The All Turtles Podcast

By All Turtles

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Description

Our artificial intelligence future is here. Robot overlords? Sci-fi utopias? Not quite. From AI studio All Turtles, hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega explore the provocative ways entrepreneurs use AI to solve real problems today.

Episode Date
Bonus 08: The Darjeeling Limited
37:10

If targeted advertising is so bad, then why do we use it at All Turtles? That was the question that came up in a Twitter debate between Phil Libin, cofounder and CEO, and Jeremy Brand Yuan, who runs product marketing. Rather than stir up a social dust storm, they sit down for a pot of tea and make peace. Entrepreneurs looking to market test potential products and messages will learn the pros and cons of behavioral targeting, and how to keep their strategies on the up and up.

 

Show notes

Pouring tea with Jeremy Brand Yuan, Product Marketer at All Turtles (1:05)

Wistaria tea house (3:51) 

Conversation about targeted ads (3:57)

Phil’s article about anger on social media and the attention economy  

Spot, the All Turtles product that helps you report harassment and discrimination at work 

Leaders, the All Turtles product that matches diverse and engaging speakers with event organizers to book speaking opportunities  

How Target figured out a teen girl was pregnant before her father did (Forbes)

EdgeRank, Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm

Inside Twitter’s struggle over what gets banned (New York Times)

Anger on social media (27:00)

  

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Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Aug 15, 2018
Bonus 07: Her
23:22

When it comes to issues of race and gender, how do people impact AI and how does AI impact people? To answer this question, Stephanie Dinkins has been speaking with a robot since 2014 and working with communities of color to develop more inclusive AI and to promote AI literacy. Her conversations with Bina48, a robotic head modeled on a black woman, challenge common assumptions about gender and race by AI and suggest ways to build more equitable systems.

 

Take our survey

We’re getting ready for Season Two of the All Turtles Podcast and we’d love your feedback: Please take this brief survey

 

Show notes

Stephanie Dinkins (Dinkins Studio)

Conversations with Bina48

Project al-Khwarizmi

What the Artist Sees in the Mirror (New York Times)

Execution: Select, Copy, Paste (BBC)

Future Perfect (Art in America)

America 3.0 (Vice)

Eyebeam studio

Dinkins involvement with Bina48 (2:20)

Bina48 advanced social robot (Wikipedia)

Racism and Bina48 (3:45)

Bina48 on Racism

Gender and Bina48 (6:39)

Martine Rothblatt (Wikipedia)

Building more inclusive AI with Project al-Khwarizmi (8:35)

Videos from PAK (scroll down page)

Not the Only One project (19:12)

Dialogflow for building conversational experiences

We want to hear from you

We’re getting ready for Season Two of the All Turtles Podcast and we’d love your feedback: Please take this brief survey

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

 

Aug 08, 2018
Bonus 06: Pirates of Silicon Valley
31:19

The rumors about Steve Jobs taking acid before dying, Mark Zuckerberg’s first business card, and why Silicon Valley is where it is are just some the tales unearthed by Adam Fisher’s Valley of Genius. Fisher joins host Blaise Zerega to discuss the culture of Silicon Valley and Steve Jobs’ outsized influence upon it, as well as to offer some predictions about its future. From semiconductors to Atari to the PC, their conversation connects the dots to AI, AR, and beyond.

 

Show notes

Valley of Genius: The Uncensored History of Silicon Valley (As Told by the Hackers, Founders, and Freaks Who Made it Boom by Adam Fisher

 

Blaise Zerega (left) and Adam Fisher at the Donatello Studio on July 26, 2018. (Image credit: Philip Dudchuk)

Vanity Fair excerpt: “Google was not a normal place”: Brin, Page, and Mayer on the accidental birth of the company that changed everything

Wired excerpt: Sex, beer, and coding: inside Facebook’s wild early years

Smithsonian excerpt: What Will Be the Next Big Thing to Come Out of Silicon Valley?

Reception and reviews (2:07)

New York Magazine

New York Times

Kirkus Reviews

The National Book Review

Culture and geography (8:07)

William Shockley (Wikipedia)

Nolan Bushnell (WIkipedia)

Steve Jobs (Wikipedia)

The importance of Atari to Apple (12:22)

Steve Jobs spirituality, death, and memorial service (15:55)

Neem Karoli Baba

Ram Dass

Did Steve Jobs take LSD before dying? (17:04)

Steve Jobs Memorial Held (The Wall Street Journal)

Steve Jobs' official cause of death released (The Telegraph)

Future of Silicon Valley (19:45)

Kevin Kelly

The Big Bang Theory

HBO’s Silicon Valley

How Green Was My Valley (Wikipedia)

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Aug 01, 2018
Bonus 05: Airplane!
07:30

Dylan Marriott is a cofounder of Spot, an All Turtles product, but during his free time, he’s a pilot. In this mini bonus episode, he talks to Phil Libin about the four lessons he’s learned from flying that are applicable to entrepreneurship. Both flying planes and launching companies require preparation, perspective, maximized optionality, and the ability to keep calm under pressure. Listeners, please prepare for takeoff.

 

Show notes

Conversation with Dylan Marriott, cofounder of Spot (0:30)

Spot, an AI chatbot that allows users to report workplace harassment and discrimination without talking to a human (0:24)

A video of Dylan flying a seaplane in Italy (0:50)

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

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Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Jul 25, 2018
Bonus 04: Doctor Doctor
08:03

Our Doctor Doctor mini-series features conversations between PhDs. Jessica Collier, cofounder of All Turtles, talks to Daniel Nicolae, cofounder of Spot, about each of their transitions from humanities PhDs to working in tech. Spot is an All Turtles product that lets users report workplace harassment and discrimination without talking to a human. Working on Spot, Daniel applied lessons he learned from academia, including the ability to follow through on challenging tasks.

 

Show notes

Conversation with Daniel Nicolae, cofounder of Spot (0:50)

Spot, an AI chatbot that allows users to report workplace harassment and discrimination without talking to a human (0:44)

Penultimate, the digital handwriting Evernote app (5:24)

 

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

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Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Jul 18, 2018
Bonus 03: Jack in the Box
22:44

We’re excited to announce that Butter.ai, an All Turtles product, is joining Box. Jon Cifuentes chats with Jack Hirsch, cofounder and CEO of Butter.ai, about the vision and execution of the deal. Butter.ai was built for people to find documents across multiple productivity apps. Jack shares the story of the team’s initial funding through their time at All Turtles and up to the offer from Box. He reveals how to successfully navigate an acquisition when you've built something that solves a real problem.

Show notes

Butter.ai joins Box (0:30)

Jack’s Medium post about Butter.ai joining Box (0:30)

The previous episode of the All Turtles podcast that featured a conversation with Jack about Butter.ai (0:35)

Conversation with Jack Hirsch, cofounder and CEO of Butter.ai (0:47)

Box, the cloud storage company (1:17)

Butter.ai, the smart, secure way for colleagues to search across work apps (1:48)

General Catalyst, a venture capital company (2:44)

Evernote, a mobile app designed for note taking, organizing, task lists, and archiving (3:10)

WeWork, a coworking and office space company (8:24)

Slack, real-time messaging, file sharing, and search (10:48)

Jack in the Box (image credit: Carlos Rocafort IV, All Turtles)

 

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Jul 12, 2018
Bonus 02: Before Sunset
20:59

Another day in Paris, another day in Paradise. Our hosts speak with Christine Foote, cofounder and COO of Leaders, an All Turtles product that matches event organizers with speakers. Foote describes the challenges of broadening the pool of speakers to increase diversity and range of viewpoints, and expanding the types of events where speakers might appear. Part of All Turtles Paris and based at Station F, Leaders makes finding speakers with both expertise and availability seamless for event organizers.

Show notes

The launch of All Turtles Paris (1:10)

Conversation with Christine Foote, COO of Leaders (1:18)

Leaders matches people organizing events with speakers who are interested, qualified, and available (1:20)

Loic Le Meur, cofounder and CEO of Leaders (3:25)

LeWeb, the largest web conference in Europe, cofounded by Loic Le Meur (3:28)

The Color Factory (18:08)

 

We want to hear from you

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Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Jun 27, 2018
Bonus 01: Round Midnight
19:29

Drawn to Paris for its burgeoning startup scene, your hosts speak with Edoardo Manitto, Managing Director of All Turtles Paris, on the eve of our Paris office opening. La Ville-Lumière (The City of Lights) is home to highly-skilled talent, smart investors, and a visa program that welcomes skilled immigrants. The first AT Paris product teams hail from across Europe and are addressing such problems as sexual harassment, language learning, and home security. All Turtles Paris is located at Station F.

Show notes

The All Turtles crew finds itself in Paris (1:22)

Conversation with Edoardo Manitto, Managing Director of All Turtles Paris (1:46)

The new All Turtles website! (3:50)

All Turtles Paris is based at Station F (4:55)

Xavier Niel, Station F, and 42 (6:51)

All Turtles Podcast Episode 27 featuring of 42

Goals for All Turtles Paris (7:20)

5 active product teams in Europe: Leade.rs, FastForward.ai, Sunflower Labs, Spot, and Chatterbox  (8:24)

The startup scene in Paris (12:35)

All Turtles partnership with Bpifrance (13:44)

All Turtles Paris job openings (16:45)

 

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Jun 20, 2018
032: Galaxy Quest
53:32

Science fiction has long inspired new technologies, from robots to flip phones to artificial intelligence and more. Yet it’s provocative to consider that sci-fi is more often descriptive than predictive. Dystopias can reflect contemporary fears and biases. Utopias may contain robot characters more developed than women characters. Still, the clear path from imagined worlds to today’s tech products is worth celebrating. Speaking of which, this episode marks the end of Season 1. Thanks for listening.

Show Notes

Welcome (0:12)

Conversation with Brittney Gallagher, host and executive producer of Digital Culture LA (2:02)

Brittney’s show on KPFK (2:02)

“Science fiction is not predictive; it is descriptive.” - Ursula Le Guin (4:54)

Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula Le Guin (7:30)

Social science fiction explained (9:29)

Foundation by Isaac Asimov (9:41)

1984 by George Orwell (9:48)

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (9:49)

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (11:07)

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (11:08)

The Call of Cthulhu by H.P. Lovecraft (11:52)

The Rats in the Walls by H.P. Lovecraft (13:45)

Anathem by Neal Stephenson (16:56)

We by Yevgeny Zamyatin (19:33)

I, Robot by Isaac Asimov (20:21)

Evernote’s Three Laws of Data Protection (21:35)

Dune by Frank Herbert (25:36)

Ready Player One (30:35)

The Matrix (30:35)

Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson (32:31)

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams (34:43)

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, which referenced transparent aluminum and voice commands for computers (35:05)

Listener questions (41:29)

You missed the obvious question, given your clear commitment to it: What impact is 42 having on diversity in the pipeline for developers? (42:05)

Can you share your thinking on blockchain for business? Various comments on the show give a negative impression of the technology. While it was created to support cryptocurrency, there are possible uses for various business scenarios. For example, procurement agreements that require definitive validation and perhaps an alternative to PGP servers for email encryption that would require storing a public key on a blockchain. (44:43)

David Mazières’ white paper on the Stellar Consensus Protocol (48:02)

Jessica’s graphic novel Adventures in Galactic Consensus (48:15)

End of Season One: Thank you (50:35)

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Jun 13, 2018
031: (Don't) Say Anything
37:27

When Gmail says, “It seems like you forgot to attach a file,” that precise phrasing is the result of careful deliberation by a design team. It’s one example Erika Hall gives in her book Conversational Design. She explains her work as “designing with words” rather than literary writing, and asserts that collaboration by designers, writers, and engineers is required for meaningful user experiences. Listener questions address previous episodes about Duplex and, our favorite scapegoat, blockchain.

Show Notes

Welcome (0:12)

Purchase Conversational Design by Erika Hall on A Book Apart (0:30)

Purchase Conversational Design by Erika Hall on Amazon (0:30)

Netflix’s company culture (0:37) 

Patty McCord’s slide deck: “You should try to build a great company to be from.”

Discussion with Erika Hall (2:41)

Erika Hall, cofounder of Mule Design Studio

The importance of non-verbal signs in communication (12:54)

Lightweight prototyping of communication interaction as part of design process and concept of minimal viable conversation (17:18)

How does reading poetry help someone become a conversational designer? (19:08)

William Carlos Williams: The Red Wheelbarrow (19:21)

Should it ever be ok for a computer to pretend to be a human? (21:49)

All the ways to interact with Amazon: “Amazon’s Quest for Global Domination” (video, Wall Street Journal) (24:33)

Rev. Walter Ong, Jesuit teacher and scholar of language (New York Times) (26:11)

Listener questions (28:47)

You came out strongly against Duplex. Can you explain why for someone who would like to be sympathetic to your viewpoint? I feel like I missed chapter 1-5 on what is so wrong with what they did. (29:03)

Episode 29 of the All Turtles Podcast featured a discussion on Duplex. (29:03)

I don’t understand the reference to blockchain in episode 28. Can you explain? (31:00)

Episode 28 of the All Turtles Podcast featured the taxonomy discussion (31:03)

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Jun 06, 2018
030: Antitrust
44:23

You may have received a slew of emails about GDPR last week. The new regulations seek to protect users’ privacy and took effect on May 25 across the EU. GDPR has guidelines on how long companies can keep users’ data, how they use it, and how they explain their requests for personal information. And because it’s the “World” Wide Web, standards set in Europe will impact companies everywhere. We also celebrate All Turtles’ one-year anniversary, and respond to suggestions about AI impersonating humans.

Show Notes

Welcome (0:38)

Discussion: GDPR (0:56)

What is GDPR and why should you care? (Wired) (1:53)

Mark Zuckerberg’s apology to the EU (8:55)

Guy Verhofstadt’s comments to Zuckerberg: “As one of the three big internet giants together with Steve Jobs and Bill Gates who have enriched our world and societies, or on the other hand, the genius that created a digital monster that is destroying our democracies and our societies. That is a question you have to put to yourself.” (9:43)

Zuckerberg avoided tough questions thanks to short EU question format (12:40)

All Turtles’ Anniversary (19:49)

Spot: replace workplace harassment and discrimination without talking to a human (22:31)

Disco: effortless recognition and rewards - appreciate employees right where work happens (22:32)

Butter: the smart, secure way for teammates to search across work apps (22:33)

Taxonomy discussion for early-stage products in episode 28 (23:48)

The Silicon Valley method isn’t enough: a better way to build products

(24:57)

Discussion: Use cases where human-impersonating AI could be beneficial (27:47)

It would be very useful for people who have social anxiety, selective mutism, or other disorders that make it very difficult for them to interact verbally with other people. Having a human-impersonating voice assistant would allow them to practice in a realistic way without feeling these anxieties. (29:48)

Improving interactions of ALS patients. (30:48)

An elderly person in a retirement home who is depressed and needs social interaction may benefit from a human-sounding voice assistant. (31:39)

Listener questions (35:49)

Bank of America is launching a virtual assistant they’re calling Erica. Why are they trying to make Erica sound human? Does the world really need another female voice assistant (e.g. Alexa, Siri, Cortana, etc.)? (36:01)

What’s the role of this podcast in growing your studio? Do you recommend that startups do their own podcasts? (39:28)

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

May 30, 2018
029: No Reservations
35:59

When we allow artificial intelligence to impersonate humans, what kind of precedent does that set? It’s one of the questions that was raised after Google unveiled Duplex, and in this episode our hosts consider what the implications of this technology might be. They also ask whether there should be new rules for grammar and speech when speaking with machines. Listener questions include the upcoming book club discussion and our favorite podcasts.

Show Notes

Welcome (0:11)

Laurel or Yanny? (Video) (1:05)

Discussion: Google Duplex (1:22)

Google I/O, the company’s annual developer conference (1:35)

Sundar Pichai demoing Duplex (video) (1:56)

Google’s statement after Duplex controversy (4:48):

"We understand and value the discussion around Google Duplex -- as we’ve said from the beginning, transparency in the technology is important. We are designing this feature with disclosure built-in, and we’ll make sure the system is appropriately identified. What we showed at I/O was an early technology demo, and we look forward to incorporating feedback as we develop this into a product." -- May 11, 2018

Pichai’s blog post about Duplex (5:10)

Microsoft’s Speech Devices SDK demo (video) (6:13)

Discussion: How does All Turtles define practical AI? (15:08)

IBM’s 5 attributes of useful AI (18:18)

Discussion: levels of formality for speaking to an AI (23:15)

Listener questions

When will you be airing the book club discussion on Erika Hall’s Conversational Design? (29:00)

Answer: Episode 31!

What are your favorite podcasts? (30:15)

The Daily, a daily news podcast from the New York Times (30:29)

Reply All, a podcast about the internet (31:03)

Pod Save America, a podcast about politics from former aides to President Obama (31:21)

Reveal, a podcast from the Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX (32:31)

Reveal’s money laundering episode (32:41)

Desert Oracle Radio (32:58)

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

May 23, 2018
028: Field of Dreams
46:20

In this episode, we reveal All Turtles’ highly scientific approach to classifying early-stage products: the Flying-shoe, the Costner, and the Play-doh. We also examine the most common reasons for failure -- and success -- of these products. Along the way, we describe being insulted by chatbots and how to improve Netflix recommendations.

Show Notes

Welcome (0:13)

Everyday encounters with artificial intelligence (3:03)

Phil: Making an online restaurant reservation (3:52)

Resy app - “The conversation has ended.”

 

Jessica: Text messaging with a political action program that uses a bot (8:30) 

 

Blaise: Netflix recommendations (13:51)

How to create separate Netflix profiles for more accurate suggestions

The All Turtles taxonomy for early-stage products and their potential failure points (15:20)

  1. The Blockchain - it’s not solving a real problem (18:38)
  2. Flying Shoe - Whoa, is it possible?! (19:27)

Failure modalities:

  • DaVinci - Can be imagined, but it can't be built (21:06)
  • Jetpack - Doesn't deliver on its promise (22:10)
  • H.W. Bush - Already exists and we just didn't know about it (22:43)
  1. Costner - Totally possible! But if you build it, will they come? (24:27)

Failure modalities:

  • Waterworld - Too long to get to market and costs too much money (25:00)
  • Golf - Boring and we don't care (e.g. ad tech use case) (25:27)
  • New Coke - There's already a better version of this (26:40)
  • Timeshare - No plausible exit or sustainable financial path forward (27:24)
  • Segway - People don't actually want it (28:30)
  1. Play-Doh - What is it? How will it work? What's the experience like? (30:04)

Failure modalities:

  • No particular failure modalities, but the product idea must become a Flying Shoe or a Costner to continue (31:19)

Spot: record and report workplace harassment (32:30)

Listener questions (35:42)

What does the crew find most useful in building a customer base as a product is introduced and gains traction? (35:55)

In mystical episode 23, you mentioned you’re hiring. As a developer myself, finding awesome people to hire is always a challenge. Can you talk a bit about your hiring process? How do you interview technical people? (39:07)

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

May 16, 2018
027: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Programming School
43:21

Imagine if you could skip college and learn to program for free. Kwame Yamgnane, co-founder and managing director of 42 Silicon Valley, joins this episode to describe how his school’s tuition-free approach to coding instruction is disrupting higher education. Your hosts also examine the importance of physical dexterity when considering AI for IKEA furniture assembly and Tesla’s manufacturing process. And drumroll, please: We announce our next book club selection. (Hint: It’s not Norse Mythology.)

Show Notes

Welcome (0:45)

All Turtles Book Club selection (1:48)

Conversational Design by Erika Hall (available for purchase at A Book Apart)

Join the book discussion on the All Turtles subreddit.

Discussion: AI, physical dexterity, and robotic automation (3:14)

Robots assembling IKEA furniture (The Economist) (3:21)

Elon Musk admits to excessive automation at Tesla factory (Futurism) (5:10)

Elon Musk says that “humans are underrated” (The Next Web) (5:40)

Video of trained eagles taking down drones (YouTube) (7:00)

Video of drone dexterity from ETH Zurich (YouTube) (7:12)

Guest: Kwame Yamgnane, managing director and co-founder of 42 Silicon Valley (12:02)

42 Silicon Valley (12:08)

42 Paris (20:40)

42 Silicon Valley admissions (22:36)

Documentary series Foundation about Station F, and part 1 of our analysis (31:07)

Listener questions (36:54)

Is Israel on All Turtles’ roadmap? Why did you choose Paris and Tokyo as the next locations (other than San Francisco) for All Turtles offices? (37:08)

I was wondering if you have an internship program, and if not, whether you plan to take on interns in the future? (40:01)

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

 

May 09, 2018
026: Crash
33:54

Public discourse around artificial intelligence continues to focus on self-driving cars, especially in the wake of fatal crashes. Yet data shows autonomous vehicles to be significantly safer than those controlled by people. One day, perhaps soon, the notion of human drivers will seem as absurd as child chimney sweeps. This episode also includes a rant about security questions, “advice to politicians” about immigration, and listener questions about All Turtles in Mexico City and Spot’s research.

Show Notes

Welcome (0:46)

Book club nominations (1:10)

Vote for your book club choice on our Twitter poll:

Blaise’s pick: Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman (1:16) 

Jessica’s pick: Conversational Design by Erika Hall (1:58)

Phil’s pick: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman (2:27)

Rant: The problem with security questions (3:16)

Time to kill security questions -- or answer them with lies (Wired)

Discussion: Self-driving cars and AI (6:36)

How a self-driving Uber killed a pedestrian in Arizona (New York TImes) (6:41)

Tesla: Autopilot was on during deadly Mountain View crash (San Jose Mercury News) (6:47)

Advice to politicians: tariffs and immigration (17:16)

Trump announces tariff on Chinese imports (CNN) (17:42)

Trump wants to build a 30-ft-high wall at Mexican border (CNBC) (17:44)

Coding school in Mexico for students who were pushed out of the U.S. (Wall Street Journal) (17:57)

Coding bootcamps in Mexico (EdSurge) (17:57)

Listener questions (26:57)

The Mexican Entrepreneurship Association recommended you as the best incubator for AI projects. Do you cover Mexico City? If so, can one work remotely? (27:03)

Mexican Entrepreneurship Association (28:29)

Does Spot plan to make its research publicly available? It would be interesting to read statistics about harassment by industry, gender, age, etc. Whatever (if anything) is appropriate to share. (29:05)

Episode 15: Conversation with Spot’s Dr. Julia Shaw (29:07)

Spot (31:00)

We want to hear from you

Please send us your comments, suggested topics, and questions for future episodes:

Email: hello@all-turtles.com

Twitter: @allturtlesco with hashtag #askAT

For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

 

May 02, 2018
025: Testworld
49:04

Pundits and politicians are stirring up fears about an artificial intelligence “arms race” between nations. But AI projects should be judged by the products they develop and the problems they solve, rather than their countries of origin. Joining the show is UX expert Susan Farrell to discuss user testing and her paper, “Computer-Assisted Embarrassment.”

Show notes

Welcome (0:42)

Discussion: AI as an arms race between US and China (Russia, too) (1:48)

China’s plans to be world’s leader in AI by 2030 (New York Times) (2:05)

Putin: “Artificial intelligence is the future” (Wired) (2:30)

China vs. the U.S. as an AI “showdown” (Technology Review) (2:45)

China's remote-controlled vehicles (Defense News) (2:49)

France’s $1.8B to fund a national program around AI development (Reuters) (4:55)

Macron positioning France to use AI for people, not companies (Technology Review) (5:04)

Google employees want their company to withdraw from Pentagon contracts, AI being used in drones (New York Times) (8:22)

Shameless plug: All Turtles Newsletter (12:30)

Subscribe to the All Turtles newsletter here, for a weekly collection of news and analysis about AI and entrepreneurship, complete with AT job listings!

Guest: Susan Farrell, UX Research and Strategy at All Turtles (13:13)

Susan’s paper Computer-Assisted Embarrassment (18:49)

Listener questions (40:54)

  1. I'm a listener to your Podcast in South Africa. Do you work with non-profits? And how would you work with someone in South Africa? (40:58)

Fast Forward, the accelerator for tech non-profits (43:40)

  1. Do you have any plan to visit Mexico or establish an office in Mexico? How should entrepreneurs in Mexico embrace artificial Intelligence? (45:22) 

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Apr 25, 2018
024: ZuckTales
58:29

Mark Zuckerberg’s Congressional testimony left many people scratching their heads. Was it an earnest effort to explain Facebook’s plans to prevent another Cambridge Analytica data scandal? Or was it part of a well-orchestrated apology tour? Riffing off Phil Libin’s 7-step analysis of the Facebook hearings, your hosts reveal a fundamental problem with the social network’s dependence on advertising and raise important questions about creating the kind of world we want to live in.

Show notes

Welcome (0:41)

Submit book club suggestion to hello@all-turtles.com (1:50)

Discussion: Mark Zuckerberg’s Congressional testimony (2:41)

Phil Libin’s 7-point plan for making sense of Zuckerberg’s Congressional testimony (LinkedIn post) (4:01)

Day 1 Senate testimony: video link and transcript

House testimony: video link and transcript

1. The big picture (4:21)

Hearing clip: “Yes or no, will you commit…?” (6:45)

2. A review of Mark Zuckerberg’s performance (8:05)

Mark Zuckerberg couldn’t stop mentioning his Harvard dorm room during Facebook testimony (Boston Globe) (10:48)

Hearing clip: One of Mark Zuckerberg’s “dorm room” mentions (10:51)

3. Facebook’s misaligned business model (12:01)

Hearing clip: “My top priority has always been our social mission…” (13:25)

Advertising comprises 97% of Facebook’s revenue (Business Insider) (15:50)

4. Fixes already underway (20:28)

Was your data shared with Cambridge Analytica? (21:48)

Hearing clip: “What is Facebook doing to prevent foreign actors from interfering in U.S. elections?” (24:48)

Russians promoted about 130 rallies through 13-Russian linked pages (New York Times) (26:44)

5. Should Facebook be regulated? (30:21)

Hearing clip: “What do we tell our constituents, given what’s happened here, why we should let you self-regulate?” (30:34)

Facebook’s most popular Black Lives Matter page was a scam run by a white Australian, report says (Washington Post) (36:11)

6. Fake news and fake accounts (36:56)

“Facebook had previously announced that $100,000 was spent on Facebook ads from June 2015 to May 2017 by Russian-linked disinformation sources, while an additional $50,000 was spent by Russians that signals indicate weren’t or were only weakly connected to an organized disinformation campaign.” (37:44)

Trump and Clinton spent $81M on US election Facebook ads, Russian agency $46K (TechCrunch) (37:50)

7. The problem of the attention economy (41:59)

Hearing clip: “Let me outline the way that we approach fighting fake news.” (42:05)

Listener question (53:04)

Submitted via the All Turtles subreddit:

As AI gets better and better at analyzing data, and predicting patterns in humans, what happens to our sense of individuality? Is there a future in which AI and data mining will be predicting most of my decisions and outcomes? My generation has been told that we are all unique, and big data and AI seems to be learning and proving that we are all much less unique than maybe we’ve grown up believing. Do advancements in this field make us feel less like individuals?

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Apr 18, 2018
023: Ghost in the Shell
36:20

Artificial intelligence may never do away with life’s two guarantees: death and taxes. But AI is changing the way people process them; memorial chatbots, for example, can take a loved one’s emails, social media, texts, and videos to create a digital facsimile of the dearly departed. And there are so many ways that AI, in theory, could make paying taxes less painful. Along the way hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega respond to listener questions about Walmart’s patent for drone bees and AI in France.

Show notes

Welcome

Ready Player One trailer (1:37)

Isle of Dogs trailer (1:45)

Dogs in the All Turtles office (1:58)

Listener correction (2:45)

All Turtles Podcast Episode 21, where “barrel” instead of “bunch” was used to describe those affected by the actions of one bad individual (skip to 16:30)

Memorial chatbots discussion (4:42)

Swedish funeral agency seeks participants for memorial chatbots (4:50)

Wired cover story on James Vlahos’s Dadbot (5:53)

The Verge story on Eugenia Kyuda’s Roman bot (6:40)

Shameless plug (19:33)

Subscribe to the All Turtles newsletter here, for a weekly collection of news and analysis about AI and entrepreneurship, complete with AT job listings!

Taxes and practical AI  (20:58)

IRS Audits Drop To Lowest Level Since 2002 news report on WBUR(21:19)

H&R Block using Watson to process tax returns (21:54)

Credit Karma using AI (21:59)

Conversation with Josh Browder from DoNotPay from Episode 21 (skip to 14:34) (22:27)

Listener questions (29:11)

What’s up with Walmart patenting drone bees? Do they really intend on stepping into the AI arena, or do you think it’s just a ploy to remain relevant to consumers in a retail apocalypse environment? (29:20)

Last week, President Macron of France made a public announcement of €1.5 billion to support AI projects and called for the creation of a national program. Previously, he attended the opening of Station F and has been very public of his support for tech. What’s All Turtles’ French strategy, and how will it give value and visibility to French developers in light of this recent news? (31:01)

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Apr 11, 2018
022: Little Giants
43:05

Artificial intelligence can render the concept of scale meaningless and enable startups to compete with global giants. Investor Hemant Taneja explains how size becomes a liability in his new book, Unscaled. Hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega also share everyday encounters with AI including autocomplete successes and disasters. Along the way, they respond to a listener question about regulating Facebook following the Cambridge Analytica data scandal.

Show notes

Everyday encounters with artificial intelligence

Google sheet autocomplete on iOS (2:21)

Email autocomplete fail (4:24)

The Amy meeting scheduler bot fail (6:36)

Conversation with General Catalyst managing director Hemant Taneja, author of Unscaled (10:19)

General Catalyst  A venture capital firm with offices in Silicon Valley, New York, and Boston.

Unscaled: How A.I. and a New Generation of Upstarts Are Creating the Economy of the Future, by Hemant Taneja  (10:36)

AngelList (16:35)

Livongo  A service for people with chronic illnesses to monitor their health. (18:32)

Ep. 5: Raging Bull  Maybe it’s kind of B.S.: Personalization (skip to 15:35) (21:51)

Hemant’s three bits of advice for entrepreneurs (30:10)

Listener Questions

Facebook was already operating under a 2011 consent decree with the FTC about sharing people’s data without their permission. Given the Cambridge Analytica scandal, and the fact that this week Zuckerberg stated that he was open to being regulated, should Facebook’s use of AI be regulated? What might that look like? (32:39)

Zuckerberg open to being regulated (New York)

Finally! For a while, I thought the All Turtles Subreddit was in the same category as flying unicorns and Daft Punk playing at the trash fence... but I finally found it! Seriously though... this is super hard to find, and you don't link to it from anywhere else. (39:10)

The All Turtles Subreddit

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Apr 04, 2018
021: The Antisocial Network
48:57

The Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal. It’s not a breach, it’s not artificial intelligence. Instead, it’s a logical result of the social network’s business model where users and their data are the product being sold. Also, our in-house patent expert Leonid Kitainik provides advice for entrepreneurs seeking to protect their intellectual property. Listener questions include whether Bitcoin will become the world’s single currency and how voice interfaces may change computing and work.

Show Notes 

The Facebook-Cambridge Analytica data scandal (1:41)

The Cambridge Analytica files: the story so far (The Guardian) (1:50)

How to delete apps from your Facebook profile (Facebook) (4:45)

Mark Zuckerberg’s statement on “the Cambridge Analytica situation” (Facebook) (9:42)

 

Conversation with Leonid Kitainik, vice president of intellectual property at All Turtles (17:12)

10 million patents (18:38)

Previous discussion on patents - Episode 14: Pillow Fort Apache, The Bronx (17:24) (skip to 4:24)

Patent requirements (29:20)

 

Listener questions (42:37)

How do we have to rethink creating work for the Internet when a big chunk of it will be interfaced via voice? What new challenges come up that upend almost 30 years of UX knowledge for a mostly visual and type- and touch-based interaction with machines? How will work change with voice interface? (42:45)

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said in an interview that he believes Bitcoin will become the world’s single currency. Is @Jack on crack? What do you think of this prediction? (46:15)

 

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Mar 28, 2018
020: A Few Good Bots
49:55

DoNotPay is a chatbot that has helped people beat more than 500,000 parking tickets and can now help you get a lower airfare after you’ve booked a flight. We talk with the startup’s founder and CEO Josh Browder about also helping refugees apply for visas and his vision for a lawyer-free future. Phil Libin, Blaise Zerega, and guest host Cathy Dinas recap a trip to Japan, debate the portrayal of AI in the Netflix series Black Mirror, and consider whether hiring a PR firm early in a product’s lifecycle is really just, well, BS.

Show notes

Postcard from Japan (3:43)

Phil’s hotel room key in Osaka

Pocketalk translation device used by Phil and Cathy

Pocketalk, SourceNext Releases 50 Languages Translation Device

Pocketalk audio featured in All Turtles Podcast Episode 2 (skip to 6:55)

Conversation with Josh Browder, Founder and CEO of DoNotPay (14:34)

DoNotPay.com (company web site)

Josh Browder on the Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Disrupting the Legal System with Robots (video)

A new tool uses legal loopholes to get you cheaper flights by checking prices 17,000 times a day (Business Insider)

Phil’s refugee story (video)

Listener questions

Black Mirror - does it interest you? What AI shown in the series is most attainable or realistic? (36:00)

Black Mirror Season 4 Trailer (video)

Is hiring a PR firm bullshit early in the product’s lifecycle? (42:17)

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Mar 21, 2018
019: Chucky
30:31

How close are we to an “Infocalypse” when AI-created audio and video present an alternative version of history? What happens to trust when facts are indistinguishable from fiction? Who controls the message? It’s a topic with roots in an early American novel when the fear wasn’t AI, but -- get this -- ventriloquism. Hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega debate the potential for this scenario and possible solutions. They also explain why the studio model is well-suited for building AI products. Listener questions include the origins of the All Turtles name and whether we’re living in a simulation.

Show notes

The threat of AI-generated audio and video to produce fake news (01:32)

He Predicted The 2016 Fake News Crisis. Now He's Worried About An Information Apocalypse. (Buzzfeed)

Synthesizing Obama: Learning Lip Sync from Audio -- video teaser (YouTube)

Synthesizing Obama: Learning Lip Sync from Audio (University of Washington)

Wieland and Memoirs of Carwin the Biloquist by Charles Brockden Brown (Goodreads)

Fake Voices Will Become Worryingly Accurate (The Rand Blog)

Discussion of Human voice or AI-generated voice? (Episode 14, 18:17)

Defining your terms: Studio (12:16)

The Silicon Valley method isn’t enough: A better way to build products by Phil Libin (All Turtles)

Phil Libin exits General Catalyst for All Turtles, a new AI ‘startup studio’ (TechCrunch)

Listener questions

Where does the name All Turtles come from and why don’t you have more fun with it? (20:18)

Are we living in a simulation? (24:04)

 Elon Musk on Simulation Theory, at Code Conference 2016 (YouTube)

 A Dream Within a Dream by Edgar Allan Poe (Poetry Foundation)

 Simulacra and Simulation by Jean Baudrillard (Goodreads)

Credits

Paul Hardcastle’s 1985 song “19” (YouTube)

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Mar 14, 2018
018: Brocast News
41:05

This episode kicks off our book club discussion of Brotopia, which reveals that sex parties are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gender discrimination in Silicon Valley. Hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega share their strong reactions to the reporting, history, and advocacy contained in Emily Chang’s book. Along the way, they delight in the ways AI improves reading the New York Times, our grammar, and keeping track of one’s schedule. Responding to listener questions, your hosts lay bets on a timeline for human birth in space, and how to maintain privacy in an age of Alexa.

Show notes

Everyday encounters with artificial intelligence

New York Times (2:35)

100 Notable Books of 2017 (NYT)

 

Like Grammarly but it shouts at you (5:18)

Grammarly (company web site)

 

Auto-suggested events in calendars (8:20)

How to create calendar events from emails (LifeWire)

Book club discussion: Brotopia by Emily Chang (13:11)

Brotopia: Breaking Up the Boys’ Club of Silicon Valley (GoodReads)

In ‘Brotopia,’ Silicon Valley Disrupts Everything but the Boys’ Club (NYT Book Review)

“Oh my God, this is so f--ed up”: Inside Silicon Valley’s Secretive, Orgiastic Dark Side (Vanity Fair)

Apple’s “1984” television commercial (YouTube)

 

Listener Questions

When do you think someone will be born in space? (31:07)

What percentage of the population is concerned with their privacy in a time of Alexa devices, Nest cameras, and the like? (33:19)

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Mar 07, 2018
017: Police Academy 2
42:53

At age 42, after co-founding one of the world’s largest wireless carriers and leading it to an IPO, Augie Fabela enrolled at a police academy. Today, Fabela serves as a Chief of Police for the Cook County’s Sheriff Department. Hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega talk with Chief Fabela about using community engagement to reduce gun violence, including an esports project (with involvement from All Turtles). In a “Maybe it’s kinda B.S.” segment, your hosts dissect so-called ID theft protection services. Listener questions include ways to learn new things and to become more efficient.

Show notes

Phil Libin: “I retire a joke.” (0:20)

Time travel (Wikipedia)

ID theft protection: Maybe it’s kinda bullshit? (2:59)

Millions of People Post Comments on Federal Regulations. Many Are Fake. (Wall Street Journal)

LifeLock (company website)

Credit Karma (company website)

Part two of our conversation with Augie Fabela, Co-founder and CEO of FastForward.ai, and Chief of Police at the Cook County Sheriff’s Department (10:16)

Augie K. Fabela II bio (LinkedIn)

DECIDE: Tactical Crisis Decision Making: A Framework For Law Enforcement by Augie Fabela (Amazon)

 

On Chicago’s South Side, Shootings Are Way Down...And Here’s The Reason Why (HuffPost)

(Left to right) Sheriff of Cook County Tom Dart, All Turtles CEO Phil Libin, Chief of Police at the Cook County Sheriff Department Augie Fabela.

FastForward.ai (company website)

Listener questions

What tactics do you use for learning new things and being more efficient? (30:14)

Halo Neuroscience (company website)

What are you looking for in founders who want to join All Turtles? (38:38)

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Feb 28, 2018
016: Police Academy 1
50:57

Outside the United States, about 4.5 billion people use prepaid wireless phone services. We check in with Augie Fabela, co-founder and CEO of FastForward.ai, which aims to reinvent the prepaid customer experience. Along the way, Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega offer “Advice to Politicians” about social media and the recent U.S. indictment of 13 Russians for interference in the 2016 election. Your hosts also explore the connection between artificial intelligence and issues of race, gender, and inequality.

Show notes

Advice to politicians: Get off Facebook and Twitter (2:10)

13 Russians Indicted as Mueller Reveals Effort to Aid Trump Campaign (New York Times)

After Florida School Shooting, Russian ‘Bot’ Army Pounced (New York Times)

Part one of our conversation with Augie Fabela, co-founder and CEO of FastForward.ai, and Chief of Police at the Cook County Sheriff’s Department (15:45)

Augie Fabela (LinkedIn)

VEON

Motorola brick phones from the early 1990s (Wikipedia)

FastForward.ai

USSD codes and menus for prepaid calling services (Wikipedia)

Sample USSD codes for Thailand

 

Prepaid card market expected to reach $3,653 billion by 2022 (Allied Market Research)

Listener comment and question

Why do you focus so much on the issues of race, gender, and inequality? (38:46)

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Feb 21, 2018
015: Spotlight
49:45

As public reckonings with harassment and discrimination abound, it’s becoming clear that the vast majority of these incidents go unreported. We check in with Dr. Julia Shaw, co-founder and Chief Scientist of Spot, a just-launched harassment reporting tool that aims to fix this. Along the way, hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega discuss the likelihoods for artificial general intelligence and artificial super intelligence, which some people have likened to God. We also announce the first selection for our Book Club: Brotopia.

Show notes

Announcing the All Turtles Book Club’s first selection (1:11)

The three nominees were:

Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art by Virginia Heffernan

How Music Works by David Byrne

Brotopia: Breaking Up the Boys' Club of Silicon Valley by Emily Chang

 

And the winner is: Brotopia. Join us next time for our debut book club discussion.

Artificial narrow intelligence, artificial general intelligence, artificial super intelligence (2:42)

The AI Revolution: The Road to Superintelligence - Part One (Wait But Why)

The AI Revolution: The Road to Superintelligence - Part Two (Wait But Why)

Conversation with Dr. Julia Shaw, co-founder and Chief Scientist of Spot (11:03)

Spot (website)

Spot launches a chatbot to combat workplace harassment (VentureBeat)

A new (and free) chatbot may help employees report instances of harassment (Washington Post)

This Chatbot Will Take Your Harassment Claims To HR Anonymously (Fast Company)

A collision of two realities (33:29)

The City & the City by China Miéville

 

Listener questions

How can developers avoid unconscious bias and make sure that AI is respectful to everyone? (34:25)

Can practical AI help virtuous people make virtuous products? (40:10)

Preparing to sign-off a la Elon Musk (46:24)

Live Views of Starman (YouTube)

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Feb 14, 2018
014: Pillow Fort Apache, The Bronx
49:52

We kick off the show with a call for listener suggestions to select our first read for The All Turtles Book Club. Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega then dive into a “Maybe it’s kinda bullshit?” segment on patents, asking whether they’ve outlived their usefulness. Your hosts also try to distinguish between human and AI-generated voices. This week’s listener questions lead to revelations about Phil’s 100,000 unread emails, Jessica’s knowledge of container ship videos, and whether Blaise is named for St. Blaise or Blaise Pascal.

Show notes

Listener suggestions for the All Turtles Book Club (1:30)

Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art by Virginia Heffernan

The Spirit Level: Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett

Safety: Car Crashes Pose Greater Risk for Women by Nicholas Bakalar, New York Times

How Music Works by David Byrne

Patents: Maybe they’re kinda bullshit? (4:24)

U.S. Constitution, Article One, Section Eight: [The Congress shall have power] “To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries.”

United States Patent and Trademark Office

First U.S. Patent issued in 1790

Patent kings: The world's 50 most innovative companies (USA Today)

Apple was Granted 39 Patents Today covering Facial Recognition and the iPad Pro's Smart Keyboard Connector and more (Patently Apple)

Human voice or AI-generated voice? (18:17)

Google’s voice-generating AI is now indistinguishable from humans (Quartz)

Fake Voices Will Become Worryingly Accurate (The Rand Blog)

Wieland: or, The Transformation: An American Tale by Charles Brockden Brown, published 1798

Audio samples from Tacotron 2 (Google’s Github page)

Uncanny valley (Wikipedia)

Love in the Time of Robots (Wired)

Interrobang in punctuation

Lyrebird.ai

Listener questions

How might AI be used to filter signal to noise? (36:00)

Screenshot of Phil Libin’s 100,000+ unread emails:

Clapping during President Trump’s State of the Union address

Will All Turtles expand to Vancouver, British Columbia? (43:06)

Containers podcast by Alexis Madrigal

How do you spend your Sundays? (45:30)

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Thanks for listening

 

Feb 07, 2018
013: Monday Night Fever
51:30

We check in with Jeremy Vandehey, co-founder and CEO of Disco, just 24 hours after his company’s successful launch. Jeremy explains the benefits of building a culture of appreciation and celebrating the contributions of all team members. Your hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega also tackle the tangled connection between .ai, .io, and colonialism, introduce a new segment called “Advice to Politicians,” and share their admiration for the late Ursula K. Le Guin. Listener questions include such topics as robots caring for the elderly, and All Turtles’ plans for 2020.

Show notes

Colonialism, .ai, and .io (1:42)

The dark side of .io: How the U.K. is making web domain profits from a shady Cold War land deal (GigaOm)

5,000 .ai domains registered

Vince Cate web site

New segment: Advice to our elected officials (4:41)

Hillbillies who code: the former miners out to put Kentucky on the tech map (The Guardian)

For Job Retraining Programs To Work, People Need To Show Up (NPR)

The Retraining Paradox (The New York Times)

Appreciation: Ursula K. Le Guin (12:37)

Ursula K. Le Guin website

Steering the Craft: Exercises and Discussions on Story Writing for the Lone Navigator or the Mutinous Crew by Ursula K. Le Guin (See page 17 of the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2015 edition by Mariner Books)

Le Guin’s letter to editor John Radziewicz

Send reading suggestions for our book club to hello@all-turtles.com

Conversation with Jeremy Vandehey, co-founder and CEO of Disco (18:01)

Disco

A startup from Phil Libin's 'studio' thinks its artificial intelligence will make employees happier at work (Business Insider)

Listener questions

Why are robots caring for elderly patients with Alzheimer’s? Shouldn’t this require empathy, something that AI lacks? (39:39)

What have you learned so far? What are All Turtles’ plans for 2020? (43:20)

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For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website.

Thanks for listening

 

Jan 31, 2018
012: Easy Rider
47:21

We check in with Ken Inoue, general manager of All Turtles Tokyo, who explains that being regarded as a “bent nail” can be a good thing. Ken also discusses the “black ships” phenomenon and tells us that Japan is a pun-loving nation. Your hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega share encounters with everyday AI when using Safari on mobile, seeking information on Michelangelo, and going for a mountain bike ride with Strava. Along the way, they answer questions about AI taking jobs and startups with .ai URL suffixes.

Show notes

Everyday interactions with AI

Auto-suggested Google searches within iOS -- Phil (2:02)

Michelangelo at the Met or Uber Michelangelo? -- Blaise (3:05)

Strava as a ride-partner finding service -- Jessica  (4:35)

Conversation with Ken Inoue, general manager of All Turtles Tokyo (7:41)

The nail that sticks out shall be hammered down” (12:30)

Japanese politicians force colleague with baby to leave chamber (20:43)

Black Ships (25:08)

Phil’s three sentences to drop into everyday conversation:

  1.  “I’m spending this week working out of the Tokyo office.”
  2.  “Set the controls for the heart of the sun” -- Pink Floyd
  3.  “Fire the explosive bolts!” -- Dr. Strangelove

Contact: hellojapan@all-turtles.com

Listener questions

AI will kill jobs. What can we do about? (32:48)

The number of startups with .ai URL suffixes doubled in 2017. Is this evidence of AI hype? (38:54)

Bonus

How we come up with episode titles (45:10)

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Thanks for listening

 

Jan 24, 2018
011: Batteries Not Included
46:20

We check in with Octane AI cofounder and COO Ben Parr about bots and ecommerce, and the surprising ways parrots may help build company culture. Along the way hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega question the importance of boards of directors in a segment called, “Maybe it’s kinda bull----?” They also discuss whether design can address ethical concerns for AI and what the demise of Facebook M means for chatbots.

Show notes

Boards of directors: Maybe it’s kinda bull----? (1:40)

The Board’s Most Important Function (Harvard Business Review)

The Board of Directors: Role and Responsibilities (Fred Wilson, AVC.com)

Interview with Ben Parr, Octane AI cofounder and COO (13:01)

Octane AI

Automating Your Sales (MSNBC)

Cult of the Party Parrot

 

Listener Questions

How do you think about AI and ethical challenges, and how do you help studio companies think about them? (34:11)

It was just announced that Facebook is killing Facebook M. What does that mean for the AI industry? (40:07)

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Jan 17, 2018
010: Buy Hard
43:27

The new year began with an ominous forecast: 12,000 U.S. retail stores are expected to close in 2018, a 33-percent increase from 2017. Hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega examine what this means for jobs, shopping, and the proverbial Main Street full of mom-and-pop stores. They manage to agree that online advertising has never been more annoying and pervasive, and debate whether AI will improve things anytime soon. Listener questions include hyper-personalization and differences between Japanese and American entrepreneurs.

Show notes

12,000 retail stores predicted to close in 2018 (00:57)

A tsunami of store closings is about to hit the US — and it's expected to eclipse the retail carnage of 2017 (Business Insider)

Fellow pour-over kettle

(Image credit: Fellow)

Why Kurt Vonnegut used a typewriter (Descriptedlines)

 

Intrusive, online advertising (16:58)

The Attention Deficit (The Baffler), a review of The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads by Tim Wu

How privacy will change internet advertising in 2018 (Boomtown)

Adblock Plus: “Surf the web without annoying ads!”

What is post-purchase marketing? (Iconic Digital)

 

Predictions for 2018 (25:03)

Panera Bread

(Image credit: Mike Mozart Flickr/Creative Commons)

Pantera, the band

(Image credit: Pantera/Facebook)

 

Pantera, an Italian sports car

(Image credit: Car Photography Tutorials)

 

Listener questions (33:02)

YouTube as an example of successful hyper-personalization as discussed in Episode 5 (33:25)

    Testing Russian Military MRE (YouTube)

How are entrepreneurs in Japan different from entrepreneurs in the U.S.? (38:20)

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Jan 10, 2018
009: Chat with Me
51:17

We check in with Replika CEO and cofounder Eugenia Kuyda shortly after her company’s AI confidant became available to more than 1.5 million people on a waitlist. Hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega speak with Eugenia about the challenges of creating an AI friend that is always there for you. She shares what differentiates Replika from conventional chatbots, therapy apps, and voice assistants like Siri and Alexa, drawing connections between how we behave towards AI and towards each other. Listener questions include glucose monitors and whether growth hacking works.

Show notes

Interview with Eugenia Kuyda, CEO of Replika (1:11)

Replika

Speak, Memory (The Verge)

What my personal chat bot is teaching me about AI’s future (Wired)

Replika Is A Strangely Therapeutic Chatbot For Talking To Yourself (Vocativ)

Listener Questions

What glucose monitor did Phil wear while fasting? (44:07)

Is growth hacking important? (45:57)

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Jan 03, 2018
008: Apocalypse Later
35:41

Robots taking jobs. The AI apocalypse. Universal basic income. These themes encompass the fears of many parents as they think about a future for their children. In this week’s episode, Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega address this worry and include advice from the likes of Senator Mark Warner, Kai-fu Lee, and Stephen Wolfram. Your hosts also assess notable developments in practical  AI from 2017 and share their daily encounters with iMessage, LinkedIn, and financial services app Penny.

Show notes

Developments in practical AI from 2017 (00:45)

AlphaGo Zero (01:51)

Voice assistants go mainstream (04:57)

Everyday AI use cases

iMessage autofill for calendar (6:12)

LinkedIn Premium for U.S. military veterans; Thank you for your service (7:30)

Penny, a financial services bot (8:46)

Listener question

What should I tell my two-year old daughter to help her survive the AI apocalypse? (11:45)

Senator Mark Warner, interviewed by Blaise Zerega on May 30, 2017, at the New Deal Ideas Summit in San Francisco.

Kai-Fu Lee, interviewed by Blaise Zerega on May 22, 2017, over lunch in San Francisco.

Stephen Wolfram, interviewed by Blaise Zerega on May 4, 2017, onstage with Group M’s Irwin Gottlieb at the Collision Conference in New Orleans.

Cafe X first Robotic Cafe in USA Robot Baristas serve up coffee

Meet SAM, the bricklaying robot

Building Tomorrow - Robotics in Construction

Tomorrow Daily - Japanese construction firm using robotic bulldozers guided by drones, Ep. 257

Wolfram Alpha: What jobs will still be important after the AI revolution?

Will Robots Take Our Children’s Jobs? (The New York Times)

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, by Yuval Noah Harari (2014)

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, by Yuval Noah Harari (2016)

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Dec 19, 2017
007: The Running Man
43:54

This week’s guest Veronica Belmont shares wisdom and tips from more than a decade of podcasting and recounts her journey to product manager of Growbot. Hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega speak with Belmont about privacy and anonymity, AI and chatbots, communication and diversity, and the importance of authentic company values. They also discuss the many, many reasons to be polite to your voice assistants. Your hosts revisit the role of AI in battling information asymmetry and reveal two AI products they’d like to see made next year.

Show notes

Information Asymmetry (1:16)

Previous discussion of information asymmetry in All Turtles Podcast Episode 3 (27:04)(iTunes)

E.F. Hutton: Stock broker with access to exclusive information (YouTube)

Phil Libin on historical asymmetries of information (Quora)

Interview with Veronica Belmont, product manager of Growbot (6:55)

Veronica Belmont

Veronica Belmont bio (Wikipedia)

Growbot 

IRL (Podcast)

Sword and Laser (Podcast)

Tor (The Tor Project)

Jad Abumrad (Radiolab)

Veronica Belmont’s podcasting protips (19:45)

Phil Libin on fart apps and crap bots

How to outrun a bear (Backpacker)

Listener questions (39:47)

Does All Turtles work with teams that are not on the West Coast? (39:59) 

What AI products would you like to see developed in 2018? (40:55)

 

Dec 12, 2017
006: The Twilight Drone
47:53

This week’s show is devoted to security and trust. After hackers stole the records of 57 million Uber customers and drivers last year, the company failed to disclose the data breach and paid the hackers $100,000. Your hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega offer the ride-sharing company no sympathy and explore what’s needed to safeguard everything from DNA to airports to social security numbers. They talk with Alex Pachikov, CEO of Sunflower Labs, who aims to reinvent home security with autonomous drones and AI. Your hosts also consider the roles of HR and physical security devices in the sexual harassment allegations against TV host Matt Lauer.

Show notes

Uber security breach (01:02)

Uber Hid 2016 Breach, Paying Hackers to Delete Stolen Data (The New York Times)

Genetic testing threatens the insurance industry (The Economist)

Transportation Security Administration: What Can I Bring? (TSA)

Will biometrics "active authentication" help do away with passwords? (CBS News)

Interview with Alex Pachikov, CEO of Sunflower Labs (17:05)

Sunflower Labs

Sunflower Home Awareness System (video)

Under The Shell: Sunflower Labs takes flight 

Listener questions (41:00)

Is there an app that can help stop sexual harassment? (41:18)

Matt Lauer Accused of Sexual Harassment by Multiple Women (Variety)

What’s with the secret button Matt Lauer allegedly used to lock his door? (44:04)

About That Secret Button in Matt Lauer's Office

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Dec 06, 2017
005: Raging Bull
46:53

Machine learning has shown the capacity to amplify our cultural and gender biases. Addressing the problem begins with admitting it exists. Join Hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega as they discuss ways to limit the impact of language that reinforces stereotypes. They also introduce a new segment called, “Maybe it’s kinda bull----t?” which in this episode casts a skeptical eye on personalization. They evaluate the utility of intelligent assistants from the likes of Amazon, Apple, Facebook. Google, and Microsoft, and explain that not all startups should go international.

Show notes

Gender bias (00:56)

Man is to Computer Programmer as Woman is to Homemaker? Debiasing Word Embeddings

Reference Software’s Grammatik

Grammarly

Friday Night Lights

Personalization: Maybe it’s kinda bullshit? (15:35)

Yahoo personalized home page

Listener questions

Please rate the voice assistants from Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft (29:30)

Is New York the new Silicon Valley? (32:00)

When should startups expand internationally? (34:36)

Everyday interactions with AI

A non-intuitive shortcut on Digit, a passive savings tool (36:09)

A wine club that uses AI-based recommendations (39:19)

iOS update includes male and female versions of CEO emoji (43:10)

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Nov 28, 2017
004: Butter
45:19

Riding a rollercoaster, taking a leap of faith, and launching a rocket are just some of the phrases used to describe the challenge of starting a company. This week, your hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega dive into the day-to-day realities of being a cofounder to reveal the value of communication, problem solving, and good, old-fashioned hard work. Along the way, they check-in with Jack Hirsch, CEO of Butter.ai, to hear what he’s learned two months after launch. Also, they debunk the gospel of the technical cofounder and describe their interactions with AI while watching HBO, conversing with Replika, and typing in iMessage.

Show notes

All Turtles

Butter.ai

Replika

Grammarly

Watch a video about Butter 

 

Listener questions

Why is Blaise’s Replika a female? (31:22)

Do startups need a technical co-founder? (32:59)

How do people apply to the All Turtles startup studio? (35:40)

 

Everyday interactions with AI

Sir, your Grammarly is showing (38:29)

John Oliver, President Trump, and AI (40:36)

TFW your generative keyboard trolls you  (41:35)

 

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For more from All Turtles, follow us on Twitter @allturtlesco, and subscribe to our newsletter on our website, http://all-turtles.com/#contact.

 

Thanks for listening

 

Nov 22, 2017
003: My Phone as a Dog
44:02

If the iPhone 6 reinvented the world of smartphones, then the iPhone X is poised to reinvent the world of contextual computing. Your hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega take a look at the implications of Apple’s new device for products involving facial recognition and everyday AI. They also discuss the potential for AI-based contraception, what UX-focused grad students ought to learn, and the possibility of a world without information asymmetry.

Show notes

Apple just put machine learning in your pocket

Replika

Amara’s Law: “We tend to overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run.”

Watch AI’s Big Mistake: Trying to Imitate Humans

Watch trailer for My Life as a Dog

Digit

Natural Cycles

Man is to Computer Programmer as Woman is to Homemaker? Debiasing Word Embeddings

Phil Libin on “historical asymmetries of information

Woebot

Grammarly use case in the wild:


 

Listener questions

Can AI be an effective contraceptive? (19:54)

What should UX-focused graduate students know about AI? (22:10)

How to avoid bias in machine learning systems? (25:20)

What does a world without information asymmetry look like? (26:29)

Is it really Turtles all the way down? (34:05)

Do you work with teams in Australia? (34:47)

 

Everyday interactions with AI

The value of chatbot therapy (35:46)

Grammarly’s keyboard for iOS (37:40)

The art of remembering phone numbers (40:39)

 

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Thanks for listening!

 

Nov 15, 2017
002: Found in Translation
36:43

There’s a clear opportunity for new applications of AI that solve common problems. Join hosts Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega for a discussion about practical AI products and why it's possible for small teams to build them. Listen as Phil uses a Pocketalk translation device in Osaka and shares sounds gathered while riding Japan Railways. Your hosts answer listener questions about big tech companies and data sets, why there’s plenty of room for startups, and they assess the current state of chatbots. They also share their everyday encounters with practical AI — from language translation to hands-free driving to remembering things.

Show notes

Watch trailer for Lost in Translation

Listen to Japan Railways jingles

Meet Noriyuki “Nori” Matsuda, SourceNext CEO

Pocketalk, SourceNext Releases 50 Languages Translation Device

The Pocketalk device in the wild: 

The Pocketalk device is about the size of a bar of soap.

The babel fish from Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

Amara’s Law: “We tend to overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run.”

Average tenure of employees at 10 biggest tech companies

 

Listener questions

With large tech companies being so active in AI, is there any room for startups? (11:15)

Is it easier to build an AI company with great data and a mediocre team or vice versa? (15:45)

What industry will be a big player/acquirer of AI in next two years? (16:26)

Chatbots were formerly all the rage, are we now in the trough of disillusionment? (23:02)

Everyday interactions with practical AI

English-Japanese translation, and Russian, too (27:51)

Google Assistant 1, Siri 0 (31:02)

Lost your photographic memory? There’s a bot for that  (32:30)

 

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Nov 08, 2017
001: The Mythology of the Garage
45:30

Introducing the All Turtles Podcast! Our premier episode features Phil Libin, Jessica Collier, and Blaise Zerega. Listen as they discuss the origins of the All Turtles studio and debunk one of Silicon Valley’s most iconic myths: the solo entrepreneur toiling in a garage. Along the way, they explain why founding teams should focus on building products before building companies. They tackle listener questions about blockchain, artificial intelligence, and how to bring more women and underrepresented minorities into the tech workforce. They also share their everyday encounters with AI -- mundane, but practical.

 

Show notes

Watch video from day one of All Turtles

Inside the All Turtles AI startup studio

Apple’s garage myth

Parker Hannafin, a 100-year old tech company

Current All Turtles studio companies

Butter.ai launch

Sunflower Labs partnership with Stanley Black & Decker

Listen to Japan Railways jingles

 

Listener questions

What’s All Turtles view of blockchain? (26:00)

What’s with so many companies calling themselves AI companies? (29:13)

How to get more women involved in leadership positions? (33:27)

Why is All Turtles going global? (38:12)

 

Everyday interactions with AI

The value of positive feedback (39:22)

Good grammar matters (41:26)

“No, Mom, I did not just call you ‘Alexa’” (42:46)

 

We want to hear from you

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And if you want to hear more from us...

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Thanks for listening!

 

Oct 30, 2017