Projectified with PMI

By Project Management Institute

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 Sep 9, 2018

Description

Projectified with PMI is your guide to the future of project management. Created by Project Management Institute, this podcast is for people who lead strategic initiatives and collaborate on teams to deliver value to their organizations. It features dynamic thought leaders and practitioners who share their real-world experiences and expertise to inform, inspire and prepare you for success.

Episode Date
PMI Projectified Ep 24 V1.1
21:27

Your professional network is a gold mine. But how can you get more from your connections without asking too much? Guests share how joining communities, volunteering professional services and building stronger relationships have helped them advance their careers.

Nina Scarnici, PMP, associate director of project management for Publicis Seattle, in Washington, USA, offers tips to help you build authentic relationships across your professional network.

Krishna Mohan, PMP, division head for program management, quality and tools for Nexteer Automotive, in Bengaluru, India, and Rick Knaggs, PMP, director of the global IT PMO for ICU Medical in San Clemente, California, USA, discuss how they bring value to others in their professional networks.

James Brady, PMP, CIO for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services shares how his professional network helped him move up the ladder and reach his career goals.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:32] Get more from your professional network
[02:20] Building relationships with new contacts
[05:40] How to give back to your network
[07:58] Asking for an introduction
[10:30] Tapping your network for new opportunities
[15:00] Strengthening connections with coworkers
[17:32] How to ask for career advice

May 22, 2019
Job Skills—Fast-Paced Problem Solving
18:42

With business moving at breakneck speeds, there’s no time to waste on persistent problems. Guests discuss how they find quick fixes under pressure and what it takes to attack complex issues at the source.

Christine Lee, PMP, associate director of project management at S&P Global in London, outlines how she empowers her team to solve problems quickly while working within a strict regulatory framework.

Roman Baranovsky, PMP, services quality assurance lead for the Europe, Middle East and Africa region at Microsoft in Moscow, outlines how he gets to the root of problems before they push his projects off track.

Chandra Shekar, PMP, general manager of IT for Schneider Electric in Bengaluru, India, shared how organizations can rethink the way project teams work to help them address issues more efficiently.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:38] The need for speed
[02:25] Finding quick fixes in a regulated environment
[06:15] AI-supported problem solving
[07:35] Getting to the root of the problem
[09:35] The power of knowledge sharing
[12:50] Building a culture of communication and transparency
[16:48] The three E’s of problem solving

May 08, 2019
Transformation—The Future of Manufacturing
20:04

Industry 4.0 technology is pushing manufacturers to disrupt—or be disrupted. Guests discuss the trends and technologies transforming the sector. Plus, the global head of IoT Services at Siemens outlines the key skills project professionals need to navigate organizational change.

Jerid Hayward, PMP, automation and robotics project manager for Stanley Black & Decker in Hartford, Connecticut shares his thoughts on how project and program managers can keep their skills sharp as digital manufacturing evolves.

Sanjoy Paul, chief digital officer for the manufacturing business unit at Wipro in Houston, Texas, USA, discusses what it takes to make cutting-edge manufacturing projects a success.

Siddharth Verma, PMP, global head and VP of IoT Services at Siemens in San Francisco, California, USA talks how project leaders can develop the talent they need to manage digital transformation projects.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:25] Manufacturing in the digital age
[02:25] Tech breakthroughs reshaping the sector
[05:07] Connected factories of the future
[07:40] Getting more from big data and IoT
[9:43] Industry 4.0 innovations
[12:53] The manufacturing talent gap
[16:50] In-demand skills for the future

Apr 26, 2019
Career Development—Moving to a New Market Sector
21:05

Long Description
Global markets are shifting rapidly, creating new career opportunities for those willing to make big moves. Guests discuss how to prepare for the transition—and Amtrak’s EPMO head shares why project talent is well suited to make this type of leap.

Phil Pavitt, consultant executive vice president of business transformation for Safelite AutoGlass, outlines the skills project professionals need to succeed in a new sector.

Narasimha Acharya, PMP, assistant director for Ernst & Young in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, explains how his experience working across sectors helped him land his current role

Sarina Arcari, PMP, vice president in charge of the EPMO at Amtrak in Washington, D.C., discusses her hesitation to switch sectors—and the opportunities that inspired her to take on an executive-level position in a new industry.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:30] Hot sectors for project talent
[02:50] Skills to succeed in a new sector
[05:45] The risk of “job hopping”
[06:55] The value of cross-sector experience
[10:35] Managing projects in a new industry
[14:40] Communicating with execs in a new organization
[16:25] When to make a big career move

Apr 10, 2019
Leadership—Managing Multigenerational Teams
22:19

The next generation of project managers isn’t satisfied with the status quo—and leaders must be ready to adapt. Guests discuss how they encourage collaboration across age groups, and a PMO director from Slack outlines how to recruit and retain young talent.

Ilinca Rolea, a junior project manager for the IT firm Cameo Global in Brussels, Belgium outlines the type of professional support she wants her managers to provide.

Andy Almenara, the PMO head for Australia’s Special Broadcasting Service in Sydney explains how proactive planning keep his multigenerational team firing on all cylinders.

Manny Ventura, PMP, the director of the business operations PMO at Slack in San Francisco, California, USA, discusses how organizations can encourage team members from different generations to build on each others’ strengths.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:30] The multigenerational workforce
[02:30] The art of communication
[04:19] Setting clear expectations
[06:30] Reverse mentoring
[08:50] A Gen Z perspective
[12:23] Competing for young project talent
[16:00] Accommodating different work styles
[18:56] How to spark collaboration across age groups

Mar 27, 2019
Social Responsibility—Promoting Gender Equality
21:53

The World Economic Forum predicts it will take 108 years for women to achieve equal status globally. Guests discuss how organizations can level the playing field—and the manager of global programs for UN Women shares recent project wins.

Adam Simpson, manager of global programs for UN Women in New York discussed the role gender equality plays in reaching the United Nation’s 2030 Sustainable Development Goals—and what it will take to reach these ambitious targets.

Anne Steinhardt, a systems engineering manager with Cisco Systems’ global virtual engineering organization in Washington, D.C. explains how Cisco’s Connected Women is encouraging more women to join the technical workforce.
Kush Dhillon, engagement manager for Capgemini in London, shares how she helps her female colleagues set clear career goals—and build the confidence they need to reach them.
We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:

[00:34] The state of gender equality
[02:59] Empowering women in the workplace
[05:52] Fighting imposter syndrome
[06:45] How to fill the future talent pipeline
[09:20] Sponsoring women in STEM fields
[11:29] The mission of UN Women
[14:09] Prioritizing high-impact projects
[17:31] Recent wins for equality

Mar 13, 2019
Transformation—Artificial Intelligence
22:04

Predictive analysis. Machine learning. Robotic automation. AI technologies are coming of age—and it’s time for them to start earning their keep. Learn how organizations are turning the hype into hard numbers.

Oliver Broom, program director for artificial intelligence and data and analytics for Virgin Media in London discusses how AI is transforming the customer experience.

Sindhu Joseph, co-founder and CEO of CogniCor Technologies in San Francisco, talks what it takes to define and deliver clear ROI as an organization integrates AI technology.

Veronika Sokolova, an intelligent automation program manager for British Telecom in London, shares how robotic automation is streamlining global operations.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:30] Trends in artificial intelligence
[02:45] The business case for robots
[04:43] End-to-end automation
[06:56] Defining and delivering AI ROI
[11:35] Transforming the customer experience
[14:55] The future AI roadmap
[17:55] AI’s impact on the workforce

Feb 27, 2019
Career Development—In-Demand Skills and Sectors
17:03

Seismic market shifts have reshaped entire sectors and shaken up the project landscape. Learn how global business trends are impacting the job market for project and program managers—and what skills will help future-proof your career.

Barnali Sahoo, PMO head for the Americas division of Flight Centre Travel Group, based in Montreal, New Jersey, USA, outlines the skills project managers need to respond to shifting customer demands.

Jens Wilken, executive director for the thermal power plant, desalination, solar thermal, and oil and gas division of Fichtner Consulting Engineers in Stuttgart, Germany explains why project and program managers need to up their business acumen.

Edgar Bonilla Torres, a project manager for Heliosolar, based in Bogotá, Colombia, discusses what’s next for renewable energy projects in Latin America.

Alarka Purkayastha, an engagement manager for Accenture in Bengaluru, India, shares his perspective on how the country’s IT services sector is evolving—and what skills will help project and program managers stay competitive.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:30] Trends shaping the job market
[01:45] New career opportunities in India
[04:18] Delivering a better customer journey
[06:20] CX: What’s at stake
[09:30] The value of project management education
[11:00] Renewable energy trends in Latin America
[12:30] The demand for business acumen

Feb 13, 2019
Job Skills—Cultivating Creativity
22:07

Creativity is the spark behind every bright idea—but it needs the right environment to flourish. Learn how leaders can give their teams both the structure and inspiration they need to think outside the box. Plus, Nickelodeon’s senior director of creative project management shares three creativity killers to avoid.

Ahmed Bahaa, PMP, managing director for Hive Studio in Cairo, Egypt, offers tips to cultivate an “always-on” creative culture that helps team produce high-quality work on a tight timeline.

Todd Henry, host of The Accidental Creative podcast and author of the book Herding Tigers in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, discusses how project leaders can encourage project team members to leave their comfort zones.

Mike Tenney, senior director of creative project management for Nickelodeon in New York, New York, USA, outlines how he minimizes the risk of last-minute surprises.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:30] Sparking and sustaining creativity
[02:25] What sets creative companies apart
[05:05] How to foster a creative workplace
[08:22] The key to better brainstorming
[10:15] Encouraging risk-taking
[12:38] What makes creative project management different?
[15:30] Keeping surprises at bay
[18:40] Creativity killers to avoid

Jan 30, 2019
Transformation—Navigating Mergers and Acquisitions
21:39

Mergers and acquisitions can take years—and they don’t always deliver the intended value. Learn how program and project managers on the front lines can ensure the success of mission-critical integrations. Plus, one of Google’s M&A program managers shares his industry expertise.

Stephanie Blanco, VP of M&A integration and program management for Sound Physicians in Washington, D.C., USA discusses how to balance transparency and confidentiality on sensitive M&A projects.

Kash Ahuja, a mergers and acquisitions program manager for Google in Seattle, Washington, USA, outlines how his team overcomes change and uncertainty on fast-moving M&A initiatives.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:30] 2019 M&A trends
[02:40] The M&A project roadmap
[04:35] Transparency vs. confidentiality
[06:15] Lessons from the Whole Foods buyout
[08:30] Unique M&A project challenges
[13:00] Unifying systems and processes
[17:30] Delivering the intended value

Jan 16, 2019
Lessons Learned—The Value of Knowledge Transfer
21:19

Talent turnover is unavoidable. Brain drain is not. Global experts discuss how effective knowledge transfer keeps organizations firing on all cylinders.

Mustafa Hafızoğlu, PMP, program director for Space & Defence Technologies in Ankara, Turkey, explains how his company has transformed project knowledge into a reusable commodity.

Betsy Mathew, PMP, director of organizational development and talent management for Dark Matter in Abu Dhabi, UAE, offers her take on how organizations can create an environment where knowledge flows freely.

Roger Forsgren, chief knowledge officer for NASA in Washington D.C., USA, shares how the agency’s breakthrough innovations are made possible by effective (and mandatory) knowledge management.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:25] The business value of knowledge transfer
[03:00] Building a formal knowledge bank
[06:00] Retaining expertise amidst employee turnover
[08:10] How to collect meaningful lessons learned
[09:22] Facilitating knowledge sharing
[11:05] How knowledge transfer reduces costs
[14:10] Gathering and disseminating knowledge at NASA
[16:30] Lessons learned for engineers
[19:00] Securing top-down support

Jan 02, 2019
Talent Management—How to Fill the Project Talent Gap
20:42

The competition for top project talent is heating up. Global business leaders discuss how they’re attracting top performers and building their project management bench.

Frederic Casagrande, the PMO manager for Nawah Energy Company in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates shares how he’s leveraged PMI’s standards and best practices to develop a training program that helps experts in nuclear energy up their project management skills.

Thokozani Skaka, the PMO head for MTN, in Johannesburg, South Africa discusses project management talent trends in the Middle East and Africa, including the skills gaps he sees and what organizations are doing to attract top performers.

Chris Hiltbrand, the division vice president of human resources for General Dynamics Information Technology in Washington, D.C., USA, outlines which skills the company hires for—and which skills it is willing to help people develop on the job.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:33] Project management talent gap data
[02:37] Developing talent for nuclear energy projects
[06:58] In-demand skills in the Middle East and Africa
[08:50] How culture attracts top talent
[10:29] Recruiting and retaining top talent
[14:12] Developing soft skills on project teams
[16:47] Measuring the success of training

Dec 12, 2018
Transformation—How to Manage Complexity
20:29

Innovation, uncertainty, rapid change—the defining factors of the modern marketplace are making projects increasingly complicated. Guests discuss how they’re overcoming complexity to deliver transformative projects.

The PMO team from Telstra, Australia’s largest telecom company and this year’s PMO of the Year Award winner, explains how PMO oversight helped get the company’s capital investment portfolio back on track.

Mohammed Fakhri, AVP of global project delivery at Standard Chartered Global Business Services in Malaysia, discusses how he manages change across an interconnected project portfolio.

Wale Elegbede, PMO manager for the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Regenerative Medicine, shares how project teams navigate uncertainty on innovative healthcare projects—while also complying with strict regulations.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:30] Defining project complexity
[03:40] Telstra case study: 2018 PMO of the Year
[05:30] Facilitating strategic innovation
[08:00] Navigating interdependencies
[10:45] What is regenerative medicine?
[14:55] Planning for uncertainty
[16:45] Understanding stakeholder priorities

Nov 28, 2018
Leadership—New Skills for an Age of Flux
22:21

What does it takes to be an effective leader in a rapidly shifting business environment? Guests discuss in-demand leadership skills—and how to keep fast-moving projects on track.

Barry Draskovich, PMP, vice president of program and contract management at Parker Aerospace in Irvine, California, USA, shares four skills project professionals should develop if they want to rise up in the ranks

Robert Safian, the founder of The Flux Group and former editor of Fast Company, discusses his research on leadership in the age of flux, how to maintain a strategic mindset when the market is shifting fast and the skills that set the best leaders apart.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:30] How leadership is evolving
[04:30] In-demand skills to sharpen
[08:10] Leading in the age of flux
[14:28] Reshaping the talent pool
[16:13] Outside-in vs. inside-out leadership
[18:18] What sets the best leaders apart

Nov 14, 2018
A Radical Mindshift—Managing Bleeding Edge Projects
21:09

Bleeding edge projects have the potential to disrupt the marketplace and reshape entire sectors—if they can make it across the finish line. Project leaders share how they shepherd and support extreme innovation in the face of increasing uncertainty.

Michael O’Connor, director of strategy and project management at Medtronic in Minnesota, USA, talks about what it took to develop the world’s smallest pacemaker in a highly regulated environment. Medtronic is a member of PMI’s Global Executive Council.

James Stewart, vice chair at KPMG in London, England, describes how a combination of flexibility and independent assurance can drive success on first-of-its-kind projects.

Marc Lahmann, director of the transformation assurance division for PwC Switzerland in Zurich, shares how leading organizations are adopting artificial intelligence—and what’s needed for this tech to deliver real business value.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified™ with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:30] Navigating risks on bleeding edge projects
[04:25] Case Study: Revolutionizing the pacemaker
[08:30] Flexing the project plan
[13:00] Integrating artificial intelligence
[15:26] How to spur cultural change
[17:23] Getting early wins with AI

Oct 31, 2018
Crisis Mode—Emergency Management and Response
19:53

From hurricanes to hunger, global disasters are increasing—and intensifying. The costs of these events are also multiplying, and the risks are becoming increasingly difficult to manage. Project leaders from around the world explain how this new disaster era is forcing teams to adjust their risk management strategies and priorities.

Mahamoudou Guimbayara, emergency team leader for the Development Food Assistance Program at CARE Mali, discusses how he and his team emphasize risk reduction and recovery in the midst of a long-term, national food scarcity crisis.

Victor Orellana Acuña, PMP, former deputy national director of Chile’s National Emergency Office, talks about the impact of standardization and simplification on emergency management in the immediate post-disaster landscape.

And members of the project team from Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, winner of the 2018 PMI® Project of the Year Award, discuss how they were able to rebuild a massive, state-of-the-art medical facility and demonstrate resiliency after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified™ with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified™ with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:
[00:37] The growing impact—and cost—of natural disasters
[03:52] Committing to risk mitigation in a long-term crisis
[08:24] Establishing a common language for recovery
[10:31] Developing a simplified model of emergency management
[13:01] Winning stakeholder buy-in despite devastation
[15:03] Gathering insight via rigorous testing
[16:57] Staying flexible in the face of setbacks

Oct 17, 2018
The Greater Good—Lessons from Governments and NGOs
20:12

Long Description

Making the world a better place is no simple task. Especially when funding is in short supply. Leaders from government agencies and NGOs share how transparency and accountability help them do more with less on their projects and programs.

Riaan Husselmann, director of enterprise portfolio management for the New South Wales Electoral Commission in Australia, shares how increased transparency can improve project delivery—and restore the public’s trust in its elected officials.

Danny Scott-Rockel, a senior program manager at Nesta, outlines how clear communication on social innovation projects helps his U.K.-based NGO maintain support from donors and grant providers.

Lori Tanner, senior director for the IT project management office and services for the American Red Cross in Washington, D.C., discusses how project leaders can respond to the need for greater transparency and reporting in the NGO space.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:

[00:48] The global trust deficit

[03:45] Projects to deliver democracy

[06:43] How project tracking drives transparency

[11:56] The case for accountability within NGOs

[13:42] Responding appropriately to risk

[15:18] How the PMO navigates volatility

[17:40] Building a culture of transparency

Transcript

Narrator

The future of project management is changing fast. On Projectified with PMI, we’ll help you stay on top of the trends and see what’s really ahead for the profession—and your career.

For an easy way to stay up to date on Projectified with PMI, go to iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play Music or PMI.org/podcast.

Stephen W. Maye

Hello, I'm Stephen Maye, and this is Projectified with PMI. I'm here with my co-host, Tegan Jones, and in this episode we're talking about how governments and NGOs can run projects that will make a bigger impact in the world.

You know, there are so many different types of needs that governments and NGOs have to address—economic development, healthcare, affordable housing. But the funding never quite matches the need. There’s always more to be done.

Tegan Jones

That’s so true. And it leaves organizations with really two options. You can either raise more money or try to cut costs. And obviously, project management can help organizations be more efficient, save some money, but there’s only so far you can go down that path. You can’t save your way to zero. So to do more work, you eventually are going to need more money.

But trust is a huge factor that influences fundraising—whether that means influencing people to make bigger donations or getting people to accept a higher tax rate. And we’re seeing a major deficit in trust right now.

Stephen W. Maye

Trust in government is definitely lower than it’s been in the recent past. We’ve seen a lot of populist platforms gaining steam and people are showing a strong preference for elected officials that seem like outsiders.

Tegan Jones

Edelman does a survey every year that actually measures this type of public sentiment. It's called the Trust Barometer. And the 2018 report found that government is distrusted—meaning less than 50 percent of a population trusts the government—in 21 of 28 of the countries that they surveyed. And overall, the global trust rate for government is just 43 percent.

Stephen W. Maye

I don’t care what your politics are, that is not good. It makes it really hard to get anything done. But I assume that figure would be higher when you’re talking about NGOs.

Tegan Jones

It is higher. But, it’s still not exactly where it needs to be, especially considering that these organizations are generally funded by donors. Edelman says only 53 percent of people around the world trust NGOs, and this figure is down from 64 percent in 2014.

Stephen W. Maye

It makes you wonder what these organizations have to do to change course. I mean, is the problem that they aren’t delivering the results people are expecting? Or is it more about communicating the progress and talking more openly about how decisions are made? I don’t know. I’m not sure what the challenge here is.

I talked about this with our featured guest, Lori Tanner, who we’ll hear from a little later in this episode. Lori is the senior director for the IT project management office and services for the American Red Cross in D.C. And she shared some thoughts on how project management can help NGOs increase transparency and build some of that trust that’s lacking with external stakeholders.

Tegan Jones

Yeah, having that type of structure in place really helps create that accountability that people want to see if they’re going to be giving you their money.

At Nesta, a UK-based NGO that calls itself an “innovation foundation,” they really focus on tracking and forecasting to make sure that they’re providing the type of information that they need to keep stakeholders on board. Danny Scott-Rockel, who’s a senior program manager for Nesta, will talk about what that looks like for him and his work in just a few minutes.

Stephen W. Maye

But first let’s get a government perspective. I’m interested to hear from Riaan Husselmann, who works for the New South Wales Electoral Commission in Australia. What did you guys talk about?

Tegan Jones

He really focused on what it takes to make sure that elections are being run fairly, which is really a huge factor that influences whether people trust their government—whether they even see it as legitimate in the first place.

Stephen W. Maye

Well, that’s definitely something you have to get right. Let’s hear what he has to say.

[musical transition]

Tegan Jones

Free and open elections are the foundation of democracy. But it takes a lot of legwork to make sure every vote counts. From training temporary staff to validating results, the organizations responsible for running elections have their work cut out for them.

In Australia’s most populous state, these tasks fall to the New South Wales Electoral Commission, where Riaan Husselmann serves as the director of enterprise portfolio management.

Riaan Husselmann

You need to understand who is eligible to vote. There are systems—IT systems and business processes—that exist that enable people to go and register to vote, then tally up and count and all the results, and then put it into a system, and then we have to publish that, those set of results. There are, just for the program we are running now, we would scale up from 250 people to 27,000.

Tegan Jones

That doesn’t come cheap. But with government budgets under constant scrutiny, project teams have to keep a close eye on costs.

Riaan Husselmann

We have funding from various government agencies or governments. And that money essentially comes from the public. We have an obligation to deliver on the commitments that have been made to them and spend that money wisely and responsibly.

Tegan Jones

Making smart, effective project investments requires a culture of accountability that starts at the top.

Riaan Husselmann

We set the expectation of what a sponsor does on a day-to-day basis, and ultimately that they're responsible—or accountable, should I say—for delivering the business cases that they sign up to. Where they are unable to do that, they need to provide a Plan B as to how they're going to achieve it.

Tegan Jones

But the project management office doesn’t expect sponsors to go it alone. Proactive portfolio management helps them identify where projects could go off the rails.

Riaan Husselmann

All projects need to attend the portfolio steering committee on a quarterly basis, where they present the ongoing achievability of their projects and specifically the business cases. We look at previous performance, and we look at expected future performance and whether the ongoing plan is still achievable.

Tegan Jones

By keeping teams on task, the PMO does more than just drive efficiency. It builds public trust and encourages people to come out and vote.

And the more people participate, the better the political system works.

Riaan Husselmann

Ultimately it's all to deliver democracy, okay? We put the systems out there, all the business processes, to deliver democracy.

[musical transition]

Stephen W. Maye

Delivering democracy. Wow, that is no small feat. But he made a great point that even this type of incredibly lofty goal depends on the same type of systems and processes you’d use to run any IT project. It’s all about integration, coordination and accountability.

Tegan Jones

Right, and he was talking about the type of accountability that gets executive sponsors to really take ownership of a project and see it through to a successful completion. And it’s those results, for him, that really get those external stakeholders on board. But our next guest, Danny Scott-Rockel from Nesta, talks about how clear project reporting can be a great tool for improving relationships with stakeholders and donors, in and of itself.

Stephen W. Maye

Especially if you call yourself an innovation foundation, you have to expect that some of your projects will potentially miss the mark or start to head in an unexpected direction. That’s just what happens when you innovate. So I’ll be interested to hear how he keeps the lines of communication open when things go sideways. Let’s have a listen.

[musical transition]

Danny Scott-Rockel

Hello, it’s Danny Scott-Rockel here. I’m at Nesta in London. I’m working on major programs, an innovation foundation, and we try to basically leverage our capability for creating societal benefit.

NGOs are typically funded via grants from government or international innovation centers and large foundations who want to drive innovation and social benefit. Although their drivers are not normally profit or commercial return to stakeholders or shareholders, they still need to deliver value. They therefore need to have good resource and cost-planning tools inside a project management culture or framework, with cost control mechanisms for the programs that they are running, along with strong reporting and governance mechanisms.

For example, a large department of the innovation foundation that I’m working at currently wants to increase its impact significantly over the next two years and make sure that the staff are as productive and as efficient as possible in achieving their impact goals. So we have spent a lot of effort over the last few months, putting in place better finance, resource, and utilization forecasting tracking tools, so that they can control the spend and resource allocations better and get a much better forecast of what they need to achieve their targets. This transparency progress against the plan drives accountability and ownership as an inherent part of the monitoring and reporting process. Basically, if you know what’s going on in detail, you know what you need to do next.

When NGOs are providing services and innovation, conditions change and objectives, budgets and schedules need adjustment to suit. Situations like major political, weather or economic changes may render the original plans unachievable or inadequate. And even minor variations in conditions, such as a small change in exchange rates or productivity, or a team member leaving, needs to be dealt with to keep the program on track. Having a well-defined set of change control procedures gives you the tools to react effectively and in a timely manner to change when needed.

The way to regain and more importantly avoid losing public trust is to be transparent about what you’re achieving and what you aren’t. Things will always go wrong. But how you react and what you say makes all the difference.

Project management controls and mechanism in a framework empower you to manage your staff, your resources, your objectives, and your reporting to your stakeholders in an effective and productive manner. It’s imperative you know what is happening, what you need to do, and have a plan for successful delivery. And most importantly, leverage the impact you are trying to achieve.

[musical transition]

Stephen W. Maye

What Danny said there at the end is really great advice for life in general. Things will go wrong, and it’s about how you deal with that. Do you try to cover it up and act like everything is fine, or do you get out ahead of the issue and minimize the damage? How you respond will really impact whether others trust you or not.

Tegan Jones
In a lot of ways it’s just basic risk management. And if you pair that with good governance then you can do a lot to maintain stakeholder support—even if your project starts to go off the rails.

Stephen W. Maye
Lori Tanner shared a bit about what that looks like on the projects she runs for the American Red Cross. She’s the senior director for the IT project management office and services, and that has given her an interesting perspective on how running successful projects behind the scenes—so upgrading IT systems or communications infrastructure—ultimately helps the Red Cross make a bigger impact in the wider world.

Tegan Jones
The Red Cross does so much work in so many areas—I’m sure they couldn’t do it without the work of people like Lori and her team. So, let’s hear how she makes it happen.

[musical transition]

Stephen W. Maye

Lori, you’ve made a significant contribution to the NGO space, specifically the humanitarian space, primarily in disaster response. You have spent, I believe, 15 years with the American Red Cross. What are some of the big picture trends that you’re seeing today that are impacting how NGOs run projects?

Lori Tanner
So the things that we’re experiencing today or focusing on today are probably things that have always been areas to consider for a PMO but now they’re getting more focused. So things like ensuring that what you’re doing is delivering business value, looking for ways to cut costs, doing more with less, and from a technology perspective, which is where my work has been—it’s within the IT organization—we’re looking at more technology solutions that are hosted and partnering more with vendors.

Stephen W. Maye

Give me an example of how your work’s been influenced by trying to address not only these individual trends, but how these trends are coming together.

Lori Tanner

Well, one big area is a need and an importance to have greater transparency. What are we working on? Who’s working on it? How much is it costing? Is it on track? Does it need to be reevaluated? These are things that we need to look at not just with a small group, but the executives need more visibility into that—quickly, regularly, and it’s not left to individual project teams to sort of work these things out.

There’s more need for reporting, more need for access to data in a very quick way. Also, when projects are initiated or considered, there’s a lot more of a focus on ROI—does this have a strong business case? Will this deliver business value in a quantitative way? There’s more scrutiny over projects as they start to go over budget or scope changes.

And what that then leads to is more overall accountability. You know, you can’t just kinda come in and say, “We’re gonna do this project, and we think it’s gonna take six months, and we think it’s gonna cost about $500,000.” And then you get in month two and you’re like, “Nope, sorry, it’s gonna take longer and cost more money.” Now there’s more accountability, there’s more scrutiny around that, and there’s more overall, because we have more access to project information and we have more transparency, those kind of situations can be addressed immediately rather than languishing and becoming something that is difficult to resolve without significant impact later.

Stephen W. Maye

So Lori, the American Red Cross provides such a range of services, from disaster relief, blood services, international relief services. So the projects that your PMO supports really have life changing, and in some cases life saving, implications.

I’m interested to know what that means to your projects from a risk perspective. How do you approach risk or think about risk that might be different from what we’re accustomed to?

Lori Tanner
In the biomedical space, are building solutions to support the collection and manufacturing and distribution of blood. We are regulated, so we have very defined approaches for risk management. Because if we make a mistake there, it’s significant. So, we’re very cautious. We make sure we’re doing what we said we were gonna do when we said we were gonna do it. And there are various checks in place to make sure that the risks of any mistakes are mitigated significantly.

That’s one way to operate a project. And that’s a different skill set than, say, another project where there’s disasters that are coming, we can’t predict them, we know that we need to react to them quickly to help people who are impacted. And in that case, sometimes decisions and risks just have to be taken. And those things are accepted. And we know that we might not always get it right, but the business dictates that we need to respond.         

Stephen W. Maye

When we think about that ability to respond quickly and shift quickly, does the PMO play a role in that, or what role does the PMO play in ensuring that projects can shift and pivot and continue to be focused on what’s most important today?

Lori Tanner

My approach has been project delivery, and meeting the customer needs, and providing business value is paramount. So I tried to put in place a structure that could provide the transparency, provide a platform for project managers to get help when needed, but not to impact the day-to-day operations of the project.

So if a project needs to twist and turn—like they almost all need to—the PMO isn’t doing anything to make that more difficult. And in fact, through the clear communication, through the regular read outs, the PMO helps to make it clear that these twists and turns are happening, and the reasons behind why they’re happening, so that leaders and others can say, “Well wait a minute, that’s not the direction that we wanted to go. I hear that that’s what you’re being asked to do, but we need to circle the wagons and come back to look at this.”

Stephen W. Maye

When you think about project management in the NGO space specifically and this idea of really doing more with less, or doing more with the resources available, does project management play a role in delivering on that request or that commitment as well?

Lori Tanner

Absolutely. Project managers by nature are driven for results. They are persistent, don’t give up, and in projects that are either not fully staffed, ill-formed, project managers can take that and make it work. And they do that either by filling in roles, coming up with creative solutions, persuading people to go above and beyond what they might have otherwise done, motivating the team, building a sense of teamwork so that everybody is pushing as hard as they can. And without that element, projects that have multiple hurdles put in front of them would just crumble.              

Stephen W. Maye

Whether it’s a new leader, or someone who is perhaps even midstream in the effort but is trying to establish stronger project management practices in an NGO environment, perhaps establishing a PMO or reestablishing a PMO in an NGO environment, what is your best advice?

Lori Tanner

What I would do if I was going into a new organization, I would first understand. I would try to understand the dynamics, the culture, and the tolerance levels to process, structure and project requirements.

And I would then gradually try to move the culture and the tolerance to something that supports a structured, transparent, balanced approach. But I wouldn’t do it right away—unless the culture will allow that. But many don’t. And you have to do it gradually.

I came in and I wanted to do it all right away. And I had to accept that cultural shift takes time, and to show every way that I could how it was beneficial to make that shift, either because I was adding value, or we were resolving issues faster. I sought to keep the team providing the good service that it can without a lot of overhead. So I would always keep in mind successful project delivery is the top, top priority. And then how can you build enough structure to keep that moving, and then also preserve the project if it hits bumps and enable it to bounce back from bumps along the way.

Stephen W. Maye

So seek to understand, accept that culture shift takes time, and demonstrate value every day as the top priority. And with that, Lori Tanner gets the last word. Lori, thanks. It’s been great having you on. It’s been a pleasure getting to know you and talking with you. And thank you again for sharing your insight.

[musical transition]

Narrator

Thank you for listening to Projectified™ with PMI. If you liked this episode, you can subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music. We'd love your feedback, so please leave a rating or review.

Oct 03, 2018
The Need for Speed—Delivering Rapid Response Projects
23:56

A rapidly shifting business landscape is forcing project teams to be more flexible. Global project leaders share how they deliver fast-paced results—without sacrificing quality.

The PMO team from McDonald’s shares how it successfully delivering a massive digital transformation project that touched 20,000 global restaurants in just nine months.

Dev Ramcharan, a program director at TD Bank in Toronto, Canada, explains how the full spectrum of project management approaches can help project teams deliver expected outcomes on an expedited schedule.

Everaldo de Souza Alves Jr., PMO manager for Latin America at Equifax, discusses how a strong understanding of business strategy can help teams run innovative projects quickly and effectively

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, ProjectifiedTM with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of ProjectifiedTM with PMI.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

Key Themes:

[00:39] Understanding the need for speed

[03:24] McDonald’s Digital Transformation

[07:45] How to define a quality outcome

[08:56] Using the right approach for the job

[12:42] Innovation as a survival mechanism

[15:16] Short-term vs long-term project impact

[17:26] Rapid response in a regulatory environment

[20:29] Keeping an eye on strategy

Sep 19, 2018
The Long Haul—Future-Proofing Infrastructure
20:48

Smart tech investments in infrastructure take center stage in our discussions with project leaders. They discuss how they’re helping communities meet needs that last for the long haul.

 

Frank Vieveen, program manager for the City of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, shares how he selects smart city and digital economy projects that streamline city life.

 

Sarah Hoban, a global project manager and lead associate for Booz Allen Hamilton in Washington D.C., discusses how project teams can prioritize the right infrastructure technology investments in developing countries.

 

Ed Blayney, innovation project manager for the Office of Performance Improvement and Innovation in Louisville, Kentucky, talks about how smaller cities can run innovative projects while still being careful stewards of taxpayer funds.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, ProjectifiedTM with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of ProjectifiedTM with PMI.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple Podcast, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

 

Key Themes:

[0:45] The impact of population growth on infrastructure

[2:20] Innovation tips for small cities

[3:45] Community-sourced innovation

[6:30] Capacity-building in developing countries

[11:15] Trends disrupting urban infrastructure projects

[15:00] How Rotterdam is planning for the future

Sep 05, 2018
Winning on Strategy—The Power of Project Delivery with guest Felipe Daguila
20:28

Insights from global experts for how project and program teams can respond to shifting priorities, when to pull the plug on an outdated project—and what it takes to deliver real strategic value.

 

Felipe Daguila, the chief digital officer for Ooredoo Qatar, explains how increasing collaboration between the teams that create and execute on strategy improves the quality of project delivery.

 

Dev Ramcharan, a program director for TD in Toronto, offer tips to help teams deliver successful projects when an organization’s strategy changes midstream.

 

Amruta Oak, executive director of program management services for Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco, and Heather van Wyk, business program manager for Engen Petroleum in Cape Town talk about how focusing on the business case helps teams deliver programs and projects that drive the strategy forward.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, ProjectifiedTM with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of ProjectifiedTM with PMI.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple PodcastGoogle Play MusicSoundCloudStitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

 

Key Themes:

[0:38] The cost of poor project delivery

[2:40] Aligning projects to strategy

[4:04] How the business case helps projects deliver value

[5:25] Tying individual performance to strategy

[7:02] Responding to strategic shifts

[10:50] Key drivers of successful strategy delivery

[13:43] Building buy-in for strategic initiatives

[16:47] When to cancel a project

Aug 22, 2018
Managing Volatility — Adapt or Fail with guest Jennifer Mercer
20:13

In this episode, global project and program leaders discuss how they deal with disruption and navigate uncertainty in a constantly shifting landscape.  

 

About Our Guests: 

Jennifer Mercer, program manager for arctic research support and logistics with the National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C. talks what it takes to manage projects in some of the world’s most extreme environments.

James Stewart, vice chair for KPMG in London, discusses how project managers need to adapt their skill sets to better manage uncertainty.

John Donohoe, director of change management and the program management office for Star Alliance Services GMBH in Frankfurt, Germany, shares how his company has evolved its product development process to quickly adapt to changing customer demands.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, ProjectifiedTM with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of ProjectifiedTM with PMI.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple PodcastGoogle Play MusicSoundCloudStitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

 

Key Themes:

[0:40] Dealing with disruption

[2:45] How The Star Alliance Network navigates change

[5:25] Planning for volatility on projects and programs

[8:40] Anticipating change and managing risk

[9:55] Data-driven decision-making

[11:50] Managing projects in extreme environments

[15:35] Dealing with project disruptions

[17:15] Lessons learned from Arctic projects

Aug 08, 2018
Career Development — Landing Your Dream Job with guest Manuel Salero Coca, PMP
22:45

Global experts discuss how to ace an interview, landing your next big promotion and the skills that set top-performing project professionals apart. In this episode, you'll hear from career experts ... 

 

Manuel Salero Coca, managing director for PIN Technologies in Mexico City, about what it takes to become a project leader in a global company—and even start your own business.

 

Lindsay Scott, director of program and project management recruitment for Arras People in London, shares some of the hiring trends she’s seen taking shape in the U.K.

 

Deepa Kalangi, senior project manager at Magellan Health in Portland, Oregon, USA, offers tips to help job seekers answer the toughest project management interview questions.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, ProjectifiedTM with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of ProjectifiedTM with PMI.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at: Apple PodcastGoogle Play MusicSoundCloudStitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

 

Key Themes:

[1:15] In-demand project management skills

[4:53] How to impress a hiring manager

[6:59] Answering impossible interview questions

[9:47] The project management talent gap

[13:48] Becoming your own boss

[17:48] What sets top performers apart

[19:30] Building trust with your team

Jul 25, 2018
Innovation - Changing the Game with guest Alice Pollard
25:45

In this episode, global project leaders discuss how to make hyper-innovation happen, the do’s and don’ts of managing virtual teams and navigating an uncertain project landscape. 

 

Alice Pollard, chief of staff and innovation architect for Cisco Hyper Innovation Living Labs in San Francisco, shares the success factors that helps some of the world’s largest companies collaborate on game-changing innovations.

 

James Stewart, vice chair for KPMG in London, talks how teams can navigate a new breed of project challenges, from breakneck speeds to real-time reporting requirements.

 

Fiona Charonnat, customer project and program management process owner for Ericsson in Paris, and Ibrahim Dani, director of governance for Optus Australia in Sydney, outline how leaders need to think differently when working with increasingly dispersed teams.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified with PMI.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at:

Apple PodcastGoogle Play MusicSoundCloudStitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

 

Key Themes:

[2:10] Defining the skill set of the future

[5:00] When to turn to a virtual team

[6:59] How to engage dispersed team members

[11:28] Future-proofing project plans

[12:35] Running a first-of-its-kind project

[15:05] How does hyper-innovation work?

[20:40] Gaining speed without sacrificing quality

[22:55] Innovation on a shoestring

Jul 11, 2018
Women in Project Leadership - Gaining Ground with guest Jane Canniff
24:55

Jane Canniff and Carrie Fletcher discuss what it takes to be a woman in charge, and Lindsay Scott shares research on gender trends in project management.

 

About our Guests — Carrie Fletcher, Lindsay Scott and Jane Caniff:

 

Carrie Fletcher, PMP, is the senior director of health information management and the enterprise project management office (PMO) for the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Canada. She has nearly 20 years of experience in the healthcare sector.

 

Lindsay Scott is the director of program and project management recruitment for Arras People in London.

 

Jane Canniff, PMP, is a senior IT consultant who spent more than a decade working for nonprofits World Vision International and CARE in the global development sector.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified with PMI.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at:

Apple PodcastGoogle Play MusicSoundCloudStitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

 

Key Themes:

[1:40] The gender pay gap in project management

[6:10] Challenges female project leaders face (Carrie Fletcher)

[8:08] Striking the right work-life balance (Carrie Fletcher)

[12:10] Gender trends in the project management profession (Lindsay Scott)

[13:45] The future of contract vs. full-time project work (Lindsay Scott)

[16:18] How to advance your career (Jane Canniff)

[20:50] Advice for female project managers (Jane Canniff)

[22:26] The value of diversity in the workforce (Jane Canniff)

Jun 27, 2018
PMI EMEA Congress Special Episode - The Demands of Digitization
15:15

During this conversation, recorded at PMI’s EMEA Congress 2018 in Berlin, John Daly and Henk van Huyssteen discuss how digitization is changing the way projects are run, the benefits project teams can expect to see in the near future— and what skills project and program managers need to develop to stay relevant. 

 

About our Guests — John Daly and Henk van Huyssteen:

John Daly, PfMP, PgMP, PMP, is a Director in Cisco Advanced Service Global PMO, managing a global team of project and program managers from Jacksonville, Florida, USA. John began his career as an engineer and quickly moved into project and program management, and has been working in that field for over 12 years.

 

Henk van Huyssteen, PMP, delivers complex business technology programs for large organizations and is based in Cape Town, South Africa. He specializes in defining delivery strategies and models to achieve aggressive timelines or to turn around projects in trouble. Over the past three years, he has led a variety of large-scale, digital transformation programs.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed our podcast series, Projectified with PMI. To join the conversation online, we ask you to use #Projectified and @PMInstitute. We also encourage you to subscribe and leave a rating on Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music by clicking on the links below. Thank you very much, and stay tuned as we release more episodes of Projectified with PMI.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, subscribe to our podcast at:

Apple PodcastGoogle Play Music, SoundCloudStitcher, or PMI.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:25] The impact of digitization on project work

[3:25] Facilitating faster decision-making

[5:50] Innovative problem solving

[7:15] Project management skills for a digital world

[8:50] How to begin the transformation

[12:30] Congress attendees weigh in on the evolving role of project management

Jun 13, 2018
IBM PM Center of Excellence — Staying Relevant with guest Jim Boland
32:46

Jim shares insights on the past, present and future of IBM's PMCoE, including its focus on attracting and developing tomorrow's project leaders, the challenge of balancing traditional methods with agile approaches, and the keys to remaining relevant over two decades.

 

About our Guest:

Jim Boland is the leader of IBM's Project Management Center of Excellence (PMCoE), which is celebrating its 21st anniversary as it serves over 350,000 "IBMers" —including dozens of PMOs and 40,000 certified project managers.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

iTunesStitcher,  Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[01:30] The broad mission of IBM's PMCoE

[03:10] Everybody is a project manager

[06:15] The difference between a CoE and PMO

[09:00] Meeting the pace of change with agility

[14:45] Frequent 'sense-checking' to identify red flags

[17:00] Internal and external certification programs

[20:15] Attracting talent to the PM workforce

[22:45] New skills needed for project managers

[25:45] Defining/reinforcing culture values/practices

[28:40] What's next for the PMCoE

[31:45] Get comfortable with change

 

 

May 30, 2018
Transformation — Momentum and Mindset with guest Kevin Murphy
30:34

In part two with transformation expert Kevin Murphy, Kevin discusses how project managers serve as big-picture change agents, developing a future mindset, how to instill new behaviors for creating a change-ready culture, and dealing with resistance.

 

About our Guest:

Kevin Murphy is a partner in Bain & Company's Washington, D.C. office, and head of its Center of Expertise for Co-Creation. He has more than 30 years of experience across multiple industries in leading large turnarounds and transformations.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

iTunesStitcher,  Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[01:00] Building and maintaining transformation momentum

[05:30] The relationship between transformation and culture

[07:30] Defining culture and the three levels of change

[11:00] Creating a mindset for the future state

[14:30] The importance of feedback from peers and teams

[18:40] Project managers as change agents

[20:15] A results delivery office: value, execution and people

[23:45] Understanding and dealing with resistance

[29:20] Less screens and meeting, more time with people

May 16, 2018
Team Leadership — Maximizing Potential with guest Andy Kaufman
34:41

Andy defines leadership and teams in this episode; discusses trust, conflict and alignment; touches on agile principles in leading teams; emphasizes the importance of finding meaning in the work; and offers advice on dealing with "bad apples" and bringing out the best in the teams you lead.

 

About our Guest:

Speaker, author and executive coach Andy Kaufman has worked with thousands of individuals from hundreds of organization to help them improve their ability to deliver projects and lead teams. He has 25 years of experience in management, technology, team leadership and project management.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

iTunesStitcher,  Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[03:00] Definitions of leadership, from vision to potential

[08:00] The ripple effect of good and bad leadership

[10:00] A team is more than a group of individuals

[11:40] Trust is the foundation, not artificial harmony

[17:45] Team alignment requires understanding the "why"

[20:50] Applying agile principles to team leadership

[26:00] Shared leadership and meaningful work

[31:00] Dealing with "bad apples" on teams

May 02, 2018
Transformation — Risks and Rewards with guest Kevin Murphy
25:16

In this episode Kevin defines transformation, describes what’s different for leaders moving through it, and makes a case that project professionals do their best work when they attend to the physical, mental and emotional space where co-creation can be achieved.

 

About our Guest:

Kevin Murphy is a partner in Bain & Company's Washington, D.C. office, and head of its Center of Expertise for Co-Creation. He has more than 30 years of experience across multiple industries in leading large turnarounds and transformations.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

iTunesStitcher,  Google Play Music, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[01:30] Drivers and characteristics of transformation

[04:45] Transformation projects are marathons, not sprints

[07:45] Transformation lessons and rewards

[10:00] Risks and reasons for high failure rates

[12:55] Attitude, resolve and top-down commitment

[16:25] Engaging in conservations that break down silos

[21:15] Creating physical, mental and emotional spaces  

Apr 18, 2018
Culture — Millennials in the Workforce with guest Dana Brownlee
31:58

Dana shares insights on building strong work relationships between millennials and managers. With perspectives from both sides, she identifies behaviors and mindsets to foster cross-generational collaboration and understanding.

 

About our Guest:

Dana Brownlee has served as project manager and strategy consultant for IBM and AT&T, among other organizations. She is president of Professionalism Matters and the author of the upcoming book The Unwritten Rules of Managing Up: Project Management Techniques from the Trenches

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

iTunesStitcher,  Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[02:30] Describing general distinctions of millennials

[7:10] Accommodating various communication modes

[9:20] Adapting leadership styles, relationship-building

[14:10] Work culture adjustments for millennials

[18:30] Balancing policies: opportunities vs. privileges

[22:00] How millennials are inspiring welcome changes

[26:00] Comfort with technology and fresh perspectives

[27:45] The value of meeting with people individually

[29:10} Project management skills for career success

 

 

Apr 04, 2018
2017 Project of the Year — Complexity and Risk w/ Guest Doug Greenwell
42:15

Doug shares experiences and insights from managing PMI's 2017 Project of the Year. You’ll learn how the team overcame dangers of the work environment and the technical, talent, and communications challenges of the project.

 

About our Guest:

Roland (Doug) Greenwell has led highly complex projects at U.S. Department of Energy sites for more than 30 years, bringing expertise in nuclear waste retrieval, safety-conscious work environments and continuous improvement.

 

Doug shares experiences and insights from managing PMI's 2017 Project of the Year. The project was replacing an underground tank that was leaking radioactive waste in Hanford, Washington, USA. Highlights of the award-winning project includes finishing the project ahead of schedule and US$8.7 under budget, and no safety issues were encountered while transferring nuclear waste. Doug’s conversation details dealing with technical and talent challenges, communicating to diverse stakeholders and negative media, risk management, and the rewards of the job.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

iTunesStitcher,  Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:13] project background and site history

[6:56] project begins with an unexpected leak

[10:50] dangers of the work environment

[13:30] technical challenges, timeline and cost

[16:23] the talent challenge, skillsets and training

[25:10] the stakeholder communication challenge

[28:27] dealing with media and negative coverage

[32:38] the shared attributes of complex projects

[36:20] risk management is indispensable

[39:43] the rewards of the job, the impact on society

 

Mar 21, 2018
Social Good — Leading Development Projects with guest Jane Canniff
34:04

After building a successful IT consulting career in the corporate world, Jane invested a decade leading global development projects and programs for World Vision International and CARE USA.

 

In this episode, Stephen Maye sits down with Jane Canniff who discusses how project management is changing and how it differs between the for-profit and global development sectors. Jane also shares what she's learned about transition, adaptation and finding purpose in work that can save lives.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow our podcast at:

iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

 

Key Takeaways:

@01:30 — the global development landscape, goals

@04:00 — the need for project leadership

@05:45 — moving from corporate to development sector

@11:45 — building local capability and commitment

@15:20 — communication and cultural considerations

@19:40 — technology and infrastructure challenges

@25:00 — the value of curiosity and encouragement

@27:00 — returning to for-profit world with new perspective

@28:55 — working with a cross-cultural, global team

@31:50 — making the transition to social-good project work

 

Mar 07, 2018
Communication — The Path to Payoff with guest Oren Klaff
24:31

Picking up our previous conversation on "pitching projects," Oren practices what he preaches — diving right into describing "a path to payoff" to follow when running team meetings or presenting a solution to stakeholders.

 

About our Guest:

Oren Klaff is author of Pitch Anything: An Innovative Method for Presenting, Persuading, and Winning the Deal and an investment banker who has raised more than $1 billion for entrepreneurs.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

iTunesStitcher,  Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[02:46] Describe problems in ways that solutions are valued

[10:57] Establish why meeting is important and worth the time

[12:35] Build a narrative arc about what's new or changing

[18:54] 'Unpack' the solution with facts then 'sell' benefits with emotion

[21:30] Only present for as long as you can be compelling

[23:13] Remember and believe that YOU are the value

 

Links:

Pitch Anything: An Innovative Method for Presenting, Persuading, and Winning the Deal,by Oren Klaff

PitchAnything.com

Feb 21, 2018
Digital Transformation — What It Takes with guest Anand Swaminathan
22:00

Anand Swaminathan, a senior partner at McKinsey and Stephen W. Maye continue their conversation about what digital transformation means today, and why it’s important to almost every organization’s future. Real-world business examples of digital transformation enlighten part two of our conversation with Anand, as we dive more deeply into the role of cross-functional teams and discuss the culture challenges that must be addressed. 

Anand Swaminathan is also one of the authors of Digital @ Scale: The Playbook You Need to Transform Your Company. Anand covers some of topics in the book such as the changes in strategy that happen as part of the digital transformation, changes in culture, the organization model and operating model, as well as the changes in fundamental capabilities.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[04:35] Breaking down silos with cross-functional teams

[07:05] Examples of digital transformation in healthcare

[10:05] Culture change and reinvention are mandatory

[12:15] Emerging roles to build bridges, drive transformation

[14:08] 'Intentionally temporary' jobs, processes and models

[17:00] Preparing for your digital work future

 

Links:

McKinsey & Company

Digital @ Scale: The Playbook You Need to Transform Your Company, by Anand Swaminathan and Jürgen Meffert

 

Feb 07, 2018
Creativity — Part of the Process with guest Scott Berkun
21:20

Best-selling author of The Dance of the Possible, The Year Without Pants and other books, Scott is a former Microsoft project manager, a creative-thinking teacher, and a popular speaker.

Episode Description:

We return to the oft-neglected role of creativity in project management as Scott shares insights on bringing fresh-thinking and innovative problem-solving to your projects and teams, regardless of the work environment.

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow our podcast at:

iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Episode Notes:

@01:15 — overcoming 'creative block' by lowering the bar

@04:26 — keeping a journal to spark ideas and solutions

@09:21 — bringing creative thinking to traditional work cultures

@12:29 — balancing quick solutions with deeper exploration

@16:40 — an idea-generation technique using 'opposites'

 

Links:

Making Things Happen: Mastering Project Management, by Scott Berkun

The Dance of the Possible: the mostly honest completely irreverent guide to creativity,
by Scott Berkun

ScottBerkun.com

Jan 24, 2018
Agile Ways — An Ongoing Journey with guest Lauri Bingham
36:30

Lauri Bingham, Director of Technology PMO at T-Mobile. Responsible for managing over $100M across a diverse, high-profile portfolio of national programs and projects.

 

Episode Description:

Stephen W. Maye is your host for Projectified with PMI. In this episode, Stephen sits down with Lauri Bingham who shares insights and lessons learned on adopting and integrating agile principles and practices into a variety of work environments. Lauri also covers the PMO’s role in supporting teams, hybrid approaches, and dealing with complexity.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow our podcast at:

iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

 

Key Takeaways:

2:44 — the importance of 'soft' and 'big-picture' skills

@06:15 — moving from waterfall to agile/hybrid methods

@08:44 — finding the right fit for right team for right project

@11:01 — communicating successes, benefits and lessons

@12:20 — the challenges of going first and changing habits

@14:40 — a culture shift throughout organization

@19:57 — balancing waterfall and agile principles

@22:25 — letting the data lead you to the answers

@25:43 — listen to your customers, build a relationships

@30:30 — the learn-trial-learn process

@33:57 — career advice to women and young project managers

 

Links:

Lauri Bingham LinkedIn

Jan 10, 2018
Communication — Pitching Your Projects with guest Oren Klaff
22:04

Oren Klaff, Pitch Expert and author of Pitch Anything: An Innovative Method for Presenting, Persuading, and Winning the Deal. Stephen W. Maye is your host for Projectified with PMI. In this episode Oren explains why the art of pitching is a crucial skill for project leaders and describes ways to increase buy-in to your ideas, proposals, recommendations, and how to sell your vision of the future to your stakeholders and teams.

 

Oren shines a light on common pitfalls people encounter while working to inform and influence those around them as well as provide solutions to these problems. He also lends his insights into how to formulate an excellent pitch and the neuroscience behind these strategies.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

iTunes, Stitcher,  Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:56] Pitching as a project leader: Presenting, persuading, influencing, and creating a ‘dome.’

[3:39] Under the ‘dome’; projecting the future of a project.

[4:15] Selling the future; Creating a strong pitch and following through.

[5:51] Establishing the rules under the ‘dome,’ or pitch, and the value of not answering every question.

[7:34] The trust connection when pitching a project and replacing trust with credibility and autonomy.

[9:06] The importance of autonomy.

[11:18] The three major problems Oren sees in every presentation: the information dump, the nothing-burger, and having the right information in the wrong order.

[15:23] Answering the right questions and organizing your presentation in a narrative arc: the setup, the path-to-payoff, and the payoff.

[16:50] The setup: What’s changing in the world?

[19:09] The neuroscience behind the formulas and theories Oren discussed.

 

Links:

Pitch Anything: An Innovative Method for Presenting, Persuading, and Winning the Deal, by Oren Klaff

PitchAnything.com

Dec 15, 2017
Creativity — Make It Part of Your Toolkit with guest Scott Berkun
25:04

Scott Berkun is a bestselling author, sought after speaker, and former Microsoft project manager. Stephen W. Maye is your host for Projectified with PMI. In this episode Stephen discusses creativity withScott explains creativity’s often misunderstood and neglected role in project work, how to foster and apply creativity in process-oriented environments today, and why it will become even more important in the future of project professionals.

 

Scott describes creativity as a creation and problem-solving process within project roles. He emphasizes that the process of creation and being creative is to not only create something new but to maintain and improve pre-existing ideas. Scott discusses the importance of defining ‘good’ when it comes to creativity, the relevance of creativity in the project management role, the benefits of applying creativity to any role, and where creativity fits in an increasingly automated and digitized world.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

iTunes, Stitcher,  Google Play, or Pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:28] Stephen provides some background on Scott and welcomes him to the podcast

[1:09] What’s the deal with Scott’s hair?

[2:49] Scott’s definition of creativity

[5:12] Scott’s early project manager role with Microsoft

[6:04] Reflecting back on his role as a project manager: Where was creativity relevant?

[7:34] The importance of defining ‘good’ and who gets to define ‘good’

[11:08] Where creativity fits in a world that is becoming increasingly more automated and digitized.

[14:14] Who is at greatest risk for losing their job to automation?

[16:02] Creativity’s relevancy in projects in an ever-increasing automated world and how project managers can better bring creativity to their job.

[20:15] The opportunities and benefits of applying creativity in the role of project management.

 

Links:

Making Things Happen: Mastering Project Management, by Scott Berkun

The Dance of the Possible: the mostly honest completely irreverent guide to creativity,
by Scott Berkun

ScottBerkun.com

Dec 08, 2017
Career Development — Your Personal Project with guest Jacqueline Van Pelt, PMP
31:30

Jacqueline Van Pelt, a rising star at BAE systems, recounts her experiences in a number of project management roles and shares the deep insights she’s gained along the way. Jacqueline’s insights will benefit both up-and-coming and mid-career project professionals alike. Stephen W. Maye is your host for Projectified with PMI.

 

Jacqueline is a young professional that has already amassed an impressive level of experience. She started as a consultant in the defence industry doing project management and business development consulting and is now employed with BAE Systems a leading defence contractor where she has spent the last year immersed in a project management role and has gotten to see project management from a number of perspectives and angles. Jacqueline has a lot to bring to the community of project professionals, project managers, and those involved in PMOs and related work.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

Itunes, Stitcher, Google Play or pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:28] Introduction to Jacqueline and her current work

[2:24] Jacqueline’s role in reinvigorating a PMO: The challenges and mission

[5:19] The importance of mentorship

[6:18] The biggest challenge of reinvigorating a PMO

[7:42] Jacqueline’s transition from an engineer-focused mind to focusing on her interactions with people

[9:07] The switch to relationship-focused PM

[11:25] A window into how building these relationships began

[13:19] Valuing your own perspective as a project manager

[15:00] Jacqueline’s ‘backstage’ tips

[17:01] Jacqueline’s basic principles when it comes to trust and building relationships

[19:14] The key to building trust with those that you need to influence

[20:43] Learning to ask the awkward questions

[23:27] The experiences Jacqueline carried with her as a consultant into her current work

[26:35] Jacqueline’s excellent mentors

[29:13] Developing a leadership style

Oct 19, 2017
Artificial Intelligence — Opportunities Ahead with guest Dr. Michael Chui
27:44

Dr. Michael Chui of the McKinsey Global Institute. Dr. Michael Chui is a technologist by training, a computer and cognitive scientist, author, and frequent speaker at major global conferences. Stephen W. Maye is your host for Projectified with PMI. In this episode, Stephen talks with Michael Chui who has conducted lots of fascinating research around automation, artificial intelligence, machine learning, robotics, and digitization.

 

Michael shares research on the impact that artificial intelligence will have on the workforce, why A.I. presents new opportunities in the project world, how it affects work and the future potential of work, and how project professionals can prepare themselves to thrive in an emergent, exciting and uncertain landscape.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

Itunes, Stitcher, Google Play or pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[:28] Steven introduces Dr. Michael Chui and he gives us some background into his work

[1:40] What Dr. Michael Chui’s research has been about, the motivation behind it and the biggest surprises to come out of it

[8:40] Where Michael sees the significant differences in the project world with the adoption of technological automation

[12:17] The good news: Emphasis on leadership roles and developing connections with people

[14:20] Where Michael anticipates the most significant impacts from automation and digitization

[16:25] Where we are from a social acceptance perspective about machines and robotics

[19:20] Awareness of robotics and automation adoption across the country and on socioeconomic levels

[22:17] How people in professional roles will prepare for a world of increasingly smart technology

[24:48] The good news for project management and project leadership: Immense value placed on leadership and motivation skills

 

Links:

Michael Chui’s McKinsey & Company Profile

Oct 19, 2017
Digital Transformation — Why It Matters with guest Anand Swaminathan
25:58

Anand Swaminathan, a senior partner at McKinsey and Stephen W. Maye talk about what digital transformation means today, why it’s important to almost every organization’s future, the role of project management and realising its benefits, the risks and challenges it introduces, and the changes it can bring to your work culture, teams and customer experiences.

 

Anand Swaminathan is also one of the authors of Digital @ Scale: The Playbook You Need to Transform Your Company. Anand covers some of topics in the book such as the changes in strategy that happen as part of the digital transformation, changes in culture, the organization model and operating model, as well as the changes in fundamental capabilities.

 

For an easy way to stay up-to-date on Projectified with PMI, follow the podcast at:

Itunes, Stitcher, Google Play or pmi.org/podcast.

 

Key Takeaways:

[1:27] What ‘Digital Transformation’ represents

[3:22] What is different today in digitizing processes and the capabilities in technology

[5:33] The fundamental difference between ‘strategy’ vs. ‘execution’

[7:07] The breadth of relevance of digital transformation as a modern movement

[7:38] Where we should look today to see the most significant impact from an industry perspective

[10:01] Going Digital: Embracing the capabilities (John Deere serving as an example)

[13:47] Connection to Culture: The culture shift from digital transformation

[15:22] The big red flags in digital transformation initiatives

[19:36] Tailoring your digital transformation to better suit your customers

[21:02] Infusing and not replacing talent; Putting together the organization ‘puzzle’

[22:11] Planning a major digital transformation program vs. Planning a large technology implementation

 

Links:

McKinsey & Company

Digital @ Scale: The Playbook You Need to Transform Your Company, by Anand Swaminathan and Jürgen Meffert

Oct 13, 2017