as 'a shock' to staff With Masses suspended, parishes face collection shortfalls and perilous finances Indianapolis Archdiocese shuts down drive-thru confessions What’s on tap?Hand sanitizer. Lots of hand sanitizer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 27, 2020
Catholic health care during the coronavirus pandemic. Ep. 133
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Dr. Amy Compton-Phillips treated the United States’s first coronavirus patient. She is the chief clinical officer and executive vice president at Providence St. Joseph Health, a Catholic hospital located outside Seattle. We asked her about where we are as a country in addressing this pandemic. Her answers were pretty clear: We aren’t even close to overreacting; we need to support our medical professionals; it’s normal to be afraid, but we don’t need to be conquered by our fear. Dr. Compton-Phillips also gives insight into the unique role that Catholic health care is and should be playing during this pandemic, and what it’s done in previous public health emergencies.  On Signs of the Times, we discuss what trying to practice our faith looks like from home and how the pandemic is affecting the church around the world. We also share a bit of good news: Washington State’s lieutenant governor (and former Jesuitical guest) Cyrus Habib announced that he's not running for re-election—he’s joining the Jesuits instead.  Links from the show:  Coronavirus: News, Reflections, Analysis. What you need to know. Jesuitical’s Facebook group—Join the discussion Podcast: Pope Francis makes pilgrimage through the deserted streets of Rome Washington Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib will not seek re-election in order to join the Jesuits Lt. Gov. Cyrus Habib: Why I am giving up elected office and joining the Jesuits What’s on tap? Nothing still, but we are starting to re-think our penances…. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 20, 2020
Is diet culture obscuring Lent? Ep. 132
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With Lent in full-swing and warmer weather around the corner, many Catholics are probably thinking about food and their bodies more than normally. But what if the way that we’re approaching fasting and dieting is harmful—especially to our neighbors who inhabit larger bodies? This week, we speak with fat activist and host of the Fat & Faithful podcast, Amanda Martinez Beck. “It took me a long time to believe that God was not disappointed with my body,” Amanda wrote in a piece for America titled “Why Lent can be a dangerous time when you’re recovering from an eating disorder.” We talk with Amanda about how her relationship to her body and health has changed over time, and how Catholics can be more welcoming to people with larger bodies. In Signs of the Times, we take on what is on everyone’s mind: coronavirus. We look at how Catholics around the world are responding practically, and ask if there are some spiritual lessons to be learned from the pandemic. We also discuss the recently announced 2022 synod of bishops on—wait for it—synodality, and check in on how our Lenten practices are going. Let us know what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week. Links from the show:  Fat & Faithful podcast Amanda’s Twitter Coronavirus: News, Reflections, Analysis. What you need to know. Pope Francis chooses ‘synodality’ as theme for 2022 synod Can Catholics eat the Impossible Burger during Lent? Sure — but it’s kind of missing the point, experts say. What’s on tap?  It’s Lent: Nothing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 13, 2020
What’s it like to say Mass on death row? Ep.131
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For the past 10 years, George Williams, S.J., has passed through metal doors plastered with the word “CONDEMNED” to minister to the men on death row at San Quentin State Prison, located on the north side of the San Francisco Bay. As the Jesuit chaplain for the California prison, he provides spiritual counseling, teaches theology and says Mass in what many would consider the most hopeless of circumstances. Yet amid the sin and injustice that he sees each day, Father Williams also encounters conversion, forgiveness and grace. We ask Father Williams how he spiritually prepares men for the death penalty or life without parole, how Jesuit spirituality resonates with inmates and what he would say to Catholics who disagree with Pope Francis’ pronouncement that capital punishment is “inadmissible.” Zac is on pilgrimage in the Holy Land, so no Signs of the Times this week. However, he sends a special message to the Jesuitical podcast community! You can tell us what you think about the interview on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 06, 2020
Meet the Louisiana priest behind a 100-gallon town blessing. Ep.130
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It is a beautiful thing when the sacred and the quirky come together in such a way that only Catholicism can arrange. Filling a crop duster plane with holy water and blessing an entire small town definitely qualifies as sacred and quirky in the best way. This week we chat with Father Matthew Barzare, the pastor of St. Anne Church in Cow Island, La., who gave the blessing. We get the full story from Father Matt: Where did the idea come from? Were there logistical issues? Canonical issues? What buildings got blessed? (Sneak peak: The town bar is among them.) In Signs of the Times, we unpack Pope Francis’ Lenten message and get a special Lenten penance from our friends Stephanie Butnick and Liel Leibovitz from Unorthodox, the world’s leading Jewish podcast. We also discuss the devastating revelations of the sexual misconduct by the late founder of L’Arche, Jean Vanier.  Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week!   Links from the show Internal report finds that L’Arche founder Jean Vanier engaged in decades of sexual misconduct Pope Francis delivers annual message for Lent Pope Francis recognizes the martyrdom of Jesuit Rutilio Grande and two lay companions in El Salvador Why does it take so long for the Catholic Church to recognize martyrs of justice? Louisiana parish uses plane to bless town with 100 gallons of holy water What’s on tap?Everything but the liquor cabinet (before we start our dry Lent) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 28, 2020
The untold history of black nuns in the United States
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Ask most people what they know about black Catholic sisters, and they will probably murmur something about “Sister Act.” Dr. Shannen Dee Williams did, too, until she began digging into communities’ archives and uncovering the previously hidden lives of African-American women religious. Now she’s telling those stories in a forthcoming book (with an amazing title), Subversive Habits.  Shannen tells us about the incredible resilience and deep faith of black Catholic women in the face of racism, discrimination and exclusion. We ask her how these stories affected her own faith and what racial reconciliation in the church looks like today. Have you checked out our Facebook page yet? Starting today, we’ll be asking for your consolations and desolations there. You can also find us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, support us on Patreon and send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org. (Originally released June 22, 2018) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 21, 2020
Can Jesuit spirituality save our politics?
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Cyrus Habib is perhaps most interesting (and inspiring) politician you haven’t heard of—yet—unless, of course, you listened to our interview with him back in May 2018. Amid a chaotic primary season and after a polarizing impeachment trial, we thought it was a good time to bring back this hopeful conversation about faith and politics.  Cyrus is the 16th and current Lieutenant Governor of Washington State. Born in Baltimore, Md., Cyrus is a three-time cancer survivor and has been fully blind since he was 8-years-old. His parents immigrated to the United States from Iran before he was born, and he is both the first and only Iranian-American official to hold statewide elected office in the United States. We ask Cyrus how his Catholic faith shapes his public service and how citizens and politicians alike can work toward the common good in these polarized times. (Originally released on May 25, 2018) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 14, 2020
Your Catholic guide to the Oscars 2020. Ep. 129
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With two dramatized popes up for Best Actor (Jonathan Pryce) and Best Supporting Actor (Anthony Hopkins), are this year’s Oscars the most Catholic yet? To find out, we spoke with America’s film critic, John Anderson, about the nominees for the 2020 Academy Awards, airing Sunday, Feb. 9. We talk with John about the films with the most obviously Catholic themes in 2019 (“The Two Popes,” “The Irishman,” “A Hidden Life”). Then we make the case for our own favorites for Best Picture—with Zac and Ashley reaching rare consensus over their love for “Little Women.” Plus, we dig into the state of filmmaking and watching in the Age of Netflix and ask: Why should we pay attention to the Oscars? Zac was out sick this week, so no Signs of the Times or Consolations & Desolations. But if you enjoy the show and want more, make sure to go back and listen to our conversation with Jonathan Pryce about what it’s like to play Pope Francis (and the High Sparrow). Then, tell us about your favorite films of the year on our Facebook group. If you’d like to support the show, check out our Patreon page or rate and review the show on Apple Podcasts.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 07, 2020
What it’s like to get to know your bishop on pilgrimage. Ep. 128
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It’s not surprising that most Catholics—especially young Catholics—don’t personally know their bishops. Sure, they might have put some oil on your forehead at confirmation and made you worry about what it would do to your acne problem (this is 100 percent hypothetical), but otherwise, you’re busy, and bishops are in charge of a zillion things and a zillion people. And even if you get to sit down with them, it’s probably in a formal setting where everyone is doing their best to look buttoned up. Our guest this week is Mychael Schilmoeller. She works in pastoral care at St. Michael’s Church in Prior Lake, Minn., in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. She also was part of a delegation of young adults who accompanied their bishops on their “ad limina” visit to Rome to meet with Pope Francis. That means she got to spend a lot of time with her bishops. Like, jet-lagged, layover-in-the-airport kind of down time. Long Italian dinners kind of time. We talk to her about what it was like to get to accompany her bishops on this trip and how this influenced her perspective on the church. Oh, and we ask her what it was like to get her and her unborn child blessed by Pope Francis and have the scene posted on His Holiness’s Instagram. On Signs of the Times, we look at the shifting political home of abortion in American politics and where that might leave Catholics. We also talk about how Pope Francis celebrated the first official Sunday of the Word of God and discuss the tragic death of Kobe Bryant. This week, we also hit 3,000 members in our Facebook group for listeners! It’s a place where you can interact with hosts and the rest of the Jesuitical team, as well as other listeners. You should check it out if you haven’t yet.    Links from the Show:  Will pro-life democratic voters be courted in the 2020 primary? So far, it’s not likely. Trump: a ‘profound honor’ to be the first president to attend March for Life Pope Francis’ Homily for 1st Sunday of the Word of God (Full Text) A (Complicated) Prayer for Kobe Young adults make ‘deep dive’ into faith during ‘ad limina’ visit Mychael’s Instagram with Pope Francis (second photo) Inside the Vatican   What’s on Tap?  Hot Toddies, to cure the common cold Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 31, 2020
A Catholic veteran on faith in war. Ep. 127
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When Pete Lucier deployed to Afghanistan in 2011 he believed in the war and the Marine Corps and violence. It was only after returning to civilian life that he began to question not only the reasons for the United States’ Middle East wars but his identity as a soldier who is loved “for my sins,” as he wrote in America. Following the U.S. drone strike on an Iranian general and ominous talk of “World War III,” we wanted to talk to Pete about the ways Americans think and talk about war. We ask about how his experience in Afghanistan has changed his relationship to violence—and God—and about the responsibility of Catholic citizens in times of ongoing conflict and new military tensions.  In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis condemns anti-Semitism once again ahead of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz; President Trump offers new guidelines for praying in public schools; and the consecration of a female Espicopalian bishop at a Catholic Church in Virginia gets called off in the face of internet outrage. Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week!   Links from the show: Pope Francis: “I will never grow tired of condemning every form of anti-Semitism” President Trump issues new guidance on prayer in public schools ‘An act of charity’: Virginia bishop defends parish hosting Episcopalian consecration As a soldier I was loved for my sins. Now I must repent for them.   What’s on tap? St. Louis’ finest: Budweiser Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 24, 2020
Learning the stories of the enslaved people owned by the Jesuits. Ep. 126
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Awareness of the Catholic Church’s—and the Jesuits’— role in slavery in the United States has grown in recent years thanks to reporting and research from journalists, univerisities and descendents. But there is still much that remains unknown about the enslaved people owned, rented and borrowed by the Catholic Church: How many of them were there? Who are their descendents? What were their day-to-day lives like?  The Slavery, History, Memory, and Reconciliation Project, a collaboration between the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States and St. Louis University, is working to uncover the untold stories of enslaved peoples. We talk with Jonathan Smith and Laura Weiss from the project about what they’ve learned so far and what they hope to achieve.  In Signs of the Times, we break down the controversy surrounding Cardinal Robert Sarah’s new book on celibacy and what Pope Benedict’s role is in it. We also look at how Catholic bishops are advocating for refugee resettlement on the state level and a new marriage prep program in Spain. Thoughts on the show? Join the discussion with other Jesuitical listeners in our Facebook group. Also, thank you to everyone who has responded so far for our call for new Patreon supporters. We can’t do it without your support.    Links from the Show:  Slavery, History, Memory and Reconciliation Benedict XVI has asked Cardinal Sarah to have his name removed from the book on priestly celibacy Texas Catholics decry Governor’s decision to spurn refugees Minn. Catholic, Lutheran bishops' open letter backs refugee admission Catholic church in Spain launches years-long marriage training for couples   What’s on tap?  The Chilton, as recommended by listener Isaiah Lucio Lopez. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 17, 2020
Dorothy Day’s granddaughter on prayer, prison and peace. Ep. 125
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In April of last year, seven Catholic activists broke into the naval submarine base in Kings Bay, Ga., home to several nuclear-armed submarines. Inside, they carried out nonviolent actions to protest the U.S. nuclear weapon’s program: They spilled their blood on the property, beat weapons with hammers and put crime-scene tape around the base. All seven were arrested, convicted and await sentencing. One of those Catholics was Martha Hennessy. Martha is the granddaughter of another Catholic peace activist: Dorothy Day. We ask her how she prepared spiritually for the protest, how her grandmother has shaped her faith and what she thinks about the state of Catholic activism. In Signs of the Times, we discuss the U.S. drone strike that killed a top Iranian military leader and how Catholic leaders are (and aren’t) responding. Plus: a 100-gallon blessing of holy water on farmland in Louisiana and Pope Francis’ eventful New Year’s Eve.  Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week! Finally, are you a college senior at a Jesuit college or university interested in writing, journalism or production? Or do you know someone who is? America Media’s Joseph A. O’Hare, S.J., Fellowship is an incredible opportunity to live in New York City while working with the smartest, kindest Catholic media professionals out there. The deadline for applications is Jan. 15 so don’t wait. Learn how to apply here: oharefellows.org   Links from the show: Pope Francis prays for dialogue as tensions mount between the U.S. and Iran The U.S. killing of Soleimani could have devastating consequences for Iraq’s Christians Louisiana parish uses plane to bless town with 100 gallons of holy water Pope shows up unannounced at funeral Mass of Italian lay woman and friend Pope Francis SlapGate   What’s on tap? Father Andy’s Manhattan: Four(!) parts bourbon, one part sweet vermouth, splash of bitters and a maraschino cherry Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 10, 2020
A workout program for you, from the formerly incarcerated
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Are you working out for the body of a god? What about the body of a convict? Meet Coss Marte, our guest this week. After being arrested at 19 for running a multimillion dollar drug trade in New York City, Coss was sent to prison. There, doctors told him that his health problems and weight could kill him within a few years. After dropping 70 pounds in six months, and helping train other convicts to make dramatic changes, Coss also experienced a religious revival in a moment of desperation. Now Coss is the head of ConBody: a gym that offers prison-style bootcamp classes taught by formerly incarcerated trainers. We’ll be talking with Coss about how ConBody was developed, how his faith helped him while incarcerated and his prison reform activism. After, we’ve got consolations and desolations, where we tell you where we did or didn’t find God this week. (Originally released on July 28, 2017) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 03, 2020
The one where Olga says goodbye. Ep. 124
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It’s the end of an era. As you heard on last week’s episode, our cohost Olga Segura is leaving America Media, and therefore Jesuitical, to freelance full-time and work on a book on race, the Black Lives Matter movement and the Catholic Church, which will be published in 2021. To quote from Olga’s farewell newsletter for Patreon supporters:  James Baldwin—my answer to “Who would you canonize” during our first live show and my favorite writer—once wrote, “Love takes off masks that we fear we cannot live without and know we cannot live within.” You—Ashley, Zac, my producer Eloise Blondiau and our listeners—helped me to remove the cover I often hid behind. I stopped code-switching and I stopped being afraid of who I was: an Afro-Latina writer in the Catholic world.  Olga offered sharp and thoughtful commentary on ecclesial and secular affairs, advocated for justice and vulnerably shared her true self with us and our listeners. Change is hard, and this will not be easy for any of us. Olga provided a unique and necessary voice in the Catholic media, and especially so on Jesuitical. Moreover, will anyone keep the peace between Ashley and Zac?  In this special episode, we skip the Signs of the Times and Consolations and Desolations to devote an entire conversation to Olga and her work at America.  We’ll miss you Olga. Come back and visit us soon.  Love,  Zac and Ashley Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 27, 2019
Meet the star of “The Two Popes”. Ep. 123
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If you are a fan of HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” you probably remember thinking when you first saw the High Sparrow: Wow, that guy looks exactly like Pope Francis. That guy was Jonathan Pryce, a distinguished Welsh actor on the stage and screen. And it was a likeness that proved irresistible for the director of “The Two Popes,” now streaming on Netflix. In the film, Pryce plays Jorge Bergoglio, the archbishop of Buenos Aires, who has been called to Rome by Pope Benedict XVI (Anthony Hopkins), to discuss the latter’s decision to renounce the papacy. We ask Pryce how he prepared to play the pope, whether the film changed his perception of the Catholic Church, and about his own spirituality. In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis abolished the “pontifical secret” for cases of sexual abuse; how are advocates and victims reacting? Also at the Vatican, the Peter’s Pence collection comes under scrutiny for potentially misleading donors. And in U.S. church news, Gwen Stefani needs an annulment, a survey of how the length of homilies compare to sermons in other denominations and a bishop opens up about mental illness. Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week! Links from the show Pope Francis abolishes the pontifical secret for sexual misconduct cases involving clerics Is the Vatican misleading donors? Peter’s Pence, explained. Blake Shelton and Gwen Stefani Are Ready to Get Married But It "Isn't Possible Currently" Because of Her Faith An Analysis of Online Sermons in U.S. Churches Bishop Conley announces medical leave of absence from Lincoln diocese https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2019/12/09/us-catholic-priests-beset-overwork-isolation-and-scandals What’s on tap? Fanta Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 20, 2019
Spiritual direction for Nones. Ep. 122
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This week, we talk to Kaya Oakes, a contributing writer for America and a teacher at the University of California, Berkeley. Kaya is the author of The Nones Are Alright: A New Generation of Believers, Seekers, and Those in Between on the religiously unaffiliated or religious “nones.” Most recently, she wrote an article on spiritual direction and why so many non-Christians are seeking the practice. We talk to Kaya about Ignatian spiritual direction, her training to become a spiritual director and more. In Signs of the Times, we discuss the appointment of Cardinal Luis Tagle, a.k.a. “Chito,” as the prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples; Nancy Pelosi’s viral “As a Catholic” moment; the Nativity scene depicting Mary, Jesus and Joseph in cages; new research on how the gap between church attendance among the poorest and richest in America has grown since the 1970s; and how Blue Christmas services can help people struggling during the holidays. Feel free to send us your questions, concerns, cocktail recipes or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. You can help other listeners find the show by leaving us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! If you’re not doing so already, please consider supporting us on Patreon, where we have started a newsletter exclusively for Patrons! Thank you to those already supporting us. We would not be able to do this without you. Links for the showPope Francis appoints Cardinal Tagle to head Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples Why Nancy Pelosi doesn’t hate President Trump and prays for him instead A church nativity scene depicts Jesus, Mary and Joseph as refugees separated in cages Jesus Came to Proclaim Good News to the Poor. But Now They’re Leaving Church. ‘Blue Christmas’ services help Christians in down times in holiday season What’s on tap? Chamomile Tea Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 13, 2019
The complicated history of AIDS and the Catholic Church. Ep. 121
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The story of Catholics and the AIDS epidemic in the United States is often told as one of “gays versus the church.” But the reality was much more complicated than that. So complicated that our colleague, Michael O’Loughlin, has spent years talking to people who lived through that harrowing period to paint a fuller picture of how Catholic patients and activists, religious sisters and bishops, hospital administrators and volunteers responded to the crisis. And now you can hear their stories in a new podcast from America Media, “Plague: Untold Stories of AIDS and the Catholic Church.” We ask Michael how the church was a source of both healing and hurt, whether the relationship between the church and the L.G.B.T. community has changed since the height of the epidemic and what the deep faith of gay Catholics who lived through this period can teach us today. In Signs of the Times, a Jesuit priest wants to create a less toxic gaming environment and Pope Francis wants you to set up a nativity scene. Plus, a groundbreaking new survey of Catholic employees and a Catholic school faces a lawsuit over what critics consider a racially discriminatory hair policy. Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week! Links from the show A Catholic Priest is Creating a Non-Toxic Minecraft Server Questions Of Faith: Exclusive Survey of Catholic Church Employees NYC Catholic schools hold fast on boys’ braid bans despite laws banning hair discrimination Pope Francis, at site of first nativity scene, issues letter on the importance of the crèche What’s on tap?St. Germain hot toddy Nursing students treat a patient in the AIDS ward of Saint Vincent's Hospital in the 1980s. (Courtesy: Archives, Sisters of Charity of New York) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 06, 2019
Introducing PLAGUE: Untold Stories of AIDS and the Catholic Church
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This week the Jesuitical team are bringing you a new podcast from America Media. In “Plague,” America’s Michael O'Loughlin investigates stories of AIDS and the Catholic Church. The release of the first episode coincides with World AIDS Day. In this first episode, Mike tells the story of David Pais, whose journey exemplifies the experience of many gay Catholics who were personally affected by the AIDS epidemic in the early days. He describes the role his faith played helping him cope with his own diagnosis—and his struggle as he walked away from the church in anger.  You can learn more about "Plague" at americamag.org/plague. You can find Mike on Twitter @mikeoloughlin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 01, 2019
Gentiles and Jews interrupt each other over booze. Ep. 120
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This week, we welcome, for the second time, Stephanie Butnick and Liel Leibovitz, two-thirds of the Jewish podcast, “Unorthodox.” They just published an amazing new book, The Newish Jewish Encyclopedia: From Abraham to Zabar’s and Everything in Between. We talk to them about Jewdar, Chinese food and Christmas, Drake, Thanksgivuhkuh and other fascinating entries in the book! In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis urges us to ask: “Do I, a Christian, have at least one poor person as a friend?” And he considers updating the Catechism to include “ecological sins.” In our third and last story, we discuss a new study from the Pew Research Center that analyzes how American adults feel about the relationship between religion and politics. Feel free to send us your questions, concerns, cocktail recipes or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. You can help other listeners find the show by leaving us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts! If you’re not doing so already, please consider supporting us on Patreon, where we have started a newsletter exclusively for Patrons! Stay tuned for things like .gifs from Ashley, advice requests from Zac or book recommendations from Olga. Thank you to those already supporting us. We would not be able to do this without you. P.S. America Media will be launching a new podcast next month called “Plague: Untold Stories of AIDS and the Catholic Church,” hosted by our national correspondent, Michael O’Loughlin. The first episode premieres on Dec. 1, World AIDS Day. Please visit the show’s page or wherever you listen to podcasts and listen to the trailer and subscribe. Links from the show: Pope Francis calls on Christians to remember the poor, ‘the treasure of the church’Pope Francis: Catechism will be updated to define ecological sinsAmericans Have Positive Views About Religion’s Role in Society, but Want It Out of Politics What’s on tap?  Stephanie and Liel brought us Arak, “a delightfully alcoholic beverage made of grapes and aniseed.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 22, 2019
Pope Francis’ struggle to reform the Catholic Church. Ep. 119
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Pope Francis’ reforms of the Catholic Church are, depending on whom you ask, a long-awaited breath of fresh air or a slippery slope toward surrender to the modern world. Austen Ivereigh, who has already written one biography of Pope Francis and closely documented the historic events of his papacy, is out with a new book, Wounded Shepherd: Pope Francis and His Struggle to Convert the Catholic Church. We ask Austen about why exactly some in the church are resistant to or skeptical of the pope, what Francis’ biggest reforms have been and what complaint Pope Francis had with his first book.  In Signs of the Times, we look at an exciting new initiative in San Diego, where Bishop Robert McElroy proposed that by the end of 2022, 25 percent of parish leadership positions should be filled by young adults. We also talk about the U.S. bishops’ meeting in Baltimore, where they elected their first Latino president, and what it could mean for the present and future of the church. Plus: a look at the falling number of Latino Catholics in the United States and Georgetown University’s plans to make reparations to the descendants of slaves sold by the Jesuits in 1838. Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week! Links from the showArchbishop Jose Gomez elected first Latino president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Study finds US Latinos are no longer majority-Catholic. Here are some reasons why. San Diego’s Catholic Church works to recruit more millennials Georgetown reparations plan for slaves sold by university draws criticism from students Pope Francis on prison systems: ‘We will be judged on this’ USCCB Statement on Wounded Shepherd What’s on Tap? Iranian Earl Grey Tea Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 15, 2019
What the Left (and everyone else) can learn from conservatives. Ep. 118
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We’ve all heard Jesus’ command to “love your enemy.” But can you love your enemies if you don’t know who they are? On the podcast “Know Your Enemy,” hosts Matthew Sitman and Sam Adler-Bell—self-described Bernie Bros—try to understand their political rivals on the right’s own terms, providing “a leftist’s guide to the conservative movement.” We sat down with Matt, an associate editor at the Catholic magazine Commonweal, to talk about his own political conversion (he was a conservative well into his 20s), what the left can learn from the conservative movement and how the Trump era is reshaping Catholic politics. In Signs of the Times, we discuss the decision of a South Carolina priest to deny Communion to former Vice President Joe Biden and Senator Marco Rubio’s challenge to Republicans to take up the cause of working people and to build a “common good capitalism.” Plus, seven anti-nuclear activists are convicted for their acts of civil disobedience and a church in Arizona has its first sensory-friendly Mass for people with disabilities. Tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Patrons get access to an exclusive newsletter written by one of your hosts each week! Links from the show Cardinal Dolan: I would not have denied Joe Biden Communion Explainer: When can someone be denied the Eucharist? Marco Rubio calls for an ‘economics of the common good’ Catholic peace activists Kings Bay Plowshares 7 convicted Chandler Catholic church to host first sensory-friendly Mass What’s on tap? Bulliet Bourbon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 08, 2019
Where is former Cardinal McCarrick now? Ep. 117
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This week Ashley and Olga interview Ruth Graham, a staff writer at Slate who consistently reports on religion with sensitivity and nuance. Ruth isn't afraid of tackling the most difficult topics—she recently got an interview with former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick by traveling all the way to Victoria, Kansas. She talks about what she learned about the small town where the former cardinal now lives, why the former cardinal still won't confess and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 25, 2019
The Amazon synod should matter to you. Here’s why. Ep. 116
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The Synod of Bishops for the Amazon is underway in Rome. This week, we welcome Luke Hansen, S.J., a former associate editor at America and special correspondent for the synod, to discuss why the synod is so significant. Since the start of the synod on Oct. 6, Luke has been reporting on the ground. He has written on indigenous leaders sharing their experiences with bishops in Rome, ministries for women in the Amazon and the possibility of ordaining married men.    We talk to Luke about why Catholics all around the world should care about the synod, Pope Francis’ involvement at the gathering, the influence of laypeople and more. (You can find all of Luke’s reporting and all of our coverage on the synod here.)    In Signs of the Times, we talk about Pope Francis going viral on Twitter, and how he is asking us to stop being hypocrites; New York’s Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio squaring off in the latest edition of Cabrini-Gate; the $3,000 “Jesus Shoes” that sold out in 24 hours; a church bingo scandal in New Jersey; and, finally, how Democratic presidential candidates discussed faith at a CNN town hall.    Feel free to send us your questions, concerns, cocktail recipes or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.  You can help other listeners find the show by leaving us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts!   If you’re not doing so already, please consider supporting us on Patreon, where we have started a newsletter exclusively for Patrons! Stay tuned for things like gifs from Ashley, advice requests from Zac or book recommendations from me.   Thank you to those already supporting us. We would not be able to do this without you.   — Olga   Links from the show:  Pope gives New Orleans Saints unexpected boost on Twitter Pope at Mass: Learn to point the finger at yourself, to be freed of hypocrisy Cuomo Swoops In On Columbus Day, Says State Will Help Build Mother Cabrini Statue $3,000 Nike sneakers that are filled with HOLY WATER and blessed by a priest sell out just minutes after the ‘Jesus shoes’ were released Church bingo players charged with cheating Democratic presidential candidates talk faith at CNN Equality Town Hall What you need to know about the 2019 Synod on the Amazon   What’s on tap?  Post-wedding detox: Pedialyte from Zac’s wedding gift bag Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 18, 2019
Loneliness isn’t something you can “fix” (or need to). Ep. 115
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Loneliness: When you’re experiencing it, it can seem like you are the only person in the world who feels this way. But when you say it out loud, you find out almost everyone, at some point, has had the feeling that they are missing out or that they don’t belong.  That is why I am so grateful that this week’s guest, Gabriella Jeakle, was willing to write so openly about being lonely in college in an article for America magazine. She writes not from the perspective of having graduated and knowing “things will get better” but as someone in the thick of it—a freshman at a Jesuit college, determined to get her degree but unsure if she will ever really feel like she belongs.  We ask Gabriella how she is learning to live with loneliness and how her faith has helped her in this time of transition. In Signs of the Times, the Synod of the Bishop on the Amazon opens in Rome and Pope Francis creates 13 new cardinals. Stateside, the Supreme Court opens its new term and a big abortion case is on the docket. Next, was Mother Frances Cabrini snubbed in New York City’s She Built NYC initiative, which is meant to bring gender balance to the city’s public monuments? Finally, Molly Burhans (a former guest!) was recognized by the United Nations for her work mapping the Catholic Church worldwide.  You can tell us what you think about the episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Please consider supporting the show by becoming a member of our Patreon community.  — Ashley Links from the show Pope Francis opens Amazon synod, says to ‘light the fire of the Gospel’ in the region Here’s what happened on the first day of the Amazon Synod Pope Francis creates 13 new cardinals, emphasizes the need for ‘compassion’ and ‘loyalty’ New Supreme Court agenda features abortion, immigrants and L.G.B.T. rights Chirlane McCray accused of ‘anti-Catholic bias’ over Mother Cabrini statue snub U.N. honors Catholic activist using data to fight climate change What’s on tap? Boozy Fall Tea: Trader Joe’s Harvest Blend Herbal Tea + a shot of Jim Beam (I swear it’s better than it sounds) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 11, 2019
Is Augustine the most relatable saint? Ep. 114
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Forget what you think you know about Saint Augustine. Maybe you only know the cities that take his name, or you had a tough experience in your introduction to philosophy class and found him medieval (in the pejorative sense) and scrupulous.  But what if Augustine was actually the first to hone in on and clearly express our human desire for authenticity, that restlessness that all of us have felt at one point in our lives? What if, “Augustine might make Christianity believable for you even if you’ve heard it all, been there, done that, and left the stupid Christian t-shirt at home.” James K.A. Smith is not the first to write a book explaining Augustine’s relatability, but he is perhaps the best at communicating it. This week we talk to Smith about his new book On the Road with St. Augustine: A Real World Spirituality for Restless Hearts.  In Signs of the Times we preview the upcoming Synod for the Amazon region and talk about how the Vatican marked the World Day of Migrants and Refugees. We also look at one of Philadelphia’s newest permanent deacons: longtime NBA referee Steve Javie. Oh, and it’s not every day that a friend and coworker sits down with Pope Francis for 30 minutes. James Martin, S.J., did just that this week.  Links from the show: On the Road with Saint Augustine Refugee advocates decry Trump administration’s plan to cut refugee cap Pope Francis reminds Christians that migrants and refugees should be welcomed around the world Synod for the Amazon Pope Francis meets with Father James Martin in private audience He Was the NBA’s Best Ref. Then He Went to a Catholic Seminary. Image Journal What’s on tap?  To quote our guest this week: “Negroni in the summer, Manhattan in the winter. Does that mean a Boulevardier for the fall?!” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 04, 2019
Faith and politics in Silicon Valley Ep.113
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Faith is probably not the first thing you think of when you hear “Silicon Valley.” But Rep. Ro Khanna, who represents the capital of the tech world in Congress, says many people in his diverse district can be found in the pews on Sunday. The Democratic congressman is one of the four Hindus currently serving in Congress and the son of Indian immigrants. We ask him how his faith shapes his politics, his interfaith outreach and his efforts to build bridges between India and Pakistan—and within the Democratic Party. In Signs of the Times, we’ve got an update on the situation at Brebeuf, the Jesuit high school that was told it could no longer call itself Catholic after administrators refused to fire a male teacher who is married to another man. Plus: the financial effects of the sex abuse crisis, mobs at Mass, all-natural burials and the pope’s message to the press.  Let us know your thoughts about the show on Facebook or Twitter, and please consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community! Patrons have access to an exclusive new newsletter written each week by one of the hosts, sweet Jesuit swag and a subscription to America magazine. Links from the show Sanctions against Brebueuf Jesuit suspended as appeal process continues at Vatican A New York diocese filed for bankruptcy. Will others follow? When a Mob Descended on Mass Dutch nuns open new cemetery for ‘natural burials’   What’s on tap? Rum and coke Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 27, 2019
What makes Catholic School Movies so great? Ep. 112
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As someone who never attended Catholic grammar or high school, I am not exactly the most qualified to break down what makes a Catholic school movie great. Then again, I rarely let qualifications get in the way of my opinions.  A few weeks ago, Ciaran Freeman, a former O’Hare fellow at America and member of the Jesuitical team wrote the definitive ranking of the 10 greatest Catholic school movies of all time. As you might expect, people had a lot of strong feelings about the ranking, good and bad. One person who is much, much more qualified to discuss the rankings is Hunter Harris. Hunter is a staff writer at Vulture, an alumna of Catholic education and a Catholic school movie savant. We talk about the quirks of “Superstar,” the staying power of “Doubt” and why “Lady Bird” is the greatest Catholic school film of all time.  In Signs of the Times, we preview the upcoming German “synodal journey” and the Vatican’s ongoing dialogue with German bishops. We also look at what one bishop is doing with church resources to help fight climate change and heed Pope Francis’ advice to pray for politicians in our “Being Frank” segment.  Links from the show The 10 Greatest Catholic School Movies of All Time Reader Rebuttal: The 10 Greatest Catholic School Movies of All Time Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ is a rallying cry for Catholic schoolgirls everywhere Hunter Harris at Vulture Remember your politicians in prayer, pope says Vatican officials offer guidance for German church ‘synodal journey’ UK Catholic bishop converts Church’s own medieval estate to wildlife sanctuary   What’s on tap? Pinot Grigio Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 20, 2019
Why you (yes, you) should go on a retreat Ep. 111
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If you’ve never been on a retreat—or if you have—this week’s guest is perfect for you. Father Joe Laramie is a Jesuit and campus minister. For years, Father Joe has been giving retreats, and this year, he published Abide in the Heart of Christ: A 10-day personal retreat with St. Ignatius Loyola. The book uses the Spiritual Exercises to “help in the formation of your heart according to Christ.”  We talk with Father Joe about the Spiritual Exercises, Ignatian retreats versus other retreats and what this ministry has taught him. In Signs of the Times, we recap Pope Francis’ recent trip to sub-Saharan Africa, including comments he made during his papal flights; Cardinal Joseph Tobin and Catholics protesting immigration in New Jersey; the new archbishop of Seattle; Pope Francis getting stuck in an elevator—for 25 minutes; and finally, our thoughts on the new trailer for “The Two Popes,” a film starring Anthony Hopkins as Pope Benedict and Jonathan Pryce as Pope Francis.  Feel free to send us your questions, concerns, cocktail recipes or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community. If you’re not doing so already, please consider supporting us on Patreon, where we have started a newsletter exclusively for Patrons! Stay tuned for things like gifs from Ashley, advice requests from  Zac or book recommendations from me.    Thank you to those already supporting us. We would not be able to do this without you.    Links from the show:  Pope Francis visits Mozambique, Madagascar and Mauritius Change the world, don’t just gripe about it, pope tells young people Pope Francis to journalist: ‘I am honored that the Americans attack me.’  Cardinal Tobin joins hundreds of Catholics protesting immigration detention ‘I am a pastor, not a prince.’ New Seattle archbishop will not live in mansion   What’s on tap?  Budlight   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 13, 2019
Why Malcolm Gladwell wants to think like a Jesuit. Ep. 110
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This summer, the hosts of this podcast learned they have something in common with Malcolm Gladwell: We all think being called “jesuitical” should be considered a compliment. Malcolm, a staff writer at the New Yorker and the author of several best-selling books, recently became obsessed with “thinking like a Jesuit” as a way to tackle new and complicated problems. In a three-part series on his podcast, “Revisionist History,” he takes a deep dive into St. Ignatius’ philosophical tradition and the unexpected ways it can be applied today. We ask him how he first encountered the Jesuits, if there are any dangers to this way of thinking and why he calls himself a “wannabe Catholic.” In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis creates news cardinals (no Americans, but three Jesuits!) and calls for swift action on climate change. Nuns in New Orleans donate land to help protect the city from flooding and a Catholic school in Tennessee donates all their Harry Potter books to the garbage bin. Finally, we discuss two tough stories: a sex abuse settlement that raises questions about the role of race and poverty in the church’s treatment of survivors and the controversy surrounding a man who sought out a priest’s blessing before choosing to die by assisted suicide. We are so happy to be back in your podcast feeds after our summer break. You can tell us what you think about the new episode on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. And last but not least, some exciting news for our Patreon supporters: We are starting a new newsletter exclusively for patrons! Please consider becoming a member to learn important things like: What book is Zac reading these days? What music can Olga not stop listening to? What animal video is Ashley watching on repeat? And much more. You can check out the benefits of becoming a patron here. And a big thank you to everyone who supports Jesuitical. We couldn’t do it without you! Links from the show Pope to create 13 new cardinals in October, including three Jesuits Pope Francis issues new call for world leaders to act on the climate emergency New Orleans’ women religious donate 25 acres for flood control project Priest removes Harry Potter books from Tennessee Catholic school, citing ‘actual curses and spells’ Mississippi Catholic sex abuse survivors underpaid in settlement cases Seattle bishops affirm sanctity of life in wake of assisted suicide What’s on tap? Wild Basin Boozy Sparkling Water Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 06, 2019
When Millennials move in with Nuns Ep. 109
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When Millennials move in with Nuns   Every year, more people—particularly those who skew younger—opt out of identifying with a religious tradition. In many ways, the spiritual lives of the next generation will look drastically different than their predecessors.    At the same time, nearly 90 percent of all women religious (these are the much talked about “nuns”) are over the age of 60. Given these shifting demographics, the future of religious life will look wildly different too.    Could the future of these two groups be tied up somehow? This was the question first posed by Nunes and Nones, an organization that brings these two groups—both spiritually seeking, both distinctly committed to justice—together for conversation, relationship and even shared housing.    This week we talk to Katie Gordon, a national organizer of Nuns and Nones, about the impetus behind starting the organization, the benefits and challenges of intergenerational and interreligious dialogue, and why aging women religious and millennials are well-suited (or not) for community.    During Signs of the Times we talk about the Archdiocese of Indianapolis’s decision to no longer allow a Jesuit high school to call itself Catholic after the school declined to not renew a contract for a teacher in a same-sex marriage. Plus, we look at what Baltimore Catholics are doing to support and protect immigrants.   This is our final show for the summer—while we’re away, be sure to join in conversation and faith sharing with other Jesuitical listeners on our Facebook group, and be sure to write us at jesuitical@americamedia.org. We’ll be back in your feeds in September.    What’s on Tap? Ciaran Jason Freeman Jam Jar Gin & Tonic   Links from the Show:  Archdiocese pulls ‘Catholic’ label from Jesuit school for refusing to fire teacher in same-sex marriage History of slaves sold for Georgetown detailed in new genealogical website Baltimore Catholics Stand With Undocumented Families As ICE Raid Threats Loom Amazon Trolls Netflix Over Catholic Group’s Call To Cancel ‘Good Omens’ Nunes and Nones Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 28, 2019
Painting black saints. Ep 108.
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Chloe Becker was upset when she realized she could not name a single African or African-American saint. A junior at Magnificat High School in Rocky River, Ohio, Chloe was inspired to learn more about racial justice after attending a school-sponsored conference on racism. It led to the creation of a semester-long project: a mural depicting African-American saints and holy people in contemporary clothing, holding up the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Chloe took a break from her summer vacation to talk to us about using the saints to fight racism, how her community has responded and why she chose to depict the saints in contemporary dress. In this week’s Signs of the Times, we look at two new Catholic initiatives: a Vatican podcast in Latin and a new Catholic cryptocurrency backed by former Senator Rick Santorum. We also break down the U.S. bishops’ latest protocols for holding themselves accoutnable for sexual abuse and its cover up. Finally, we look at a Belgian group of monks who are changing the way they sell their award-winning beer. That’s it for us this week. Only one more show until Jesuitical goes on summer break. Links from the show: Looking for new religious art? Check your local high school. Augustine Tolton, Ex-Slave and First Black Catholic Priest in U.S., Takes Step to Sainthood Paris archbishop celebrates first Mass in Notre Dame since fire U.S. bishops adopt new protocols for holding themselves accountable for sex abuse Vatican will discuss ordaining married men as priests in Amazon region Vatican News to launch news program, podcast in Latin The Rick Santorum-backed coin for Catholics Belgian monks go digital to sell their ‘world’s best beer’   What’s on tap: “The Crisp” pilsner from Six Point Brewery Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 21, 2019
Being Gay and Catholic. Ep. 107
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Pat Gothman is committed to creating welcoming spaces for L.G.B.T. Catholics. Pat, who is gay and Catholic, is a writer and editor of Reaching Out, an online publication that highlights the stories of L.G.B.T. people of faith. In December, Pat co-launched Vine & Fig, an online community where the lives and experiences of queer Catholics are “affirmed as true, holy, and beautiful.” Vine & Fig provides community members with books, videos and other resources and gives them a digital space—via Slack—where “queer Catholics can safely get to know one another and grow together.” We talk to Pat about Vine & Fig, his experience as a gay Catholic man and why he stays in the church. In Signs of the Times, David Haas, a composer of Catholic hymns, releases a new refrain for Pride Month; 90 Catholic airport chaplains meet in Rome; Joe Biden retracts his support for the Hyde Amendment; and the Toronto Raptors forward who almost became a priest. Finally, we discuss the Vatican’s most comprehensive statement yet on gender theory. Feel free to send us your questions, concerns, cocktail recipes or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community. This week’s episode was sponsored by the Catholic Travel Centre.   Links from the show: Catholic Composer Pens Song For Pride Month Because ‘We Are Called To Love’ Vatican issues new document criticizing ‘gender theory’ Over 90 Catholic airport chaplains gathered at the Vatican this week. Airport chaplains have special ministry, pope says W.Va. bishop gave powerful cardinals and other priests $350,000 in cash gifts before his ouster, church records show Joe Biden says he no longer supports the Hyde Amendment Pascal Siakam: How a Toronto Raptors star got his start in seminary   What’s on tap? Ginger beer Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 14, 2019
How a punk rock journalist found healing in the Catholic Church Ep. 106
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Dawn Eden Goldstein was born into a Jewish family, but in her teens and 20s—dealing with cycles suicidal depression—charted her own path as a journalist and devotee of the religion of punk rock. In the early 2000s, as the first round of the sexual abuse crisis was unfolding in the Catholic Church, Dawn, herself a survivor, began making her way to that very church. Since converting, she has written several books, including My Peace I Give You: Healing Sexual Wounds with the Help of the Saints and her new memoir, Sunday Will Never Be the Same. We ask Dawn about her spiritual journey, how the latest abuse revelations have tested her faith and what lessons the church can learn from the arduous healing process of survivors. In Signs of the Times, the U.S. church is reporting a rise in new sex abuse allegations. What’s being the recent spike? Next, the bishop in Rhode Island warns Catholics not to take part in Pride marches and an Irish archbishop tells parents not to give their kids smartphones for Holy Communion. Finally, relics are stolen from a church in Italy and the French senate votes to restore Notre Dame to its former glory. Tell us what you think about the show on our Facebook page! You can follow us on Twitter, support us on Patreon and help other listeners find Jesuitical by leaving us a review on Apple Podcasts. Thanks for listening! Links from the show US Catholic Church reports big rise in sex-abuse allegations Rhode Island bishop faces backlash after tweet about Pride Month Don’t give kids smartphones as communion gifts, says Archbishop Relics of Fatima child saints stolen from Italian church French senate passes bill for preservation of Notre Dame’s original state What’s on tap? Not-fancy-enough-for-Zac office coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 07, 2019
Georgetown Jesuits enslaved her ancestors. Now she's working for justice.
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Onita Estes-Hicks has been Catholic her entire life. Men in her family were named “Nace” after St. Ignatius, a testament to the influence of the Jesuits in her family’s life. But her relationship with her faith was forever changed in 2004, when her family discovered that they were the descendents of one of the 272 enslaved persons sold by the Jesuits who ran Georgetown University in 1838. We talk to Onita about what it was like to find out about her family’s history, what Georgetown has done to ask for forgiveness and what it’s been like to form a community of other descendants. In Signs of the Times we unpack the latest developments from the case of former cardinal Theodore McCarrick (for a fuller discussion, listen to this week’s episode of Inside the Vatican) and discuss the new Archbishop of Washington, D.C. In our new segment, “Being Frank,” we talk about the pope’s advice to young travelers to focus on encounter, not consumerism (or Instagram likes). Links from the show: GU272 Descendants Association New correspondence obtained by Crux confirms that the Vatican placed restrictions on former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick In new interview that appears to have been conducted before this report was released, Pope Francis said he ‘knew nothing’ about McCarrick Washington’s black Catholic community looks to Archbishop Gregory for new leadership Pope praises Catholic tourism group dedicated to young people   What’s on tap? Goodbye whiskey from Father Eric Sundrup 😔 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 31, 2019
A beginner’s guide to spiritual direction Ep. 104
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For over two years, Father Eric Sundrup has provided the hosts of Jesuitical with spiritual formation. Every week, we sit and talk to him about where we found God—and where it was a little harder. Sadly, it’s Eric’s last week as an associate editor at America (though he’s sticking around as Jesuitical’s faith formator), so we decided to interview him and give listeners a behind-the-scenes look. We talk to Eric about spiritual direction and what makes it different from counseling, the role of spiritual direction for the Jesuits and the best—and most awkward—parts of talking to the hosts about their consolations and desolations. In Signs of the Times, we share some Catholic school news: a new policy from the Archdiocese of Detroit is asking Catholic parishes and schools to stop scheduling athletic games and practices on Sundays; and Cathedral Catholic High School in San Diego has banned skirts. In our Being Frank section, where Pope Francis teaches us to be better Christians, the pope reminds us: “to throw food away means to throw people away.” And finally, we discuss why the latest article in The Atlantic on abolishing the priesthood isn’t helping us make the church better. Feel free to send us your questions, concerns, cocktail recipes or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community. This week’s episode was sponsored by Sunday to Sunday with Father Mike Russo. Links from the show: No more Sunday games for Detroit Catholic parish, school sports teams Skirts Banned From Dress Code at San Diego Private Catholic High School Throwing away food is like throwing away people, pope says The Case Against Abolishing the Priesthood What’s on tap? Just coffee because we had an earlier recording this week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 24, 2019
How this Jesuit leads the Vatican’s fight against sex abuse without losing faith Ep. 103
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Hans Zollner, S.J., has dedicated his life to protecting children from the horrific crime of sexual abuse. A psychologist and Jesuit priest, he has guided the church’s efforts to bring healing to survivors and to prevent such abuse from happening again. Father Zollner meets regularly with survivors and as one of the organizers of the Vatican summit on sexual abuse in February helped to lift up their voices. We spoke to Father Zollner back in March and asked him what concrete steps need to be taken after the summit, how hearing from survivors has shaped his perspective and how he maintains his own spiritual and mental health. In Signs of the Times, we discuss the new rules for reporting sexual abuse issued by Pope Francis as well as the pope’s remarks on the possibility of women deacons. Plus: the cardinal who went down a manhole to restore power to a homeless shelter, Asia Bibi finally joins her family in Canada and Louis Farrakhan makes anti-Semitic remarks in a Catholic Church. You can share your thoughts about the show in our Facebook group, and if you want to support the work we’re doing, please consider becoming a member of Jesuitical’s Patreon community.   Links from the show Pope Francis issues new rules for accountability and response to allegations of sexual abuse Pope Francis tells women religious church cannot alter revelation on women’s diaconate Hundreds in occupied building had no power for days. A Pope Francis aide climbed down a manhole to restore it Asia Bibi happy to be in Canada but ‘very tired’ after blasphemy ordeal, says friend Farrakhan refers to ‘Satanic Jews’ in speech at Chicago Catholic Church Cardinal Cupich apologizes for Farrakhan visit to Chicago Catholic Church   What’s on tap? Dark and Stormies   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 17, 2019
Remembering Rachel Held Evans. Ep. 102
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Like so many, we were devastated by the news of Rachel Held Evans’s death last weekend. Rachel’s willingness to write candidly and prophetically about her faith inspired countless believers and doubters. The importance of Rachel’s life and work is clear from the outpouring of grief and love that’s emerged from her death. To honor her life and legacy, we wanted to re-air our interview with Rachel from last year. We spoke to Rachel about her book, Inspired: Slaying Giants, Walking on Water, and Loving the Bible Again. Rest in peace, Rachel. In Signs of the Times, we discuss whether or not we like when priests improvise at Mass, the legacy of L’Arche founder, Jean Vanier and the new editorial director of the Vatican women’s magazine. Thoughts on this week’s show? Join the discussions happening with other Jesuitical listeners (and hosts and producers!) on our Facebook group. This week’s episode was sponsored by Sunday to Sunday with Fr. Mike Russo, a new online video series that explores the art, craft and spirituality of preaching.   Links from the show: Rachel Held Evans, Christian writer of honesty and humor, dies at age 37 Dear priests who improvise at Mass: Please don’t. Jean Vanier, ‘living saint’ who ministered to people with disabilities, dies at 90 How the University of San Francisco became the first Jesuit university to go carbon neutral Catholic officials pleased with new conscience protection rule Pope to Hairdressers: Cut Gossip, Work in ‘Christian Style’ Vatican newspaper appoints new editorial board for women’s magazine Sunday to Sunday   What’s on tap? Leftover party beer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 10, 2019
Kate Bowler on faith, cancer and the prosperity gospel. Ep. 101
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On this week’s episode, we talk with Kate Bowler, the author of the New York Times bestseller Everything Happens For A Reason (And other lies I’ve Loved). She just won a Christopher Award for the book. (The Christopher Awards were created in 1949 to celebrate authors, illustrators, writers, producers and directors whose work “affirms the highest values of the human spirit.”) Kate is a professor of Christian history at Duke Divinity School. For years, she has taught and written about the prosperity gospel, and, in Everything Happens For A Reason, she gives readers a personal perspective into what this theology represents. We talk to Kate about her memoir, what her stage-IV cancer diagnosis taught her about American Christianity, her upcoming book on evangelical Christian women leaders and more. In Signs of the Times, we discuss the terrorist attacks on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka; changes to the Roman Curia at the Vatican; Peter’s Pence and how Pope Francis donates; affordable housing in New York City; and finally, we ask: Should you vote for presidential candidate because of his or her religion? Feel free to send us your questions, concerns or cocktail recipes at jesuitical@americamedia.org, or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community. This week’s episode was sponsored by the award-winning documentary, “Hesburgh.” The film is out in select theaters nationwide today. Visit www.hesburghfilm.com/ to learn more. Links from the show: Churches padlocked, schools closed week after Sri Lanka attacks Catholic bishops condemn Poway synagogue shooting Big changes to the Vatican’s Roman Curia are coming Pope Francis donates $500,000 to help migrants in Mexico New York archdiocese opens new affordable housing List: Catholic presidential candidates since J.F.K.   What’s on tap? Lent is over—Prosecco. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 03, 2019
Jesuitical’s 100th episode: This time, Ashley, Olga and Zac answer the questions
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Zac, Olga and I have had the chance to interview some pretty incredible people over the course of 99 episodes—from Father James Martin and Sister Helen Prejean to Sarah Silverman, Audrey Assad and so many more. But this week, we’re turning the tables: To celebrate our 100th episode, former guest and CNN analyst Kirsten Powers interviews your hosts to give you a behind the scenes look at how we got here. At a live recording at the America Media headquarters in New York City, Kirsten asks us: Who’s idea was Jesuitical? What do the hosts fight about? Do we feel “censored” because we work for the Catholic Church? And what’s next for Jesuitical? A huge thank you to everyone who came out for the live show and to the Catholic Travel Centre for sponsoring the event. And thank you to everyone who listens to and supports Jesuitical. We are so grateful that we get to make this podcast, and we literally could not do it without the wonderful community that has grown up around the show over the past two years (nor would we want to). Here’s to 100 more! No Signs of the Times this week, but we’ll be back next week to sift through the Catholic news of the week so you don’t have to. Links: This episode was made possible by Catholic Travel Centre, the most trusted name in religious group travel. Visit gocatholictravel.com to learn more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 26, 2019
Should Catholics care about what happens at the Vatican? Ep. 99
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Should you care about what’s going on at the Vatican? It seems clear that you should pray for the pope and for the people making important decisions about the church’s governance, but should you follow the updates about hirings and firings, exhortations and motu proprios?   Colleen Dulle, host of America’s podcast “Inside the Vatican,” will tell you why paying attention to the Vatican regularly could become a spiritual practice and put the headlines you see about the church in context.   In Signs of the Times, we look back at Pope Francis’ trip to Morocco (his third visit to a Muslim-majority nation), ask why were there Catholic priests burning Harry Potter books in Poland and give our initial thoughts and reflections on Pope Francis’ new apostolic exhortation on young people and the church, “Christ Lives.” Oh, and we wade into the Legging Wars underway at the University of Notre Dame.   You may have heard, we’re celebrating our 100th episode this month with a live event featuring James Martin, S.J., and Kirsten Powers. You can buy tickets here. If cost is a prohibitive factor, we have complimentary tickets available thanks to a generous sponsorship from the Catholic Travel Centre. Just send me an email if you’d like one.   Links from the show: Solidarity on Tap Our Live Show!Pope Francis celebrates largest Mass in the history of Morocco Catholic priests burn Harry Potter books in Poland Northern Ireland soccer fans face ban after filmed singing anti-Catholic song Woman Begs World to Shield Her 4 Catholic Sons From Legging-Clad Butts Pope signs Apostolic Exhortation to young people   What’s on Tap? Not much. Lent is feeling extra long. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 05, 2019
Meet the two teens who started a feminist club at their all-boys Catholic school. Ep. 98
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Matias Benitez and Matt Chen are students at Regis High School in New York City, and in February of 2018, the teenagers started HeForShe, the school’s first feminist club. Every week, a dozen or so students gather after school to discuss the treatment of women and topical, sometimes difficult topics, like the Kavanaugh hearing. We talk to Matt and Matias about HeForShe, how they define feminism and what they hope fellow students learn from their club.   In Signs of the Times, following the massacre at Christchurch in New Zealand, Bishop Kevin Doran criticizes “faith-filled” Catholics who demonize Muslims. We discuss the upcoming book by our Vatican correspondent, Gerry O’Connell, on the election of Pope Francis. The founder of Women Church World, Lucetta Scaraffia, resigns as editor in chief of the all women’s magazine. And an archbishop in New Mexico reminds Catholics that “Santa Muerte” goes against church teaching.   Feel free to send us your questions, concerns or cocktail recipes at jesuitical@americamedia.org, or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community, where you can enter to win a free ticket to our live show in April. The live show, celebrating our 100th episode, will feature an introduction by James Martin, S.J., and a panel with the hosts and Kirsten Powers, a CNN political analyst and former guest on Jesuitical.   The event will be on April 24, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at America Media’s headquarters. You can find ticket information and more here.   Links from the show: Bishop criticizes 'faith-filled' Catholics who spread fear of Muslims Exclusive: Inside the election of Pope Francis Founder, board of Vatican women’s magazine quit New Mexico archbishop again denounces ‘Santa Muerte’   What’s on tap? Just water. Lent. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 29, 2019
Meet the evangelical pastor who spoke with Pope Francis (twice). Ep 97
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“Walk together, work together, love each other.” That is how Pope Francis described the journey of building Christian unity in the 21st century. Michael Rudzena is walking that path as part of the John 17 Movement, an ecumenical group dedicated to responding to the prayer of Jesus that “all who believe in me be one.” Michael was born into a Catholic family that eventually found a new spiritual home in the Baptist church. Today, he is the founding pastor of Trinity Grace Church, a non-denominational church in New York City, and is part of a group of evangelical and Pentecostal faith leaders that has met with Pope Francis to advance “a communion of friendship and love.” We asked Michael about his encounter with the pope, the internal diversity of the evangelical Christian community and the misconceptions Catholics have about evangelicals (and vice versa). In Signs of the Times, we say a prayer for Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, who recently suffered a stroke, and discuss the cases of two bishops removed from ministry over the handling of or involvement in sexual misconduct. Next, we explore what the Catholic Church says about vaccinating your children, break down which Catholic and Jesuit schools will compete in this year’s NCAA men’s basketball tournament and talk about the ways sacred spaces can be opened up to the wider community. As always, we want to hear from you! Joining our Facebook group is a great way to connect with other listeners, discuss the Catholic news of the day and share your own consolations and desolations. Also: If you can make it to New York City on April 24, we are going to be celebrating our 100th episode with a fantastic live event featuring Kirsten Powers and James Martin, S.J. More details here. Links from the show Cardinal DiNardo, USCCB president, ‘resting comfortably’ after suffering mild stroke Two bishops removed from ministry over allegations of sexual harassment Unvaccinated Student in Kentucky Sues After Being Barred From Playing Basketball Acoustics make Utah Catholic churches top venues for community concerts March Madness 2019: Catholic Schools Look To Maintain Winning Tradition What’s on tap? Lenten sacrifice. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 22, 2019
Marquette’s Markus Howard is changing the way athletes talk about mental health. Ep. 96
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Marquette University men’s basketball standout Markus Howard is having a banner year. He’s earned the Big East Conference Player of the Year award on his way to leading Marquette toward a (hopefully) deep run in the N.C.A.A. tournament. He’s also become a leading advocate for mental health care. We talk to Markus about why he decided to start going to therapy and why he started talking about it publically. Are we closer to ending the stigma surrounding mental health care? In Signs of the Times, we lament the Ethiopian Airlines crash that killed 157 people, many who worked for humanitarian agencies. We ask: was Pete Davidson’s joke comparing support for R. Kelly to support for the Catholic Church offensive? Why did an elementary school teacher tell her student to wash off his ashes on Ash Wednesday? Why was a child of a same-sex couple denied admittance to a Catholic school? Finally, what’s the future of religious life going to look like when fewer people are entering orders? This week I talked about how inspired I was by the community found on our Facebook group. It’s a great reminder that this podcast is a ministry and a community. Thank you. PS: If you haven’t joined our Facebook community, you can find it here. Feel free to send us your questions, concerns, cocktail recipes or let us know what you gave up for Lent at jesuitical@americamedia.org, or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community.   Links from the show: Catholic Relief Services Mourns The Loss Of Four Staff Killed In Ethiopian Airlines Crash Pete Davidson Compares R. Kelly to Catholic Church on Saturday Night Live Utah teacher facing discipline for making Catholic student remove Ash Wednesday mark Catholic School in Kansas Faces a Revolt for Rejecting a Same-Sex Couple’s Child 2 out of 3 religious orders had no entrants in 2018 Markus Howard brings awareness to his own mental health What’s on tap? Water, Seltzer, Tea. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 15, 2019
Meet Mireille Twayigira: Rwandan Refugee, Doctor, Education Advocate. Ep. 95
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When Mireille Twayigira was two, she fled Rwanda with her family after her father was killed in the country’s genocide. At the age of eight, she entered a Jesuit Refugee Service school in Malawi. After she graduated from secondary school as one of the best students in the country, she traveled to China, where she learned Chinese and, in 2016, graduated as a doctor.   We talk to Mireille about the role of education in her life, how her faith has kept her strong and what it means to be a symbol of hope in your 20s.   In Signs of the Times, during the 2016 presidential campaign, Michael Cohen threatened to sue Fordham University if they released Donald Trump’s grades or SAT scores. Pope Francis will open the secret archives of Pope Pius XII. Why is this significant? The Leadership Roundtable, a church reform group, has released a 40-page report that lists recommendations for dealing with the sexual abuse crisis. We discuss some of the takeaways.   And finally, we tell you what we’re giving up for Lent.   Feel free to send us your questions, concerns, cocktail recipes or let us know what you gave up for Lent at jesuitical@americamedia.org, or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community.   Links from the show: Fordham confirms Cohen threatened legal action if Trump’s grades became public Pope Francis will open the secret archives on Pope Pius XII Archdiocese to organize parish network of mental health resources Catholic leadership group offers plan to fight abuse and cover-up Pope Francis: Give up gossiping for Lent   What’s on tap? Coffee, because Lent. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 08, 2019
The Catholic nun stories that haven’t gone viral (yet). Ep. 94
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Catholics love a good nun story. A chainsaw-wielding sister cleans up after Hurricane Irma? Social media gold. Nuns playing soccer? Yes please. And who can forget Sister Jean? (Not Zac). But every day and on every continent women religious are doing life-saving, cutting-edge work in hospitals, research laboratories, refugee camps and prisons. And those are the stories Dawn Araujo-Hawkins tells as a writer for National Catholic Reporter’s Global Sisters Report.   We ask Dawn what she wished more people knew about the work of women religious, especially black sisters, and about her own experience working as a person of color in the mostly white Catholic media world.   In Signs of the Times, we bring you the top takeaways from the Vatican’s historic summit on child sexual abuse and discuss the case of Cardinal George Pell, the highest-level church official ever to be convicted of abusing a minor. Next, Pope Francis plans to write an apostolic exhortation on last year’s youth synod. What is an apostolic exhortation and why should we care? And finally, a new poll shows growing support for pro-life positions.   You can let us know what you think about our conversation with Dawn or any of our stories in our Facebook group. And thanks as always to our supporters on Patreon!   Signs of the Times Vatican sex abuse summit: what you need to know Cardinal Pell, most senior Catholic charged with child sex abuse, convicted, Vatican Cardinal Pell news is ‘painful’ and he has right to defend himself to the end Pope to issue post-synod document on young people in March New poll: Big majorities of Democrats and young people reject late-term abortion   What’s on tap? Sevenhill Cellars Inigo (Jesuit-made!) Riesling Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 01, 2019
What in the hell? How Vinson Cunningham imagines the afterlife. Ep. 93
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Vinson Cunningham doesn’t meet many people who believe in hell—but he still does. We sit down with Vinson, who is staff writer at the New Yorker, to discuss his recent essay “How the Idea of Hell Has Shaped the Way We Think.”   We talk about our first memories of hell, how it still impacts our lives and our culture, and why it might be easier to describe hell than heaven.   In Signs of the Times, we look at the laicization of former cardinal Theodore McCarrick and preview the Vatican’s summit on sexual abuse. Sister Norma Pimentel, a former guest on Jesuitical, runs into conflict with the city commissioners of McAllen, Tex. And could contactless payment be on the way for church donations? One cluster of parishes in Dublin, Ireland, is trialing it, and we are here for it.   We want to hear from you! One great place to do that—and chat with other Jesuitical listeners—is our Facebook group. We’re sharing news and consolations and desolations throughout the week.   Links from the show: “How the Idea of Hell Has Shaped the Way We Think.” Vatican sex abuse summit: what you need to know Vatican emphasizes transparency and accountability at upcoming sex abuse summit Former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick laicized by Pope Francis New York gives sex abuse victims more time to sue, press charges Border city to close Catholic Charities center run by Sister Norma Pimentel Catholic Church To Trial Contactless Payment For Donations More of Vinson Cunningham’s writing   What’s on tap? Wild Turkey Bourbon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 22, 2019
Will the sex abuse crisis ever end? Ep. 92
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This week, America and Spoke Studios published “Deliver Us,” a new podcast about the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church. Maggi van Dorn is the host and executive producer of “Deliver Us.” Following the release of the Pennslyvania grand jury report last summer, Maggi, like so many Catholics in the United States, found herself asking: How did could happen? And what, if anything, could Catholics do to help? She put her resources and audio skills together and decided to create “Deliver Us,” which features survivors, experts and advocates discussing ways in which the church and Catholics can move forward. We talk to Maggi about how the podcast centers the stories of survivors and what it means to be hopeful as a Catholic during this crisis. In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis has, for the first time, acknowledged the abuse of Catholic sisters. We discuss why this matters and what it shows us about the sex abuse crisis. Last month, Nicolás Maduro was sworn in as Venezuela’s president, which has led to protests across the country. Political leaders, including President Trump, state that the rightful president is Juan Guaidó, head of Venezuela’s National Assembly. Pope Francis has stated that he is “always available” to assist diplomatically but that these negotiations can only occur if both sides ask for help. Pope Francis has a history of getting involved in Latin America. Why does this matter?   On Feb. 7, the Supreme Court allowed the execution of Domineque Ray, a Muslim death-row inmate in Alabama, to proceed without an imam; and a young Catholic asks the pope to go vegan for Lent. Finally, we ask: Do you have an obligation to attend your local parish?   Feel free to send us your questions, concerns or cocktail recipes to jesuitical@americamedia.org, or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community.   Links from the show: Women religious organization issues statement on abuse of sisters Nun’s Rape Case Against Bishop Shakes a Catholic Bastion in India U.S. bishops condemn court's denial of imam's presence at execution Francis expresses openness to Vatican mediation in Venezuela Venezuela opposition envoys visit Vatican, Rome officials to press Juan Guaido's cause Open letter asks Pope Francis to adopt vegan diet during Lent   What’s on tap? Coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 15, 2019
How do we talk about consent on Catholic campuses? Ep. 91
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In recent years, there has been a lot of debate around the word “consent” when it comes to preventing sexual assault on campus. What can Catholic colleges and universities bring to these discussions? To find out, we talk with Brianna Maturi, who leads Loyola Marymount University's consent program, called LMU Cares. We ask Brianna about the hook-up and dating scene on campuses today, what a culture of consent looks like after college and what bystanders can do prevent sexual assault and harassment. In Signs of the Times, we discuss Pope Francis’ historic trip to the Arabian Peninsula and Cuba’s newest Catholic Church. Next, how should bishops respond when Catholic politicians support abortions. And in Midwest news: The bishops in Illinois come out against the legalization of recreational marijuana, and the University of Notre Dame covers up murals of Christopher Columbus. Let us know what you think about our conversation with Brianna or any of these stories on our Facebook page or Twitter. And please consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Also: If you want to learn more about Pope Francis’ trip to the U.A.E., check out the latest episode of Inside the Vatican, from our colleague and friend of the podcast, Colleen Dulle. Links from the show Pope Francis to world’s religious leaders: We build the future together or there will be no future Cuba’s first church inauguration since the revolution Canon law examined in wake of push for excommunication over abortion Illinois Bishops Advise Against Legalization of Marijuana University of Notre Dame to Cover Up Prominent Columbus Murals How one Catholic university is trying to create a culture of consent   What’s on tap Margaret River Distilling Co.’s Giniversity, provided by our friends at Adelaide’s Catholic Office for Youth and Young Adults and Pub Theology Adelaide Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 08, 2019
Live from Australia: How young Catholics are changing the church (also kangaroos). Ep. 90
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This week, Jesuitical is coming to you live from Australia. We’ve mastered driving on the left side of the road (sort of); we got up close and personal with a kangaroo; and even though Ashley tried to leave me to drown in the Great Barrier Reef, we managed to record this week’s episode.   On our first international trip, we headlined the Archdiocese of Adelaide’s World Youth Day celebrations. In addition to leading workshops and giving a few talks, we recorded this live show. In Signs of the Times, we talk about Pope Francis’ visit to Panama for World Youth Day, review the pope’s new prayer app, “Click to Pray,” look at a few stories from the Australian church, and break down the Covington Catholic controversy.   In our interview, we chat with Sebastian Duhau, Australia’s representative at the Synod on Young People. We look at the Synod’s final document and talk about what still needs to be done to have young people lead in the Catholic Church.   P.S. A HUGE thank you to the Catholic Office for Youth & Young Adults at the Archdiocese of Adelaide for inviting us to the other side of the planet and for being amazing hosts.   What’s on Tap? Adelaide’s own Coopers Birell low-alcohol beer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 01, 2019
How the New Wave Feminists are changing the conversation around abortion
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In 2004, Destiny Herndon-De La Rosa founded New Wave Feminists, a pro-life feminist organization dedicated to changing the divisive language surrounding the abortion debate. New Wave works to give women the support and resources needed to make motherhood a feasible option. Destiny was inspired to form the pro-life feminist organization by her own experience as a young mother. Destiny is one of the few people who has attended the Women’s March and the March for Life in the same weekend in good faith. (Two years ago, Destiny and New Wave made headlines after they were removed as sponsors of the Women’s March because they were pro-life, but Destiny and her colleagues marched there anyway.) This week, Destiny will be at the Women’s March and the March for Life yet again. We talk to Destiny about her advocacy and how to create dialogue within and outside the pro-life feminist movement. In Signs of the Times, the president and the Catholic Church battle over La Lomita Chapel on the U.S.-Mexico border. In sex abuse news, the Northeast Province of the Jesuits release the names of all clergy accused of sexual abuse since 1950. A new Gallup survey says the crisis has led Catholics to lose faith in church leaders. We remember the life of Bishop Joseph Howze, the first black bishop to lead a U.S. diocese, who died at the age of 95 on Jan. 9. In international news, a new art exhibit featuring a crucified Ronald McDonald angers Christians in Israel. Finally, the Vatican officially launches a new track team, which includes nuns, priests and migrants. Feel free to send us your questions, concerns or cocktail recipes to jesuitical@americamedia.rog, or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community. Next week, we will be in Australia and you can follow along on Patreon and social media! A special thanks this week to “Catholic Health USA,” the podcast of the Catholic Health Association. Make sure to listen and download! Links from the show: Trump, Catholic Church Battle Over Chapel in Way of Border Wall USA Northeast Province releases names of Jesuits credibly accused of sexual abuse Catholics are losing faith in clergy and church after sexual abuse scandal, Gallup survey says Bishop Howze, founding bishop of Diocese of Biloxi, Miss., dies at 95 Haifa Catholic Church Leader Blasts 'McJesus' Sculpture: 'What's Suitable for Europe Isn't Suitable for Us' The Vatican’s New Track Team Includes Priests, Nuns and a Scholar   What’s on tap? Lemon ginger tea Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 18, 2019
The Catholic Church has a leadership problem. Lay people can help.
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The Catholic Church, according to this week’s guest, is facing not one but two crises. The first is the sexual abuse of children and its cover-up; the second is a complete break down of trust in church leadership. Kerry Alys Robinson has been working to confront both over a decade as the founding executive director of Leadership Roundtable, a group that brings together clergy, religious and laypeople to promote the best practices in the areas of finance, human resources and management. We ask Kerry about the biggest obstacles to greater lay involvement in church governance, what concrete steps the bishops and laypeople can take to restore trust and protect children, and how women and mothers, in particular, can lead the way. In Signs of the Times this week, we take a look at the religious make-up of the new Congress and discuss an update to the church’s teaching on hysterectomies. Plus: The U.S. bishops are on retreat to pray about the sex abuse crisis. Should they be doing something instead? And finally, a laywoman is picked to head a parish in New Haven—and the layman who has pretended to be a priest for 18 years is finally caught. You can let us know what you think about our conversation with Kerry or any of our stories in our Facebook group. And thanks as always to our supporters on Patreon!     Links from the show How many members of the new Congress are Catholic? Jesuit priest remains House Chaplain in new Congress Hysterectomy can be morally licit in limited situations, Vatican says Why are the bishops praying about the abuse crisis instead of doing something about it? Sex Abuse Crisis: What dioceses have released names (so far)? Bishop Announces New Leadership Model At St. Anthony Shocking: Man Caught Pretending to be a Catholic Priest After 18 Years, Here’s the Details   What’s on tap? The alcoholic drink that’s even better for you than wine Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 11, 2019
Sister Helen Prejean fought the death penalty—and won. Ep. 87
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  Sister Helen Prejean has been the face of the anti-death penalty movement for decades. A member of the Congregation of St. Joseph, Sister Helen has been accompanying inmates on death row and lobbying against capital punishment in the United States (and in the church) for decades. She blew up on the national scene for her book Dead Man Walking, which was adapted into an Oscar-winning film, and she was crucial to the Vatican’s eventual decision to ban the death penalty in the Catechism. We talk to Sister Helen about how she became an anti-death penalty activist and how the fight against the death penalty has changed throughout the years—and how “sneaky Jesus” changed her life forever. In Signs of the Times, we talk about two Jesuit provinces releasing the names of more than 150 priests and other ministry leaders who were found to have “credible allegations” of sexual abuse. We break down a few “nun” stories and ask an important question before we go on break for Christmas: How can parishes welcome newcomers at Christmas Masses? On that note, we just wanted to thank everyone in the Jesuitical community: Whether you are a Patreon supporter, Facebook group poster (or lurker), or a casual listener—the whole Jesuitical team wishes you the peace and joy of the baby Jesus this Christmas. We’ll see you in the New Year. Links from the show: Two Jesuit provinces release 153 names of accused abusers Dear @POTUS: The Nun Who Tweets a Daily Prayer to President Trump 2 Nuns Accused Of Embezzling $500,000 From Catholic School Pope Francis will visit Abu Dhabi ‘Of Gods and Men’ monks beatified Detroit’s Back to Christmas Campaign     What’s on tap? Bob Dylan’s Double Barrel Rye Whiskey, courtesy of our colleague Ed Schmidt, S.J. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 14, 2018
Thinking about your death will make you a better Catholic Ep. 86
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“Reflecting on death is not a morbid affair,” believes Sister Theresa Aletheia, “it is a healthy and often healing practice that helps us accept the inevitable with hope.” Sister Theresa is a self-proclaimed #MediaNun with the Daughters of Saint Paul and the founder of the Memento Mori Project, an online revival in which she offers daily reflections about death.   This week, we talk to Sister Theresa about her faith journey and why Catholics should imagine their deaths, especially during Advent. Inspired by Blessed James Alberione, the founder of her order, Sister Theresa placed a ceramic skull on her desk and began tweeting about memento mori, Latin for “remember you will die,” in 2017. She says it’s impossible to value life without paying proper attention to what it means to die, and that the practice has enabled her to be more present in her daily life. In Signs of the Times, investigators in Texas executed a search warrant at the offices of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, headed by Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, following complaints from survivors on how DiNardo and his staff handled their abuse allegations. In a soon to be published book, Pope Francis is quoted as saying that he is worried about homosexuality in the priesthood. Catholic priests in England and Wales received new identification cards.   Finally, we discuss Pope Francis’ thoughts on consumerism: “Consumerism is a great disease today. I am not saying that we all do this, no. But consumerism, spending more than we need, is a lack of austerity in life; this is an enemy of generosity.” How should we reflect on these words during the Christmas season?   Feel free to send us your questions, concerns or cocktail recipes to jesuitical@americamedia.rog, or join us for discussion on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community. And, if you’re looking for some last minute Christmas gift ideas, check out some Jesuit Swag.   Links from the show: As investigation hits home diocese, can Cardinal DiNardo continue to lead on the abuse crisis? In new book, Pope Francis says he is worried about homosexuality in the priesthood Catholic priests issued with photo cards to confirm their identities Consumerism is the enemy of generosity, pope says   What’s on tap? Bon Appetit Best Masala Chai made by America’s own, Vivian Cabrera Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 07, 2018
Juan Carlos Cruz: the survivor who changed the pope’s mind on sex abuse. Ep. 85
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Juan Carlos Cruz was abused by the notorious predator Fernando Karadima, a Chilean Catholic priest. For years, the Catholic Church in Chile disregarded the abuse allegations against the powerful cleric. One cardinal even told Juan Carlos it was hard to believe he was a victim because he is gay and “might have liked it.” When Pope Francis visited Chile earlier this year, he initially dismissed as “slander” allegations from Juan Carlos and other victims that a bishop had covered up Karadima’s abuse. Yet Juan Carlos persisted and, by sharing his story, has changed the church in Chile and given hope to many other survivors.   We ask Juan Carlos: What it’s like to feel betrayed by the pope—and to have the pope ask for your forgiveness? What concrete steps do Pope Francis and the church need to take to protect and bring healing to survivors of sexual abuse?   In Signs of the Times, the International Union of Superiors General is urging sisters who have been abused to report the crimes to police and their superiors, more details emerge about February’s global summit on sex abuse at the Vatican and Catholics respond to the migrant crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border. Plus, we discuss the U.S. bishops’ new pastoral letter on racism. It’s been 40 years since the bishops have spoken together on racial justice. Does this statement go far enough?   Let us know what you think about our conversation with Juan Carlos or any of these stories on our Facebook page or Twitter. And please consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community.   Also: If you want to learn more about the Vatican’s meeting on sex abuse, check out the latest episode of Inside the Vatican, a new podcast from our colleague and friend of the podcast, Colleen Dulle.   Links from the show: Catholic Nuns Urge Sisters Around the World to Report Sexual Abuse to Police Exclusive: Archbishop Scicluna says February meeting start of ‘global approach’ to fighting sex abuse Caravan migrants join long queue of asylum seekers in Tijuana U.S. bishops adopt new anti-racism letter, first in almost 40 years   What’s on tap? Holy Water, courtesy of Zac’s mom and future in-laws: Peach schnapps, vodka, blue curaçao, Crystal Lite lemonade. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 30, 2018
Catholic women are leaving the church. This group wants them to lead it. Ep. 84
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The Catholic Church is failing to engage Catholic women. A groundbreaking survey of Catholic women published by America earlier this year found that 26 percent rarely or never attend Mass; 27 percent only attend a few times a year; and 67 percent of Catholic women have never served in a parish in any ministry. The GIVEN Institute is trying to fix that. This week we chat with Elise Italiano, the group’s executive director, about what they’re doing to help Catholic women lead inside and outside the church. On Signs of the Times, our weekly Catholic news roundup, we scratch our heads at the U.S. bishops’ inaction on sexual abuse at the annual meeting in Baltimore, look at the next U.S.-born #Blessed, see how an N.B.A. rookie is helping out his Catholic high school, and more. Links from the show: Given Institute Vatican tells U.S. bishops to delay votes on new sex abuse protocols Pope Francis appoints Archbishop Scicluna to top role in addressing abuse crisis Jesuits to release names of accused priests in the west Pope recognizes martyrdom of U.S. Christian Brother Kevin Knox’s deal with Puma also benefits Tampa Catholic’s basketball program What’s on tap? Trappist Ale from Spencer Brewery, courtesy of listeners (and Patreon supporters!) Stephen and Dina Grant. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 16, 2018
How Catholics influence U.S. politics Ep. 83
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Stephen P. Millies is the author of Good Intentions: A History of Catholic Voters’ Road from Roe to Trump. In his book, Stephen analyzes the history of the Catholic vote, from the Supreme Court’s decision in Roe v. Wade to the presidential elections of 2016.   We talk to Stephen about the role of Catholics in U.S. politics and why so many Catholics feel politically homeless and the 2018 midterm elections. (Full disclosure: Our interview with Stephen happened a week before the elections.)   In Signs of the Times, first up, November just started, but Christmas is already making headlines: Bishop Edward Braxton of Belleville, Ill., tells kids at Our Lady of Peace that Santa Claus isn’t real. Next, The Boston Globe and the Philadelphia Inquirer co-published an article on Nov. 4 analyzing the second wave of the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church.   And finally, we discuss the decision by the Supreme Court to overturn the death sentence of Asia Bibi, a 47-year-old Pakistani Catholic who has been in prison since 2009 and was sentenced to death in November 2010 on charges of blasphemy against the Prophet Mohammed. Following the court’s decision, Bibi remained in prison due to safety concerns; however, since Tuesday’s recording, Bibi has been freed.   Links from the show: Parents angry after Illinois bishop tells Catholic school kids that Santa isn’t real Pakistani Christians fear violence after Asia Bibi’s blasphemy death sentence is overturned Newspapers examine U.S. bishops’ responses to abuse allegations   What’s on tap? Yuengling Lager Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 09, 2018
You have to visit the border to understand the migrant caravan. Ep. 82
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Family separations, the caravan, birthright citizenship—immigration stories have dominated the headlines in the lead-up to the 2018 midterms. But for Sister Norma Pimentel, who has worked on the U.S.-Mexico border for decades, migration is not a political issue; it is a human issue. As the executive director of Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley, Sister Norma accompanies migrants who cross the border seeking asylum and a better life for their families.   We ask Sister Norma how her work has changed under the Trump administration, who is really traveling with the migrant caravan and why, and what we can do to help our immigrant brothers and sisters at the border and in our communities.   [Explore America’s in-depth coverage of immigration]   In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis denounced as “inhuman” the anti-Semitic attack on the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburg that left 11 dead and six injured and prayed that we may overcome “hotbeds of hate.” And in Kentucky, a white man shot and killed two African-Americans at a grocery store after failing to gain access to a predominantly black church.   Next, the synod on young people came to a close on Oct. 28; we bring you the top takeaways from the synod’s final document. Finally, a new app is being described as Pokémon Go for Catholics. Is this what synod participants had in mind when they said the church needs to reach young people online?   Let us know what you think about our conversation with Sister Norma or any of these stories on our Facebook page or Twitter. And please consider supporting Jesuitical by becoming a member of our Patreon community.   Links from the show Pope Francis denounces attack on Pittsburgh synagogue, expresses closeness to Jewish community On Squirrel Hill by The Unorthodox podcast Kroger Shooting Suspect Tried to Enter Black Church Before Killing 2, Police Say Closing the synod, Pope Francis highlights “the three fundamental steps on the journey of faith”   New app blends Pokemon Go with catechesis for young users Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley What’s on tap? Birthday Girl’s Choice: Luna Nuda Pinot Grigio   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 02, 2018
A good Catholic meddles in politics (and votes in the Midterms) Ep. 81
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The nuns are back (on the bus). Headed by Sister Simone Campbell, the executive director of NETWORK Lobby for Catholic Social Justice, the almost-annual campaign (they’ve traveled six of the last seven years), is traveling across the country to raise awareness about the 2017 Tax Cut and Jobs Act and its impact on social services and local communities.   The nuns stopped at the Church of the Redeemer in Morristown, N.J., where we caught up with Sister Simone, S.S.S. and Sister Richelle Friedman, P.B.V.M., about what’s wrong with the new tax bill, what’s at stake in the upcoming midterm elections and why good Catholics should “meddle” in politics.   This episode of Jesuitical is proudly sponsored by Catholic Women Preach, celebrating two years sharing the wisdom and witness of women breaking open the Word. Visit catholicwomenpreach.org for video, text and podcasts of weekly preaching on the Sunday Scriptures.   Links from the show: Nuns on the Bus Faith in Focus with Fr. James Martin Inside the Vatican Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 26, 2018
Christians have been in Iraq for thousands of years. They might all be gone soon.
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Kevin Clarke is the chief correspondent at America. Recently, he traveled to Iraq for 12 days where he met with Iraqi Christians and other religious minorities. We talk to Kevin about why he decided to take this trip and the future of Christianity in that region. (You can check out Kevin’s reporting here.) In Signs of the Times, we discuss the canonization of Saint Óscar Romero, the resignation of Cardinal Wuerl, the archbishop of Washington, D.C., and why women aren’t allowed to vote at this year’s Synod on Young People. As always, you can email us at jesuitical@americamedia.org or tweet us on Twitter. You can also join our Facebook group and consider supporting us on Patreon!   P.S. This episode is brought to you by Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Chicago. For 23 years, Cristo Rey has educated Latino students with limited means, preparing the leaders of tomorrow today. Learn about their mission at cristorey.net.   Links from the show: Pope Francis declares Pope Paul VI, Óscar Romero saints Pope Francis accepts the resignation of Cardinal Wuerl Jesuit, Dominican, Franciscan leaders see no reason why women shouldn’t vote at synod   What’s on tap? This week, we are drinking a gift from listener Bridget: a special blend, Cafe St. Joe, from Furnace Hills Coffee, a fair- and direct-trade coffee roaster who employs adults with disabilities. You can buy your own here!   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 19, 2018
Haley Stewart’s Catholic guide to living simply. Ep. 79
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I’m sure I am not the only city dweller who sometimes fantasizes about putting in my two-weeks notice and escaping to a dude ranch in Wyoming or an organic pumpkin farm in Nebraska (or wherever they grow pumpkins). The ever-increasing rent, the dirty, dysfunctional subway, the nonstop noise and pressure to not just keep up but get ahead—it all makes me question why I moved to New York. Well this week’s guest Haley Stewart and her husband did drop out of the rat race and move to a farm (without flush toilets! with three young kids!)—but she thinks you can build a simpler and more intentional life in the city or the suburbs, out in the country or right on campus. We ask Haley about her escape from the “throwaway culture,” how to pray through drastic life changes and why she loves Molly Weasley (yes, that Molly Weasley). In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis gets invited to North Korea, but his favorability is dropping in the United States. The synod on young people is underway at the Vatican, the Nuns on the Bus are back on tour and Lady Liberty may get a West Coast (Catholic) counterpart. As always, you can keep in touch via our Facebook group and Twitter @jesuiticalshow or emailing us at jesuitical@americamedia.org. Please consider helping Jesuitical keep the mics on by supporting the show on Patreon—every little bit helps! Links from the show Kim Jong Un invites Pope Francis to North Korea Pew Poll: Pope Francis’ favorability numbers drop, and worse for handling of abuse Synod 2018 Day 1: Migrants, sex abuse and church credibility ‘Nuns On The Bus’ For ‘Tax Justice Truth Tour’ En Route To Trump’s Mar-a-Lago Diocese of San Diego launching statue of Mary Inspired by Lady Liberty for San Ysidro   What’s on tap? Maple whiskey Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 12, 2018
Lakota and Catholic: Jesuit education on the Pine Ridge Reservation
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“My hope is that we can learn that we can be indigenous and all these other things: Catholic, worldly, a diplomat, a scientist, etc. My hope is that being indigenous is not limited,” said Maka Clifford in the pages of America last year. Maka is the director of curriculum and assessment at the Red Cloud Indian School, a Catholic school led by the Jesuits and the Lakota people. Maka was born on the Pine Ridge Reservation and graduated from Red Cloud in 2005. After studying in California, New York and Japan, Maka realized his calling to be involved in indigenous studies and human rights. He returned to Red Cloud in 2013. We talk to Maka about what it means to be a Lakota Catholic, the controversial history of Jesuit-run and boarding schools, Lakota spirituality and teaching indigenous students in 2018.   Last week, the editors of America stated that the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court should be withdrawn. We discuss the magazine’s previous support of the nomination and why the editors decided to withdraw it.   In sexual abuse news, Pope Francis laicizes Chile’s Fernando Karadima. “The Better Church Governance Group” is a new organization founded by wealthy Catholics to investigate the College of Cardinals. And for the feast of St. Francis, we have a story about a dog that completes the Camino de Santiago.   As always, you can email us at jesuitical@americamedia.org or tweet us on Twitter. You can also join our Facebook group and consider supporting us on Patreon!   This episode is brought to you by Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Chicago. For 23 years, Cristo Rey has educated Latino students with limited means, preparing the leaders of tomorrow today. Learn about their mission at cristorey.net.   Looking for an event in your neighborhood? Check out when the Ignatian Solidarity Network is hosting a “Solidarity On Tap” near you!   Links from the show: The Editors: It is time for the Kavanaugh nomination to be withdrawn Pope Francis defrocks Chilean priest at center of sexual abuse scandal Wealthy Catholics to target Cardinals with ‘Red Hat Report’ A dog that has completed the Camino de Santiago comes to Rome Jewish husband and wife to be first married couple knighted by the Vatican   What’s on tap? Mulled cider (on the rocks), Jack’s Winter Cider whiskey, one cinnamon stick, one star anise, ice Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 05, 2018
A survivor of sex abuse on how the church can help victims. Ep.77
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“[The sex abuse crisis is] not something that I think can be fixed by our priests alone,” Amanda Zamora told us this week. “The pain and the harm has been caused by the church and the solution will need to come from the church—and that includes all of us.” Amanda is the chief audience officer at the Texas Tribune, which she joined in 2016. Previously, she spent 13 years on the East Coast working for organizations like The Huffington Post Investigative Fund, The Washington Post and ProPublica. She recently wrote an article co-published in the Texas Tribune and the Washington Post called “I’m a Catholic survivor of abuse. I still want to hear the church say it’s sorry.” Amanda shared her own experience of surviving abuse within her family and how that has influenced her perspective on the church’s crisis.   In Signs of the Times we give an update on a couple of international stories we’ve been following and discuss a story from Chicago involving a priest burning a flag bearing a rainbow and a cross. We also look at a new policy for reporting sex abuse outlined by the U.S. bishops, and how some churches are using coffeehouse culture to evangelize and work for justice. Have you checked out our Facebook group yet? It’s a great way to talk about the episode and other Catholic news with other Jesuitical listeners. And as always, you can stay in touch via email, Twitter and Patreon.    Links from the show: I'm a Catholic survivor of abuse. I still want to hear the church say it's sorry. Pope Francis recognizes Chinese bishops ordained without papal approval Indian bishop accused of raping nun is arrested U.S. Catholic Church creates new process for reporting misconduct by its bishops Flag-burning priest removed from Avondale parish by Cardinal Cupich These Catholic coffee shops take evangelization to new grounds Facebook Group Twitter Patreon   What’s on Tap? Angry Orchard’s Rosé Cider, because 👏Fall 👏 Is 👏 Here!👏   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 28, 2018
Stephanie Saldaña on love, loss and memory in the Middle East
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He was a French novice living in a desert monastery in Syria. She was a journalist from Texas who wanted to become a nun. Then, they fell in love. I know, it sounds like a rom-com. But that is, in fact, how this week’s guest, Stephanie Saldaña, met her husband—and it’s not even the most fascinating part of her story. Today, Stephanie lives with her family in Jerusalem where she writes and teaches. In 2016, she started Mosaic Stories, a project that seeks to preserve the cultural heritage of the war-torn Middle East. We ask Stephanie what lessons the monastery has for family life, what she has learned raising children in a conflict zone and what her unique path to marriage taught her about discerning between two loves. In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis announces a summit of sex abuse and sources say the Vatican and China are close to a deal over the status of bishops; Catholics and Buddhists team up to provide green housing for seniors; a bishop skydives for donations; a new institute prepares Catholic women for leadership; and thousands of Latino Catholics gather in Texas for V Encuentro. Have you checked out our Facebook group yet? It’s a great place to keep up with Catholic news between shows and share your own consolations and desolations. You can also find us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, support us on Patreon and send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org. Also, Jesuit swag. Get some. Links from the show: An Impossible Hope: Three men in Syria showed me what Jesus looks like. Resignations, Rome meetings and investigations: A week of major developments in the sexual abuse crisis Developing Story | Pope Francis meets with bishops about the sexual abuse crisis China and Vatican to Sign Landmark Deal Over Bishops DiMarzio says ‘Laudato si’ to flower in Brooklyn with green housing Bishop takes a (sky) dive to get pilgrims to Lourdes Women’s Catholic leadership program, GIVEN Institute, officially launches More than 3,000 Latino Catholics expected at Encuentro gathering What’s on tap? Everything but the kitchen sink. Cleaning out the fridge/liquor cabinet to make room for PSL cocktails. Miller Lite for Zac, a lager for Olga and tequila for me. Cheers! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 21, 2018
Synod on Youth preview: How will we keep young people in the church?
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Next month, the Vatican will hold the Synod of bishops on young people. Earlier this year, in preparation for the October gathering, the Vatican hosted 300 delegates from around the world. These delegates met in Rome and produced an 11-page document, titled “Young People, The Faith and Vocational Discernment.” One of the delegates selected by the U.S.C.C.B. was Katie Prejean McGrady. She is a writer, podcaster, Catholic speaker and author of Follow: Your Lifelong Adventure with Jesus. We talk to Katie about her work at the pre-synod gathering, how the sexual abuse crisis shows we need the synod now more than ever and what the church can do to keep young Catholics in the faith. In Signs of the Times, thousands in India joined nuns of the Missionaries of Jesus congregation last week to call for the arrest of Bishop Franco Mulakkal, who has been accused of rape. We also discuss the latest updates to the U.S. sexual abuse crisis, including the launching of investigations into clerical sexual abuse in dioceses across the country. Finally, some Catholic school news: the first Catholic school to open up in Baltimore in decades will be named after Mary Lange, who opened the first school in the United States for black children; and Kolbe Academy in Pennsylvania will be the first Catholic high school for students battling addiction. As always, you can email us at jesuitical@americamedia.org or tweet us on Twitter. You can also join our Facebook group and consider supporting us on Patreon! Links from the show: Indian nuns demand arrest of bishop accused of rape Vatican officials knew of McCarrick allegations in 2000, letter confirms States Round up of newly announced investigations into clerical sexual abuse 1st Catholic high school for students battling addiction opening in Bethlehem area Baltimore’s new Catholic school to be named after African American nun What’s on tap? St. Germain spritzer Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 14, 2018
"I can't date Jesus": A conversation with Michael Arceneaux
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Michael Arceneaux has stopped going to church. After growing up as a gay black Catholic in the South, he eventually decided that he could not find a way to integrate his identities into the Catholicism he grew up with. In his new memoir: I Can’t Date Jesus: Love, Sex, Family, Race, and Other Reasons I’ve Put My Faith in Beoncé, Michael describes how coming out as gay led to tension and conflict with people like his mother, still a devout Catholic. But Michael hasn’t given up on God just yet. In fact, in I Can’t Date Jesus he describes taking a friend up on an invitation to go to a church service. There he met a pastor and theologian who “really understands the Bible wasn’t just repeating verses kind of like the equivalent (as I put in the book) like a talking head on cable news… He was far more informed than me so I actually learned something from the conversation. I found it elevating.”    Michael told us how he wished he had been able to have conversations like that earlier in his life. “I think if you caught me much earlier around the time when I was generally trying to still be in church…you would have probably been able to keep me there.” This week in Signs of the Times we break down the explosive letter that was released over the weekend by Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò accusing many church leaders—including Pope Francis—of covering up the misconduct and crimes of former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick. Thank you all so much for sharing your thoughts and struggles and joys with us in in our Facebook group, Twitter and with your emails. A special shout out to our supporters on Patreon: Your financial support makes this show possible. Thank you. If you’ve been on the fence about visiting our Patreon page—there’s no time like right now! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 31, 2018
We don’t use religious words anymore. That’s a problem.
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When was the last time you talked about faith with a friend? If you’re listening to this podcast, maybe you don’t mind dropping words like “sin,” “grace” and “confession” in casual conversations. But most Americans, according to Jonathan Merritt, have forgotten or never learned how to “speak God”—and that’s bad news for people who care about the future of the church. We ask Jonathan, an award-winning religion writer, podcast host and author of the new book Learning to Speak God from Scratch, why spiritual conversations matter, how we can save endangered sacred words and what distinguishes Catholic and Protestant approaches to language. This week in Signs of the Times we focus on one story that’s been on all of our minds: the unfolding sexual abuse crisis in the U.S. Catholic Church. We bring you up to speed on developments since the release of the Pennsylvania grand jury report on Aug. 14, ask how the church got here and discuss possible ways forward as the church seeks to bring healing to victims and accountability to priests and bishops who for decades committed and covered up horrific crimes against children. Let us know how you are processing the news and let know when you are (or aren’t) finding God in all this by reaching out in our Facebook group and Twitter @jesuiticalshow or emailing us at jesuitical@americamedia.org. Please consider helping Jesuitical keep the mics on by supporting the show on Patreon—every little bit helps! Links from the show Pennsylvania report documents over 1,000 victims of priest abuse Vatican: Pope Francis is on the side of the victims of Pennsylvania abuse Bishops around U.S. respond with ‘sorrow’ to abuse report, vow to act Pennsylvania prelate says bishops who hid abuse should resign Pope Francis issues new letter on sex abuse: ‘We showed no care for the little ones’ Don’t blame the sex abuse crisis on queer Catholics What’s on tap? Brooklyn Brewery East IPA Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 24, 2018
Julio Ricardo Varela on being the only Latino (rebel) in a room. Ep. 72
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“Being the only Latino means that while the white men get to disagree with each other and develop idiosyncratic or counterintuitive arguments, you can never just say how you feel or what you think about a story,” wrote Julio Ricardo Varela in America. “Instead, you always have to frame your comments in a way that responds to the needs of the 56.5 million people who share some part of your identity.”   Julio is a Puerto Rican journalist. Along with writing for Latino Rebels, a website he founded in 2011 that provides news, analysis and commentary about U.S. Latino culture, he is the co-host of the Webby-nominated “In The Thick” podcast with Maria Hinojosa and a contributor to Latino USA on NPR. On this week’s episode, we talk to Julio about working in media as a Latino, Hurricane Maria, the sexual abuse crisis and more.   In Signs of the Times, a giant Pope Francis scarecrow wins a competition in Ireland; and a 27-year-old pastor starts GodSquad Church to bring God to the gamer community. In Argentina, where abortion is illegal in most cases, the Senate voted down a bill that would have legalized abortion through 14 weeks of pregnancy. What made the difference between Argentina and the referendum in Ireland earlier this year that legalized abortion? In Peru, Jesuit priest Carlos Riudavets Montes was found murdered on Aug. 10.   Finally, we bring you the latest developments on the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church, including the grand jury report from Pennsylvania and reports on two Benedictine abbey schools in England.   We know it has been a difficult week trying to process what it means to be Catholic during this crisis. Part of the reason we do this is to help all our listeners process moments such as these. You can email us at jesuitical@americamedia.org or tweet us on Twitter. Please feel free to also join our Facebook group, where members this week followed a live panel featuring Ashley and Zac on an intergenerational discussion on how Catholics are responding to the sexual abuse crisis and shared their own questions and comments about the crisis.   Links from the show: Giant straw Pope Francis wins annual scarecrow festival in Ireland An online church for gamers: Va. pastor draws thousands to worship on Twitch Details of second letter priest sent to Cardinal O’Malley describing McCarrick abuse Pennsylvania report documents over 1,000 victims of priest abuse New reports of sexual abuse rock Benedictine abbey schools in England The abortion debate in Argentina vs. Ireland: what made the difference? Jesuit priest murdered in Peru   What’s on tap? Luna Vida pinot grigio Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 17, 2018
The one where two of the Jesuitical hosts get engaged. Ep. 71
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Did you miss us? Jesuitical is BACK from its summer break and we are sunsprayed, rested and ready to hit the studio for a new season. We also have some pretty big personal news to share, so tune in for some life updates. We also loved getting to spend some more time talking with listeners during the break, both on- and offline. Our online communities like Patreon, Twitter and our Facebook groupcontinue to grow, and we’ve been blessed with some visits to America’s offices over the past month. We asked the members of our Facebook group for guest suggestions for the upcoming season, and one name that came up more than once was Sister Simone Campbell. Sister Simone is the leader of Nuns on the Bus and executive director of NETWORK Lobby for Catholic Social Justice—and also a former Jesuitical guest! While the Signs of the Times and Consolations and Desolations segments of the show are new this week, we’re re-airing an incredibly insightful interview with Sister Simone from last year. It was a busy July for Catholic news too—during Signs of the Times we discuss the sexual abuse stories that have been coming from several parts of the Catholic world, and get into Pope Francis’ revision of the Catechism of the Catholic Church’s teaching on the death penalty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 10, 2018
What does Catholic architecture look like in the 21st century? Ep. 70
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This week, we talk with Gilbert Sunghera, S.J. He is an architectural consultant and associate professor of architecture at the University of Detroit Mercy. Gilbert has worked on projects such as the Jesuit community at Fairfield, the parish of St. Joseph the Worker in Wyoming and the Jesuit high school chapel in Sacramento. We talk with Gilbert about architecture, how he balances his dual passions and what it means to design a sacred space.   Speaking of architecture, America’s new office space—including the studio where Jesuitical is recorded—was profiled in the New York Times this week. You have a look at where we work and read the profile here. We are on vacation until next month, so no Signs of the Times or Consolations and Desolations this week. However, we still want to hear from you! Come share your consolations and desolations or some interesting Catholics news in our Facebook group. You can also find us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, support us on Patreon and send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 20, 2018
Why you (yes you) should care about theology. Ep. 69
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You don’t have to have a Ph.D. in theology to write about religion (thank goodness)—but Tara Isabella Burton’s work shows it certainly doesn’t hurt. After getting her doctorate in theology at Oxford University, Tara became the first full-time religion correspondent for Vox (with a V she is quick to clarify). There she translates religious stories to a largely secular audience and brings a theologian’s lens to questions of public policy and values. Tara also published her first novel this year, Social Creature, a thrilling story about striving and sin in the decadent world of upper-class New York. We ask her about the book, how her own own faith has shaped her writing and why everyone should study theology. Jesuitical is on vacation until August, so no Signs of the Times this week, but we still want to hear from you! Come share your consolations and desolations or some interesting Catholic news in our Facebook group. You can also find us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, support us on Patreon and send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 13, 2018
Questioning the Bible just might help you fall in love with it. Ep. 68
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Rachel Held Evans grew up loving the bible. Like, was on her high school’s homecoming court representing the Bible club. She was taught to honor and defend it from all its enemies, science and history included. But her Biblical worldview started to fall apart in college. Neat, pre-packaged answers that she was taught weren’t satisfying anymore. “I never had permission to challenge the Bible,” Rachel told us on this week’s podcast. “And yet when I began doing that it's like all these new layers of meaning began to unfold and it became a richer experience.” Rachel talks to us this week about her new book, “Inspired: Slaying Giants, Walking on Water, and Loving the Bible Again.” We talk about why finding enchantment in the Bible is important, how to teach Bible stories to your kids and more. In this week’s rundown of Catholic news, we discuss what Catholic organizations are doing to help immigrant families separated at the border; Philippine priests seeking gun permits in light of recent murders; and a Kenyan priest who was suspended from ministry for rapping. Want to discuss this week’s episode with the hosts and other Jesuitical listeners? Check out our Facebook group. You can also find us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, support us on Patreon and send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org. Links from the show Donations surge at Catholic Charities border asylum-seeker center Hundreds of calls come in at USCCB HQ seeking to foster detained kids Parkland students kick off anti-gun tour with rally at Catholic church Philippine bishops hesitant about priests seeking gun permits Kenya parishioners disappointed after priest suspended for rapping Swole.Catholic helps people strengthen body and soul   What’s on tap? New Jersey Beer Co.’s LBIPA, courtesy of Patron and friend of the podcast, John Dougherty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 29, 2018
The untold history of black nuns in the United States Ep. 67
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Ask most people what they know about black Catholic sisters, and they will probably murmur something about “Sister Act.” Dr. Shannen Dee Williams did, too, until she began digging into communities’ archives and uncovering the previously hidden lives of African-American women religious. Now she’s telling those stories in a forthcoming book (with an amazing title), Subversive Habits.  Shannen tells us about the incredible resilience and deep faith of black Catholic women in the face of racism, discrimination and exclusion. We ask her how these stories affected her own faith and what racial reconciliation in the church looks like today. In our news segment this week, we talk fun Catholic World Cup facts, an update on the synod on young adults and Pope Francis’ controversial comments on abortion and Nazis. Finally, we discuss the Trump administration’s policy of separating children from their parents at the border—and what you can do to help.  Have you checked out our Facebook page yet? Starting today, we’ll be asking for your consolations and desolations there. You can also find us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, support us on Patreon and send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org. Links from the show Faith and the 2018 World Cup: little-known Christian details about soccer (football!) stars Synod working document: Young Catholics need a church that listens to them Pope Francis says abortion is ‘same thing’ as Nazi eugenics Catholic leaders denounce Sessions’s asylum decision: ‘We have truly lost our moral compass.’ Father James Martin: Five things you can do to help immigrants at the border What’s on tap? Celebrating our Catholic Press Association awards with Champagne! Well, technically, prosecco. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 22, 2018
How living in L’Arche made Jeremy McLellan a better person (and funnier comedian). Ep. 66
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This week, we talk with Jeremy McLellan, a comedian from Charleston, S.C. Jeremy was recently named a “New Face of Comedy” at the Just for Laughs Comedy Festival in Montreal. He was recently baptized at this year’s Easter Vigil. We talk to the comedian about his time living in a L’Arche community, his struggles with depression and making people laugh in 2018. In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis accepts the resignations of Chilean bishops and meets with energy executives to discuss care for the poor and the environment. In Baltimore, the archdiocese is letting Catholic couples get married outside of the bride or groom’s parish. A new study claims that kids who attend Catholic schools have more self-control than those who do not. The Catholic Memes Facebook group sparks controversy after posting a meme that many are describing as anti-Semitic. Finally, last month the Catholic Women’s Forum and the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture sponsored a conference on the #MeToo movement. We discuss the conference, the church’s response and the effects of the sexual revolution on the movement. Make sure to check us out on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, and send us some feedback by emailing jesuitical@americamedia.org. You can support the show by joining our Patreon community. And we are also on Facebook. We love hearing from all of our listeners weekly, and we wanted to give you all the opportunity to not just continue talking with us but to get to know each other as well. If you haven’t joined yet, go do that. Links from the show: Pope Francis appeals to top energy executives to care for the poor and the environment Pope begins purge in Chile church over sex abuse scandal Conference asks: Is the Sexual Revolution to blame for #MeToo? Vanity Fair ad takes ‘#MeToo’ campaign to victims of religious violence Catholic Memes controversy Baltimore Catholics can now have that outdoor wedding they’ve dreamed of Study finds Catholic school correlates with student’s self-control What’s on tap? This week, we’re drinking some fancy Malbec wine, courtesy of my mom, Francisca Segura Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 15, 2018
What Mario Lopez learned about his Catholic faith in the Holy Land. Ep. 65
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It was a curious Tweet that came across my timeline. Was A.C. Slater really getting baptized in the Jordan River? Got baptized in the same river Jesus did...#JordanRiver #Jesus #JohnTheBaptist pic.twitter.com/WIuPtqEk9b — Mario Lopez (@MarioLopezExtra) March 22, 2018 And there was another one—this time at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Annunciation: Angel Gabriel told the Virgin Mary she was going to be the mother Christ of here...#AnunciationCathedral #RomanCatholic #AngelGabriel #VirginMary pic.twitter.com/QVMEr9Gyf9 — Mario Lopez (@MarioLopezExtra) March 21, 2018 Mario Lopez is a TV host and actor. You might know him as A.C. Slater on “Saved by the Bell” or from “Dancing with the Stars.” He is currently one of the hosts of “Extra”—and a promoter of the Gospel. It’s one thing for celebrities to be privately religious; using their platforms for evangelization is quite another. This week we talk with Mario about his pilgrimage to the Holy Land, what it’s like to be faithful in Hollywood, and passing down faith to children. The Signs of the Times segment of the show comes with a cake motif: we discuss the Supreme Court’s recent decision in the Colorado “gay wedding cake” case and its impact on religion and culture; also, there was a life-sized Jesus cake—complete with icing stigmata wounds—that was maybe (or definitely) made in bad-taste. Outside of cake news, we talk about why the Vatican issued a new document on SPORTS!™; why a statue of Jesus was “too-Catholic” for one Baptist church; and how a former slave is going to be the first Catholic entombed in Denver’s Cathedral. Have you been thinking to yourself, “Friday is such a long time to wait for another episode, I wish I could listen to some of it early”? If so, I have great news for you: we’ve started posting videos of the full, uncut versions of weekly interviews to our Patreon page on Wednesdays. You can help keep us employed and get some bonus content. We also have our Facebook group—it’s a great way to meet and discuss Catholic things with other Jesuitical listeners. You can also follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow and send us feedback and cocktail recipes at jesuitical@americamedia.org. Links from the show: Pope Francis asks German bishops to set aside plan on Communion for non-Catholic spouses Vatican Sports on Sundays are O.K. (except when used to skip Mass) Baptist congregation votes Jesus statue out for being ‘too Catholic’ A life-sized Jesus cake with stigmata wounds is making Christians angry Supreme Court sides with baker who wouldn’t make cake for a same-sex couple Former slave, on possible path to sainthood, to be entombed in Denver cathedral Patreon Facebook What’s on tap? Chocolate Cake Martini: vanilla vodka, chocolate liqueur, half-and-half, whipped cream and a cookie wafer to garnish. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 08, 2018
Fighting Islamophobia with social justice comedy. Ep. 64
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How do you change the mind of someone who thinks you don’t belong in this country because of your faith? Make them laugh, says Negin Farsad, Muslim-American comedian, actress, writer and filmmaker. And she does. Back in 2014, she took a troupe of Muslim comedians on tour in America’s heartland to talk (and joke) about Islamophobia for the documentary film “The Muslims Are Coming!” Today, she continues to work in what she calls “social justice comedy,” using humor to confront religious hatred and racism. We ask her how she walks the line between laughing with and laughing at the people she would like to convince. In Signs of the Times, the supporters of Ireland’s Eighth Amendment suffered a resounding defeat in the May 25 referendum, opening the door to abortion on demand. We talk about the future of the church and the pro-life movement in light of this setback. Plus: an archbishop in Australia faces jail time for failing to report sexual abuse; an ecumenical group of faith leaders takes on racism in Minnesota; and a new poll shows only 50 percent of Catholics support welcoming refugees to the United States. What gives? When you’re done listening, you can hop on over to our Facebook group and let us know what you think! Follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow and send us feedback and cocktail recipes at jesuitical@americamedia.org. And if you haven’t yet, please consider leaving us a review on Apple podcasts—it’s a great way to help other people find the show. Links from the show: Catholics who voted Yes should consider confession, says Bishop Catholic archbishop convicted in Australia of concealing child sex abuse New Minnesota faith alliance takes on racism Only 50% of U.S. Catholics believe the U.S. Should Accept Refugees What’s on tap? Brooklyn Brewery Lager hand delivered by Patron Emilee Hunter-Maguire Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 01, 2018
Meet Cyrus Habib: the most interesting Catholic politician in Washington (State) Ep. 63
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Cyrus Habib is the 16th and current Lieutenant Governor of Washington State. Born in Baltimore, Md., Cyrus is a three-time cancer survivor and has been fully blind since he was 8-years-old. His parents immigrated to the United States from Iran before he was born, and he is both the first and only Iranian-American official to hold statewide elected office in the United States. We ask Cyrus how his Catholic faith shapes his public service and how citizens and politicians alike can work toward the common good in these polarized times. In Signs of the Times, during the royal wedding, Bishop Michael Curry name-dropped French Jesuit, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. Who was this controversial Jesuit philosopher? Next, Pope Francis is creating 14 new cardinals, and a Seattle nun is taking on the gun industry—from the inside. Plus, Irish citizens are voting today on whether or not to repeal the Eighth Amendment, which recognizes that both mothers and unborn children have an equal right to life. We discuss why repealing the Eighth Amendment will be a step back for Ireland. Finally, following an investigation into the Chilean sexual abuse crisis, 34 bishops in Chile have offered their resignation. Sexual abuse survivor Juan Carlos Cruz said that during his meeting with the pope, Francis stated: “Juan Carlos, that you are gay doesn’t matter. God made you like this and loves you like this and it doesn’t matter to me. The pope loves you like this.” We discuss the impact of the pope’s comments. Make sure to check us out on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, and send us some feedback by emailing jesuitical@americamedia.org. You can support the show by joining our Patreon community. And we are also on Facebook! We love hearing from all of our listeners weekly, and we wanted to give you all the opportunity to not just continue talking with us but to get to know each other as well! If you haven’t joined yet, go do that. And a special shoutout to our sponsor, “Pope Francis: A Man of His Word,” written and directed by three-time Academy Award nominee Wim Wenders. Links from the show: Who was the Jesuit priest mentioned during the Royal Wedding sermon? Pope Francis announces that he will create 14 new cardinals in June Abuse victim says Pope Francis told him “being gay doesn't matter” All of Chile’s bishops offer resignations after meeting pope on abuse Meet the Seattle nun who infiltrated a gun company The Irish Exception What’s on tap?Substance, a Washington State wine, brought to us by Cyrus Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 25, 2018
Ross Douthat is worried about Pope Francis’ leadership. Should we be, too?
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It’s not an easy position for faithful Catholics to stake out, criticizing a popular pope. But Ross Douthat is worried about where Pope Francis is leading the Catholic Church. In his new book, To Change the Church: Pope Francis and the Future of Catholicism, the New York Times op-ed columnist argues that Francis’ “truces” with the modern world—specifically his more pastoral approach on issues ranging from divorce and same-sex relationships to euthanasia—threaten to not only divide and weaken the church but betray the very words of Jesus. We ask Ross whether he thinks people in the pews share his concerns, what mercy means for Catholics who feel hurt by Catholic teachings and what gives him hope about the church. In Signs of the Times: a Catholic school showcases a caged tiger at prom. Bad idea or the worst idea? Plus, new rules for contemplative nuns, the United States’ first African-American priest gets a step closer to sainthood, thoughts on the new Pope Francis biopic and news from the Holy Land. Finally, it’s Mental Health Awareness Week, so we wanted to discuss what more the church can do to support families struggling with mental illness. As always, check us out on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, and send us some feedback by emailing jesuitical@americamedia.org. You can support the show (and get exclusive swag and bonus content!) by joining our Patreon community. Links from the show A Catholic School in Florida Had a Caged Tiger at Its Jungle-Themed Prom and WTF? Vatican issues new rules for communities of contemplative nuns Runaway slave-turned-priest moves closer to beatification California bishops: The mental health care system is broken Pope gets an unprecedented close-up, courtesy of Wim Wenders Pope Francis denounces spiral of violence in the Holy Land What’s on tap? Wisconsin white wine from our very first in-studio Patreon V.I.P. visitor, Creede Caldwell! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 18, 2018
What makes a good "Christian" movie? Ep. 61
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What makes a Christian movie? Can you define it based on its themes and subjects? Or is it all in whom it’s marketed at? Alissa Wilkinson is a film critic at Vox, where she covers film and culture. Before writing at Vox, Alissa was critic-at-large at Christianity Today. We discuss the role of religion in film, whether “Christian” or not, what her favorite films are and more on this week’s show. During Signs of the Times, our weekly Catholic news update, we discuss whether the Catholic-imagination themed Met Gala was offensive or awesome, what some churches are doing to aid immigrants in the midst of destructive decrees from the Trump administration and whether non-Catholic spouses might be able to receive communion at Mass. Last week, we launched a Facebook group—you should join! It’s a great way to meet other young-ish, hip-ish and lay-ish Jesuitical listeners. You can also follow us on Twitter and support the show on Patreon. Links from the show: Why the Met Gala is a good thing for Catholicism Sessions: "Zero-tolerance" policy may cause families to be split at border Catholic groups decry end to Temporary Protected Status for Hondurans Dallas-area immigrants apply for Catholic church-issued IDs to ease deportation fears Pope Francis asks German bishops to find agreement on Communion for non-Catholic spouses Paul Ryan reinstates Jesuit as House Chaplain Directory for the Application of Principles and Norms on Ecumenism What's on tap?  Miami Vice, Zac's mom's favorite drink, in honor of her graduation.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 11, 2018
Wajahat Ali reminds U.S. Catholics of their own history of discrimination. Ep. 60
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This week, we talk with Wajahat Ali, a contributing op-ed writer for The New York Times, where he covers religion, family life and U.S. politics. Wajahat is also one of the producers of the Emmy-nominated series, “The Secret Life of Muslims,” which takes a look into the lives of U.S. Muslims. We talk with Wajahat about the perception of Muslim Americans in the age of Trump, and how his Jesuit education has made him a better Muslim. In Signs of the times, Cardinal Pell stands trial for sex abuse; Katy Perry visits the Vatican; Catholic leaders oppose Bavarian crucifix order; and parishes are closing in Pittsburgh, Pa. Following the forced resignation of Jesuit House chaplain, Patrick Conroy, we ask: Why did this happen And finally: Prom season in Michigan had one Catholic high-school bringing out “modesty ponchos.” We discuss whether or not this is problematic. Follow us Twitter @jesuiticalshow, send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org and support our work by becoming a part of our Patreon community. You subscribe to us wherever you get your favorite podcast and leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. And a special shoutout to our sponsor, the Catholic Travel Centre, who made this episode possible. P.S. We are now on Facebook! We love hearing from all of our listeners weekly, and we wanted to give you all the opportunity to not just continue talking with us but to get to know each other as well! If you haven’t joined yet, go do that. Links from the show: Cardinal Pell to stand trial in sex abuse case Katy Perry Meets Pope Francis, Speaks At Vatican Conference Dr. Oz leads Vatican panel on faith and medicine Catholic leaders join criticism of Bavarian crucifix order Do reactions to the firing of Jesuit House chaplain show anti-Catholic bias? Michigan Catholic school to use ‘modesty ponchos’ at prom Bishop Zubik unveils parish reorganization plans for Pittsburgh diocese What’s on tap? Margaritas—or as my co-hosts like to say, “margs” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 04, 2018
From alcoholism and agnosticism to converting to Catholicism: a conversation on faith with Mary Karr Ep. 59
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“Any way I tell this story is a lie.” Mary Karr opens her memoir “Lit” with a warning about the inevitable unreliability of memory. But don’t be fooled. Mary Karr delivers many truths that you need to hear. Mary Karr is an award-winning poet and New York Times best-selling author. Her poems have been published in the New Yorker, the Atlantic and the Paris Review. Her trilogy of memoirs, The Liars Club, Cherry and Lit, chronicle her traumatic childhood in southeast Texas, her turbulent coming of age as a woman and poet, her marriage and motherhood, alcoholism and recovery and conversion to the Catholic faith. We were grateful to chat with Mary about all of this and more during our live event at America’s headquarters in New York City, sponsored by the Catholic Travel Centre. Before we delve into the live recording, we’re reunited with Olga (who missed the live event, succumbing to a nasty fever) to discuss the week’s top Catholic news: A surprise parish visit from a Catholic NBA all-star; Pope Francis gives out free gelato on his name day to Rome’s needy and appoints three women to consult the Vatican’s oldest congregation; a nun is being deported for living out the Gospel in the Philippines; and we discuss an alarming trend of the killing of priests in Mexico. As always, check us out on Twitter @jesuiticalshow, and send us some feedback (or just say hi! We love that too.) by emailing jesuitical@americamedia.org. You can support the show (and get exclusive swag and bonus content!) by joining our Patreon community. Links from the show Trust the prayers: Embiid surprises churchgoers near Philly Pope Francis offers free gelato to Rome’s poor and homeless to mark his feast day Be fruitful and multiply: Threatened trees planted in Vatican Gardens Pope Francis appoints three women as consultants to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith Philippines to deport 71-year old Australian nun who advocates for farmers Lay down your weapons, say Mexican bishops after second priest murdered What’s on tap? Sugar Hill Golden Ale, courtesy of Harlem Brewing Company Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 27, 2018
Have we reached a turning point in the gun control debate?
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As I write this, thousands of students across the country are walking out of their high schools to protest gun violence. April 20 marks the 19th anniversary of the 1999 Columbine High School shooting in Littleton, Colo., which left 13 dead. At the time, it was the deadliest school shooting in modern U.S. history. Tragically, that grisly record had been overtaken several times in the last two decades, most recently at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. After the Parkland shooting on Feb. 14, which left 17 students and employees dead, listeners asked that we dive deeper into the topic of gun violence. So this week, we are talking with Patrick Blanchfield, a writer who has covered the topic for n + 1 among other publications. We ask him why advocacy for gun control has been so ineffective; why religion and theology play such an important role in these debates; and whether the student activism following the Parkland shooting represents a new and promising front for those seeking to pass more restrictive gun laws. In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis admits that he has made serious mistakes in his handling of the sex abuse crisis in Chile; Blessed Oscar Romero finally has an official canonization date; and Catholic agencies are alarmed by the severe drop in the number of Syrian refugees admitted to the United States. Next, we discuss the state of Catholic activism: Is it a problem that the most visible Catholic protesters in peace and justice movements are often baby boomers? Where are all the millennial Catholics? Finally, need a good pump up video? Check out these boxing nuns in Poland. Need a good cry? Watch this video of Pope Francis responding to a young boy who asks: is my atheist father in heaven? Follow us Twitter @jesuiticalshow, send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org and support our work by becoming a part of our Patreon community. You subscribe to us wherever you get your favorite podcast and leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Links from the show Pope Francis admits ‘serious errors’ in handling of Chilean sex abuse cases Oscar Romero canonization probably in Rome in October Catholic agencies concerned by drastic drop in Syrian refugees admitted to US Bond Denied for 7 Catholic Protesters Who Prayed on Nuclear Submarine Base in Georgia VIDEO: Boxing nuns take Poland by storm ‘Is my dad in heaven,’ little boy asks pope What’s on tap? Keller Dry-Hopped Lager from Zero Gravity Craft Brewing Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 20, 2018
The (Catholic) Science Guy Ep. 57
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Whoever says you have to choose between science and faith has not met Guy Consolmagno, S.J.—a Jesuit brother and director of the Vatican Observatory. We ask what projects the pope’s astronomers are working on now, if he believes in aliens and why people in every time and place look to the stars with big questions. And in Signs of the Times, Pope Francis denounces a chemical attack in Syria that killed dozens of innocent civilians. How should the United States respond? And U.S. and Mexican bishops push back on President Trump’s plan to send the National Guard to secure the border as a group of Central American migrants travels north seeking sanctuary. Next, the pope has released a new apostolic exhortation on holiness. Zac, Olga and I discuss our favorite parts of the document. Plus, updates on Catholics in France, Sweden and Brazil—where one church decided to incorporate a drone into the liturgy. As always, we want to hear from you. You can tweet us @jesuiticalshow or send us an email jesuitical@americamedia.org. Please leave us a review on Apple podcasts, tell your friends about the show and check out our Patreon page to support Jesuitical. P.S., if you’re in the New York area next week, come see us talk to New York Times-bestselling author, Mary Karr, for a live recording of Jesuitical! You can buy your tickets here—drinks are on us. Links from the show: Pope Francis denounces chemical weapons attack in Syria Top Five Takeaways from ‘Gaudete et Exsultate’ Bishops on both sides of Mexico border criticize troop deployment France's Macron sparks uproar by reaching out to Catholic Church Sweden's Lutherans to let Catholic parish hold Masses in Lund cathedral Video: Jesus Saves, but Drone Delivers This Catholic Church from Boredom What’s on tap? Need. Coffee. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 13, 2018
Sarah Silverman on whether hell exists and why she loves the Jesuits Ep. 56
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“You know, I don’t know about Jesuits except what I am learning,” Sarah Silverman tells us on this week’s episode of Jesuitical. “Every Jesuit I meet, I find that I adore and just love the bringing emotion and feelings and intellect together.” Every week, during the interview portion of the podcast, we feature a guest, Catholic and sometimes non-Catholic, that offers an interesting perspective on faith, culture or the news. This week, we welcome Sarah, a comedian, actress and host of “I Love You America with Sarah Silverman.” We discuss why she loves Jesuit priests even as a non-believer, whether or not hell exists and why the world desperately needs Mr. Rogers. Before our conversation with Sarah (which starts at 12:15), we discuss and analyze this week’s top Catholic news:this year’s NCAA tournament champions, Villanova and Notre Dame; and Joan Roanhauer, the first woman to lead Jesuit Refugee Services. We also discuss Pope Francis’ latest Easter message, in which he calls for an end to conflicts in the Holy Land and Syria. April 4 also marked 50 years since the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis. We talk about Dr. King’s legacy, his influence on people like Pope Francis and the whitewashing of his beliefs. We also discuss the killing of 22-year-old Stephon Clark in Sacramento. Please tweet us @jesuiticalshow or send us an email jesuitical@americamedia.org and let us know your reactions to our conversation with Sarah. And please leave us a review on Apple podcasts and tell your friends about the show. Links from the show: I Love You, America with Sarah Silverman Pope Francis in Easter message calls for end to conflicts in Syria and the Holy Land How Pope Francis carries on Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy of Christian nonviolence First woman to head Jesuit agency takes on refugee crisis Nuns in Poland show ‘fighting spirit’ in boxing video to raise funds for orphanage Ogunbowale encore! Final Four hero lifts Notre Dame to title What’s on tap? Lent is over! Easter is here! So we celebrate with prosecco. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 06, 2018
Live from Loyola University Chicago Ep. 55
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For this week’s episode, we’re bringing you our live recording from last Friday, March 23 at Loyola University Chicago. We’re talking with a frequent guest of the show, James Martin, S.J., about his new podcast “The Examen with Father James Martin.” Now, I will admit—I have always wanted to be good at praying the Examen (like a good Jesuit-educated Catholic), but for various reasons (sloth and original sin) have not been able to. Father Martin told us all why he has never missed a daily Examen since he entered the Jesuits, and why it’s been so essential to his ministry. For Signs of the Times, we mark the fifth anniversary of Pope Francis’ pontificate by discussing our favorite moments from his papacy, and where he has fallen short. We know many of you might be listening in the heart of Triduum and could be looking for a show on that topic. If so, we’ve got you covered. You can check out our interview with Father Martin from last year, where we talked all things Holy Week. Once again, want to give a huge thank you to our Patreon supporters. You can check out the page here.  As always, you can tweet us @jesuiticalshow or send us an email jestuical@americamedia.org. And please leave us a review on Apple podcasts and tell your friends about show. An extra special thank you this week to Loyola University Chicago and the Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage for hosting us. It was a great consolation for me to be back on the campus of my alma mater, and especially during the middle of our Cinderella run in N.C.A.A. tournament. Have a blessed Easter, and Go Ramblers. Links from the show The Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage Five years into Pope Francis’ papacy, there is much more noise to be made. The Examen with Fr. James Martin Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 30, 2018
The making of a Papal Ninja Warrior Ep. 54
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What is a papal ninja and how do you become one? This week, we went straight to the source to find out. Sean Bryan competes on the hit NBC show “American Ninja Warrior,” where he takes on insanely difficult obstacle courses—for the greater glory of God. And that’s just his side gig. Sean also helps lead the Lay Mission Project, which forms lay people to live out their faith and transform whatever corner of the secular world they work in. We ask Sean how to pray while doing pull-ups and which church leaders would make good ninjas. And in Signs of the Times: It snowed. Again. The 427th Nor’easter to hit New York this March kept us out of the studio on Wednesday so just a couple of headlines delivered by yours truly: a Catholic school in Australia is in trouble for letting girls wear shorts; Pope Francis gives his imprimatur to tattoos; and World Downs Syndrome Day gives us time to reflect on the human dignity of people with disabilities—in and outside the womb. Once again, want to give a huge thank you to our Patreon supporters. You can check out the page here. Sign up ASAP if you want to take part in our first Jesuitical video chat at the end of the month! As always, you can tweet us @jesuiticalshow or send us an email jestuical@americamedia.org. And please leave us a review on Apple podcasts and tell your friends about show. Links from the show Allowing shorts at a Catholic girls' school is sensible and without hidden intent Pope Francis talks tech, sex and tattoos with young adults ‘Elimination’ of Down syndrome is a ‘great hate crime,’ says Holy See conference at the U.N. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 23, 2018
So we interviewed our boss Ep. 53
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It’s taken over a year for us to get our boss, Matt Malone, S.J., on Jesuitical—and we promise it was worth the wait. Matt is president and editor in chief of America, and the reason why Jesuitical exists in the first place. This week we talk to him about Pope Francis’ election five years ago, for which he was present, the spiritual side of St. Patrick’s day and his journey to working at America. In Signs of the Times we chat about  our favorite topic of all time: Catholic sisters, since it’s National Catholic Sisters Week, and we also discuss how Catholics should be responding to the Parkland students’ call for gun reform. Thank you to all of our new patrons this week! To see the full unedited interview, visit patreon.com/americamedia to donate. Shout out to our VIPs: Kody Teaford and Vivian Veloso Macaspac; and our Super Fans, Jim Eraci and Ben Bartosik. As always, we want to hear from you. Write us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org and follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 16, 2018
How ESPN’s Joe Lunardi invented bracketology Ep. 52
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This week, due to inclement weather, we were unable to record on our usual Wednesday. This week’s episode is an abbreviated one, sans consolations and desolations, but have no fear: It’s a good one. Since Selection Sunday—the official start of the NCAA tournament and office bracket pools across the nation—is this weekend, we decided to bring in Joe Lunardi, the ESPN bracketologist and administrator at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia. We talk to Joe about the art of bracketology, how his Jesuit education has influenced his career and more. Finally, in Signs of the Times, we talk “Lady Bird” getting snubbed at the Oscars, Francis’ five years and a new feast day for Mary. We want to give a huge thank you to listeners who have pledged to support Jesuitical through our new Patreon page. Shout out to Super Fans Jessica, Caroline Marcotte and Sarah Neville Jimenez and Ambassador Emilee Hunter Macguire. We are grateful for your investment in our little (but growing!) podcast community. As always, we want to hear from you. Write us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org and follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 09, 2018
Think you’re not a poetry person? Let Elizabeth Acevedo change your mind. Ep. 51
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I feel the same way about poetry that I do about prayer: I know it’s good for the soul; I really respect those who have mastered the art—and I have a very hard time getting into it. To which Elizabeth Acevedo, this week’s guest, (wisely) responds: “Maybe you just haven’t found the right poet.” Liz is a slam poet and author of the upcoming novel, The Poet X, set for release on March 6. In the book and in her spoken-word poetry, Liz explores her identity as a Dominican woman and wrestles with the Catholic faith of her upbringing. We ask her what it means for Latinos and people of color to see themselves reflected in literature. In Signs on the Times, Catholic activists, including priests and sisters, were arrested on Capitol Hill this week as they voiced their support for Dreamers. Plus, why has the Catholic Church fought against attempts to extend the statute of limitations in sexual abuse cases? And why are the bishops in Texas cutting ties with the state’s largest pro-life group? Finally, some lighter stories (and great photos) coming out of Rome: Versace and Vogue go to the Vatican, and a rare snowstorm blankets the Eternal City. We want to give a huge thank you to listeners who have pledged to support Jesuitical through our new Patreon page. Shout out to Supers Fans Allison Colson, Catherine Addington, Jeff Trussel, Keith Bourgoin, Matthew Kyrish and Nicholas Frega; Ambassadors Carlos Mesquita, Claudia Macaluso and Michael Kelly; and V.I.P. Andy Stulc. We are eternally grateful for your investment in our little (but growing!) podcast community. As always, we want to hear from you. Write us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org and follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow. Link’s from the show: Dozens of Catholics arrested as they call on Congress to help 'Dreamers' Bill spurred by Nassar case concerns Catholic Church Catholic bishops cut ties with Texas anti-abortion group Vatican, Versace and Vogue team up to show Catholic influences in fashion First snow in six years: Priests have a snowball fight at the Vatican What’s on tap? Seltzer for Zac, Diet Coke for me. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 02, 2018
Why do we let ‘good manners’ get in the way of prayer? Ep 50
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How’s your Lent going? Did you make it at least a few days (unlike me) before breaking your Lenten practice? If you’re trying to up your prayer game this Lent and haven’t quite figured out how to do it yet, you won’t want to miss this week’s guest. Luigi Gioia, a professor at the Pontifical University of Sant’Anselmo in Rome, is the author of Say It To God: In Search of Prayer, which the Archbishop of Canterbury has chosen for his official Lent book of 2018. “Far too spiritual, our prayer is asphyxiated by good manners,” Luigi writes in his new book. We ask Luigi about why almost everyone has a difficult time with prayer and what it means to truly find God everywhere in our lives. In Signs of the Times, we give an update on Pope Francis’ handling of the sexual abuse crisis in Chile, the U.S. bishops’ national call-in to Congress day for Dreamers, discuss the Secret Service’s new chaplain and more. In other news, we’re starting a Patreon page! We’ve been blessed to do the show for a full (liturgical) year, and we love the community that we’ve created so far. But if we want to keep it going, we’re going to need some help from our listeners. We’d also like to make this a mutually beneficial relationship. If you pledge to support the show, you can get access to full-length interviews that don’t make it into the final podcast, Jesuitical shirts and swag, and monthly video chats with Ashley, Olga and me. Check out the Patreon page for full details. Thank you so much to everyone who writes to give us adverbs and share your reactions from the show. It means a lot to us, and we want to keep hearing from you. Send us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org and tweet at us @jesuiticalshow. Links from the show: Chile abuse victim: story is finally heard Pope Francis revives lapsed commission on sex abuse Vatican wants to hear from young about hopes, concerns Secret Service chaplain called to the diaconate USCCB calls on Catholics to take action for Dreamers A Catholic parish in Parkland preaches love the first Sunday after the massacre Say it to God: In Search of Prayer Our Patreon page! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 23, 2018
An Unorthodox celebration of our one year (liturgical) anniversary E. 49
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This week, to celebrate our one year (liturgical) anniversary we are talking with Liel Leibovitz and Stephanie Butnick. They are two-thirds of Unorthodox, a Jewish podcast from The Tablet. Here at Jesuitical, we hold a special place in our hearts for these hosts—they are a part of our origin story. We talk to Liel and Stephanie about how we basically stole their podcast format, the differences between Jewish and Catholic fasting and more. And, because this week is also the start of Lent, we asked our guests what we should all give up for Lent. In Signs of the Times, we discuss the latest firing of L.G.B.T. Catholic church workers, focusing on why these firings have gotten so much media attention and what it means for the church as a whole. The Florida Conference of Catholic Bishops supports a new resolution that could label pornography a “public health risk.” In light of the #MeToo movement, we talk about why conversations about sex must include a focus on the effects of pornography, what the church can do and more. Finally, a Catholic school robotics team ranks 15th in the world. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow. Send us any questions, cocktail recipes or consolations and desolations at jesuitical@americamedia.org. And if you haven’t already, please leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, and tell your friends, parents or children about the show. P.S. Hope you enjoy our amazing redesign, courtesy of Angelo Jesus Canta. And, along with Jesuitical, you can check out additional America podcasts, including “The Examen with Father James Martin, S.J.” and “The Word: Scripture Reflections from America Media.” Links from the show: Firing of L.G.B.T. Catholic church workers raises hard (and new) questions Florida resolution could label pornography a ‘public health risk' Carmel Catholic robotics team, ranked number 15 in the world, qualifies for state tournament What’s on tap? Nothing. Because Lent. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 16, 2018
The case against hot takes Ep. 48
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We live in an age of opinion writers telling us that we live in an age of [insert sweeping generalization here]. The hotter the take, the more attention it gets not only from readers who already agree but pundits eager to tear it down with their own scorching rebuttal. Enter Christine Emba, an op-ed writer for The Washington Post, who traffics in nuance and explores the deeper questions beneath the latest outrage de jour. On topics from #MeToo movement and s***hole countries to Harry Potter and burritos, Christine has opinions worth reading. This week, we ask her about her vocation as an op-ed writer and what a successful column looks like. (Homilists would be wise to take notes.) And in Signs of the Times, did you know the Winter Olympics were underway? Yeah, neither did we. Next: A German cardinal seems to (maybe) open the door to pastors blessing same-sex unions, fall out from Pope Francis’ handling of clerical sex abuse continues and we dive into a potential breakthrough for the Catholic Church in China. Finally, Lent begins next week on Valentine’s Day/Ash Wednesday—and PETA wants you to go vegan. Tell us what you’re giving up (or #TakingUp) this Lent! Tweet us @jesuiticalshow or send us an email jestuical@americamedia.org. And please leave us a review on Apple podcasts and tell your friends, parents or children about the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 09, 2018
A conversation on why Catholics need to dialogue with Muslims Ep. 47
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“It is not possible to build bridges between people while forgetting God,” Pope Francis said early in his pontificate. “But the converse is also true: it is not possible to establish true links with God, while ignoring other people.” Many U.S. Catholics have not only ignored their Muslim brothers and sisters but harbor discriminatory views about Muslims at alarming rates. Georgetown University’s Bridge Initiative, “a multi-year research project that connects the academic study of Islamophobia with the public square,” released a report in 2016 that documented how U.S. Catholics view Muslims. America’s national correspondent, Michael O’Loughlin, reported then: When asked, “What is your overall impression of Muslims?” 30 percent of those Catholics polled said they held unfavorable views, 14 percent said favorable and 45 percent said they held neither favorable nor unfavorable views... Forty-five percent of Catholics said that Islam encourages violence more than other religions while 24 percent said it encourages violence as much as other religions. Jordan Denari Duffner, an associate at the Bridge Initiative and author of the new book, Finding Jesus Among Muslims: How Loving Islam Makes Me a Better Catholic, joins us on this week’s episode of Jesuitical. Jordan discusses why she felt called to work in Catholic-Islamic dialogue, and why it’s an essential part of the Christian vocation. In Signs of the Times, we discuss President Trump’s invocation of dreamers in his State of the Union address, and a Chicago priest who is on hunger strike in support of DACA recipients. We also provide an update on Pope Francis’ handling of allegations of sexual abuse in Chile, a rise in demonic activity and a limb of St. Francis Xavier making a road trip across Canada. Links from the show: Undocumented Loyola Medical Student to Join Durbin at State of the Union Chicago priest pledges hunger strike to support ‘Dreamers’ Pope Francis sends special prosecutor to Chile to investigate charges against Bishop Barros Couple, married 70 years, renew vows—this time in church St. Francis Xavier’s severed arm to visit Calgary in relic pilgrimage Irish priest asks for back-up as demand for exorcisms rises ‘exponentially’ What’s on tap? Hot Toddy 1 cup of tea Whiskey (feel free to eyeball the amount) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 02, 2018
Is it possible to blend yoga and Catholicism? Ep. 46
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Is yoga cultural appropriation? Is it just stretching? Is it possible to blend yoga and the Catholic faith? This week we get into these questions and more with Bobby Karle, S.J., the founder of Ignatian Yoga, a practice that draws on Ignatian spirituality and yoga. Through Ignatian Yoga, Bobby offers classes, retreats and workshops centered around the core principles of Ignatian spirituality, like finding God in all things and living a life of self-awareness and discernment, and yoga practices like breathing meditations and vinyasa flow. In Signs of the Times, we talk Catholic dioceses suspending the sign of the peace due to flu outbreaks; priests in cassocks competing for the John Paul II Cup; and Pope Francis celebrating the marriage of two flight attendants during a papal flight. “Going, Going, Gone: The Dynamics of Disaffiliation in Young Catholics” is a new study that seeks to understand why so many young Catholics leave the faith they were born into. We get into the study, our own experiences growing up in the church and some of the study’s most interesting findings. Should older married men become priests in order to serve isolated Catholic communities? Cardinal Beniamino Stella, of the Congregation for Clergy, says yes. Finally, we get into Pope Francis’ latest handling of sexual abuse allegations against clergy. Make sure to leave us a review on Apple podcasts. If you already have, thank you! And don’t forget write us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org, where you can share your own consolations and desolations or drink recipes, and follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow. Links from the show: Catholic diocese suspends ‘sign of peace’ due to flu VIDEO: Priests in cassocks take part in annual skiing competition Serving isolated parishes may mean ordaining married men, cardinal says Study asks: Why are young Catholics going, going, gone? Pope Francis explains why he celebrated the airborne marriage of two flight attendants Pope Francis asks forgiveness from sexual abuse victims but reaffirms support for Bishop Barros What’s on tap? Negronis Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 26, 2018
What do (Catholic) women want? Ep. 45
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You have heard it said, “Who run the world? Girls” (Bey 4:12). But we ask: Who runs the church? Popes, of course. But across the country there are dedicated women of faith taking the lead in parishes, schools, social ministries—and magazines. Our guest this week is one of them. Kerry Weber is an executive editor at America and the driving force behind a groundbreaking new survey of U.S. Catholic women. We ask her why Catholic women are so often reluctant to claim the label of role model and what the church can do to lift up the important work women are already doing in the church. Make sure to check out the new special issue on women in the church, which features Kerry’s piece, “The humble, indispensable women leading the Catholic Church you’ve (probably) never heard of,” plus tons of other great articles diving into the survey data. [view:related_content] And in Signs of the Times, Pope Francis says he is “truly afraid” of nuclear war—and how Catholics in Hawaii reacted when they thought that such a war was coming. Next, we discuss what America’s findings about the politics of U.S. Catholic women might mean for the 2018 midterm elections. Finally, we tackle the history of football’s “Hail Mary pass” and the question: Should church doors ever be locked? Have you left us a review on Apple podcasts yet? We’d be eternally grateful if you did. Please. Not that we’re desperate. If you already have, thank you! Do keep in touch: Write us an email at jesuitical@americamedia.org and follow us on Twitter @jesuiticalshow so you can take part in our unscientifically significant polls! Links from the show U.S. Catholic Women: What a New Survey Reveals Pope Francis: “I am truly afraid” of nuclear war. How our Confirmation students kept us calm during a false missile threat in Hawaii Overall, the survey found that 59 percent of Catholic women are Democrats or lean Democratic, whereas 38 percent are Republican or lean Republican. Roger Staubach, Drew Pearson hope Vikings’ miracle play makes up for 1975 Hail Mary Catholic bishop says churches should stay open like the Church of England What’s on tap? (Modified) Elderflower Thistle 2 ounces of Jameson, an ounce of St. Germain and a dash of Angostura bitters, over ice. (The original recipe calls for Scotch. Apparently, Irish whiskey is not, in fact, the same thing as Scotch. You live and you learn.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 19, 2018
One thing you can do to support migrants and refugees. Ep. 44
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It is not the first time and it is unlikely to be the last time, but President Trump’s latest racist remarks about “shithole” countries has many of asking: Who are we? What do we stand for? Who do we welcome and why? We recorded this episode on Wednesday before the news about the president’s comments broke, but nonetheless we think a lot of what we talk about with this week’s guest will help you channel the anger you might feel toward practical steps to help migrants and refugees. This Sunday the Catholic Church marks the 2018 World Day of Migrants and Refugees, and Jesuitical is marking that by talking with Giulia McPherson. Giulia is the director of advocacy and operations at Jesuit Refugee Service/USA, where she works [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 12, 2018
What’s it like being Catholic at The New York Times? Ep. 43
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In our final Jesuitical episode of 2017, we talk with my fellow Bronxite and award-winning journalist at The New York Times, David Gonzalez. Born and raised in the South Bronx to Puerto Rican immigrants, David was raised Catholic and attended Cardinal Hayes High School. Since the 1970s, he has been snapping pictures of people and places all around New York City. Currently, he co-edits the Times’ photography and video blog, Lens, and writes the Side Street column. In Side Street, he offers his “native New Yorker take on life off the beaten path in the five boroughs” in stories such as the Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 22, 2017
Kirsten Powers worked for Bill Clinton and Fox News. She has some thoughts on sexual harassment. Ep 42
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How does an appointee in the Bill Clinton administration end up as a regular face of Fox News? It’s complicated. And what does a woman who has worked for decades in both politics and the media have to say about today’s sexual assault and harassment reckoning? A lot. This week we talk with Kirsten Powers, who you may recognize as a frequent on-air political analyst for CNN and an opinion writer for USA Today. We ask Kirsten whether she thinks we’ve reached a turning point in how we handle sexual misconduct in the workplace and beyond. Kirsten has also had a fascinating spiritual journey—from growing up in an Episcopal church in Alaska to straddling atheism and agnosticism in New York to becoming an evangelical Christian and, finally, entering the Catholic Church. We ask her how her faith has changed her approach to politics [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 15, 2017
When your favorite Jesuit moonlights as a model. Ep. 41
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Have you ever gotten to know a priest only to discover that your conception of who he was was misguided? Too often priests have either the best or the worst assumed of them, and the result is that we, the laity, fail to see them as they are: human. Our guest this week is Chris Yates, a graduate of Loyola Marymount University who has created a fine-art coffee table book that seeks to show the Jesuits he had grown close to as they truly were. Emmaus: The Nature of the Way profiles several Jesuit priests with two portraits. One is a traditional headshot, the other is an informal composition of each Jesuit doing one of his hobbies: gardening, cooking, stand-up. It’s a beautiful book filled with over 100 portraits, some of which can be found on Yates’s site. Some housekeeping notes: you’ll notice that this week’s episode is a bit shorter than normal. A [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 08, 2017
Black catholics are the past and future of the U.S. church Ep. 40
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When you think about the history of American Catholicism, images of Irish, Italian, German and Polish immigrant parishes probably come to mind. Think about the future of the U.S. church, and you’ve probably been told it’s Latino. But the story of the church, in the United States—past, present and future—is the story of black Catholics. On this week’s show we talk with Mary C. Curtis, an award-winning journalist and columnist at Roll Call, who recently wrote about the African-American Catholic experience for America. We ask her how the church can address the sin of racism, about the gifts black Catholics bring to the church and what she thinks about Pope Francis five years in. In Signs of the Times: An entrepreneurial cannabis company in Canada is selling a unique Advent calendar—and the Archdiocese of Washington holds its ground in the W [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 01, 2017
Thanksgiving special: A look at Jesuit basketball Ep. 39
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This week, we talk with Brian Larkin of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. Larkin is part of the Jesuit Basketball Spotlight. Founded in 2018, the J.B.S. is “a nationwide effort to capitalize on basketball games between Jesuit schools and, through those games, bring greater positive awareness and exposure to Jesuit education and its shared mission.” We talk about its creation, the Jesuit Player of the Week, greatest moments in Jesuit ball history and why he thinks Patrick Ewing should be canonized. No Signs of the Time this week because it’s Thanksgiving. We are super thankful for all of our listeners. As always, we appreciate your feedback, so email us at jesuitical@americamedia.org or follow us on Twitter at @jesuiticalshow. While you’re home eating turkey, tell your family about us an [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 24, 2017
What is Hipster Catholicism? Ep. 38
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In an article that appeared in America over the summer, David Michael wrote: Hipsters are drawn to craft beer, obscure cheeses, organic farms, taxidermy and homemade preserves. They favor hand-dipped candles, old-fashioned stationery, Indian headdresses and the lamentable industrial-chic decor and exposed bricks that mark so many new restaurants and bars. Hipsters love the authentic, the craft and the obscure—which is exactly why Catholicism, in its practices and its aesthetic, is perfectly suited for them. Don’t believe me? Well, let Tommy Tighe, this week’s guest on Jesuitical, have his say. Tighe is the author of The Catholic Hipster Handbook: Rediscovering Cool Saints, Forgotten Prayers, and Other Weird bu [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 17, 2017
Live, from D.C., it’s Jesuitical! Ep. 37
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Last weekend Jesuitical took the show on the road for our first live recording at the Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice in my hometown, Arlington, Va. The Teach-In is the country’s largest Catholic social justice gathering, which brings together students from Jesuit high schools and colleges and other members of the Ignatian family for three days of learning, prayer and advocacy. For this week’s interview, the tables were turned and your hosts were in the hot seat. Our audience had some extremely thoughtful questions for us: How has our faith changed since graduating from college? How do you convince teens who say they like God but not religion that the church has something to offer them? And, of course, if we could canonize one person, living or dead, Catholic or not, who would it be? And in Signs of the Times, Pope Francis makes an extra-long distance call to the International Space Station. Next, the “chainsaw nun” now has an IPA named in her honor [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 10, 2017
Sister Simone Campbell on Paul Ryan, religious life, and the political issues driving her crazy right now Ep. 36
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This week, we talk with celebrity nun, Sister Simone Campbell. Sister Simone is the leader of the Nuns on the Bus and executive director of the NETWORK Lobby for Catholic Social Justice. We talk balancing spirituality with fame, women religious, Catholic feminism, Paul Ryan and more.  In Signs of the Times, next week is Halloween, and some women religious warn: sexy nun costumes aren’t funny. Half of U.S. citizens don’t think you need to believe in God to be a good person—what exactly does it mean to be good? Have you heard of the Palmarian Catholic Church? Well, Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code and infamous for getting Catholicism wrong, has a new book out focusing on the creepy, Catholic sect (as a bonus, you guys get to hear about Zac’s schismatic church rabbit hole). Earlier this year, the Vatican released a survey in anticipation of next year’s Synod 2018 on Young People, the Faith, and Vocational Discernment. The three of us took the survey ba [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 27, 2017
Do you know why you’re Catholic? Ep. 35
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“What does religion have to offer me?” It’s a question more people are asking as affiliation with organized religion continues to fall. Brandon Vogt thinks that Catholics should be ready with answers. “Today, as the world becomes more and more disinterested and disenchanted with religion, we need this positive approach [to being Catholic more] than a negative defense,” he says. Vogt, the guest on this week’s episode of Jesuitical, is the author of Why I am Catholic (And You Should Be Too). In it, Vogt recounts his conversion to Catholicism and the arguments that convinced him to enter the church. He also outlines arguments he thinks will convince those skeptical of what the Catholic Church teaches. Before the interview with Vogt, we summarize and discuss the top [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 20, 2017
Catholic feminism is not an oxymoron Ep 34
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What does it mean to be a feminist? I wasn’t raised one—I barely even understood what the word meant growing up. It wasn’t until my 20s that I began to fully engage with feminist ideas and literature, from Betty Friedan to bell hooks to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. For me, feminism is intersectional, incorporating various aspects of my identity: being a woman of color, an immigrant, a writer, and a person of faith. This week, in a women’s only episode—Zac is on a much deserved vacation—Ashley and I discuss our personal relationships with the feminist label, Catholicism and more with this week’s guest, Claire Swinarski. A former FOCUS missionary, Claire is the host of “The Catholic Feminist Podcast.” And, in Signs of the Times, Pope Francis reaches [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 13, 2017
Matt Maher: Jesuit spirituality could save the world Ep. 33
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Even super fans (your hosts included) of Grammy-nominated Christian artist Matt Maher may not know this fun fact: The Canadian musician went to a Jesuit high school in Newfoundland! On this week’s episode, we ask Matt if Ignatian spirituality has influenced his music, how the music industry has changed since he released his first album in 2001 and about the place of protest and suffering in his latest album, “Echoes,” which dropped on Sept. 29. In Signs of the Times, we talk about how we, as individuals and a country, responded to the horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas. Are thoughts and prayers enough? Is this the right time to talk about gun control? Next, a former ESPN employee fired for writing a racist headline and about to become a Catholic priest show the power of second chances. And in other sports news, a Catholic diocese decrees that student athletes and spectators cannot take a knee during the national anthem. Also, they might have found Santa’s gra [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 06, 2017
How one Jesuit grad is building Tiny Homes to end chronic homelessness Ep 32
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Tiny homes—you’ve probably heard of them. They’re littered all over Instagram and Pinterest, and HGTV has dedicated a show to hunting them. But what you probably haven’t heard about is how they could be a solution to end chronic homelessness. This week we talk to Andrew Lunetta, a graduate of LeMoyne University, who is the executive director of A Tiny Home for Good. Only 27, Andrew “builds and manages safe, affordable and dignified housing for individuals facing homelessness in Syracuse, New York.” How does he do it? In Signs of the Times, we discuss the first U.S.-born priest to be beatified, funeral Mass-crashing and the controversy around N.F.L. players taking a knee. This week we’re giving away print copies of the latest issue of America if you leave us an iTunes review! To have one personally mailed to you, leave us a review on iTunes and send us [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 29, 2017
Audrey Assad on doubt, social justice and mysticism—plus an exclusive album sneak peek Ep 31
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Last week, we talked about how to pray—this week, we bring you the music for those prayers as we talk with Catholic rockstar Audrey Assad. She is the daughter of a Syrian refugee, an author, speaker and producer who uses her music and her various social media platforms to talk about her Syrian identity and movements like Black Lives Matter. We talk to Audrey about her latest album, “Inheritance,” her conversion to Catholicism and more. We’ve also got an exclusive preview (!) of her next album, “Evergreen,” which debuts next year. Next in Signs of the Times, we pray for Mexico and the lives lost in the latest earthquake to hit the country. In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, we talk about “Siervas,” a rock band from Peru made up of 11 nuns. And an 11- [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 22, 2017
Father James Martin: The right way to pray is whatever works best for you. Ep. 30
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Chances are if you’re Catholic you’ve said it, or at least thought it: I am terrible at praying. I know I have (and am). You’ve tried the rosary. You’ve given the Examen a shot. You even dragged yourself to adoration. Why isn’t God answering?! Especially in this long slog between Pentecost and Advent, it’s easy to get discouraged. Fear not, dear listener. This week, we bring back Father James Martin, who has written a new book on prayer, In All Seasons, For All Reasons: Praying Throughout the Year. We ask him: How to (pumpkin?) spice up your prayer life during plain ol’ Ordinary Time? What’s your favorite way to pray? And what’s the worst prayer advice you’ve ever heard? (You can enter to win a free copy of Father Martin’s book if you leave us a review on iTunes, screenshot the review and then send it to jesuitical@americamedia.org!) We also asked listen [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 15, 2017
You need to pay attention to hip-hop if you’re religious. Here’s why. Ep. 29
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Rap got religious last year. At least that’s what Zac wrote earlier this year for America. The truth is, while it may have gotten more explicit about religion in 2016, hip-hop has always had a deep religious undercurrent to its bars and beats. This week we’re chatting with Alex Nava, the author of In Search of Soul: Hip-Hop, Literature, and Religion. We talk to Alex about religion’s influence on hip-hop and why people are surprised to find out about it. If you need any convincing before or after listening to us—go listen to Kendrick Lamar’s “How Much a Dollar Cost.” In Signs of the Times, we talk Pope Francis in Colombia, rapping nuns, beer-brewing monks and proposing in front of Pope Francis. Links from the show: Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 08, 2017
Maps, they don’t love you like I love you. Ep. 28
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Whether you connect our episode title to Beyoncé, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs or even Vampire Weekend, maps matter. This week we are talking with Molly Burhans, the founder and executive director of GoodLands, a startup that is mapping the global Catholic Church. Information can change lives and Molly helped us wrap our heads around the amazing work she and h [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 01, 2017
What makes a Catholic guy, The Catholic Guy? Ep. 27
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This week, we talk with Lino Rulli, host of “The Catholic Guy” on Sirius XM’s The Catholic Channel. We talk balancing his Catholicism and comedy, being vulnerable on air, relationships, late-night television and more. Is there anything he hasn’t (or wouldn’t) share with listeners after 10 years on the radio? In Signs of the Times, the “Mother Teresa of Pakistan” gets a state funeral. Iceland claims that it is on its way to eliminating people with Down Syndrome. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan gets grilled by a Dominican nun from Wisconsin on how he reconciles his politics and Catholic beliefs. St. Junipero Serra’s statue gets defaced in California amid national dialogue surrounding Confederate statues. Do statues with offensive history belong in public spaces? And finally, William Aitcheson, a Catholic priest in Virginia, has stepped down after revealing that he was a member of the Ku Klux Klan 40 years ago. Is he irredeemable? This week we also [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 25, 2017
Is there a right (or wrong) time for millennials to have kids? Ep. 26
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How could I possibly have kids if I can barely do my taxes without calling my mom in a panic on April 14? It’s a question I must admit that has crossed my mind more than once. I’ve never even owned a dog. Isn’t that a prereq for parenting these days? Our guest this week, Liz Bruenig, wears many hats: Washington Post editor, socialist, Catholic convert, Twitter enthusiast—and “young” mother. She pushes back against the idea that young people need to have their lives figured out before starting a family. In Signs of the Times, with a fun art project to celebrate the 300th anniversary of Our Lady of Czestochowa, the church is trying to reach out to the so-called selfie generation. So why are they asking people to snail mail their selfies? Next, just how far will some parents go to get their kids on the basketball team or honor roll? Two Catholic school parents in New Jersey took their case all the way up to the cardinal and the courts. Finally, we talk [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 18, 2017
Remembering Michael Brown and Ferguson with Rev. Broderick Greer. Ep. 25
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Three years ago this week, on Aug. 9, 2014, police officer Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown, an African-American teen in Ferguson, Mo. Within 24 hours of the shooting the Ferguson uprising began. On this episode, we talk with the Rev. Broderick Greer, an Episcopalian priest in Memphis, Tenn., who boarded a bus and headed to Ferguson following Mr. Brown’s death. He wrote about this experience in an article for America, “How Ferguson helped me understand my baptismal identity.” We ask Rev. Greer about his experience in Ferguson, black Christianity and why he doesn’t call himself an activist. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 11, 2017
Why can’t there be a magazine out there that doesn’t make women feel terrible? Ep. 24
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For millions of women around the world, women’s magazines—from Teen Vogue and Seventeen to Cosmopolitan and Glamour—have played a pivotal role in the way we are taught to view ourselves. These publications condition the way we view our hair, bodies, sexuality and relationships. But what are the damaging effects these publications can have on women? This week, we talk with Kara Eschbach, founder, CEO and editor in chief of Verily Magazine, “a photoshop-free magazine empowering women to be their best selves.” We talk with Kara about Verily’s mission statement, the differences between Catholic and secular media, accepting our flaws and more. And in Signs of the Times, Pope Francis celebrates the Feast of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus. Sean Spicer and Anthony Scaramucci, both Catholics, are out of the Trump administration. How long will the new chief of staff, Joh [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 04, 2017
Working out for the body of a god? What about the body of a convict? Ep. 23
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Are you working out for the body of a god? What about the body of a convict? Meet Coss Marte, our guest this week. After being arrested at 19 for running a multimillion dollar drug trade in New York City, Coss was sent to prison. There, doctors told him that his health problems and weight could kill him within a few years. After dropping 70 pounds in six months, and helping train other convicts to make dramatic changes, Coss also experienced a religious revival in a moment of desperation. Now Coss is the head of ConBody: a gym that offers prison-style bootcamp classes taught by formerly incarcerated trainers. We’ll be talking with Coss about how ConBody was developed, how his faith helped him while incarcerated and his prison reform activism. After, we’ve got consolations and desolations, where we tell you where we did or didn’t find God this week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 28, 2017
‘The Keepers’ isn’t easy to watch. Here’s why you should anyway. Ep. 22
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What is it about habits and cassocks that capture the imagination of even secular audiences? Mix those priests and nuns with a murder mystery and you’ve got a ready-made hit. Netflix’s Emmy-nominated documentary series “The Keepers,” begins with the story of Sister Cathy Cesnik, a beloved Catholic high school teacher, who was murdered in 1969 and whose case remains unsolved. But it quickly evolves into something much larger: an excruciating investigation into clerical sex abuse at the school. This week, we talk to Nick Ripatrazone about the series—and ask why it is important for Catholics to watch shows and films that expose the church’s sins. And in Signs of the Times, a message from the Holy Father: Stop complaining! At least to the pope. Save it for the Lord; he’s much more patient. Next, a Catholic priest in [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 21, 2017
Who goes on dates anymore? Ep. 21
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This week we’re going back to college. That means Natty Light, hook-ups and figuring out “gluten” is. This week our guest is Kerry Cronin, professor of philosophy at Boston College. She teaches her students, among other things, about the pitfalls of hookup culture and the dos and don’ts of Catholic dating. She frequently makes headlines (like this one: Ask Someone on a Date—or Kerry Cronin Will Fail You) because of an unorthodox assignment she includes in her classes: asking someone on a date. Like, a real date. So we discuss with Kerry what it’s like to date in college and beyond; we also break open the perennial debate of Tinder vs. Catholic Match. (Swipe right for Jesus!) In Signs of the Times, we break down the Vatican’s (not-so-new) rules on gluten-free Communion; pasta made to strangle priests; God propping up Stephen Colbert’s ratings; and the Cathol [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 14, 2017
Independence Day: Sharing in sin, success and beer. Ep. 20
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This week the United States celebrated the Fourth of July: a day where people gather with friends and families, drinking Budweisers and eating hot dogs. This week’s episode reflects on the state of the country. Our own Zac Davis wrote “Donald Trump’s sins are our sins, too, and impeachment won’t absolve them,” which we discuss in conversation about American exceptionalism and more. This week we chat about the new survey released by the Vatican in anticipation of next year’s Synod 2018 on Young People, the Faith, and Vocational Discernment. What does it mean to be a “young person” in the church? And how do you minister to the different age ranges within this demographic? We discuss this and more with Danny Gustafson. And finally, in a special consolations-only segment, we tell you where we find hope in the [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 07, 2017
Making it in the (secular) (white) media as a Catholic Latina. Ep. 19
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This week, we talk Latina identity, journalism and more with Juleyka Lantigua-Williams. She is the former senior supervising producer and editor of NPR’s Code Switch and a former staff writer at The Atlantic. She has covered issues ranging from women’s rights at home and abroad, environmental justice, U.S. immigration policy, poverty, maternal health, early childhood development and demographic changes. Lantigua-Williams is also the founder of Lantigua Williams & Co., a production company that seeks to amplify the “voices of organizations, people and projects that have a real sense of social justice.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 30, 2017
If you’re so depressed you can’t get off the floor, how can you get into the confessional? Ep 18
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Talking about mental health isn’t easy. And when you throw faith into the mix it often becomes even harder. Many Catholics mistakenly think that needing mental health treatment amounts to a kind of spiritual failure. This week, we talk with writer Simcha Fisher, author of The Sinner’s Guide to Natural Family Planning, about how she learned to balance her Catholic faith and therapy. And in Signs of the Times, for our listeners who have been anxiously awaiting an update, the stolen relic of St. John Bosco has been found—inside a teapot! In papal news, Pope Francis urges parents to “stop pretending to be adolescents”; and he meets with NFL legends. We also  talk about Britanny Hamama, a University of Michigan ju [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 23, 2017
Fr. James Martin: L.G.B.T Catholics have been treated like dirt. We can do better. Ep. 17
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This week, Father James Martin tells us why he was disappointed with how many church leaders spoke about the Orlando attack (very few uttered the word “gay”)—and what he’s doing to change the conversation within the church between the hierarchy and L.G.B.T. Catholics. (This being the prolific Jim Martin, there is a new book involved.) Zac Davis is in China. Sad! But we have found a Jesuit Zach to take his seat. Zach with an H works in prisons and with the formally incarcerated in New York City and we so enjoyed his company that we invited him to come back next week. In Signs of the Times: Who wore it better, Francis or JPII? According to the tailors and cobblers of Rome, papal fashion is changing under ou [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 16, 2017
News Cycle Survival 101 with an NPR reporter. Ep. 16
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How do you keep your sanity while covering the news in the Trump era? This week we’re talking with NPR congressional correspondent, host of the NPR Politics Podcast and proud Fordham alum Scott Detrow. Scott has some great tips for keeping up with the news without drowning in it. Pro-tip: Listen to jesuitical while bike riding. Church can help, too. In this week’s Signs of the Times, our self-described “tone deaf” pope belts out some hymns while at Mass with Charismatic Catholics, and our self-described “evangelical Catholic” vice president says, “American Catholics have an ally in President Trump.” Next, it has been said, “You can take away a relic of Don Bosco, but you can’t take away Don Bosco from the church or the world.” Wel [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 09, 2017
God and War Stories. Ep. 15
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“I had at least thought there would be nobility in war. I know it exists. There are so many stories, and some of them have to be true. But I see mostly normal men, trying to do good, beaten down by horror, by their inability to quell their own rages, by their masculine posturing and their so-called hardness, their desire to be tougher, and therefore crueler, than their circumstance. And yet, I have this sense that this place is holier than back home. Gluttonous, fat, oversexed, overconsuming, materialist home, where we’re too lazy to see our own faults.” That’s just a sample of the stinging and raw prose found in Phil Klay’s collection of short stories, Redeployment. Klay, a veteran of the Iraq war and recipient of the National Book Award, sat down with us to talk about Memorial Day, why we find it diffi [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 02, 2017
Some Catholics and a Rabbi Walk into a Podcast Studio Ep. 14
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What does the word “rabbi” stand for? Is a priest just the Catholic version of one? If you’ve ever had these questions, this week’s episode is just for you. We talk Judaism 101, “radical hospitality” and more with Rabbi Avram Mlotek. In Signs of the Times, Pope Francis selects five new Cardinals; Haitians in the United States get temporary protected status extensions; and Vice President Mike Pence and Greg Boyle speak at the Notre Dame Commencement. And, in what is slowly becoming the “Zac Davis Wonders Why This Is Interesting” section, we discuss “The Bachelorette.” Finally, the meeting everyone has been excitedly and anxiously awaiting: President Donald J. Trump and Pope Francis meet at the Vatican, or as we like to call it, PRUMP 2017. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 26, 2017
Stop, cooperate and listen: Ep 13
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Does capitalism not do it for you? Communism a bit much? There’s another way. This week we’re talking with Nathan Schneider (and his adorable baby, Daniel) about co-ops. Now, that word might bring to mind hippies living together and making vegan meals from the community garden (which Nathan did)—but there are hidden cooperative businesses all around you: REI, Dairy Queen, Southwest Airlines. We ask him about the Catholic roots of the co-op movement and why he thinks it’s making a comeback.  In Signs of the Times, President Trump is heading to the Vatican. Will Francis be “pope-like” enough for him? And, Simone Biles: great Catholic gymnast or the greatest Catholic gymnast? Next, it’s commencement speech controversy season. Do speakers at Catholic colleges need to agree with church teaching? Does anyone even remember commencement speeches? We discuss. Finally [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 19, 2017
From Elvis to Queen Bey, Finding God in All Tunes. Ep. 12
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Aside from being fodder for tattoos and Twitter bios, “Finding God in all things,” is a powerful idea that can spark an exploration into realms of pop culture that often are considered… surprising. This week we chat with Professor Tom Beaudoin from Fordham University about his course: “Faith in Music: Sound Theology From the Blues to Beyoncé.” In Signs of the Times, we’ll catch up on the recently unemployed James Comey and the flood of news surrounding President Trump and his visit to Rome. All that and more on this week’s epsiode of Jesuitical. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 12, 2017
My Big Fat Very Catholic Dream Wedding. Ep. 11
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Are you a Sorta Catholic? Symptoms include: residual guilt, love for Pope Francis, alternating between church and SoulCycle Sundays. This week’s guest is a Sorta Catholic who wound up having a Very Catholic Wedding. Tracey Wigfield won an Emmy as a writer for “30 Rock” and is a graduate of Boston College (you can decide which is more impressive). In Signs of the Times, we check in on the bros of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus. Much to our dismay, the Ringling Bros are not a traveling fraternity. May Day, Catholic scientists, Pope Francis in Egypt and a new study on college education and religion, all that and more this week on Jesuitical.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 05, 2017
We choose life: Arkansas, Nebraska and the death penalty. Ep 10
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This week we’re talking with Brother Joseph Hoover, S.J., about the Catholic Church’s fight against the death penalty. Signs of the Times includes a band formed by four Dominican sisters. On the Pope Francis news front, we’ve got his latest donations to an Italian non-profit, his comparison of refugee camps to concentration camps and his surprise TED Talk calling for a “revolution of tenderness.” And finally, we wade into the debate around being a Catholic and a member of the Democratic Party. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 28, 2017
Jesus is risen. And so are our glasses. Ep. 9
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He is risen! And so are our pint glasses, now that Lent is over. This week, we chat with Andy Otto, author of the new book God Moments: Unexpected Encounters in the Ordinary and author of the blog godinallthings.com. Who gets to be an expert on Ignatian spirituality? What are “God moments?” And how can Ignatian discernment help you with making the big and small choices in life? In Signs of the Times, we open up Pope Francis’ annual Easter message, “Urbi et Orbi,” Bill O’Reilly’s up-and-down Wednesday, anti-Catholic Irish slurs, what schism really means and whether you should put down your yoga mat and pick up your cross. Finally, in consolations and desolations, which is quickly devolving to the “we go to church with our significant others” part of the show, we look at where we found God in our [...] Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 21, 2017
It’s all Good… Friday. Ep. 8
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Why is the Easter Vigil so long and why should you definitely attend it? We sat down with Fr. James Martin, S.J. (again) to talk about all things Holy Week. This week we also explain where we got the phrase “Signs of the Times,” no we didn’t make it up. All that and more for this, the holiest week of the year, and perhaps the holiest of all Jesuitical episodes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 14, 2017
Disney Kids 4eva - Bonus Episode (Featuring our moms)
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We had so much fun talking Beauty and the Beast last week, that we decided to take a deeper dive into how Disney influenced our upbringings. So we decided to ring up the people best able to assess that: our mothers.    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 06, 2017
Be our guest! Ep: 6
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This week we are talking all things “Beauty and the Beast.” Alfonso Pizano, S.J., who spent 14 years working at Disneyland, “where he piloted the monorail, sailed submarines, hawked souvenirs and danced in the Christmas Fantasy Parade,” joins to offer his expertise. He is currently a Jesuit scholastic studying philosophy at Fordham University in New York. This week on jesuitical, we talk with Alfie about some of his favorite Disney moments and what makes the 2017 version of “Beauty” different than its Oscar-nominated original. In Signs of the Times, we discuss Pope Francis landing the third spot on Fortune’s world leaders list, why the pope wants you to stop bullying, zombie Catholics and President Trump’s latest executive order. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 31, 2017
Busted Brackets and the Jesuit Elite Eight - Bonus Extra
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Our brackets are busted! Back in Episode 4, we talked March Madness with Paddy Gilger, SJ.  We decided to give Paddy a call and rub in the fact that Zac predicted the Jesuit Elite Eight matchup between Xavier and Gonzaga. Who are the Jesuits rooting for this round, Xavier or Gonzaga? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 25, 2017
Is Pope Francis subtweeting Donald Trump? Ep. 5
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Four years ago this month, the Argentine cardinal (and Jesuit) Jorge Bergoglio became Pope Francis. Michael O’Loughlin, America’s national correspondent and author of The Tweetable Pope: A Spiritual Revolution in 140 Characters, has been covering this historic papacy ever since. This week on jesuitical, we ask Mike who has a better Twitter game: Pope Francis or President Trump? And in Signs of the Times, we discuss the wrong ways to use the rosary, the right ways to use technology and a meeting of prominent Catholics at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 24, 2017
The Jesuit Guide to March Madness. Ep: 4
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Is your bracket busted? Did you pick an upset, just the wrong one? Take a break from the madness of March and listen in as we talk with Paddy Gilger, S.J., about the top Jesuit moments in the NCAA tournament’s history, the good things sports can do for us and when they become a religion of their own.  In our review of this week’s Catholic news, we look at where you can eat corned beef this St. Patrick’s Day Friday, mark Pope Francis’ four years as pope and return to last week’s debate about ouija boards (I get some vindication, here, I’m not proud to admit).  And finally, in Consolations and Desolations we fess up to not being experts in Ignatian spirituality. But we believe that God loves us when we try, as do our Jesuit colleagues.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 17, 2017
A woman’s place is in the…Vatican? Ep: 3
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One year ago, on International Women’s Day, Nicole Perone had the opportunity to speak at the Vatican before hundreds of activists and Catholic leaders about the importance of giving young Catholics and women real leadership in the church. This year, she had the opportunity to tell jesuitical all about it…. Upgrade?  And in Signs of the Times, we discuss the Catholic high school that made millions off of Snapchat, Pope Francis says, “Get off Snapchat!” and we return to the age old question: Should you give a beggar money, even if “he just spends it on a glass of wine”? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 10, 2017
Being undocumented in Donald Trump’s America. Ep: 2
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So since we weren’t canceled after one episode, we’re happy to present Episode 2! We speak with Jorgé Corona, a producer at Gizmodo Media Company, about a viral video he made about what it’s like to be an undocumented immigrant in the United States. And in Signs of the Times, we shine some more light on the chaplain to Loyola University Chicago’s basketball team: 97-year-old Sister Jean Dolores Schmidt. And Pope Francis settles the eternal question: Should you give money to homeless people who ask you? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 03, 2017
Father James Martin on what makes a good Lent. Also, our pilot.
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What does James Martin, S.J., give up for Lent? And does he cheat on Sundays? On our debut episode of (jesuit)ical, we sit down with America’s editor at large to talk about how he approaches Lent, what living saint he would canonize today and why you  might not want to but nevertheless should go to confession.  And in this week’s Signs of the Times, we’ve got stories on how people of faith view Donald Trump’s refugee ban and some bad news for purveyors of Pope Francis swag and memes.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 01, 2017