WARDROBE CRISIS with Clare Press

By Clare Press

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WARDROBE CRISIS is a sustainable fashion podcast from VOGUE's sustainability editor Clare Press. Join Clare and her guests as they decode the fashion system, and dig deep into its effects on people and planet. This show unzips the real issues that face the fashion industry today, with a focus on ethics, sustainability, consumerism, activism, identity and creativity.

Episode Date
Saving the Great Barrier Reef - Science Meets Activism
3179

Is the Great Barrier Reef dead? Headlines to that effect zoomed around the world after two consecutive coral bleaching events in 2016 and 2017. But Australia’s most famous World Heritage wonder is still very much with us - a vast eco-system, roughly the size of Germany, it teams with life.

Threats from climate change and other factors aren't going away though. Find out what is being done to build resilience on the reef. Meet the scientists and activists working together to protect it. Learn what makes coral tick - and how it makes love (seriously!)

This week’s podcast invites you on an excellent adventure with Clare, Vogue Homme cover model Jarrod Scott and Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef to discover the full story. Also starring: Andy Ridely, Laura Wells, Professor David Suggett, researcher Katie Chartrand and dive guide Fiona Merida.

Don't miss the shownotes on clarepress.com

Got feedback? Connect with us on social media - find Clare on Instagram and Twitter. And please consider rating and reviewing the show in your favourite podcast app.

HAPPY LISTENING!

Dec 11, 2019
Beyond Marie Kondo! Adam Minter Unpacks Secondhand, Recycling & Resuse
3231

Are you into vintage shopping or second-hand style? Join the club. Whether you're glued to Depop, buying high end designer vintage or a committed charity shop trawler, secondhand has lost its stigma in fashion circles. 

Recommerce is growing. According to Thredup preloved fashion is on track to eclipse fast fashion within a decade, while 64% of women have either bought or are open to buying used clothes. But... that doesn't mean the world isn't drowning in unwanted stuff. 

This podcast goes live on Black Friday. On this holiday and sales frenzy last year, Americans spent $6.2 billion on Black Friday, up 23.6% on the previous year.

Much of this haul will end up on the bin. We're still discarding clothing and other unwanted items at a record rate. So what happens to all our stuff when we’re done with it?

Meet the recycling obsessive who grew up on a junkyard and now works for Bloomberg. Adam Minter, author of Junkyard Planet, has a new book out. This one's called Secondhand - Travels in the New Global Garage Sale, and to write it he travelled all over the world talking to the people who deal in trash.

In this fascinating interview, we discuss everything from how metals get recycled to the politics of exporting our trash.

LOVE THE SHOW? Please share on social media and consider rating and reviewing in your favourite podcast app.

Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter, and at clarepress.com

 

Nov 29, 2019
Green Architect Jason McLennan on Biophilic Design & the Living Building Challenge
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What if our buildings weren't just a little bit more energy efficient or decorated with a few extra plants? What if they gave back to the environment instead of taking away from it? Biophilic design is a buzz word, and we're on board!

Meet the visionary Canadian architect Jason McLennan, founder of the Living Building Challenge and the Living Future Institute.

This Episode is all about how we can not just green our built environment but totally rethink it so that it’s regenerative, and provides havens for other species too. How might we truly live in harmony with nature? And as Jason puts it: “Create places that are not only lovely but express the love we have for people, for animals and for the environment.”

Oh, and seriously, we need to fix the toilets!

Happy listening!

Nov 20, 2019
Economist Raj Patel - Can We Imagine the End of Capitalism?
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Why are the old white men still in charge? What's the system build from, and how might be change it? In A History of the World in 7 Cheap things, Raj Patel and his co-author Jason W. Moore argue that the modern world has been shaped by the exploitation of cheap nature, money, work, care, food, energy, and lives.

"Cheap is a strategy, a practice, a violence that mobilises all kinds of work - human, animal, botanical and geological - for as little compensation as possible.” And it goes back way further than the Industrial Revolution. Think about Columbus "conquering" new frontiers. Centuries later, we're still carrying on the same way - invade, exploit, move on.

Is it really easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism? Could we reform society along more equitable lines and create a brighter future for people and planet?

This week, Clare gets to hang out with Raj Patel, the US-based British writer, speaker, activist, academic and wearer of very nice ethically made jackets. He’s got degrees from Oxford, the London School of Economics and Cornell. And he has worked for the World Bank and World Trade Organisation - but he has also protested against them. Fascinating, provocative and full of ideas and information, this Episode will make you question everything.

Enjoying the show? DON'T FORGET TO HIT SUBSCRIBE. Please consider rating and reviewing Wardrobe Crisis in your favourite podcast app.

Nov 14, 2019
Fashion Designers! Vegan Chefs! Gung-Ho & Women Leading the Sustainable Food Movement
3138

Have you ever thought about the water footprint of beef or olive oil? Or how far your food has travelled before it reaches your dinner plate? And what has all this god to do with fashion? 

Meet Gung-Ho designer Sophie Dunster, food writer and photographer Sara Kiyo Popowa, and chefs Lauren Lovatt and Abi Aspen Glencross. Whether they’re vegan or just very excited about colourful vegetables; sure that what we eat can affect our mental health or just really keen on yummy food that doesn’t cost the Earth - these four female foodies are combining fashion with activism to put change on the menu. Bon appetit!

THANK YOU for listening.

Looking for links and extra info? Find detailed shownotes here.

Get in touch on Instagram and Twitter

 

Nov 07, 2019
Disability advocate Sinead Burke on Fashion Activism & Inclusivity
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IT'S OUR BIRTHDAY! You are listening to the 100th Episode of Wardrobe Crisis - hurrah! Thank you for being part of it.

This week's guest is Sinéad Burke, the Irish fashion journalist, activist and inclusivity advocate. Maybe you've watched her TED talk, Why Design Should Include Everyone, or heard about reminding the World Economic Forum at Davos this year, to ask: "Who is not in the room?" Probably you saw her on the cover of the Duchess of Sussex-edited September issue of British Vogue.

This interview was recorded during London Fashion Week, so of course we talk clothes. These days, Sinéad sometimes gets about in custom-made Gucci, but that wasn’t always the case. We discuss, what happens when clothes don’t fit you? How do you navigate a world that is not designed for you? Is the fashion industry finally ready to embrace the opportunity to cater to more shapes and sizes, abilities and needs? Why does it so often exclude so many people, and how can we change that?

Let's get to it!

CAN YOU HELP US CELEBRATE OUR BIRTHDAY BY SHARING ABOUT THE SHOW? Clare's on Instagram and Twitter, @mrspress

We love it when you rate & review is in Apple Podcasts too - keep them coming.

Oct 23, 2019
What Will it Take to Fix Unsustainable Fashion? British MP Mary Creagh
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Why do we need to "fix" fashion? Try because textile production contributes more to climate change than international aviation and shipping combined and consumes lake-sized volumes of fresh water. If current consumption levels continue the industry could account for 25% of the world's carbon budget.

Because our wardrobes are full of clothes we don't wear, yet we keep buying more and more garments, most of which are made from polyester and shed tiny plastic microfibres every time we wash them. Because we buy fashion to throw it away.

This week’s guest is Mary Creagh, chair of the UK Parliament’s Environmental Audit Committee (EAC) and the Labour MP for Wakefield - the woman responsible for raising all these things with the British parliament this year.

But this is not just relevant in the UK because the EAC’s report, Fixing Fashion, made headlines globally when it was published in this year.

In this frank insider conversation, we discuss the power of the shopping detox, how Brits got to the point where they’re consuming - and disposing of - twice as many clothes as the Italians and Germans, and just what we ought to be doing about it. Oh and we talk about cycling too. Come join us.

Don't forget to hit subscribe!

 

Oct 16, 2019
Courage! Activist Anna Rose on How to Conquer Climate Anxiety
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How are you doing with all this climate news? Is it getting you down? This Episode to the rescue! It's all about climate hope and how we can feel more courageous and positive about our activism.

Meet climate activist, Anna Rose. She started forming environmental groups when she was a school kid. By the time she was at university, she, and her friend Amanda McKenzie, cofounded the Australian Youth Climate Coalition, which today has more than 150,000 members. She's been involved in leadership for Earth Hour, is on a bunch of important academic advisory boards and today works with an organisation called Farmers for Climate Action. But the reason you need to listen to her is that Anna has a long view on how to stay motivated with our activism . She talks about "hope as a strategic decision" and reminds us that we all have difference capacities that "it's only called impossible until it's done."

“Often I don’t feel brave, but I have to do things that I know are important,” she says. "I see courage as a muscle we can build up over time."

In this upbeat, inspiring conversation, we discuss where to begin, why courage is important, how to foster it and how we can use it to change the world.

ENJOYING THE SHOW? Don't forget to subscribe. Please consider rating and reviewing us? Follow Clare on Instagram.

Find all the shownotes on clarepress.com

Oct 10, 2019
Extinction Rebellion - No Fashion on a Dead Planet
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This Episode was recorded during London fashion week. Extinction Rebellion is a grass roots activism movement demanding radical action on the global climate crisis. The group formed in the UK in October 2018 on the premise that trying to be a bit more sustainable, tinkering around the edges of the system but essentially carrying on with business as usual, will not save us from climate breakdown.

They are calling on governments to declare a climate and ecological emergency, and to act immediately to halt biodiversity loss and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero by 2025.

You will hear from some of the Extinction Rebellion protestors who staged a 'funeral' for London Fashion Week in September, then sit down with activists: Clare Farrell, Sara Arnold and Will Skeaping to find out why they think civil disobedience is the way to go, what to do about the scary science, and where fashion fits in with all of this.

Do you value this show? Please help us spread the word by rating and reviewing in your favourite podcast app, and sharing about Wardrobe Crisis on social media.

Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

To see all the podcast info and shownotes, visit www.clarepress.com

 

Oct 01, 2019
Are You Represented? Sara Ali on Fashion's Diversity Problem & Colonialism
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How does colonialism play out in fashion? And how can we encourage the fashion industry in general, and retail in particular, to be more inclusive? And when will fashion finally wake up to cultural appropriation and do better?

Join me and Sara Ali, a London-based luxury fashion consultant who focuses on Arabia and Africa, as we decode this sensitive subject and ask, Why don’t more conversations focus on it?

Enjoying the show? Thank you for listening. Please help us spread the word. Rating and reviewing in iTunes can help others find us. Or share about the show on social media. Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

To see all the podcast info and shownotes, visit www.clarepress.com

Sep 11, 2019
Fighting Pollution & Detoxing Fashion with Greenpeace Eco Warrior Kirsten Brodde
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Have you heard the one about denim factories turning rivers blue in China? Horrendous, right? But change is possible.

Kirsten Brodde is a former science journalist on a mission to clean up fashion. Meet the Greenpeace activist who led the Detox My Fashion campaign, which spurred an industry-wide commitment to phase out harmful chemicals from clothing production.

In this interview, we unpick what it takes to be an effective activist (think dogged persistence!) and passion but also a willingness to be unpopular.

The Detox campaign took time, major pressure and careful negotiation, but it actually worked. Kirsten describes what’s happened as a result as “a paradigm shift,” and says there’s no going back.

The message, activism matters. We need these dedicated, gusty individuals to rock the boat.

Enjoying the show? Thank you for listening. Please help us spread the word. Rating and reviewing in iTunes can help others find us. Or share about the show on social media. Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

To see all the podcast info and shownotes, visit www.clarepress.com

Sep 04, 2019
Joost Bakker, Zero Waste Renegade
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The New York Times calls him "the poster boy for zero waste living". He's a florist, artist, restaurateur, architect, inventor and revolutionary thinker. Meet the man on a mission to convince us we can grow all the food we need where we live.

In this riveting episode, we discuss everything from how wasteful the floristry industry is to the microbial power of healthy soil to boost serotonin (Yep, it can get you high apparently). What would happen if we reconnected with the natural world? How might eating seasonally change our health, happiness and impact? Could we really grow all the food we need on the roof and walls of our houses and apartment buildings? What's the future of green cities?

Enjoying the show? Thank you for listening. Please help us spread the word. Rating and reviewing in iTunes can help others find us. Or share about the show on social media. Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

To see all the podcast info and shownotes, visit www.clarepress.com

Aug 21, 2019
Everlane's Michael Preysman - Radical Transparency & Beyond
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Do you have any idea how much it actually costs to make your clothes? Most brands would rather you didn't.

Meet the fashion disruptor who is happy to tell you exactly what it costs his company to make its products, and exactly how much profit they make on each style.

Michael Preysman founded Everlane on the concept of "radical transparency" and says: “We believe our customers have a right to know how much their clothes cost to make. We reveal the true costs behind all of our products—from materials to labor to transportation—then offer them to you, minus the traditional retail markup.”

Why is transparency important in the fashion industry? How does that idea apply when it comes to garment workers and factory supply chains? How did this Californian start up become a major global player, and what drives Michael Preysman? In this interview we discuss what it takes to succeed, the power of disruption, and being okay with not being perfect. 

Check out the shownotes on clarepress.com for links and more info.

Enjoying Wardrobe Crisis? Get in touch with Clare on Instagram and Twitter (@mrspress) and let her know. Please consider rating and reviewing us in Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen.

 

Aug 14, 2019
Nest's Rebecca Van Bergen - the Handworker Economy
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Did you know that handwork, or craft, is the second largest employer of women in emerging economies? Since a large proportion of them work from home, this is an often hidden and unregulated sector.

Post Rana Plaza, there’s been more attention on garment factories, but how often do we consider outworkers - homeworkers - who are often contracted by third parties?

This week’s guest is Rebecca van Bergen, founder of fab New York-based NGO, Nest. They are on a mission to “build a new handworker economy to increase global workforce inclusivity, improve women’s wellbeing beyond factories, and preserve important cultural traditions around the world.”

In this interview, we discuss what it takes to make it as a social entrepreneur, the importance of practical plan as well as a big vision, the familiar story of women's work being values and what's being done about it. 

Enjoying the show? Don't forget to hit subscribe, and please tell your friends! Connect with Clare on Instagram and Twitter, @mprsress

Head to clarepress.com for detailed shownotes.

Jul 30, 2019
How to Make it in Sustainable Fashion - A.BCH's Courtney Holm
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I'm sure you've heard that sustainable fashion is the thing right now. Searches on Lyst increased by 66% last year. Vogue has a sustainability editor. Slow fashion is so popular that even Zara is trying to convince us they're not a fast fashion brand

But what does it take to make it as an independent designer working in this space? To cut through the noise to become a sustainable label people talk about? And buy?

Are hard work and dedication enough? 

Nope, says Courtney Holm, the Australian designer behind buzzy independent fashion label A.BCH. She argues that new gen designers need to rethink the whole system. Holm is on a mission to revolutionise how we buy, wear and dispose of clothing.

In this interview we discuss the instinct to have a go yourself when you see something isn't being done, the importance of doing your homework and the usefulness of having a stubborn streak. And we bust the myth that size matters when it comes to being the change.

Enjoying the show? Let us know via www.clarepress.com

Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Thank you for listening. Don't forget to hit subscribe!

Jul 24, 2019
How to Make Denim Circular with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation's Francois Souchet
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Denim is ubiquitous. Almost 2 billion pairs of jeans were sold around the world in 2017. That's a lot of jeans. It’s also a lot of jeans waste. 

According to The New Textiles Economy report, less than 1% of used clothing is recycled into new clothing. We’re landfilling and incinerating more while at the same time decreasing clothing use over time. The new Jeans Redesign Guidelines from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation seek to solve this. Can they get everyone on board? 

Enjoying the show? Let us know via www.clarepress.com

Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Thank you for listening. Don't forget to hit subscribe!

Jul 17, 2019
Post-Growth Plan - Kate Fletcher on Craft of Use
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By 2030, we keep going as we are, the fashion industry will manufacture 102 million tons of clothes and shoes. For comparison, that's the weight equivalent of half million blue whales!

Growth is not something we like to question in the fashion industry (or indeed any industry). In our capitalist system, commercial success is measured by growth. But, how can we support infinite growth on a finite planet? 

“If we could live within the limits of what we’ve already got, we could get a glimpse of what fashion might be like beyond consumerist obsessions,” says this week's guest, Kate Fletcher.

Kate is a professor at the Centre for Sustainable Fashion in London. She is a founding member of the Union of Concerned Researchers in Fashion, and the author of a wonderful book called Craft of Use. In it she asks, what if we paid more attention to the tending and wearing of garments rather than their acquisition? 

Enjoying the show? Let us know via www.clarepress.com

Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Thank you for listening. Don't forget to hit subscribe!

Jul 10, 2019
Poet Wilson Oryema - What to Do About Consumerism?
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What drives us to consume, and what does over-consumption do to us and the planet?

Twenty-five-old British poet, filmmaker and activist Wilson Oryema describes himself as “a semi-retired fashion model”. He was scouted on his lunch break when he was working a London office job, and walked his first show for Margiela in Paris in 2015. He went on to appear in ads for Calvin Klein Underwear and Hugo Boss.

His first book of poetry, titled Wait, explores consumerism, contemporary culture and waste. It sprang from an art show he held in a London gallery, after he interned for his photographer friend Harley Weir.

Now, as well as writing, he’s making short films about the fashion industry’s impacts on the environment. Wilson says poetry is just another way to communicate his ideas to his audience, and that when he began it didn’t worry him one bit that he hadn’t read loads of poetry - he just gave it a go and it worked.  This interview is about how we reach different people, how we story tell, and - ultimately - how we change the world.

Enjoying the show? Let us know via www.clarepress.com

Find Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Thank you for listening. Don't forget to hit subscribe!

Jul 03, 2019
The UN's Sustainable Development Goals decoded with Cameron Saul
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Cameron Saul is a British social entrepreneur and the co-founder of ethical accessories brand Bottletop. For his next trick, he's teamed up with the United Nations and Project Everyone on #TOGETHERBAND - which is all about spreading awareness of the UN Sustainable Development Goals - (SDGs) - also known as the Global Goals.

“We want solutions, but what most of us don’t realise is that there is a roadmap for a healthy planet, and that’s the Global Goals. It’s an extraordinary framework for action and for scaling solutions, and helping us achieve that healthy future for ourselves, our children and our children’s children.” - Cameron Saul

Join us as we decode the Goals, and discuss where we're kicking them and where we've got a long way to go. This is an inspiring and info-packed episode - essential listening, sustainability warriors!

Join the conversation - follow Clare in Instagram and Twitter

Don't miss the show-notes each week on clarepress.com - they're packed with links and extra info.

Jun 27, 2019
Jennifer Boylan on Trans Activism, Equality & Acceptance - Clothes Don't Make the Woman
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(Trigger warning: this interview contains a brief reference to suicide.)

This week's interview is with brilliant writer and activist Professor Jennifer Finney Boylan. Her memoir She’s Not There, A Life in Two Genders is a must-read, as are her New York Times columns.

For many years, Jenny was the co-chair of GLAAD’s board of directors. She was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Kinsey Institute for Research on Sex, Gender and Reproduction, and she advised and appeared on the TV series I Am Cait with Caitlin Jenner. But wait - there's more: Jennifer Boylan’s big TV moment was on Oprah, and you’re going to hear all about that.

We discuss the transgender experience, and the detail of Jennifer's journey. We talk about the role and limitations of clothes in communicating identity, how fashion represents status, the moral imagination, why Kris Jenner believes in the power of the stylist, and fighting bigotry in Trumpland. 

Join the conversation - follow Clare in Instagram and Twitter

Don't miss the show-notes each week on clarepress.com - they're packed with links and extra info.

Jun 20, 2019
Michael Kobori, Give Earth A Chance - Levi's VP of Sustainability
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Blue jeans were invented by Jacob Davis and Levis Strauss in the 1870s. They were worn by gold miners and cowboys, then James Dean, Marlon Brando, American teenagers and rock stars. If you want to talk about the history of cool, Levi’s was there. From Debbie Harry and The Ramones to Jim Morrison - they all wore Levi’s. And did you also know that Levi's introduced women's jeans in 1934, when skirts were the norm? The company has also been active raising money and awareness in the fight against AIDs since the '80s. So there's a lot to love about this brand.

But how sustainable is Levi’s? This week, we hear from Levi’s Vice-President of Sustainability, Michael Kobori. He started out in human rights, and joined Levi’s in 1995. He's seen the conversation move from sweatshops and corporate social responsibility (CSR) to new gen materials, life cycle assessments, worker wellbeing and carbon emissions. 

Join the conversation - follow Clare in Instagram and Twitter

Don't miss the show-notes each week on clarepress.com - they're packed with links and extra info.

Jun 11, 2019
Fashion Royalty - Katharine Hamnett is Queen of the Slogan Shirt
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CHOOSE LIFE, EDUCATION NOT MISSILES, WORLDWIDE NUCLEAR BAN NOW, SAVE THE FUTURE, and more recently, CANCEL BREXIT...just a few of the iconic slogan T-shirts designed by this week's guest over the years.

Designer Katharine Hamnett is one of the pioneers of modern British fashion. She invented the much copied slogan T-shirt, was the first winner of the British Fashion Council's 'Designer of the Year' award (in 1984), and championed organic cotton long before it was trendy. This year marks her 40th in the industry.

In 1989, her research into fashion's environmental & social impact horrified her. She lobbied the industry to act for change, but with little success. She campaigned directly on issues such as the use of pesticides and the plight of cotton farmers, and badgered her licensees to reduce the environmental and social impact of her collections. But it was a war before its time. She took the decision to wind down her brand – ripping up licences – until production methods could meet her environmental criteria. Moving out of the mainstream industry, she concentrated on campaigning, political activism and collaborating with charities. Now the world has caught up with Katharine Hamnett - in 2017, she relaunched her business.

In this frank, intimate discussion, you get to hear it all from her glitzy early years as a designer to what motivates her to be change agent today. We talk fast fashion, climate change, her work with organic cotton, saving the bees, but also growing up in France and being comfortable with being a minority of one. 

This Episode goes live on World Environment Day 2019, as Katharine Hamnett launches her latest tee. The Global Green New Deal Now T-shirt can be purchased at katharinehamnett.com and all proceeds go to support Greenpeace and their work on climate justice

Join the conversation - follow Clare in Instagram and Twitter

Don't miss the show-notes each week on clarepress.com - they're packed with links and extra info.

Jun 05, 2019
Bandana Tewari - What We Can Learn from Gandhi about Mindful Fashion
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We don’t talk very much about mindfulness in fashion, but it’s not like the two are mutually exclusive. If the opposite of sustainable fashion is thoughtlessly buying more and more clothes and getting rid of them after just a few wears, then mindfulness surely has a place.

Fashion journalist Bandana Tewari is a former Vogue India editor who now writes for Business of Fashion, and speaks globally on India’s rich tradition of fashion craftsmanship. This episode covers that but from a unique perspective: Bandana’s been developing a theory around what we can learn from the great Indian activist Mohandas Gandhi (mahatma means high-souled in Sanskrit). It was Gandhi who lead the khadi movement, uniting Indians in opposition to British colonial rule around the issue of cotton production. How did he develop his sartorial integrity, and what can we learn from that in today's context of hyper-consumerism. As powerful argument as we ever heard in support of the idea that clothes do matter...

Join the conversation - follow Clare in Instagram and Twitter

Don't miss the show-notes each week on clarepress.com - they're packed with links and extra info.

May 29, 2019
Supermodel Arizona Muse - A Post Prada Education
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In 2011, Arizona Muse landed a Prada contract and a 14-page story in American Vogue, with Anna Wintour comparing her to Linda Evangelista and Natalia Vodianova. She's since become a familiar face on Vogue covers everywhere (including Vogue Paris, British vogue plus she's graced 3 Australian Vogue covers). But these days Arizona has new priorities.

Today she is using her platform to help the industry that she loves transition to a more sustainable future. She’s been working with The Sustainable Angle, curating showcases of young sustainable designers with her friend Rebecca Corbin-Murray, and she plans to set up a consultancy.

This episode is about following your dreams, diving into new worlds, reinvention, and learning. It’s the story of a woman we knew for one reason, her beauty, changing the conversation around her, to focus outward. 

Join the conversation - follow Clare in Instagram and Twitter

Don't miss the show-notes each week on clarepress.com - they're packed with links and extra info.

May 15, 2019
Maggie Marilyn - Meet New Zealand 's Sustainable Fashion Darling
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Meet the millennial behind cult New Zealand label Maggie Marilyn. We hear a lot about how the Gens Y and Z are more woke, more into sustainability and of course more worried about climate change and the environment - why wouldn’t they be? These are the generations that are going to inherit the mess that’s been made. They are already inheriting it.

Find out why designer Maggie Hewitt is determined to do fashion differently, how she sold her very first collection to Net-A-Porter and gets most excited about seeing her clothes worn by women she doesn’t know in the street. Yep, even though Megan Markle, Kendall Jenner and Rose McGowan are fans.

The brand launched in 2016, and is Made in New Zealand. Big on pink, but never simply pretty, these clothes evoke a sense of feminine strength and speak to the designer’s passion for sustainable production and materials. (BTW, who wants to move to New Zealand?!)

Join the conversation - follow Clare in Instagram and Twitter

Don't miss the show-notes each week on clarepress.com - they're packed with links and extra info.

May 08, 2019
Citizen Wolf - A Tech Company with a Fashion Problem
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The mainstream fashion production process is extremely wasteful. The whole system is built on over-ordering, taking a punt on how much will sell, and writing off over-production. This leads to shocking amounts of pre-consumer textiles and garments being landfilled or incinerated - according to some estimates, 1/3 of all the fashion ever produced it never sold.

Australian made-to-order T-shirt company Citizen Wolf is using big data and algorithmic power to disrupt this. And they plan to take on the world. Can it work? How did founders Zoltan Csaki and Eric Phu build it? This thought-provoking discussion looks into the fashion crystal ball to imagine a leaner, greener, more responsive manufacturing future.

For links and further reading, check out the show notes here.

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

May 01, 2019
Craftivist Sarah Corbett - Stitching the Rebellion
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Fashion has a long association with craft, but what about fashion activism? Could we stitch out way to a better world?

Meet the author of How to be a Craftivist and founder of Craftivist Collective. Sarah Corbett believes, “If we want a world that is beautiful, kind and fair, shouldn’t our activism be beautiful, kind and fair?”

This Episode is a call to arms for fashion change-makers, a demonstration of the persuasive nature of gentle activism, and the wonderful idea that together we might stitch a rebellion, sweep out the status quo and usher in a fairer world in fashion and beyond.

Happy Fashion Revolution Week! 

For links and further reading, check out the show notes here.

Are you a craftivist? Would you like to be? We'd love to know what you think. Find Clare on Instagram & Twitter.

Apr 23, 2019
Natalie Isaacs & 1 Million Women Fight Climate Change
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As we gear up to Earth Day on April 22, we're thinking about living more lightly on the planet. This year’s theme is Protect Our Species, and one of the quotes that inspired it is from Rachel Carson, who said, “In nature nothing exists alone.”

This week's podcast guest is proof of that. She is Natalie Isaacs, the super-inspiring Australian movement builder behind 1 Million Women. Natalie is one-woman powerhouse who decided to harness that power of other women - heck, the whole of womankind! - to start a lifestyle revolution to fight climate change. 

We discuss connectivity, community and staying focused, plus the fact that the strangest routes can lead you to where you want to be. How did Natalie transition from cosmetics producer (and plastic polluter) to eco warrior? What kickstarted the process, and kept her going? How does she bring others along with her? And how can you?

“We as individuals and as citizens of the world have a) and obligation and b) the power," she says. "We have glorious power to act in our lives and rise above politics, because we cannot just wait for politicians and for governments to put in policies to fight climate change. We can’t wait! We have to get on with it!"

 

Apr 16, 2019
Ecoalf's Action Man - Javier Goyeneche
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Who’s up for stopping our wasteful ways and reimagining trash as a resource? This week’s guest is proving fashion can be made from entirely from recycled materials.

He is Javier Goyeneche, president and founder of Ecoalf, the Spanish clothing company that pioneers high-tech new materials made from waste.

If you’re a sustainability nerd, you’ve no doubt heard of Ecoalf. It was Spain’s first B-corp and Gwyneth Paltrow is a fan - a few years back she did a collab with them for Goop.

They’ve developed fabrics from used coffee grounds, cotton waste from the cutting room floor, old fishing nets and car tyres and ocean plastic, and they’ve created a cult brand in the process, focused on timeless sporty pieces designed to last.

We’ve all heard of recycled poly made from discarded PET bottles, some even collected from our shorelines and beaches. But Javier set his sights on cleaning up the open ocean. The Ecoalf Foundation has partnered with thousands of fishermen in Spain and Thailand to fish for the ocean plastic that’s turned into Ecoalf’s Upcyle the Oceans yarn. “We’re not a story-telling company, we’re a story-doing company,” says Javier.

This inspiring episode is about what it takes to succeed, and how to harness big ideas. And it’s a call to action: As the Ecoalf shirts say, “There is no Planet B."

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

Apr 10, 2019
The Sustainable Angle's Nina Marenzi - Future Fabrics
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Have you heard that phrase: from seed to garment? Probably, right? Because most natural textiles are grown in the Earth. Around 24% of textiles are made from cotton, while hemp, linen and wool all depend on soil. But how often does fashion get its fingernails into the actual dirt?

Perhaps it ought to start, because according to the UN, globally, one third soil is degraded. If we carry on like this, we could lose all of our precious topsoil in 60 years. Fashion isn't entirely to blame, but it certainly has it's part to play. 

Our guest this week is Swiss-born Londoner with a Masters degree in sustainable agriculture, who is now taking on the fashion world. Nina Marenzi runs The Sustainable Angle, which stages the Future Fabrics Expo. It's all about what she calls ‘diversifying the fibre basket’  - or rethinking fashion materials.

The Expo showcases 1000s of fabrics that can help lighten fashion's environmental footprint, from organic and eco-friendly versions of our staples, to recycled synthetics right through to 3D printed seaweed and sustainable sequins.

Nina says we need to step up regenerative agriculture, organic and circular materials, and transition to textiles that have don’t trash our soil, water and air, and don't pile up in landfills. 

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

Links, further reading and lots more info in the shownotes. Find them here.

 

Apr 03, 2019
Sass Brown - Clothing Ethics
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Is sustainable fashion elitist? Does fashion contribute to poor body image and eating disorders by perpetuating a single, unattainable beauty ideal? What can we do about fashion's diversity problem? How do we, as consumers of fashion, navigate all this? "You can’t do it all at the moment,” says this week's guest. “You have to make choices based on your values and those are your personal ethics.

Sass Brown is an English designer, educator and the author of Eco Fashion. For many years, Sass taught at FIT in New York. She was the Founding Dean of the Dubai Institute of Design and Innovation (DIDI). She has purple hair, is a dedicated thrifter and has her shoes made by hand. But actually, this is not an interview about a life in fashion...

In this conversation, we focus on how fashion shapes our collective image, and how and why we allow it to dictate culture, and often get it so wrong.

 

 

Mar 27, 2019
Rosario Dawson & Abrima Erwiah, Studio 189's Dynamic Power Duo
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This episode is about purpose, co-creation and building a social enterprise with a friend. It's about fashion with a heart, and following your dreams. Rosario Dawson and Abrima Erwiah are Studio 189, a social enterprise fashion, lifestyle and media brand based between New York and Ghana, that won the CFDA Sustainable Fashion Initiative Award last year.

They work in countries with valuable skills but little infrastructure and limited access to markets, to help build the creative economy of the African fashion industry.

You no doubt know Rosario for her film work - she was discovered at 15 sitting on her New York stoop by Harmony Korine, who cast her in his cult hit, Kids. Since then she’s been in major movies from Sin City to Men in Black to Rent. She’s also an activist. In 2004 she co-founded Voto Latino, to encourage young Hispanic and Latino voters to become more politically involved. She sits on the board of Eve Ensler’s V-Day's One Billion Rising, a global protest to end violence against women and promote gender equality.

Abrima studied business and her career background is in luxury - she used work for Bottega Veneta. A trip with Rosario to Eve Ensler's City of Joy in the Congo cemented her decision to work in social enterprise. 

What does it take to build a business like this? How do you overcome the challenges of working in countries where the lights regularly go out, or a day off sick might mean malaria? Are we on the brink of a new era, one characterised by sharing, empathy, purpose? What sort of world do we want to shape for the next generation of women change-makers?

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

Mar 20, 2019
Claire Bergkamp - Stella McCartney's Secret Sustainability Weapon
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You know it: Stella McCartney does the eco things first. Whether it’s making all things green super-cool, proving non-leather accessories can compete with traditional animal leather in the luxury market, or bringing the circular fashion conversation mainstream, this fashion brand leads the way.

So who makes all this happen? There’s McCartney herself, of course - the designer is a visionary greenie. But no woman is an island. Claire Bergkamp has her back.

Meet Stella McCartney’s Worldwide Sustainability & Innovation Director. A self-confessed fibre nut, Claire started out as a costume designer in LA before switching lanes to study sustainability in London. There, she found her calling.

Six years ago Claire joined the Stella McCartney brand to head up sustainability; she was a team of one. Today she runs a team based in London and Italy. Her work is disruptive and tend-setting - from rethinking traditional supply chains to working with startups on new circular materials, Claire is changing the way fashion is produced. And she’s lovely too.

Notebooks at the ready, there’s so much to learn in this Episode.

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

 

 

Mar 12, 2019
Ronald van der Kemp - Upcyling Couture
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VOGUE once called him a “high-end scavenger”. Meet Dutch designer Ronald Van Der Kemp - the "sustainable couturier" behind RVDK. Fans include Lady Gaga and Kate Moss, Emma Watson and Lena Dunham.

While he was still in college, Ronald wrote a thesis on fashion and nature, and designed a collection using vintage materials. He then spent two decades working in luxury fashion for the likes of Barney's, Bill Blass, Guy Laroche and Celine.

Now he's come full circle. Today, brand RVDK - which shows at Paris couture week - focuses on sustainability, and uses reclaimed, vintage and archival fabric.  Ronald describes his approach to couture as: “Dressing ageless strong personalities that expect exclusivity, originality and high quality.''

In this interview, recorded in his Amsterdam atelier ahead of his Spring ‘19 couture show, Clare and Ronald discuss the balancing ethics and integrity with glamour and fun. Yes, that is possible.

Check out our shownotes. Links, pics and further reading here.

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

 

Mar 05, 2019
Mother of Pearl's Amy Powney, BBC Earth & #SustainableMe
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Meet London fashion star Amy Powney: an eco pioneer in polka dots and pearls, who grew up off-grid in a caravan and is simply not content to let fashion off the sustainability hook. 

Amy is the creative director of Mother of Pearl , a British sustainable luxury womenswear brand that celebrates individuality and authenticity.

Known for its dark florals, satin bows, ruffles and outsized faux-pearl trims, you could never accuse Mother of Pearl of being homespun or beige. Amy's putting the glamour and fun into sustainable style. But she's also dead serious about making change and acting now to protect the planet.

Most brands don’t talk about sustainability at all. Those that do, tend to stick to a few obvious, safe things. But Amy's all like, let's take over London Fashion Week, and convince BBC Earth to make a film about the environmental impacts of fast fashion. Let's talk seriously about the future of this planet of ours, about climate change, about water use and about what needs to happen to turn this mess around.

In this absorbing and inviting conversation, Amy and Clare discuss inclusivity, responsibility and traceability. They talk about 1970s sitcom The Good Life and how childhood shapes the adult you become. And they have a frank, honest discussion about how hard it can be to get the message across about the dire environmental situation we face, while also trying to do business and stay happy. Because happy matters.

Further reading & links - the shownotes are on the way!

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

 

Feb 27, 2019
New Power Generation - London's Rising Fashion Stars
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Fashion schools everywhere are full of eco warriors and bright, brilliant kids who are determined to do fashion differently. London is the leader. Long known for its fashion creativity, this is the capital that produces the most vibrant student shows and earth-shaking emerging designers. The big international and Paris-based design houses look to London fashion schools like Central St Martins and the London College of Fashion for their future stars - but will they be seduced?

Many in this new guard are questioning the validity of the exisiting fashion system, and asking if they want to be part of it at all. Now is a time of reinvention - young designers are redrawing fashion and re-imagining the way it might work in future. 

In this Episode, we hear from 3 young London-based ones to watch: Bethany Williams, Matthew Needham and Patrick McDowell.

Find out why they care about sustainability and how they apply it to their work, what they’re doing to combat fashion waste and redesign the whole system.

Further reading & links - the shownotes are here.

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

Feb 21, 2019
Fashion Revolution's Orsola de Castro - Upcycling Queen
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Welcome to Series 3! This Episode is a treat! It features Orsola de Castro, is one of the warmest, most generous, most knowledgable people working in sustainable fashion today. You may know her as the cofounder, with Carry Somers, of Fashion Revolution. But did you also know that she is the queen upcycling?

In the that 1990s, after crocheting around the holes in a much-loved old jumper that she couldn’t part with (although it was literally falling apart), she founded the fashion label From Somewhere. Her designs used only discarded, unloved, unwanted materials and turned them into the opposite: treasured, loved, wanted, and highly covetable.

From Somewhere was stocked in stores like Browns in London, and Lane Crawford in Hong Kong, Orsola and her man Fillipo, who was also her business partner, did collaborations with the likes of Topshop, Jigsaw and Tesco. Later, they ran Esthetica, London Fashion Week’s hub for sustainable for fashion.

These days, Orsola teaches at Central St. Martins inspiring the next generation. She’s an in-demand international speaker on ethical fashion, and is the Creative Director of Fashion Revolution. She is passionate about making, mending and loving clothes, and of course about upcycling, but also about treating workers with dignity, and about fashion justice.

In this conversation, we talk about it all - from seeing the world in colours, through inspiring designers, from how to reconnect with your clothes to what sort of fashion future we want to create for ourselves. Enjoy!

Don't forget to subscribe to this podcast in iTunes, and join the conversation on social media. You can find Clare on Instagram and Twitter.

Follow Orsola here and here.

And last, but most certainly not least, join the Fashion Revolution movement in your country. Thank you for listening.

Feb 12, 2019
Livia Firth, Eco-Age & the Green Carpet
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Livia Firth is the Creative Director of sustainability consultancy Eco-Age, and the founder of the Green Carpet Challenge and Green Carpet Fashion Awards. She is a UN Leader of Change, a founding member of Annie Lennox’s women’s advocacy group The Circle, and was a co-producer on Andrew Morgan’s ethical fashion documentary, The True Cost. Livia is also a warm and wonderful advocate for ethical and sustainable fashion, and an absolute treat to interview. We are so grateful to Livia for kicking off this, our brand sparkling new series 3 of the Wardrobe Crisis podcast!

In Episode, Clare and Livia discuss what it means to be a fashion activist, and why the world needs more of us (yes, including you!). We cover the big stuff - garment worker dignity, living wages, social justice - and the glitzy stuff - influencers, social media and the power of fashion to change stories.

Livia shares about her childhood growing up in Italy in a pre-fast fashion world, being “a ballbreaker” and starting a business with her brother. She reveals how her eco fashion quest began: when her husband Colin Firth was up for a Best Actor Oscar for his role in the Tom Ford movie A Single Man - dressing “eco” gave her a role to play. And she explains how that first challenge grew and flowered into something truly extraordinary that has seen Eco-Age become one of the biggest players in sustainable fashion. Want to change fashion for the better? This Episode is full of inspiration.

Don't miss our shownotes for links and further reading.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter, and join the conversation.

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING!

Feb 05, 2019
Tamara Cincik, Fashion Politics - Brexit & the Environmental Audit Committee
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From front row to front bench? Why not? It's time we stopped considering fashion as simply fluffy. The industry is a giant global employer with serious impacts on the environment, and yet it is not traditionally associated with being active in the political arena or central to government policy.

Our guest this week, on the final Episode of Series 2, is Londoner Tamara Cincik, founder of the British policy organisation Fashion Roundtable, who is derminted to change this. Her timing's pretty good.

In the UK in June, the Environmental Audit Committe (a select committee of the House of Commons) announced it would be looking in to fast fashion, inquiring into the carbon, resource use and water footprint of clothing throughout its lifecycle, and looking at how clothes can be recycled, and waste and pollution reduced.

Over the next few months, loads of industry insiders made submissions, and the mainstream headlines hummed with fashion and politics. It’s about time, says Tamara, that fashion stepped up its engagement in this space, because things like Brexit and modern slavery legislation affect the industry. And, in the UK at least, MPs are currently very interested in what fashion is doing to clean up its supply chains and environmental impact.

This is our final show for Series 2. Are you excited for Series 3? We need your help to make it happen. Donate to our Pozible crowdfunding campaign here. THANK YOU!

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter. Find more podcasts and the shownotes at clarepress.com

Dec 31, 2018
Teatum Jones - the London Designers on Positive Fashion, Inclusivity & Activism
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“We truly believe in the power of fashion to present a pro-social message of inclusivity and positive identity." How’s that for a vision statement? These are the words of Catherine Teatum and Rob Jones, AKA London fashion duo Teatum Jones.

This year the British Fashion Council named them Positive Fashion Representatives. At London Fashion Week for Spring 19, they partnered with Youtube and Google in support of UN Women to present their collection: ‘Global Womanhood Part Two, 16 Days Of Activism.’ Instead of a runway show, they held a roundtable discussion on fashion's +++ Watch it here.

What role can fashion play in empowering women and girls? How can we modernise fashion and make it way more inclusive? How do we smash the idea that you have to look and be a certain way to qualify as beautiful, stylish, in fashion? How come fashion ignores disability - and keeps on getting away with it? Why do designers have a responsibility in this area, and how can they maximise their positive impact? 

In this lively, thought-provoking Episode, we address these thorny issues and more, and have a laugh while we're at it. Positive fashion indeed!

Next week's our final show for Series 2. Are you excited for Series 3? We need your help to make it happen. Donate to our Pozible crowdfunding campaign here. THANK YOU!

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter. Find more podcasts and the shownotes at clarepress.com

 

Dec 17, 2018
Ruchika Sachdeva on Indian Fashion's New Gen & Winning the Woolmark Prize &
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Meet Indian designer Ruchika Sachdeva of Bodice Studio, the Delhi-based label that took out the 2017/18 International Woolmark Prize .

Join us as we discuss how to make it in fashion, and build a successful small business, sustainability, our need for connection and the importance of provenance and craft. We explore the rise of emerging Indian fashion talent (and no, it's not all Bollywood) and look at how can design offer solutions to fashion's waste crisis.

A recent British survey found that 25% of women have clothes lurking in their wardrobe that can’t wear because they no longer fit. Extending the life of a garment by an extra nine months can reduce its environmental impact by 20 to 30%. Ruchika's collections often feature tie fastenings, and moveable pleats and buttons because she wants these clothes to last for years. She also sees designing classics as a way to mitigate against waste. “If they’re too much, too loud or too trend-based, you’re going to get bored of clothes more easily.”

Our shownotes are packed with links and extra information. 

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little bit helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. 

 

Dec 06, 2018
Paul van Zyl - Social Justice, Maiyet & The Conduit
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Paul van Zyl is a human rights lawyer and ethical fashion entrepreneur, who 2009 he founded Maiyet, a luxury fashion brand with a social impact purpose.

The idea was to “incorporate ancient traditions in non-traditional ways by partnering with artisans in developing economies and by sourcing material in ethical ways.” It’s about creating opportunity, local entrepreneurship, prosperity, and dignity in, as Paul puts it, the places that need it most.

Maiyet partnered with Artisans in Colombia, India, Indonesia, Kenya, South Sudan. They showed on the Paris fashion week schedule and they really helped shift the conversation about ethical fashion in the luxury space.

But Paul is not your obvious fashion man. His grew up in South Africa during the apartheid era, and served as the Executive Secretary of South Africa’s post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission from 1995 to 1998.

In this interview we talk about what that was like and how it shaped him. We discuss the opportinities provided by the fashion industry to make positive social change, look at the rise and rise of business with purpose. Why are customers demanding more from brands? How are community values shaping fashion;'s future? And why is The Conduit the hottest private members club in London?

Our shownotes are packed with links and extra information. 

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little bit helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. 

Nov 30, 2018
Christina Dean - Fighting Fashion Waste
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‘Single-use’ was named the Word of the Year for 2018 by the Collins Dictionary. Now that we know the oceans are choking with plastics, disposable has become a dirty word. We also know, there is no away. Nothing that uses synthetic materials is ‘disposable’ – it has to go somewhere. Out of site, out of mind is a total copout. But what about so-called "disposable fashion"?

Single-use fashion is perhaps a stretch – but we’re not a million miles away. Clothing usability is declining. Stats vary, but according the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, the average number of times a garment is worn before it ceases to be used has decreased by 36% compared to 15 years ago. In the US clothes are worn for around a quarter of the global average. The same pattern is emerging in China, where clothing utilisation has decreased by 70% over the last 15 years ago.

Do you know how much fashion we throw away?

Clothing production about doubled during that time; we now produce around 100 billion garments a year. Of the total fibre input used, 87% ends up landfilled or incinerated.

Why have we become so wasteful and how can we turn it around? This week’s guest thinks we need to reconnect with fashion's soul. She is Christina Dean, fashionwaste warrior and the founder of Redress, a Hong Kong-based NGO that works to reduce fashion waste. A former journalist, Christina is also the co-author of Dress [with] Sense (a consumer guide for the conscious closet), and the hosts of documentary series, Frontline Fashion

Our shownotes are packed with links and extra information. 

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little bit helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. 

Nov 27, 2018
Easton Pearson - Slow Fashion in a Fast Fashion World
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What was it like to pioneer ethical fashion before that was even a phrase? For 27 years, Pamela Easton and Lydia Pearson ran the iconic Australian fashion label Easton Pearson, known for its exquisite artisanal fabrics and embellishments, colourful exuberance and sense of fun.

They are the subjects of a new exhibition at the Museum of Brisbane, The Designers’ Guide: Easton Pearson Archive - an invaluable resource for fashion students and fashion fans. It’s also an important contribution to Australia’s cultural history, which fashion absolutely should be considered a part of.

You could win free tickets - check Clare's Instagram for details.

In this interview, we discuss why this Aussie icon, that sold at Browns in London and Bergdorf’s in New York, was such a big deal. Pam and Lydia decode their design and making processes, and detail how they started out on the business of fashion, and kept at it for so long.

We talk about how they pioneered and centred slow fashion and ethical production in the Australian context, and also in India, where their main workshop was located. We also have a frank discussion about the challenges of running an independent, slow fashion business in a fast fashion world.

Our shownotes are packed with links and extra information. 

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little bit helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. 

Nov 20, 2018
Vogue Italia's Sara Maino & Vogue Green Talents
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What does it take to break through as an emerging fashion designger today? Do sustainable designers have the edge? Who are the names to know, now? 

Sara Maino is the deputy editor-in-chief of VOGUE ITALIA, and the fashion force behind VOGUE TALENTS, Vogue Green Talents and Who Is On Next?

As she told the New York Times: “You will rarely see me at the big shows, those blockbuster events with a starry front row. That is really not my scene.” Instead, Sara combs the globe meeting students, attending independent shows and scouting under-the-radar studios and showrooms.

In this Episode, recorded during Milan fashion week for Spring '19, Sara shares her insights on nurturing creativity and finding the next big thing. We discuss slow fashion, the pressures on young designers and the ways in which the industry can support new talent. 

We also hear from 4 new gen talents, who are changing fashoin for good - whether by choosing recycled and eco-friendly fabrics, re-energising age-old crafts or embedding social justice and radical localism into their business models.

Meet Tiziano Guardini (winner of last year's Green Carpet Award for Best Emerging Designer), Shyma Shetty of Indian brand Huemn, denim upcycler Nathalie Ballout and print queen Sindiso Khumalo.

Check out our shownotes for masses of links and extra information. 

Chat with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little bit helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. 

Nov 09, 2018
Fashion Education - Dilys Williams & the Centre for Sustainable Fashion, London
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Don't miss our shownotes.

Welcome to our 60th episode! Can you believe it? This week's guest also have an anniversary to celebrate as the Centre for Sustainable Fashion at London College of Fashion turns 10. You're going to meet its founder, academic, designer, educator and all-round sustainable fashion legend Dilys Williams.

This is a lively and thought-provoking discussion about how we might totally redesign the way the current fashion system works.

We talk about the role of the designer, the role of fashion in all our lives and how commerce fits in. We discuss the importance of being critical thinkers, fashion rebels and outspoken advocates for justice. We touch on DIY, Margaret Thatcher, The Clash, and finding your fashion identity, but also big stuff continuing the conversation that’s been running through this series of the podcast about how we stand with nature, and what our obligations are to it. How do we define our struggle for sustainability?

Chat with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little bit helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. You can also find us on Spotify.

Oct 31, 2018
Cradle to Cradle's William McDonough - Fashion is a Verb
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Meet legendary thinker, innovator, disruptor and Cradle to Cradle hero, William McDonough. Architect, designer, thought leader, and author – his vision for a future of abundance for all is helping companies and communities think differently. He was the inaugural chair of the World Economic Forum’s Meta-Council on the Circular Economy and currently serves on the Forum’s Global Future Council on the Future of Environment and Natural Resource Security. For more than 40 years, he has defined the principles of the sustainability movement.

This interview is a must for anyone who is interested in the circular economy, or indeed just cares about the future of our planet. 

We discuss why we should we view waste as a resource, and how we can transition to doing that. We talk about sustainable development, about look at how we measure society’s success now, and how we might change that in future.

As Bill and his co-writer Michael Braungart write in Cradle to Cradle,In the race for economic progress, social activity, ecological impact, cultural activity, and long-term effects can be overlooked.”

We also dig into emptiness vs. abundance. Unpick the idea of fashion as a verb. Look at how weaving and mathematics are linked. And talk about clothes and Diana Vreeland, beauty and the impotrtance of language. Bill can talk about any subject in a completely delightful way. Buckle up for a wild conversational ride.

 

Oct 13, 2018
Fashion for Good's Katrin Ley
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Katrin Ley is the CEO of FASHION FOR GOOD, an Amersterdam-based organisation that was co-founded by Cradle-to-Cradle's William McDonough. They aim to bring together the entire fashion ecosystem with incentives, resources and tools for sustainability.

At Fashion For Good's core is McDonough’s concept of the Five Goods, which, he says, “represent an aspirational framework we can all use to work towards a world in which we do not simply take, make, waste, but rather take, make, renew and restore.” 

In interview Katrin and Clare discuss what good looks like when it comes to clothing production and circularity. Case study: the first Gold Cradle to Cradle Certified jeans and T-shirts.

There’s a strong focus in this interview on innovation, new ideas and disruptors. We also explore this new age of sharing and helping each other, because, as Katrin says, if we want to change the fashion system, that’s what it’s going to take.

Is the fashion industry really ready for serious collaboration? What about you? How can you find your purpose? How can you align your work with your values? 

DON'T MISS OUR SHOWNOTES - the are packed with links & extra info

Chat with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little bit helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. You can also find us on Spotify.

Oct 06, 2018
Dame Ellen MacArthur, Making Fashion Circular
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DON'T MISS OUR SHOWNOTES - the are packed with links & extra info!

To say that Ellen MacArthur is a phenomenal woman is an understatement. In 2005, aged 28, she became the fastest person to sail solo, non-stop around the world. It took her 71 days, 14 hours and 18 minutes.

You’re going to hear what that was like, how she stayed focused and what she learned from it. The importance of goal setting really comes through in this interview. Ellen is obviously an incredibly determined person but there’s a take-away for us all here: it’s about having a plan - by knowing which direction you want to go in, that’s how you make stuff happen.

What’s all this got to do with fashion? This is the story of how a world-record-breaking British sailor became an international advocate for the circular economy. How she created a platform, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, to encourage the global economy to transition to a system that designs out waste & pollution, keeps materials in use and regenerates natural systems. It's also the story of what that might look like, and how we can action it.

Ellen’s lightbulb moment happened at sea. In parts of the Southern Ocean she was 3000 kilometres from land. If she ran out of teabags, there was no nipping to the shop to buy more. She wrote in her logs: "What I have on this boat is all I have.’” That’s how it is with the Earth’s finite resources too.

Last year, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation launched its Make Fashion Circular initiative at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit with Stella McCartney and a bunch of other big brands on board. The aim is to tackling fashion’s polluting and wasteful ways and create a new system.

Chat with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps us keep telling these stories.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. You can also find us on Spotify.

Sep 29, 2018
Tamsin Lejeune, Access over Ownership & Common Objective
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Don't miss our SHOWNOTES - they're a veritable cornucopia of extra info...

Sometimes it can feel like sustainable fashion is a new thing, but pioneers laid the groundwork years ago. People like this week’s guest, British fashion change-maker Tamsin Lejeune.

Back in 2006, Tamsin founded the Ethical Fashion Forum, a London-based industry body for sustainable fashion. Her team also brought us Source, one of the first platforms to list sustainable resources & suppliers in one place.

In the UK, it was Tamsin & her team who were running the sustainable fashion panel discussions and bringing the fledgling ethical fashion community together.

How much has changed since then? How far off is sustainable fashion from being the norm? What tools do we need TO DO FASHION BETTER?

Today, Tamsin leads a new project called Common Objective with that in mind. Think, a sustainable fashion matchmaking service, like a targeted Linkedin, or Tinder without the romance.

In this absorbing interview we discuss what’s going on with fast fashion and why the model is broken. We decode the discomfort we feel when fast fashion giants launch eco capsule collections while still making most of their stuff the same old way. And we delve into the magic powers of fashion access over ownership, and the opportunities for the next generation of designers.

Chat with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. Don't forget to hit subscribe. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Sep 20, 2018
Outland Denim's James Bartle on Fighting Human Trafficking & Creating Positive Opportunity
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CHECK OUT OUR SHOWNOTES for further reading.

How does an ordinary Aussie bloke go from motor-cross riding and working as a welder to setting up a social enterprise fashion business? You’re going to meet James Bartle, founder of Outland Denim. This is a candid eye-opening interview about an extraordinary story.

We talk about the tough stuff: Who gets trafficked, and who does the trafficking and why? Is it possible to empathise with their desperation?

We talk about materials, and how organic and reduced waste is essential to the big picture. We talk about B Corps and value-driven business, the state of ethical fashion right now, & where the industry is improving and failing. Plus there’s heaps of insights into how to set up, run and make a success of a sustainable, ethical fashion label.

This is the last of 3 shows on modern slavery. Don't miss the previous 2. We’ve managed to make them accessible and even inviting. No mean feat for such a tricky subject.

Chat with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

 

Sep 14, 2018
Safia Minney, Fair Trade Fabulous
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CHECK OUT OUR SHOWNOTES for masses of extra goodness.

If only all fashion was fair trade fashion. According to the Global Slavery Index 2018, fashion is one of 5 key industries implicated in modern slavery. In Australia, every year we import over $US4 billion worth of clothes and accessories at risk of being tainted by modern slavery. 40 million people globally are trapped in it, and 71 % are women.

In this Episode, we hear from ethical fashion pioneer Safia Minney. The founder of People Tree is now heading up fair trade shoe brand Po-zu. She appears in The True Cost. She's an MBE, an activist, and has spoken more than once at the World Economic Forum's meetings in Davos. Safia is the author of 4 books, including her latest Slave to Fashion

Slave-free fashion is achievable, says Safia. Indeed fashion can be used to empower workers. We discuss how, the challenges and joys of working this way, how she started out - way before ethical fashion was *a thing and what makes her heart sing these days.

This episode is brought to you by makers of excellet fair trade totes and tees, Liminal Apparel.

Find Safia on social media here 

Chat with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

 

Sep 04, 2018
Baroness Lola Young on Modern Slavery in Fashion
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CHECK OUT OUR SHOWNOTES for masses of extra goodness.

According to the Global Slavery Index 2018, fashion is one of 5 key industries implicated in modern slavery. How does that happen? What can we do about it?

In this Episode, you're going to meet Baroness Lola Young of Hornsey, a British crossbench peer in the House of Lords who is active in the ethical fashion space and is working to amend the UK's Modern Slavery Act.

Modern slavery is, of course, a depressing issue but this episode is not depressing. No, no. It's got the power! It’s all about unleashing your inner activist, understanding the issues and taking positive steps to do something about them - if you’re an individual, they can be really small steps. If you’re in business, they might be bigger ones. Don't forget to check the shownotes for further reading.

Lola Young started out as an actor, went onto become a professor of cultural studies then the Head of Culture at the Greater London Authority. She’s been a judge for the Orange Prize for Literature, and The Observer newspaper’s Ethical Awards. In 2004 she was appointed an independent Crossbench member of the House of Lords. In 2009 she set up the All Party Parliamentary Group on Ethics and Sustainability in Fashion, which she co-chairs.  Lola Young is fabulous.

What do you think about all this? Please get in touch with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress to let us know.

Don't forget to check the shownotes for further resources.

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

 

 

Aug 29, 2018
Do We Need Sustainable Fashion Weeks?
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In 2018, what is fashion week actually for? Is the old system tired & old-fashioned? Has it lost its purpose and reason for being? If so, what sorts events do we want to see take over? Do we need sustainable fashion weeks?

In this Episode, we meet Evelyn Mora, 26, the Finnish photographer-turned-event-producer behind Helsinki Fashion Week. This event, which happened in July in Finland's capital city, focuses on sustainability. 

Evelyn's mission? To reinvent “traditional concepts of fashion week venues and the ways they present collections to buyers and press” while simultaneously “questioning the way we consume.”

She says her vision is for “circularity, sustainability and beauty” but it’s also about getting rid of what’s gone before. Evelyn is a change agent who likes to shake things up. 

She wants fashion weeks to be super-inclusive, zero-waste, diverse, open to anyone who's interested, showcasing ONLY ethically produced and environmentally-aware  collections; in short, totally different to how they used to be. 

What do you think about all this? Please get in touch with Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress to let us know.

Don't forget to check the shownotes for further resources.

THANK YOU FOR LISTENING.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

 

Aug 23, 2018
Artisan Fashion in Kenya
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How can fashion aristanship empower women? What does a fair work accessories factory look like, and how do the workers see value in the setup? How about in community hubs, where skilled artisans can work as collectives?

This is the second installment of a 2-part series about the UN’s Ethical Fashion Initiative, a flagship programme of the International Trade Centre. The EFI connects skilled artisans in places like Kenya, Mali, Burkina Faso, Haiti and Afghanistan, to the international value chain of fashion, working with the likes of Stella McCartney, Vivienne Westwood, Adidas and the Australian accessories house MIMCO.

In this Episode - recorded on the ground in Nairobi, Kenya - we get to hear from the artisans themselves, and discover why Artisan Fashion now runs the organisation here as a social enterprise. And we learn how fair work can empower women - from the women themselves.

This show is brought to you by MIMCO Follow them on Instagram  

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Aug 16, 2018
Simone Cipriani, the United Nations & the Ethical Fashion Initiative
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Meet Simone Cipriani, founder of the UN’s Ethical Fashion Initiative, a flagship programme of the International Trade Centre, a joint agency of the UN and World Trade Organization.

The EFI connects skilled artisans in places like Kenya, Mali, Burkina Faso, Haiti and now Afghanistan, to the international value chain of fashion, working with the likes of Stella McCartney, Vivienne Westwood, Adidas and the Australian accessories house MIMCO.

Simone sees luxury fashion as a vehicle for development. He talks about ethics and aesthetics and says Sweatshops and workers trapped in an endless cycle of creating cheap fast-fashion is not true fashion.

Simone believes responsibly produced fashion can help change the world  for the better. Actually, he knows it can, because he started this endeavour in 2009, and nearly a decade later it's thriving and has seen thousands of people find fair and ongoing work opportunities.

This is part 1 of a 2-part series. Next week, we’ll be bringing you the podcast Clare recorded in Nairobi, Kenya with the Ethical Fashion Initiative artisans.

This show is brought to you by MIMCO Follow them on Instagram  

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Aug 08, 2018
Tim Jarvis, a Polar Explorer's Insights
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What to pack for an expedition to Antarctica? Or to keep yourself alive on a remote mountainside? In extreme conditions, clothes move way beyond fashion to become tools for survival.  

In this Episode, you get to hang out with environmental scientist, polar explorer, author and adventurer Tim Jarvis, a man for whom pushing himself to the limits of his physical endurance is all in a day's work. But Tim doesn't undertake his incredible expeditions just to prove he's tough; he does it for a higher purpose - to spread the word about climate change, and show us how some of the remotest regions on Earth are being impacted by global warming.

In 1992, at the time of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, 25 mountains at the equator had a glacier. Most of these glaciers will be melted completely away within 25 years. Enter Tim's project 25-Zero. With support from travel and adventure brand Kathmandu, Tim and a team of climbers and filmmakers have been documenting rapid, irreversible melting.

In this interview, Tim shares what he's seen of climate change on his travels and what we can expect in future if we continue to emit carbon pollution at current rates. Scary quote: "We will have ice-free Arctic Ocean by the mid 2030s."

Loads of kids dream of beging explorers when they grow up, but few actually do it. What made Tim the exception? What are some of the crazier expeditions he's undertaken? How does he re-integrate himself into society after he's been away? We dig deep on inspiration and the pull of the extraordinary life, and finding yourself in the wilderness. We discuss climate grief, and staying motivated. Tim explains why he's encouraging kids to embrace Nature. Oh, and we dabble in the mysteries of the universe. Are you ready for a grand adventure?

This show is brought to you by Kathmandu. Follow them on Instagram and Twitter @kathmandugear

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Jul 25, 2018
Anna Gedda on H&M's Sustainability Goals & Challenges
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Can fast fashion ever be sustainable? Will circularity funadamentally change things? Or is it, practically speaking, too far off? How about supply chain transparency, collaboration and pumping resources into textile innovation? Is all this eclipsed by the shadow of overproduction?

Swedish giant H&M is the second biggest clothing company in the world (the first is Zara.) The H&M Group comprises the H&M brand, but also COS, & Other Stories, jeans brand Cheap Monday, hyper-transparent newcomer Arket and a couple of others.

Clare caught up with Anna Gedda, Head of Sustainability at the H&M Group since 2015, at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit to ask about the company’s approach to sustainability across its brands. 

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Jul 12, 2018
Tim Silverwood, Beating Plastic Pollution
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"Change isn’t going to be easy, but there’s no time to procrastinate or hope someone else is going to fix it…it’s time to do something. YOU are the person you’ve been waiting for." — Tim Silverwood.

Meet Tim Silverwood CEO of Take 3 for the Sea. Tim is an Australian environmentalist, surfer and plastic pollution campaigner. In Australia, you might have seen him on War on Waste, or if you have kids (or if you are one) you might have seen him at your school. He’s given hundreds of talks to schools, communities and businesses on the ocean plastics issue.

This episode is all about what we can do to turn it around. Be warned: it's highly motivating!

Our interview was recorded live at the Sustainable Living Festival in Melbourne. 

Thank you to the Australian documentary Blue for supporting this Episode.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Jul 03, 2018
Supermodel Lily Cole on the Bcorps & Purpose
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Lily Cole rose to fame as a model. She was the youngest model to appear on the cover of British Vogue, and was listed by French Vogue as one of the top 30 models of the 2000s. Her pictures, shot by some of photography's greatest names (think Tim Walker, Nick Knight, Steven Meisel) are some of the most memorable in the business, but these days Lily has other fish to fry.

An environmental advocate, actor, writer and filmmaker, she is also a social entrepreneur. She is the founder of Impossible.com, a B Corp that uses technology to solve social and environmental problems. It began as a platform for the gift economy and today, she says, is focused on "trying to use tech in a positive way, and doing that through collaborations."

In this lovely and intriguing Episode, we discuss Lily's love for nature and the ways in which that informs the work she does today. We talk climate change and the power of positive messaging. We get into frameworks for business with puropse, the need to rethink how we measure success and encouraging more women to enter the tech world. And fashion, natch. Don't you worry, we talk about that.

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Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes - it helps new listeners to find us. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Jun 27, 2018
Roland Mouret, Sex, Fashion & Sustainability
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You probably know about ROLAND MOURET’s famous "Galaxy" dress. Fitted, flattering, cap-sleeved and much-copied, it was a phenomenon in the 2000s, worn by everyone from Beyoncé and Scarlett Johansson to Demi Moore and Victoria Beckham.

You might also know about another of his glamorous clients, Megan Markle, who wore a chic navy Roland Mouret dress the day before her wedding to Prince Harry.

What is less well-know is the designer’s strong interest in sustainability. He's thought deeply about this subject, and questioned everything around it, from how and why he makes things, and how that has evolved, to the impacts of over-consumption, the power of fashion to communicate a message and how we can make sustainability hot—and not just hot right now.

We doubt there's anyone better placed to contextualise fashion’s perpetuation of addictive desire than Roland Mouret. His design magic lies in making women feel amazing in his clothes. He says a dress doesn't come alive until a woman wears it. 

This thought-provoking, winding conversation takes us through his life, from rural French butcher's son, to modelling for Jean Paul Gaultier and Yohji Yamamoto, to him tearing up the dance floor at legendary Paris fashion hangout Le Palace.

These days, he finds his balance by escaping to the country. “I never thought I would go for that life,” he says. Recorded in Roland’s head office in Mayfair, with Dave the dog in tow, we discuss change, reflection, maturing, and the idea that sustainability is now, as he puts it, “so present a problem that we have to face it.”

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes - it helps new listeners to find us. You can find us on Spotify now too.

 

Jun 22, 2018
Fashioned From Nature: V&A curator Edwina Ehrman
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London’s Victoria & Albert Museum (“perhaps the world’s best dressing-up box” with an archive of more than 75,000 items of clothing) takes on sustainable fashion! 

Thw new Fashioned From Nature exhibition includes amazing historical garments as well as contemporary fashion by the likes of Vivienne Westwood, Katherine Hamnett, Alexander McQueen, Christophers Kane and Raeburn, and Bruno Pieters. But most importantly, it looks at fashion’s eco footprint, and the massive impacts of textile production on the planet. What can we learn from the past to design a better fashion industry for the future?

Meet curator Edwina Erhman, who specialises in 19th Century fashion and textiles, and the history of London fashion, & has worked for many years for both the V&A & the Museum of London.

This is a quote from Emma Watson, who wrote the foreword for the book of the exhibition: “Regardless of our social or economic status, we can all dress and shop more mindfully and sustainably. It is so important & timely that we now re-conceptualise what it means to wear and consume and what is fashionable.”

Everyone’s talking about the 1860s muslin dress embroiderd with Indian beetle wings and the earrings made from hummingbird heads (ugh)...there are items on show that to modern eyes are really macabre, but at the time were considered gorgeous and exotic. Today's humman-made materials now use seem more benign, but are they?

You don’t have to see the exhibition to think about these issues, to see how they play out in history and in our present, and to ask yourself, how do I want stand in nature? What do I believe nature is for? Am I part of it? If I'm inspired by it, how can I knowingly damage it for something - beautiful clothes - that’s a luxury not a necessity? And what can we do to lessen fashion’s impact on nature, even to make it a positive one?

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes - it helps new listeners to find us. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Jun 13, 2018
Simon Collins, Fashion Culture Design
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Simon Collins is a creative director, educator, fashion consultant, and ex-dean of the fashion school at Parsons in New York. With his new platform Fashion Culture Design, Simon holds what he calls Unconferences where not-boring fashion people address topics such as, How do you solve a problem like fashion week? And, Can sustainability be sexy?

He gave the opening address at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit this year, and his point was: it's all your fault!

Is it? Is it down to us to make fashion more sustainable? And if so, how can we do it?

Why is fashion important? Why don't more people recognise it at such? What is fashion's power? What on Earth has all this got to do with Hemingway, or, for that matter, Britney Spears? Listen to find out, and to hear some very good stories about London style back in the day, and how fashion education has changed.

Simon was a mad fashion kid in Bournemouth and London in '80s, and we talk about what that was like, and style, and making your own outfits, dressing up to go to clubs like Taboo, & being obsessed with The Face magazine. 

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes - it helps new listeners to find us. You can find us on Spotify now too.

Jun 07, 2018
Sara Ziff, Fashion, Me Too & the Model Alliance
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Meet Sara Ziff, founder of the Model Alliance. She is a campaigner for a fairer, more sustainable fashion industy in general and for the rights of models in particular.

This Episode was recorded during the Copenhagen Fashion Summit - Sara was there with model Edie Campbell and casting director James Scully to speak about the RESPECT Program. It launched with an open letter signed by more than 100 fashion models in the wake of Me Too, calling for fashion houses, media companies and model agencies to commit to “an orderly and fair process for addressing charges of abuse”, backed up with training and education initiatives.

The letter begins: “Over the past year, many courageous individuals have revealed the dark truth of sexual harassment in the fashion industry. These concerns have yet to be addressed in a meaningful and sustainable way. As models our images serve commercial purposes but our bodies remain ours.”

Proposals include stronger, enforceable workplace standards to protect underage models and ensure, for example, that they are never asked to pose nude without prior agreement; a confidential and secure complaints process; and a neutral body set up to investigate complaints. Sara says “one in five models is working in debt to her agency,” so this is not only an issue of sexual intimidation, misconduct and abuse, it’s a power issue.

This is an important topic and one the industry urgently needs to address. What's being done about it? How is Sara trying to change the fashion world, and where does the urge to do that come from in her? How did she go from walking for Chanel and Alexander McQueen to being a voice for change? All this and more is in this show, and we can't wait to hear what you make of it.

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes - it helps new listeners to find us. 

May 24, 2018
Bianca Spender, the Australian designer on Nature, process & creativity
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She’s a brilliant tailor, cuts a mean coat & has been a Woolmark Prize finalist. One of the most considered, creative, thoughtful designers working in Australia today, Bianca Spender also thinks deeply about sustainability & making positive impacts on people & planet with her work.

In this interview, recorded live at the recent SCCI Fashion Hub in Sydney, we discuss Bianca’s approach to intregrating sustainability into every aspect of her business. We talk about her use of dead stock, her design process and relationship to and obsession with nature, and what it ws like to grow up in the fashion business - Bianca’s mother is Carla Zampatti, who, but the way, presented her first collection in Sydney in 1965.

Bianca's AW'18 collection is titled Letters to Nature and explores how we stand in Nature, literally in terms of the elements, but also existentially - what sort of world do we want to create for future generations, and how will the actions we take today impact on tomorrow? In May, Bianca showed her Resort 18 collection at Australian fashion week to critical acclaim. Check out her Instagram here.

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Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page - every little helps!

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes. You can find us on Spotify now too.

May 17, 2018
Eva Kruse, on the Copenhagen Fashion Summit
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How can we begin to solve fashion’s most pressing sustainability issues? We need collaboration, knowledge-sharing, and a willingness to look fearlessly at what's wrong as well as the opporunities for positive change. We need the movers and shakers to get involved, and stakeholders from all areas of the industry to join them. We need fresh ideas and points of view. Enter, the Copenhagen Fashion Summit. 

Organisers liken the summit "the Davos of the fashion industry", and say: "it’s a nexus for agenda-setting discussions on the most critical environmental, social and ethical issues facing our industry and planet.” So this is a table you want to be at! Which is why...

We are bringing you some special Episodes of the Wardrobe Crisis podcast from this year’s event, starting with this one, with its very engaging CEO and president Eva Kruse.

Eva founded the summit in 2009 to coincide with United Nations summit on climate change that happened in Copenhagen that year. Very forward-thinking - at a time when it was rare for businesses to discuss sustainability in public, even if you were working away at it behind the scenes. And fashion really wasn’t part of the climate change conversation.

Fast-forward nine years, and everyone wants a ticket - from designers like Stella McCartney to media leaders such as Graydon Carter, from circular economy leaders like Ellen McArthur and William McDonough, to the CEO's of the big fashion companies and the founders of small ones.

The daughter of activist parents, Eva Kruse attended a progressive Danish business school called Kaos Pilot. She fell into a TV career then went onto become a renowned magazine editor. She was instrumental in the creation of the Danish Fashion Institute and Copenhagen fashion week in 2005, and is much loved in the industry for her big ideas and, more importantly, her ability to make them happen.   

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us.

We are always grateful for ratings and reviews on iTunes - it helps new listeners to find us. 

Happy listening!

May 09, 2018
Stylist Laura Jones, Red Carpet Ready
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It’s Met Gala time, which means your social media feeds are going to be full of who wore what. This got us thinking about the huge influence of the red carpet on fashion and pop culture, and about how it works and who, apart from the designer, creates these looks - because make no mistake, celebrities do not dress themselves at these things...

What better time to share an Episode about styling? You’re going to meet New York-based fashion editor Laura Jones, who is fast carving a niche for herself as sustainable fashion’s go-to creative.

An ex-MTV stylist who used to work at W magazine, Laura has dressed the likes of Alicia keys, Rebecca Hall and Naomie Harris for red carpet events, and styled names like Katie Holmes and Uma Thurman for shoots. Now she's launched new sustainable fashion magazine The Frontlash .

This is a fascinating interview, about much more than frocking up for the red rug. We dig deep on fashion's #MeToo crisis and look at how we might apply ideas of health and wellbeing to the fashion industry. We discuss the challenges and opportunities of moving the needle on sustainability when it comes to high fashion and the business of dressing for events. We talk feminism, and the politics and power games of fashion, and of course, we decode what a stylist actually does

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Our podcasts and shownotes also live here

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us.

We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes - it helps new listeners to find us.

May 03, 2018
VEJA's co-founder Sébastien Kopp, Active Good
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Are you a sneaker freak? How sustainable are your favourite sneakers? If they’re by cult French brand, Veja, the answer is very.

In the sustainable fashion space, we often talk about reducing the negative impacts of production on people and planet, but Veja's Sébastien Kopp and François Morillion talk about having a positive impact on the environment and society. Not less harm but active good.

Is it possible? How do you choose eco-positive materials to make sneakers? Can you make money doing it? Veja sneakers cost 5 to 7 times more than conventional brands to produce because the raw materials are environmentally friendly and purchased according to fair trade principles, and because the sneakers are produced in fair factories. How do you balance the books? Hint: you give up advertising.

What are the challenges of working this way? And what are the rewards?

In this Episode, recorded in Veja's HQ in Paris, Clare speaks with Sébastien Kopp about these questions and more. We talk: vegan shoes, Made in Brazil, agro-ecological organic cotton and wild rubber. We cover the history of colonialism in the Amazon, the definitions of success and failure and how to reshape the economic system for the better. This is a fascinating conversation with a truly original fashion thinker. And of course, he loves sneakers...

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Our podcasts and shownotes also live here

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us.

We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes - it helps new listeners to find us.

 

Apr 26, 2018
Fashion Revolution's Sarah Ditty, Pro-Fashion Protest
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Who made your clothes? Welcome to the last in our mini-series of four shows in celebration of Fashion Revolution Week, the global not-for-for profit campaign that was established on the anniversary of the Rana Plaza disaster in Bangladesh, to promote transparency in the fashion industry. 

You’re going to meet Fashion Revolution’s Head of Policy, Sarah Ditty. Sarah is based in London, and has a wealth of insights the big issues around ethical and sustainable fashion today, from modern slavery to living wages to sustainable fabrics and fashion waste and extending the life of our clothes. Why do these things matter? What can you do to help? How far have we come and what sort of fashion industry would be like to create for our future?

This show is brought to you by Mighty Good Undies in celebration of Fashion Revolution week #whomademyclothes?

How fab is our music? Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Follow Mighty Good Undies on Instagram

Our podcasts and shownotes also live here. Clare is on deadline for her next book, so please forgive a short delay in updating clarepress.com (All the new Eps will be live by the end of April.)

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Apr 19, 2018
Fashion Social Enterprise 101 with The Social Outfit's founder Jackie Ruddock & the Social Outfit
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Where would we be without creative collaboration? This week’s Episode is all about fashion community, its power to change the world, and the idea that together we are stronger.

You're going to meet the inspiring change-maker Jackie Ruddock, CEO of The Social Outfit, a Sydney-based social enterprise and fashion brand that works with refugees and new migrants to provide first Australian jobs in the fashion industry. 

What it’s like to come to a new country and to try to build a new life? How can fashion help? Community and giving back are central to this story. We discuss the challenges and joys of running a social enterprise, the magic powers of sewing, and our common humanity. And fabulous style!

This show is brought to you by Bianca Spender in celebration of Fashion Revolution week. #whomademyclothes

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Follow Bianca Spender 

Follow The Social Outfit

Our podcasts and shownotes also live here. Clare is on deadline for her next book, so please forgive a short delay in updating clarepress.com (All the new Eps will be updated by end of April.)

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Apr 11, 2018
Patrick Duffy, The Clothes Swap King - Sustainable in Sequins
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The second in our series of Fashion Revolution-themed shows, this Episode is about the magical powers of the clothes swap. It's also about us having way too many clothes. And some of it is just about the charmed life of Patrick Duffy, New York’s clothes swap king, and co-founder of Global Fashion Exchange.

Buy less choose well is great, but it’s clearly it’s not what everyone’s doing. There are quite simply too many clothes in our wardrobes. Fashion resale is projected to be bigger than fast fashion within 10 years. Millennials are both the most sustainably minded and the biggest impulse buyers - they typically discard items after 1 to 5 wears. What we are seeing here is a picture of excess.

So now it’s time to consider some of the more creative ways we can tackle our clothing mountains and also our appetites for fashion.

What's the haulternative?

The simplest way to extend the life of your clothes is by giving them a new owner. And the greenest way to get a mad fashion fix is to go to, or hold a fashion swap.

Fashion Revolution week is April 18 - 24

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Our podcasts and shownotes also live here. Clare is on deadline for her next book, so please forgive a short delay in updating clarepress.com (All the new Eps will be updated by end of April.)

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Apr 06, 2018
Walk Sew Good - Discovering Positive Fashion Stories
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"By walking, we connect with the Earth" - Satish Kumar. Towards the end of 2016 two friends from Melbourne, Megan O’Malley and Gab Murphy went out for a walk. A year later, they made it home. Calling themselves Walk Sew Good they went on a epic adventure - walking 3,500 kilometres through Souh East Asia to collect and share stories from some of the people who make our clothes. They met with and interviewed more than 50 different people and organisations, made videos and wrote a blogs - and made friends. When they set out, Meg was a fashion fan, Gab not so much. How did they change, and what did they learn? And what's it really like to walk for 8-hours every day?

This show was recorded live at the Planet Talks at the WOMADelaide festival, and it's the first of a Series of 4 Episodes celebrating Fashion Revolution Week, featuring stories about #whomademyclothes and how we can fashion a more sustainable fashion future. Make sure you check the events FASHION REVOLUTION have in your area so you can get involved: Be curious, find out, do something.

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Walk Walk Sew Good on Instagram @walksewgood

Our podcasts and shownotes also live here. Clare is on deadline for her next book, so please forgive a short delay in updating clarepress.com All the new Eps will be updated by mid-April.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Mar 27, 2018
Kim Jenkins, Fashion & Race
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We need to talk. And we need to listen. Fashion is supposed to be modern, cutting edge, leading the way. But is it? Or is it stuck in old-fashioned tropes that place white culture at its centre? Now is the time to shake things up and insist on representation and inclusivity, and we all have our parts to play. But what does diversity really mean? Are we headed in the right direction, and are we going there fast enough?

In this week's Episode, we meet Kim Jenkins, a New York-based writer, educator and authority on the intersections between fashion, race and culture. Kim teaches at both Parsons, The New School and the Pratt Institute. She also sits on the advisory board of the Model Alliance.

She specialises in the sociocultural and historical influences behind why we wear what we wear, specifically addressing how politics, psychology, race and gender shape the way we ‘fashion’ our identity. Plus she's a massive vintage fan, and a serious fashion history buff.

At Parsons, Kim developed a class called Fashion & Race, which inspired this podcast. These are issues we need to be discussing more - from cultural appropriation vs. appreciation, to diversity on the runway and in imagery, through diversity and representation in all areas; not just race, but body type, age, sweeping away those old-fashioned beauty norms, all that.

This is an intriguing interview, and it's warm and beautiful and personal. You get to hear how Kim got to where she is today, what she loves and is inspired by. We talk about everything from what it was like for Kim to grow up black in a very white neighbourhood in Texas, how she found and formed her identity, why she fell in love with fashion TV, crazy Dallas style (oh the shoulder pads), and of course, where fashion has been and where it’s headed. Enjoy!

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

Follow Kim Jenkins on Instagram @kimberlymjenkins

Our podcasts and shownotes also live here. Clare is on deadline for her next book, so please forgive a short delay in updating clarepress.com All the new Eps will be updated by mid-April.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

 

Mar 20, 2018
Advanced Style's Ari Seth Cohen, No More Invisible Woman
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Photographer and author Ari Seth Cohen is the creator of Advanced Style, a project devoted “to capturing the sartorial savvy of the senior set.” He says, “I feature people who live full creative lives. They live life to the fullest, age gracefully and continue to grow and challenge themselves.”

In this interview, you’re going to hear all about how he began, who he met along the way, what he’s learned and how he his work has helped to change the way the world looks at older women and advanced beauty. We discuss love and loss, and refusing to give up and go gently into elastic waisted pants, and of course we talk about the enduring, uplifiting power of style.

It’s packed full of wisdom, but even better - it’s packed full of Advanced Style ladies. From Ilona Royce Smithkin, who at 97 published a book on staying creative, to Jacquie Murdock, the former Apollo dancer who at 82 shot a Lanvin campaign, and so many more.

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

You can find all our podcasts and shownotes here.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Mar 13, 2018
Fanny Moizant, Secondhand is Not Second Best
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There used to be a stigma about old clothes. Whereas vintage was always cool for those in the know, until fairly recently plain second hand wasn’t always so welcome. But this is changing: 30% of millennials have shopped second-hand in the last three months. Instagram is full of stylish people wearing second-hand gear. Fashion rental and resale sites are booming.

In this Episode, recorded in Paris, we meet Fanny Moizant, one of founders of Vestiaire Collective, the French ‘re-commerce’ site that’s seeing 30,000 designer items offered for sale each week by members of its 6 million-strong fashion community. Imagine a cross between Net-A-Porter and eBay with a bit of Instagram thrown in, so you can follow and like your favourite sellers. 

This interview is a must for anyone who buys or sells secondhand anywhere. It’s a ‘How to make it in fashion’ episode, a tech disruptor episode, an inspirational woman episode. Fanny is a working mamma and she has heaps of great advice on female entrepreneurship. Not surprisingly, she also has fantastic style. Fanny is super chic.

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

You can find all our podcasts and shownotes here.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

 

Mar 06, 2018
Kit Willow, Sustainability Gets Glamorous
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  • Meet the Australian designer on a mission to save the planet one dress at a time. She's just been in London for Fashion Week showing her work at Buckingham Palace, no less. Livia Firth and Emma Watson lover her, and she's always in Vogue. No wonder everybody's talking about Kit Willow.

Her KITX label is a sustainable fashion standout, established to do good as well as look good. 

Recorded at Kit's home in Sydney, this Episode offers a fascinating insight into what makes this revered creative tick. We cover everything from artisan craft, production hiccups, and authenticity and longevity in fashion to how trees talk to each other, and how to do your kids' slime stall sustainably. It's a joy, this one. Happy listening!

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

You can find all our podcasts and shownotes here.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Feb 28, 2018
Christopher Raeburn, Remade, Reduced, Recycled
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Meet British fashion's ruling King of Ucycling, and prepare to fall in love with his ideas.

He's a Fashion Revolution favourite who shows both mens and womenswear at  London Fashion Week Men's. US Vogue says Christopher Raeburn  "totally relevant" and WWD notes that right now he totally captures the Zeiteist. True that, but this is no sudden trend-driven thing. Raeburn has been creating collections sustainably since he started out a decade ago.

With his industry-leading Remade, Recycled and Reuse ethos, he is changing the way fashion works by using upcycled and deadstock textiles and repurposing army surplus materials. He's turned his studio into a place of learning, and loves a good repair, and baking bread, and watching Blue Planet, because, who doesn't?

"A collaborative, creative fashion studio where daily design meets painstaking production, alongside monthly events, discussions and workshops." That's how Christopher Raeburn describes his work world. And what an intriguing world it is.

Ethical fashionistas, lend us your ears!

How fab is our music? THANK YOU Montaigne. She is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress

You can find all our podcasts and shownotes here.

Love the podcast? We have a Patreon page if you'd like to support us. We're also, as always, super grateful if for ratings and reviews on iTunes.

Feb 20, 2018
Kowtow's Gosia Piatek, The Beauty of Minimalism
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Welcome back! We're excited to kick off Series 2 with this inspiring interview with Gosia Piatek, the fabulous force behind cult ethical fashion label Kowtow.

Decluttering, minimalism and the sustainable wardrobe are big themes in the ethical fashion conversation. But what does minimal design really mean? And what's it like to be an aesthetic minimalist with a partner who's a full-on maximalist?

In this Episode, we discuss how to build a sustainable fashion business, and the pressures of running one between London, where Gosia lives, and New Zealand, where Kowtow is based.

Gosia shares about her early life as a refugee from Poland, what it was like for her family to arrive in New Zealand knowing no one, and how she grew up a greenie.

The story of how she began her label is fascinating and unusual. Find out how she built it up, according to her values and her interests in art, architecture, craftsmanship, landscapes and travel. And how to make clothes while making a contribution to Mother Earth - enjoy!

THANK YOU for the music Montaigne. Montaign is singing an acoustic version of Because I love You.

Follow Clare on Instagram and Twitter, @mrspress

Feb 13, 2018
A message for you, dear listener
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That's a wrap, Series 1! Thank you for coming along for the ride. Wardrobe Crisis, your best fashion friend, is going on holidays.

It's time to catch up on Episodes you might have missed, and relisten to your favourites. Please do share (tag Clare on Instagram and Twitter @mrspress), and rate and review us in iTunes.

Series 2 starts in the New Year.

Missing you already. xxx

 

 

Dec 13, 2017
Eva Galambos, Luxury and the Art of Retail
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London has Browns and Dover St Market, Milan has 10 Corso Como, New York has Jeffrey, and Paris had Collette. In Australia, the multi-brand designer fashion stores to know are Melbourne’s Marais and in Sydney, Parlour X.

This Episode is about independent high fashion retail, how it works and what it does, what’s happening with bricks and mortar stores, and why we need them. You’re going to meet the brilliant buyer, style setter and retailer Eva Galambos, who is Parlour X’s founder.

Eva is an expert on the business of fashion, and the changing landscape of retail. It’s her job to partner with the brands she believes in to present their collections in store, and to choose the right stuff to stay ahead in a game that’s been turned upside down in recent years by the growth of online and the rise of the flagship, where more brands are becoming vertical operations.

We talk about who decides what’s on trend, the purpose of fashion shows, and what happens on a buying appointment and in the Paris showrooms. We cover the importance of longevity and timeless design, what the term ‘investment piece’ really means, the pressures and opportunities of online retailing? What does luxury mean today and how is sale culture impacting it? This Episode is a must for anyone studying fashion, working in the business or just trying to figure out how it all works.

Check THE SHOWNOTES for links and resources from today's story.

DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW CLARE ON INSTAGRAM FOR ALL THE WARDROBE CRISIS NEWS!

Our incredible music is by Montaigne  - it's an acoustic version of Because I Love You from ther album Glorious Heights.

Like what you hear? Please review us in iTunes, and share on social media.

Fancy becoming a citizen producer of Wardrobe Crisis? We have a Patreon page ! We're so grateful to our supporters. 

Dec 05, 2017
The Streets Barber, Good Hair Day
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On any given night in Australia 1 in 200 people don't have a roof over their heads. Nasir Sobhani A.K.A The Streets Barber skateboards around Melbourne giving free haircuts and shaves to homeless people as a part of his ‘Clean Cut Clean Start’ movement. 

Today, fashion and hairdressing live in the same world, along with makeup artistry, art direction, photography. The hair stylist on a shoot, for example, is just as important as the stylist, model or photographer. But the art of cutting hair is more fundamental, and more universally experienced, than those other disciplines.

Grooming is an animal urge and an ancient art. Razors have been found in Bronze Age and ancient Egyptian ruins. In the middle ages, barbers served as surgeons and dentists; they were literally engaged in wellness and healing.

These days it’s more about counselling, though isn’t it? You know the score. The intimacy of sitting in the hairdresser’s or barber’s chair, the human contact. Who hasn’t told their hairdresser secrets?'

Okay, but this Episode is about way more than a good haircut. It’s a story of addiction and redemption, the journey of an extradordinary man who, with this scissors by his side, found a vocation, changed his life and set himself to task to do some good in the world.

Nas calls the Street Barber Project, a “place where people who believe in the fundamental goodness of human beings can come to find stories, ideas, hope, community & inspiraiton in order to go out and serve in their own way.”

Check THE SHOWNOTES for links and resources from today's story.

DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW CLARE ON INSTAGRAM FOR ALL THE WARDROBE CRISIS NEWS!

Our incredible music is by Montaigne  - it's an acoustic version of Because I Love You from ther album Glorious Heights.

Like what you hear? Please review us in iTunes, and share on social media.

Did you know we have a Patreon page ? We're so grateful to our supporters. 

Nov 28, 2017
Richard Denniss, Curing Affluenza
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Join ethical fashionista Clare Press as she asks, Do you suffer from affluenza? This week’s guest, Australian economist Richard Denniss has the cure!

Richard is the author of a fascinating new book called Curing Affluenza, in which he argues that there’s nothing inevitable about our current mode of consuming.

“The vast majority of humans who have ever lived (and the majority of humans alive today) would find the idea of using our scarce resources to produce things that are designed to be thrown away absolutely mad,” he writes.

We’ve lost sight of true value and true cost of many of the things we buy. In this Episode we explore what led us here, and how the future could be about experiences rather than stuff. We ask, what’s the difference between materialism and consumerism? Do we need to reshape the economy? And, of course, what role does fashion have to play?

Check THE SHOWNOTES for links and resources from today's story.

THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY CITIZEN WOLF.

DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW CLARE ON INSTAGRAM FOR ALL THE WARDROBE CRISIS NEWS!

Our incredible music is by Montaigne  - it's an acoustic version of Because I Love You from ther album Glorious Heights.

Like what you hear? Please review us in iTunes, and share on social media.

Also, we have a new Patreon page. We're so grateful to our supporters - welcome to the Wardrobe Crisis family.

Nov 22, 2017
Garment Workers, What She Makes
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Join ethical fashionista Clare Press as she asks, What's it like to be a garment worker in Asia making clothes for high street brands in Australia and the global north?

This Epsiode explores one of the biggest issues around fast fashion and cheap clothing supply chains - low pay. Do we care? Do brands? And what's being done to campaign for a living wage and fair fashion?

Based on CEO pay levels of some of the big brands in Australia, it would take a Bangladeshi garment worker earning the minimum wage more than 4,000 years to earn the what CEOs get paid in just one year...

Check THE SHOWNOTES for links and resouces from today's story, as well as how you can join the movement to make a difference.

THIS SHOW IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY CITIZEN WOLF.

DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW CLARE ON INSTAGRAM FOR ALL THE WARDROBE CRISIS NEWS!

Our incredible music is by Montaigne  - it's an acoustic version of Because I Love You from ther album Glorious Heights.

Like what you hear? Please review us in iTunes, and share on social media.

Also, we have a new Patreon page. We're so grateful to our supporters - welcome to the Wardrobe Crisis family.

Nov 14, 2017
Patagonia's Director of Philosophy Vincent Stanley, Talking The Big Stuff
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Vincent Stanley is Patagonia’s Director of Philosophy. (Yes, that's a thing). He has been with the outdoor gear company since 1973, when his uncle, Yvon Chouinard, gave him a job as a kid out of college. 

Vincent is a deep thinker and passionate environmentalist, and a visiting fellow at the Yale School of Management. He's also a poet, whose work has appeared in Best American Poetry.

With Yvon, he co-wrote the book THE RESPONSIBLE COMPANY, which is like a handbook for building a more sustainable business. Oh and hello! This is the guy who wrote the first copy for The Footprint Chronicles Patagonia’s game-changing supply chain mapper -  and along with Rick Ridgeway, worked on the much-talked-about "Don’t Buy This Jacket" campaign that Patagonia ran in the New York Times in 2011. 

This Episode is about the big, important issues facing our planet, and business, today: We discuss what’s happening to our soils, loss of biodiversity, climate change, ocean acidification and water pollution, and the problems with over-consumption, population growth and the role of business in this challenging new world. But don't you worry, it's also fun. And awesome. And SUPER INSPIRING. Buckle up, this is a wild, challenging, and thought-provoking journey, and you're invited. Are you ready?

DON'T FORGET TO FOLLOW CLARE ON INSTAGRAM FOR ALL THE WARDROBE CRISIS NEWS!

Our incredible music is by Montaigne  - it's an acoustic version of Because I Love You from ther album Glorious Heights.

Like what you hear? Please review us in iTunes, and share on social media.

Also, we're excited to announce our new Patreon page. We're so grateful to our supporters - welcome to the Wardrobe Crisis family.

 

Nov 07, 2017
Blake Mycoskie, TOMS' Chief Shoe-Giver on One for One
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Have you got big ideas? Do you dream of starting a company that makes a difference in the world? Or working for one? Are you interested in how brands can create positive impacts in communities, beyond the boring, some would say broken, mainstream consumerism model? This Episode is a must-listen for anyone interested in social enterprises

Blake Mycoskie is one of the most successful players in this space, and in this interview he shares the story of his company TOMS, how he built it, and what it takes to succeed

Via its 'One for One' model, TOMS has given more than 75 million pairs of shoes to kids who need them, helped restore sight to more than 500,000 people, and supported safe birth services for more than 175,000 mothers.

This Episode is full of vital insights for changemakers who want to use their powers for social good. We discuss the essential ingredients for getting a venture like this off the ground and making it grow, what it takes to suck it up when things go wrong and the challenges and joys of building better business. Oh, and shoes. Of course we talk about shoes. This is a fashion podcast afterall...

Our incredible music is by Montaigne  - it's an acoustic version of Because I Love You from ther album Glorious Heights.

Like what you hear? Please review us in iTunes, and share on social media.

Also, we're excited to announce our new Patreon page. We're so grateful to our supporters - welcome to the Wardrobe Crisis family!

 

 

Oct 31, 2017
Karen Walker, Beyond Trends
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New Zealand designer Karen Walker is one of The Business of Fashion’s 500. Her brand sells in 42 countries, in prestigious stores like Barneys New York, and Liberty of London. She is a New York fashion week veteran, with some very famous fans. Everyone from Beyoncé and Rihanna to Scarlet Johansson, Alexa Chung, Lorde, Lena Dunham, Toast the dog, oh look everyone, wears her sunglasses.

She also designs ready-to-wear, handbag, shoe and jewellery collections as well as homewares. Okay, Karen Walker is a hot brand...

But what does it take to be an ethical one too? How can successful designers incorporate sustainability and social responsibility into their business models? Karen says "ethical values of responsibility, uniqueness, quality and connection, are at the heart of what we do." What does that look like on a practical level? 

Karen is engaging with all these issues. She is working with Baptist World Aid Australia on their Ethical Fashion Giude, for example, and has an ongoing collaboration with the Ethical Fashion Initiative. She is highly invested in the process of producing her products and the people who make them, but also in what it means to work as a creative in fashion today, from responsibilities around supply chains to the impacts of advertising and messaging. She also has a lot to say about the deep stuff: the purpose of design. Ultimately, what is fashion for?

We start off this interview talking about widening the lens on beauty and Advanced Style, we discuss beginnings - Karen started out by making a single men’s floral shirt for a musician friend when she was 18-years-old - what’s changed and what’s remained the same. And we look to the future. How can fashion designers meet tomorrow's challenges?

Check out the shownotes here.

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

Also, we're excited to announce our new Patreon page. We're so grateful to our supporters.

 

Oct 24, 2017
Lisa Hall, Embracing Indian Craft
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The fashion business is based on many hands, and on women’s labour. 80 % of garment workers are women. So while fashion is a giant global industry with extremely sophisticated marketing behind it, at the end of the day, it’s built on a woman sitting sewing in a room somewhere. And women sewing is wonderful. Some of fashion’s most inviting stories about that. Like today’s…

After years as a dressmaker and sewer of costumes for film & TV in Sydney, Lisa Hall made a radical change and moved to hot, dry, dusty Bhuj, a small city in the Kutch district of Gujurat, in northwest India. It’s way off the obvious tourist track, except during flamingo season, when thousands of pink birds descend on the lagoons of the nearby Great Rann salt marsh.

Lisa made the trip with her sewing machine and her rescue cats in tow - she couldn’t leave Sydney without her furry family. What drew her there? What’s it like to live in Bhuj when you don’t speak the language? What’s all this got to do with fashion?

it was the rich tradition of women’s craft that drew Lisa to India. Her Madame Hall label, which debuted at Lakme fashion week in Mumbai in February, uses traditional local textiles and artisan embroideries but in non-traditional, quirky and unexpected ways.

From her tiny workroom, she makes makes one of a kind clothes, which she sells on Etsy, using traditional Ajrakh block printed cotton, and tribal embroideries.

Check out the shownotes here 

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.
Oh, and we have a new Patreon page. Hop on over to support the show. 

Love,
Clare x

Oct 17, 2017
Front Row Influencer Catherine Baba, Cycling in Heels
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Yves Saint Laurent, Loulou de la Falaise, Pierre Cardin, Chanel, Givenchy, couture, prêt-à-porter and vintage shopping in the Paris flea markets, this week’s Episode trés chic.

My guest the Paris-based Australian-raised stylist and César-winning costume designer, Catherine Baba.

Vogue calls her a “fashion eminence”. Vanity Fair? An “original”. Indeed that magazine just included her on its 2017 Best Dressed List.

She is also an accessories designer with her own line of sunglasses, a massive vintage fan and a walking fashion encyclopaedia with a particular fascination with the history of Paris fashion in the 1970s

But best of all, she's a mad keen cycler. Could there be there a more glamorous eco-aware-transport influencer? Pas possible! Please do check the shownotes to see some delightful photos of her pedalling around Paris. Riding a bike to the fashion week shows wearing a vintage kimono, high heels or even couture? No problem, darling. “It creates an aero-dynamism to the look,” she says.

We recorded this interview at the Perth Fashion Festival soon after Yves Saint Laurent’s partner Pierre Bergé died, and we drill deep into what makes Paris fashion tick and how it has changed. 

This Episode is another insider's guide, a companion piece to Epsiodes 12, 13 & 14 with Simon Doonan, Stephen Jones and Linda Jackson. For anyone who loves the creativity and artistry that makes fashion tick, these shows are for you.

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

Oh, and we have a new Patreon page. Hop on over to support the show. 

Merci, à bieontôt,

Clare x

Oct 10, 2017
Tim Flannery, on Climate Change & Saving the Great Barrier Reef
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Australia's GREAT BARRIER REEF is the largest living thing on earth. Visible from outer space, it's the size of 70 million football fields and is home to 400 different types of coral and more than 1500 species of toprical fish. It's a magical underwater garden. No wonder fashion is obsessed with its beauty.

But climate change is killing the reef, and fashion, being a major manufacturing industry, has its part to play. About 5% of global greenhouse gas emissions come from the fashion sector.

This week we meet Tim Flannery, internationally acclaimed scientist, writer, explorer and conservationist. Actual proper legend.

Our interview was recorded at the Heron Island Research Centre 80 kilometres off the Queensland coast on an pristine part of the reef, undamaged by recent bleaching events.

It's a very special opportunity to hear from an expert on the front line of climate change science about how the whole thing works, and what can be done about it. We hope you will share the Episode with your friends and communities.

The WARDROBE CRISIS show notes unpack the issues addressed in each Episode. Head over to www.clarepress.com/ to check them out.

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

 

Oct 03, 2017
Fast Fashion Question Time
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This week’s Episode is little different from normal. It was recorded in September at a live Q&A event at the Wheeler Centre for Books & Ideas in Melbourne, and moderated by Madeleine Morris, a reporter for ABC television’s 7.30

We touch on a whole lot of issues front and centre in an industry currently in overdrive, from slow fashionoverconsumption and waste, to what brands are doing about supply chain transparency, as well as Australia’s move towards a Modern Slavery Act, the role of magazines in the fashion transparency conversation, and even how body mapping technology might reduce dead-stock.

For more on these issues, don't miss the shownotes here.

WHO’S TALKING?

Clare Press, yours truly, presenter of the Wardrobe Crisis podcast.

Clara Vuletich, a sustainable fashion consultant with a PhD in sustainable textiles, who has worked with clients such as H&M and Kering. 

Rebecca Hard, CEO of Sussan. The Sussan Group is the Australian women’s fashion retailer that owns retail brands Sportsgirl, Sussan and Suzanne Grae.

Jessica Perrin, one of the co-founders of Not My Style, a UK-based ethical shopping app that “tells you how much your favourite fashion brands share about how they treat the women and men who make our clothes.” The app launched after a successful Kickstarter campaign last year.

Music is by Montaigne 

Enjoying the show? Clare would love to hear from you - get in touch here www.clarepress.com

Please consider leaving a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us! 

Sep 26, 2017
Rachel Rutt, Making Mending Great Again
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We live in a our throwaway society. "Landfill fashion" has become a phrase - we literally buy clothes to throw them away. With fast fashion brands dropping new stock into store sometimes as often as every week, we're consuming new clothes like never before. The average woman wears just 40 % of what's in her wardrobe, meanwhile it's cool to declutter. Or is it? Have you considered where all that "clutter" ends up when you remove it from your house?

In this Episode, fashion model and Heart People frontwoman Rachel Rutt makes the case for making mending great again! Rachel is a mad-keen mender, weaver, knitter and sewing person. She is especially excited about patching up old denim, and wants to make that a craze - why buy pre-ripped jeans? "If you wear them enough, they will get there." Authentically aged denim is much more satisfying. By mending your clothes, you deepen your connection to them, argues Rachel.

Listen to Rachel's story of being home-schooled, shaving her head as a kid, finding herself in modelling and learning to harness the creativity within. Can fashion be a beautiful, supportive place to be? It can!

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Clare would love to hear from you - get in touch www.clarepress.com

Please consider leaving a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us! 

Sep 19, 2017
Linda Jackson, Inventing Australian Style
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It's such a treat to listen to this beautiful interview with one of Australia's most important, most innovative and most inspiraitonal fashion figures.

Linda Jackson is an iconic designer who, with her friend and creative partner Jenny Kee, invented a new language for Australian fashion in the 1970s, inspired by Australia's native flora, fauna and landscapes.

Until then, we'd mostly looked outward, copying what Europe did. But Linda and Jenny shook that whole thing up, and the world took notice. In Sydney they engergised the arts scene, bringing fashion to the party, and collaborating with creative friends like Peter Tully and David McDairmid, who went on to become leading lights of the Mardis Gras movement. In Milan and Paris, they were photographed by Italian Vogue and made a big splash. In the US, they were key to Nieman Marcus's Australian Fortnight in 1986 and in London, three years later, to the V&A show Australian Fashion: The Contemporary Art.

Linda opened her Bush Couture studio in 1982. She stepped up the art aspect to her work, she began collaborating with indigenous women batik artists at Utopia Station.

This Episode is about culture and respect, and valuing original voices. It’s also, broadly, about craft and technique and the hands-on practice of making clothes. And it's the story of how an arty kid from Melbourne grew up to be one of the wildest style voices of her generation.

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

 

 

Sep 12, 2017
Milliner Stephen Jones, from Club Kid to Christian Dior Couture
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Stephen Jones is the most extraordinary, the most famous, and the most marvellous milliner working in fashion today.

This interview took place at the National Gallery of Victoria on the eve of the opening of the exhibition, THE HOUSE OF DIOR: SEVENTY YEARS OF HAUTE COUTURE.

During John Galliano’s tenure at Dior in particular, from 1996 to 2011, Stephen made some of the house's most jaw-droppingly fabulous hats.

Stephen also designed hats and headpieces for the designers who came after Galliano at Dior: for Raf Simons and now for Maria Grazia Chiuri. He’s collaborated with pretty much every other iconic fashion you can think of too, from Vivienne Westwood and Rei Kawakubo to Jean Paul Gaultier and Louis Vuitton. He's made hats for Lady Gaga and Rihanna, curated exhibitions of hats and written books on them.

In terms of the sustainable and ethical fashion conversation, this story is all about fashion as high art and the celebration of the hand-made. No mass production here.

But it's not just his own hats that fascinate Stephen Jones. He's a font of knowledge on the history of millinery, and its role in fashion and culture. 

In this Episode, we touch on those things, and so much more. We talk the importance of Christian Dior and his New Look, and of the London club scene and the New Romantics that were so integral to forming Stephen’s taste.

And we talk about Marie Antoinette, Anna Piaggi and Princess Di, because they were all major hats fans. And you will be too after listening to this!

The WARDROBE CRISIS show notes unpack the issues addressed in each Episode. And there are some amazing pics this week. Head over to www.clarepress.com/ to check it out.

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

 

Sep 05, 2017
Simon Doonan, Tales from the Fashion Asylum
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Designers know they’ve made it when their collections are stocked by Saks, Bergdorf’s or Barneys. The iconic New York department stores hold a special allure, even when you live elsewhere. But retail, globally, is in a state of flux.

Will there even be physical stores in 10 or 20 years’ time? As customers continue to head online, it seems like every week there's news of another “bricks and mortar” closure. In the US, analysts predict 25 % of malls could shutter within the next five years. Will we ditch consumerism on mass, as the anti-shopping / buy nothing movements expand? Will renting fashion and clothing libraries become major trends? Or is it still all about experiences?

The latter is where Simon Doonan comes in. He calls himself a carnival type, likens his celebrated window displays for Barneys New York to something out of Coney Island – and indeed he has put some very unusual objects in shop windows in his time.

Creative director, writer, fashion commentator and OTT window dresser extraordinaire, Simon Doonan is an actual proper fashion legend.

Wait till you hear how he got into it.

Growing up gay and dreaming of glamour in 1960s Reading, he moved to Manchester then London in search of “the beautiful people”, cadging window dressing jobs off the likes Tommy Nutter (tailor to the Beatles and the Rolling Stones) and cult filmmaker Ken Russell’s wife.

Simon was a Blitz Kid (part of the famed London party set) then moved to LA, where he did windows for luxury boutique Maxfield. In mid-80s Manhattan, he worked for Diana Vreeland at the Met, before joining Barneys, where, you know, he was JUST CASUALLY FRIENDS WITH JOAN RIVERS. And nearly starred in The Devil Wears Prada.

Simon’s story is both extraordinary, and, in a weird way ordinary – in that Fashion Land has long been a place where eccentric, creative kids from small, unremarkable towns can find a home and thrive.

In this Episode we talk about his professional path, and how today’s new generation of designers and dream weavers can navigate the changed fashion landscape. We discuss Simon’s unwavering belief in the value of originality - ("Conformity is the only real fashion crime," he says) and some of the fashion geniuses he’s encountered. And of course we talk shop.

The show notes will be live shortly at  www.clarepress.com/ - keep checking back, we’ll have some fantastic pics to show you.

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

Aug 29, 2017
Conscious Chatter's Kestrel Jenkins, Curiosity Counts
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The ethical fashion movement is gathering momentum! Not so long ago sustainable, ethical, eco-fashion (whatever you want to call it) was a too easily dismissed as some way-out, niche concern. Something kooky, and very possibly hairy and hemp-y, that belonged on the lunatic fringe. Well, NO LONGER. Obvs.

Today sustainability is a buzz word. Everyone wants a piece of the activism action. We're in the middle of a Fashion Revolution, where the coolest, smartest most creative fashion fans are starting to ask more questions about who made their clothes, where how and from what.

Fabulous fashion podcaster Kestrel Jenkins is a pioneer in this space. She's been asking these questions since she was in college (she studied global studies and international journalism), became fascinated by fair trade, then went to intern at People Tree in London. Back in the her native USA she spent time in New York working for Ecouterre.

In 2016, she launched Conscious Chatter, "a podcast where what we wear matters".

Since then she's produced over 75 shows, telling stories about textiles, design, supply chains and the social and eco impacts of fashion, both fast and slow. She's interviewed everyone from True Cost filmmaker Andrew Morgan to some of the serious boss people at Patagonia  (and Clare Press!).

Oh, and she's delightul.

“I always have wanted to learn the stories behind things,” says Kestrel. Her favourite word? "Curious."

In this Episode Clare and Kestrel discuss the power of the podcast as a medium, who we think is listening and why, and how we keep them tuned in.

We share our perspectives on ethical and sustainable fashion, discuss how the conversation has changed since we both first joined it, and where we see it heading.

"For all you changemakers out there" (that's a Kestrel catchphrase), it’s really a treat to hear how Kestrel built her world, and what makes her tick.

Aug 22, 2017
Interiors Stylist Megan Morton - Chasing Decorating Dreams & Finding Beauty
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This is our 10th episode. Can you believe it? THANK YOU for listening! We’ve covered some big ugly issues from ocean plastic to Rana Plaza so we thought it was about time we talked about beauty.

Beauty is one of the major motivators for people who work in creative industries – they want to make beautiful things, whether it’s a garment, textile, show or picture. They want, as Megan Morton puts it in this Episode, to chase down true beauty wherever they see it. Not to push the beautiful lie but to try to capture and understand it.

Megan is a stylist, author and “house whisperer” with a life-long love for vintage and the stories behind old things. She grew up on a banana farm in Queensland, where her mum subscribed to 1970s back-to-the-land magazine, Grass Roots. Megan grew up seeing the beauty in nature, while figuring out how to make stuff.

Today her styling work is focused on houses and interiors, but she turns her eye for beauty on everything from her wardrobe, to teaching to travel to Instagram. She’s worked for magazines like Vogue Living and Elle Decoration, and is the author of four books. The latest? It’s Beautiful Here (Thames & Hudson).

In this Episode we go off on a lot of beautiful tangents about managing stress in the creative industries, the heart and soul of getting dressed, the value of vintage and the importance of the handmade. We try and pin down beauty, what it means and why we seek it, and discuss the beauty of provenance, generosity and sharing.

“Being flush and doing well affects everybody in your circle and the only way to keep that going is to be generous with your knowledge. The more you give away, the more free you are.” says Megan.

Megan is also the founder of The School, a creative hub in Sydney where you can learn things like shibori dyeing and extreme knitting from the best-of-the-best craftspeople inside the industry. Hello crafternoon-inspiration.

The WARDROBE CRISIS show notes unpack the issues addressed in each Episode. Way more than just links, it's like a mini magazine

Head over to www.clarepress.com/ to read yours and #bethechange

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Aug 15, 2017
Ethical Fashion & NGOs - Making it Work in India
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What do you think is possible? How about impossible? Kim Pearce and Katherine Davis are living proof of the old adage: where there’s a will there’s a way. The Possibility Project, which they cofounded after meeting on the school run, “delivers social justice programs through the mindset of social entrepreneurship”.

What does that look like on the ground? Try their womenswear label Slumwear 108, and made in the slums of Jaipur in partnership with the NGO i-India. The number 108, in case you’re wondering, is considered sacred in may eastern religions and traditions. Ask Kim what it means to her and she says, “It’s all about spiritual completion.” 

But these clothes and accessories aren’t some mystical idea – they are real. Whether it’s a jacket made from upcycled old saris or a string of silk covered beads, they offer measureable benefits to the people who make them, and to their communities.

How do you begin to set up a social enterprise? How do you keep it going? What qualities and resources do you need? These two demonstrate that it can be as simple as giving it, as we say in Australia, a red hot go. They insist that they are two ordinary mums, but their spirit and energy is obviously EXTRAORDINARY.

In this Episode, we discuss the politics of happiness, the practicalities of rethinking what’s conventionally deemed possible and how fashion can be a fabulous way to build bridges. Listen up, and you’ll come away thinking anything is possible. 

Make sure you visit clarerepress.com for the shownotes which include a bunch of links and further reading. By the way if you’re enjoying the podcast I love it you to review it in iTunes

The WARDROBE CRISIS show notes unpack the issues addressed in each Episode. Way more than just links, it's like a mini magazine! 

Head over to www.clarepress.com/ to read yours and #bethechange

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

 

 

Aug 08, 2017
StyleLikeU’s Elisa Goodkind – Disentangling style from Fashion
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Hands up who’s over the narrow view of beauty peddled by mainstream fashion brands and media! Elisa Goodkind wants us to take back our power from magazines, advertising and the money-driven global fashion business, so that getting dressed each day becomes an act of self-love. 

With their platform StyleLikeU New Yorkers Elisa and her daughter Lily Mandelbaum are breaking down the fake stereotypes about what’s beautiful, and what’s supposedly not. 

They’ve published a new booked called True Style is What's Underneath: The Self-Acceptance Revolution. They take their message on the road, holding open castings and talks around the world. And they make intimate documentary-style video portraits that “explore how style is not about trends, money or presenting a façade of photoshopped perfection”.

No wonder these videos have gone viral – with over 35 million views. What comes across more than anything when you watch them is how we are all the same in our difference.

The WARDROBE CRISIS show notes unpack the issues addressed in each Episode. Way more than just links, it's like a mini magazine! 

Head over to www.clarepress.com/ to read yours and #bethechange

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

 

Aug 01, 2017
Marina Debris – The grotesque beauty of trashion
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In our final Episode for Plastic Free July, Clare interviews American visual artist Marina DeBris. Marina calls herself a “trashion” designer, as well as an environmental activist, and anti-plastics campaigner. She makes her "Beach Couture" collections from rubbish she finds washed up on beaches.

There’s a history of fashion designers referencing refuse. John Galliano's controversial Couture 2000 collection for Christian Dior featured newspaper prints inspired by homeless people’s makeshift blankets. Vivienne Westwood has also dabbled in derelicte chic (like Mugatu in Zoolander). Jean Paul Gaultier once made a frock out of a bin liner – he named it his “rubbish bag dress” (in French). Jeremy Scott’s Autumn '17 Moschino collection was inspired by cardboard packaging. But these designers used luxurious fabrics to render the garbage theme gorgeous.

Marina comes from a very different place. She doesn’t want her work to be considered chic, fabulous or fashionable. She wants it to shock you.

So there’s a bustier embellished with discarded plastic utensils. A gown fashioned from the flimsy, floaty remnants of old white plastic carrier bags. She’s made dresses from polystyrene containers, old nappies, bed springs, even dead bird’s wings.

In this Episode we talk about why she makes her work, how she does it, and what sort of reactions she gets. Fashion can be a conduit for cultural conversation, so why not hijack it and use as a frame of reference for political art? That’s what Marina does with her provocative, confronting project trashion. Can you wear it? IF YOU DARE!

The WARDROBE CRISIS show notes unpack the issues addressed in each Episode. Way more than just links, it's like a mini magazine! 

Head over to www.clarepress.com/ to read yours and #bethechange

Music is by Montaigne http://www.montaignemusic.com.au/ 

Enjoying the show? Please leave a review in iTunes. It helps other people find us.

Jul 25, 2017
Singer/songwriter Montaigne – Using fame for good
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Montaigne, AKA Jessica Cerro, shot to fame while she was still in school thanks to Triple J’s Unearthed High competition. Now 21, she’s made a name for herself as one of the most interesting and original new Australian recording artists. 

Rolling Stone describes her vocals as “astonishingly powerful and expressive”, praising her debut album, Glorious Heights, as: “an enthralling listen, with pin-balling pop melodies and irrepressible hooks.”

Equally enthralling is her mindful approach to everything from conscious consumption – she’s a vegan, and a dedicated thrift-store fan - to politics. Anyone who watched the ARIAs this year will no doubt remember Montaigne appearing with “people over profit” daubed across her chest in black paint.

In this Episode we talk about millennial values, how the older generation has no right to screw up the planet for those who will inherit their mistakes, and Montaigne’s sartorial mission to dress “swashbuckling, somewhat medieval but also kind of Amish and vampire-esque” on stage. Often in the work of emerging ethical fashion designers. Sometimes in frills and furbelows upcycled from old curtains.

The WARDROBE CRISIS show notes unpack the issues addressed in each Episode. Way more than just links, it's like a mini magazine! 

Head over to www.clarepress.com/ to read yours and #bethechange

Jul 17, 2017