The Week in Art by The Art Newspaper

By The Art Newspaper Podcasts

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From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is brought to you in association with Christie's.
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Episode Date
Can the art market weather the coronavirus storm?
1:02:40
We discuss the present and future of the art market, first with Rachel Pownall, a Professor of Finance at Maastricht University School of Business and Economics, in the Netherlands, who specialises in the art market, and then with our market editors, Anna Brady and Margaret Carrigan. And in the latest in our series of lonely works, focusing on artworks behind the doors of museums that have closed due to the coronavirus, we talk to the artist Sean Scully about Matisse's 1915-16 painting The Moroccans, in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
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Apr 03, 2020
Saving the art world’s self-employed
56:50

This week, we explore the devastating effects of the coronavirus (Covid-19) on art communities, and particularly the wealth of self-employed workers in the art world. We hear about the support packages for people working in the visual arts in Germany, we discuss the precarious position of artists in the UK and we hear about a petition highlighting the fact that galleries in New York and their teams of workers may not benefit from the relief initiatives for small businesses recently announced by the New York mayor Bill de Blasio. Plus, we have the latest in our new series in which focus on works behind the doors of museums that have closed due to the coronavirus, this week with Zoe Whitley, the new director of the Chisenhale Gallery in London. Whitley discusses a springtime gem from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Alma Thomas's Wind and Crepe Myrtle Concerto (1973).



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Mar 27, 2020
Coronavirus: dispatches from Italy and China
44:54

We speak to our journalists in the two epicentres of the Covid-19 pandemic thus far: Anna Somers Cocks in Italy and Lisa Movius in China. We hear about their experiences of lockdown, the response of museums and galleries and the effect on the art community, as the two countries enter contrasting moments in the coronavirus crisis.


And we begin a new feature, turning the spotlight on works of art normally enjoyed by millions of visitors in museums across the world that are suddenly hanging unseen in empty galleries closed because of the coronavirus pandemic. In the first of the series, we asked the art historian and broadcaster Bendor Grosvenor to choose his "lonely work": Anthony van Dyck’s masterpiece Martin Ryckaert (about 1631), in the Prado Museum in Madrid, which closed indefinitely last week.


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Mar 20, 2020
Titian’s poesie: an in-depth tour of “the most beautiful pictures in the world"
1:03:49
As the National Gallery opens its show dedicated to Titian's great mythological paintings made for Philip II of Spain, we talk to the gallery's director, Gabriele Finaldi, about making a once impossible curatorial dream a reality, and we take an in-depth tour of the seven paintings in the exhibition with its curator, Matthias Wivel. As museums around the world close, Finaldi also discusses the latest advice from the UK government on COVID-19: business as usual. Plus, the latest art-world news.
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Mar 13, 2020
Remembering Ulay
51:17
We pay tribute to the performance art trailblazer Ulay, who died on 2 March—and discuss his years of collaboration with Marina Abramović— with Catherine Wood, Tate Modern’s senior curator of performance art. And we talk to Marc Spiegler, Art Basel’s global director, about the decision to cancel the Hong Kong fair due to the coronavirus outbreak, and the implications of the cancellation. Plus, this week’s top art world stories.
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Mar 06, 2020
Surrealism: what was Britain's role?
47:38
Plus, Independent Art Fair's director on the New York's changing gallery landscape
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Feb 28, 2020
Who owns the Parthenon Marbles?
1:02:26
Is the dispute between Greece and the British Museum about the Parthenon Marbles about to escalate? A leaked draft of the EU mandate for talks with the UK about the post-Brexit relationship suggests it might. We look at the history of the marbles and what this new development means. Plus, we talk to Shirin Neshat as she unveils her new work at Goodman Gallery in London, and update you on the top art stories of the week.
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Feb 21, 2020
Does Los Angeles want a big art fair?
47:45
As Frieze Los Angeles opens, we look at the LA art scene, its artist-run galleries and grassroots spaces and ask: does the city need the art-market juggernaut? We also pay tribute to the late LA-based artist John Baldessari. We look at Frieze Projects and its unique Hollywood film-set location. And we explore the latest show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Sahel: Art and Empires on the Shores of the Sahara.
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Feb 14, 2020
Tschabalala Self and radical figurative painting
45:51
We visit the Whitechapel Gallery in London to explore their show Radical Figures: Painting in the New Millennium, with the curator Lydia Yee, and talk to one of the ten artists, Tschabalala Self. And we look at the Foundling Museum’s exhibition Portraying Pregnancy: From Holbein to Social Media with the curator Karen Hearn.
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Feb 07, 2020
A fake Gauguin at the Getty
48:37
We look at the story behind the front-page article in our February issue: the discovery that a multi-million dollar Gauguin sculpture purchased by the Getty Museum in Los Angeles is actually not by the artist at all. Plus, we talk to the Canadian First Nations artist Kent Monkman about his monumental paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; and we look at an exhibition about art and food at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, UK.
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Jan 31, 2020
2020: art market issues and big shows
1:04:05
We look at the year ahead for galleries, art fairs and auctions, and seek out the big shows in the UK, Europe and the US.
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Jan 24, 2020
2019: the Year in Review
1:15:10
2019: the Year in Review by The Art Newspaper Podcasts
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Dec 20, 2019
Bananaman: who is Maurizio Cattelan? Plus, art and comedy
52:54
We take an in-depth look at Maurizio Cattelan, the creator of the banana-and-duct-tape work which caused a sensation at Art Basel in Miami Beach last week, with the critic and broadcaster Ben Lewis. And we talk to three UK comedians—Rob Auton, Jenny Eclair and Annie McGrath—about their contributions to the exhibition Art is the Best Medicine at Fiumano Clase in London, featuring works by a wealth of the UK's top comedy talent. The works are on sale and will raise money for the charity Mental Health UK.
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Dec 13, 2019
Turner Prize shocker: what next? Plus, Teresita Fernández in Miami
51:30
The art world has been up in arms this week as Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Helen Cammock, Oscar Murillo and Tai Shani were all announced as the winner of the Turner Prize. We talk to Louisa Buck about the decision and how it might change the award in the future. Plus, we talk to the Miami-born artist Teresita Fernández about her homecoming show at Pérez Art Museum Miami.
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Dec 06, 2019
Troy: the show and the problem with BP sponsorship
52:56
We talk to Lesley Fitton, the co-curator of the British Museum's blockbuster show on the myth and reality of Troy. And we talk to Jess Worth of Culture Unstained about ongoing protests relating to fossil-fuel companies' sponsorship of arts organisations.
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Nov 29, 2019
Dora Maar and Jann Haworth: acclaim at last
54:24
As a huge exhibition of Dora Maar's work opens at Tate Modern, we take a tour of the show with the curator, Emma Lewis. Finally, Maar is escaping the shadow of her lover between 1936 and 1945, Pablo Picasso. We also talk to Jann Haworth, the US-born artist who was a key figure in the 1960s pop art scene in Swinging London and was, with Peter Blake and Michael Cooper, the creator of the cover for The Beatles' Sgt Pepper album—though she is often ignored when that seminal image is discussed. Haworth has a retrospective show at the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester, UK.
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Nov 22, 2019
Anselm Kiefer interview. Plus, New York auction "gigaweek"
37:54
As he opens a new show at London's White Cube gallery, we talk to the German artist about the themes of the exhibition in the context of his art over several decades. And we explore the results of the New York auctions with Scott Reyburn of the New York Times: why is the market treading water?
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Nov 15, 2019
Tutankhamun in London: Tutmania returns. Plus, Duchamp in the US
1:00:24
This week, we review Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh, which has just opened at the Saatchi Gallery in London. The show includes 150 objects from Tutankhamun’s tomb, 100 more than the British Museum’s show in 1972, which attracted almost 1.7m visitors. Sixty of the objects in the new show have never left Egypt before. We also look at Marcel Duchamp: the Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection, a new show at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC, and at the homecoming of perhaps the greatest collection of Duchamp's work, which is at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, following a three-venue tour of museums in Asia and the South Pacific.
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Nov 08, 2019
Fireworks! Picturing pyrotechnics with professor Simon Werrett
30:40
To mark Bonfire Night in the UK, this bonus episode of The Art Newspaper takes a look at the history of pyrotechnics in art and wider visual culture. We talk to Simon Werrett, the author of the book Fireworks: Pyrotechnic Arts and Sciences in European History, and he talks about the variety of uses of fireworks over the centuries and the differing ways that artists have depicted them. You can see some of the art discussed in the podcast by visiting theartnewspaper.com/podcast.
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Nov 05, 2019
Dread Scott’s slave revolt reenactment. Plus, Pre-Raphaelite Sisters
48:51
We talk to the artist Dread Scott about his extraordinarily ambitious two-day performance in Louisiana where he and 500 Louisianans in 19th-century dress will reenact a slave rebellion from 1811. And we visit an exhibition of the women connected to the Pre-Raphaelites at the National Portrait Gallery, London.
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Nov 01, 2019
Leonardo at the Louvre: the spectacular show and the Salvator Mundi no-show
44:22
As the exhibition of the year opens at the Louvre, we talk to Ben Lewis about the latest developments in the Salvator Mundi saga. Vincent Delieuvin, the co-curator, tells us about the 13 years he has been working on the show and explains its key themes and ideas. And we explore the Mona Lisa in virtual reality with Dominique de Font-Réaulx, Director of the Interpretation and Cultural Programming Department at the Louvre.
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Oct 25, 2019
MoMA special: the verdict on the museum opening of the year
56:46
After a $450m expansion overseen by the architects Diller, Scofidio and Renfro, the Museum of Modern Art in New York reopens its doors on 21 October with 47,000 sq ft of additional gallery space and a more expansive story to tell about the history of modern art. Nancy Kenney, our senior editor in New York met this week with Sarah Suzuki, the drawings and prints curator who’s in charge of the reopening, and Rajendra Roy, the museum’s chief curator of film, to talk about these major changes in the museum. Then, three editors from The Art Newspaper's New York office—Helen Stoilas, Margaret Carrigan and Nancy Kenney—and our Insider correspondent, Linda Yablonsky, sat down to compare notes.MoMA reopens on 21 October. And you can read a wealth of reporting on the building and the displays on our website theartnewpsaper.com, on our app for iOS which you can find in the App Store, and in the November print edition of The Art Newspaper, which is out at the end of the month.
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Oct 18, 2019
Agnes Denes: environmental art pioneer. Plus, Rembrandt-Velázquez and De Hooch
48:34
We talk to Agnes Denes, best known for her extraordinary Wheatfield, a two-acre field of wheat that she planted, tended and harvested in 1982 on landfill in Lower Manhattan, as the Shed opens a retrospective of her work. And we visit two new shows in the Netherlands: Rembrandt-Velázquez at the Rijksmuseum and Pieter De Hooch in Delft at the Museum Prinsenhof.
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Oct 11, 2019
Frieze week: Ai Weiwei, Mark Bradford, Peter Doig, Melanie Gerlis, Hettie Judah
1:33:59
In this bumper edition of the podcast we interview three of the world's leading artists, all of whom have shows timed to coincide with the Frieze art fairs: Ai Weiwei at Lisson Gallery, Mark Bradford at Hauser & Wirth and Peter Doig at Michael Werner Gallery. We also get all the latest news of sales and trends at the Frieze fairs from Melanie Gerlis, as another Brexit deadline approaches. And Hettie Judah tells us about her new book, Art London, billed as "a guide to places, artists and events" across the city.
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Oct 04, 2019
Special: is art education in crisis? Featuring Bob and Roberta Smith
1:07:43
As art schools start their new term in the UK, this week’s episode is an education special. We talk to the artist Patrick Brill, or Bob and Roberta Smith, about his campaign for art’s place at the centre of the curriculum, often expressed directly in his art. We look at the National Art and Design Saturday Club, an initiative offering a free Saturday learning programme, founded by the designers Frances and John Sorrell. We talk to two professors at Goldsmiths College about the pressures and realities of art schools today. In the US, we talk to the co-author of a study on the benefits of art education in schools.
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Sep 27, 2019
Museum ethics. Plus, the Chicago Architecture Biennial
59:27
We discuss the dilemmas facing museums as the focus intensifies on ethical sponsorship and governance in the UK and US. And we hear about the latest edition of the Chicago Architecture Biennial, which addresses, among other things, the erasure of the history of indigenous settlements in Chicago and its region.
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Sep 20, 2019
Tate's William Blake blockbuster. Plus, Pace and the New York gallery boom
51:46
We take an in-depth tour of the huge new William Blake exhibition at Tate Britain and explore the life and art of this brilliant yet complex visionary. And in New York, we talk to Marc Glimcher about Pace's eight-floor gallery in Chelsea and what this and the glut of other expanding galleries tell us about the market in New York.
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Sep 13, 2019
Tim Spall plays Lowry, artists in movies, Chris Ofili and Jasmine Thomas-Girvan
1:01:11
New season! In this first episode, we talk to Timothy Spall about the new film Mrs Lowry and Son and to Jacqueline Riding who worked closely with Spall as an art consultant on Mike Leigh's Mr Turner. Plus, Chris Ofili and Jasmine Thomas-Girvan give an exclusive interview about their show at David Zwirner in London and their lives and work in Trinidad.
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Sep 06, 2019
Top of the Pods: David Hockney and other modern British mavericks
43:58
In the last of our summer series of podcasts looking back over 200 interviews, we talk to David Hockney about a record-breaking auction sale, printmaking and Van Gogh. Plus, Martin Gayford sets Hockney in the London scene, along with Lucian Freud, Francis Bacon and others.
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Aug 30, 2019
Top of the Pods: The best of the Venice Biennale
47:34
In the latest podcast featuring highlights from our first 200 interviews on The Art Newspaper podcast, we feature three conversations about May You Live in Interesting Times, the main event at this year's Venice Biennale, curated by Ralph Rugoff. Jane Morris and Ben Luke review the exhibition, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster discusses her virtual reality work for the show, and Rugoff describes the thinking behind the show, its major themes, and the playful nature of much of the work.
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Aug 23, 2019
Top of the Pods: Leonardo—the Salvator Mundi saga
37:46
We look back at three interviews about the most expensive painting ever sold at auction. In a short clip from a November 2017 chat, Judd Tully tells us about the atmosphere at Christie's as the Salvator Mundi sold. The Leonardo scholar Martin Kemp explains his view that the painting is a true Leonardo, in an interview from March 2018. And in a wide-ranging conversation from April 2019, Ben Lewis explores the painting's history and the continuing debates about its provenance, attribution and present whereabouts.
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Aug 16, 2019
Top of the Pods: video art in the spotlight
41:16
In this latest episode looking back at the 200 interviews we've done over the past two years, we bring together discussions with three masters of video art: Ragnar Kjartansson, John Akomfrah and Chris Marclay.
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Aug 09, 2019
Top of the Pods: Artemisia Gentileschi and the forgotten female Old Masters
46:53
In our latest look back at the 200 interviews we've done over the past two years, we focus on Artemisia Gentileschi with Letizia Treves from the National Gallery in London and Lavinia Fontana and Sofonisba Anguissola, among others, with Jordana Pomeroy, the director of the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at Florida International University in Miami. We also discuss women composers of the Baroque period, who like those painters were written out of history, with the contemporary artist Helen Cammock—her current Whitechapel Gallery exhibition is in part a response to those composers.
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Aug 02, 2019
In Memoriam: Karsten Schubert in conversation with Michael Landy
29:29
In this special podcast, we publish an archive interview with the London-based dealer and publisher Karsten Schubert, who died this week after a long illness. The artist Michael Landy spoke to Karsten in September 2018 about his life as a collector.
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Aug 01, 2019
Top of the Pods: climate crisis with Olafur Eliasson, Justin Brice Guariglia and Anna Somers Cocks
47:57
As many parts of the world record their highest ever temperatures, and the art world begins to take more urgent action on the climate emergency, we look back on three interviews, from 2018 and earlier this year, focusing on climate change and the anthropocene. Olafur Eliasson, whose retrospective at Tate Modern has just opened, talks about his project Ice Watch and his climate activism, and another artist, Justin Brice Guariglia, argues that responding to the climate crisis is the moral imperative of our age. Finally, Anna Somers Cocks, the founder of The Art Newspaper, discusses the grave threat posed by rising sea levels to heritage in Europe and particularly around the Mediterranean.
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Jul 26, 2019
Top of the Pods: the world of Warhol as told by Jeremy Deller and Donna De Salvo
58:13
In the second episode of our summer season of curated podcasts, it's all about Andy. With the major retrospective of the Pop artist on at the San Francisco Museum of Modern art, we bring together two interviews: one with the British artist Jeremy Deller on meeting Warhol, his life-changing trip to the Factory, and Warhol’s legacy, and the second with the curator Donna De Salvo, who takes us through all the key Warhol landmarks.
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Jul 19, 2019
Top of the Pods: experts on Van Gogh in the asylum and his early life
49:51
While we're on our summer break, we're looking back over the 200 interviews we've done for the podcast and putting together highlights in a weekly themed episode. First up are two conversations about Van Gogh, from September 2018 and earlier this year, with Martin Bailey of The Art Newspaper and Martin Gayford, critic and writer of books on Michelangelo, Freud and Hockney, among others.
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Jul 12, 2019
Ibrahim Mahama's ghosts of Ghana. Plus, China's epic Picasso show
49:48
We speak to the leading Ghanaian artist as he unveils a major new commission about the forgotten history of his homeland, on show at the Whitworth as part of the Manchester International Festival. Plus, we find out about the Picasso blockbuster at the UCCA Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing.
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Jul 05, 2019
Vermeer's hidden cupid, the Prado's Dutch-Spanish show, plus Helen Cammock
58:15
We hear about how a painting of Cupid in one of Vermeer's greatest masterpieces, in Dresden, was long thought to have overpainted by the master himself, but was in fact covered by a later artist. It's now in the process of being revealed, as Vermeer intended. We also learn about the Prado's show where Vermeer appears alongside Velázquez and Rembrandt, among many others. And we talk to Helen Cammock about her Whitechapel show and her nomination for this year's Turner Prize.
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Jun 28, 2019
David Smith in Yorkshire. Plus, the works that inspired leading artists
38:26
The great American sculptor's work comes to Yorkshire Sculpture Park as part of the Yorkshire Sculpture International festival, and we talk to Clare Lilley, the park's director, and to Smith's daughters Rebecca and Candida. And Jori Finkel tells us about her new book, in which she has interviewed 50 artists about works of art in their home-town museums that inspired them.
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Jun 21, 2019
Art Basel and William Kentridge
56:13
As his show opens at the Kunstmuseum Basel to coincide with the Art Basel fair, we talk to the South African artist about his latest works, his complex methods and his extraordinary family history. We also look at the 50th edition of the fair with Melanie Gerlis, an editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper.
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Jun 13, 2019
Painting, identity and injustice: Howardena Pindell and Oscar Murillo
54:12
We talk to two artists of different generations as they open new London shows. Howardena Pindell discusses the use of the circle in her abstract paintings, its origins in segregation in the US and the resistance to her art that she encountered among her peers. And Oscar Murillo reflects on his journey from rural Colombia to the UK, its effect on his multifarious art and why it's only now that he's doing a pure painting show for the first time.
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Jun 07, 2019
The rise of the mega-dealers, plus artists take over the Guggenheim
59:47
We talk to Michael Shnayerson about his book Boom, following the big art dealers from the 1940s to now. Plus, we speak to Nancy Spector, the organiser of Guggenheim in New York’s Artistic Licence: Six Takes on the Guggenheim Collection, and Paul Chan, one of the six artist-curators invited to mine the museum’s collection.
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May 31, 2019
Manga and Camp: the art of going over the top
47:20
We talk to Nicole Coolidge Rousmaniere of the British Museum about Manga, the museum's huge new show exploring the Japanese cultural phenomenon. And we explore the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Camp: Notes on Fashion with Valerie Steele, the director of the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology.
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May 24, 2019
Should museums sell works of art? Plus, activism at the Whitney Biennial
56:31
As a Mark Rothko painting is sold by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, we talk to Christopher Bedford from the Baltimore Museum of Art about deaccessioning works by white male artists in order to diversify museum collections. And we speak to Marz Saffore, an organiser for Decolonize This Place, and Adam Weinberg, the director of the Whitney Museum of American Art, about the protests that have greeted this year’s Whitney Biennial. They relate to Safariland, a company owned by the museum’s vice-chairman Warren Kanders, which manufactures tear gas canisters and other military products that have been used against asylum seekers along the US-Mexico border.
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May 17, 2019
Venice Biennale special: our review plus, how much longer will the city survive?
1:06:24
Ben Luke and Jane Morris review the main exhibition and we speak to the artists Laure Prouvost and Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster about their works in the show. Plus, we talk about climate change and the challenges Venice is facing as the surrounding waters rise.
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May 10, 2019
Ralph Rugoff on his Venice Biennale concept. Plus, Bernar Venet and Berlin Gallery Weekend
47:55
The artistic director of this year's main show at the Biennale tells us how he is creating two playful but serious shows in one, each featuring the same 79 artists. We then talk to Venet, the veteran French artist, about his work and his own collection, and ask the director of the Berlin Gallery Weekend if criticism of its gender imbalance is fair.
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May 03, 2019
How did Salvator Mundi go from $1000 to $450m? Plus, the tragic story of Van Gogh’s only love
50:59
We talk to Ben Lewis about his book The Last Leonardo, the story of the world’s most expensive painting. And Martin Bailey tells us about his latest book Living with Vincent Van Gogh, exploring the Dutch master’s search for a home.
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Apr 26, 2019
The Notre Dame fire and Cold War Steve
50:23
We talk to Jonathan Foyle about the effects of the fire at Notre Dame, the building’s history, including moments of neglect, and what happens next. And as a book of his photomontages is published, we speak to Christopher Spencer, the man behind the Cold War Steve about his extraordinary journey from a cult Twitter collagist to Britain’s favourite satirical artist.
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Apr 18, 2019
Edvard Munch and The Shed
50:00
We talk to Giulia Bartram at the British Museum about her exhibition of Munch’s prints, Love and Angst. And we look at the new shapeshifting cultural centre in New York, The Shed.
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Apr 12, 2019
Sackler sponsorship: take it or leave it? Plus, museum attendance
44:33
We examine the growing unease amongst British museums to accept money from Sackler family members involved in the sale of the opioid painkiller OxyContin, and look at 2018's most visited shows and museums with Met director Max Hollein
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Apr 05, 2019
Art Basel Hong Kong, Richard Lin and the Met’s World Between Empires
57:25
We talk to Marc Spiegler, global director of Art Basel, about the latest fair in Hong Kong, the Asian market and supporting smaller galleries. We look at Bonhams’s show in Hong Kong of Richard Lin’s work – Lin achieved great fame in the West in the 1960s, but later was largely forgotten, especially in the West; only now is he being rediscovered. Finally, we talk to the curators of The World Between Empires at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, focusing on the period between the first century B.C.E and the third century A.D., when the Middle East was the meeting point between two powerful empires, the Parthian and the Roman. We also discuss the troubled recent history of the region and its heritage.
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Mar 29, 2019
David Bailey in focus, plus John Richardson remembered
43:04
We meet David Bailey at his London studio to discuss his new book: the latest SUMO from Taschen. And we remember the Picasso biographer John Richardson, who died aged 95 last week, with Gijs van Hensbergen, who worked with Richardson on the as-yet-unpublished fourth volume of his magisterial A Life of Picasso.
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Mar 22, 2019
Wham! The George Michael auction and the YBA market. Plus, Shezad Dawood
43:06
As George Michael's collection of contemporary art, dominated by Young British Artists, goes under the hammer in London, we speak to Paola Saracino Fendi from Christie's about the collection and then report on the sale immediately after the final fall of the gavel. What does it tell us about the YBA market and the pull of celebrity auctions?Plus, we speak to the artist Shezad Dawood about Encroachments, his new installation for the Sharjah Biennial, featuring a virtual reality work.
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Mar 15, 2019
Carolee Schneemann, the Armory Show and Venice Biennale curators
56:22
We pay tribute to the pioneering painter, performance artist and film-maker, ask what on earth is going on with the New York fairs this week, and discuss what it’s like to curate a Venice Biennale national presentation with the curators of the British pavilion, Scotland + Venice and Wales in Venice.
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Mar 08, 2019
Ruskin and Gombrich: revisiting two art historical heavyweights
53:06
Amid a wealth of events celebrating the bicentenary of John Ruskin’s birth we reconsider the breadth of this Victorian polymath’s achievements, and we talk to two experts in E.H. Gombrich, writer of The Story of Art and Art and Illusion.
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Mar 01, 2019
Rembrandt special: the complete artist
54:51
As numerous exhibitions open marking the 350th anniversary of the Old Master's death, we speak to Taco Dibbits, the director of the Rijksmuseum about the museum's blockbuster shows and its imminent public restoration of The Night Watch. We also look closely at a masterpiece in the Dulwich Picture Gallery and at his prints and drawings in the British Museum.
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Mar 01, 2019
Bonus podcast: Dorothea Tanning at Tate Modern
19:52
As the female Surrealist’s exhibition arrives in London following its stint in Madrid, this is the full, unedited discussion from last year with Alyce Mahon, the show’s curator. Contains previously unreleased material.
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Feb 26, 2019
Antony Gormley at the Uffizi, plus portrait miniatures
1:06:28
We talk to the British artist as he shows his sculptures with ancient works in the Florentine museum, and we zoom in on the tiny art works made in Elizabethan and Jacobean times that are the subject of a major show at the National Portrait Gallery in London.
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Feb 22, 2019
Can artists live off art alone? Plus, Los Angeles
1:00:56
Two-thirds of artists in the UK earn less than £5,000 per year from their art, according to a new survey. We speak to the art advisor James Doeser who worked on the study and the artist Tai Shani about the bleak reality of working as an artist in Britain today. Then, as the inaugural Frieze Los Angeles gets underway, our correspondent Jori Finkel discusses whether Frieze will succeed where other fairs have failed. This year's Desert X exhibition in Palm Springs is also reviewed.
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Feb 15, 2019
Tracey Emin on mourning and #MeToo; George Shaw on realism and Rembrandt
1:00:04
We talk to Tracey Emin as A Fortnight of Tears, her exhibition at White Cube, opens. And we visit Bath to talk to George Shaw, whose show A Corner of a Foreign Field has arrived at the Holborne Museum after its stint at the Yale Center for British Art in the US.
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Feb 08, 2019
Mapplethorpe at the Guggenheim, Bill Viola at the Royal Academy
49:23
We talk to the people behind major exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic: Ben Luke meets Kira Perov, Bill Viola's wife and collaborator, at the Bill Viola / Michelangelo show at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, while Nancy Kenney talks to the curator of the new Robert Mapplethorpe show at the Guggenheim.
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Jan 25, 2019
Female old masters — prominence at last. Plus, Condo
57:19
We speak to curators Letizia Treves and Jordana Pomeroy about the growing trend to bring historical female artists to the fore. Plus, Kate MacGarry tells us about participating in the collaborative gallery exhibition programme Condo London.
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Jan 18, 2019
2019: Market predictions and the best events
1:23:21
A bumper podcast featuring two roundtable discussions. First, art market specialist Georgina Adam ponders the current situation in the market and considers its future with Victoria Siddall, the director of the Frieze fairs, Francis Outred, the former head of postwar and contemporary art at Christie’s, and the art dealer Thaddaeus Ropac. Then, our correspondents Louisa Buck and Jane Morris join our host Ben Luke to look ahead at the museum openings, biennials, anniversaries and exhibitions coming up this year.
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Jan 11, 2019
The Year in Review
1:15:14
Our London and New York teams ponder 2018's biggest art stories
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Dec 21, 2018
Should looted African art be returned?
1:02:51
In the wake of the Savoy-Sarr report commissioned by French President Emmanuel Macron, we discuss the pros and cons of returning colonial artefacts to Africa with the campaigner Vicky Ngari-Wilson and Nicholas Thomas, Director, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Cambridge. Curator of African art at the Cleveland Museum of Art Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi tells us about his innovative solutions.
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Dec 14, 2018
Olafur Eliasson on climate change and the threat to heritage. Plus, Art Basel in Miami Beach
55:09
We talk to the Danish-Icelandic artist about the urgent threat to the environment as his work Ice Watch, featuring chunks of glacier, go on show outside Tate Modern and Bloomberg’s HQ in London. We also discuss the potentially catastrophic effects of sea level rise to Mediterranean and European heritage with Anna Somers Cocks. And we talk to David Castillo, the Miami gallerist, as Art Basel makes its annual return to Florida.
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Dec 07, 2018
Edmund de Waal exclusive interview, plus Roma persecution
45:19
We speak to Edmund de Waal, the ceramic artist and author of the Hare with Amber Eyes, about the incredible journey of his netsuke collection and the current state of nazi-loot restitution. Plus, on occasion of his show in London, artist Krzysztof Gil describes the tragic history of “Roma hunting” and the continued plight of the community today.
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Nov 30, 2018
The Beatles' White Album: the band, the artist, the dealer. Plus, art in Dubai
1:00:52
We talk to Andrew Wilson at the Tate and Harriet Vyner, Robert Fraser's biographer about one of the greatest albums, and album covers, of all time. And we visit the new Jameel Arts Centre in Dubai.
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Nov 23, 2018
David Hockney: exclusive interview with the world's most expensive living artist
44:51
We talk to Hockney about Van Gogh, printmaking and the Bayeaux Tapestry but also about Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures), which broke auction record this week. We also look at the personal heartbreak behind the painting with Lawrence Weschler and analyse the trends of the New York auctions so far with Melanie Gerlis.
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Nov 16, 2018
Warhol (part two): Jeremy Deller and Shadows
43:29
In the second part of our Andy Warhol special, we talk to the British artist about meeting Warhol, his life-changing trip to the Factory and Warhol’s legacy. We also discuss Dia’s vast installation of the Shadow paintings (1978-79): are they "disco decor” as Warhol remarked, or one of the central bodies of work in his career, unifying many key themes and strands?
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Nov 13, 2018
Warhol (part one): the Whitney retrospective, in depth
53:58
An in-depth interview with Donna De Salvo, organiser of the vast Andy Warhol show at the Whitney Museum of American Art. De Salvo takes us through all the key Warhol landmarks, from his early life as a commercial artist through his 1960s Pop art breakthrough and his films and celebrity portraits, to his late appropriations of Leonardo’s Last Supper and the catholicism that underpinned his interest in that work. We also hear about his relationship with a certain Donald Trump.
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Nov 09, 2018
Don’t call me a woman artist: overlooked Surrealists. Plus, Klimt/Schiele
45:49
We talk to Alyce Mahon, the curator of the Dorothea Tanning exhibition now in Madrid, and curatorial adviser for the Leonor Fini show in New York about the art and life of the two surrealist artists. Meanwhile, in New York, we discuss how Klimt and Schiele compare, with curator and art dealer Jane Kallir, as a spate of shows open in Europe and the US.
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Nov 02, 2018
Bruce Nauman’s New York takeover. Plus, the British Museum’s new Islamic art galleries
36:09
We discuss the vast Bruce Nauman retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 New York and chart the British Museum's Islamic collection's journey from dusty back rooms to grand light-filled spaces.
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Oct 26, 2018
The Gainsborough murders. Plus, RoseLee Goldberg on performance
43:03
We talk to the researchers who uncovered the grisly murders in the family of the young Thomas Gainsborough. Plus, RoseLee Goldberg tells us all about her new book on performance art.
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Oct 19, 2018
Banksy self destructs at Sotheby’s, plus Bauhaus pioneer Anni Albers
1:08:32
We go behind the scenes of one of the most publicised stunts in auction history with our correspondent Anny Shaw, who was there that evening. Then we get a tour of Tate Modern's Anni Albers retrospective with its curator Briony Fer, speak to her biographer Charles Darwent and the head of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Nicholas Fox Weber.
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Oct 12, 2018
Frieze special: the fair and the top shows, with Doris Salcedo and Ragnar Kjartansson
1:03:48
We talk to the art market specialist Melanie Gerlis about Frieze London and Frieze Masters, to Doris Salcedo about her White Cube show, to the artist Ragnar Kjartansson and the curator Massimiliano Gioni about Strange Days, the New Museum’s video-art pop-up in London, and to the artist Ipek Duben about Social Work, Frieze London’s radical new section.
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Oct 05, 2018
Special: the rise and rise of contemporary African art
1:03:09
On the eve of the 1-54 fair for contemporary African art, we talk to an artist, a curator, an art fair founder, a gallerist and an auctioneer about the long overdue recognition of the diverse art of a continent. Produced in association with Bonhams, auctioneers since 1793.
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Sep 28, 2018
Courtauld’s Impressionists. Plus, Armenian treasures at the Met
43:59
How Samuel Courtauld’s collection ignited Britain’s passion for Impressionists. Plus, New York’s Metropolitan Museum looks at Armenia, the first country to convert to Christianity. Produced in association with Bonhams, auctioneers since 1793.
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Sep 21, 2018
Van Gogh in the asylum. Plus, Christian Marclay on The Clock
47:56
We speak to our long-standing correspondent and expert on Van Gogh Martin Bailey on his new book, which tells the story of the artist’s life at the asylum at Saint-Paul-de-Mausole in Provence, southern France. He is joined by the art historian Martin Gayford, author of the Yellow House, a book on Van Gogh’s time in Arles. Later, Christian Marclay tells us about his ground-breaking work The Clock returns to London where it was created eight years ago. Produced in association with Bonhams, auctioneers since 1793.
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Sep 14, 2018
Episode 39: All about biennials
39:23
We talk to Sally Tallant, the artistic director of the Liverpool Biennial, about the 10th edition, which opens next week. And Jane Morris, an editor-at-large of The Art Newspaper, joins Ben Luke to discuss whether we’ve reached “peak biennial”.
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Jul 06, 2018
Episode 38: Marina Abramovic and Michael Jackson
31:13
We speak to the queen of performance art about casting herself in stone and to the National Portrait Gallery’s director Nicholas Cullinan about the king of pop’s influence on artists.
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Jun 29, 2018
Episode 37: Art and football plus John Akomfrah interview
37:51
With the World Cup in full swing, we look at a London show exploring football as a cultural phenomenon with its co-curator Eddy Frankel, and talk to the British film-maker John Akomfrah about his exhibition at the New Museum, New York.
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Jun 22, 2018
Episode 36: Berlin Biennale and Art Basel
34:43
We explore the two big European art world events of the past week: Arsalan Mohammad is in Berlin with the curator Serubiri Moses and the critic and curator Annika von Taube, and Ben Luke speaks to Melanie Gerlis, writer for the Financial Times and The Art Newspaper, on the line from Basel.
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Jun 15, 2018
Episode 35: Freud, Bacon, Hockney and the post-war London scene; and Signals gallery
41:32
We talk to Martin Gayford about his book Modernists and Mavericks and sitting for portraits by Freud and Hockney. And we explore Kurimanzutto and Thomas Dane Gallery’s collaboration on a show celebrating the Signals gallery, where Latin American and European avant-gardes converged.
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Jun 08, 2018
Episode 34: Venice Biennale for architecture, and the Brutalist social housing debate
36:20
Edwin Heathcote of the Financial Times reviews the Biennale, and Christopher Turner on his controversial exhibition focusing on Alison and Peter Smithson’s Robin Hood Gardens housing estate.
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Jun 01, 2018
Episode 33: Absent friends: Howard Hodgkin's final paintings; Robert Indiana remembered
33:19
We talk to Antony Peattie, the music writer and partner of the late Howard Hodgkin and to Barbara Haskell, curator of Robert Indiana's 2013 retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
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May 25, 2018
Episode 32: The Royal Academy’s new project unveiled: David Chipperfield interview
44:55
The Academy’s £56m project opens, with subtle additions and revamps by the British architect. Chipperfield talks about the subtleties of architecture, the RA’s chief executive Charles Saumarez Smith discusses funding and the quirks of the institution and we review the buildings and its displays with Jane Morris.
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May 18, 2018
Episode 31: The $646m Rockefeller sale. Plus: should big galleries subsidise smaller ones?
45:56
We drill down into the big numbers from the Post-Impressionist and Modern sale in New York, talk to Professor Rachel Pownall about the wider market and look at a small gallery housed in Piccadilly Circus Tube station.
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May 11, 2018
Episode 30: All about Berlin
42:25
Our guest host Arsalan Mohammad takes us behind the scenes of Gallery Weekend Berlin and beyond, speaking to dealers and artists about the changing face and enduring appeal of one of the world's most creative cities.
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May 04, 2018
Episode 29: Taryn Simon interview, and restoring a Renaissance masterpiece at the Met
51:26
We talk to the American artist about her acclaimed work staged in New York and now London, An Occupation of Loss. We hear from a curator and conservator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art about resurrecting Moretto da Brescia’s final great painting. And Louisa Buck and Ben Luke appraise the Turner Prize shortlist.
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Apr 27, 2018
Episode 28: The battle over Ethiopia’s treasures
34:14
We speak to Hailemichael Aberra Afework, Ethiopia’s ambassador to the UK, about the treasures looted by the British army at Maqdala, go behind the scenes of the Sony Photography Award with judge Gareth Harris and speak to Richard Parry about his plans for Glasgow International.
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Apr 20, 2018
Episode 27: The enduring appeal of enigmatic Beuys. Plus, lost masterpieces reborn
50:21
We hear from Adam Lowe of Factum Arte about a new TV series in which seven lost paintings are recreated using digital means, and speak to Norman Rosenthal and Thaddaeus Ropac about the enigmatic German artist Joseph Beuys
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Apr 13, 2018
Episode 26: Christo interview, plus museum visitor figures
46:42
We speak to the Bulgarian-born artist about his grand project for the Serpentine, and look at our annual survey of visitor figures
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Apr 06, 2018
Episode 25: Living with Leonardo da Vinci
41:03
Leonardo specialist Martin Kemp on decades spent in the company of the Renaissance master, plus the 300th edition of The Art Newspaper
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Mar 28, 2018
Episode 24: Mural-gazing with the Dalai Lama, plus Michael Rakowitz
43:50
We speak to Thomas Laird about his new sumo-sized book on Tibetan murals, and to the artist creating the new work for the Fourth Plinth commission in London's Trafalgar Square.
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Mar 23, 2018
Episode 23: The death of Venice?
35:27
Salvatore Settis talks about his new book, plus Tacita Dean on her three London shows
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Mar 16, 2018
Episode 22: The genius of Picasso
37:06
We take a tour of Tate Modern's blockbuster and explore the strength of Picasso's market
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Mar 09, 2018
Episode 21: Photography special: from Victorian pioneers to 2018 prize contenders
42:11
We meet the men and women behind three fascinating but very different exhibitions of lens-based art
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Mar 02, 2018
Episode 20: Yes to Picasso, no to Van Gogh: the Rockefellers’ collection
42:05
We talk to the American dynasty’s historian about David and Peggy Rockefeller’s tastes, and explore the funding crisis at Glasgow’s Transmission Gallery
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Feb 23, 2018
Episode 19: Klimt and Schiele plus Songs for Sabotage
37:32
A look at the life and art of the two Austrian greats as shows open marking the 100th anniversary of their deaths. And the New Museum Triennial is reviewed.
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Feb 16, 2018
Episode 18: Talking politics with Cornelia Parker and the future of ivory
35:36
We meet the 2017 Election Artist. Plus, what do new ivory regulations mean for the art world?
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Feb 09, 2018
Episode 17: Real or fake? The suspicious Russian avant-garde show in Ghent
37:24
Expert on Russian art Simon Hewitt discusses developments in The Art Newspaper's current cover story, plus we explore an unusual collaboration at Hauser & Wirth Somerset
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Feb 02, 2018
Episode 16: Charles I at the Royal Academy—an exhibition fit for a king
32:02
We pick apart the latest smash hit show to open in London with art historian Bendor Grosvenor, then complete our 2018 preview with a look at the big exhibitions coming to the US this year
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Jan 26, 2018
Episode 15: What will 2018 hold for the art world?
34:23
We are at the London Art Fair speaking to Georgina Adam about her art market predictions and to Louisa Buck about the top shows and artists to keep on your radar this year
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Jan 19, 2018
Episode 14: The top stories of 2017
51:01
From Louvre Abu Dhabi to Leonardo, Documenta to Trump, we look back at the year in art with our journalists Louisa Buck, Gareth Harris and Anny Shaw
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Dec 22, 2017
Episode 13: The dark side of the art market
41:37
Former editor of the The Art Newspaper Jane Morris speaks to Georgina Adam about her new book Dark Side of the Boom and the art world's less savoury side
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Dec 15, 2017
Episode 12: Old Masters after the Leonardo and Art Basel Miami Beach
33:30
We talk Titian, Constable, Veneziano, Wright of Derby, Van Dyck and, yes, Leonardo, with art historian Bendor Grosvenor. And our deputy art market editor Anna Brady gets Judd Tully’s views on Miami’s annual art fair.
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Dec 08, 2017
Episode 11: Antiquities now and Rose Wylie
32:03
How is the antiquities trade coping with increased focus on Middle East looting and new approaches to collecting? And Rose Wylie on the pleasures and struggles of painting.
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Dec 01, 2017
Episode 10: Restoring Iraq’s heritage, plus the complex politics of First Nations art
32:10
John Darlington of the World Monuments Fund discusses projects to train local people in craft traditions and the curator Victor Wang on the work of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, whose first European solo show opens in London next week
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Nov 24, 2017
Episode 9: $450m! The Leonardo breaks all records
28:57
How the art sale of the century happened, with Judd Tully, our man in the salesroom. Plus, a new museum in Indonesia.
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Nov 17, 2017
Abu Dhabi Focus episode three: How the UAE art scene became a force to be reckoned with
25:29
Art dealer Thaddaeus Ropac and curator Maya Allison tell us how the nation’s creative ambitions have blossomed. Plus: Silver Lion-winning musician and artist Hassan Khan on his Abu Dhabi Art performance.
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Nov 10, 2017
Abu Dhabi Focus episode two: How Saudi artists are driving political change
22:09
As Abu Dhabi Art fair opens, we speak to the Saudi artists Manal Al Dowayan and Ahmed Mater about their role in recent changes to their society. Plus: Iraq's Dia Azzawi on creating the Arab world's Guernica.
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Nov 10, 2017
Abu Dhabi Focus episode one: Louvre Abu Dhabi and Abu Dhabi Art
18:35
With all eyes on Abu Dhabi this week, we speak to the architect Jean Nouvel on designing the Arab world's first universal museum. Plus: a preview of Abu Dhabi Art fair.
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Nov 08, 2017
Episode 8: How hackers are attacking the art world
31:33
Galleries are losing huge sums to cybercrime, what makes them vulnerable? Plus: the dubious restoration along the Camino di Santiago.
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Nov 03, 2017
Episode 7: The Tale of an Old Master forgery scandal
40:17
The 'masterpieces' that fooled the art world. Plus: a review of London's latest shows, from Cezanne to Soutine.
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Oct 27, 2017
Episode 6: Trouble at Unesco, plus Art and Terror
32:45
Why did the US and Israel pull out of the organisation and what will happen next? Plus: 9/11 and its impact on art is explored at London’s Imperial War Museum.
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Oct 20, 2017
Episode 5: What’s the story behind the $100m Leonardo?
30:31
As the only painting in private hands by the Renaissance master heads to auction, The Art Newspaper's founder wonders what might happen to it. Plus, we speak to the people behind the New Museum's big new show about gender, and The Art Newspaper's literary editor talks eighteenth-century princesses.
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Oct 13, 2017
Episode 4: Frieze special with Peter Blake
42:18
As the art world descends on London, we take the pulse of the city's art scene with an art market specialist, a collector and two artists, Peter Blake and Ed Fornieles.
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Oct 06, 2017
Episode 3: How the Getty is shaping southern California’s art scene
30:13
The story behind Pacific Standard Time in Los Angeles; Ming Wong on the historic queer art show in Taipei. Plus: an exclusive audio work by Zardulu the Mythmaker
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Sep 29, 2017
Episode 2: Zeitz Mocaa and London autumn preview
41:19
The lowdown on the new Thomas Heatherwick-designed museum in Cape Town, plus a look at some of the most enticing shows opening in London around the Frieze art fairs.
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Sep 22, 2017
Episode 1: Nazi Loot and Rachel Whiteread
30:16
Nazi-loot conference at London’s National Gallery and how The Art Newspaper’s journalist returned a stolen treasure to its cathedral. Plus: Rachel Whiteread on “mummifying the air” at Tate Britain.
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Sep 15, 2017
The Art Newspaper Weekly – coming soon!
1:03
Introducing The Art Newspaper Weekly – a new podcast in which the team at The Art Newspaper pick apart the art world's big stories, with the help of special guests. First episode coming soon.
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Sep 07, 2017