Science Talk

By Scientific American

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Anders
 Jul 13, 2020

Description

Science Talk is a weekly science audio show covering the latest in the world of science and technology. Join Steve Mirsky each week as he explores cutting-edge breakthroughs and controversial issues with leading scientists and journalists. He is also an articles editor and columnist at Scientific American magazine. His column, "Antigravity," is one of science writing's great humor venues. Also check our daily podcast from Scientific American : "60-Second Science." To view all of our archived podcasts please go to www.scientificamerican.com/podcast

Episode Date
COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues
00:24:23
Contributing editor W. Wayt Gibbs spoke with Arthur Caplan , head of the NYU School of Medicine’s division of medical ethics, about some of the ethical issues that researchers have to consider in testing and distributing vaccines against COVID-19.
Aug 07, 2020
How Your Homes and Buildings Affect You
00:34:20
Journalist and author Emily Anthes talks about her book The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of How Buildings Shape Our Behavior, Health, and Happiness.
Jul 30, 2020
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice
00:29:25
Journalist Bob Hirshon reports from the Taking Nature Black conference, reporter Shahla Farzan talks about tracking copperhead snakes, and nanoscientist Ondrej Krivanek on microscopes with sub-ångström resolution.
Jul 21, 2020
How Nature Helps Body and Soul
00:29:52
Journalist and author Florence Williams talks about her book The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier and More Creative.
Jun 28, 2020
The Messenger Is the Message
00:36:39
Behavioral scientist Stephen Martin and psychologist Joseph Marks talk about their book Messengers: Who We Listen To, Who We Don't, and Why.
Jun 26, 2020
Air, Sea and Space: Ocean Health, Atmosphere Insights and Black Holes
00:24:33
Miriam Goldstein, Ph.D. in biological oceanography, talks about issues facing the oceans; reporter Adam Levy discusses air pollution info available because of the pandemic; and astrophysicist Andrew Fabian chats about black holes.
Jun 21, 2020
Science on the Hill: Calculating Climate
00:59:55
For the fourth Science on the Hill event, "Future Climate: What We Know, What We Don't", experts talked with Scientific American senior editor Mark Fischetti about what goes into modeling our climate and how such models are used in addition to long-term climate prediction.
Jun 18, 2020
Your Brain, Free Will and the Law
00:42:06
Stanford University neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky talks about human behavior, the penal system and the question of free will.
May 29, 2020
No, No Nobel: How to Lose the Prize
00:42:57
Physicist Brian Keating talks about his book Losing the Nobel Prize: A Story of Cosmology, Ambition, and the Perils of Science’s Highest Honor .
May 19, 2020
Galileo's Fight against Science Denial
00:25:52
Astrophysicist and author Mario Livio talks about his latest book, Galileo: And the Science Deniers, and how the legendary scientist’s battles are still relevant today.
May 05, 2020
Where Is Everybody Else in the Universe?
00:22:07
Guest host Wayt Gibbs talks with Jason Wright, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University's Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds about what's known as the Fermi Paradox: in a universe of trillions of planets, where is everybody?
Apr 28, 2020
Why Exercise Is So Good For You
00:30:29
Health journalist Judy Foreman talks about her new book Exercise Is Medicine: How Physical Activity Boosts Health and Slows Aging
Apr 25, 2020
COVID-19: What the Autopsies Reveal
00:15:31
Pathologists are starting to get a closer look at the damage that COVID-19 does to the body by carefully examining the internal organs of people who have died from the novel coronavirus.
Apr 24, 2020
COVID-19: The Need for Secure Labs--and Their Risks
00:14:32
Coronavirus research requires high-containment labs. Journalist Elisabeth Eaves talks with Scientific American contributing editor W. Wayt Gibbs about her article "The Risks of Building Too Many Biohazard Labs?", a joint project of the New Yorker and the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists .  
Apr 03, 2020
Flat Earthers: What They Believe and Why
00:33:51
Michael Marshall, project director of the Good Thinking Society in the U.K., talks about flat earth belief and its relationship to conspiracy theories and other antiscience activities.
Mar 27, 2020
COVID-19: Predicting the Path and Analyzing Immunity
00:15:48
Scientific American contributing editor W. Wayt Gibbs continues to report on the coronavirus outbreak from his home in Kirkland, Wash., site of the first U.S. cases. In this installment, he talks with researchers about what their models show for the future of the pandemic and on research to create tests to see who has developed immunity.
Mar 24, 2020
COVID-19: How and Why the Virus Spreads Quickly
00:13:59
Scientific American contributing editor W. Wayt Gibbs reports from the original U.S. epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, Kirkland, Washington. In this installment of our ongoing series, he talks with researchers about the properties of the virus and why the virus spreads so quickly.
Mar 24, 2020
COVID-19: The Wildlife Trade and Human Disease
00:12:01
Christian Walzer, executive director of global health at the Wildlife Conservation Society, talks about how the wildlife trade, especially for human consumption, can lead to disease outbreaks.
Mar 20, 2020
David Quammen: How Animal Infections Spill Over to Humans
00:34:34
In this 2012 interview, David Quammen talks about his book, Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, which is highly relevant to the emergence of the coronavirus that has changed our lives.
Mar 19, 2020
COVID-19: Dealing with Social Distancing
00:13:59
Judy Moskowitz, professor of medical social skills at Northwestern University, talks about ways to cope during this time of missing out on our usual diet of social interactions.
Mar 17, 2020
Coronavirus Hot Zone: Research and Responses in the U.S. Epicenter
00:13:49
Scientific American contributing editor W. Wayt Gibbs reports from the U.S. epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, Kirkland, Washington. In this installment of our ongoing series, he talks with researchers about the efforts to create vaccines and treatments, and the challenges the outbreak poses to cancer patients and others who are immunocompromised.
Mar 14, 2020
Coronavirus Hot Zone: The View from the U.S. Epicenter
00:16:35
Scientific American contributing editor Wayt Gibbs reports from the U.S. epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, Kirkland, Washington. In this first of an ongoing series, he looks at why children seem to weather this disease better than adults and the complicated issue of shuttering schools.
Mar 10, 2020
The New Cosmos: A Conversation with Ann Druyan
00:33:42
Emmy and Peabody Award–winning science writer, producer and director Ann Druyan talks about Cosmos: Possible Worlds, the next installment of the Cosmos series.
Mar 08, 2020
Advancing Efforts in Disease Interception
00:21:50
Ben Wiegand, global head of the World Without Disease Accelerator at Janssen, the Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, talks about efforts to prevent a disease or to identify it in its earliest stages for more effective treatments.
Feb 27, 2020
Kirk, Spock and Darwin
00:23:31
Duke University evolutionary biologist Mohamed Noor talks about his book Live Long and Evolve: What Star Trek Can Teach Us About Evolution, Genetics, and Life on Other Worlds.
Feb 13, 2020
How to Make a Mass Extinction
00:39:45
Journalist and author Peter Brannen talks about his book The Ends of the World: Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth’s Past Mass Extinctions .
Jan 30, 2020
Air Pollution: An Unclear and Present Danger
00:37:15
Journalist and author Beth Gardiner talks about her new book Choked: Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution. And CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna talks about gene editing.  
Nov 21, 2019
150 Years of the Journal Nature
00:33:34
Nature is arguably the world’s most prestigious scientific journal. Editor in chief Magdalena Skipper spoke with Scientific American ’s acting editor in chief Curtis Brainard about her journal as it celebrates its 150th anniversary.
Nov 11, 2019
Lithium-Ion Battery Creators Win Chemistry Nobel Prize
00:15:46
John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino share the 2019 Chemistry Nobel Prize for the development of lithium-ion batteries that have led to portable electronic devices that are rechargeable virtually anywhere on the planet.
Oct 10, 2019
How Cells Sense Oxygen Levels: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
00:22:43
William Kaelin, Sir Peter Ratcliffe and Gregg Semenza share the 2019 Nobel Prize for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability. New therapies for cancer and conditions such as anemia are in the pipeline based on these discoveries.  
Oct 08, 2019
Talking Health and Energy at U.N. Climate Action Summit
00:24:17
Scientific American senior editor Jen Schwartz talks with WHO officials Maria Neira and Agnès Soucat about climate and health and with Rachel Kyte, special representative to the U.N. secretary-general for, and CEO of, Sustainable Energy for All.
Oct 02, 2019
Kicking Climate Change: Wins for Health, the Economy and Security
00:21:00
Former EPA Adminstrator Gina McCarthy talks with Scientific American's Andrea Thompson about the widespread benefits of taking action against climate change.
Sep 28, 2019
The Mathematical Language of Nature
00:34:16
Physics historian Graham Farmelo talks about his latest book, The Universe Speaks in Numbers: How Modern Math Reveals Nature's Deepest Secrets.
Sep 24, 2019
Jacks-of-All-Trades Make the Grade
00:39:57
Journalist and author David Epstein talks about his new book Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World.
Aug 10, 2019
It's Melting: Science on Ice
00:24:46
Glaciologist Elizabeth Case, of Columbia University Earth Institute's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, takes us out near Juneau to study and live on the shifting ice.
Jul 21, 2019
Joseph Lange's Campaign against HIV
00:48:08
Seema Yasmin, director of research and education at the Stanford Health Communication Initiative, talks about her book The Impatient Dr. Lange: One Man’s Fight to End the Global HIV Epidemic. Lange was killed five years ago today when flight MH17 was shot down.  
Jul 17, 2019
Bone Up on What's Inside You
00:44:39
Author and self-described fossil fanatic Brian Switek talks about his new book Skeleton Keys: The Secret Life of Bone.
Jun 26, 2019
Solving Our Plastic Problem
00:35:11
At Scientific American 's third Science on the Hill event, experts from academia and the private sector met at the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill to talk with Scientific American editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina about solutions to our plethora-of-plastics problem.  
Jun 19, 2019
Secrets of the Universe Revealed!
00:36:39
Cornell University applied mathematics professor Steven Strogatz talks about his new book Infinite Powers: How Calculus Reveals the Secrets of the Universe.
May 24, 2019
How the Black Hole Said Cheese
00:21:44
Scientific American 's chief features editor Seth Fletcher talks about his book Einstein's Shadow, an account of the long effort to image a black hole that recently came to fruition.
Apr 29, 2019
A Tree and Its People in a Warming Landscape
00:35:51
Conservation scientist Lauren Oakes discusses her book about Alaska ecology and sociology, In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress, and a Changing World.
Apr 22, 2019
Science Couple Phages Out Superbug
00:34:32
Medical researcher Steffanie Strathdee needed to save the life of her husband, researcher Tom Patterson, when he contracted one of the world's worst infections. She turned to phage therapy: using a virus to kill the bacteria.
Mar 13, 2019
Vaccine Rejection: Truth and Consequences
00:24:52
Kent State epidemiologist Tara Smith talks about vaccines, recent preventable measles outbreaks and her 2017 journal article on vaccine rejection.
Feb 20, 2019
On the Origin of Darwin
00:15:07
On this 210th anniversary of Darwin's birth we hear evolution writer and historian Richard Milner perform a brief monologue as Charles Darwin, and former Scientific American editor in chief John Rennie and Darwin's great-great-grandson Matthew Chapman read excerpts from The Origin of Species .
Feb 12, 2019
Warming Arctic on Thin Ice
00:16:08
Scientific American collections editor Andrea Gawrylewski talks to managing editor Curtis Brainard about how warming in the Arctic affects us all. And glaciologist Elizabeth Case takes us out near Juneau to study and live on the shifting ice.
Jan 31, 2019
Fake Whiskeys and Octo-Ecstasy
00:28:18
Scientific American assistant news editor, Tanya Lewis, and collections editor, Andrea Gawrylewski, take a deeper look at two short articles from the Advances news section of the December issue, on counterfeit whiskeys and the effect of real ecstasy...on octopuses.
Jan 14, 2019
Ultima Thule and the Apes of Earth
00:07:25
As the New Horizons mission approached Ultima Thule, Rowan University paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara put our close-up study of the Kuiper Belt object into a deep-time perspective.
Jan 03, 2019
Meet the Real Ravenmaster
00:38:19
Christopher Skaife talks about his new book The Ravenmaster: My Life with the Ravens at the Tower of London, in front of a live audience at Caveat, “the speakeasy bar for intelligent nightlife" in Lower Manhattan.
Dec 18, 2018
The Crusade against Dangerous Food, Part 2
00:21:05
Pulitzer Priz​e–winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the 20th Century, Part 2.
Nov 22, 2018
The Crusade against Dangerous Food, Part 1
00:30:00
Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the 20th Century, Part 1.
Nov 22, 2018
Bones and Stones: Cemetery Geology
00:32:53
A tour of Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, N.Y., focuses on the geology of the landscape and the mausoleums.
Oct 31, 2018
Tinder for Cheetahs; and an Unusual Blindness
00:25:31
Scientific American assistant news editor, Tanya Lewis, and collections editor, Andrea Gawrylewski, host a new podcast that takes a deeper look at short articles from the Advances news section of the magazine.
Oct 17, 2018
Better Living through Evolution: Nobel Prize in Chemistry
00:14:28
Frances Arnold, George Smith and Gregory Winter shared the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for using evolutionary principles to create highly efficient enzymes and antibodies, with numerous practical applications.
Oct 03, 2018
Laser Advances That Changed Our Lives: Nobel Prize in Physics
00:29:15
Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland shared the Nobel Prize for finding ways to control and enhance laser light, leading to numerous common applications. 
Oct 02, 2018
Unleashing Immunity against Cancer: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
00:20:47
James P. Allison and and Tasuku Honjo shared the Nobel Prize for their discovery of inhibition of negative immune regulation, the basis of new drugs against cancer.
Oct 01, 2018
Where There's a Wills There's a Way to Explain the Home Run Rise
00:30:50
Astrophysicist and sports data scientist Meredith Wills talks about why a subtle change in Major League baseballs may be behind the jump in home runs after 2014.
Oct 01, 2018
More People, but Less Hardship?
00:26:34
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Sue Desmond-Hellmann talks about the just-issued Goalkeepers Report, tracking progress against poverty and disease even as the population keeps rising.
Sep 25, 2018
Here's Looking at Humanity, Kid
00:24:49
Senior Editor Gary Stix talks about the September special issue of Scientific American , devoted to the science of being human. And Brown University evolutionary biologist Ken Miller discusses human chromosome 2 and what it tells us about us.
Sep 05, 2018
Life at the Improv: The Power of Imagination
00:40:45
Stephen Asma, professor of philosophy at Columbia College Chicago, talks about his two latest books, The Evolution of Imagination and Why We Need Religion .
Aug 17, 2018
Out with the Bad Science
00:37:52
NPR science journalist Richard Harris talks about his book, Rigor Mortis: How Sloppy Science Creates Worthless Cures, Crushes Hope and Wastes Billions .
Aug 02, 2018
AI, Robotics and Your Health
00:31:27
At the second Science on the Hill event, AI, Robotics and Your Health, experts from academia and the private sector talked with Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina about the future of AI and robotics in medicine.  
Jun 19, 2018
Dinosaurs: From Humble Beginnings to Global Dominance
00:35:55
Edinburgh University paleontologist Steve Brusatte talks about his May 2018 Scientific American article, "The Unlikely Triumph of the Dinosaurs," and his new book, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World .
May 23, 2018
Humans Evolved but Are Still Special
00:40:20
Brown University biologist and author Ken Miller talks about his new book The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness and Free Will .
Apr 30, 2018
A Brain Deprived of Memory
00:29:54
Michael Lemonick, opinion editor at Scientific American , talks about his most recent book, The Perpetual Now: A Story of Amnesia, Memory and Love , about Lonni Sue Johnson, who suffered a specific kind of brain damage that robbed her of much of her memory and her ability to form new memories, and what she has revealed to neuroscientists about memory and the brain.
Mar 30, 2018
Blockchain beyond Bitcoin: The Energy Sector
00:11:37
Freelance science journalist Kevin Begos reports from the U.S. Power and Renewable Summit in Austin, Texas, on the use of blockchain technology to make more efficient energy markets and distribution. 
Feb 28, 2018
Enrico Fermi: The Last Man Who Knew Everything
00:39:19
David N. Schwartz talks about his latest book, The Last Man Who Knew Everything: The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi, Father of the Nuclear Age .  
Feb 19, 2018
A Future for American Energy
00:39:44
At the first Science Meets Congress event, Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future, energy and innovation experts from academia, government and the private sector talked with Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina about American's energy future.  
Jan 29, 2018
The Skinny on Fat
00:38:23
Biochemist Sylvia Tara talks about her book The Secret Life of Fat: The Science behind the Body's Least-Understood Organ and What It Means for You .
Dec 12, 2017
Your Brain Is So Easily Fooled
00:32:13
Journalist Erik Vance talks about his first book, Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain’s Ability to Deceive, Transform and Heal .
Nov 27, 2017
Come On and Zoom (through the Universe)
00:29:44
Caleb Scharf, director of Columbia University’s Astrobiology Center talks about his latest book, The Zoomable Universe: An Epic Tour through Cosmic Scale, from Almost Everything to Almost Nothing, and the OSIRIS-REx space mission.
Nov 12, 2017
Monsters: Not Just for Halloween
00:38:43
Stephen Asma, professor of philosophy at Columbia College Chicago and author of On Monsters: An Unnatural History of Our Worst Fears, talks about our enduring fascination with monsters.
Oct 25, 2017
Maryn McKenna's Big Chicken, Part 2
00:19:19
Award-winning journalist Maryn McKenna talks about her latest book, Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats . (Part 2 of 2)
Oct 18, 2017
Maryn McKenna's Big Chicken, Part 1
00:30:00
Award-winning journalist Maryn McKenna talks about her latest book, Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats . (Part 1 of 2)
Oct 18, 2017
Nobel Prize Explainer: Catching Proteins in the Act
00:10:49
The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded jointly to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson for developing cryo-electron microscopy that can determine high-resolution structures of biomolecules in solution.
Oct 04, 2017
Nobel Prize Explainer: Gravitational Waves and the LIGO Detector
00:17:29
The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded today to Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne for their contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves.
Oct 03, 2017
Nobel Prize Explainer: Circadian Rhythm's Oscillatory Control Mechanism
00:16:44
The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded today to Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young for discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms.
Oct 02, 2017
Does Evolution Repeat Itself?
00:43:00
Jonathan Losos, biology professor at Harvard and curator of herpetology at the university’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, talks about his latest book, Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance and the Future of Evolution .
Sep 27, 2017
The Great American Eclipse
00:38:09
In advance of the big solar eclipse on August 21, author and journalist David Baron talks about his new book American Eclipse: A Nation's Epic Race to Catch the Shadow of the Moon and Win the Glory of the World .
Aug 08, 2017
Curiouser and Curiouser
00:25:04
Astrophysicist and author Mario Livio ventures deep into the human mind in his new book, Why? What Makes Us Curious .
Aug 01, 2017
The Shark That Conquered the Whorl
00:39:10
Journalist and author Susan Ewing talks about her new book Resurrecting the Shark: A Scientific Obsession and the Mavericks Who Solved the Mystery of a 270-Million-Year-Old Fossil . (And we'll discuss how Helicoprion is not technically a shark, but it's really close!)
Jul 22, 2017
Undersea National Monument Could Be Left High and Dry
00:23:47
Scott Kraus, vice president and senior science advisor at the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life at the New England Aquarium in Boston, talks about the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, created last year and already under threat.  
Jul 12, 2017
Wacky Florida's Weird Science
00:31:37
Journalist Craig Pittman of the Tampa Bay Times talks about his book, Oh, Florida! How America’s Weirdest State Influences the Rest of the Country .
Jun 19, 2017
The Gestation Equation: Testing Babies' Genes
00:38:37
Journalist Bonnie Rochman talks about her new Scientific American /Farrar, Straus and Giroux book, The Gene Machine: How Genetic Technologies Are Changing the Way We Have Kids—and the Kids We Have .
Jun 02, 2017
5G Wiz: What's on the Horizon for Mobile
00:17:42
Verizon’s director of network planning, Sanyogita Shamsunder, talks with Scientific American 's Larry Greenemeier about the coming 5G and EM-spectrum-based communications in general.
May 30, 2017
Take the Tube: Underground as a Way of Life
00:30:24
Emory University paleontologist, geologist and ichnologist Anthony J. Martin talks about his new book, The Evolution Underground: Burrows, Bunkers and the Marvelous Subterranean World beneath Our Feet .
May 03, 2017
Killer Cats Bash Biodiversity
00:23:45
Conservation biologist Peter Marra talks with journalist Rene Ebersole about the threat of outdoor cats to wild animals and to human health. Marra is the co-author, with writer Chris Santella, of the book Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Cuddly Killer .
Apr 24, 2017
Dogging It: Turning Wild Foxes into Man's Second-Best Friend
00:32:49
Evolutionary biologist and science historian Lee Dugatkin talks about the legendary six-decade Siberian experiment in fox domestication run by Lyudmila Trut, his co-author of a new book and Scientific American article about the research.
Apr 18, 2017
What's Driving the Self-Driving Cars Rush
00:11:15
Scientific American technology editor Larry Greenemeier talks with Ken Washington, vice president of Research and Advanced Engineering at Ford, about self-driving cars.
Mar 28, 2017
Biology's Lessons for Business
00:20:42
Martin K. Reeves and Simon Levin talk about their Scientific American essay "Building a Resilient Business Inspired by Biology."
Mar 22, 2017
Churchill's Extraterrestrials
00:11:56
Astrophysicist and author Mario Livio writes in the journal Nature and talks to Scientific American about the recently rediscovered essay by Winston Churchill that analyzed with impressive scientific accuracy the conditions under which extraterrestrial life might exist.  
Feb 15, 2017
Rapid-Response Vaccines for Epidemic Outbreaks
00:13:45
Trevor Mundel, president of global health at the Gates Foundation, talks to Scientific American editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina about the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) and the efforts to create vaccine platforms for rapid responses to epidemics.
Jan 31, 2017
Exit Interview: Presidential Science Advisor John Holdren
00:32:51
Scientific American executive editor Fred Guterl talks with Pres. Obama’s science advisor, John Holdren , about climate science, space travel, the issue of reproducibility in science, the brain initiative and more .
Jan 19, 2017
We're Taking You to Bellevue
00:37:58
Pulitzer Prize–winning N.Y.U. historian David Oshinsky, director of the Division of Medical Humanities at the N.Y.U. Langone Medical Center, talks about his latest book, Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America’s Most Storied Hospital .
Jan 17, 2017
Best Science Books of 2016
00:13:23
Barbara Kiser, books and arts editor at Nature , talks about her favorite science books of 2016, especially three works about the little-known history of women mathematicians.
Dec 31, 2016
Getting Robots to Say No
00:18:30
Gordon Briggs, a postdoc at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, talks about the article he and Matthias Scheutz, director of the Human Robot Interaction Laboratory at Tufts University, wrote in the January Scientific American titled "The Case for Robot Disobedience."
Dec 21, 2016
How Myths Evolve over Time and Migrations
00:14:09
Julien d’Huy, of the Pantheon–Sorbonne University in Paris, talks about the use of evolutionary theory and computer modeling in the comparative analysis of myths and folktales, the subject of his article in the December 2016 Scientific American .  
Nov 15, 2016
Attack On the Internet: Weak-Link Nanny Cams
00:18:25
Paul Rosenzweig, former deputy assistant secretary for policy in the Department of Homeland Security and founder of Red Branch Consulting, PLLC, talks about the October 21 attack on internet service in the U.S. that left millions without connectivity for hours.
Oct 26, 2016
Flint's Water and Environmental Justice
00:18:31
The University of Michigan's Paul Mohai, a leading researcher of issues related to environmental justice, talked about the Flint water crisis at a workshop sponsored by the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources, attended by Scientific American contributing editor Robin Lloyd.  
Oct 17, 2016
Chemistry Nobel Prize: Machines Too Small to See
00:20:10
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded today to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir James Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa for the design and synthesis of molecular machines.    
Oct 05, 2016
Physics Nobel Prize: Buns, Bagels and Pretzels Help Explain Exotic Matter
00:18:51
The Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded today to David J. Thouless, F. Duncan Haldane and J. Michael Kosterlitz for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter.    
Oct 04, 2016
Nobel Prize Explainer: Autophagy
00:08:54
The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded today to Yoshinori Ohsumi of Japan for his discoveries concerning autophagy. Following the announcement, journalist Lotta Fredholm spoke to Juleen Zierath, chair of the Nobel Committee for Physiology or Medicine, about the research.    
Oct 03, 2016
They Do What?!: The Wide Wild World of Animal Sex
00:28:05
Carin Bondar talks about her new book Wild Sex, which covers the strange, surreal and sometimes scary sex lives of our animal cousins.    
Sep 26, 2016
Big Bang of Body Types: Sports Science at the Olympics and beyond
00:34:20
David Epstein talks about his 2013 bestseller The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance and his recent Scientific American article "Magic Blood and Carbon-Fiber Legs at the Brave New Olympics."  
Aug 17, 2016
Grand Canyon Rapids Ride for Evolution Education
00:33:31
Each summer, the National Center for Science Education organizes a boat trip down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon to bring visitors face to wall-face with striking examples of geologic and evolutionary processes.
Aug 16, 2016
The Science of Soldiering: Mary Roach's Grunt
00:36:37
Best-selling science writer Mary Roach talks about her latest book, Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.  
Aug 04, 2016
Electric Eels versus Horses: Shocking but True
00:14:20
Kenneth Catania of Vanderbilt University talks to Cynthia Graber about electric eel research that led him to accept 19th-century naturalist Alexander von Humboldt's account of electric eels attacking horses.    
Jun 27, 2016
Tiger, Tiger, Being Tracked
00:24:34
Wildlife Conservation Society researcher Ullas Karanth talks about his July, 2016, Scientific American article on state-of-the-art techniques for tracking tigers and estimating their populations and habitat health.  
Jun 16, 2016
Gravitational Wave Scientists Astounded--by Your Interest
00:06:44
Caltech’s Kip Thorne and Ronald Drever and MIT’s Rainer Weiss were the founders of the LIGO experiment that detected gravitational waves. They were just awarded the Kavli Prize in Astrophysics and two of them spoke with Scientific American 's Clara Moskowitz about LIGO and the public's reaction.  
Jun 14, 2016
Sean M. Carroll Looks at The Big Picture
00:30:26
Caltech theoretical physicist Sean M. Carroll talks about his new book The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself . (Dutton, 2016)  
May 12, 2016
The Bowling Ball That Invaded Earth
00:34:39
Former Scientific American editor Mark Alpert talks about his latest science fiction thriller, The Orion Plan, featuring the method whereby aliens most likely really would colonize our planet.  
May 05, 2016
Different Minds: The Wide World of Animal Smarts
00:36:45
Primatologist Frans de Waal discusses his latest book, Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? (Norton, 2016).  
Apr 29, 2016
The Perfect Bet: Taking the Gambling out of Gambling
00:34:29
Mathematician and author Adam Kucharski talks about his new book The Perfect Bet: How Science and Math Are Taking the Luck Out of Gambling (Basic Books, 2016).  
Apr 15, 2016
Gorilla's Hum Is a Do-Not-Disturb Sign
00:04:30
If a socially prominent gorilla is in the midst of a meal, it may hum or sing to tell others nearby that it's busy at the moment and will get back to you later.  
Feb 29, 2016
Bill Gates Wants a Miracle
00:35:21
Scientific American 's energy and environment editor, David Biello, met with Bill Gates on February 22 to discuss tackling carbon emissions while at the same time making necessary energy available to ever more of the globe’s growing population.  
Feb 25, 2016
From AI to Zika: AAAS Conference Highlights
00:17:49
Scientific American editors Mark Fischetti, Dina Maron and Seth Fletcher talk about the info they picked up at the just-concluded annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C. Subjects covered include gravitational waves, whether there's really a war on science, the growing concern over Zika virus, sea level rise and advances in artificial intelligence.  
Feb 16, 2016
Gravitational Waves Found: Kip Thorne Explains
00:15:42
Scientific American 's Josh Fischman talks with renowned astrophysicist and general relativity expert Kip Thorne about the discovery of gravitational waves by the LIGO Project, co-founded by Thorne.  
Feb 12, 2016
The Big Gath Dig: Goliath's Hometown
00:29:47
Freelance journalist Kevin Begos talks with archaeologist Aren Maeir, from Bar Ilan University in Israel, at his dig site in Gath, thought to be Goliath's hometown and a major city of the Philistine civilization.  
Feb 10, 2016
Roman Sanitation Didn't Stop Roaming Parasites
00:07:15
The University of Cambridge's Piers Mitchell, author of the 2015 book Sanitation, Latrines and Intestinal Parasites in Past Populations, talks about the counterintuitive findings in his recent paper in the journal Parasitology titled "Human parasites in the Roman World: health consequences of conquering an empire."  
Jan 13, 2016
Evolution Still on Trial 10 Years after Dover
00:31:33
Evolutionary biologist Nicholas Matzke talks about the Kitzmiller v. Dover evolution trial on the 10th anniversary of the decision. He advised the plaintiffs while working for the National Center for Science Education. He also discusses the continuing post- Dover attempts to get creationist narratives taught in public school science classrooms.  
Dec 20, 2015
Lifting the Visor on Virtual Reality
00:14:54
Ken Perlin, a New York University computer science professor and virtual reality pioneer, talks with Scientific American tech editor Larry Greenemeier about the state of virtual reality , its history and where it's heading  
Dec 15, 2015
The Epic History of the Horse
00:32:41
Science journalist and equestrian Wendy Williams talks about her new book The Horse: The Epic History of Our Noble Companion  
Dec 11, 2015
Math Can Equal Fun
00:30:30
Harvey Mudd College math professor Arthur Benjamin talks about his new book The Magic of Math: Solving for x and Figuring Out Why  
Nov 21, 2015
Teaching Machines to Learn on Their Own
00:06:27
Stephen Hoover, CEO of Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center, talks with Scientific American tech editor Larry Greenemeier about the revolution underway in machine learning, in which the machine eventually programs itself  
Nov 10, 2015
Chemistry Nobel: Keeping DNA in Good Repair
00:19:40
The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for discoveries of the mechanisms by which cells maintain the integrity of their DNA sequences  
Oct 07, 2015
Physics Nobel: Neutrinos Do Have Mass
00:35:11
The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass
Oct 06, 2015
Medicine Nobel: Sifting Nature for Antiparasite Drugs
00:19:03
The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to William C. Campbell and Satoshi Ōmura for their discoveries of a medication against roundworm parasites and to Youyou Tu for her discoveries concerning a novel therapy against malaria. Some 3.4 billion people are at risk for the diseases these drugs treat  
Oct 05, 2015
The Hunt for the Fat Gene
00:32:20
Medical researcher Richard Johnson, of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, talks about his October Scientific American article "The Fat Gene," co-authored by anthropologist Peter Andrews of University College London and the Natural History Museum in London. Their piece is about how a genetic mutation in prehistoric apes may underlie today’s pandemic of obesity and diabetes  
Sep 16, 2015
The Errors of Albert
00:20:20
Physicist and cosmologist Lawrence Krauss, director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University, talks about his article "What Einstein Got Wrong," in Scientific American ’s September issue, devoted to the 100th anniversary of Einstein’s publication of general relativity  
Sep 02, 2015
Public Health Hero Jimmy Carter; SA Turns 170
00:15:56
Jimmy Carter talks about his public health efforts to eradicate guinea worm and improve global mental health and women's health. Plus, magazine collector Steven Lomazow brings part of his collection to the Scientific American 170th birthday party  
Aug 31, 2015
Olympics Loser Boston Wins Big Economically
00:35:05
Smith College sports economist Andrew Zimbalist talks about why the Olympics is almost always a big financial hardship for the host city, a subject he treats at length in his book Circus Maximus: The Economic Gamble behind Hosting the Olympics and the World Cup . Recorded at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse in New York City  
Aug 06, 2015
Betting Lots of Quatloos on the Search for Alien Civilizations, Part 2
00:35:55
Stephen Hawking and entrepreneur and former physicist Yuri Milner announce a $100-million, 10-year initiative to look for signs of intelligent life in the cosmos
Jul 21, 2015
Betting Lots of Quatloos on the Search for Alien Civilizations, Part 1
00:34:05
Stephen Hawking and entrepreneur and former physicist Yuri Milner announce a $100-million, 10-year initiative to look for signs of intelligent life in the cosmos  
Jul 21, 2015
Pluto Mission Finally Calls Home
00:04:41
At 8:52 P.M. Eastern time, July 14, 2015, an all's-well signal from the New Horizons spacecraft finished its 4.5-hour, three-billion-mile trip from near Pluto through the solar system to alert mission control on Earth that it was in working order and had succeeded in gathering data  
Jul 15, 2015
Pluto, Ready for Your Close-Up!
00:25:18
At just before 7:50 A.M. today, July 14, 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft made its closest approach to Pluto. After a 9.5-year, three-billion-mile voyage, the ship got within about 7,750 miles from the surface
Jul 14, 2015
Restore Research to Preserve the American Dream
00:30:03
Norman Augustine, former CEO of Lockheed Martin and former undersecretary of the Army talks about the report he co-chaired for the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, "Restoring the Foundation: The Vital Role of Research in Preserving the American Dream"      
Jun 23, 2015
Migratory Birds: What a Long-Range Trip It's Been
00:21:08
Ornithologist Eduardo Inigo-Elias, senior research associate with the conservation science program at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, talks about the challenges of studying migratory birds and how improved relations between the U.S. and Cuba will help his field     
Jun 19, 2015
Take a Bite out of the Math of Math
00:20:34
Mathematician Eugenia Cheng, tenured in the School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Sheffield in the U.K. and currently Scientist in Residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago talks about her new book How to Bake Pi: An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics      
Jun 03, 2015
Animals Don't Use Facebook but They Have Social Networks, Too
00:28:21
Lee Dugatkin, evolutionary biologist and behavioral ecologist at the University of Louisville, talks about his article in the June Scientific American called "The Networked Animal," about how social networks in disparate animals species affect the lives of the entire group and its individual members. His co-author is Matthew Hasenjager, a doctoral candidate in his lab     
May 16, 2015
Mississippi Mound Builders Meet the 33rd Legion
00:22:45
Astronomer Alan Smale spends his days at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center exploring celestial objects, but he's also the author of Clash of Eagles, an alternate-history novel in which a Roman Legion invades North America  
May 06, 2015
The Ebola Outbreak: Past, Present and Future
00:11:28
Scientific American ’s Dina Maron talks with Keiji Fukuda, assistant director general for health security at the World Health Organization, about the current Ebola outbreak, the threat of sexual transmission and the hope for a vaccine. They were both at an Institute of Medicine Forum on Microbial Threats held at the Pan American Health Organization in Washington, D.C., concentrating on Ebola in west Africa  
Mar 26, 2015
Humans and the Amazon: A 13,000-Year Coexistence
00:17:58
University of Exeter archaeologist  José  Iriarte talks to freelance journalist Cynthia Graber about his efforts to understand human activity in and influence on the Amazon region for the last 13 millennia    
Mar 20, 2015
The Placement Excitation: Scientific American on The Big Bang Theory
00:17:27
In conjunction with this magazine's inclusion on the March 12 episode of The Big Bang Theory , here's an edited version of a talk by the sitcom's science advisor, U.C.L.A. physicist David Saltzberg, about his role and the show's reach  
Mar 12, 2015
Science Goes to the Movies: A New TV Program
00:08:46
Heather Berlin, assistant professor of psychiatry and of neuroscience at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, is the co-host of the new CUNY TV program Science Goes to the Movies  
Feb 21, 2015
Every Life Has Equal Value, Part 2: Gates Foundation CEO Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann
00:20:39
Gates Foundation CEO Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann and Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talk about the foundation set forth in its recently released annual letter. Part 2 of 2  
Jan 31, 2015
Every Life Has Equal Value, Part 1: Gates Foundation CEO Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann
00:32:03
Gates Foundation CEO Dr. Susan Desmond-Hellmann and Scientific American Editor in-Chief Mariette DiChristina talk about the foundation set forth in its recently released annual letter. Part 1 of 2
Jan 31, 2015
Best of Thanksgiving, Part 2: Let's Talk Stuffing—Your Face!
00:12:58
Cornell University's Brian Wansink talks about eating behavior and how mindless eating has us consuming way more calories than we suspect  
Nov 27, 2014
Best of Thanksgiving, Part 1: Let's Talk Turkey!
00:08:55
Turkey scientist Rich Buchholz of the University of Mississippi talks about the turkey on your plate and his own turkey research   
Nov 27, 2014
Doctors Without Borders Fight on Ebola's Front Lines
00:20:19
Scientific American health and medicine correspondent Dina Fine Maron talks with Armand Sprecher of Doctors Without Borders, who has fought Ebola in Guinea and Liberia. And Steve talks Ebola with Stanford's David Relman, chair of the Forum on Microbial Threats of the Institute of Medicine  
Nov 14, 2014
Ebola Expert Update
00:24:32
Scientific American health and medicine correspondent Dina Fine Maron talks about Ebola with tropical medicine and infectious disease expert Daniel Bausch of Tulane University at the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene  
Nov 06, 2014
Let's Get Small: A Panel on Nanoscience
00:32:04
Scientific American senior editor Josh Fischman joins nanoscience researchers Shana Kelly, Yamuna Krishnan, Benjamin Bratton, along with moderator Bridget Kendall from the BBC World Service program The Forum  
Oct 15, 2014
Building a Better Microscope: 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
00:22:47
The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry is awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. The winning work is explained by chemistry Nobel Committee members Sven Lidin and Måns Ehrenberg  
Oct 08, 2014
Blue Light Special: 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics
00:12:57
The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura for the invention of efficient blue light–emitting diodes, which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources. The winning work is explained by physics Nobel Committee members Per Delsing and Olle Inganäs  
Oct 07, 2014
The Map in Your Mind: 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
00:18:58
The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain—an inner GPS. The winning work is explained by Karolinska Institute faculty and Nobel Committee members Göran Hansson, Ole Kiehn, Hans Forssberg and Juleen Zierath  
Oct 06, 2014
Kodiak Update: Scientific American Alaska Cruise, Part 4
00:24:58
Scientific American Bright Horizons Cruise 22 is in port in Kodiak, Alaska, on September 2nd. We talk about our last few stops and hear from passenger and Manhattan Project veteran Margaret Asprey
Sep 02, 2014
The Juneau Tour: Scientific American Alaska Cruise, Part 3
00:14:22
Scientific American Bright Horizons Cruise 22 arrives in Anchorage, Alaska, on August 31st, which allows us to post audio from a fascinating taxi trip through Juneau on August 28th.
Aug 31, 2014
Juneau Where I Am: Scientific American Alaska Cruise, Part 2
00:12:07
Scientific American Bright Horizons Cruise 22 arrives in Juneau, Alaska
Aug 28, 2014
Catch Me If You Ketchikan: Scientific American Alaska Cruise, Part 1
00:08:26
Scientific American Bright Horizons Cruise 22 arrives in Ketchikan, Alaska.
Aug 26, 2014
Shakespeare and Science, Part 2
00:44:56
Dan Falk discusses his latest book, The Science of Shakespeare: A New Look at the Playwright's Universe    
Aug 19, 2014
Shakespeare and Science, Part 1
00:32:16
Dan Falk discusses his latest book, The Science of Shakespeare: A New Look at the Playwright's Universe    
Aug 19, 2014
Furious New Science Fiction from Mark Alpert
00:24:03
Scientific American editor–turned-sci-fi-writer Mark Alpert, author of Final Theory and Extinction , talks about his latest book, The Furies    
Aug 03, 2014
Under the Dome: Scientific American Editor in Chief Talks to the Senate
00:15:48
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina testifies before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation about the value of scientific research and development. Also testifying is Vint Cerf , one of the fathers of the Internet and Google’s vice president and "chief Internet evangelist." The hearings took place July 17, 2014
Jul 22, 2014
Wild Sex: Beyond the Birds and the Bees
00:30:44
Joy Reidenberg , comparative anatomist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, talks about her new PBS series Sex in the Wild , about the sex lives of elephants, orangutans, kangaroos and dolphins. The series debuts July 16, 2014
Jul 16, 2014
What's So Funny?: The Science of Humor
00:32:52
Cognitive neuroscientist Scott Weems talks about his book HA!: The Science of When We Laugh and Why
Jul 07, 2014
Hunting the Wild Neutrino
00:21:45
Astrophysicist Ray Jayawardhana , of the University of Toronto, talks about his new book Neutrino Hunters: The Thrilling Chase for a Ghostly Particle to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe
May 23, 2014
Sometimes the Hoofprints Are from Zebras
00:32:23
David J. Hand , emeritus professor of mathematics at Imperial College London, talks about his new book The Improbability Principle: Why Coincidences, Miracles and Rare Events Happen Every Day
May 01, 2014
The First Nuclear Arms Race: Churchill's Bomb, Part 2
00:22:25
Graham Farmelo is the award-winning author of the Dirac biography The Strangest Man . His latest book is Churchill’s Bomb: How the United States Overtook Britain in the First Nuclear Arms Race
Apr 25, 2014
The First Nuclear Arms Race: Churchill's Bomb, Part 1
00:28:28
Graham Farmelo is the award-winning author of the Dirac biography The Strangest Man . His latest book is Churchill’s Bomb: How the United States Overtook Britain in the First Nuclear Arms Race
Apr 25, 2014
Take Me Out to the Run Expectancy Matrix Analysis
00:37:54
Smith College economics professor Andrew Zimbalist talks about his latest book, The Sabermetric Revolution: Assessing the Growth of Analytics in Baseball (co-authored with Benjamin Baumer), at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse, with proprietor Jay Goldberg
Mar 18, 2014
Found in Space, Part 2
00:20:24
Journalist Lee Billings Talks about his book Five Billion Years of Solitude: The Search For Life Among the Stars , Part 2 of 2
Feb 27, 2014
Found in Space, Part 1
00:20:02
Journalist Lee Billings Talks about his book Five Billion Years of Solitude: The Search For Life Among the Stars , Part 1 of 2
Feb 27, 2014
From Gadgets to Galaxies: Conference Reports
00:20:00
Scientific American technology editor Seth Fletcher talks about the recent Consumer Electronics Show and astronomy editor Clara Moskowitz discusses last month's American Astronomical Society conference    
Feb 10, 2014
Fighting Cancer with Physics
00:26:16
Rakesh K. Jain, director of the Edwin L. Steele Laboratory for Tumor Biology in the radiation oncology department of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, talks about his article in the February issue of Scientific American about interfering with extracellular matrix as a way to increase the efficacy of cancer therapy   
Jan 27, 2014
The Man Who Wasn't Darwin: Alfred Russel Wallace on the Centenary of His Death
00:26:49
Alfred Russel Wallace biographer Peter Raby of the University of Cambridge talks about the great naturalist and co-creator of the theory of evolution by natural selection on the 100th anniversary of Wallace's death
Nov 07, 2013
Perv-View: Jesse Bering's New Book PERV
00:39:16
Psychologist Jesse Bering talks about his latest book PERV: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us .
Oct 29, 2013
The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Karplus, Levitt and Warshel
00:19:46
The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel for applying both quantum and classical physics to develop computer models of chemical systems that show details of chemical reactions
Oct 09, 2013
The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics: Englert and Higgs
00:23:07
The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to François Englert and Peter Higgs for the theory of how particles acquire mass, requiring the existence of the Higgs Boson, experimentally confirmed to exist in 2012
Oct 08, 2013
The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: Rothman, Schekman and Südhof
00:18:25
The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman and Thomas C. Südhof for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells
Oct 07, 2013
Alan Alda Communicates Science
00:33:15
At the Learning in the Digital Age summit at Google's New York City offices, Scientific American editor in chief Mariette DiChristina talked with Alan Alda about communicating science to the general public.
Oct 01, 2013
Ira Flatow and the Teachable Moment
00:18:40
At the Learning in the Digital Age summit at Google's New York City offices, Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talked with Science Friday host Ira Flatow about the "teachable moment in science and culture"
Sep 21, 2013
Adam Rutherford's Creation Science (The Real Kind) Part 2
00:24:32
Science journalist, author and Nature editor Adam Rutherford talks about new book Creation: How Science Is Reinventing Life Itself , which looks at the science of the origin of life and at the emerging science of synthetic biology.
Aug 30, 2013
Kids JUMP for Math [John Mighton's Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies]
00:30:41
Mathematician John Mighton talks with Scientific American MIND editor Ingrid Wickelgren about getting math-shy kids interested, via JUMP: Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies
Aug 08, 2013
Adam Rutherford's Creation Science (the Real Kind), Part 1
00:32:45
Science journalist, author and Nature editor Adam Rutherford talks about new book Creation: How Science Is Reinventing Life Itself, which looks at the science of the origin of life and at the emerging science of synthetic biology
Jul 31, 2013
Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto: The Threatened Enlightenment
00:17:55
Nobel laureate Harry Kroto, who shared the 1996 chemistry prize, talks with Scientific American Executive Editor Fred Guterl at the recent Lindau Nobel Laureates meeting, about the role of science in society
Jul 26, 2013
Penis Enlightenment: Bering Straight Talk
00:34:14
Jesse Bering discusses his 2012 book Why Is the Penis Shaped Like That? (And Other Reflections on Being Human)
Jun 27, 2013
Close Shave for Bill Nye the Science Guy
00:15:05
Bill Nye the Science Guy ponders Superman's tonsorial travails, and science education
Jun 18, 2013
Is There a Doctor in the Spaceship?
00:13:42
NASA astronaut and medical doctor Michael Barratt spoke to schoolkids at the Family Science Days event at this year's meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston
Apr 30, 2013
Mary Roach Cruises the Alimentary Canal
00:30:33
Mary Roach talks about her new book Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal, which traces what she calls "the whole food chute"
Apr 16, 2013
Start Talking: Synthetic Biology and Conservation Biology Meet, Part 2
00:13:16
Conservation biologist Kent Redford talks about the issues facing the intersection of synthetic biology and conservation biology and a conference that starts April 9th called "How will synthetic biology and conservation shape the future of nature?"
Apr 03, 2013
Start Talking: Synthetic Biology and Conservation Biology Meet, Part 1
00:24:05
Conservation biologist Kent Redford talks about the issues facing the intersection of synthetic biology and conservation biology and a conference that starts April 9th called "How will synthetic biology and conservation shape the future of nature?"
Apr 02, 2013
Imagine All the People Turning Blue and Green
00:15:39
Science writer Dennis Meredith talks about his new science fiction book The Rainbow Virus, in which a bioterror plot turns people all the colors of the rainbow
Mar 30, 2013
Biotech's Brave New Beasts, Part 2
00:16:22
Journalist and author Emily Anthes talks about her new book, Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts
Mar 27, 2013
Biotech's Brave New Beasts, Part 1
00:20:21
Journalist and author Emily Anthes talks about her new book, Frankenstein's Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech's Brave New Beasts
Mar 27, 2013
CSI: 19th-Century France and the Birth of Forensic Science
00:31:56
Reporter and storyteller Steven Berkowitz talks to science journalist and author Douglas Starr about his book The Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science
Mar 16, 2013
John Rennie Hacks the Planet
00:21:20
Former Scientific American editor in chief John Rennie talks about his new six-episode Weather Channel TV Show, Hacking the Planet, which debuts February 28
Feb 28, 2013
Inside Isaac: A Discussion of Newton, Part 2
00:20:50
A panel of physicists, science historians and playwright Lucas Hnath discuss Newton following a performance of Hnath's play about Newton, called Isaac's Eye, at the Ensemble Studio Theater in New York City on February 20th. The play runs through March 10, 2013
Feb 25, 2013
Inside Isaac: A Discussion of Newton, Part 1
00:28:27
A panel of physicists, science historians and playwright Lucas Hnath discuss Newton following a performance of Hnath's play about Newton, called Isaac's Eye, at the Ensemble Studio Theater in New York City on February 20th. The play runs through March 10, 2013
Feb 25, 2013
Extinction: New Sci-Fi from Mark Alpert
00:23:01
Mark Alpert is a former editor at Scientific American who has gone on to become a best-selling science fiction writer. We talk about his latest book, Extinction , an apocalyptic tale hinging on brain-machine interfaces.
Feb 14, 2013
Science and Tech in President Obama's SOTU
00:13:38
In his 2013 State of the Union address, Pres. Obama talked about climate change, energy and manufacturing technology innovation, and STEM education—that is, science, technology, engineering and math
Feb 14, 2013
Michael C. Hall Analyzes His Dexter's Mind, Part 2
00:27:32
Actor Michael C. Hall , TV's Dexter , talks with psychologist Kevin Dutton , author of The Wisdom of Psychopaths , at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City
Jan 24, 2013
Michael C. Hall Analyzes His Dexter's Mind, Part 1
00:36:30
Actor Michael C. Hall , TV's Dexter , talks with psychologist Kevin Dutton , author of The Wisdom of Psychopaths , at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City
Jan 24, 2013
Psychopathy's Bright Side: Kevin Dutton on the Benefits of Being a Bit Psychopathic, Part 2
00:15:42
Kevin Dutton is a psychologist at the University of Oxford. He talks about his latest book, The W isdom of Psychopaths : What Saints, Spies, and Serial Killers Can Teach Us about Success
Dec 29, 2012
Psychopathy's Bright Side: Kevin Dutton on the Benefits of Being a Bit Psychopathic, Part 1
00:26:03
Kevin Dutton is a psychologist at the University of Oxford. He talks about his latest book, The W isdom of Psychopaths : What Saints, Spies, and Serial Killers Can Teach Us about Success
Dec 29, 2012
Creativity's Dark Side: Dan Ariely on Creativity, Rationalization and Dishonesty
00:31:41
Dan Ariely is professor of behavioral economics at Duke University. He talks about the subject of his most recent book, The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone--Especially Ourselves . Also see: Unveiling the Real Evil Genius
Dec 26, 2012
Darwin in Space: How Multigenerational Missions Could Shape Human Evolution
00:15:44
Portland State University anthropologist Cameron Smith talks with Scientific American 's John Matson about how multigenerational space exploration missions and colonization might change the human genome and thus shape human evolution
Dec 19, 2012
David Quammen: The Spillover of Animal Infections to Humans
00:32:50
David Quammen talks about his latest book, Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic . From his Web site : "The next big and murderous human pandemic, the one that kills us in millions, will be caused by a new disease--new to humans, anyway. The bug that's responsible will be strange, unfamiliar, but it won't come from outer space. Odds are that the killer pathogen--most likely a virus--will spill over into humans from a nonhuman animal"
Nov 18, 2012
Scientific American after Sandy
00:06:21
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina brings us up to date on the state of our New York City-based operation after Sandy. Recorded October 31 at 2:30 P.M Eastern time
Oct 31, 2012
The 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
00:19:43
The 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded jointly to Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka for studies of G-protein-coupled receptors, which are the portals by which information about the environment reaches the interior of cells and leads to their responses. About half of all drugs work by interacting with G-protein-coupled receptors
Oct 10, 2012
The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics
00:02:46
The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland for experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems
Oct 09, 2012
The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
00:10:50
The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent
Oct 08, 2012
The Climate of Climate Science
00:25:32
James McCarthy , Alexander Agassiz professor of biological oceanography at Harvard, talks about climate science and testifying before Congress, and the collaborations between climate scientists and the national security community as well as with evangelicals. And the Union of Concerned Scientists releases a report about the misleading coverage of climate science at Fox News and The Wall Street Journal
Sep 28, 2012
The Flynn Effect: Modernity Made Us Smarter
00:33:20
James Flynn studies intelligence at the University of Otago in New Zealand. And he features prominently in an article called “Can We Keep Getting Smarter?” in the September issue of Scientific American magazine. Back on July 10, Flynn visited the SA offices, where he chatted with a group of editors
Aug 20, 2012
What's Next for Curiosity on Mars
00:09:54
Scientific American contributor David Appell talks with Mars Science Lab Project leader John Grotzinger, professor of geology at Caltech, about the plans for the rover on the Martian surface
Aug 07, 2012
Curiosity Lands on Mars
00:27:42
Less than an hour after NASA received confirmation that the Curiosity rover was safely on the Martian surface , some principal members of the mission briefed the press. This is an edited presentation of that briefing, which started at about 11:20 P.M, Pacific time on August 5th.
Aug 06, 2012
Plants Know Stuff
00:32:13
Daniel Chamovitz , director of the Manna Center for Plant Biosciences at Tel Aviv University, talks about his new book What a Plant Knows .
Jun 30, 2012
Super-Earths: Bigger, and Maybe Better
00:37:05
Dimitar Sasselov, professor of astronomy at Harvard University and the founder and director of the Harvard Origins of Life Initiative, talks about his new book The Life of Super-Earths: How the Hunt for Alien Worlds and Artificial Cells Will Revolutionize Life on Our Planet
Jun 22, 2012
The Transit of Venus, Part 2
00:12:54
Mark Anderson, author of the book The Day The World Discovered the Sun , talks about the transit of Venus coming up on June 5th or 6th in different parts of the world and how it will be of use to astronomers searching for exoplanets
May 31, 2012
The Transit of Venus, Part 1
00:27:20
With a transit of Venus coming up on June 5th or 6th in different parts of the world, Mark Anderson, author of the book The Day The World Discovered the Sun, talks about the great efforts to track the transits of Venus in the 1760s and the science they would produce
May 31, 2012
Virus Victors: People Who Control HIV
00:38:02
Bruce Walker, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Ragon Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital, M.I.T. and Harvard, talks about his article in the July issue of Scientific American magazine called "Controlling HIV," about rare individuals who never develop AIDS after being infected by the virus
May 29, 2012
The Football Concussion Crisis
00:31:34
NFL Hall of Famer Harry Carson joins former NBC anchor Stone Phillips and pathologist Bennet Omalu for a discussion of chronic traumatic encephalopathy among football players. Recorded May 12th at the Ensemblestudiotheatre.org, site of the new play Headstrong about the brain injury issue
May 16, 2012
Killer Chimps and Funny Feet: Report from the AAPA Conference
00:13:56
Scientific American editor Kate Wong talks about the recent conference of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists in Portland, Ore., where subjects included killer chimps, unprecedented fossil sharing among researchers and divergent hominid foot forms
Apr 27, 2012
Getting Guinea Worm Gone: Report from the AHCJ Conference
00:16:26
Scientific American editor Christine Gorman talks about the recent conference of the Association of Health Care Journalists, including Jimmy Carter's efforts against guinea worm and trachoma, and Rosalynn Carter's mental health initiatives
Apr 26, 2012
Food Poisoning's Lasting Legacy
00:20:13
Scientific American Science of Health columnist Maryn McKenna talks about the new understanding that food poisoning can have long-lasting negative health effects
Apr 05, 2012
Fukushima Anniversary: We Listen Back
00:10:45
Scientific American editor David Biello takes us through newly released audio from the first week of the nuclear meltdown crisis at Fukushima Daiichi
Mar 11, 2012
AAAS Report: Fracking, Whale Rights, Higgs Evidence and Twitter Truthiness
00:15:14
Scientific American editors Mark Fischetti and Michael Moyer discuss some of the sessions they attended at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Subjects covered include fracking, cetacean rights, the Higgs boson and Twitter 's truthiness
Mar 08, 2012
If You're Happy, How You Know It
00:08:15
Social scientist Roly Russell, of the Sandhill Institute in British Columbia, talked with Scientific American 's Mark Fischetti at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science about potentially better measures than GDP of a nation's well-being
Feb 22, 2012
The Coming Entanglement: Bill Joy and Danny Hillis
00:36:01
Digital innovators Bill Joy, co-founder of Sun Microsystems, and Danny Hillis, co-founder of the Long Now Foundation, talk with Scientific American Executive Editor Fred Guterl about the technological "Entanglement" and the attempts to build the other, hardier Internet
Feb 15, 2012
More with Maryn: McKenna on Antibiotic Resistance
00:28:38
In part 2 of our conversation with journalist and author Maryn McKenna, she talks about antibiotic resistance in agriculture and human health, MRSA, and offers a brief coda on the subject of fecal transplants
Feb 03, 2012
Fecal Transplants: The Straight Poop
00:19:01
Journalist and author Maryn McKenna talks about fecal transplants, which have proved to be exceptionally effective at restoring a healthy intestinal microbiome and curing C. diff infections, yet remain in regulatory limbo
Feb 01, 2012
State of the Union: Research, Technology and Energy
00:07:18
About six minutes of President Obama's State of the Union address dealt with research, technology and energy
Jan 25, 2012
A Second Science Front: Evolution Champions Rise to Climate Science Defense
00:17:59
Eugenie Scott, executive director of the National Center for Science Education, long the nation's leading defender of evolution education, discusses the NCSE's new initiative to help climate science education
Jan 16, 2012
Anna Deavere Smith: Let Me Down Easy
00:35:26
Actor, playwright and journalist Anna Deavere Smith talks about the health care crisis and her play about people dealing with illness, health and the health care system, Let Me Down Easy
Jan 14, 2012
Man from Mars: Health and Nutrition Research at Mars, Inc., and Beyond
00:30:50
Hagen Schroeter, the director of fundamental health and nutrition research at Mars, Inc., talks about research on bio-active food compounds and the search for why a healthful diet is good for you
Jan 06, 2012
The YouTube SpaceLab Competition
00:03:49
If you're 14 to 18 years old, you still have until December 14th to prepare a two-minute video of a suggestion for an experiment to be performed at the International Space Station and upload it to youtube.com/spacelab. Winners will see their experiment performed in space
Dec 12, 2011
Large Hadron Collider Backgrounder
00:21:25
Thomas LeCompte of Argonne National Lab was the physics coordinator for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. He talks about the instrument and its future, as we await the December 13th announcement as to whether the LHC has found the Higgs particle
Dec 11, 2011
Out of Our Depth: Sea Level on the Rise
00:09:33
Ocean and climate scientist Eelco Rohling talks with Scientific American senior editor Mark Fischetti about updated calculations of sea-level rise as a function of climate change
Dec 08, 2011
Brian Greene Talks Faster-Than-Light Neutrinos
00:05:01
Physicist Brian Greene, host of the NOVA series The Fabric of the Cosmos, addresses the question of faster-than-light neutrinos at a Q&A session after the debut of the PBS series
Nov 23, 2011
The Mind's Hidden Switches
00:28:19
Eric J. Nestler, director of the Friedman Brain Institute at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, talks about his article in the December issue of Scientific American magazine on epigenetics and human behavior, called "Hidden Switches in the Mind"
Nov 23, 2011
The Discovery of Quasicrystals: The 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
00:18:41
Listen to the announcement of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, to Daniel Shechtman of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. Then hear comments from the president of the American Chemical Society, Nancy Jackson, of Sandia National Laboratories
Oct 05, 2011
An Accelerating Universe: The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics
00:22:24
Listen to the announcement of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics, to Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam Riess, from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Following the formal announcement comes an explanation of the research, which tracked type Ia supernovae to discover that the expansion of the universe was accelerating, and a phone conversation with new Nobel laureate Brian Schmidt
Oct 04, 2011
Cancer Vaccines
00:24:27
Eric von Hofe, cancer researcher and president of the biotech company Antigen Express talks about his article in the October issue of Scientific American called "A New Ally against Cancer," about cancer vaccines
Sep 30, 2011
Science Legend Christian de Duve
00:21:25
Christian de Duve, 1974 Nobel laureate for physiology or medicine, talks about going from a cell biologist to a theorist on evolution and the origin of life
Sep 09, 2011
Carl Zimmer on Rats, Cats, Viruses and Tattoos
00:16:50
In part 2 of our interview, award-winning author Carl Zimmer talks about his latest books, and a new study that shows how Toxoplasma influences the behavior of rats--and maybe of us
Aug 26, 2011
Carl Zimmer on Evolution in the Big City
00:23:20
The annual Scientific American September single-topic issue is all about cities. And award-winning author Carl Zimmer recently penned a piece on evolution research in the urban environment for The New York Times . In part 1 of this interview, he talks about urban evolution
Aug 25, 2011
The City That Became Safe: What New York Teaches about Urban Crime and Its Control
00:27:29
U.C. Berkeley School of Law professor Franklin Zimring talks about his article, "How New York Beat Crime," in the August issue of Scientific American
Aug 10, 2011
Nobel Laureate Avram Hershko: The Orchestra in the Cell
00:25:53
Nobel laureate Avram Hershko, who determined cellular mechanisms for breaking down proteins, talks about his research in a conversation recorded at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany. And Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina discusses the recent inaugural Google Science Fair
Jul 28, 2011
Nobel Laureate Peter Agre: From Aquaporins to Lutefisk
00:34:58
Peter Agre, 2003 Chemistry Nobel laureate for his work on aquaporins, the proteins that allow water into and out of cells, talks about his research, his upbringing and why he almost ran for the Senate, in a conversation recorded at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany
Jul 20, 2011
Let's Make a Probabilistic Deal: A Fresh Look at the Monty Hall Problem
00:13:54
Scientific American math and physics editor Davide Castelvecchi revisits the Monty Hall problem, so you can know whether you're better off holding on to your original pick or switching when new information presents itself
Jun 25, 2011
How Physics Limits Intelligence
00:26:12
Award-winning author Douglas Fox talks about his cover story in the July issue of Scientific American on The Limits of Intelligence, placed there by the laws of physics
Jun 17, 2011
Dying for Science: The 100th Anniversary of the Doomed Scott Antarctic Expedition
00:22:50
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Edward Larson talks about his article "Greater Glory" in the June issue of Scientific American on the forgotten science of the doomed Scott expedition a hundred years ago
May 26, 2011
Skirting Steak: The Case for Artificial Meat
00:20:55
Journalist Jeffrey Bartholet talks about his June Scientific American magazine article on the attempts to grow meat in the lab, and Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talks about the cover piece in the May issue on radical energy solutions
May 17, 2011
Astronaut Love: An Interview with Spacewalker Stanley Love
00:15:53
On the eve of the launch of the penultimate space shuttle mission, STS-134, Scientific American astronomy editor George Musser talks to veteran astronaut Stanley Love about being in space and the future of spaceflight
Apr 28, 2011
Editors' Roundtable: Science Conference Reports
00:35:29
Scientific American editors Christine Gorman, Robin Lloyd, Michael Moyer and Kate Wong talk about their recent trips to different science conferences: the meetings of the Association for Health Care Journalists, the Paleoanthropology Society, the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and an M.I.T. 150th-anniversary conference called Computation and the Transformation of Practically Everything
Apr 22, 2011
Can It Be Bad to Be Too Clean?: The Hygiene Hypothesis
00:25:11
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine researcher Kathleen Barnes talks about the hygiene hypothesis, which raises the possibility that our modern sterile environment may contribute to conditions such as asthma and eczema
Apr 07, 2011
Self-Aware Robots?
00:14:16
Journalist Charles Choi talks about work being done to make robots self-aware. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news
Mar 03, 2011
The Cornucopia Conference: Roundtable on the AAAS Meeting
00:33:15
Podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with Scientific American magazine Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina, news editor Anna Kuchment, feature editor Mark Fischetti and online news editor Robin Lloyd about various sessions at the recently completed annual conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, DC.
Feb 25, 2011
The Spirit of Innovation: From High School to the Moon
00:19:26
Nancy Conrad, chair of the Conrad Foundation, talks about the Spirit of Innovation competition for high school students, and about her late husband, Pete Conrad, the third man to walk on the moon
Feb 17, 2011
What's New with Science News
00:32:46
Former Scientific American editor in chief and current Gleaming Retort blogger John Rennie, blogger and Scientific American blogs network director Bora Zivkovic, and Scientific American online news editor Robin Lloyd talk about the future of science news
Feb 17, 2011
Jefferson's Moose: Thomas's Fauna Fight against European Naturalists
00:27:54
Biologist and author Lee Dugatkin talks about his article "Jefferson's Moose" in the February issue of Scientific American, the story of Jefferson's battle against the European theory of American biological degeneracy. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Jan 26, 2011
What Is the Watson Jeopardy-Playing Supercomputer, Alex?
00:20:12
Scientific American editor Michael Moyer talks about the sneak preview he caught of IBM's Watson Jeopardy! -playing computer. And ScientificAmerican.com 's Larry Greenemeier spoke with Ford's Brad Probert about the new all-electric Focus at the Consumer Electronics Show last week in Las Vegas
Jan 14, 2011
Vinod Khosla: Searching for the Radical Solution
00:24:48
Clean technology investor Vinod Khosla, co-founder of Sun Microsystems, talks with Scientific American editor Mark Fischetti about the energy payoffs to be had by reinventing mainstream technologies
Dec 24, 2010
How You Gonna Keep Flu Down on the Farm?: Pig Farms and Public Health
00:17:45
Journalist Helen Branswell discusses her January Scientific American article, "Flu Factories," about the attempts to monitor new strains of flu that can originate on pig farms and the difficulties of balancing economic and public health constituencies
Dec 22, 2010
Anna Deavere Smith: Let Me Down Easy
00:33:44
Actor, playwright and journalist Anna Deavere Smith talks about the health care crisis and her play about people dealing with illness, health and the health care system, Let Me Down Easy
Dec 21, 2010
The Spewings of Titan (and More from the AGU Meeting)
00:16:47
Scientific American editor Davide Castelvecchi joins us from San Francisco to talk about some of the highlights of the meeting of the American Geophysical Union, including volcanoes on Titan, x-rays from lightning, the biota of the Sulawesi Sea, and the connection between light pollution and air pollution. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Dec 17, 2010
Let's Talk Stuffing--Your Face
00:12:58
Cornell University's Brian Wansink talks about eating behavior and how mindless eating has us consuming way more calories than we suspect
Nov 25, 2010
Let's Talk Turkey!
00:08:55
Turkey scientist Rich Buchholz talks about the turkey on your plate and his own turkey research
Nov 25, 2010
Why Do Women Live Longer Than Men?
00:24:09
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and podcast host Steve Mirsky talk about longevity differences in the sexes, the importance of music education, the pros and cons of the Kindle, and other content from the November issue. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news
Nov 19, 2010
Physics Nobel Laureate Steven Weinberg
00:16:40
Nobel physicist Steven Weinberg spoke to an audience of science journalists, and then to podcast host Steve Mirsky
Nov 16, 2010
Photograph 51: Rosalind Franklin and the Race For The Double Helix of DNA (Part 2 of 2)
00:37:08
Photograph 51 is a new play about Rosalind Franklin, Watson and Crick, and the race to determine the structure of DNA, at the Ensemble Studio Theatre in New York City, running through November 21st. A panel discussion about the play on November 2nd featured crystallography expert Helen Berman, biologist and Franklin scholar Lynne Osman Elkin, science journalist Nicholas Wade, playwright Anna Ziegler and moderator Stuart Firestein
Nov 06, 2010
Photograph 51: Rosalind Franklin and the Race for the Double Helix of DNA, Part 1 of 2
00:41:03
Photograph 51 is a new play about Rosalind Franklin, Watson and Crick, and the race to determine the structure of DNA, at the Ensemble Studio Theatre in New York City, running through November 21st. This November 2nd, a panel discussion about the play and the issues it raises featured crystallography expert Helen Berman; biologist and Franklin scholar Lynne Osman Elkin; science journalist Nicholas Wade; playwright Anna Ziegler; and moderator Stuart Firestein
Nov 04, 2010
The Quest for the Giant Pumpkin
00:21:13
Susan Warren, author of the book Backyard Giants, talks about "the passionate, heartbreaking and glorious quest to grow the biggest pumpkin ever." Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news
Oct 29, 2010
Not Your Grandfather's Scientific American
00:24:27
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talks about the new look and new outlook of Scientific American magazine and of ScientificAmerican.com Plus, we discuss the results of a poll of the readers of Scientific American and Nature
Oct 20, 2010
The Harlem Science Renaissance
00:28:19
Molecular geneticist Sat Bhattacharya talks about his creation, the Harlem Children Society, which gets underprivileged kids involved in scientific research. And 13-year-olds Mitchell Haverty and Angus Fung talk about their research on algae as alternative fuel. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news
Oct 15, 2010
Totally Bogus: The Science Talk Quiz
00:02:43
In this special stand-alone edition, see if you know which of four science news stories is Totally Bogus.
Oct 08, 2010
Exactly When Is a Person Dead?
00:23:15
Award-winning science journalist Robin Marantz Henig and podcast host Steve Mirsky discuss Robin's article in the September issue about organ donation and definitions of death. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include http://bit.ly/ctIDsx; http://bit.ly/9Us1lE
Sep 24, 2010
Could Time End?
00:35:30
Scientific American staff editor George Musser joins podcast host Steve Mirsky to discuss his article in the September issue about the possibility of time itself coming to an end
Sep 22, 2010
The End: Death, Endings and Things That Should End
00:35:45
Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and issue editor Michael Moyer talk with podcast host Steve Mirsky about the September single-topic issue of Scientific American --endings in science. Plus, we test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Sep 14, 2010
Cooking for Geeks: Jeff Potter on Experimenting in the Kitchen
00:24:22
Jeff Potter, author of Cooking for Geeks: Real Science, Great Hacks and Good Food, talks with daily podcast correspondent Cynthia Graber, and podcast host Steve Mirsky tests your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.cookingforgeeks.com
Sep 03, 2010
Mary Roach Is Packing for Mars, Part 2
00:17:29
Podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with author Mary Roach about her new book "Packing For Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void." Part 2 of 2. (Part 1 is at http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=mary-roach-is-packing-for-mars-10-08-20). Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.maryroach.net.
Aug 21, 2010
Mary Roach Is Packing for Mars, Part 1
00:31:57
Podcast host Steve Mirsky recently attended a talk by author Mary Roach about her new book Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void . In part 1 of this two-part episode, we'll hear that talk. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.maryroach.net
Aug 20, 2010
When Humans Almost Died Out; Earthy Exoplanets; And Scientific American's 165th Birthday
00:31:51
Podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with human evolution expert Kate Wong about the small group of humans who survived tough times beginning about 195,000 years ago and gave rise to all of us, a story told in the cover article of the August issue of Scientific American, our 165th anniversary edition. And Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talks about the rest of the contents of the issue, including our coverage of the search for rocky exoplanets. Plus, we test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to content of this podcast include http://snipurl.com/10louu
Aug 12, 2010
Arguing with Non-Skeptics, Part 2 of 2
00:19:37
A panel discussion on arguing with non-skeptics at the recent Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism in New York City featured James Randi, George Hrab, D. J. Grothe and podcast host Steve Mirsky. Julia Galef moderated. Part 2 of 2. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.necsscon.org
Jul 28, 2010
Arguing with Non-Skeptics, Part 1 of 2
00:32:30
A panel discussion on arguing with non-skeptics at the recent Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism in New York City featured James Randi, George Hrab, D. J. Grothe and podcast host Steve Mirsky. Julia Galef moderated. Part 1 of 2. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.nature.com/nature/podcast and www.necsscon.org
Jul 28, 2010
Whiz Kids: Intel Science Talent Search Documentary
00:33:04
The new documentary film Whiz Kids follows three high school student-scientists as they attempt to get their projects accepted into the prestigious Intel Science Talent Search. Scientific American podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with the film's writer and editor, Jane Wagner, and with two of the stars of the documentary, Ana Cisneros and Hermain Khan. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.nature.com/nature/podcast and http://whizkidsmovie.com
Jul 19, 2010
Will Your Plug-In Car Actually Be Coal-Powered? And Other July Stories
00:27:39
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and staff editor Michael Moyer join podcast host Steve Mirsky to talk about articles in the July issue, including: "The Dirty Truth about Plug-In Hybrids"; "How Babies Think"; and "Birds That Lived with Dinosaurs". Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to content of this podcast include www.scientificamerican.com/sciammag; http://bit.ly/cwcTtR
Jul 08, 2010
Paul Dirac: "The Strangest Man" of Science, Part 2
00:23:09
Award-winning writer and physicist Graham Farmelo talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about The Strangest Man, Farmelo's biography of Nobel Prize-winning theoretical physicist Paul Dirac. Part 2 of 2. Web sites related to this episode include www.thestrangestman.com and http://bit.ly/dirac1963
Jun 25, 2010
"The Strangest Man" of Science, Part 1
00:34:19
Award-winning writer and physicist Graham Farmelo talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about The Strangest Man, Farmelo's biography of Nobel Prize-winning theoretical physicist Paul Dirac. Part 1 of 2. Web sites related to this episode include www.thestrangestman.com and http://bit.ly/dirac1963
Jun 25, 2010
Physics Now and Then: From Neutrinos to Galileo
00:25:38
Theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss, director of the Origins Initiative at Arizona State University, talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about neutrinos and gravity waves. And Cynthia Graber talks with Paolo Galluzzi, director of the newly reopened Museo Galileo, the science museum in Florence, Italy. Plus, we test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to content of this podcast include http://www.museogalileo.it
Jun 16, 2010
The Big Dozen: 12 Events That Will Change Everything
00:26:20
Scientific American magazine Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and news editor Philip Yam join podcast host Steve Mirsky to talk about the cover story of the June issue of the magazine, "12 Events That Will Change Everything". How things like the first human clone, an asteroid impact or the discovery of extra dimensions will change the world and our view of our place in the universe
Jun 03, 2010
Remembering Martin Gardner, with Douglas Hofstadter
00:27:14
Martin Gardner died May 22nd at 95. He wrote the Mathematical Games column for Scientific American magazine for 25 years and published more than 70 books. Podcast host Steve Mirsky talks with Gardner's friend Douglas Hofstadter, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, about Martin Gardner
May 24, 2010
More from MacMania: Kindle v. iPad, Mac v. PC and App Development
00:35:20
MacWorld editorial director Jason Snell and app developer Peter Watling talk with podcast host Steve Mirsky about the iPad, computer culture and apps, aboard a cruise ship in the Atlantic during MacMania, produced by insightcruises.com
May 19, 2010
David Pogue on Tech, Twitter and Transgenic Goats
00:27:10
The ubiquitous David Pogue, author of the Missing Manual series and tech columnist for The New York Times, talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky aboard a cruise ship in the Atlantic during MacMania, produced by insightcruises.com. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
May 11, 2010
Your Inner Healers: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and More
00:29:54
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about the contents of the May issue, including articles on induced pluripotent stem cells, high-speed and maglev trains, and blindsight. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
May 01, 2010
Bill McKibben's Eaarth, Part 2
00:27:00
Writer and activist Bill McKibben talks to Scientific American 's Mark Fischetti about his new book Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet . Part 2 of 2. Edited and produced by podcast host Steve Mirsky
Apr 22, 2010
Bill McKibben's Eaarth, Part 1
00:37:55
Writer and activist Bill McKibben talks to Scientific American 's Mark Fischetti about his new book Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet Part 1 of 2. Edited and produced by podcast host Steve Mirsky
Apr 22, 2010
Invisible Ink and More: The Science of Spying in the Revolutionary War
00:24:26
John Nagy, author of Invisible Ink: Spycraft of the American Revolution, discusses the codes, ciphers, chemistry and psychology of spying in the American Revolution, in a talk recorded by podcast host Steve Mirsky at the historic Fraunces Tavern in New York City. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include http://snipurl.com/vnhy8
Apr 21, 2010
The Science of Staying in Love; and Scientists as Communicators--and Heroes
00:23:31
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and psychology researcher Robert Epstein, a contributing editor to Scientific American MIND magazine, talk about falling in love and staying that way. And science communicator Dennis Meredith discusses his book Explaining Research, and the importance for scientists of reaching the public. Web sites related to this episode include www.explainingresearch.com
Apr 07, 2010
From Eternity to Here: Sean M. Carroll's Quest to Understand Time
00:31:30
Sean M. Carroll, theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about his new book From Eternity to Here: The Quest for the Ultimate Theory of Time . Plus, we test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include preposterousuniverse.com
Mar 30, 2010
Are We Pushing Earth's Environmental Tipping Points?
00:24:46
Jon Foley, director of the University of Minnesota's Institute on the Environment, talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about his article in the April issue of Scientific American, "Boundaries for a Healthy Planet". Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include snipurl.com/foleyplanet
Mar 19, 2010
The Science Talk Quiz: "Totally Bogus"
00:02:44
Here are four science stories, but only three are true. See if you know which story is TOTALLY BOGUS
Mar 19, 2010
Where's My Fusion Reactor?
00:36:35
Scientific American staff editor Michael Moyer talks about his article "Fusion's False Dawn" in the March issue, and Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina discusses the rest of the issue. Web sites related to this episode include www.sciamdigital.com; www.snipurl.com/mikefusion
Mar 17, 2010
Algae, Art and Attitudes: A Roundtable about the AAAS Conference
00:29:19
Scientific American staffers Mark Fischetti and Robin Lloyd talk with podcast host Steve Mirsky about sessions they attended--including those about algae for energy, dissecting the astronomy in art, and attitudes about climate change--at the recent meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.aaas.org, www.aven.com
Feb 27, 2010
The Poisoner's Handbook: The Sinister Side of Chemistry
00:31:05
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her new work, The Poisoner's Handbook, a look at how easy it used to be to kill someone with poison and the researchers who made poisoning much harder to get away with. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include blog.deborahblum.com
Feb 25, 2010
Ice, Ice, Baby: The Physics of Curling
00:27:40
Mark Shegelski of the University of Northern British Columbia talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about the physics of curling, currently taking its turn on the world stage at the Vancouver Olympics. (Shegelski is also the author of the new sci-fi collection "Remembering the Future.") Plus, we test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Feb 18, 2010
Whaddaya Do with a Dead Whale?
00:25:56
Scientific American magazine Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about some of the articles in the February issue, including one on the ecosystems that arise around the carcasses of whales that die and fall to the ocean floor; the warfare between our cells, our allied microbes and disease-causing organisms; and ways to improve the internal combustion engine
Feb 11, 2010
Cleopatra's Alexandria Treasures
00:28:23
Renowned archaeologist Franck Goddio talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about his efforts to recover artifacts from the ancient cities of Alexandria, Heracleion and Canopus, with special attention to discoveries related to Cleopatra and her reign. The exhibit Cleopatra: The Search for the Last Queen of Egypt opens at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia on June 5th. Web sites related to this episode include www.underwaterdiscovery.org
Feb 01, 2010
The Science Talk Quiz: "Totally Bogus"
00:03:35
Here are four science stories, but only three are true. See if you know which story is TOTALLY BOGUS
Jan 26, 2010
Creating Darwin's Biopic; and Consumer Electronics
00:21:07
Science Talk correspondent John Pavlus talks with Jon Amiel, director of the new Darwin biography movie Creation, and with Randal Keynes, Darwin's great-great-grandson and one of the film's scriptwriters. Then we'll hear from a few of the exhibitors who spoke to ScientificAmerican.com 's Larry Greenemeier at the recent Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas
Jan 23, 2010
The Science Talk Quiz: "Totally Bogus"
00:03:46
Here are four science stories, but only three are true. See if you know which story is TOTALLY BOGUS.
Jan 19, 2010
Mining for Online Game Gold and Other Amazing Stories
00:23:23
Scientific American magazine Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina talks about the January issue, including articles on the chances of conditions conducive to life elsewhere in the multiverse and the growing practice of virtual gold farming, in which legions of online game players in developing countries acquire currency in the game that they sell to other players for real money. Web sites related to this episode include www.snipurl.com/nobelfrank; www.redcross.org; www.pih.org
Jan 16, 2010
Alan Alda's Human Spark, Part 2
00:22:27
Alan Alda, host of the new PBS science series The Human Spark, talks to podcast host Steve Mirsky about his experiences as a fictional physican, a real patient and an amateur scientist. Web sites related to this episode include www.pbs.org/humanspark
Jan 08, 2010
Alan Alda's Human Spark
00:35:13
Alan Alda, star of stage, screen and science, talks with podcast host Steve Mirsky about his new PBS science series The Human Spark as well as his strong interest in science and long association with Scientific American
Jan 08, 2010
The Science Talk Quiz: "Totally Bogus"
00:03:59
Here are four science stories, but only three are true. See if you know which story is TOTALLY BOGUS.
Dec 29, 2009
Christmas Season Science
00:15:46
Scientific American daily podcast contributor Karen Hopkin talks about a few recent studies related to the science of the Christmas season
Dec 23, 2009
Bonus Bogus Brainteaser
00:03:20
The Totally Bogus Quiz for this week
Dec 21, 2009
Copenhagen and Everywhere Else
00:36:26
ScientificAmerican.com 's David Biello is in Copenhagen at the climate conference, and he'll tell us what's going on there. And the Wildlife Conservation Society's Steven Sanderson discusses his Foreign Affairs article, "Where the Wild Things Were," worldwide conservation and the Everglades. Web sites related to this episode include www.snipurl.com/sanderson; www.twitter.com/dbiello
Dec 18, 2009
World Changing Ideas: December's Scientific American
00:26:06
Scientific American magazine Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and editor Michael Moyer talk about the "World Changing Ideas" feature as well as other contents of the December issue. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news
Dec 11, 2009
Bogus Brainteaser
00:03:40
The Totally Bogus Quiz for this week
Dec 04, 2009
John Rennie's 7 Answers to Climate Contrarian Nonsense
00:39:46
On the eve of the United Nations Global Warming Conference in Copenhagen and in the wake of the hacked climate researchers' e-mails, former Scientific American Editor in Chief John Rennie discusses his ScientificAmerican.com article "7 Answers to Climate Contrarian Nonsense," available at http://bit.ly/8bg9Fx
Dec 04, 2009
Darwin's Influence on Modern Thought
00:14:26
On the 150th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's Origin of Species, we review Darwin's influence on the the modern world, as analyzed by Ernst Mayr, one of the 20th century's most prolific evolutionary theorists. We review Mayr's July 2000 Scientific American article, "Darwin's Influence on Modern Thought". The original, complete essay is temporarily available free of charge at http://snipurl.com/darwinsciam
Nov 24, 2009
Tree Ring Science and Tomorrow's Water
00:24:08
Tree ring expert Kevin Anchukaitis, of the tree ring lab at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, part of Columbia University's Earth Institute, talks about the information available in tree rings. And Colin Chartres, the director general of the International Water Management Institute, talks to Lynne Peeples about water issues. Plus, we test your knowledge of some recent science in the news, specifically the November issue of Scientific American magazine. Web sites related to this episode include http://snipurl.com/sciamwater; http://snipurl.com/sciamnov
Nov 18, 2009
Human Evolution II: Recent Evolution; and "Becoming Human" NOVA Preview
00:34:30
Anthropologist John Hawks of the University of Wisconsin - Madison talks about recent human evolution, especially of our ability to digest lactose. And producer Graham Townsley discusses his three-part PBS NOVA premiering on November 3rd called "Becoming Human". Plus, we test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.snipurl.com/t1ivr
Nov 03, 2009
Human Evolution: Lucy and Neandertals
00:35:02
Anthropologist Chris Stringer of the Natural History Museum in London talks about Neandertals. And Scientific American 's Kate Wong, co-author with Donald Johanson of Lucy's Legacy, talks about the discovery and impact of the famous Lucy fossil. Plus, we test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.snipurl.com/lucyfinder; http://bit.ly/bntu0
Oct 23, 2009
Brain Enhancement: October Issue of Scientific American
00:25:32
In this episode Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina discusses the contents of the October issue of Scientific American, including articles on brain enhancement, lost cities of the Amazon and a century-old plan to make subway rides more entertaining
Oct 14, 2009
New Nobel Laureate Jack Szostak and Surrogates Film Director Jonathan Mostow
00:22:57
Jack Szostak, who just shared the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, talks about his latest research on the origin of life. And Scientific American editor George Musser talks to Jonathan Mostow, director of the new Bruce Willis sci-fi thriller Surrogates . Web sites related to this episode include www.snipurl.com/surrogates; www.snipurl.com/telomere; www.snipurl.com/origin
Oct 06, 2009
Clean Energy Contest; and Counting Crickets and Katydids
00:27:43
Scientific American podcast correspondent Cynthia Graber talks about the M.I.T. Clean Energy Prize Competition. And we take part in the recent Cricket Crawl, an effort to take a census of crickets and katydids in the New York metropolitan area. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.amnh.org and www.discoverlife.org/cricket
Sep 28, 2009
Where There Was Smoke, There's Science
00:22:13
Wake Forest University School of Medicine neuroscientist Dwayne Godwin talks about the the Winston-Salem area's adoption of biomedical research as well as meetings with Congress about science funding and his comic strip contributions to Scientific American Mind . Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Sep 09, 2009
Origins of Everything: The September Scientific American Magazine
00:26:36
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina discusses the September special single-topic issue of Scientific American magazine, which covers origins, from the universe to the horse stirrup. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.thelongtail.com
Sep 01, 2009
Colony Collapse and Ruptured Ribosomes; Minding Darwin's Beeswax
00:17:31
John Williams, the beekeeper at Down House in England, talks about Darwin's bees. And May Berenbaum, entomologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, talks about the latest publication related to colony collapse disorder and ribosome damage in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . Web sites related to this episode include www.bee-craft.com
Aug 26, 2009
To Bee or Not to Bee
00:23:22
In part 2 of our bee podcast, we talk with May Berenbaum, entomologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and inspiration for the X Files fictional entomologist Bambi Berenbaum, about bees, other insects and how life history analysis can make us rest easy during scary sci-fi invasion movies. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news
Aug 22, 2009
Bee Afraid, Bee Very Afraid
00:22:08
May Berenbaum, entomologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and inspiration for the X Files fictional entomologist Bambi Berenbaum, talks about colony collapse disorder and disappearing bees as well as the importance of honeybees in agriculture
Aug 14, 2009
Swimming In Spacetime and Other Stories
00:30:45
Scientific American Editor in Chief Mariette DiChristina and staff editor Kate Wong talk about the contents of the August issue, including articles on some of the odd consequences of general relativity, life as a Neandertal, and the latest research on celiac disease. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Aug 01, 2009
Nuts, Bolts, Photons and Electrons of Solar Energy
00:28:15
Jeff Wolfe, the CEO and co-founder of groSolar, talks about solar energy's present and future. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.grosolar.com
Jul 24, 2009
Movie Magic (Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs), Part 3
00:29:41
In this series of episodes, we talk to many of the scientists at Blue Sky Studios, which created the Ice Age series of animated features, including the recently released Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs . In episode 3, we hear from co-director Mike Thurmeier, art director Mike Knapp and head of lighting Andew Beddini. Special thanks to Hugo Ayala. Web sites related to this episode include www.blueskystudios.com and www.iceagemovie.com
Jul 14, 2009
Movie Magic (Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs), Part 2
00:20:17
In this series of episodes, we talk to many of the scientists at Blue Sky Studios, which created the Ice Age series of animated features, including the recently released Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs . In episode 2, we hear from the research and development team about their backgrounds, the kinds of technical challenges they face and the ways they use math and computers to solve those problems. Web sites related to this episode include www.blueskystudios.com; www.iceagemovie.com; www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=magic-and-the-brain
Jul 11, 2009
Movie Magic (Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs), Part 1
00:21:45
In this series of episodes, we talk to many of the scientists at Blue Sky Studios, which created the Ice Age series of animated features, including the recently released Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs . In episode 1, we hear from company founders Carl Ludwig and Eugene Troubetzkoy and senior research associate Hugo Ayala. Web sites related to this episode include www.blueskystudios.com and www.iceagemovie.com
Jul 11, 2009
Atul Gawande Redux
00:29:10
While Steve's at the conference of the World Federation of Science Journalists in London, we look ahead to some of the programming coming your way in the coming weeks, and we replay our 2007 interview with surgeon Atul Gawande, whose recent research in The New England Journal of Medicine and writing in The New Yorker have caused a big stir in the medical and health care reform communities. Web sites related to this episode include http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/06/01/090601fa_fact_gawande?yrail and http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/NEJMsa0810119
Jul 01, 2009
Hello Moon, Good-Bye Rennie
00:29:16
We look at the contents of the July issue of Scientific American magazine, the last under outgoing Editor in Chief John Rennie, including an article by moon explorer Harrison Schmitt, a piece on the fight against superbugs, a report on the potential of biofuels such as grassoline, and a recollection of the pernicious effects of chess! Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Jun 26, 2009
Panamania!: A Visit to the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
00:27:26
We take a walking tour of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute on Barro Colorado Island in Panama, with the STRI's Beth King and Harilaos Lessios. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web Sites related to this episode include www.stri.org
Jun 18, 2009
The Truth about Cats and Dogs
00:27:13
Scientific American magazine Editor in Chief John Rennie talks about the contents of the June issue, including articles on the evolution of cats and the physiology of sled dogs. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
May 29, 2009
High Achievement High Schoolers
00:28:10
High school scientists Sruti Swaminathan, Maia ten Brink, Alyssa Bailey, Moyukh Chatterjee and Fedja Kadribasic, all winners of state competitions sponsored by the American Junior Academy of Sciences, talk about their research. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
May 19, 2009
Beauty Is Truth (and Science)
00:20:31
Procter & Gamble scientists Greg Hillebrand and Jay Tiesman talk about scientific research related to beauty products and cosmetics. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.pg.com/science
May 11, 2009
People, Pan Troglodytes (Chimps) and Pigs
00:29:36
Scientific American editor Christine Soares discusses the swine flu situation and Editor in Chief John Rennie talks about the May issue--topics include the specific genetic differences between humans and chimps, side-channel hacking, food shortages, and our leaky atmosphere. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
May 01, 2009
Sherwin Nuland's Tales from the Bedside
00:29:36
Surgeon and author Sherwin Nuland talks about his new book The Soul of Medicine: Tales from the Bedside, a Chaucerian take on doctors and their relationships with patients and each other. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Apr 23, 2009
Life Goes on within You and without You: Health and the Environment
00:27:29
In this episode, we'll hear parts of three talks from the recent symposium, Exploring the Dynamic Relationship Between Health and the Environment, organized by the American Museum of Natural History's Center for Biodiversity and Conservation. Speakers include Penn State's Peter Hudson, who talks about disease transmission; Oxford's Oliver Pybus, on how genome analysis exonerated health care workers accused of infecting children with HIV; and N.Y.U.'s Martin Blaser on our disappearing stomach flora. Plus, we'll test your knowlege of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.symposia.cbc.amnh.org/health
Apr 17, 2009
Why People Believe What They Do
00:25:11
University of California, Berkeley, psychologist Tania Lombrozo talks about why people believe what they do, especially regarding evolution or creationism. Author Steve Miller discusses his new book The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Science of Everything . Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include psychology.berkeley.edu/faculty/profiles/tlombrozo.html
Apr 10, 2009
From Dark Energy to Lone Star Lunacy
00:28:55
Scientific American magazine Editor in Chief John Rennie talks about articles in the April issue, covering dark energy, bee colony collapse and post-traumatic stress. And Eugenie Scott, executive director of the National Center for Science Education, discusses anti-evolution-education efforts by the Texas School Board. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.ncseweb.org; www.youtube.com/NatCen4ScienceEd
Apr 02, 2009
What Shape Is Your Galaxy?
00:23:02
Yale astrophysicist Kevin Schawinski talks about Galaxy Zoo, a distributed computing project in which laypeople can help researchers characterize galaxies. And we tour Kroon Hall, the new green home of the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Sciences. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.galaxyzoo.org; www.environment.yale.edu/kroon
Mar 26, 2009
In Search of Time
00:33:20
Journalist and writer Dan Falk talks about his new book In Search of Time, about the cultural, physical and psychological aspects of the mysterious ticking clocks all around us. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.danfalk.ca
Mar 19, 2009
Phrasing a Coyne: Jerry Coyne on Why Evolution Is True
00:20:28
During a Scientific American cruise in the Caribbean, University of Chicago evolutionary biologist Jerry Coyne talks about his new book Why Evolution Is True . And we hear a brief example of what it's like to attend science lectures at sea. Plus, we'll test your knowlege of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.insightcruises.com; www.whyevolutionistrue.com
Mar 13, 2009
From Spooky Action to Tiny Radios
00:27:41
Scientific American Editor in Chief John Rennie talks about the contents of the March issue of the magazine, including articles on quantum entanglement, nano radios, fresh brain cells and more. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Mar 04, 2009
Remarkable Creatures (and Getting Them Fixed)
00:22:00
University of Wisconsin evolutionary biologist Sean Carroll talks about his new book, Remarkable Creatures, which chronicles the derring-do of some of natural history's brightest stars. And FoundAnimals.org 's Katy Palfrey discusses the Michelson Prize, for the development of a nonsurgical pet-neutering technique. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include foundanimals.org; seanbcarroll.com
Feb 25, 2009
Stars of Cosmology, Part 2
00:33:26
In part 2 of this podcast, cosmologists Alan Guth from M.I.T., Arizona State University's Lawrence Krauss, John Carlstrom from the University of Chicago, and Fermilab's Scott Dodelson take reporters' questions at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago on February 16th
Feb 19, 2009
Stars of Cosmology, Part 1
00:17:08
In part 1 of this podcast, cosmologists Alan Guth from M.I.T., Arizona State University's Lawrence Krauss, John Carlstrom from the University of Chicago, and Fermilab's Scott Dodelson discuss the state of cosmology--and the universe's possible dismal future--at a press conference at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Chicago on February 16th
Feb 18, 2009
Darwin Day Special, Part 3: Origins of Paleontology and the Impact of Religion on the Development of Evolutionary Theory
00:28:08
In part 3 of this special Darwin Day podcast, the Reverend Thomas Goodhue, executive director of the Long Island Council of Churches and author of the book Curious Bones: Mary Anning and the Birth of Paleontology, talks about Anning and how religion informed Darwin and the scientists who led to him.
Feb 13, 2009
Darwin Day Special, Part 2: Evolutionary Psychology and Religion
00:22:55
In part 2 of this special Darwin Day podcast, Hofstra University religion professor John Teehan discusses the study of religion from an evolutionary psychology perspective
Feb 12, 2009
Darwin Day Special: Bicentennial of the Birth of Charles Darwin
00:35:38
In part 1 of this special Darwin Day podcast, celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Darwin on February 12th, Richard Milner performs part of his one-man show about Darwin; Scientific American Editor in Chief John Rennie and Darwin descendant Matthew Chapman read from The Origin of Species ; and Chapman talks about his book 40 Days and 40 Nights, about the Dover intelligent design trial as well as about his efforts to get presidential candidates to discuss science--a project called ScienceDebate
Feb 12, 2009
The Naked Singularity Meets Social Media
00:31:11
Scientific American Editor in Chief John Rennie talks about the content of the February issue, including naked singularities and the greenhouse hamburger. N.Y.U. journalism professor Jay Rosen discusses social media. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.SciAm.com/sciammag; journalism.nyu.edu/pubzone/weblogs/pressthink
Feb 04, 2009
CO2 Rising: Follow the Bouncing Carbon Atom
00:33:48
Scientist and author Tyler Volk talks about his new book CO 2 Rising: The World's Greatest Environmental Challenge . Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include http://pages.nyu.edu/~tv1/Volk.htm
Jan 29, 2009
Darwin: Ghostbuster, Muse and Magistrate
00:26:48
Darwin historian Richard Milner shares some of the lesser known aspects of Darwin's life. And Scientific American columnist Michael Shermer talks about the stock market, religion and other belief systems. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.darwinlive.com; www.michaelshermer.com
Jan 22, 2009
From Astronomy to Zune
00:33:47
Scientific American astronomy expert George Musser discusses the recent meeting of the American Astronomical Society and SciAm.com 's Larry Greenemeier reports on the Consumer Electronics Show. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news
Jan 14, 2009
The Evolution of Evolution
00:21:32
Scientific American Editor in Chief John Rennie discusses the special January issue of the magazine, which focuses on evolution--2009 being the 200th anniversary of the birth of Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of The Origin of Species . Subjects in the issue include the importance of natural selection, the sources of genetic variability, human evolution's past and future, pop evolutionary psychology, everyday applications of evolutionary theory, the science of the game Spore, and the ongoing threat to science education posed by creationist activists. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.SciAm.com/jan2009
Jan 07, 2009
The Manhattan Project and the Met
00:46:24
The Metropolitan Opera's production of the new opera Doctor Atomic aired on PBS on December 29th. We'll hear from Manhattan Project veterans Roy Glauber (Nobel laureate), Murray Peshkin, Leonard Jossem, Al Bartlett, Hans Courant, Harold Agnew, Benjamin Bederson, who spoke at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. And we talk to the Metropolitan Opera's Patricia Steiner. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include tinyurl.com/3lmldy
Dec 31, 2008
Christmas at the Moon; and Instant Egghead Guide: The Mind
00:29:04
Scientific American editor Michael Battaglia discusses the online In-Depth-Report on Apollo 8, which orbited the moon 40 years ago this week. And author Emily Anthes talks about her new book, Instant Egghead Guide: The Mind . Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.SciAm.com/report.cfm?id=apollo8; www.SciAm.com/report.cfm?id=science-movies; www.pbs.org/wnet/gperf/tag/doctor-atomic
Dec 24, 2008
From Carbon to the Cretaceous: Report from the American Geophysical Union Meeting
00:24:50
Scientific American editor Davide Castelvecchi reports from the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in San Francisco. Subjects include the extinction of the dinosaurs and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory. And CNET Senior Associate Editor Michelle Thatcher gives us the lowdown on netbooks and tablet PCs. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.agu.org; crave.cnet.com
Dec 19, 2008
Klaatu's Back and He's Not Happy
00:23:17
Scott Derrickson, director of the new version of The Day the Earth Stood Still, talks about his take on the iconic sci-fi movie. And Nobel laureate Richard Roberts discusses the importance of open-access science publishing. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news
Dec 10, 2008
The Science of Pain
00:31:45
Stanford University pain expert Sean Mackey talks about the modern take on pain, how to treat it, why treatment is so important, and the relationship between pain and empathy. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include sciencegeekgirl.wordpress.com/2008/10; paincenter.stanford.edu
Dec 03, 2008
Viruses against Disease; Going Batty for Bats
00:24:28
Scientific American editor in chief, John Rennie, talks about the contents of the December issue, including bat evolution and how magicians are helping neuroscience. And Boro Dropulic of Lentigen talks about converting viruses into disease fighters. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include http://www.sciam.com/report.cfm?id=bat-guide; http://www.sciam.com/report.cfm?id=thanksgiving
Nov 26, 2008
Approval of Seals: Wildlife Docs and Their Exotic Patients
00:27:35
Some veterinarians treat animals much more exotic than the family pet. Jeffrey Boehm, executive director of the Marine Mammal Center, talks about the challenges of caring for sick sea mammals. And Alisa "Harley" Newton, a pathologist with the Wildlife Conservation Society, discusses how vets figured out that a pathogen attacking humans was in fact West Nile Virus. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.tmmc.org; www.wcs.org
Nov 19, 2008
Kayaking Antarctica with Jon Bowermaster
00:27:15
How a warming climate leads to freezing penguins, with journalist and author Jon Bowermaster, who has kayaked the world's seas, most recently in Antarctica. And Cynthia Graber takes us on a tour with a new M.I.T. underwater autonomous vehicle. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Websites related to this episode include www.jonbowermaster.com
Nov 12, 2008
The Day After: Science in the Obama Administration
00:22:52
Stanford University biologist Sharon Long, a science advisor to the Barack Obama campaign, talks about science in the upcoming administration. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.SciAm.com/report.cfm?id=election2008
Nov 05, 2008
Cemetery Science: The Geology of Mausoleums
00:37:10
For Halloween, we take a tour of Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, N.Y., with geologist Sidney Horenstein and Woodlawn expert Susan Olsen, concentrating on the geology of the rock used in the memorials. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include www.bigpumpkins.com; www.thewoodlawncemetery.org
Oct 30, 2008
Today's Alternative Energy; and November Issue Topics, Including Computer-Brain Interfaces and DNA Computing
00:28:59
Scientific American magazine editor in chief, John Rennie, talks about the November issue's contents, including computer-brain interfaces, DNA computing, the ongoing attempts to find an HIV vaccine and getting closer to the Star Trek tricorder with portable NMR. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include snipurl.com/4LJ71; SciAm.com/sciammag
Oct 22, 2008
More Than Pickles and Ice Cream: The Link Between Diet and Fertility
00:20:22
Harvard School of Public Health epidemiologist Walter Willett talks to SciAm correspondent Cynthia Graber about his latest book, The Fertility Diet as well as about the links between nutrition and health generally. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Oct 15, 2008
Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about E. Coli, Part 2
00:21:53
Carl Zimmer continues his discussion of E. coli, the bacteria that are the subject of his new book Microcosm: E. Coli and the New Science of Life . Plus, we'll test your knowledge about the Nobel Prizes awarded this week. Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.carlzimmer.com; improbable.com; nobelprize.org
Oct 09, 2008
Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about E. Coli, Part 1
00:26:46
Author and journalist Carl Zimmer talks about E. coli, the bacteria that are the subject of his new book Microcosm: E. Coli and the New Science of Life . Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.carlzimmer.com
Oct 08, 2008
Searching for Intelligence
00:28:00
Author and journalist Carl Zimmer talks about the search for the physiological and biological basis of intelligence, the subject of his article in the October issue of Scientific American magazine. And Editor in Chief John Rennie discusses other articles in the issue, including the cover story on the possibility of a big bounce instead of the big bang and the science of the World Wide Web. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.SciAm.com/sciammag; www.carlzimmer.com
Oct 01, 2008
Earth 3.0
00:28:18
Scientific American editor Mark Fischetti talks about Earth 3.0, a new SciAm publication concerning energy, sustainability and the environment. And ScientificAmerican.com writer Larry Greenemeier discusses the interface between nanotech and biology. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.sciamearth3.com
Sep 24, 2008
The Large Hadron Collider Goes to Work
00:30:35
Nobel Prize-winning physicist Frank Wilczek and Scientific American editor George Musser talk about the Large Hadron Collider, the most powerful particle accelerator ever built, which went online this week. Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.frankwilczek.com; www.youtube.com/watch?v=j50ZssEojtM; http://www.sciam.com/report.cfm?id=lhc-countdown
Sep 11, 2008
Tom Friedman's New Book--Hot, Flat, and Crowded
00:29:13
Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Tom Friedman discusses his new book, Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution--And How It Can Renew America . Plus, we'll test your knowledge about some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.thomaslfriedman.com
Sep 09, 2008
Who's Watching You: The Future of Privacy
00:28:00
Scientific American editor in chief, John Rennie, discusses the future of privacy and security, the subject of the September single-topic issue of Scientific American magazine. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.SciAm.com/sciammag; www.snipurl.com/sciamfootball
Sep 03, 2008
Return of a Killer: Tuberculosis in Russia
00:29:02
Veteran journalist Merrill Goozner, director of the Integrity in Science project at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, discusses his series of articles for SciAm.com on the rise of tuberculosis in Russia. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.gooznews.com; www.snipurl.com/goozner
Aug 27, 2008
What's the Buzz: A Conversation with Buzz Aldrin
00:20:00
Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, talks about solar energy, buses between the planets, the Constellation program, his time on the moon and his new animated movie, Fly Me to the Moon . Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.snipurl.com/aldrin; www.sciamdigital.com; www.flymetothemoonthemovie.com
Aug 20, 2008
Superdove!: The Straight Poop on Pigeons
00:20:12
Courtney Humphries talks about her new book, Superdove: How the Pigeon Took Manhattan...And the World . Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned in this episode include www.birds.cornell.edu/pigeonwatch; chumphries.org
Aug 13, 2008
Inside SciAm: The August Issue
00:14:13
In this special edition of Science Talk, Scientific American editor in chief, John Rennie, talks to Steve about the August issue of the magazine, which features articles on migraine, solar superstorms and self-cleaning materials
Aug 08, 2008
Inside China: Science, Technology, Energy and the Environment
00:28:51
Former Washington Post Beijing bureau chief, Philip Pan, author of Out of Mao's Shadow: The Struggle for the Soul of a New China, discusses the science, technology, environment and culture of China with Scientific American 's David Biello, who recently spent almost a month reporting from the country. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news.
Aug 06, 2008
Outsmarting Bombers; and A Warless Future?
00:27:36
IEEE Spectrum editor in chief, Glenn Zorpette, talks about high-tech attempts to battle improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in Iraq as well as the state of reconstruction of Iraq's electricity grid. And journalist John Horgan talks about the possibility of eliminating war. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include: www.saferoadmaps.org, www.thomaslfriedman.com; www.spectrum.ieee.org
Jul 30, 2008
Visit to the Fair: Inside a Tech Expo
00:18:10
In this episode we feature five interviews conducted at the Digital Experience! computer and electronics expo that took place in New York City in June. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites related to this episode include: www.eye.fi; www.skype.net; www.synaptics.com; www.jakkspacific.com; www.m-audio.com
Jul 23, 2008
The Complete Idiot's Guide to String Theory
00:29:57
George Musser talks about his new book, The Complete Idiot's Guide to String Theory . Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news
Jul 16, 2008
The Long and Winding Road: DNA Evidence for Human Migration; Plus July Issue Highlights
00:30:00
Gary Stix discusses his July Scientific American cover article on DNA evidence for the history of human migration. And editor in chief, John Rennie, talks about the neuroscience of dance, the quantum cosmos and Rubik's Cubes. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.sciam.com/sciammag
Jul 07, 2008
Gott Ya: Astrophysicist J. Richard Gott on Time Travel and Presidential Polling
00:22:34
Princeton astrophysicist J. Richard Gott discusses some of the realities and speculations of time travel (one human holds the record for time travel--1/48 of a second) as well as how best to evaluate presidential election polling data. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.colleyrankings.com, snipurl.com/2oorv
Jun 25, 2008
One Singular Sensation: Will We Upload Our Brains, and Other Questions Related to "The Coming Singularity"
00:22:45
Glenn Zorpette, executive editor of IEEE Spectrum magazine, and journalist John Horgan discuss various ideas related to what some call "the coming singularity," a point where computers will allegedly attain consciousness and superintelligence. Or not. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.spectrum.ieee.org/singularity
Jun 18, 2008
The Happening: A Conversation with Director M. Night Shyamalan
00:23:44
M. Night Shyamalan's new film, The Happening, involves an environmental backlash, the limits of reason and the beauty of math. SciAm editor George Musser discusses the film with the director. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.sciam.com/daily
Jun 12, 2008
Fact and Fiction: James Randi's "Amaz!ng Meeting" and Mark Alpert's Physics Novel, Final Theory
00:24:10
James Randi, famous debunker of frauds, talks about the "Amaz!ng Meeting" coming up in Las Vegas, and SciAm editor Mark Alpert discusses his new physics novel, Final Theory . Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.sciam.com/daily, www.badscience.net, www.randi.org, www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4vgsZmleoE
Jun 04, 2008
The Feral Biologist: A Talk with George Schaller; A Look in the June SciAm
00:26:53
The Wildlife Conservation Society's George Schaller talks about his new book, "A Naturalist and Other Beasts," which covers his 50 years of documenting important large animal species in the field. And Scientific American editor in chief, John Rennie, offers a look at some articles in the June issue. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.SciAm.com/daily, www.wcs.org
May 28, 2008
Little Brains, Big Brains: Latest Flores Hobbit News and the Intel Science Fair
00:22:26
Kate Wong brings us up to date on the ongoing research into fossils of the tiny human, called the Hobbit, found on the island of Flores. And Ivan Oransky reports from the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. Plus, Nobel laureate Gerald Edelman illustrates problems with reductionism and refrigerators. And we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.SciAm.com/daily, www.nybg.org/darwin/symposium.php, www.intel.com/education/ISEF
May 21, 2008
China Quake Update; Fictional Scientists; What's New at SciAm.com
00:23:13
David Biello reports from China on the aftermath of the major earthquake that struck this week. Mark Alpert talks about the portrayal of scientists in fiction. And new online managing editor Ivan Oransky discusses what's up on the Web site. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.sciam.com/daily, www.snipurl.com/madsci, www.snipurl.com/hotpepper
May 14, 2008
Evolution Enclaves: Darwin the Botanist and Origins of Life Research
00:29:01
David Kohn, curator of the Darwin's Garden exhibit at the New York Botanical Garden, discusses Darwin's botanical studies. And Harvard Medical School's Jack Szostak talks about research into the origins of life. Plus we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Websites mentioned on this episode include www.nybg.org/darwin; www.hhmi.org; www.sciam.com/daily
May 07, 2008
Plasma Physics: From Black Holes to Radio Reception
00:21:39
Plasma plays a big role from the ionosphere to black holes. Stanford physicist Roger Blandford explains plasma and its connection to black holes in a conversation with Scientific American 's JR Minkel. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.snipurl.com/26dun-sciam1; www.snipurl.com/26dv2-sciam2; www.nybg.org/darwin
Apr 30, 2008
Can Science Save the Banana?
00:24:24
The banana is the world's most important fruit. But it's under threat from a disease spreading around the world. We'll hear from Dan Koeppel, author of the book "Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World." And we'll visit a Guatemala banana plantation with guide Julio Cordova. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.bananabook.org
Apr 23, 2008
On The Shoulders of Giants: John Wheeler and Salome Waelsch
00:26:34
Physicist John Wheeler and geneticist Salome Waelsch both had incredibly long and fruitful careers, providing numerous fundamental insights in their respective fields. We'll hear from Kenneth Ford, former director of the American Institute of Physics, about Wheeler, who died April 13th at 96. And Princeton's Lee Silver talks about Waelsch, who died last fall at 100 and who was memorialized on April 14th at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Plus we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Websites mentioned on this episode include www.ianford.com/kenford; www.leemsilver.net
Apr 16, 2008
Expelled Explained
00:28:48
A new movie, Expelled, claims that intelligent design is good science that is being censored by adherents to evolution, which is nothing but Darwinian dogma. Scientific American's editor-in-chief, John Rennie, and podcast host Steve Mirsky discuss the movie. And Eugenie Scott, director of the National Center for Science Education, talks about being interviewed for the film as well as her organization's efforts to provide correct information about the claims in Expelled. Plus we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. For more of SciAm's coverage of Expelled visit www.sciam.com/expelled. Websites mentioned on this episode include www.expelledthemovie.com; www.expelledexposed.com; www.natcenscied.org