A Better Peace: The War Room Podcast

By A Better Peace: The War Room Podcast

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: National

Open in Apple Podcasts


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 49
Reviews: 0

Description

This is the podcast of WAR ROOM, the official online journal of the U.S. Army War College. Join us for provocative discussions about U.S. national security and defense, featuring prominent national security and military professionals.

Episode Date
PAST VISIONS OF FUTURE WARS
36:14
A BETTER PEACE welcomes Adam Seipp to discuss the world of Cold War literature. Adam's previous article in our DUSTY SHELVES series reviewed Sir John Hackett's 1978 best seller, The Third World War: August 1985. Hackett, deemed both the heir to Pat Frank and Neville Shute and also the ancestor of Tom Clancy and so many others, is at the center of this episode. Adam is joined by DUSTY SHELVES editor, Tom Bruscino, and podcast editor Ron Granieri in the virtual studio. The three look at the allure of the dark topic of the Cold War apocalypse story and the growth of the military techno-thriller. The book may not be a literary classic, but it sold quite well thanks to a breathless ad campaign that included the blurb 'This book occupies a place under the Bible on President Carter's desk.' Prof. Adam Seipp Is Assistant Provost for Graduate and Professional Studies as well as Professor of History and Associate Department Head at Texas A & M University. His research focuses on war and social change in modern Germany, transatlantic relations, and the history of the Holocaust. His most recent books are Strangers in the Wild Place: Refugees, Americans, and a German Town, 1945-1952 (2013) and Modern Germany in Transatlantic Perspective (2017) co-edited with Michael Meng. Thomas Bruscino is an Associate Professor at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of the DUSTY SHELVES series. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: General Sir John Winthrop Hackett GCB, CBE, DSO & Bar, MC (5 November 1910 – 9 September 1997) Photo Credit: Artist Unknown
Nov 17, 2020
A LABORATORY FOR MILITARY PROFESSIONALS (WARGAMING ROOM)
37:20
A BETTER PEACE welcomes back Ken Gilliam for another installment of the WARGAMING ROOM. In this episode Ken sits down with Doug Winton, the chair of the Department of Military Strategy, Planning and Operations (DMSPO) at the U.S. Army War College. Ken and Doug discuss War College games like JOINT OVERMATCH and MDO 1943. They examine the history of the games and their incorporation into the DMSPO curriculum to include the benefits as well as the limitations based on the time constraints and faculty experience of the resident program. We're different than biologists or chemists or physicists because we don't have a laboratory where we can learn and develop new knowledge. Doug Winton is a colonel in the U.S. Army and the Chair of the Department of Military Strategy, Planning and Operations (DMSPO) and the Henry L. Stimson Chair of Military Studies at the U.S. Army War College. He holds a Doctor of Philosophy degree in International Relations from Johns Hopkins University. Ken Gilliam is a colonel in the U.S. Army and Director of Strategic Wargaming at the Center for Strategic Leadership, U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: MDO 1943 gameboard Photo Credit: COL Ken Gilliam
Nov 10, 2020
A FATAL DOSE IN 2 MILLIGRAMS: FENTANYL AND NATIONAL SECURITY
31:56
The United States has identified drug trafficking, drug use, and drug manufacturing as important issues -- domestically and internationally. In recent years, the opioid crisis has been at the center of many U.S. government efforts. Overdoses due to synthetic drugs have been on the rise for the past decade with fentanyl and its derivatives squarely at the heart of the issue. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Heidi Munro to the virtual studio to discuss how this once legal prescription painkiller has become a national crisis leading to criminal activity, tragedy for families across the country and a point of contention in international relations. Heidi joins podcast editor Ron Granieri to examine this issue's impact on national security, the military's involvement in possible management of the issue and where the nation goes from here. The military treats illicit drugs and narcotic trade as a crime, so it's a transnational crime. So because of that they don't really have a way to act on it. Heidi Munro is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Idaho Army National Guard where she is currently serving as the state's joint medical planner for COVID-19. She is also the Administrative Officer for the Medical Detachment and full-time clinician for the Office of the State Surgeon. She is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College resident class of AY20. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description:Two milligrams of fentanyl, a lethal dose in most people Photo Credit: Courtesy of the Drug Enforcement Agency
Nov 03, 2020
UNDERSTANDING A DIFFERENT PEOPLE: THE OKINAWAN IDENTITY
28:51
When planning for interactions with foreign countries, whether in peace or in war, it can be easy for military planners to be lulled into the false security of the homogeneity of a culture or race or nationality. Many would argue that was exactly what happened in Afghanistan and Iraq in the last two decades. But long before the United States' most recent conflicts in the Middle East, there was a small island chain in the Pacific known as the Ryukyus that posed a particular challenge to the efforts of WWII Army and Marine planners. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Courtney Short to the virtual studio to discuss her study of the Okinawan people and the experiences of Soldiers and Marines as they invaded the southern-most islands of Japan. Courtney joins our Editor-In-Chief, Jackie Whitt to look at the individual culture and behavior of the Okinawans as U.S. forces moved ashore during a war that would, in some ways, liberate the people of the Ryukyus from centuries of rule by mainland Japan. They saw themselves as subjects of the emperor, even though they were aware of the inequalities and what they did not have similar to Japanese on the mainland. Courtney Short is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army and the Garrison Commander of Carlisle Barracks, PA. She has a PhD in History from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and is the author of Uniquely Okinawan: Determining Identity During the U.S. Wartime Occupation. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description:This is a portion of a work by Nakasone Shōzan in 1889. An orihon (zigzag folded book). It illustrates people's hairstyles, tattoos, hairpins, merchants' customs, wedding ceremonies, funerals, etc. with varicolored drawings. This is a very valuable material for understanding the people of that period. Photo Credit: http://manwe.lib.u-ryukyu.ac.jp/d-archive/s/viewer?&cd=00063470 via Wikimedia Commons
Oct 27, 2020
THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)
27:50
A BETTER PEACE welcomes Pulitzer nominated journalist and author Stephen Vogel to the virtual studio to talk about his path to authorship and his love of history. Steve joins our own Michael Neiberg to discuss the differences between his role as a journalist versus his style as a narrative historical author and how that differs even further from academic historical accounts. They both lament the future lack of written first hand accounts as the world moves forward in this day and age of electronic communications and what that means for historical accounts of present day. I wish I could say I really knew what was going to happen. But the truth is, a friend of mine wanted to go to Oktoberfest and I said, "Oh well, I'll go with you. we'll go to Oktoberfest and I'm going to stick around and, you know, try my luck at freelancing." Steve Vogel is the author of Through The Perilous Fight, The Pentagon: A History and Betrayal in Berlin. He is a veteran journalist who has written extensively for The Washington Post about military affairs and the treatment of veterans from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: 1988 photo of graffiti on the West side of the Berlin wall before its fall Photo Credit:Thomas Panter (Panterdesign) Other releases in the "On Writing" series: TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
Oct 20, 2020
GAMES, PLAY, AND THE AFFECTIVE DOMAIN (WARGAMING ROOM)
30:00
What do a hyper-competitive Monopoly player, an educational methodologist and a U.S. Army War College Faculty member have in common? Well for starters they're all the same person and that combination of skills and interests makes Megan Hennessey the perfect guest on this inaugural WARGAMING ROOM episode of A BETTER PEACE. Megan joins series editor Ken Gilliam in the virtual studio to discuss how wargames tick all the boxes the head of educational methodology looks for. Megan and Ken examine how wargaming gets at breaking down relationship barriers, replicating emotional responses in a safe setting and the ability to track learning in an experiential learning environment.   My strategy was to buy up all the railroads because it was sort of like passive income...but I guess I must have gotten pretty good at it because no one will play with me anymore. Megan J. Hennessey, Ph.D., is the Professor of Educational Methodology at the U.S. Army War College. Ken Gilliam is a colonel in the U.S. Army and Director of Strategic Wargaming at the Center for Strategic Leadership, U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. LEGO® is a trademark of the LEGO Group of companies which does not sponsor, authorize or endorse this site Photo Description: We don't know what this is. You'd have to ask its creator what they were trying to represent with this conglomeration of LEGO® bricks. That's the beauty of Serious Play®, participants are required to verbalize the physical constructions they make to represent ideas and concepts. Photo Credit: COL Ken Gilliam
Oct 13, 2020
BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING AND HE’S HERE TO HELP
29:26
Facial recognition technology promises to help law enforcement identify and track suspicious individuals ideally revealing bad actors before they can commit acts of violence or other crimes. The more promising facial recognition becomes as a technology however, the louder grow the voices concerned about the potential invasion of privacy that such mass collection could or would entail. "Only the guilty need worry" may be the comforting reply, but how does a free society protect itself while also protecting the privacy of its citizens? A BETTER PEACE welcomes Mandi Bohrer to examine facial recognition as it currently exists and where it may be going in the future. She joins podcast editor Ron Granieri in the virtual studio to discuss the pros and cons of this incredible tool and the measures necessary to ensure that the technology isn't misused. Well, first to clarify, I’m not going to advocate for the DOD using facial recognition at the corner of East and Main in whatever city. Mandi Bohrer is a Lieutenant Colonel and a Military Police Officer in the U.S. Army. She is a graduate of the AY20 Resident class of the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay
Oct 06, 2020
WOMEN IN PEACE AND SECURITY
31:52
On October 31st, 2000, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1325, which reaffirmed “the important role of women in the prevention and resolution of conflicts and in peace building, the importance of their equal participation and full involvement in all efforts for the maintenance and promotion of peace and security, and the need to increase their role in decision-making with regard to conflict prevention and resolution.” Resolution 1325 helped create the Women in Peace and Security program or WPS. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Ambassador Jean E. Manes as she shares her experience in the national security realm. She joins podcast editor Ron Granieri in the studio to explain how far the WPS program has come in the last two decades and where it needs to continue to go. Ambassador Manes is the Civilian Deputy to the Commander and Foreign Policy Advisor, U.S. Southern Command, and in this unique position she has a wealth of real world cases that have benefited from the involvement of women.   When it becomes unremarkable and we don't even have to highlight it, or it's not even anything we notice, then I think we will have met the goal. Ambassador Jean E. Manes assumed duties as Civilian Deputy to the Commander and Foreign Policy Advisor, U.S. Southern Command, Miami, FL, in October 2019. She is a member of the Senior Foreign Service with the Department of State, having joined in 1992 and has served under five Presidents. Throughout her 27-year career she led large scale operations, focusing on empowering people and prioritizing resources. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense or Department of State. Photo Description: (L) Rosie the Riveter is a widely known symbol of American women's contribution to the U.S. defense industry  of WWII.  She was the sign of changing attitudes in the nation over 70 years ago. (R) Ambassador Jean E. Manes, Civilian Deputy to the Commander and Foreign Policy Advisor, U.S. Southern Command, represents how far women in peace and security have come—and what the nation needs more of. Photo Credit: (L) J. Howard Miller, Office for Emergency Management, War Production Board. (R) U.S. Southern Command
Sep 29, 2020
TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)
25:05
It's a two-for-one on A BETTER PEACE this week. Kara Dixon Vuic and Jason Vuic join Michael Neiberg in the studio for our ongoing ON WRITING series. Kara and Jason share their varied approaches to writing and discuss what literary collaboration looks like in their house. Two very different authors that write on different topics discuss their takes on research, their writing styles and reading each other's drafts. Well, we also have very different writing styles, right? I can write 100,000 drafts...When Jason sits down to write, the period does not go at the end of the sentence until it is done. Kara Dixon Vuic is the Lance Corporal Benjamin W. Schmidt Professor of War, Conflict, and Society in 20th-Century America at Texas Christian University. Jason Vuic is an independent scholar and freelance writer. He holds a PhD in Balkan and Eastern European history from Indiana University. They happen to be married to each other. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Courtesy of Harvard University Press, Johns Hopkins University Press,  Hill and Wang, Simon & Schuster and University of Massachusetts Press Other releases in the "On Writing" series: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
Sep 22, 2020
WOULD YOU BE WILLING TO ANSWER A FEW QUESTIONS?
35:14
It's an election year, and leaving all politics aside, the use of opinion polls is already in full swing by all parties involved. Polling performance in recent years has called the accuracy of polls into question. Was the sample size big enough? Did the questions lead to predictable answers? Who is actually willing to answer the polls, and how many are truthful? A BETTER PEACE welcomes Amanda Cronkhite to the studio to discuss the art and science of opinion polling. She joins podcast editor Ron Granieri to examine what polls can really tell us if done correctly. The most famous man on the street poll that failed, probably, being that Dewey Beats Truman, which made of course into one of the most famous photos in American presidential history. Amanda Cronkhite has been a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. She just accepted a position at the School of Advanced Military Studies (SAMS), Leavenworth, KS. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Photo by cottonbro from Pexels
Sep 15, 2020
A SMARTER WAY TO RECRUIT AND RETAIN
33:57
"Be All You Can Be", "Army of One", "Army Strong" these are just a few of the most recent slogans used by the U.S. Army Recruiting Command in the last 40 years. The first remained in place for over 20 years. The last was 12 years running. But if the Army is going to meet its recruiting and retention goals it's going to need new and innovative strategies to find and keep, motivated, talented and qualified individuals. David Eckley and Silas Martinez join A BETTER PEACE host Ron Granieri in the studio to discuss innovation in Recruiting Command. As a student in AY20, Eckley realized that during his time as a recruiting battalion commander, he had applied the very same innovation strategy he learned in class. He used that knowledge to outline a plan to ensure innovation doesn't stagnate. I noted that my experience in recruiting command aligned with the innovation implementation strategy that was discussed in in one of our classes. Lieutenant Colonel Dave Eckley is an Army intelligence officer who most recently served as a battalion commander in recruiting command. He holds a Masters degree in geographic and cartographic science from George Mason University and is a graduate of the AY20 Resident Class of the U.S. Army War College. Colonel Silas Martinez has served as Director of Leader Development at the U.S. Army War College since 2017. He holds a PhD in industrial organizational psychology from Wright State University and is a 2015 Army War College graduate. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: A collage of U.S. Army Recruiting posters throughout the years. Photo Credit: U.S. Army
Sep 08, 2020
TOWARDS A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF OTHER PEOPLES
33:04
Born of an idea first uttered in October 1960 at an impromptu speech by then Senator John F. Kennedy, the Peace Corps was officially established on 1 March 1961. In its first year Peace Corps volunteers served in just 5 countries. Six short years later 14,500 volunteers had served in 55 countries around the world. To date more than 240,000 volunteers have served in 142 host countries. Due to COVID-19, all of those volunteers have been recalled to the United States. But that doesn't stop former volunteers from singing the praises of the program and its great works. A BETTER PEACE welcomes four volunteers of the Peace Corps organization "To help promote a better understanding of other peoples on the part of Americans" the third goal of the organization. Brad Arsenault, Steven Saum, Maricarmen Smith-Martinez, and Joby Taylor all join our podcast editor Ron Granieri in the studio to discuss their Peace Corps experiences. It is their hope to inspire the next generation to selfless service so that once the pandemic is managed, the Peace Corps can continue its mission "To help the people of interested countries in meeting their need for trained men and women" and "To help promote a better understanding of Americans on the part of the peoples served."   My reasons for joining the Peace Corps were somewhat simplistic and somewhat idealistic. I knew that I wanted to live outside of the United States, and I knew that I wanted to help people.   Brad Arsenault was a Peace Corps volunteer in Gabon and is a Foreign Service Officer with USAID. He is a graduate of the AY20 Resident Class of the U.S. Army War College. Joby Taylor was a Peace Corps volunteer in Gabon and is the current Director of the Shriver Center Peaceworker Fellows Program. Steven Saum was a Peace Corps volunteer in Ukraine and is the Director of Strategic Communications/Editor, WorldView Magazine for the National Peace Corps Association. Maricarmen Smith-Martinez was a Peace Corps volunteer in Costa Rica and is a program manager at Bixal, a digital communications, design, and technology, company co-owned by an RPCV. She was elected to serve as Chair of the National Peace Corps Association Board of Directors in 2018. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) keep serving throughout their lives. We provide resources to support returned Volunteers and to showcase the Third Goal of the Peace Corps mission - To help promote a better understanding of other peoples on the part of Americans. Photo Credit: Courtesy of the Peace Corps  
Sep 01, 2020
CARLISLE SCHOLAR, INTERNATIONAL FELLOW — THE VIEW FROM BAHRAIN
29:45
Imagine taking a graduate level program in a foreign country in a different language from your native tongue. Now imaging stepping it up and enrolling in the one class that does it completely differently from all the rest, and prides itself on significantly challenging its students to think and behave in a manner that forces them outside their comfort zone daily. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Khaled Al Khalifa, a Bahraini Army officer that did just that during his academic year in Carlisle. Khaled joins podcast editor Ron Granieri to discuss his experience as an International Fellow in the AY20 Resident class at the U.S. Army War College who elected to join the prestigious Carlisle Scholars Program. When we go through committees and we go through student centered instruction...instruction that is led by students themselves we are practicing strategy, we are practicing the practical side of what we are being taught Developing Strategists: Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Interwar Army War College Khaled Al Khalifa is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Bahrain Defence Force, a participant of the Carlisle Scholar Program and a graduate of the AY20 Resident course of the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: (Top) The 1928 class of the U.S. Army War College, in which (L) Dwight D. Eisenhower was a student (Bottom) The International Fellows of the AY20 Resident class of the U.S. Army War College, in which (R) Khaled Al Khalifa was a student. Photo Credit: All photos U.S. Army
Aug 25, 2020
NOT YOUR FATHER’S NATIONAL GUARD
28:34
The citizen soldiers of the Army's National Guard component often lead different lives from their active duty counterparts. Geographically tied to their state units, they often live out their entire career in their home states spared of the constant moves the rest of the military endures. Guard units in years past have been overlooked for equipment modernization and training. But the wars that the United States has been involved in since 2001 have changed a great deal of those historic missteps. What once was a strategic reserve has now found itself with a much larger operational role. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Mike Flaherty and Pete Helzer, two graduates of the AY20 Resident Class of the Army War College, and guardsmen form Ohio and Oregon respectively. They join podcast editor Ron Granieri to discuss their experiences throughout their careers and during their time in Carlisle. Mike and Pete share what they learned during their academic year and what they hope their active duty counterparts may have learned about the National Guard. This was our first podcast episode conducted remotely during the pandemic as you'll hear noted in the intro. We greatly appreciate Mike and Pete's patience as we worked through the process to utilize this capability. I know folks who are self-employed, own their own companies and well, they certainly have the flexibility to deal with themself as their employer, their business suffers, and in many cases, that can be unrecoverable. Pete Helzer is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Oregon Army National Guard. Mike Flaherty is a Lieutenant Colonel in the Ohio Army National Guard. Both of them are graduates of the AY20 Resident Class of the U.S. War College.  Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: (Top Left) Roughly 400 troops with the Winder-based 1st Battalion of the 121st Infantry Regiment advised and assisted Afghan security forces in 2019. (Top Right) Maj. Brent R. Taylor, 39, who was killed during an insider attack in Kabul on 3 Nov 18, was the mayor of North Ogden, a husband, and a father to seven young children. He epitomized the citizen soldier as a Utah National Guardsmen. (Bottom Right) Maj. Timothy A. Doherty of the 148th Medical Company, Georgia Army National Guard, helps a man up from a school building near downtown New Orleans after being stranded by the flood waters that ravished the city. The Army National Guard was mobilized to take part in Joint Task Force Katrina, a humanitarian assistance operation in an effort led by the Department of Defense in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (Bottom Left) The First Muster by Don Troiani for the state of Massachusetts, 1637. First Muster, Spring 1637, Massachusetts Bay Colony. The birth of the United States National Guard Photo Credit:(Top Left) U.S. Army photo by Master Sgt. Casey Nelsen (Top Right) Unknown (Bottom Right) U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate First Class (AW) Brien Aho, Fleet Combat Camera, Atlantic (Bottom Left) Don Troiani
Aug 18, 2020
THE MAGIC OF THE INTERWEBS
33:17
If anyone still doubts how integral the Internet is to daily life then shut off your modem or put your phone in airplane mode in the midst of the current pandemic social distancing exercise. Now try and pay a bill, study for a course, contact friends or family, stream a movie -- you get the idea. But that's just the beginning of cyber's reach into your world. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Joe Atkinson and Richard D'Angelo to the studio to discuss their experiences in the cyber arena as a Marine JAG officer and an Army Signals Officer. They join podcast editor Ron Granieri to examine just how much society takes for granted and worse how little the average individual understands about cyberspace and the threats that lurk behind every bit and byte. I don't know if everybody truly appreciates how interconnected everything is and relies on cyberspace... and I don't know if we truly appreciate how vulnerable we can be to malignant actors Joseph Atkinson is a Lieutenant Colonel and a member of the Judge Advocate General's Corps in the U.S. Marine Corps. Richard D'Angelo is a Lieutenant Colonel and a Signal Officer in the U.S. Army. They are both graduates of the AY20 Resident Class of the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Image by kalhh from Pixabay
Aug 11, 2020
THE TURMOIL OF IDENTITY CRISIS: SPECIAL FORCES ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE
34:29
Organizational culture, on its face, is a relatively easy concept to understand; who "we" are as an organization is defined by the underlying beliefs, assumptions, and values - spoken and unspoken - held by the members, leadership and the organization as a whole. Truly understanding and identifying those beliefs, assumptions and values can be incredibly difficult. And when members hold or are exposed to conflicting ideas within that organization it can lead to morale, discipline and behavior issues that can tear a unit apart if not addressed. A BETTER PEACE welcomes the leadership of 1st Special Forces Command (Airborne) (1SFC(A)) MG John Brennan, BG Steve Marks and COL Ed Croot to the studio to discuss Croot's recent study accomplished during his War College Fellowship in AY20. The Commanding General, Deputy Commanding General and Chief of Staff join podcast editor Ron Granieri to examine the current identity crisis that 1SFC(A) is undergoing and way ahead as explained in Ed's work. We have to have a common vision of who we are and what we are for. That goes from the recruiting piece all the way through onboarding once they are in their unit of action, all the way through to retirement really. There is an Identity Crisis in Special Forces: Who are the Green Berets Supposed to Be? by COL Edward C. Croot, U.S. Army Special Forces   MG John Brennan is the Commanding General of 1st Special Forces Command. He has served in the Special Operations community since completing the Special Forces Qualification Course in 1995 and is a graduate of NC State University, the Air Command and Staff College, and the U.S. Army War College Fellows Program at UNC Chapel Hill. BG Steve Marks is the Deputy Commanding General of 1st Special Forces Command. The majority of his 28 years of service have been within Special Operations units, and he is a graduate of the University of Missouri, the Army’s Command and General Staff College, the Naval Postgraduate School, and the U.S. Naval War College. COL Ed Croot is the command’s Chief of Staff. He is a Green Beret with 25 years of service in the Army, and he recently completed the Counterterrorism and Public Policy Fellowship at Duke University where he conducted research on the current culture and identity of the U.S. Army Special Forces. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: (Foreground) 1SFC(A) Logo. (Background) Soldiers assigned to the U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School stand in formation after donning their green berets for the first time during a Regimental First Formation at Fort Bragg, North Carolina July 9, 2020. The ceremony marked the completion of the Special Forces Qualification Course where Soldiers earned the honor of wearing the green beret, the official headgear of Special Forces. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by K. Kassens
Aug 04, 2020
LIKE A FISH OUT OF WATER: A SAILOR AT THE ARMY WAR COLLEGE
31:01
The J in JPME stands for joint. In order to qualify for joint accreditation each senior service college and the National Defense University are mandated by CJCS instruction to include a proportional number of students and faculty from the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines. Each year hundreds of senior officers attend the college of another service and they find themselves confronted with a whole new world of traditions, culture, acronyms and terms. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Henry Wicks, a member of the Navy element and graduate of the AY20 Resident class at the U.S. Army War College. Henry joins podcast editor Ron Granieri as they discuss what it's like to be a representative of the U.S. Navy and naval warfare to the School of Strategic Landpower. Henry explains the differences he expected to find in Carlisle along with the vast number of things that are very much the same regardless of uniform or service component. So, it's actually been kind of nice to be at Carlisle because for the first time in many years I actually have a chance to see mountains, don't tend to be a lot of mountains right next to the ocean where the Navy has submarine bases. Henry Wicks is a Commander and Submarine Officer in the U.S. Navy. He is a graduate of the AY20 Resident Class of the U.S. Army War College and has entered the prospective commanding officer pipeline to be the Commanding Officer (Gold Crew) of the U.S.S. Maryland (SSBN-738). Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738) transits the Saint Marys River. Maryland returned to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay following routine operations. KINGS BAY, Ga. (Aug. 1, 2012) Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James Kimber/Released
Jul 28, 2020
MULTI-COMPONENT UNITS: MAXIMIZING THE TOTAL FORCE
29:03
In the last decade the U.S. Army reserve component has moved from a strategic to an operational reserve. This has driven a clear requirement for greater reserve integration amongst the active component. To accomplish this the Army and the Joint force have expanded the use of multi component units (MCUs) to improve efficiency and readiness across the active and reserve components of the DoD. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Darren Buss and Rick Giarusso to discuss the employment of MCUs in support of the the Army and Joint missions in keeping with the Total Force Policy. They join podcast editor Ron Granieri to explain the challenges and successes of marrying up the different components in support of real world missions. ...As you expand that to a larger scope with these larger Army headquarters it's more people and it's a little harder...there are consequences when you're trying to recruit and retain a reserve component element to meet that high level of operational tempo   Darren Buss is a Colonel and an aviation officer in the U.S. Army. Richard Giarusso is a Lieutenant Colonel and a logistics officer in the U.S. Army Reserves. They are both graduates of the AY20 Resident Class of the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command employs National Guard, Active Duty and Reserve units to successfully carry out its crucial mission. The unit patches of 1st Space Brigade (active and reserve components), the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command, and the 100th Missile Defense Brigade (a multi-component Army National Guard brigade headquarter), left to right. Photo Credit: Carrie David Campbell
Jul 21, 2020
THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)
30:37
A BETTER PEACE welcomes Alexandra Richie, internationally acclaimed and award-winning writer and historian, and one of the world's foremost experts on World War II in Europe. Richie joined Michael Neiberg to discuss her studies and books on both German history as viewed from Berlin, and the Warsaw Uprising. Their conversation covered how she first started writing and how her study of classical music years earlier aided her mindset and method of writing. The interview took place at the new U.S. National World War II Museum in New Orleans. I don't mean to sound pretentious but I think that long, long, long musical training and studying things like the structure of symphonies and so on, I think it trains your brain to think in a certain sort of structure   Alexandra Richie is the Wladyslaw Bartoszewski Chair co-chair and she teaches History and International Studies at the Collegium Civtas University, Warsaw, Poland. She is the author of Faust’s Metropolis: A History of Berlin which was named one of top ten books of the year by American Publisher’s Weekly and Warsaw 1944 which won the Newsweek Teresa Torańska Prize for best non-fiction book of 2014. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Ambassador to Poland Arthur Bliss Lane at the ruins of Warsaw circa 1945. Lane was the Ambassador to Poland from 1944 to 1947, first to the Polish government in exile in London and later in Warsaw to the post-war government. Photo Credit: Government photo taken from Arthur Bliss Lane: I saw Poland betrayed: An American ambassador reports to the American people, New York 1948. Other releases in the "On Writing" series: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
Jul 14, 2020
THEY REALLY READ IT FOR THE ARTICLES
28:36
Playboy magazine first hit newsstands in December 1953, so it was quite well established by the time the United States joined the conflict in Vietnam. Derided by a portion of the population as disgraceful smut, the common retort from the men who perused the sordid pages was "I just read it for the articles." A BETTER PEACE welcomes Amber Batura to the studio as she discusses Playboy's place amongst soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines during the Vietnam conflict. She joins our Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to explore how the articles and interviews the magazine presented truly were a lifeline to home, relaying the thoughts and concerns of the citizenry these military members represented. With subjects like Stanley Kubrick, Martin Luther King Jr., Nabokov, Ayn Rand, Muhammad Ali and Ralph Nader it's hard to deny that Playboy captured some of the most popular voices of the time. And perhaps there were other features that attracted the attention of young men in a far off land. But mostly they read it for the articles. I was in a small village outside of Hanoi when we ran across a Playboy store...and so I decided I have to know why this is here and why is it still here. Why is it branding the war basically?   Amber Batura is an Instructor at Texas Tech University. She researches gender, sexuality and popular culture's influence on soldiers in the US military. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: A soldier spends his off time reading the Jul '69 edition of Playboy magazine. Location unknown. Photo Credit:Photographer and subject unknown. Believed public domain. Please contact warroomeditors@gmail.com for credit or removal
Jun 25, 2020
SERVICE TO THE NATION: CLOSING THE CIVIL-MILITARY DIVIDE (EISENHOWER SERIES)
33:13
When you talk about the millennial generation a lot of them want some kind of fulfillment out of the work that they're doing and not feel like they're just gonna be a cog in the machine. In September of 2019 we introduced you to the Eisenhower Series College Program. Members of the Eisenhower Program began the year on the road visiting colleges and universities, interacting with audiences often unfamiliar with members of the U.S. Military. Unfortunately the DOD's Travel Policy, as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic, has curtailed the Spring schedule for the program. It is our hope at WAR ROOM to bring you a glimpse of what some of those presentations might have looked like via A BETTER PEACE: The WAR ROOM Podcast. The first three episodes discussed diversity and inclusivity in the military and social media's impact on national security and technology's role on the battlefield. In this fourth and final episode of the series A BETTER PEACE editor Ron Granieri is joined by three members of the U.S. Army War College AY20 resident course Aaron Sadusky, Eric Swenson and Melissa Wardlaw. The four of them discuss the relationship between higher education in the United States and the military. Their conversation ranges from compulsory national service, to the impact of current education standards on the military recruiting pool and the all volunteer force, to a free 13th and 14th grade. Aaron Sadusky is a Lieutenant Colonel and a Field Artillery Officer in the U.S. Army. Eric Swenson is a Colonel and an Engineer in the U.S. Army. Melissa Wardlaw is a Lieutenant Colonel and a Medical Operations officer in the U.S. Army. All three of them are graduates of the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: AmeriCorps is potentially one of the national service options spoken of in this episode. It is a network of national service programs, made up of three primary programs that each take a different approach to improving lives and fostering civic engagement. Members commit their time to address critical community needs like increasing academic achievement, mentoring youth, fighting poverty, sustaining national parks, preparing for disasters, and more. Photo Credit: Photographer unknown Also of possible interest The Martial Citizen "Inspired to Serve" Final Report "Inspired to Serve" Executive Summary Other releases in the "Eisenhower Series": SERVICE TO THE NATION: CLOSING THE CIVIL-MILITARY DIVIDE (EISENHOWER SERIES)NEW WEAPONS FOR NEW DOMAINS? (EISENHOWER SERIES)SOCIAL MEDIA: GOOD MEDICINE OR A BAD PILL (EISENHOWER SERIES)INCLUSIVITY, DIVERSITY AND THE MILITARY AS A LEADER OF CHANGE (EISENHOWER SERIES)
Jun 19, 2020
NEW WEAPONS FOR NEW DOMAINS? (EISENHOWER SERIES)
34:59
Getting that idea from the battlefield...back into the hands of someone who can fix it back in the states or elsewhere in the world rapidly is absolutely critical. In September of 2019 we introduced you to the Eisenhower Series College Program. Members of the Eisenhower Program began the year on the road visiting colleges and universities, interacting with audiences often unfamiliar with members of the U.S. Military. Unfortunately the DOD's Travel Policy, as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic, has curtailed the Spring schedule for the program. It is our hope at WAR ROOM to bring you a glimpse of what some of those presentations might have looked like via A BETTER PEACE: The WAR ROOM Podcast. The first two episodes discussed diversity and inclusivity in the military and social media's impact on national security. In this episode A BETTER PEACE editor Ron Granieri is joined by three members of the U.S. Army War College AY20 resident course Ryan Ehrler, Henry Schantz and Dave Short. The four of them discuss technology's role on the battlefield, and whether or not new tech truly requires new domains or simply levels the playing field and speeds up the battle. Their conversation ranges from the new Space Force to prop-driven aircraft to lightweight batteries and the infantryman that still has to carry them to the fight. While some of this technology leads to dramatic new ways to fight much of it just enhances tried and true tactics. Ryan Ehrler is a Colonel and a Special Forces officer in the U.S. Army. Henry Schantz is a Lieutenant Colonel and F-22 pilot in the U.S. Air Force. Dave Short is a Lieutenant Colonel and an Air Defense officer in the U. S. Army. All three of them are graduates of the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Lt. Col. Keith Colmer, a test pilot with the Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve Command Test Center in Tucson, Ariz., successfully releases a 500-pound GBU-12 laser-guided weapon from an AT-6C experimental light attack aircraft Sept. 28, 2011. The Air Force has stated as recently as March 2020 that it will only purchase a limited number of light attack aircraft for experimentation and training foreign militaries. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo/James Haseltine Other releases in the "Eisenhower Series": SERVICE TO THE NATION: CLOSING THE CIVIL-MILITARY DIVIDE (EISENHOWER SERIES)NEW WEAPONS FOR NEW DOMAINS? (EISENHOWER SERIES)SOCIAL MEDIA: GOOD MEDICINE OR A BAD PILL (EISENHOWER SERIES)INCLUSIVITY, DIVERSITY AND THE MILITARY AS A LEADER OF CHANGE (EISENHOWER SERIES)
Jun 16, 2020
READINESS IS PRIORITY #1, BUT READY FOR WHAT? (WARGAMING ROOM)
30:31
What do you do when the training your organization requires you to accomplish doesn't actually prepare you for your mission or enhance your unit readiness. You create a board game, of course. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Mike Loftus, Will McKannay and Jim Markley to discuss how Mike and Will, with Jim's help, came to create a board game during their year at the U.S. Army War College. The three join podcast editor Ron Granieri to explain how their game helps to illustrate the development of appropriate requirements, training plans and reporting cycles for Brigade Combat Teams across the Army. Mike and Will sought out Jim to advise them on the actual game construction and the central question they were trying to answer. They then incorporated inputs from offices in the Pentagon, actual units in the field and the commanders that are living the readiness drill. I struggled and I questioned why we did so much training to meet certain gates to go someplace and then ultimately be told 'Hey that training was very useful, it got you ready, but doesn't meet the requirements of this particular mission.'   Lieutenant Colonel Mike Loftus is an Army Engineer who most recently served as Brigade Engineer Battalion Commander with the 1st Armored Division and forward deployed to the Republic of Korea. He previously served as a Fellow for the Chief of Staff of the Army Strategic Studies Group. Colonel Will McKannay is a Military Policeman with 26 years of service across all echelons most recently as a Criminal Investigations Division (CID) Battalion Commander. A former Joint Staff Intern, COL McKannay served on both the Joint and Army Staffs. They are both graduates of the AY20 Resident Class of the U.S. Army War College. Jim Markley is the Deputy Director of Wargaming at the Center for Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher R. Morales Other releases in the "Wargaming Room" series: A LABORATORY FOR MILITARY PROFESSIONALS (WARGAMING ROOM)GAMES, PLAY, AND THE AFFECTIVE DOMAIN (WARGAMING ROOM)
Jun 09, 2020
WHOSE HISTORY? WHOSE HERITAGE? MEMORY AND MEMORIALS IN THE ARMED FORCES
28:51
I would venture to say that there are a lot of black troops that understand what those names mean and just have chosen not to take it up as an issue. Bragg, Benning and Hood are names that are universally known throughout the Army and most of the Department of Defense. They are some of the largest installations in the Army, and they are home to the Airborne Corps, Special Operations, the Infantry, Armored and Cavalry branches to name a few. Millions of soldiers have lived, trained and deployed from these posts. But to some, the individuals that these forts are named after are a divisive point. All three were Confederate generals, and what they represent to many service members and civilians is deeply hurtful. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Vianesa Vargas to discuss her recent research centered around the need for change in the DoD. She joins podcast editor Ron Granieri to explain why now is the time to rename these and other installations and ships and acknowledge their impact on the whole of the force and the inclusiveness the U.S. military strives to represent. Vianesa Vargas is a Lieutenant Colonel and Logistics Readiness Officer in the U. S. Air Force and a member of the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The "Stone Gate" on Benning Road at Ft. Benning, Georgia. The fort is named after after Henry L. Benning, a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War. Since 1909, Fort Benning has served as the Home of the Infantry. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo
Jun 04, 2020
SOCIAL MEDIA: GOOD MEDICINE OR A BAD PILL (EISENHOWER SERIES)
35:33
There is a concept called collective coping. It's using social media and specifically social relationships to cope with issues...more than ever you can see that people are reaching out.   In September of 2019 we introduced you to the Eisenhower Series College Program. Members of the Eisenhower Program began the year on the road visiting colleges and universities, interacting with audiences often unfamiliar with members of the U.S. Military. Unfortunately the DOD's Travel Policy, as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic, has curtailed the Spring schedule for the program. It is our hope at WAR ROOM to bring you a glimpse of what some of those presentations might have looked like via A BETTER PEACE: The WAR ROOM Podcast. Our first episode in the series discussed diversity and inclusivity in the military. In our second episode our podcast editor Ron Granieri is joined by War College students Ryan Ehrler, Steve McNamara and Henry Schantz. In their conversation they try to address the overarching topic of modern communications and social media including how they impact national security and how they shape contemporary politics and society. For all the good social media can do for the world there are dangers associated with its use and abuse. Military members in particular must guard against the information leaks that are inherent to the world of social media. Ryan Ehrler is a Colonel and a Special Forces Officer in the U.S. Army. Henry Schantz is a Lieutenant Colonel and F-22 pilot in the U.S. Air Force. Steve McNamara is a Lieutenant Colonel and Tactical Air Control Party member in the U. S. Air Force. All three of them are members of the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit:Original Photo by cottonbro from Pexels Other releases in the "Eisenhower Series": SERVICE TO THE NATION: CLOSING THE CIVIL-MILITARY DIVIDE (EISENHOWER SERIES)NEW WEAPONS FOR NEW DOMAINS? (EISENHOWER SERIES)SOCIAL MEDIA: GOOD MEDICINE OR A BAD PILL (EISENHOWER SERIES)INCLUSIVITY, DIVERSITY AND THE MILITARY AS A LEADER OF CHANGE (EISENHOWER SERIES)
May 29, 2020
FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)
29:22
Suddenly I was distracted by this amazing roar...and I turned to the umpire and I said 'What is that?' absolutely dumbstruck by this vision and sound and he said 'That's a Spitfire' A BETTER PEACE welcomes James Holland, internationally acclaimed and award-winning historian, writer, and broadcaster. A familiar and trusted face appearing in numerous WWII documentaries, James is also the author of over two dozen books and novels. He joins Michael Neiberg in the studio to discuss how he began writing, where he finds his passion and the immense pleasure he derives from interviews and research that have made him a highly sought after subject matter expert. In this episode Holland explains to the listener how a chance encounter with a Supermarine Spitfire lead him back to his childhood fascination with WWII and his first novel about the Battle of Britain. Neiberg interviewed Holland at the new U.S. National World War II Museum in New Orleans last year. Michael Neiberg (L) and James Holland (R) in front of WWII themed artwork at the Higgins Hotel adjacent to the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. James Holland is an internationally acclaimed and award-winning historian, writer, and broadcaster. The author of the best-selling historical novels, he has also written nine works of historical fiction. He regularly appears on television and radio, and has written and presented the BAFTA-shortlisted documentaries. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Ray Hanna at the controls of his famous Spitfire MH434 at the Flying Legends of 2005 Photo Credit: Bryan Fury75 at French Wikipedia. Other releases in the "On Writing" series: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
May 27, 2020
EFFECTIVE, AFFORDABLE AND TIMELY: DOD ACQUISITION
26:48
The Defense Acquisition System is the management process by which the Department of Defense provides effective, affordable, and timely systems to the users. -Department of Defense Directive Number 5000.01 Misunderstood, under-appreciated, Congressionally scrutinized, and even mocked and immortalized in a Hollywood movie, the acquisition corps of each of the services have a difficult job. Charged with acquiring all of the stuff necessary to train and equip the soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines of the nation's military, the professionals in the acquisition world face daily challenges. Good, fast and cheap are a great set of guiding principles but everybody knows you can only have two of those thing at the same time. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Jason Tate, an Army acquisition officer, to share his experiences and thoughts based on his time in this crucial career field. He joins podcast editor Ron Granieri as they delve into COTS, GOTS, PMs and PEOs along with a number of other misunderstood tools and terms of the acquisition community. Jason Tate is a Lieutenant Colonel and Acquisition Officer in the U.S. Army. He is a student in the AY20 Resident class of the U.S. Army War College. And yes he passed his oral comps. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Bruce Jette (center), Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics & Technology (ASA(ALT)) & Army Acquisition Executive (AAE), gets a briefing on product improvements for cannon systems. Photo Credit: John Snyder/U.S. Army
May 22, 2020
INCLUSIVITY, DIVERSITY AND THE MILITARY AS A LEADER OF CHANGE (EISENHOWER SERIES)
36:45
What you're describing...always has been a leadership problem. It's leadership at the extreme echelons. So leadership at the top of the Army and leadership at the bottom of the Army are primarily where you address and solve this problem.   In September of 2019 we introduced you to the Eisenhower Series College Program. Members of the Eisenhower Program began the year on the road visiting colleges and universities, interacting with audiences often unfamiliar with members of the U.S. Military. Unfortunately the DOD's Travel Policy, as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic, has curtailed the Spring schedule for the program. It is our hope at WAR ROOM to bring you a glimpse of what some of those presentations might have looked like via A BETTER PEACE: The WAR ROOM Podcast. In this first episode our podcast editor Ron Granieri is joined by War College students Joe Buccino, Sam Smith and Vianesa Vargas. In their conversation they try to answer the overarching question, "How does an institution built on uniformity reflect the very diverse society that it defends? And how does the military accomplish diversity and inclusivity while maintaining unit cohesion and readiness?" Joe Buccino is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army, a published poet and the host of the All American Legacy Podcast. Sam Smith is a Lieutenant Colonel and Military Intelligence Officer in the U.S. Army. Vianesa Vargas is a Lieutenant Colonel and Logistics Readiness Officer in the U. S. Air Force. All three of them are members of the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Boston College, Burns Library building, northeast view; in April 2019. Boston College was one of the many venues that was on the schedule for the Eisenhower Program but was cancelled due to the COVID-19 Pandemic and DoD Travel Restrictions. Photo Credit: Karlunun via Wikimedia Commons under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license
May 19, 2020
NEGLECT AND ATTENTION IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE
25:59
There is no "Latin America" right? It is a region made up of independent sovereign countries, some with different histories, some with different languages...based on that they're going to have different relationships with the United States. In the present day examination of global security, much of the United States' attention is focused on the Middle East, East Asia and Eastern Europe. All too often Western hemisphere countries, activities and interests get short changed on resources and attention. The United States's top trade partner is Canada, and Mexico is close behind. Many countries in the Western hemisphere share values and forms of governance, and have been important security partners for the United States. But does the United States undervalue these long-term partnerships, running the risk of losing their support against adversaries such as China and Russia? A BETTER PEACE welcomes Eric Farnsworth back to the studio to examine the risks of the United States' current behaviors in Latin America and Canada. He's joined by our Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt, as they discuss the unique relationships the United States has with its Western hemisphere neighbors and what might be done to ensure they endure. Eric Farnsworth is the Vice President and Head of the Washington Office, Americas Society and Council of the Americas. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: U.S. Army Soldiers conduct a multinational exercise alongside National Army of Colombia at Tolemaida Air Base, Nilo, Colombia on January 23, 2020. The exercises demonstrate operational readiness and enhance interoperability in Airborne Operations. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Spc Edward Randolph
May 12, 2020
EVOLUTIONARY STRATEGY TO COMBAT STRATEGIC ATROPHY
27:45
The 2018 National Defense Strategy was clear in its call to shake off strategic atrophy - to maintain competitive advantage against our Nation's adversaries we must evolve. - Commander's Foreword, Army Special Operations Forces Strategy In the realm of national security very few elements ever remain stagnant, and those that do are relegated to irrelevance. As the environment changes, capabilities are developed, motivations shift, loyalties fade, new players rise and old players fall. In order to account for those changes new guidance flows downward from the highest levels of leadership increasing in detail and specificity as it descends to the lowest echelons of the military. Bryan Groves joins A BETTER PEACE editor Ron Granieri to discuss U.S. Army Special Operations Command's (USASOC) latest iteration of its command strategy. In the words of the Commanding General, LTG Francis Beaudette, this strategy "charts our course to drive evolutionary changes in how we man, train and equip our formations in the Information Age." Bryan and Ron examine how USASOC forces intend to execute their mission in support of the national defense amongst general purpose, joint and coalition forces against ever changing adversaries. The Army Special Operations Forces Strategy can be found online here or a PDF can be directly downloaded here. LTC(P) Bryan Groves is the Chief of the Strategic Planning Division, U.S. Army Special Operations Command. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: All images from U.S. Army Special Operations Forces Strategy document
May 08, 2020
IMPERIAL ECHOES AND CONTEMPORARY CONFLICT IN THE MIDDLE EAST
30:47
The old adage under Atatürk was zero problems with the neighbors; now the adage is zero neighbors without problems. You would be hard pressed to find a current member of the U.S. military who remembers a time in their service when the United States wasn't involved in conflict in the Middle East. Forty years ago this year Operation EAGLE CLAW, the rescue attempt of American hostages in Iran failed at a remote site known as DESERT ONE. Thirty years ago began DESERT SHIELD, followed by DESERT STORM. Nineteen years ago ENDURING FREEDOM began in Afghanistan and seventeen years ago IRAQI FREEDOM. And the current Syrian conflict, INHERENT RESOLVE began nine years ago. A BETTER PEACE welcomes David Sorenson to examine the underlying historical causes behind the modern day conflicts that plague the region, cause terrible death and destruction, and draw in the resources and attention of the entire world.  Dave joins podcast editor Ron Granieri in the studio to discuss lessons that should be learned by the United States when dealing with this chaotic region. He gives his thoughts as to what the future holds for the Middle East and implications for the rest of us. Dr. David Sorenson is professor of international studies at the U.S. Air Force Air War College, Maxwell Air Force Base. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The Flag of Iran, the Flag of Saudi Arabia overlaid on a geographic map of the Middle East Photo Credit: All images courtesy of the CIA World Fact Book
May 06, 2020
GREAT WAR IN THE GREAT LAKES REGION OF AFRICA
32:08
It's very hard to implement a long term development project when rebels might overrun and destroy or steal whatever you've implemented. To say that Central Africa has been a tumultuous region for the last three decades is an understatement. Genocide, civil and proxy wars and disease have lead to a death count that numbers in the millions and several million more displaced persons. But how much does the American citizen understand about the region, and how much should they be concerned? A BETTER PEACE welcomes Laura E. Seay to the studio to share her expertise on the topic. Laura is hosted by podcast editor Ron Granieri to discuss international efforts in the sub-Saharan region to develop countries and governance through security and stability operations. Dr. Laura E. Seay is an Assistant Professor of Government at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Africa political map, 16 May 2019 Photo Credit: Map Library, Central Intelligence Agency, 2019
May 05, 2020
FIGHTING OVER THE LAW OF WAR
25:32
International law can actually be a very powerful tool in the regulation of warfare In 1907 the major powers of the world gathered in the Netherlands for the Second Hague Conference. Building on the agreements of the First Hague Conference of 1899 the participants noted that many warring parties were not observing the international laws agreed upon by civilized nations. Of particular concern was the forces that had continued armed resistance after defeated nations were occupied by their conquerors. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Jonathan Gumz, a Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. Jonathan joins JP Clark in the studio to discuss the attempts and failings of both Hague conventions as well as the Geneva Conventions to try and maintain civility and order in the midst of the brutality of war. Dr Jonathan E Gumz is a Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. COL JP Clark was the Deputy Director for Academic Engagement for the Strategic Studies Institute and a WAR ROOM Senior Editor as well as a student in the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Female Yezidi resistance fighters of the Êzidxan Women's Units (YJÊ), September 2015 in Sinjar Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons PanchoS
Apr 28, 2020
CULTURAL TERRAIN IN DOMESTIC OPERATIONS
32:10
We can't function in a vacuum without understanding who the people are that we're interacting with on a daily basis. And this is particularly critical, even in domestic operations, from a disaster and a mass emergency response standpoint. When disaster strikes in the United States we are fortunate to have the National Guard available to bolster and support our civilian first responders. Experts in logistics and transportation, organization and construction as well as medical experts, the Guard is vital in supporting the long term recovery operations that follow any disastrous event. The Guard response to the current COVID-19 pandemic is very much like many other natural disasters that the U.S has endured in the last 50 years. But it's also very different. The pandemic hasn't struck a single region that allows help to arrive from safe staging areas outside the hot zone. The entire nation is vulnerable to this virus, and responders find themselves immersed in aiding citizens at a very personal level. With that level of interaction come the complications of diverse cultures, religious and political views, and a multitude of  multitude of languages other than English. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Michele Devlin and Steve Warnstadt to the studio to examine the navigation of the complex cultural terrain of our great American melting pot. They're joined by our Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to discuss what the DoD, along with state level leadership, must do to ensure that Guard troops are best prepared to succeed amongst the diverse culture that is our national strength. Dr. Michele Devlin is Professor of Global Health at the University of Northern Iowa and an Adjunct Research Professor with the Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) at the U.S. Army War College. Brigadier General (ret) Steven Warnstadt is the former Deputy Commanding General for Operations, Iowa National Guard and an AY12 graduate of the U.S. Army War College Distance Education Program. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Army Spc. Reagan Long, left, a horizontal construction engineer with the New York Army National Guard’s 827th Engineer Company, and Army Pfc. Naomi Velez, a horizontal construction engineer with the New York Army Guard’s 152nd Engineer Support Company, register people at a COVID-19 mobile screening center in New Rochelle, New York, March 14, 2020. More than 1,500 National Guard members in 22 states have been activated in support of state and local authorities responding to the COVID-19 outbreak. In addition to operating mobile screening centers, Guard members have been disinfecting public spaces, providing logistical and transportation support and coordinating with state and local health officials. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Amouris Coss
Apr 23, 2020
CBD: SNAKE OIL OR A G.I.’S NEW HOPE?
28:01
The DoD has [set] a precedent for using its service members for drug tests, for vaccines, for things that they think may be of benefit to the warfighter...I don't see that it would be too wild to also include CBD Cannabidiol (CBD) is a compound found in both marijuana and hemp plants and it's the hot product in the health/self-care market. And it's the perfect topic for us to discuss in the studio at A BETTER PEACE on 4/20 dude. Tina Cancel joins podcast editor Ron Granieri to examine the potential for CBD use in the military health community. Not to be confused with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the other compound that produces the “high” sought with marijuana use, CBD is either the 21st century equivalent of snake oil or an actual wonder cure that can be found in nature. Advocates of CBD claim it treats anything from inflammation to anxiety to epilepsy. Critics point out that the majority of the "data" is anecdotal at best and more study is definitely required. The facts are that it's unregulated and untested by the FDA, and there are no guarantees when you buy a product containing CBD. And its use or even investing in CBD ventures is illegal for military members and federal employees. It can cost you your career, your clearance and possibly even lead to criminal charges. So Tina and Ron ask the question; should it be approved for use treating the ailments of military members and veterans? Tina Cancel is a U.S. Navy Civilian and the Lead Financial Management Analyst for the Navy Working Capital Management Fund Portfolio. She is a member of the AY20 Resident Class at the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit:Photo by Washarapol D BinYo Jundang from Pexels
Apr 20, 2020
CULTIVATING INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS ONE STUDENT AT A TIME
24:18
The key thing is relationships. When we build those relationships those are bridges that help us to go throughout all the situations we face in our career as military [members]. One of the finest aspects of the resident class each year at the U.S. Army War College is the cohort of International Fellows (IF). For the last 42 years the best and brightest from our allied nation's militaries have attended class alongside their U.S. counterparts. Bringing the perspectives and experiences of their nation's militaries and cultures they return home with the same from not only their U.S. classmates but the other IFs. In order to capitalize on those experiences and relationships the War College has recently developed the International Fellow Continuing Education Program (IFCEP). A BETTER PEACE welcomes Juan Carlos Correa, Brian Foster, and Jeffrey McDougall to explain the goals of the IFCEP and the outcomes of the first iteration in Mexico City this last year. They joined podcast editor Ron Granieri in the studio to discuss how IFCEP refreshes and enhances bonds that were built in classrooms on Carlisle Barracks and reinforces their importance in today's complex world. Juan Carlos Correa is a Brigadier General in the Colombian Army and the Director of J-7/9 at U.S. Southern Command. He is a graduate of the AY16 Resident Class of the U.S. Army War College.  Brian Foster is a Colonel in the U.S. Army and the Director of the International Fellows Office at the U.S. Army War College. Jeffrey McDougall is a Colonel in the U.S. Army and is the Director of the Defense Planners Course in the Department of Distance Education at the U.S. Army War college. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: AY20 Resident Class International Fellows Photo Credit: U.S. Army War College Photo Lab
Apr 17, 2020
THE MAN IN THE MACHINE: IS AVIATION’S WEAKEST LINK THE PILOT?
33:51
It wasn't long before the aircraft were able to fly to much greater altitudes and at greater speeds and get into an environment where humans just could not function correctly and humans became sort of the weak link or the limiting factor Anyone who watches military aviation knows that many believe the F-35 will be the last manned fighter aircraft produced by the United States. Remotely piloted aircraft have been prevalent in the battlespace for at least a decade. Many of the most routine tasks in-flight are accomplished by a machine with a pilot monitoring. But the discussion about the "man in the can" far predates any of the debates that confront us now. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Tim Schultz to discuss the limitations that were placed on aviation development by the insistence that there be a human in the cockpit. Author of The Problem with Pilots: How Physicians, Engineers, and Airpower Enthusiasts Redefined Flight, Schultz lauds the engineers and scientists along with flight surgeons for all of the advancements they were able to make in the aviation industry in spite of the human crew members on board. He joins Senior Editor JP Clark as they look back at the trade offs that have been made in aircraft design to accommodate the pilot. Dr. Timothy Schultz is the Associate Dean of Academics for Electives and Research, U.S. Naval War College and the author of The Problem with Pilots: How Physicians, Engineers, and Airpower Enthusiasts Redefined Flight. COL JP Clark was the Deputy Director for Academic Engagement for the Strategic Studies Institute and a WAR ROOM Senior Editor as well as a student in the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Members of the 128th Air Refueling Wing, Milwaukee, Wisc. prepare to land a KC-135 Stratotanker after a training exercise Nov. 3, 2013. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jenna V. Hildebrand/Released
Apr 14, 2020
PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE: THE TRANSATLANTIC ALLIANCE
31:11
Burden sharing has been an issue in the alliance from the very beginning, from the drafting of the treaty when members of the U.S. Congress wanted to make sure that the Europeans were going to be able to hold up their end of the deal In discussing NATO and our European allies, burden sharing has been a hot topic for the last several years under the current administration. But the fact of the matter is that burden sharing has been an area of concern since the inception of NATO and throughout it's development. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Stanley Sloan to the studio to discuss the current state of NATO and a way ahead for the organization. Sloan, a subject matter expert on NATO and transatlantic relations, joins podcast host Ron Granieri to examine the history of U.S./NATO relations, the growth in membership and the current and future implications for all of its member nations as well as Russia. Stan Sloan is a Visiting Scholar in Political Science at Middlebury College, a Non-resident Senior Fellow in the Scowcroft Center of the Atlantic Council of the United States, and an Associate Fellow at the Austrian Institute for European and Security Policy and is the founding Director of the Atlantic Community Initiative. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Press conference by President Donald Trump and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. April 12 2017 Photo Credit: NATO Press Office
Apr 10, 2020
THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)
33:46
I think in a lot of ways our job...is to move the dialog out of the Pentagon and into the field. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Brian Linn, renowned student and historian of the U.S. Army as an institution. Linn joins Michael Neiberg in the studio to discuss how he began his work first looking at the counterinsurgency in the Philippines at the turn of the century. The author of eight books on the history of the U.S. Army, Linn's opinion is often sought by military officers trying to find understanding of present day issues in the historical actions of the service. In this episode both Linn and Neiberg share their thoughts on the purpose of historians, effective documentation and successful practices for writing books. Brian Linn is a Professor of History and the Ralph R. Thomas Professor in Liberal Arts, at Texas A&M University. He specializes in military history and war and society in the 20th century. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: 17th Infantry moving to the front during the Philippine Insurrection. Photo Credit: War Department, B.W. Kilburn, Circa 1899-1900 Other releases in the "On Writing" series: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
Apr 07, 2020
A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)
24:02
My abiding memory of colonels is that they really are the pivot between the engine room and the ultimate decision makers particularly, for example, in a corps headquarters. A BETTER PEACE welcomes General Timothy Radford of the British Army to the studio to discuss his perspectives on strategic leadership, vision and effect. Radford was in Carlisle to address the 2020 resident class of the U.S. Army War College as part of the annual Kermit Roosevelt Exchange Lecture series. He joins WAR ROOM Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to consider the challenges ahead as he will soon move into his new role as Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe (DSACEUR) in Apr 2020. General Timothy B. Radford, CB, DSO, OBE is a British Army officer who has served as Commander Allied Rapid Reaction Corps and as Deputy Commander Resolute Support Mission. He will assume the appointment as Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe (DSACEUR) in Apr 2020. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Formal group portrait of members of the Maquis (3rd Section, Compagnie Louis) posing with weapons and banners at Luzy, France, September 1944. Kenneth Mackenzie and David Sillitoe of SOE are in the centre. Photo Credit: Courtesy of the Imperial War Museums, photographer unknown. Other releases in the "Senior Leader Perspectives" series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Apr 02, 2020
THE MARTIAL CITIZEN
23:31
Martial Citizenship...is the concept that since soldiers serve the state the state therefore owes something back. The National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service released its report "Inspired to Serve" on 25 March 2020. The Commission's two primary statutory charges were: (1) to "conduct a review of the military selective service process" and (2) to "consider methods to increase participation in military, national, and public service in order to address national security and other public service needs of the Nation." In concert with this release A BETTER PEACE welcomes Amy Rutenberg to the studio to discuss how the Vietnam-era draft affected society and how the U.S. transitioned to the all volunteer force. She joins our Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to examine the unintended consequences and discriminations of draft policy, deferments and the evolution of what she calls the martial citizen. "Inspired to Serve" Final Report "Inspired to Serve" Executive Summary Amy Rutenberg is an Assistant Professor at Iowa State University. She researches the connections among war, U.S. society, citizenship, and gender. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: (L) Curtis W. Tarr, director of the Selective Service System, turns the drum containing capsules of draft numbers at the annual draft lottery, 1972  (Top Center) Draft-age Americans being counseled by Mark Satin (far left) at the Anti-Draft Programme office on Spadina Avenue in Toronto, August 1967. (R) Congressman Alexander Pirnie (R-NY) drawing the first capsule for the Selective Service draft, Dec 1, 1969. (Bottom Center) Front cover of the 25 Mar 2020 report released by The National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service. Photo Credit: (L) Library of Congress, Thomas J. O'Halloran, (TopCenter) Laura Jones and Bennett Jones Phillips, (R) Selective Service System, (Bottom Center) The National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service
Mar 27, 2020
LEADERSHIP IN THE MIDST OF TRAUMA
28:21
Don't just know the soldier in the uniform, know the man or the woman behind the uniform. Military members, law enforcement officers, and first responders are sadly no strangers to tragedy and trauma. How well individuals and organizations respond to those events, and just as importantly avoid future events, can be highly dependent on the leadership displayed during those trying times. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Drew Deaton to discuss effective leadership in the midst of and prior to trauma. He joins our podcast editor Ron Granieri in the studio to share his thoughts on effective leadership skills and techniques. Colonel Deaton's Article in Police Chief Magazine can be found here. Andrew Deaton is a Colonel and a Military Police officer in the U.S. Army. He is also a student in the AY20 Resident Class of the U.S. Army War College. Ronald Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE.  The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: As part of the Army family, you know your buddies to your left and right, and you may recognize early warning signs of distress that sometimes precede suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Be vigilant to buddy check and make sure your team is doing well. Reach Out, Talk & Listen, we are all a part of the team and need everyone to stay strong. Photo Credit: US Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Caleb Barrieau
Mar 24, 2020
THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF CLASSIFICATION
28:36
I think the most important thing the public should know about classification is that there are rules. The Department of Defense does not just make up what they think is classified. No, NOTHING in this episode is classified. If you're a novice to the world of classification, have you ever wondered who classifies something and why they do it, and can it ever be declassified? A BETTER PEACE welcomes Alison Goldsmith to the studio to discuss the DoD's classification system with our podcast editor Ronald Granieri. The two address some of the rules and guidelines along with strengths and weaknesses of the process that produces Secret, Top Secret and even Special Access resources and programs. Alison Goldsmith is a member of the AY20 Resident class of the U.S. Army War College and a Program Security Manager for the Navy Engineering Logistics Office (NELO). Ronald Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: DoD Documents and Labels, compiled by Buck Haberichter
Mar 20, 2020
THAT NEVER HAPPENED: A WATER COOLER DISCUSSION ABOUT MOVIES
32:31
If he didn't do that, he should have. If you've ever spent any time with historians you know that they are the worst people to watch a movie with. Custer never said that, Roosevelt didn't jump up from his wheelchair, there was no grass on that battlefield in 1917. A BETTER PEACE gathered three of our senior editors to lay waste to some of your favorite historical movies. Tom Bruscino, Jacqueline Whitt, and Ron Granieri sit down for a water cooler style discussion and tell us why we should be miserable watching movies like they are. Thomas Bruscino is an Associate Professor at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of the DUSTY SHELVES series. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Man working with a projector in a movie theater 1958 Photo Credit: This work is from the U.S. News & World Report collection at the Library of Congress.
Mar 17, 2020
THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ODNI: AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
23:56
The President, and all policy makers should have the unvarnished truth as best as the intelligence community can serve it up. A BETTER PEACE welcomes former Director of National Intelligence (DNI), James Clapper to discuss the role of the ODNI and the current state of the position. Clapper joins guest host Genevieve Lester, Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College. They examine the strategic importance of the DNI position, the individual chosen to fill it, and the impact on the intelligence community. James Clapper is the former Director of National Intelligence. Genevieve Lester is the DeSerio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College.  The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The Director of National Intelligence (DNI), the Honorable James R. Clapper (left), prepares to speak during a town hall with members of the intelligence community and U.S. Strategic Commander's (USSTRATCOM) intelligence staff at USSTRATCOM Headquarters, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., Aug. 23, 2016. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jonathan Lovelady Other Posts in the "Intelligence" series: THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE TODAYPOLICY SUCCESS VS. INTEL FAILURE?IMPACT (OR NOT) OF INTEL ON STRATEGIC DECISION MAKINGSTRATEGIC ATTACKS AND THEIR FALLOUTNEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS: ANALYZING TODAY’S FLOOD OF INFORMATIONWHERE DOES INTELLIGENCE GO FROM HERE? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPERTHE DOD-CIA RELATIONSHIP: ARE WE MILITARIZING STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE?THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ODNI: AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
Mar 13, 2020
LESSONS FROM 1918: GET A FLU SHOT, WASH YOUR HANDS
28:37
What we do know is that all of the movement of people and animals made this virus transmit much faster around the world than it would have otherwise. And you can directly associate it with the effects of the war. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Michael Neiberg to examine the misnamed Spanish Flu of 1918. Neiberg joins our Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt as they consider the factors that lead to the devastation of that pandemic and how it relates to the modern day COVID-19 outbreak. What are the parallels, best practices and considerations that might be crucial to dealing with the present day pandemic? Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The 39th Regiment, wearing face masks provided by the Red Cross, marching in Seattle, Washington, prior to their departure for France. Photo Credit: National Archives Photograph, December 1918.
Mar 11, 2020
THE ARMY WAR COLLEGE EXPERIENCE – EN ESPAÑOL
22:58
The Army War College joins the rest of society to commemorate the long tradition and considerable contribution made by Hispanics to defend our nation.   A BETTER PEACE welcomes three native Spanish speakers as they take over the mics. Originally recorded during National Hispanic Heritage Month 2019 (Sep 15 - Oct 15 '19) three students in the AY20 Resident class of the U.S. Army War College sat down to record our first ever all Spanish podcast. International Fellows Alfredo Pozzo and Fernando Prada joined fellow U.S. student Andres Paz to discuss their initial impressions of the Carlisle experience as they embarked on their academic journey that is the War College. For those of you who aren't quite as fluent in Spanish, a full English transcript can be found here. Alfredo Pozzo is an International Fellow in the AY20 Resident class at the U.S. Army War College and a Colonel in the Argentinian Army. Fernando Prada is an International Fellow in the AY20 Resident class at the U.S. Army War College and a Lieutenant Colonel in the Spanish Army. Andres Paz is a student in the AY20 Resident class at the U.S. Army War College and an employee of the U.S. Department of State. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Flags of the United States of America, Argentina, and Spain Photo Credit: Wikipedia
Mar 06, 2020
CHINA’S GRAND STRATEGY AND THE BRI
30:14
There has never been anything like it in recorded history where a country has put…a trillion dollars aside to help in jump starting all of these infrastructure projects around the country Much has been made of China's Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). Wary watcher's are quick to point out the spread of Chinese influence in many resource rich countries. Critics promptly highlight the missteps that China has made including snubbing local labor and ignoring cultural norms. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Sarwar Kashmeri as he joins our Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to examine how the BRI has succeeded and more importantly how China has learned from its failures and adapted its efforts. Sarwar Kashmeri is a Fellow at the Foreign Policy Association and an Applied Research Fellow at the Peace & War Center at Norwich University. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: A Type-001A Chinese aircraft carrier Shandong, moored at Dalian, China in 2019 prior to commissioning. Photo Credit: Via Wikimedia Commons User Tyg728
Mar 03, 2020
IT’S ONLY A PRE-WAR PERIOD IN HINDSIGHT
30:37
The Army prides itself on being able to learn, but it also has shown throughout history it also forgets pretty quick too. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Brian Linn and Conrad Crane to discuss the inter-war periods throughout U.S. history and what they've meant to the further development of the U.S. Army. WAR ROOM Senior Editor JP Clark joins them to look at how post-war versus pre-war mindsets have guided leadership over time. Brian Linn is a Professor of History and the Ralph R. Thomas Professor in Liberal Arts, at Texas A&M University. He specializes in military history and war and society in the 20th century. Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. COL JP Clark is a student in the AY20 resident class at the U.S. Army War College and a WAR ROOM Senior Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: American servicemen and women gather in front of “Rainbow Corner” Red Cross club in Paris to celebrate the conditional surrender of the Japanese on August 15, 1945. Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo
Feb 28, 2020
EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARY
36:15
As we wind down Black History Month the Editorial Team thought it most appropriate to re-release this and one other podcast on Executive Order 9981. Originally released in July 2018, the 70th anniversary was a great reminder to examine the official order to desegregate the military and consider how far we've come and what still must be accomplished. We are better than we were, in that our communities [and individuals] are more integrated, but not necessarily totally so This podcast is the second of two commemorating the seventieth anniversary of EO 9981 and its influence over the U.S. armed forces today. WAR ROOM welcomes Brigadier General Earl Simms, U.S. Army Retired, whose thirty-three year career culminated as Commanding General of the U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute. BG Simms relays his experiences as an African-American officer in the early days of integration and his perspectives on the state of race relations in the U.S. military and society today. Army War College Professor of Leadership and Cultural Studies Chuck Allen moderates.     Brigadier General Earl Simms, U.S. Army Retired, culminated his career as Commanding General, U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute. Charles Allen is Professor of Leadership and Cultural Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Air Force Colonel Fred Vann Cherry attends the unveiling of his portrait in the Pentagon, 1981. Col. Cherry was a colonel and command pilot in the U.S. Air Force. A career fighter pilot, he served in the Korean War, the Cold War and the Vietnam War. Col. Cherry was also the first and highest ranking black officer among U.S. Prisoners of War during the Vietnam War. Photo Credit: National Archives Photo by Mickey W. Sanborn, public domain Other posts in the "Anniversaries" series: EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESLOOKING TO THE PAST TO CHANGE THE FUTUREREMEMBERING THE BATTLE OF THE BULGEREFLECTIONS ON THE HUE CITY MASSACREEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESTHE TET OFFENSIVE: 50 YEARS LATERON BEING A ‘DIFFERENT’ KIND OF COMMAND — AFRICOM AT 10 YEARS (PART 2)
Feb 27, 2020
EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCES
17:15
As we wind down Black History Month the Editorial Team thought it most appropriate to re-release this and one other podcast on Executive Order 9981. Originally released in July 2018, the 70th anniversary was a great reminder to examine the official order to desegregate the military and consider how far we've come and what still must be accomplished. We are at an all-time high of African-Americans serving at the three-star level, [including two] women. In my thirty-seven years in uniform, I don't recall that many African-Americans at that most senior level. It is hereby declared to be the policy of the President that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin. - Harry S. Truman, Executive Order 9981. July 26, 1948 saw a landmark event in U.S. military history, President Harry Truman's signing of Executive Order (EO) 9981 directing the desegregation of the armed forces. Preceding the Civil Rights Act by more than a decade, this Executive Order was a groundbreaker -- recognizing both the exemplary performance of African-Americans during World War II and their acceptance by white officers. This podcast is the first of two commemorating the seventieth anniversary of EO 9981 and its influence over the U.S. armed forces today. WAR ROOM welcomes Major General William Walker, Commanding General of the District of Columbia National Guard, who shares how integrating the armed forces opened doors for him and other African-Americans. U.S. Army War College Professor of Leadership and Cultural Studies Chuck Allen moderates.     Major General William Walker is the Commanding General of the District of Columbia National Guard. Charles Allen is Professor of Leadership and Cultural Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by T. Anthony Bell, Fort Lee Public Affairs Other posts in the "Anniversaries" series: EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESLOOKING TO THE PAST TO CHANGE THE FUTUREREMEMBERING THE BATTLE OF THE BULGEREFLECTIONS ON THE HUE CITY MASSACREEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESTHE TET OFFENSIVE: 50 YEARS LATERON BEING A ‘DIFFERENT’ KIND OF COMMAND — AFRICOM AT 10 YEARS (PART 2)
Feb 26, 2020
LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)
30:24
If you go into reading history with an open mind what you're looking for is to be surprised; you're looking for things that tell you something you didn't know. The liberation of an oppressed people is indeed a noble venture. But as the U.S. learned in Iraq, it's a complicated relationship between the liberated and their liberators. A BETTER PEACE welcomes William Hitchcock to discuss the lessons that were evident in France in the days following victory in Europe post WWII. Michael Neiberg interviewed Hitchcock at the new U.S. National World War II Museum in New Orleans, where they also discussed some tools of the trade for people who are looking to write history from a different vantage point. William Hitchcock (L) and Michael Neiberg (R) in front of the replica D-Day invasion map at the Higgins Hotel adjacent to the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. William Hitchcock is the William W. Corcoran Professor of History at the University of Virginia and author of The Bitter Road to Freedom: The Human Cost of Allied Victory in World War II Europe, a Pulitzer Prize nominated book. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The Founders Plaza creates an impressive entryway to the National WWII Museum Campaigns of Courage: European and Pacific Theaters building. Photo Credit: Courtesy of the National WWII Museum Other releases in the "On Writing" series: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
Feb 25, 2020
AI ON THE BATTLEFIELD? – IT’S ALREADY HERE
25:42
I worry that we're going to field many of these systems without really thinking through both the legality and morality of putting them into the field. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Dr. Paul Springer Chair of the Department of Research at the U.S. Air Force Air Command and Staff College. Paul joins our Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to examine the current state of autonomous warfare and the look ahead at where the technology may be going.  Paul argues that the use of artificial intelligence (AI) on the battlefield is a revolution in military affairs (RMA) that impacts both the nature and the character of warfare. This new norm will require a new structure of understanding and behavior that some aren't ready to adopt. When will we become comfortable enough with technology to eliminate the human in the loop and what will it mean for humanity? Dr. Paul Springer is the Chair of the Department of Research at the Air Command and Staff College, Maxwelll AFB, AL. He is the author or editor of 12 books in print including Outsourcing War to Machines: The Military Robotic Revolution and Military Robots and Drones: A Reference Handbook. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: A special ribbon cutting ceremony, signaling the completion of work on the first RQ-4 Global Hawk at Robins Air Force Base, Ga., was held on the base flight line June 29 2017. Robins AFB is the first and only installation to have a building-based Launch and Recovery Element, allowing the aircraft to take off and land from this location. This is also the first time a Global Hawk has flown into an Air Force air logistics complex. Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex maintenance professionals meticulously painted the aircraft to prevent corrosion. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Kelly Goonan Articles and Episodes related to this topic: WE NEED AN AI-BASED ENEMY ANALYSIS TOOL … NOW! ROLL OUT THE ROBOTS! MANAGING COMM NETWORKS AND ACCESS IN THE FUTURE INCORPORATING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: LESSONS FROM THE PRIVATE SECTOR HOW DO ORGANIZATIONS CHANGE AFTER INCORPORATING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE? THE IRON TRIANGLE: TECHNOLOGY, STRATEGY, ETHICS, AND THE FUTURE OF KILLING MACHINES A.I. & THE URGENCY OF FINISHING FIRST
Feb 20, 2020
HUMANITARIAN OPS: OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES AND PITFALLS
27:40
To really have a successful mission you have to be willing to stay A BETTER PEACE welcomes Mary Elizabeth Walters to discuss to calculus of humanitarian operations involving the U.S. military. The decision to render aid or enter into humanitarian operations in another country isn't always an easy one. It may seem like a simple endeavor, help wherever and whoever you can, but what happens when helping ends up hurting in the long run? Mary Elizabeth and WAR ROOM Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt sit down in the studio to discuss the question "When should the United States execute humanitarian operations and what questions should be asked and answered before it begins?" Dr. Mary Elizabeth Walters is an Assistant Professor of history at Kansas State University. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Water bundles align a C-17 Globemaster III prior to a humanitarian air drop, Aug. 8, 2014, Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The 816th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron aircrew, air dropped 40 bundles of water for Iraqi refugees during a humanitarian air drop over Iraq. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Vernon Young Jr. Articles and Episodes related to this topic: WHY DOES THE MEDIA COVER STORIES IN SOME COUNTRIES ... BUT NOT OTHERS? THE CONNECTION BETWEEN PEACEKEEPING AND INCREASED SEX TRAFFICKING FIGHTING SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN WAR: CONTEXT MATTERS “ON BEHALF OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE”
Feb 14, 2020
EUROPEAN STRATEGIC AUTONOMY: ON U.S. TERMS
30:15
SO IT WASN'T JUST THE STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENT THAT ENABLED THIS BUT ALSO THE PERSONALITIES SEEMED TO BE RIGHT The United States has been in favor of a more autonomous Europe ever since the end of WWII. But it's possible that there have been a few mixed messages throughout the years. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Robert Gleckler and Joel Hillison to the studio to examine just what it is the U.S. means when it speaks of EU strategic autonomy, how that message has evolved and how the European governments have responded to the ongoing conversation. WAR ROOM Managing Editor Buck Haberichter joins the guests in their discussion. Robert Gleckler is a Colonel in the U.S. Army, a recent graduate of the U.S. Army War College and an instructor at the Eisenhower School at the National Defense University. Joel Hillison is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Buck Haberichter is the Managing Editor of the WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: An International Medal Parade for 222 EUFOR soldiers, sailors, and airmen from 12 countries was held at Camp Butmir on Tuesday 28 January 2020. COMEUFOR, Major General Reinhard Trischak, presided over the event, which was also attended by the Ambassadors of Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania, Poland, Slovakia and the Deputy Ambassador of Hungary. Photo Credit: G.Payer; EUFOR
Feb 11, 2020
OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)
30:16
What I think is important is to do your current job as good as you can. Don't be too focused on the next steps because then you are not focused on your current job. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Major General Torgeir Gråtrud, commander of the Norwegian Special Operations Command, to the studio to discuss his perspectives on strategic leadership. Major General Gråtrud was in Carlisle to attend his induction into the International Fellows Hall of Fame at the U.S. Army War College. He becomes the 70th International Fellow to receive the honor. During the podcast he addresses Norway's participation in the Global SOF Network, the nature of cooperation and relations in the Nordic region and his advice to junior officers and NCOs. A BETTER PEACE podcast editor Ron Granieri moderates. Torgeir Gråtrud is a Norwegian Major General in the Army and commander of the Norwegian Special Operations Command. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Operatører fra Marinejegerkommandoen i rib båt langs Trøndelagskysten.  Translated: Operators from the Marine Hunter Command in a rib boat along the Trøndelag coast. Photo Credit: Torbjørn Kjosvold / Norwegian Armed Forces
Feb 07, 2020
LOOKING TO THE PAST TO CHANGE THE FUTURE
24:45
Back in the 1930s, Air Force officers who were assigned instructor duty at the Air Corps Tactical School…would wear these little…pledge pins on their uniforms. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Dr. John Terino, Chair of the Department of Airpower at the U.S. Air Force Air Command and Staff College (ACSC.) John joins our Editor-In-Chief, Jacqueline Whitt to discuss professional military education (PME) in the Air Force. Stationed at Maxwell AFB, AL which is known as "the intellectual and leadership-development center of the U.S. Air Force," ACSC is one of the many educational institutions that comprise Air University (AU.) Their conversation covers initiatives and difficulties in manning, accreditation, curriculum and returning prestige to service as faculty and instructors in the greater professional development enterprise. 2020 is the 100th anniversary of the creation of the Air Corps Tactical School (ACTS,) the predecessor to modern PME in the Air Force and more specifically ACSC. John Terino is a professor of Comparative Military Strategy and the Chair of the Department of Airpower at the Air Command and Staff College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Air Corps Tactical School (ACTS) Class of 1933-1934. From September 1931 to June 1941, the ACTS provided professional military education to field grade officers and developed airpower doctrine. The War Department suspended classes in July 1941 and closed the school in October 1942 with the onset of World War II. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo, Air University History Office Other releases in the "Anniversaries" series: EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESLOOKING TO THE PAST TO CHANGE THE FUTUREREMEMBERING THE BATTLE OF THE BULGEREFLECTIONS ON THE HUE CITY MASSACREEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESTHE TET OFFENSIVE: 50 YEARS LATERON BEING A ‘DIFFERENT’ KIND OF COMMAND — AFRICOM AT 10 YEARS (PART 2)
Feb 04, 2020
LESSONS LEARNED THE HARD WAY: THE EVOLUTION OF THE BRITISH LIGHT INFANTRY
29:18
It's not that Dundas was opposed to the use of light infantry he thought it was, the pejorative term was, 'it's very American'   A BETTER PEACE welcomes Dr. Huw Davies of King's College London. Huw joins WAR ROOM Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to trace the development of Great Britain's Light Infantry. It's easy to call yourself a learning organization, but to do so there must be a serious examination of history. Specifically, one must study their own organization's history examining the greatest failures in great detail and be willing to make changes. War stories over dinner, journal entries and some of the first organized staff rides led to the development of Rangers, the use of local forces and a dedicated light infantry that was confronted with a great deal of resistance. The conversation ties past development to modern day failures to actually learn from previous lessons. Dr. Huw J. Davies is a Reader in Early modern Military History, and has been a member of the Defence Studies Department at the School of Security Studies, King's College London since March 2005. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: The Battle of Alexandria, 21 March 1801, Philip James de Loutherbourg (1740–1812) Public Domain
Jan 30, 2020
LYKKE’S LITTLE THREE-LEGGED STOOL (PART 2)
23:21
This was never meant to be the be all and the end all...let's remember this title of my little 4-page magnum opus...'Toward An Understanding of Military Strategy' A BETTER PEACE welcomes back U.S. Army Colonel (retired) Arthur F. Lykke for the second and final part of his interview. Having explained the birthplace of the three-legged-stool model in part one, Art goes on to share his thoughts on why his model has endured and his experiences in the classrooms of the Army War College and the potential of the students that attend it. Art once again joins the Chair of the Department of National Security and Strategy, Mark Duckenfield, and our own Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt. Part 1 Colonel (retired) Arthur F. Lykke was a faculty instructor in the Department of National Security and Strategy. He is the author of “Toward an Understanding of Military Strategy.” Mark Duckenfield is Chair of the Department of National Security Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and Editor of the Whiteboard series on WAR ROOM. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The Army War College Resident Class of 2019 seated for their graduation ceremonies on Carlisle Barracks. Taken 7 June 2019, these men and women have significantly grown personally and professionally since their arrival in August 2018. Photo Credit: U.S. Army War College Photo
Jan 24, 2020
LYKKE’S LITTLE THREE-LEGGED STOOL (PART 1)
24:45
The Vice [Chief of Staff] of the Army...came to the War College…and the first thing he said to me was something like 'Art why the hell does Senator Nunn want to talk to you about strategy...?' If you've ever participated in strategic-level professional military education you're probably familiar with his work. If you've ever listened to congressional testimony that involved a plan or policy you've likely heard the words "ends, ways, and means." If you have a teenage child you've probably dampened their enthusiasm for a harebrained scheme with the simple reality of his model of strategy. A BETTER PEACE is thrilled to welcome U.S. Army Colonel (retired) Arthur F. Lykke. His name might not be on the tip of your tongue, but a dream and his little "4-page opus" (as he refers to it), was the birthplace of the three-legged-stool model that informs discussions of strategy in classrooms, board rooms, congressional offices, and even the White House. Thinking about "Ends, Ways and Means" as three legs of a stool was Art's way of conceptualizing military strategy nearly forty years ago. And it's still an important starting point for contemporary discussions. Art joins the Chair of the Department of National Security and Strategy, Mark Duckenfield, and our own Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to discuss how it all started in part one of our two part interview. Part 2 Colonel (retired) Arthur F. Lykke was a faculty instructor in the Department of National Security and Strategy. He is the author of “Toward an Understanding of Military Strategy.” Mark Duckenfield is Chair of the Department of National Security Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and Editor of the Whiteboard series on WAR ROOM. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: 20 Feb 2019 brought a bit of snow to the Army War College, Root Hall, Carlisle Barracks. Root Hall is the home of the Strategic School of Landpower. Joint, Interagency and International leaders from around the world pass through the doors of this building with the goal of expanding their thinking into the strategic realm. Photo Credit: U.S. Army War College Photo
Jan 21, 2020
“ON BEHALF OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE”
33:46
From my vantage point…there's been a growing role and place for USAID in policy discussions. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Brad Arsenault, Alexious Butler and Leigh Caraher to the studio to explain the great works of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID.) The three join Podcast Editor Ron Granieri to discuss how USAID measures success, works with other government agencies and their level of inclusion in U.S. international affairs. Visit USAID Brad Arsenault is a Foreign Service Officer with USAID and a current student at the U.S. Army War College. Alexious Butler is a Foreign Service Officer with USAID and a current student at the U.S. Army War College. Professor Leigh Caraher is a Professor of Communicative Arts in the U.S. Army War College Applied Communication and Learning Lab. She previously served as a Humanitarian Assistance Advisor to the Military at USAID's Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance, where she served as the lead advisor to the U.S. Africa Command and its components. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: U.S. Marines and sailors help U.S. citizens into a Marine Corps KC-130J Hercules airplane in Juba, South Sudan, during an evacuation of personnel from the U.S. Embassy, Jan. 3, 2014 Photo Credit: U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Robert L. Fisher III
Jan 17, 2020
REMEMBERING THE BATTLE OF THE BULGE
32:20
In September 1944 defeat looked not only likely but imminent for the German Army. And It was at that point that Adolf Hitler told his generals that he was going to launch a winter offensive that would turn the war around. A BETTER PEACE welcomes David Hogan, Director of Histories at the U.S. Army Center of Military History. In our first ever phone interview David joins our own Podcast Editor Ron Granieri to discuss the Battle of the Bulge and its 75th anniversary. Referred to as “the greatest American battle of the war” by Winston Churchill, the six week long Ardennes Offensive occurred from 6 December 1944 to 25 January 1945 and was the last major German offensive campaign on the Western Front. Dense forests and frigid winter conditions contributed to it being the costliest battle fought by the Americans in WWII. By the time it was over, the path to V-E day was in sight. David W. Hogan, Jr. is the Director of Histories at the U.S. Army Center of Military History. He is the author of A Command Post at War: First Army HQ in Europe, 1943-1945; Centuries of Service: The U.S. Army, 1775-2005; and Raiders or Elite Infantry? The U.S. Army Rangers from Dieppe to Grenada. He is currently working on a biography of General of the Army Omar N. Bradley. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: U.S. Army engineers emerge from the woods from defensive positions after fighting in the vicinity of Bastogne, Belgium, during the Battle of the Bulge. Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo
Jan 14, 2020
STAGE SETTING: THE MODERN THEATER ARMY
26:05
Perhaps the biggest most powerful thing they can do is in the field of logistics. They can be prepared for the reception, staging and onward movement and integration of forces. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Paul T. Mikolashek and Gregory Cantwell to the studio to discuss the modern theater army. The two join Managing Editor Buck Haberichter to examine the importance of the  Army component in stage setting operations in any given theater. As the former Commander of the Coalition Forces Land Component Command (C/CFLCC) during Operation Enduring Freedom, Mikolashek brings a wealth of experience to the conversation. And Cantwell's role as the director of the CFLCC course makes him uniquely qualified to discuss modern Army doctrine on the subject. Lt. General (R) Paul T. Mikolashek served as Inspector General, U.S. Army as well as the Commanding General, Third United States Army/Army Forces Central Command. As Coalition Land Forces Component Commander he commanded all ground forces in Afghanistan and the Middle East during Operation Enduring Freedom. Gregory Cantwell is a retired Army Colonel and is the Director of the Joint Forces Land Component Commander (JFLCC) Course at the U.S. Army War College. Buck Haberichter is the Managing Editor of the WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Clip Art Library
Jan 07, 2020
PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)
31:44
And somebody hadn't written a book on the whole [conference]…and so I thought well maybe I'll try and then I thought that's crazy. Who am I to try this massive subject.   A BETTER PEACE welcomes award winning and internationally renowned author Margaret MacMillan. Perhaps best known for her study and writings of the 1919 Paris Peace Conference, she joins our own Michael Neiberg to discuss her journey as an academic and an author. Faced with multiple rejection letters MacMillan recounts how what she affectionately refers to as "her obsession" was finally published. Margaret MacMillan CC CH is a Professor of History at the University of Toronto and emeritus Professor of International History and the former Warden of St. Antony's College at the University of Oxford. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The Big Four (World War I) in 1919 in Paris. Vittorio Orlando (Italy), David Lloyd George (Britain), Georges Clemenceau (France), Woodrow Wilson (USA) (left to right) Photo Credit: Unknown - Public Domain Other releases in the "On Writing" series: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
Dec 31, 2019
MAKING PEACE, KEEPING PEACE
32:33
When the local belligerents are still willing to fight and they've not stopped the war, dropping peacekeeping forces in the middle of that is not a recipe for immediate success. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Dr. Paul Williams from the Elliot School of International Affairs at the George Washington University. Williams, an academic expert and consultant in the politics and effectiveness of peace operations, joins podcast editor Ron Granieri to discuss the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM.) Created in 2007, the multi-national peacekeeping task force is a study in political relations, matters of trust, and regional cooperation in the face of a terrorist threat.     Dr. Paul Williams is Professor of International Affairs in the Elliot School of International Affairs at the George Washinton University and associate director of the Security Policies Studies MA Program. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: A member of the Uganda People’s Defence Force assists in parking a convoy of armored troop carrying vehicles provided by the U.S. Department of Defense and Department of State as they are driven into the UPDF compound, Mogadishu International Airport, Somalia, Sept. 25, 2017. The contribution comes with spare parts for the vehicles and a maintenance team assigned to train personnel for timely repairs Photo Credit: U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Andria Allmond
Dec 19, 2019
DIVERSITY IN PROFESSIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION
35:00
Every voice will bring something a little bit different and that particular voices have particular things to add. For the past century we have been discussing diversity in some form or fashion in the United States Department of Defense. There have obviously been great strides but many would argue there is still a long way to go. A complicated topic that will require many detailed considerations, the conversation must continue in order to find a successful path forward. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Megan Hennessey and Brandy Jenner to continue the conversation specifically about diversity in professional military education. They join Ron Granieri in the studio to discuss the Army War College's approach to diversity, both amongst the students and the faculty as well. Megan J. Hennessey, Ph.D., is the Professor of Educational Methodology at the U.S. Army War College. Brandy M. Jenner, Ph.D., is a Post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Educational Methodology at the U.S. Army War College. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Convocation ceremony for the Resident Academic Year Class of 2014 at the U.S. Army War College Photo Credit: U.S. Army War College Public Affairs
Dec 10, 2019
THE WEST POINT CLASS OF 1829
24:37
Quite frankly a number of times in [Lee's] career he debates getting out of the Army to pursue other interests. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Paul Springer to the studio to discuss the influence of the West Point class of 1829. Springer joins our Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to examine the unique experiences of this cohort, and how it influenced, not only their development as leaders, but several generations of officers to follow. Many of these men impacted the country not only through their military service, but also as captains of industry and through civil service as well. Paul Springer is a Professor of Comparative Military History at the Air Command and Staff College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Image of United States Military Academy aka West Point stamp, 5-cents, Issued: May 26, 1937 Photo Credit: U.S. Post Office; Smithsonian National Postal Museum, Bureau of Engraving and Printing; Imaging by Gwillhickers
Dec 06, 2019
COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE: MORE THAN JUST TECHNOLOGY
28:42
A BETTER PEACE welcomes Gail Fisher and Joel Hillison into the studio to examine the DoD's approach towards gaining and sustaining the competitive advantage over adversaries across the spectrum of competition. The DoD has no specific doctrine regarding this topic and all too often the response to the challenge falls to the acquisition community in the form of newer cutting edge technology. Fisher argues that while technology is a piece of the puzzle, the larger picture requires so much more. At any given time the DoD can be engaged with a competitor, an adversary, anywhere from cooperation through competition and into armed conflict. Download COL Fisher's paper Colonel Gail Fisher is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College and currently serves on the Joint Staff in the Strategic Plans and Policy Directorate. Joel Hillison is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Buck Haberichter is the Managing Editor of the WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: An F-35A Lightning II pilot turns his aircraft along the yellow taxi line on the 33rd Fighter Wing flightline at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr. Photo Credit:  U.S. Air Force photo/Samuel King Jr.
Dec 03, 2019
THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)
30:14
I'm using Kennedy's life to tell the story of America's rise, first to great power status and then superpower status. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Pulitzer Prize winning author Fredrik Logevall to discuss his newest project, a two-volume biography of John F. Kennedy. Logevall joins Michael Neiberg in the studio as they discuss the complexity of writing a biography. They relate thoughts behind research efforts, organization and prioritization of themes and interests and just how much information can be covered in a mere 500,000 words.     Fredrik Logevall is a Swedish-American historian and educator at Harvard University, where he is the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and professor of history in the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: John F. Kennedy poses at The Hague, Netherlands, during his tour of Europe. Photo Credit: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston., Public Domain Other releases in the "On Writing" series: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
Nov 21, 2019
BOOK LOVERS NEED APPLY: A DUSTY SHELVES PODCAST
31:47
One of the things we're trying to do is encourage people...to start talking about older books, older readings, older things that are lost or never really well known that really should have been. A BETTER PEACE welcomes WAR ROOM editors Tom Bruscino and Jon Klug to explain the drive and desire behind the DUSTY SHELVES series. Podcast editor Ron Granieri moderates the discussion as all three examine some of their favorite and not-so-favorite historical works that deserve another look with fresh eyes.   Thomas Bruscino is an associate professor at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of the DUSTY SHELVES series. Colonel Jon Klug, U.S. Army, is an Army Strategist and military historian and he is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of New Brunswick as well as an Associate Editor for WAR ROOM. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Theodore Roosevelt Jr. was the 26th president of the United States from 1901 to 1909. Known to be a voracious reader and considered by many as a great thinker of the 20th century, he is seen here in his Sagamore Hill study contemplating one of the many offerings in his personal library. Photo Credit: Waldon Fawcett, Library of Congress c 16 March 1903, Public Domain Other releases in the "Dusty Shelves" series: BOOK LOVERS NEED APPLY: A DUSTY SHELVES PODCASTHOW A HOMING PIGEON SAVED THE LOST BATTALION OF WORLD WAR I (DUSTY SHELVES)COOK’S ‘MIDNIGHT DRAWINGS’ AND THEIR HAUNTING VIEWS OF WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)BUILDING THE CONTINENTAL ARMY: VON STEUBEN’S “BLUE BOOK” (DUSTY SHELVES)RECEIPT: BOMB, ATOMIC, 1 EACH (DUSTY SHELVES)NSC-68: THE POLICY DOCUMENT THAT SHAPED THE COLD WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)RIDGWAY’S MEMO: “WHY WE ARE HERE” (DUSTY SHELVES)
Nov 15, 2019
WAC MARRIAGE CASE: THINKING ABOUT GENDER, SEX, AND MILITARY SERVICE
25:10
The law only required that both parties be consenting adults…which tells us something about the assumptions at the time A BETTER PEACE welcomes Tanya Roth to discuss a topic that we often think of as an issue of modern day -- LGBT service members -- but has been a fact of military service for decades. Our Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt sits down with Tanya to examine a case of transgender marriage, accusations of homosexuality and the Army's handling of the situation in 1976.     Clipping of 14 June 1977 The Montgomery Advertiser "Gender Expert Labels Former WAC Male" Dr. Tanya Roth is a high school history teacher with emphasis on 20th Century World History and US History at Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The Women's Army Corps (WAC) was the women's branch of the United States Army. It was created as an auxiliary unit, the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) on 15 May 1942 by Public Law 554, and converted to full status as the WAC in 1943. The WAC was disbanded in 1978, and all units were integrated with male units. Photo Credit: Image derived from original recruiting poster, Bradshaw Crandell, Department of the Treasury, 31 December 1942
Nov 12, 2019
ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)
28:40
We need to go back and think big, and We need to think big fast.   A BETTER PEACE welcomes Major General Eirik Kristoffersen, Chief of the Norwegian Army, to the studio to discuss his perspectives on strategic leadership. Major General Kristoffersen was in Carlisle to attend his induction into the International Fellows Hall of Fame at the U.S. Army War College. He becomes the 69th International Fellow to receive the honor. During the podcast he addresses the nature of the NATO alliance and the historical importance of allies to the country of Norway as well as the complicated relationship with its neighbor Russia. A BETTER PEACE podcast editor Ron Granieri moderates.     Maj. Gen. Eirik Kristoffersen is the Chief of Staff Norwegian Army and a distinguished member of the U.S. Army War College Resident Class of 2015. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Members of the Norwegian Home Guard Quick Reaction Force stopped by a main battle tank live-fire range in Rena, Norway, Feb. 18, 2016. The U.S. Marines and Norwegians are preparing for Exercise Cold Response 16, which will bring together 12 NATO Allied and partner nations and approximately 16,000 troops in order to enhance joint crisis response capabilities in cold weather environments. Photo Credit: Master Sgt. Chad McMeen, USMC Other releases in the "Leader's Perspectives" series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Nov 08, 2019
RETHINKING STRATEGY IN VIETNAM AFTER TET – EPISODE 2
22:30
What are the costs for the U.S. of losing the war? And it's a sort of uncomfortable conversation in some ways because the answer may be not all that much. A BETTER PEACE returns with our three scholars of the American War in Vietnam and Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to examine the Tet Offensive and its significance in the Vietnam War in Episode 2. Bob Brigham, Hang Ngyuen and Greg Daddis continue the discussion about what we know, and more importantly, what we don't know about the period from 1968-1973 and how it affected U.S. and Vietnamese policy, strategy and tactics.   Robert K. Brigham is the Shirley Ecker Boskey Professor of History and International Relations at Vassar College, USA. He is the author of numerous publications on American foreign relations. Gregory Daddis is a retired Colonel in the U.S. Army and a Professor for the History Department in the Chapman University. Lien-Hang T. Nguyen is the Dorothy Borg Associate Professor in the History of the United States and East Asia. She specializes in the Vietnam War, U.S.-Southeast Asian relations, and the global Cold War. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description:  A VNAF UH-1H Huey loaded with Vietnamese evacuees on the deck of the U.S. aircraft carrier USS Midway (CV-41) during Operation Frequent Wind, 29 April 1975 Photo Credit: U.S. Navy Photo Episode 1
Oct 31, 2019
RETHINKING STRATEGY IN VIETNAM AFTER TET – EPISODE 1
17:14
From an American-centric scholarship standpoint, I think much of it is driven by this search for finding a scapegoat to make it understandable for why we lost.   A BETTER PEACE welcomes three scholars of the American War in Vietnam to sit down with Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to examine the Tet Offensive and its significance in the Vietnam War. Bob Brigham, Hang Ngyuen and Greg Daddis discuss what we know and, more importantly, what we don't know about the period from 1968-1973 and how it affected U.S. and Vietnamese policy, strategy and tactics.     Robert K. Brigham is the Shirley Ecker Boskey Professor of History and International Relations at Vassar College, USA. He is the author of numerous publications on American foreign relations. Gregory Daddis is a retired U.S. Army Colonel and a Professor of History and the Director of the Master of Arts Program in War and Society at Chapman University. He is the author of three books on the Vietnam war. Lien-Hang T. Nguyen is the Dorothy Borg Associate Professor in the History of the United States and East Asia. She specializes in the Vietnam War, U.S.-Southeast Asian relations, and the global Cold War. She is the author of "Hanoi’s War" and she is currently working on a comprehensive history of the Tet Offensive. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: President Johnson visited Gen William C. Westmoreland, U.S. military commander, in South Vietnam a month before Tet. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo Episode 2
Oct 29, 2019
BIAS IN THE MEDIA?…SAY IT ISN’T SO
28:38
If you read a story and it sounds just too good to be true -- either good or bad -- open  up another window and look for the same topic from a different outlet. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Amanda Cronkhite, a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of National Security and Strategy, to discuss the reality of media bias. She joins podcast editor Ron Granieri to take a critical look at the state of partisanship and objectivity in the realm of modern day as well as historical news sources.     Amanda Cronkhite is a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College.  Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image Description: An 1894 cartoon by Frederick Burr Opper criticizes American newspapers’ elasticity with the truth. Image Credit: Created by Frederick Burr Opper
Oct 22, 2019
TEACHING GENDER AND RACE IN HISTORY AT USMA
24:14
HISTORICALLY WE WANT THEM TO BE ABLE TO... READ ABOUT ANOTHER CULTURE, READ ABOUT THEIR HISTORY, THEIR ETHICAL DEVELOPMENT AND TO UNDERSTAND WHY A CULTURE DEVELOPED THE WAY THAT IT DID In a world that is dominated by discussions of artificial intelligence, increasing technology on the battlefield, and new domains in space and cyber, what part does history play in the development of today's military officer. Dr. Greta Bucher, Professor of History at the United States Military Academy, joins our Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to discuss how an education in history is just as relevant today as it was a hundred years ago. But what should a historical education look like? Bucher and Whitt discuss the importance of incorporating social and cultural history, especially related to questions about race and gender, in the education of future military officers.     Dr. Greta Bucher is a Professor of History and the Vice-Deputy for Academic Affairs in the History Department at West Point Military Academy. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: In 1976, 119 female cadets, a few of them seen here with their male counterparts, became the first women to join the Corps of Cadets at The United States Military Academy at West Point. Of the original 119, 62 graduated in 1980. Photo Credit: Department of the Army
Oct 15, 2019
WE’RE ALL CONSTRUCTIVISTS NOW
29:30
Our students come with a professional ethos and a professional mindset of being apolitical and fundamentally the decisions... we're talking about often are happening in the political realm. In a rather momentous occasion, our Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt turns over the reins of podcast production to our new Editor of A BETTER PEACE, Ron Granieri. After the hand-off, the conversation turns to thinking about how faculty and students at the War College, and other institutions, are approaching the teaching of national security policy and decision making given the current global and domestic political environment. How can national security professionals understand allies' and adversaries' actions and motivations? What is the relative importance of process and psychology in influencing national security decisions? What tools and frameworks might help us make sense of the world around us? Can Whitt and Granieri convince you that we are all Constructivists now?     Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. Ron Granieri is an Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: President Donald J. Trump speaks at a ceremony honoring those who died in the 9/11 terrorist attacks. It was held at the 9/11 Pentagon Memorial in Washington, Sept. 11, 2019. Photo Credit: White House Photo
Oct 11, 2019
SOME THINGS CHANGE, SOME STAY THE SAME – EPISODE 3
27:25
Imagine a conflict, a real war with China…what does war termination look like in that environment? In our third and final episode our scholars continue the discussion of war termination, the latest calls for more lethality and persistent presence of politics in every conflict in modern times. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Emily Knowles of the Oxford Research Group to join our own faculty members Tino Perez, Jacqueline Whitt, and Andrew Hiil to closely examine this article of faith of strategic thought. They each offer personal and professional opinions on the concept and delve into a great deal more in part one of this watercooler style discussion.     Emily Knowles is the Program Director of Oxford Research Group’s Remote Warfare Program. Celestino Perez is a colonel in the U.S. Army and a faculty instructor in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. Andrew A. Hill is the former Chair of Strategic Leadership and the first Editor-In-Chief of WAR ROOM at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The Office of Naval Research Electromagnetic Railgun located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division, fired a world-record setting 33 mega-joule shot, breaking the previous record established Jan. 31, 2008. The railgun is a long-range, high-energy gun launch system that uses electricity rather than gunpowder or rocket motors to launch projectiles capable of striking a target at a range of more than 200 nautical miles with Mach 7 velocity. A future tactical railgun will hit targets at ranges almost 20 times farther than conventional surface ship combat systems. Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams Episode 1 Episode 2
Oct 08, 2019
SOME THINGS CHANGE, SOME STAY THE SAME – EPISODE 2
20:23
…the claim that AI is changing the nature of warfare…it doesn't have to be backed up by any empirical evidence at all…simply saying that maybe gets you what you want In the first episode our scholars began the discussion of the nature versus the character of war. In episode 2 the conversation turns to AI and the marketing value of claiming nature IS changing and it eventually flows to war termination. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Emily Knowles of the Oxford Research Group to join our own faculty members Tino Perez, Jacqueline Whitt, and Andrew Hiil to closely examine this article of faith of strategic thought. They each offer personal and professional opinions on the concept and delve into a great deal more in part one of this watercooler style discussion.     Emily Knowles is the Program Director of Oxford Research Group’s Remote Warfare Program. Celestino Perez is a colonel in the U.S. Army and a faculty instructor in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is an Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. Andrew A. Hill is the former Chair of Strategic Leadership and the first Editor-In-Chief of WAR ROOM at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: The M3 howitzer was designed to be deployed with airborne troops and used during World War II, with a variant used during the Korean War. Photo Credit: U.S. Army Episode 1
Oct 04, 2019
SOME THINGS CHANGE, SOME STAY THE SAME
26:58
I think it makes...strategic thinkers think that they're saying something profound when in fact they are not.   Scholars have long held that the nature of war is enduring and unchanging, while the character of war is in flux and subject to the whims of technology and modern thought. It is a concept often credited to von Clausewitz but odds are it's not that old an idea. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Emily Knowles of the Oxford Research Group to join our own faculty members Tino Perez, Jacqueline Whitt, and Andrew Hiil to closely examine this deeply held truth of strategic thought. They each offer personal and professional opinions on the concept and delve into a great deal more in part one of this watercooler style discussion.     Emily Knowles is the Program Director of Oxford Research Group’s Remote Warfare Program. Celestino Perez is a colonel in the U.S. Army and a faculty instructor in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. Andrew A. Hill is the former Chair of Strategic Leadership and the first Editor-In-Chief of WAR ROOM at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: New Inventions of Modern Times -Nova Reperta-, The Invention of Gunpowder, plate 3 Image Creator: Jan van der Straet, called Stradanus, Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1934 Episode 2
Sep 27, 2019
THERE’S MORE TO LIFE THAN LETHALITY
22:10
When you're more focused on lethality you're less likely to look at ways the military can act to support things that will maybe avoid war in the first place During his tenure as the Secretary of Defense, James N. Mattis frequently used the term lethality in describing all aspects of the U.S. Department of Defense. It was described as a desired endstate for all acquisitions, it was the subject of criticism in the world of joint Professional Military Education, and service secretaries and chief were given carte blanche to eliminate or restructure anything that hindered or didn't contribute to lethality. Andrew Diederich joins Editor-In-Chief Jacqueline Whitt to discuss the shortcomings of that thinking in the strategic realm. If all the DoD concerns itself with is lethality, what roles, what options, what contributions is it at worst ignoring, at best, allowing to deteriorate?     LTC Andrew Diederich is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College AY19 Resident Class and currently assigned to Northern Command. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Description: Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif. – Cpl. Matthew Teutsch (left) and Cpl. Brett Norman, both combat videographers with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, participate in hand-to-hand and close quarters combat during martial arts training at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Oct. 2, 2018. The Marines worked on offensive and defensive techniques utilizing different weapons systems focusing on the motto of the Martial Arts Program: “One Mind, Any Weapon.” Photo Credit:  U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Donald Holbert
Sep 24, 2019
IT’S A MATTER OF INTELLECTUAL CURIOSITY
27:33
To me what intellectual leadership means is to read more and study more and be a deep thinker, and I don't think that's what the secretary of defense wants us to do. Words have meaning and all too often there is no common understanding of that intended meaning. When former Secretary of Defense Mattis placed an emphasis on intellectual leadership in "cultivating creative workforce talent" he surely had a specific idea in mind as to what that represented. Today's panel takes a crack at just what intellect versus intelligence means and more importantly how to get after individual development. COLs Terri Peterkin and Maurice Sipos along with Dr. John Bonin join Buck Haberichter in the studio to try and understand just what the SECDEF had in mind and just as importantly how to get to his desired end state. What should institutions of higher learning, leaders and mentors do to develop creative leaders?     COL Terrie Peterkin is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College AY19 Resident Course.  COL Maurice Sipos is a Professor of Organizational Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Dr. John Bonin is the Director Concepts and Doctrine Division at the Center for Strategic Leadership.  Col Buck Haberichter is the Managing Editor of WAR ROOM. Photo: The Thinker, sculpture by Auguste Rodin, in Madrid. Photo Credit: Carlos Delgado; CC-BY-SA
Sep 18, 2019
THE GENERAL STAFF THAT WASN’T
30:00
The charter was...to look at preparation of the Navy for the defense of maritime security and the coasts In the early 1900's the U.S. Navy found itself creating strategy in an ad hoc manner in the midst of modernization and calls for officer corps structure and education reform. In response the Secretary of the Navy initiated efforts which led to the creation of the Naval War College and equally as important the General Board of the Navy. The General Board was essentially the first Navy General Staff in all but name for fear of creeping Prussian militarism. John Kuehn, a professor of history at the Army Command and General Staff College, recounts the early days of the Navy's attempt to formalize strategy formulation. He and JP Clark review the formative stages of the modern U.S. Navy and the worldwide reach and structure that so many are familiar with today.   Dr. John Kuehn is a Professor of Military History at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. COL JP Clark is the Deputy Director for Academic Engagement for the Strategic Studies Institute and a WAR ROOM Senior Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: USS Baron DeKalb, an Eads class ironclad Photo Credit: U.S. Naval archives
Sep 13, 2019
THE EISENHOWER SERIES COLLEGE PROGRAM: 50 YEARS OF OUTREACH
22:57
Dickinson College...students marched on the War College but instead of violence we had discussion. In a time when the nation sees increasing political divides and claims that the civil-military gap is ever widening, one program reaches out to try and reverse the trend. Colonels Ed Kaplan and Mike Baim join WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt, to highlight the contributions of the U.S. Army War College's Eisenhower Series College Program. Ed and Mike explain how each academic year a joint cohort of military officers reach out to colleges and town halls across the nation to introduce War College students to audiences that some might expect to be hostile towards the military. Their goal is to have reasoned and thoughtful discussions with the society they serve and protect. And for the last 50 years the Eisenhower Program has succeeded in closing that gap in communities that have little or no tie to the military.     COL Mike Baim is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College AY19 Resident Class. Colonel Ed Kaplan is the Director of Aerospace Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Check out this video of a typical engagement for the Eisenhower Series College Program. Photo: On the eve of the operation, Dwight D. Eisenhower visited Greenham Common, an English airfield in Newbury, where he addressed the blackened face of 1st Lieutenant Wallace C. Strobel, Company E, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, and other airborne troopers. Photo Credit: U.S. Army Signal Corps
Sep 10, 2019
A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
30:28
I see [Jomini] as one of the final products of the Enlightenment -- the idea of this ability to find scientific principles ... that anyone can use, [such as] in this case, war In this episode in our Great Strategists series, U.S. Army War College historians Bill Johnsen and Con Crane present one of the more enigmatic figures in military theory, Baron Antoine-Henri Jomini. Historians have given Jomini mixed reviews in terms of evaluating his theories and contributions, but almost all recognize his influence. Modern analysts often pit Jomini and his contemporary, Carl von Clausewitz, as polar opposites, creating "Jominian" and "Clausewitzian" camps. In reality, both were informed by their experiences with the Napoleonic Wars, but they took different perspectives--Clausewitz from the Prussian perspective, Jomini from the French. And while Clausewitz died in 1831, Jomini lived to be an old man and prolific writer, so you can see elements of Clausewitzian thought in Jomini's writing. Still, Jomini was interested in finding general principles of warfare that could translate directly to success on the battlefield; a task that seemed simple when he could draw from observations of Napoleon's greatest victories. Bill and Con tell Jomini's story, contributions to theories of war and relations with other thinkers, and the contemporary relevance of his ideas. WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Bill Johnsen recently retired as Professor at the U.S. Army War College. Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM.   Other releases in the "Great Strategists" series: A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTSMAHAN AND SEA POWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 4)KAUTILYA, THE ARTHASHASTRA, AND ANCIENT REALISM — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 3)SUN TZU AND THE ART OF WAR — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 2)ON CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ – GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 1)
Sep 05, 2019
THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
32:26
[Thucydides] is one of the very few primary resources we have. If he hadn't done this, we probably wouldn't know very much about this period at all We continue our Great Strategists series with an episode on the man whose works serve as a foundation of strategic thought about war. Thucydides (c. 460-400 BC) was a Athenian general in the Peloponnesian War who, early on, recognized the War's potential for transforming the political and social structures of the period. Thus, he set out to write a detailed account of the War from its onset. His aim was to understand how wars began, its impacts on combatant forces and societies, and to raise questions about the meaning of 'just' war. His first-person perspective adds color and power to his description of these events. Much of the contemporary discourse about the nature and character of war is owed to Thucydides. However, the full History of the Peloponnesian War is not the easiest read and covers an extensive amount of ground. It is both too easy and dangerous to reduce the work to particular passages such as the powerful Melian Dialogue or reduce the work to bumper stickers like the "Thucydidean Trap." A wider reading shows how strategic decisions made early in the war had significant effects in the short and long terms. Helping tell Thucydides' story and the impacts of his History are three faculty members from the U.S. Army War College -- Drs. Tami Davis Biddle, Michael Neiberg, and Richard Lacquement. Each have a role in incorporating Thucydides' works into the War College curriculum and offer their individual perspectives. UProfessor of Strategy and WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Tami Davis Biddle is Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Army War College. Michael Neiberg is Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Richard Lacquement is Dean of the School of Strategic Landpower at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. Image: Depiction of Pericles' Funeral Oration by Phillip Foltz, c. 1877, via Wikimedia Commons, public domain WAR ROOM Releases by Michael Neiberg: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)LESSONS FROM 1918: GET A FLU SHOT, WASH YOUR HANDSLIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
Aug 28, 2019
FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)
32:49
If you don't end your essay with the 'so what' answered, you haven't done your job Ah, writing ... that elusive skill. For all the advice and helpful books on the market, there is little substitute for developing the skill through practice and experience. But not everyone has the time, and even experienced writers can struggle to find the right words. In this episode of A BETTER PEACE, Jennifer Keene and Michael Neiberg discuss various tips on writing, especially history and other scholarship. How does one craft a good thesis? Or deliver a great hook in the introduction? Or develop those 'wow' moments that leave a lasting impression on the reader?     Jennifer Keene is Dean of Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences and a specialist in American military experience during World War I. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Pxhere.com under creative commons license. Other releases in the "On Writing" series: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
Aug 26, 2019
WORLD WAR I WAS ALSO FOUGHT IN AFRICA!
26:21
At the outbreak of the war, all of those armies were quite small but they rapidly grew many times their size in 1914 Historical memory of the First World War often focuses on the western front, perhaps because of egocentrism or the wealth of documents and literature that emerged from the front. But while the western front is iconic, this focus obscures the fact that the Great War was indeed a world war fought on several continents by soldiers from around the globe. An often overlooked theater was Africa, where soldiers from colonial armies fought each other on the continent, or joined their colonial powers on the western front. These small colonial armies originally supported and preserved imperial rule, but as the Great War broke out they mobilized quickly. What motivated Africans to fight in the armies of their colonial power? How did the war change the relationships between the empires and their colonies? These are other topics are presented by special guest Michelle Moyd, author of Violent Intermediaries: African Soldiers, Conquest, and Everyday Colonialism in German East Africa. WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Michelle Moyd is the Ruth N. Halls Associate Professor, Department of History and Associate Director, Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society at Indiana University. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Four Askaris, German East Africa Soldiers, taken between 1906 and 1918. Photo Credit: By Bundesarchiv, Bild 105-DOA3124 / Walther Dobbertin / under creative commons license 3.0, Germany [CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 de]. Refer to this link for more information.
Aug 23, 2019
A CAREER FULL OF ‘ZIGS’ AND ‘ZAGS’ — MAJOR GENERAL TAMMY SMITH (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)
26:44
One of the things that will occur as you [move up the ranks] is you're going to have a more diverse workforce A BETTER PEACE welcomes to the studio U.S. Army Reserve Major General Tammy Smith to discuss her perspectives on strategic leadership, especially her current role in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs. With WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt, MG Smith tells how her career followed many different directions over time. Through self-awareness and purposeful self-development activities, she adapted and overcame at each step, especially when she did not have the technical expertise of those around her. This was true even in her current position, where she takes on the quality of life portfolio, something she had limited knowledge about previously, but is enjoying and adding value to it every way she can!     Tammy Smith is is a major general in the U.S. Army Reserve and Military Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Fort Drum community members welcomed Maj. Gen. Tammy Smith, then-Army Deputy G-1, as guest speaker for their annual LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) Pride Month observance. Photo Credit: Mike Strasser, Fort Drum Garrison Public Affairs, public domain Other releases in the Senior Leader Perspectives series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Aug 20, 2019
“GIRLS NEXT DOOR” — WOMEN AS EMOTIONAL LABORERS ON THE FRONT LINES
27:20
They're outgoing. They're adventurous. They want to do something for the war effort. They want to do their bit. While contemporary conversations about women and the military focus on the extent to which women are or should be integrated as service members, this is but one perspective. Women have been associated with militaries in various ways and to varying degrees throughout human history. In the U.S., the wars and conflicts of the 20th century saw civilian American women taking on significant roles and responsibilities in support of war efforts, from the thousands of women manning the factory floors (a la Rosie the Riveter) to entertainers sent overseas. One of the more interesting (and by today's standards, rather odd) initiatives was the sending of attractive single women to the front lines of World War I. The purpose was simply to meet and converse with the soldiers thereby sustaining morale. For soldiers who had never left home before the war, the presence of these women were reminders of the home front and (it is believed) helped keep soldiers from engaging in immoral or unprofessional conduct with the locals. This idea evolved over subsequent wars but the aim remained the same -- to alleviate combat stress and help keep soldiers on the straight and narrow. However, the launch of the All-Volunteer Force, gender integration, and the growing numbers of older, married soldiers led to movements away from employing women in such morale support roles. Discussing this history and contemporary implications is Kara Dixon Vuic, author of the book The Girls Next Door: Bringing the Home Front to the Front Lines. WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   Kara Dixon Vuic is the Lance Corporal Benjamin W. Schmidt Professor of War, Conflict, and Society in 20th-Century America at Texas Christian University. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Doughnut Girl in World War I with troops, circa 1918 Photo Credit: Salvation Army via Smithsonian, public domain (pre-1924)
Aug 16, 2019
THE ARMED FORCES OF LIBERIA TODAY
24:56
The western African nation of Liberia underwent a period of significant unrest and violent beginning with a military coup in 1980 and culminated with a very bloody civil war in 2003, which saw the ouster and exile of an autocratic leader. Under watch of the United Nations Mission to Liberia, the nation successfully transitioned to democratic rule, signified by the free and fair election of President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf in 2005. In the years that followed, the U.S. assisted in the demobilization of the old Armed Forces of Liberia (AFL) and the establishment of a new AFL, operating under civilian rule, by 2010. So what has transpired since? Is the new AFL operating as a professional force similar to the U.S.? To what extent does it contribute to enduring peace in Liberia at home and to international peace efforts elsewhere? These and many other topics are explored in this special episode where we welcome Lieutenant Colonel Roland Murphy of the Liberian Armed Forces who provides an insiders' view of the AFL's professionalization. These may inform future U.S. efforts to build partner capacity in other nations. U.S. Army War College Director of African Studies Chris Wyatt moderates. A lot of neighbors in our subregion were skeptical of Liberia, so after the new Armed Forces of Liberia were formed, they were watching carefully. The story is different now. Roland Murphy is a lieutenant colonel in the Liberian Army, a member of the 2nd Cohort of the new Armed Forces of Liberia, and an International Fellow of the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2020. Chris Wyatt is a colonel in the U.S. Army and the Director of African Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf inspecting AFL soldiers on board USS Fort McHenry in 2008 Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Elizabeth Merriam
Aug 13, 2019
WHY WAR COLLEGES? — A SPECIAL RE-RELEASE
19:23
From the WAR ROOM Editorial Staff: What happens when a DBA from the Harvard Business School lands at the U.S. Army War College? There's the inevitable push-back against the formal dress code, but more importantly--there's innovation and new ideas. Although Dr. Andrew A. Hill has announced his departure from the War College and as the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM, his mark and legacy is unmistakable. Under Andrew's tenacious leadership and vision, WAR ROOM and its podcast, A BETTER PEACE, matured from a twinkle in his eye to a somewhat-rebellious adolescent in just two years. There have been growing pains and challenges as the editorial team navigated the crowded space of online publishing in the national security arena and as WAR ROOM hit its stride and found its niche. Andrew's imagination and tireless efforts were central to every achievement. To commemorate his departure from the U.S. Army War College, the WAR ROOM Editorial Team has elected to re-release one of our earliest podcasts, Andrew's June 2017 interview with then-War College Commandant Major General Bill Rapp entitled, "Why War Colleges?" The podcast is more than a treatise on the roles, missions, challenges, and opportunities of senior professional military education (PME). It represents Andrew's vision of WAR ROOM as a forum for introspection on enduring issues in national security and the defense enterprise. The WAR ROOM team, under the leadership of the new Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Jacqueline E. Whitt, pledge to faithfully uphold the vision of crowdsourced content that opens space for new voices in the arena while insisting on the highest standards of content and quality. All of us at WAR ROOM thank Andrew for his vision, energy, and dedication these past two-and-a-half years and wish him every success, and (even if this does require a strained translation from Latin), prudens futuri. It is leaders and ideas that make the War Colleges, especially today, necessary and vital In this War Room Podcast, “Why War Colleges?” Andrew A. Hill interviews the 50th Commandant of the U.S. Army College, U.S. Army Major General Bill Rapp to discuss the history, roles, and responsibilities of war colleges to develop future strategic leaders, both military and civilian, and to develop ideas that address current and future needs of the defense enterprise. They explore why the Army’s performance during the Spanish-American War necessitated the Army War College’s founding, and how it has evolved in the century since.     Bill Rapp is a major general in the U.S. Army and the 50th Commandant of the U.S. Army War College.  Andrew A. Hill is editor-in-chief of War Room. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Army or the U.S. Government.  Photo:  Left -- Close-up of U.S. Army War College resident class of 1952. Right -- Close-up of U.S. Army War College resident class of 2017. Photo credit:  U.S. Army War College
Aug 06, 2019
WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR ONE TO SUCCEED IN A MULTINATIONAL ASSIGNMENT?
28:53
How important is enhancing unity of effort ... [so] all the differences in culture, values, caveats, mindsets, etc. are harmonized for a common objective? Service at the strategic level sometimes involves working with international partners and possibly serving within multinational environments, such as NATO in Belgium or UN peacekeeping missions. The experiences of American officers in such settings can feel, literally, foreign as U.S. military culture and habits may differ from those of allied and partner nations. Unfortunately, not everyone receives adequate training or other preparation for entry into such assignments, which can impact both individual and team performance. This year, a team of U.S. Army War College researchers studied factors that contribute to success in multinational staff assignments based on interviews with U.S. Army War College students -- both Americans and International Fellows. Reporting the results of this study are two of the team members -- Colonel Christian Vial, a U.S. Army War College Exchange Officer from Chile and Dr. George Woods. What can professional military education institutions and force providers do to set its budding multinational staff officers for success? A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates. Click here to download an executive summary of the study!     Christian Vial is a colonel in the Chilean Army and an exchange officer on the faculty of the U.S. Army War College. George Woods is Professor of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Official opening of the SHAPE Headquarters, Mons, Belgium, 1967 Photo Credit: NATO
Jul 30, 2019
WHAT SHOULD A U.S. SPACE FORCE LOOK LIKE?
29:42
Space is important and we would notice if it went away Indeed, so much of what the global public relies upon for work and life depends on space capabilities. But more than ever, the space domain is becoming contested, and that is driving a new discourse about the capabilities that the U.S. military require to protect it from adversarial attack or exploitation. Recognizing these emerging challenges, the U.S. President expressed the intent to create a dedicated space force. Since then, there have been many discussions about a space force's roles, missions, require capabilities, rules of engagement, and composition. What are the problems that the DoD and the Army face in the space domain, and how would a dedicated space force address those problems? Addressing these and many other questions is Andrew Diederich, a space officer in the Army. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.       Andrew Diederich is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army National Guard and a graduate of the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2019. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo
Jul 23, 2019
THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)
20:16
There is nothing we do in the joint force that isn't enabled by space. Nothing. A lot of attention is being paid to the space domain, and so A BETTER PEACE welcomes General John W. "Jay" Raymond, Commander of the U.S. Air Force Space Command, to the studio to discuss his perspectives on strategic leadership. General Raymond's responsibilities include organizing, training, equipping and maintaining mission-ready space forces and capabilities for North American Aerospace Defense Command, U.S. Strategic Command and other commands around the world. The position calls for boldness and innovation to maintain U.S. leadership in a domain that both the military and the private sector depend on. Meanwhile, adversaries to the U.S. are mobilizing their capabilities to deny U.S. access to the space domain, and the potentially devastating effects of an even minor attack would be felt worldwide. So how does a leader cope with such high-visibility, high-risk responsibilities? A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Jay Raymond is a general in the U.S. Air Force and serves as Commander of the U.S. Air Force Space Command. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Two terminal dishes assist Army space Soldiers of Alpha Company, 53rd Signal Battalion (SATCON) at the Wideband Satellite Communications Operations Center, Fort Detrick, MD. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo Other releases in the "Leader's Perspectives" series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Jul 18, 2019
KNOWING WHEN A WAR IS UNWINNABLE — GENERAL FREDERICK C. WEYAND (GREAT CAPTAINS)
29:38
He realized that in a democracy, military success is not sufficient General Frederick C. Weyand served as the 28th Chief of Staff of the Army in the 1970s but, as Dr. Frank Jones of the U.S. Army War College explains, he earned the right to be considered a Great Captain from his efforts during the Vietnam War. Leveraging his intelligence background to survey the environment and the state of the South Vietnamese government and people, Weyand saw that the dominant U.S. military strategy of conventional war was not going to succeed. Instead, the war was headed toward stalemate and it was better to concentrate on winning over the peoples in the rural areas. This led to open disagreements with U.S. military leaders. Weyand proved himself right when he moved his troops closer to Saigon than along the Cambodian border region, he succeeded in saving Saigon from the Tet Offensive and delivering a powerful blow to the North Vietnamese forces. Still, this success was obscured by strong anti-war sentiment back in the U.S., showing Weyand how the military was but one part of nation's war effort. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Frank Jones is Professor of Strategic Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and WAR ROOM's podcast editor. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photos: U.S. Army mechanized infantry soldiers in action during Operation Attleboro; portrait of LTG Weyand from Vietnam in front Photo Credit: U.S. Army photos; image composed by Tom Galvin Other releases in the "Great Captains" series: KNOWING WHEN A WAR IS UNWINNABLE — GENERAL FREDERICK C. WEYAND (GREAT CAPTAINS)AN UNBEATEN ROMAN GENERAL: SCIPIO AFRICANUS (GREAT CAPTAINS)KNOW THY ENEMY: OSAMA BIN LADEN & RISE OF THE NON-STATE ACTOR (GREAT CAPTAINS)GEORGE C. MARSHALL & LEADING THE NATIONAL WAR EFFORT (GREAT CAPTAINS)THE PARTNERSHIP OF ROBERT E. LEE AND STONEWALL JACKSON (GREAT CAPTAINS)HANNIBAL AND THE MARCH THROUGH THE ALPS (GREAT CAPTAINS)WILLIAM T. SHERMAN: THE FIRST ‘MODERN’ GENERAL (GREAT CAPTAINS)GEORGE WASHINGTON: THE LESSONS OF FAILURE (GREAT CAPTAINS)
Jul 16, 2019
THE DOD-CIA RELATIONSHIP: ARE WE MILITARIZING STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE?
17:33
Military intelligence is important, but it isn't the whole world As quoted from David Oakley's book, Subordinating Intelligence: The DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship How has the relationships among intelligence agencies evolved over the past half century, and why is this important for national security leaders today? In this episode in our on-going series on Strategic Intelligence, David Oakley shows how two prominent actors in the intelligence community -- the Department of Defense and Central Intelligence Agency -- moved from an even-weighted partnership to a virtual supported-supporting relationship since the 1990s. Using the constructs of "intelligence for action" vs. "intelligence for understanding," Oakley describes how this negatively impacted the functioning of the community as a whole. U.S. Army War College DeSerio Chair for Strategic Intelligence Genevieve Lester moderates.     David Oakley is an Assistant Professor in the Department of War and Conflict Studies at the National Defense University. Genevieve Lester is the De Serio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats, left, and Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency Lt. Gen. Robert P. Ashley, Jr. testify on March 6, 2018, on Capitol Hill. Photo Credit: Defense Intelligence Agency photo Other releases in the "Intelligence" series: THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE TODAYPOLICY SUCCESS VS. INTEL FAILURE?IMPACT (OR NOT) OF INTEL ON STRATEGIC DECISION MAKINGSTRATEGIC ATTACKS AND THEIR FALLOUTNEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS: ANALYZING TODAY’S FLOOD OF INFORMATIONWHERE DOES INTELLIGENCE GO FROM HERE? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPERTHE DOD-CIA RELATIONSHIP: ARE WE MILITARIZING STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE?THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ODNI: AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
Jul 09, 2019
CLEARING THE BATTLEFIELD: WHY DE-MINING IS A POWERFUL U.S. CAPABILITY
21:57
Humanitarian Mine Action is one way for the DoD to really support the other three instruments of national power Explosive Remnants of War, or ERW, is a significant problem in former battlefields. For example, the landscape of Bosnia and Herzegovina after the Dayton Accords was littered with antipersonnel mines. Since 1996, more than 3,000 square kilometers of land have been cleared of mines but an estimated 150,000 devices remain. Landmines, ammunition stocks, and other hazards represent both present dangers, especially to innocent civilians, past reminders of the prior conflict, and potential flashpoints for renewed hostilities. Humanitarian Mine Action, also known as "de-mining," is a capability the U.S. has to safely remove and dispose of ERW. While this capability is high-risk, generally slow and methodical, and requires tremendous skill and knowledge; the benefits of restoring land to a safe, sustainable, and usable condition are extraordinary. It is also one way that the military can provide direct support to the other instruments of national power -- diplomatic, informational, and economic. A BETTER PEACE presents three experts in Humanitarian Mine Action -- Shawn Kadlec, graduate of the War College resident class of 2019 and an explosive ordnance detachment officer; Jared Harper, USAWC faculty instructor and specialist in security force assistance; and Rick Coplen, Professor of Economic Development at USAWC and an expert on development in fragile states. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.       Shawn Kadlec is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army and a graduate of the resident class of AY2019. Jerad Harper is a colonel is the U.S. Army and a faculty instructor in the Department of Distance Education at the U.S. Army War College. Rick Coplen is Professor of economic development at the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: U.S. Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians from 20th CBRNE Command respond to dozens of unexploded ordnance calls a month, both on and off post. Photo Credit: 20th CBRNE photo via U.S. Army homepage
Jun 26, 2019
STRATEGY AS PERFORMANCE: EDUCATING STUDENTS TO GO BEYOND ENDS, WAYS, & MEANS
26:35
One weakness of the way we view strategy ... is that we neglect the environment Professional military education (PME) plays a vital role in preparing military leaders to fight and win the nation's wars. PME occurs at all levels of leadership, required for the most junior non-commissioned officers to the most senior flag officers and every rank in between. But what PME should teach, how it should be taught, and who should teach it is a long-standing debate, one that has featured in several other WAR ROOM releases. One subject area embroiled in this debate is military strategy, where there are demonstrable gaps in knowledge and perspective between the military and academic communities. As U.S. Army War College professor Celestino Perez demonstrates, national decisions to employ the military are frequently (and hotly) debated. Yet military officers may not be exposed to these debates, and they may also be disconnected from the experts and expertise available concerning the operational environment. How might PME bridge these gaps and improve student preparation for greater responsibilities?     Celestino Perez is a colonel in the U.S. Army and a faculty instructor in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Maj. Gen. John Kem, Commandant, U.S. Army War College, welcomed 157 government, business and academic leaders to the 64th annual National Security Seminar in Bliss Hall June 4, 2018. Photo Credit: U.S. Army War College Public Affairs  
Jun 24, 2019
WHY SENIOR LEADERS SHOULD NOT TAKE PERSONAL FINANCE FOR GRANTED
33:57
For those that say 'I wish I would have started a little bit earlier but I didn't' -- don't despair. ... Start now! The demands on senior leaders can sometimes overwhelm their abilities to manage their personal affairs and maintain a healthy work-life balance. Thinking about and planning for the long-term may lose out against the short-term demands of leading and managing the defense enterprise. But senior leaders who improperly manage their money can not only fall into debt and assume significant risk but also expose themselves to security risks. Personal finance -- which includes savings, investments, and insurance -- is therefore a readiness issue, one that too many senior leaders overlook until it is too late. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt welcomes two recent graduates of the U.S. Army War College -- Jay Parker and Mark Henderson to discuss a senior leader's perspective on personal finance. What is it, what tools does it require, and how does one balance tomorrow's financial security with the intense demands of the here and now?     Jay Parker is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army and a graduate of the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2019. Mark Henderson is a colonel in the U.S. Army and a graduate of the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2019. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Pixabay, via Pexels.com under the creative commons license
Jun 20, 2019
HOW A HOMING PIGEON SAVED THE LOST BATTALION OF WORLD WAR I (DUSTY SHELVES)
24:43
Pigeons were treated with very high regard in the military ... much like working dogs are today Technological innovation has always been central to warfighting, and the advances made over the 20th century were especially important. During the First World War, battlefield communications were limited, and armies employed means--old and new--to communicate. They used old technologies such as semaphores and telegraphs as well as new ones such as telephones and signal lights. But they also relied on animal power, including messenger dogs and homing pigeons to transmit critical information. One such pigeon was responsible for delivering the message that saved the "Lost Battalion" -- the 77th Infantry -- from a friendly artillery barrage whilst trapped behind enemy lines. The message from commander Major Whittlesey is an important artifact and tells an important story about communications, artillery, and combat in the First World War. Homing pigeons were celebrated and hailed as war heroes. Cher Ami, one of the most famous pigeon messengers from the war is on display at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History (NMAH). Explaining the roles and importance of homing pigeons in the first World War is Dr. Frank Blazich of the NMAH. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Frank Blazich is Lead Curator of Modern Military History at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Screen shot of the original message carried by a WWI homing pigeon, with the famous pigeon, Cher Ami overlaid. Both from the National Archives, via the U.S. Army Home Page. Image Credit: Composed by Tom Galvin
Jun 18, 2019
HOW CHANGE OF FLAG OFFICER COMMANDERS IMPACT THEIR ORGANIZATIONS
30:01
Command at the strategic level is challenging. Commanders are leading large organizations that are regionally (even globally) distributed, perform a widely diverse range of missions and tasks, or are overseeing the execution of military campaigns. They must address both short-term mission accomplishment and the long-term needs of their organizations, services, or the joint force. But the typical commander only serve for two to three years, not always sufficient time to shape the long-term future of their commands. Addressing how this routine changeover of leadership influences the organization, for good and bad, are two officers who have served in multiple four-star commands -- U.S. Army colonels Bob Bradford and Matt Coburn, both now serving as faculty instructors at the U.S. Army War College. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates. When you have a new commander who comes in and feels like they must change things to make their impact, that can be tremendously disruptive.   Bob Bradford is a colonel in the U.S. Army and Professor of Defense Enterprise Management at the U.S. Army War College. Matt Coburn is a colonel in the U.S. Army and Professor of Special Operations at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense.  Photo: From the U.S. Army Materiel Command's change of command ceremony, 2016. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by SGT Eben Boothby
Jun 11, 2019
ON HOLDING THE ENEMY ACCOUNTABLE: CUSTOMS OF RETALIATION IN THE CIVIL WAR
27:49
The ritual of retaliation codified what makes you legitimate [as a combatant] and what makes you not legitimate How did combatants enforce the lawful practice of war prior to the Geneva Conventions and other conceptions of international laws of warfare? During the Civil War period, the answer was the customary practice of retaliation, which provides wronged combatants the opportunity to redress unlawful conduct by an opponent. Through a process of formal notification, threat of action, and binding honorable resolution, the Union and Confederacy managed to keep each other on the right side of the law. How and why this worked, and to what extent did this practice reinforce good order of discipline? Dr. Lorien Foote, a prominent Civil War historian from Texas A&M University, addresses these and other questions with A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt.       Lorien Foote is the Patricia & Bookman Peters Professor of History and Director of Graduate Studies at Texas A&M University. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Reprisal for, quoting the extended title, "The desolation of the border counties of Missouri, during the enforcement of military orders, issued by Brigadier General [Thomas] Ewing, of the Union Army, from his Head Quarters, Kansas City, Augt. 25th 1863." Image Credit: "Martial Law," George Caleb Bingham, c. 1872 via Library of Congress, public domain
Jun 05, 2019
HOW DO ORGANIZATIONS CHANGE AFTER INCORPORATING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE?
30:47
If we want [Artificial intelligence] to thrive, we have to have leaders who understand it Artificial intelligence is seemingly everywhere and everyone is talking about it. But so what? What is the real utility of "AI" and how did it change or transform the organizations that incorporated AI into their practices? A trio of U.S. Army War College students -- Tom Spahr, Chris Chase, and Andre Abadie -- visited businesses and other organizations from around the country to answer these questions. They found that AI helped improve some practices by making them more efficient, but not other practices. There are important cultural barriers to adopting AI for some purposes. What are the implications for the U.S. military should it decide to incorporate AI technologies? A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Tom Spahr, Chris Chase, and Andre Abadie are U.S. military officers and resident students in the U.S. Army War College class of 2019. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: PxHere.com under Creative Commons license
Jun 03, 2019
GENDER INTEGRATION AND THE EXPERIENCE OF BEING A “FIRST”
25:13
Today it is commonplace for a female to command a brigade, and it is hugely important The military is a constantly evolving organization. Change in the US military is driven by both the need to serve as an effective fighting force and maintain a connection with society. An example is the recent integration of women in combat roles. Although women have been associated with the US military since the American Revolution, traditional gender roles often defined the limits of women's service. Nevertheless, women who have chosen to serve have transcended these limitations, performed acts of heroism and courage, and inspired future generations of women to serve and push against the social and structural boundaries placed before them. This episode features one of those women: Major General Jessica Wright, U.S. Army retired, who served over six years as The 50th Adjutant General of Pennsylvania and, following retirement, served as Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, and Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs. With A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt, Major General Wright reflects on her service, women in the military, and those service members who enabled and supported her throughout her career.       Jessica Wright is a retired major general in the U.S. Army. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photos: (L) Women's Army Corps Dorothy "Dora" Feinbloom, served with the Army Air Corps in 1943; (R) PFC Christina Fuentes Montenegro, one of the first three women to graduate from the Marine Corps’ Infantry Training Battalion in October 2013. Photo Credits: (L) National World War II Museum, (R) U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Tyler Main
May 29, 2019
“FICINT”: ENVISIONING FUTURE WAR THROUGH FICTION & INTELLIGENCE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
21:00
I don't write science fiction so I can predict the future, but I want to better understand what's lies ahead This episode is the final in a series of releases on the Emerging Environment in the Indo-Pacific Region, produced in collaboration with the United States Military Academy at West Point’s Department of Social Sciences as part of the 2019 Senior Conference. What does the future of war look like? A common trope is that militaries default to fighting the 'last' war, leaving themselves exposed when the next war emerges. Conventional war planning may not always provide the best answer, so what are alternatives? One is exploring the future through fiction, where authors can analyze and develop war scenarios from friendly, enemy, and neutral perspectives. A BETTER PEACE welcomes a scholar and author who has done just that. August Cole is both a war futurist at the Atlantic Council and co-author of the novel Ghost Fleet: A Novel of the Next World War  with P. W. Singer. The novel imagines various ways that emerging technologies may be leveraged by both sides in a predominently Indo-Pacific environment. August Cole generalizes this approach in what he calls FICINT -- the combination of fiction writing with intelligence to imagine future scenarios in ways grounded in reality. The approach helps both to raise self-awareness and challenge one's own assumptions while articulating complex concepts using tried and true writing techniques that emphasis tension, conflict, and clarity. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     August Cole is a nonresident senior fellow at the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Marine photo by Lance Cpl. Brian Adam Jones, public domain Other releases in the Indo-Pacific Region Series: “FICINT”: ENVISIONING FUTURE WAR THROUGH FICTION & INTELLIGENCE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HOW COMPETITORS USE TECHNOLOGY TO SHAPE THE ENVIRONMENT (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HYPERCOMPETITION AND TRANSIENT ADVANTAGE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION: THE VIEW FROM TOKYO (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)THE MEANING OF ‘PARTNERSHIP’ IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)DEMOGRAPHICS, AGING, AND SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
May 22, 2019
HOW COMPETITORS USE TECHNOLOGY TO SHAPE THE ENVIRONMENT (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
30:24
This is not humanity's first technological rodeo This episode is another in a series of releases on the Emerging Environment in the Indo-Pacific Region, produced in collaboration with the United States Military Academy at West Point’s Department of Social Sciences as part of the 2019 Senior Conference. Just how much have the rapid advance of the Internet and modern information technologies changed society? Or, is it more accurate to say 'shocked' society? There is perhaps no part of the world where cyberspace is more important than in the Pacific, where emerging competition are using technology to mitigate the U.S. advantage. How so, and what does this mean for U.S. strategy in the region. To discuss these topics and where the Internet revolution fits with other great revolutions in history, A BETTER PEACE welcomes Renee DiResta and Jonathan Reiber, both experts in the fields of cybersecurity and cyber policy. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Renée DiResta is the Director of Research at cybersecurity company New Knowledge, and Head of Policy at the nonprofit Data for Democracy. Jonathan Reiber is head of cybersecurity strategy at Illumio and is former Pentagon Chief Strategy Officer for Cyber Policy. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. Photo: Cyber warfare specialists serving with the Maryland Air National Guard’s 175th Cyberspace Operations Group engage in weekend training at Warfield Air National Guard Base in Middle River, Md., June 3, 2017. Photo Credit: Air Force photo by J.M. Eddins Jr. Other releases in the Indo-Pacific Region Series: “FICINT”: ENVISIONING FUTURE WAR THROUGH FICTION & INTELLIGENCE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HOW COMPETITORS USE TECHNOLOGY TO SHAPE THE ENVIRONMENT (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HYPERCOMPETITION AND TRANSIENT ADVANTAGE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION: THE VIEW FROM TOKYO (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)THE MEANING OF ‘PARTNERSHIP’ IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)DEMOGRAPHICS, AGING, AND SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
May 17, 2019
HYPERCOMPETITION AND TRANSIENT ADVANTAGE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
29:30
We have to become accustomed to federated approaches to security ... as opposed to multilateral alliance approaches This episode is another in a series of releases on the Emerging Environment in the Indo-Pacific Region, produced in collaboration with the United States Military Academy at West Point’s Department of Social Sciences as part of the 2019 Senior Conference. Can the U.S. count on having a persistent competitive advantage in the Indo-Pacific region? Not likely, say today's guests who were part of a major U.S. Army War College research project on Indo-Pacific Strategy. Rather than a persistent strategy, research participants Nate Freier of the Strategic Studies Institute and War College resident student Dana Tucker suggest that the intensity of competition means that any advantage will be temporary and transient. What does that mean for U.S. strategy in the region? And, what does it mean for a free and open Indo-Pacific region? WAR ROOM Social Media Editor Buck Haberichter moderates.     Nathan Freier is a Researcher at the the U.S. Army War College's Strategic Studies Institute.. Dana Tucker is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army and a student of the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2019. Buck Haberichter is the WAR ROOM Social Media Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: U.S. Marine Cops Cpl. Gary Johnston provides security during a beach landing exercise with Republic of Korea (ROK) Marines in the vicinity of Pohang, South Korea in 2015 as part of the Korean Marine Exchange Program 15. The program enhances amphibious operations between ROK and U.S. forces that contributes to security and stability on the Korean Peninsula as well as the entire Asia-Pacific region. Photo Credit: U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Brian Bekkala Other releases in the Indo-Pacific Region Series: “FICINT”: ENVISIONING FUTURE WAR THROUGH FICTION & INTELLIGENCE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HOW COMPETITORS USE TECHNOLOGY TO SHAPE THE ENVIRONMENT (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HYPERCOMPETITION AND TRANSIENT ADVANTAGE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION: THE VIEW FROM TOKYO (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)THE MEANING OF ‘PARTNERSHIP’ IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)DEMOGRAPHICS, AGING, AND SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
May 14, 2019
SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION: THE VIEW FROM TOKYO (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
27:22
It's not so much the mil-mil relationship ... the political relationship is something that's a little more volatile than it has been in the past This episode is the next in a series of releases on the emerging environment in the Indo-Pacific Region, produced in collaboration with the United States Military Academy at West Point’s Department of Social Sciences as part of the 2019 Senior Conference. Often when thinking about security in the Asia-Pacific region, Americans do so from an egocentric perspective. This episode flips the script a little bit, presenting the Indo-Pacific region as seen from Japan. Joining us in the studio is Jeffrey Hornung, a political scientist at the RAND Corporation and a specialist in Japanese security and foreign policies, East Asian security issues, maritime security, and U.S. foreign and defense policies in the Asia-Pacific region, including its alliances. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Jeffrey Hornung is a political scientist at the RAND Corporation.. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. Photo: Then-Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert is escorted by a troop commander as he performs a customary troop inspection at a full honors ceremony to welcome Greenert and his delegation to Japan upon their arrival at the Japanese Ministry of Defense in 2014 for a series of counterpart visits with Japanese political and military leaders. Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Peter D. Lawlor, public domain. Other releases in the Indo-Pacific Region Series: “FICINT”: ENVISIONING FUTURE WAR THROUGH FICTION & INTELLIGENCE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HOW COMPETITORS USE TECHNOLOGY TO SHAPE THE ENVIRONMENT (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HYPERCOMPETITION AND TRANSIENT ADVANTAGE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION: THE VIEW FROM TOKYO (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)THE MEANING OF ‘PARTNERSHIP’ IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)DEMOGRAPHICS, AGING, AND SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
May 10, 2019
THE MEANING OF ‘PARTNERSHIP’ IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
29:12
This is not going to look like US-Soviet competition. ... Countries in Southeast Asia -- they don't want to choose. This episode is the second in a series of releases on the Emerging Environment in the Indo-Pacific Region, produced in collaboration with the United States Military Academy at West Point’s Department of Social Sciences as part of the 2019 Senior Conference. One of the central features of the Indo-Pacific region is the importance of alliances and partnerships. For the United States, five of its seven mutual defense treaties are in this region, and working together on issues from deterrence to proliferation to security to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief is a critical element of strategy. But these alliances and partnerships require plenty of care and maintenance. How do these partnerships affect U.S. policy and strategy? A BETTER PEACE welcomes two experts in this area. First is Dr. Tanvi Madan from the Brookings Institution. Tanvi is an expert on Indian security and on India’s relations with China and the United States. Second is Ms. Lindsey Ford from the Asia Society Policy Institute. Lindsey previously served in a number of roles in the Office of the Secretary of Defense from 2009-2015, most recently as the Senior Adviser to the Assistant Secretary for Asia-Pacific Security Affairs. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Tanvi Madan is is a fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution and director of the India Project. Lindsey Ford is the Director for Political-Security Affairs and Richard Holbrooke Fellow at the Asia Society Policy Institute. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. Photo: Commander Robert Rose, commanding officer of the USS Louisville, discusses daily operations with Royal Thai Navy leaders during a submarine tour in support of GUARDIAN SEA 2019. Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher A. Veloicaza Other releases in the Indo-Pacific Region Series: “FICINT”: ENVISIONING FUTURE WAR THROUGH FICTION & INTELLIGENCE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HOW COMPETITORS USE TECHNOLOGY TO SHAPE THE ENVIRONMENT (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HYPERCOMPETITION AND TRANSIENT ADVANTAGE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION: THE VIEW FROM TOKYO (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)THE MEANING OF ‘PARTNERSHIP’ IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)DEMOGRAPHICS, AGING, AND SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
May 07, 2019
DEMOGRAPHICS, AGING, AND SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
25:03
How fantastic that we live in a world where we have a problem of 'population aging'? This episode marks the first in a series of releases on the Emerging Environment in the Indo-Pacific Region, produced in collaboration with the United States Military Academy at West Point’s Department of Social Sciences as part of the 2019 Senior Conference. The Conference provides a forum for distinguished scholars, practitioners, and government officials to engage in candid discussions on topics of national security importance. Senior Conference is made possible by the generous support of the Rupert S. Johnson Grand Strategy Program and the Association of Graduates. This inaugural episode focuses on how demographic change relates to security, but the conclusions might be counterintuitive or vary depending on the country and region in question. Some countries have a prominent "youth bulge" - where the population distribution is heavily skewed toward young people. Other countries see the opposite and an aging population is the driver of demographic change. And it's the latter trend that dominates across the Indo-Pacific region, with Japan leading the way in terms of its median population age. Here to discuss the potential effects of aging and demographic change on security in the Indo-Pacific Region is special guest Dr. Jennifer Sciubba, the Stanley J. Buckman Professor of International Studies at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee and a Global Fellow with the Environmental Change and Security Program at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC. She is the author of two books on the subject, The Future Faces of War: Population and National Security, published in 2011 and Everybody Counts which will be out with W.W. Norton in 2020. A BETTER PEACE Editor-in-Chief Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Jennifer Sciubba is the Stanley J. Buckman Professor of International Studies at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee and a Global Fellow with the Environmental Change and Security Program at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. Photo Credit: Pxhere.com under creative commons license Other releases in the Indo-Pacific Region Series: “FICINT”: ENVISIONING FUTURE WAR THROUGH FICTION & INTELLIGENCE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HOW COMPETITORS USE TECHNOLOGY TO SHAPE THE ENVIRONMENT (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)HYPERCOMPETITION AND TRANSIENT ADVANTAGE (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION: THE VIEW FROM TOKYO (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)THE MEANING OF ‘PARTNERSHIP’ IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)DEMOGRAPHICS, AGING, AND SECURITY IN THE INDO-PACIFIC (INDO-PACIFIC SERIES)
May 03, 2019
AN UNBEATEN ROMAN GENERAL: SCIPIO AFRICANUS (GREAT CAPTAINS)
24:11
These two commanders, Scipio Africanus vs. Hannibal ... demonstrated [strategic leadership] to a great degree A BETTER PEACE continues the Great Captains series with the sequel to a previous episode on the renowned Carthaginian general Hannibal. This episode tells the story of Hannibal's opponent in the Battle of Zama, Scipio Africanus. Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus (236-183 BC) was one of the greatest military commanders of his time but has been overshadowed by Hannibal because of the latter's campaign in the Alps. However, Scipio not only defeated Hannibal at Zama, he previously was victorious in campaigns in Hispania (Spain) and overall was undefeated in battle. U.S. Army War College historian GK Cunningham presents Scipio's remarkable story with WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Andrew A. Hill.     GK Cunningham is Professor of Strategic Landpower at the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is the WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: The Battle of Zama, by anonymous between 1567 and 1578. Image Credit: From the Art Institute of Chicago, public domain. Other Releases from the Great Captains series: KNOWING WHEN A WAR IS UNWINNABLE — GENERAL FREDERICK C. WEYAND (GREAT CAPTAINS)AN UNBEATEN ROMAN GENERAL: SCIPIO AFRICANUS (GREAT CAPTAINS)KNOW THY ENEMY: OSAMA BIN LADEN & RISE OF THE NON-STATE ACTOR (GREAT CAPTAINS)GEORGE C. MARSHALL & LEADING THE NATIONAL WAR EFFORT (GREAT CAPTAINS)THE PARTNERSHIP OF ROBERT E. LEE AND STONEWALL JACKSON (GREAT CAPTAINS)HANNIBAL AND THE MARCH THROUGH THE ALPS (GREAT CAPTAINS)WILLIAM T. SHERMAN: THE FIRST ‘MODERN’ GENERAL (GREAT CAPTAINS)GEORGE WASHINGTON: THE LESSONS OF FAILURE (GREAT CAPTAINS)
Apr 30, 2019
THE EUROPEAN UNION LOOKS FORWARD II: DEVELOPING EU CAPABILITIES
28:04
The European Union is a cooperative of twenty-eight member states, and everyone has different views A BETTER PEACE welcomes special guest Aili Ribulis of the European Union's delegation to the United States to discuss advances and initiatives that the EU is undertaking to develop its capabilities. This follows up on a podcast conducted in 2018 with Ms. Ribulis' predecessor, Mr. Ludwig Blaurock, who presented the concepts under development. As Ms. Ribulis explains, over thirty major initiatives are being pursued, and several are in active development. There are also challenges from having to secure consensus from all its member states and dealing with on-going issues such as Brexit. Is there cause for optimism or caution? U.S. Army War College Director of European Studies Darrell Driver moderates.     Aili Ribulis serves as counselor of political-military affairs with the European Union delegation to the United States. Darrell Driver is the Director of European Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Hungarian soldiers of KTRBN (KFOR Tactical Reserve Battalion) in convoy arrive at Kula during an exercise help by the European Force (EUFOR) in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo Credit: Warrant Officer Ullrich Kallinger, EUFOR
Apr 26, 2019
HOW TO TELL THE STORY OF A WAR: THE OIF STUDY
29:49
[General Odierno] felt that we'd spent the first several years of the Iraq War re-learning many of the lessons of the Vietnam War In 2013, a team of authors was commissioned by then Chief of Staff of the Army General Odierno to write a study of Operation Iraqi Freedom to glean insights for immediate practical application. The resulting two-volume report (Volume I | Volume II) was completed in 2016 but not authorized for release until early in 2019. In this presentation, A BETTER PEACE welcomes co-editor U.S. Army Colonel (Retired) Frank Sobchak and author U.S. Army Colonel Jim Powell to discuss their experiences of assembling the team, researching the report, and ultimately writing what came to a 1300-page product with tremendous implications for the current and future Army. What were more important insights? What were the toughest challenges, beyond the sheer size of the project? A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Frank Sobchak is a retired colonel in the U.S. Army and co-editor of the Iraqi Freedom Study (with U.S. Army Colonel Joel Rayburn. Jim Powell is a colonel in the U.S. Army and one of the Study's authors. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. The OIF Study is available at the U.S. Army War College Publications website. Click the following links to access them: Volume I | Volume II Image: Covers of the two volumes of the report. Prepared by Jennifer Nevil. Composite assembled by Tom Galvin.
Apr 23, 2019
BEYOND TASK FORCE SMITH: ‘NATIONAL’ UNPREPAREDNESS FOR WAR IN KOREA
23:03
In the States, we hadn't had tanks coming off the assembly line in months In 1992, as calls for the post-Cold War peace dividend grew louder, then-Chief of Staff of the Army General Gordon Sullivan wrote a provocative essay in ARMY Magazine as a clarion call for the nation to sustain vigilance and military preparedness for war. "NO MORE Task Force Smiths" presented the story of U.S. unpreparedness going into the Korean War. A badly understrength and underequipped constabulary force in Japan found itself very quickly inserted into action after North Korea's invasion of the south and performed poorly. Sullivan's concern was that U.S. penchant for precipitous post-war drawdowns would leave U.S. forces vulnerable for an unforeseen fight in an unexpected place. But the focus on TF Smith left insufficient attention to other factors leading to unpreparedness, factors that could undermine U.S. efforts in a future war even if the combat forces are fully trained and ready. Historian Michael E. Lynch of the Army Heritage and Education Center presents these factors and explains the lessons for the modern defense enterprise. A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Michael E. Lynch is a senior historian at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor-in-Chief of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Task Force Smith of the 24th Infantry Division arriving at the railway station in Taejon, Korea. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo, public domain.
Apr 15, 2019
FORECASTING THE 2019 SOUTH AFRICAN ELECTIONS
19:23
Democracy in South Africa is still fairly young. ... The people of South Africa are still not enjoying the fruits of prosperity or economic growth As South Africa faces its May 2019 Presidential elections, the nation finds itself at a crossroads. Support for the African National Congress, the party of Mandela that ushered in post-Apartheid democracy, is waning as other political parties mature and charges of corruption has engulfed some ruling officials. But the momentum for change is not going as fast as perhaps eighteen months ago, so the outcome is far from clear. But this does not deter returning guest Dan Hampton of the Africa Center for Strategic Studies and War College professor Chris Wyatt from using their 'crystal ball' and forecasting the results. Regardless of what transpires, South Africa remains an important partner for the U.S. in Africa, and therefore the U.S. is monitoring closely.     Dan Hampton is Chief of Staff and Professor of Practice at the Africa Center for Strategic Studies. Chris Wyatt is a colonel in the U.S. Army and is the Director of African studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image: Hand and voting box from Elements5 Digital via Pexels.com, public domain under the creative commons license; South Africa flag via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Apr 10, 2019
TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)
22:10
The common thread [in addressing key strategic problems] is the requirement to convert operational military success to political success A BETTER PEACE welcomes General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith to the studio to discuss his perspectives on strategic leadership and balancing continuity with the need for change. The British Army has a very long history, and General Carleton-Smith addresses the importance of remembering and maintaining that history, especially today with emerging views that robust land-based forces and capabilities are no longer relevant or necessary. Decision making at the strategic level, therefore, balances the past, present, and future of the force while synthesizing military conceptions of risk, success, and failure with those of the political leaders. A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Mark Carleton-Smith is the Chief of the General Staff in the British Army and was the 73rd Kermit Roosevelt lecturer. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor of A BETTER PEACE: The WAR ROOM Podcast. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: General Sir Mark Alexander Carleton-Smith addresses the U.S. Army War College resident class during the Kermit-Roosevelt Lecture Series. His talk underscored the commitment, capabilities, and like-mindedness of the U.K. and U.S. relationship. Photo Credit: Charity Murtorff, U.S. Army War College photo. Other releases in the "Senior Leader Perspectives" series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Apr 02, 2019
TRANSATLANTIC TRADE: MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER
25:09
There is a significant percentage of Europeans ... that believe that American standards and quality of products and services ... are very low A BETTER PEACE explores the current state of trade between the U.S. and Europe as compared to U.S.-China trade. While the latter gets more attention nowadays, in reality transatlantic trade remains many times greater and much more important politically. However, as relations between the U.S. and Europe become more complex (and in some ways more strained), it may be risky to assume current trade levels can be sustained. Discussing these and related topics are Johan Eliasson of East Stroudsburg University and Darrell Driver, Director of European Studies at the U.S. Army War College.     Johan Eliasson is Associate Professor of International Relations at East Stroudsburg University. Darrell Driver is a colonel in the U.S. Army and the Director of European Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Scene of the port of Hamburg, Germany by Tom Galvin
Mar 26, 2019
RUSSIA’S VIEW OF THE WEST: IT’S COMPLICATED
24:50
Russia still needs to be a part of the West. ... Our position should be to remain open and stay engaged with Russia A BETTER PEACE is pleased to welcome Ambassador John Tefft to the studio to discuss his perspectives on Russia and Russian-US relations. As former US Ambassador to Russia from 2014-2017, AMB Tefft served in the aftermath of Russia's annexation of Crimea and the most recent Presidential election. With U.S. Army War College Director of Eurasian Studies Bob Hamilton, AMB Tefft provides background and insights into Russia's strategic interests and recent actions. Although many are looking to Russia through an adversarial lens, AMB Tefft offers some contrarian views based on his experience and observations. A fascinating conversation you won't want to miss.       John Tefft is former U.S. Ambassador to Russia and currently a fellow a RAND Corporation. Bob Hamilton is Director of Eurasian Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Russian War Memorial, shot during a Victory Day celebration. Photo Credit: Uncredited, from pxhere.com under creative commons license.
Mar 22, 2019
RELIVING THE CIVIL WAR THROUGH BATTLEFIELD STAFF RIDES
23:49
It's natural to ask what can we gain from this 'old war'? ... You can read [history] in a book, but when you actually walk the field, it rams home into your head and stays there In an earlier episode of A BETTER PEACE, Learning Strategy by Walking the Ground, Andrew Hill and Len Fullenkamp talked about the value of staff rides. In this follow-up discussion, Christian Keller and Jacqueline E. Whitt focus in on battlefield staff rides covering the U.S. Civil War. Carlisle, Pennsylvania is near several key Civil War battles, including Gettysburg and Antietam, now preserved as historical sites administered by the U.S. National Park Service. These sites allow visitors to visualize the stories of the battle and analyze the tactical and strategic decisions made by leaders on both the Union and Confederate sides. Christian and Jacqueline discuss the best way to approach visiting a Civil War battlefield to get the most out of the experience -- preparing for the visit through reading and study; walking the ground; and post-visit reflection.     Christian Keller is Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo: Battlefield cannons arrayed at Antietam National Battlefield Memorial. Photo Credit: Original photo uncredited from Pxhere.com, public domain. Modified by Tom Galvin.
Mar 19, 2019
REMOTE WARFARE & RISKS OF RELYING ON LOCAL FORCES
34:57
'Is Remote Warfare Cheaper?' 'So that's a really hard question to answer. ... We actually have very little data' A BETTER PEACE explores the implications of NATO members' ongoing shift away from large-scale coalition operations to smaller-scale operations that rely primarily on local forces, militias, or other groups supported by Western resources, training, and small numbers of personnel (i.e., "remote warfare").  While the shift appears to allow NATO partners to manage risk and limit their boots on the ground, the longer-term strategic implications and the potential effects on preparedness for conventional warfare are debatable. Additionally, there are persistent myths about remote operations being 'cleaner' or 'cheaper' forms of warfare. Are they true? Or are they merely transferring more risk and cost? Addressing these topics are special guest Emily Knowles of the Oxford Research Group's Remote Warfare Program and A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt.     Emily Knowles is Program Director of the Oxford Research Group's Remote Warfare Program. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: U.S. Army Sgt. Kevin Murphy (right) instructs Iraqi army soldiers on individual movement techniques during a class at the Ghuzlani Warrior Training Center, Iraq, in 2011. Photo Credit: Sergeant Shawn Miller, United States Army
Mar 13, 2019
RUSSIA, GREAT POWER COMPETITION, & POLITICS OF HYBRID WAR
30:50
At the end of the day, what Putin really wants to re-structure European relationships [from the EU's] rules-based Europe towards a [transactionally-based] Great Power Europe A BETTER PEACE presents "Russia, Great Power Competition, & Politics of Hybrid War" where Mitchell Orenstein and Darrell Driver discuss the history of great power dynamics and interests in Europe before the European Union, and lens that history as a lens to understand Russian interests and motivations. How does the current European structure disadvantage Russia? What is Russia's alternative vision and how do her current actions (e.g., hybrid warfare) and policies enable that vision? How does this affect nations sandwiched between Russia and the western powers? Therefore, what are options for the U.S.?   Mitchell Orenstein is Professor of Russian and East European Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Darrell Driver is the Director of European Studies at the U.S. Army War College and a colonel in the U.S. Army. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: A Russian military honor guard welcomes the U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during a 2009 wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Moscow, Russia. Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo/MC1 Chad J. McNeeley
Mar 05, 2019
BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
23:51
What if we spent one day on Herodotus, one day on Thucydides, and one day on Xenophon [at the War College]? Students with a basic foundation of ancient military history are likely to know about Thucydides and his accounts of the Peloponnesian War from both strategic and operational perspectives. But it would be an oversight to stop there, as there were other important war historians in antiquity. This episode in A BETTER PEACE's Great Strategists series explores two of them -- Herodotus, who wrote about the rise of the Persian Empire, and Xenophon, who fought in Cyrus the Younger's latter campaign to capture the Persian throne. Herodotus became known as the Father of History but according to our guest speaker Rob Farley, his methods would likely not pass muster in contemporary historian circles. Yet over the centuries that followed, his insights on how Xerxes the Great built his Army were significant and relevant to military leaders. Xenophon, as mercenary and soldier, provided rich details into the battles he fought and the manners in which ancient militaries were led and managed. Together with Thucydides, these writers and thinkers provide a great canon to understand the ancient ways of war. A BETTER PEACE editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Rob Farley is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Kentucky and Visiting Professor at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Xenophon and the Ten Thousand coming in sight of the sea (published 1881 in the Illustrated History of the World, public domain)
Feb 27, 2019
KNOW THY ENEMY: OSAMA BIN LADEN & RISE OF THE NON-STATE ACTOR (GREAT CAPTAINS)
28:12
Armed conflict is a deadly business. We in the military profession have a moral obligation to examine what works and what doesn't work Traditional lists of prominent and successful strategic leaders are often biased toward celebrated historical figures. Of course, such figures were both heroes (to their own people) and villains (to the enemy) all at once. In the introductory essay to the Great Captains series, Jacqueline Whitt and Tom Galvin said that the podcasts would not constitute "hero worship," but instead allow listeners "to glean lessons about the great captains’ approaches to the problems of war and warfare and their understanding of the military art." Therefore, to be fair and complete, such a series must necessarily consider those that history would (and should) treat as villains. The purposes are to understand their motivations, place their actions in context, analyze the lasting impacts, and ultimately enable better preparation to face a similar leader in future. It is in this spirit that WAR ROOM presents a unique look at a most controversial figure, Osama bin Laden, who according to U.S. Army War College Professor Sparky Anderson, was successful at building and sustaining a grass-roots mobilization, understanding and adapting to the operational environment, and ultimately enabling a significant change in the character of war. Bin Laden's actions, beginning at Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation, would eventually contribute to the prominence of non-state actors on the global stage. What can we learn from this story? The insights and implications are many, including the importance of knowing thy enemy. A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Sparky Anderson is Professor of Strategy, Operations, and Plans at the U.S. Army War College and a colonel in the U.S. Army. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: A guide in a Herat, Afghanistan war museum describes a fight during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan depicted in a diorama. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Raheb Homavandi (AFGHANISTAN SOCIETY)
Feb 22, 2019
GEORGE C. MARSHALL & LEADING THE NATIONAL WAR EFFORT (GREAT CAPTAINS)
23:30
As the 'global' commander, he oversees all of the Army including the Army Air Corps in all of the theaters in World War II In this episode in our Great Captains series, we profile an officer whose extraordinary achievements depart slightly from those typical associated with the term 'great captains' as described by Napoleon. George Catlett Marshall Jr. was by any measure a tremendous strategic leader who presided over the U.S.'s national war effort in World War II and the subsequent reconstruction of Europe through the "Marshall Plan." Facing the need to rapidly grow the Army after 1939, Marshall leveraged his strong interpersonal relationships within the military and with Congress to get the necessary resources and support. Marshall was also renowned for speaking truth to power. Yet when the President made a decision that Marshall disagreed with, Marshall complied with all his energy. Despite not having served as a field army commander, U.S. Army War College Professor Bill Johnsen makes the case that George Marshall has earned the title of 'great captain.' A BETTER PEACE editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Bill Johnsen is Professor of Military History and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Official U.S. Army portrait, public domain
Feb 19, 2019
THE COMPLEX POLITICAL LANDSCAPE IN NIGERIA
24:43
Elections in Nigeria are not about issues. They are about personality and personal and ethnic alliances A BETTER PEACE welcomes Ambassador John Campbell to the studio to discuss the upcoming Nigerian elections and describe the very complex political and social landscape in Nigeria. Contrary to the mythical 'north-south' divide, Nigeria comprises about 350 different ethnic groups and languages such that being Muslim or Christian is just one differentiating factor. With 20,000 candidates vying for political office on the 16th of February, this weekend could signal a significant change in direction for the country.     John Campbell is the Ralph Bunche Senior Fellow for Africa Policy Studies at the Council of Foreign Relations. Chris Wyatt is a colonel in the U.S. Army and Director of African Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers are do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Map of Nigeria from the United Nations, public domain. Image composed by Tom Galvin
Feb 14, 2019
WHY DOES THE MEDIA COVER STORIES IN SOME COUNTRIES … BUT NOT OTHERS?
28:26
If Moldova is never in the news, I doubt policy makers are ever really thinking about Moldova If you were a news editor, which story would you run first -- a moderate earthquake in Italy or a larger earthquake in Sri Lanka? In the U.S., the Italian earthquake would be more likely due to the connections between the U.S. and Italy at both national and societal levels. According to Amanda Cronkhite, post-doctoral fellow at the U.S. Army War College, the newsworthiness of a story is often measured by factors unrelated to the story itself. For this podcast, the focus is on the story's location and how it influences how long a story may run or whether the story will run at all (and where). To what extent does this affect the way people follow the news? A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Amanda Cronkhite is a post-doctoral fellow at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Pixabay, via Pexels.com. Creative Commons license.
Feb 12, 2019
CIVIL-MILITARY RELATIONS & THE DANGERS OF BEING A HIGHLY TRUSTED INSTITUTION
30:48
Don't love the military too much, and don't love the other institutions too little It is well-known that poll after poll shows the military ranks as the most trusted institution in the U.S. And, it is equally known that the opposite was true a mere few decades ago. The numbers belie the persistent tensions that exist between U.S. society and its military, tensions that have been tempered through long-standing civil-military norms. Where did these norms come from, and do they suggest that the comtemporary military's positive esteem is on shaky ground? A BETTER PEACE welcomes U.S. Army War College professor Marybeth Ulrich to discuss principles of civil-military relations as practiced in the U.S. and how they help explain U.S. society's high regard for its armed forces ... at least for now. A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Marybeth Ulrich is Professor of Government and the General Maxwell D. Taylor Chair of the Profession of Arms at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense.
Feb 08, 2019
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS & NATIONAL SECURITY
23:39
The approach that the government often takes to acquisition of [intellectual property] rights is something that's completely anathema to working with tech companies Managing and regulating intellectual property (IP) rights is central to the functioning of a working economy. The intellectual work behind the development of new products, publications, or innovative ideas is vital and must be protected in some way. Hence, governments establish both legal frameworks and norms designed to provide this protection. However, determining who owns what and why has been a dynamic process since IP rights were codified and systematized in the 20th century. And there are many challenges raised with respect to ideas that contribute to capabilities vital to national security. A BETTER PEACE welcomes Rob Farley, a researcher in the area of intellectual property, to discuss the challenges of IP in the contemporary competitive global environment and what they mean to the U.S. A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Rob Farley is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Kentucky and Visiting Professor at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo, public domain.
Feb 05, 2019
REFLECTIONS ON THE HUE CITY MASSACRE
33:47
It was the largest battle in the [Vietnam] war in terms of numbers of casualties, and politically it was the most important On the Anniversary of the start of the Tet Offensive of 1968, A BETTER PEACE welcomes retired U.S. Ambassador Jim Bullington to recount the story of the Battle of Huế in Vietnam which began on January 31, 1968 and lasted nearly a month. In contrast to the Viet Cong's previous strategies of raiding, the Viet Cong occupied Huế and captured thousands of civilians and prisoners of war. Bullington was serving as a Foreign Service Officer at the time, and found himself in Hue in unusual circumstances. In this podcast, Bullington tells both his personal story (a love story in the midst of a war) and about the broader implications of the battle. While historians still debate the impact of the Tet Offensive and the Battle of Hue on the conduct of the American War in Vietnam, this story reminds us of the personal narratives and consequences that are also central to war. A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Jim Bullington is a retired U.S. ambassador who served as a foreign service officer in Vietnam during Huế. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Twentieth Century "Angel of Mercy" -- D. R. Howe (Glencoe, MN) treats the wounds of Private First Class D. A. Crum (New Brighton, PA), Company H, 2nd Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, during Operation Huế City. Photo Credit: U.S. Marine Corps/Sergeant William F. Dickman, public domain
Jan 31, 2019
ROLES (AND PERILS) OF BEING A WATCHDOG: THE PRESS AND GOVERNMENT
27:58
The relationship is complex because journalists and politicians depend on each other A free and independent media is a hallmark of freedom and provides an important check against government power. Meanwhile, government leaders are invested in pursuing their agenda. This brings about natural tensions between political objectives and the objective truth, and therefore between governments and media. Unfortunately, these tensions can manifest in intimidation and violence against members of the press. To discuss these tensions, and how they can be beneficial or detrimental to both sides, A BETTER PEACE invited War College post-doctoral fellow Amanda Cronkhite to discuss the historical and contemporary challenges of government and the media. A BETTER PEACE Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Amanda Cronkhite is a post-doctoral fellow at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Marine Corps Gen. Joe Dunford tells Thai and U.S. reporters that the military relationship between the two nations is strong and that leaders are planning for decades of cooperation during a news briefing in Bangkok, Thailand in February 2018. Photo Credit: DoD photo by Jim Garamone
Jan 29, 2019
THE PARTNERSHIP OF ROBERT E. LEE AND STONEWALL JACKSON (GREAT CAPTAINS)
25:51
As the Campaigns of 1862 move forward, Lee turns to Jackson more and more for counsel A BETTER PEACE continues its Great Captains series with a look at a leadership team, rather than an individual. In this episode, U.S. Army War College Professor of History Christian Keller argues that the strategic teaming of Generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson enabled the success of the Confederate Army in 1862-1863. While Lee was a great strategic thinker at all levels of war, Jackson proved to be an exceptional field commander and strategic advisor to Lee. While each independently earned consideration of the title of Great Captain, their symbiotic relationship proved very powerful. That is, until Jackson was killed--a death that greatly affected both Lee and the Confederacy. U.S. Army War College Professor of Strategy Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Christian Keller is Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image: In 1869, Everett B. D. Julio painted this scene of the Civil War generals and their horses. It depicts their meeting on May 1, 1863, just before the tragic death of Jackson. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, public domain.
Jan 25, 2019
JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
19:36
The great benefit of looking at John Warden's system is that it [employed] effects-based objectives [for] attacking an enemy A BETTER PEACE continues the Great Strategists series with a look at the systems-based theory of John Warden III, Colonel, U.S. Air Force retired. Out of the emerging theories of airpower and his own experiences in Vietnam, Warden developed the five-ring system model of an enemy force. Using effects-based operations, Warden used the five rings to suggest ways to use air operations to more efficiently influence an enemy force. Attacking targets closer to the center of the rings meant greater effects on the enemy. Presenting the history, concept, and implications of this theory are U.S. Army War College professors Clay Chun and Jacqueline E. Whitt.     Clay Chun is Chair of the Department of the Distance Education at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and is the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Portrait of John Warden, U.S. Air Force photo; Five ring graphic adapted from Warden, John A. "The enemy as a system." Airpower journal 9, no. 1 (1995): 40-55. Image Credit: Composed by Tom Galvin   More podcasts from the "Great Strategists" series: A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTSMAHAN AND SEA POWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 4)KAUTILYA, THE ARTHASHASTRA, AND ANCIENT REALISM — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 3)SUN TZU AND THE ART OF WAR — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 2)ON CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ – GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 1)
Jan 23, 2019
LEADING AND MANAGING CHANGE: MORE THAN JUST A PROCESS
32:39
[Kotter's] first step is to establish a sense of urgency. ... But then the question I ask the students is, 'What's the step that leads to figuring out what's urgent?' Why is change hard in military organizations? There's no question that militaries need to change routinely to sustain the ability to fight and win its nation's wars against current and emerging threats. But large, complex organizations face many obstacles and therefore deliberate change efforts need clear vision and direction. Sounds easy, but it isn't. In this episode of A BETTER PEACE, Tom Galvin and Buck Haberichter from the U.S. Army War College's Department of Command, Leadership, and Management, discuss some of the problems of leading change that the popular change management literature doesn't always address. How can leaders craft a coherent and convincing story that motivates both members and stakeholders to pursue change and sustain the organization's competitive advantage?     Click here to access the monograph Leading Change in Military Organizations: Primer for Senior Leaders by Tom Galvin. Also click the below links to access the three episodes in a video series on leading change in military organizations: Part 1. How to define and describe a problem Part 2. How to develop a vision and concept Part 3. How to plan, implement, sustain, and terminate the change effort Tom Galvin is Assistant Professor of Leadership Studies and the Director of the Driving Change and Innovation area of concentration at the U.S. Army War College. Buck Haberichter is the Managing Editor of the WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: A U.S. Army infantry squad leader discusses squad movement tactics with Jordanian soldiers during small arms training near Alexandria, Egypt. Photo Credit: U.S. Army/SGT James Lefty
Jan 18, 2019
WHAT DO YOU DO WITH FORCE AFTER YOU WIN?
23:26
We don't have a sophisticated genre about what do militaries do in the wake of victory What is the role of the military in consolidating victory? This has been a difficult question at least since World War II and is very salient now. A BETTER PEACE explores this topic with the help of Dr. Wayne Lee, the Dowd Distinguished Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Dr. Jacqueline E. Whitt, U.S. Army War College Professor of Strategy. The speakers shows that the transition from conflict to post-conflict depends greatly on the cultures of the combatants involved. The expectations have evolved from pre-industrial times to present, shaping the ends of warfare and therefore the post-conflict roles of the military -- from the traditional taking and holding of territory to something else.     Wayne Lee is the Dowd Distinguished Professor of History at the U. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: A crowd, acting as protestors, approaches a simulated United Nations camp at exercise SHANTI PRAYAS III in Nepal, 2017. SHANTI PRAYAS is a multinational U.N. peacekeeping exercise designed to provide pre-deployment training to U.N. partner countries in preparation for real-world peacekeeping operations
Jan 15, 2019
A ‘BIG DATA’ APPROACH TO WINNING THE ASYMMETRIC FIGHT
34:09
Fundamentally in asymmetric conflicts, the struggle is over information that comes from the [local] population. This is different from the traditional 'hearts and minds' view A BETTER PEACE welcomes Jacob Shapiro from Princeton U., co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. Conventional wisdom in conflict has been that those combatants bringing greater power, applying it intelligently, and controlling the most territory are more likely to achieve their political outcomes. The asymmetric conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq challenged these conventions and demonstrate that achieve success at a local level is paramount. But then how do strategic leaders roll up hundreds or thousands of local level successes and convert it into political success? WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Andrew A. Hill moderates.     Jacob Shapiro is Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. Andrew A. Hill is the WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: An Afghan National Army soldier directs perspective cadets to their assigned groups as the day begins at the ANA Academy, Kabul, Afghanistan Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force/Staff Sgt. Brian Ferguson
Jan 11, 2019
JOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
22:11
The OODA loop kinda represents how ... humans and organizations learn, grow, and survive A BETTER PEACE continues its series on Great Strategists with a look at airpower theorist John Boyd, who conceived of the "OODA" (Observe, Orient, Decide, and Act) Loop. Originally expressing an approach to tactical engagement, Boyd later expanded the idea to incorporate broad strategic action. How can individuals, organizations, and entire forces use this action-and-feedback mechanism to shape an uncertain environment and outthink the opponent? Discussing Boyd, his legacy, and contemporary views of his theories are U.S. Army War College professors Clay Chun and Jacqueline E. Whitt.     Clay Chun is Chair of the Department of the Distance Education at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and is the Editor of A BETTER PEACE. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Portrait of John Boyd as a Captain or Major flying as a wingman (U.S. Government photo via Wikimedia Commons, public domain); OODA Loop graphic from Air University (public domain) Image Composed by Tom Galvin   More podcasts from the "Great Strategists" series: A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTSMAHAN AND SEA POWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 4)KAUTILYA, THE ARTHASHASTRA, AND ANCIENT REALISM — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 3)SUN TZU AND THE ART OF WAR — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 2)ON CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ – GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 1)
Jan 08, 2019
DOCUMENTS CAN LIE, TOO: THE “LESSONS” OF HISTORY (PART 3)
17:36
You cannot help but approach your sources from your own experiences and backgrounds Our three-part roundtable on the "Lessons" of History concludes as Con Crane, Jacqueline E. Whitt, and Andrew A. Hill discuss the importance of critical thinking for developing historical mindedness. From the subjectivity of first-person accounts to the modern phenomenon of so-called "fake news," what is presented as definitive history is almost assuredly not. How can a historical mindset help individuals sort out what information is valid or not? How can we construct useful and clear understandings of what happened in the past?     Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: The first page of the Aesinas manuscript of Tacitus's Germania. View the codex here.
Dec 07, 2018
JUDGES, NOT LAWYERS: THE “LESSONS” OF HISTORY (PART 2)
23:14
You cannot help but approach your sources from your own experiences and backgrounds Our three-part roundtable on the "Lessons" of History continues as Con Crane, Jacqueline E. Whitt, and Andrew A. Hill discuss the roles of military historians in professional military education and the practical uses of military history in general. If history doesn't teach clear lessons, what use is it to policymakers and leaders? To what extent has military history become insular and disengaged from the policy arena? Have historians ceded the field of practical application to political scientists? And to what extent has the need for novel ideas caused historians to succumb to commercial temptations, rather than clear, critical analysis based on evidence?     Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Ulysses Grant reviewing proofs of his memoirs, June 27, 1885, just weeks before his death. Source: Library of Congress.
Dec 04, 2018
“HISTORY TEACHES US” NOTHING: THE “LESSONS” OF HISTORY (PART 1)
24:18
HISTORY IS NOT A BOX OF FACTS, IT IS A STATE OF MIND History teaches us ____________." Many listeners have probably heard that opening a few times, usually followed by a claim that is apparently profound and timely, but also probably poorly supported and problematic. Why does this construction persist, then? Is it because of an innate human quest for simple answers to intractable problems? Or is it because leaders believe that history repeats itself? Is it because we misunderstand how historical thinking should shape contemporary decisions? Misconceptions about the purpose, processes, and even the meaning of the word history abound. The roles and approaches of historians are similarly misunderstood. So what is history and what does it teach us -- or not? U.S. Army War College faculty members Con Crane, Jacqueline E. Whitt, and Andrew A. Hill discuss and critique this very question and what it means to be historically-minded. For one to learn from history, one may have to re-learn what history really is.   Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: U.S. Army Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps perform during the 2017 Military Appreciation Weekend at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Ismael Ortega
Nov 29, 2018
DRIVEN TO DISTRACTION: WHAT SENIOR LEADERS CAN DO TO IMPROVE FOCUS
31:56
Every major thread in the world's wisdom has some aspect of contemplative practice in it How can senior leaders cope with the overwhelming amount of information and constant high demand for complex decision making and action? A recognized barrier is a natural limitation of a leader's ability to focus on the situation at hand. Instead, the mind wanders. The possible negative effects of distraction are many--from misinterpreting current events to sending non-verbal cues such as disinterest and lack of empathy--and can have a significant impact on senior leader performance. One technique for improving one's abilities in this area is mindfulness training, presented in this podcast by renowned expert Dr. Amishi Jha of the University of Miami. WAR ROOM Social Media editor Buck Haberichter moderates.   Amishi Jha is Associate Professor of Psychology from the University of Miami, Florida. Buck Haberichter is the WAR ROOM Social Media Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: David Cassalato, via Pexels.com
Nov 14, 2018
LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)
29:52
We definitely want leaders that know how to win A BETTER PEACE welcomes Admiral John Richardson, the 31st Chief of Naval Operations, to present his perspectives on strategic leadership. Admiral Richardson's talk focuses on the qualities necessary to lead in an environment of growing great power competition -- integrity, toughness, accountability, and initiative. How should leader develop these qualities, and what are the roles of military institutions to foster them? WAR ROOM Podcast Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates. Admiral John Richardson is the 31st Chief of Naval Operations. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG 57), right, provides a warm welcome to the French tall ship replica the Hermione in the vicinity of the Battle of Virginia Capes off the East Coast of the United States. The original Hermione brought French General Marquis de Lafayette to America in 1780 to inform General Washington of France's alliance and impending support of the American Revolutionary War. Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael Sandberg Other Releases in the Leader Perspectives series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Nov 13, 2018
WHY WITHDRAW FROM THE INTERMEDIATE-RANGE NUCLEAR FORCES TREATY?
21:50
The Europeans should not be happy about [the US withdrawal] ... even if it is a good thing for the U.S. The Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (also known as INF) has garnered significant attention in the latter half of 2018 as President Trump announced that the US would withdraw from it. But before then, the INF was rather obscure and not well known. Thus, A BETTER PEACE explores the history of the INF and the controversies and implications of withdrawing from it in a two-part podcast series. In the second release, we welcome Rob Farley, a U.S. Army War College Visiting Professor from the University of Kentucky who is an expert in nuclear matters. He explains the rationale on both sides of the controversy -- why to stay in the treaty and why to withdraw, and how withdrawal could impact other powers such as China and Europe. U.S. Army War College Professor of Strategy Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   Rob Farley is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Kentucky and Visiting Professor at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Three single-stage Pershing II missiles prepared for launch at McGregor Range, 1987 Photo Credit: Frank Trevino/Department of Defense/American Forces Information Service, Defense Visual Information Center, public domain
Nov 07, 2018
LOOKING BACK AT THE INTERMEDIATE-RANGE NUCLEAR FORCES TREATY
24:55
The INF was a successful treaty, in that it was fully implemented. ... [and it was] intended not to be easy to pull out The Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (also known as INF) has garnered significant attention in the latter half of 2018 as President Trump announced that the US would withdraw from it. But before then, the INF was rather obscure and not well known. Thus, A BETTER PEACE explores the history of the INF and the controversies and implications of withdrawing from it in a two-part podcast series. This release is the first, in which we welcome Grace Stettenbauer, a former State Department Foreign Service Officer and former instructor at the Army War College. She had experience with the verification and monitoring processes involved in the INF in the early days of the treaty. In her conversation with U.S. Army War College Professor of Strategy Jacqueline E. Whitt, she explains what the INF was about and what was desirable and undesirable about it.   Grace Stettenbauer is a former foreign service officer and former faculty member of the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev signing the INF Treaty in the East Room of the White House, 1987. Photo Credit: Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, public domain
Nov 06, 2018
AMERICA IN VIETNAM: WHEN THE BEST AND BRIGHTEST GO WRONG
38:10
How do you explain how well-intentioned, patriotic, bright people make poor judgments that lead to so much suffering? Historian and U.S. Naval Academy Professor Brian VanDeMark joins the podcast to discuss his acclaimed new book, Road to Disaster: A New History of America's Descent into Vietnam.  How do advances in cognitive psychology help explain how intelligent, well-intentioned leaders led America into the tragedy of Vietnam? What lessons does this hold for our own era? In this podcast, Brian VanDeMark talks about his book, discussing how factors such as incomplete information, unchallenged assumptions, lack of creative thinking, and short-sightedness led to a compounding of errors by the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Andrew Hill moderates.   Brian VanDeMark is Professor of History at the U.S. Naval Academy. Andrew A. Hill is WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo: Secretary of State Dean Rusk, President Lyndon B. Johnson, and Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara at a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House. Photo Credit: Yochi Yokamoto, Executive Office of the President of the U.S., public domain
Nov 02, 2018
LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)
30:28
Napoleon stands out in history for being an individual who understood the interplay between war and politics WAR ROOM welcomes Lieutenant General Christopher Cavoli, Commander of U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army, to discuss his perspectives on strategic leadership. In this interview, he uses the examples of prominent historical figures to describe the qualities of strong strategic leaders, and the importance of reading classic texts as a way of better understanding today's national security issues. He shows the importance of taking the time to read and reflect, and not give military history a rushed, cursory look. WAR ROOM Podcast Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   Christopher Cavoli is a lieutenant general in the U.S. Army and Commander, U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: U.S. Soldiers of 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division and Polish soldiers pose for a photo at the Mihail Kogalniceanu Air Base in Romania, Sept. 3, 2018. U.S. Army leaders of 2-5 Cav, 1st ABCT, 1st CD met with Polish soldiers to discuss future joint training opportunities in support of Atlantic Resolve, an enduring training exercise between NATO and U.S. forces Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard photo by SPC Hannah Tarkelly, 382nd Public Affairs Detachment, 1st ABCT, 1st Cavalry Division Other Releases in the Leader Perspectives series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Oct 30, 2018
MILITARY MIGHT AND THE DEFENSE MARKETPLACE
33:23
The promise of much of this outsourcing was to reduce cost. ... but the total costs [of all contracts] have gone up. So contracts are not cheaper The joint force has long depended on the private sector to provide necessary goods and services to support and sustain the warfight. This has been true since the days of the American Revolution, but reliance on contracted support has steadily increased over time. Business interests, emergence of dual-use technologies and commodities (e.g., tents), and political pressures have shaped this relationship. Has the promise been realized of cost savings due to contracting under conditions of private sector competition? Or, has the dependence on the private sector caused overall costs to increase? Addressing these and other questions are Dr. Jennifer Mittelstadt of Rutgers University and former U.S. Army War College faculty member, and Dr. Jacqueline E. Whitt, Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College.     Jen Mittelstadt is Professor of Political and Military History at Rutgers University and former Harold K. Johnson Chair of Military History at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Scene from the 2014 Association of the United States Army Annual Meeting. U.S. Army photo.
Oct 26, 2018
TRIALS AND ERRORS IN INTEGRATING FEMALE SOLDIERS
25:10
At its best, integrating women or any new group of people makes you re-evaluate where the Army is as a whole The current discourse on the inclusion of women in combat roles follows a long history of questions surrounding the roles and restrictions afforded to women in the military. Positive change often came about out of necessity, as the demands of war exceeded available manpower, leading to opportunities for women to make significant and lasting contributions to the force. But positive change was subject to systemization as the defense enterprise had to answer questions of 'how' integration would take place. As this podcast shows, the devil is in the mundane details such as figuring out how to outfit, equip, train, house, and care for the well-being of female Soldiers. These efforts were neither simple nor easy as shown by guest Dr. Miranda Summers-Lowe of the Smithsonian Institution and WAR ROOM Podcast Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt.   Miranda Summers-Lowe is Modern Military Curator for Armed Forces History at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: PFC Janice Hayes, U.S. Army, participates in a field exercise in April 1974. Photo Credit: U.S. Army Women's Museum
Oct 23, 2018
WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)
24:32
A day in the Army where you don't learn something new is a day wasted WAR ROOM welcomes Lieutenant General Wayne Eyre of the Canadian Armed Forces to the studio to discuss his perspectives on strategic leadership. He focuses most of his comments toward colonels entering the strategic level and the need for them to show self-awareness, develop their character, be lifelong learners, and lead teams. An excellent presentation for mid-grade officers to learn what it takes to make it as a senior leader. WAR ROOM podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Wayne Eyre is a lieutenant general in the Canadian Armed Forces and 2012 graduate of the U.S. Army War College. He currently serves as the Deputy Commander, United Nations Command, Republic of Korea. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, Department of Defense, or the Canadian Armed Forces. Photo: Scene from a video celebrating Canada Day 2016. Photo Credit: Canadian Armed Forces.
Oct 19, 2018
FOREIGN FIGHTERS ARE NOT FOREIGN TO INSURGENCIES
28:51
If you look at all the civil wars over the past two hundred years, you can document foreign fighters in more than a quarter of them Foreign fighters are "individuals who are not citizens of a state where there is a conflict but who travel to that state to become part of the non-government forces participating in insurgencies," according to our guest speaker Dr. David Malet of American University. Although it is only recently that scholars have taken an interest in people willing to travel to faraway places and fight, foreign fighters have been an integral part of many insurgencies over the past two centuries. These fighters are not mercernaries as they are unlikely to be paid well (or paid at all), so what drives them to participate? Is it ideology or something else? Does the nature of the conflict matter? David Malet presents a number of cases from the 1800s onward and finds the answer to be quite complex. WAR ROOM Podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   Dr. David Malet is an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs, American University. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Somali policemen look at the wreckage of a car at the scene of an explosion following an attack in Somalia's capital Mogadishu in 2016. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Feisal Omar
Oct 16, 2018
WAR FILMS: COOPERATION AND FRICTION BETWEEN THE MILITARY AND HOLLYWOOD
30:11
The Navy's trying to figure out, 'how can you expand your reach.' ... And in all the agreements that they forge with the studios, at no point is the Navy supposed to be paying for any of this WAR ROOM welcomes Ryan Wadle from Air University to discuss the history of how the war film industry emerged out of the interwar period. Focusing on the Navy, he relates how the military's relationship with Hollywood began as an opportunity to enhance public relations at a time when the service could only devote a couple individuals to the task. As naval films grew in popularity and Hollywood began investing in them, challenges arose such as questions over operations security, accuracy in the depictions of military life, and commercial pressures. What are the implications for the relationship between the military and Hollywood today? WAR ROOM podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.     Ryan Wadle is an Associate Professor of Comparative Military Studies at the eSchool of Graduate Professional Military Education and author of Selling Seapower: Public Relations and the U.S. Navy 1917-1941. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Cast members Charlie Hunnam (R) and Rinko Kikuchi pose at the premiere of "Pacific Rim" at Dolby theatre in Hollywood, California July 9, 2013. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
Oct 10, 2018
HOW US LEADERSHIP OF THE GLOBAL ECONOMY AFFECTS STRATEGY (ECONOMICS SERIES #3)
19:40
Even a big country like the United States can't efficiently produce everything we need and want The third and final installment in our economic series focuses on how U.S. post-World War II "leadership" in the international system and burgeoning global economy has shaped U.S. strategy ever since. C. Richard Neu and Joel Hillison discuss how the U.S. once served as the exemplar of prosperity that other nations desired to follow, such that it was tolerant of its economic struggles so long as it maintained its abilities to set the rules and establish order. This position is now being challenged by actors who follow different rules, which has led to a loss of American confidence in the global economy. How does uncertainty in the global economy affect the U.S. national security interests, and therefore the U.S. military?     C. Richard Neu is a Professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and a former senior economist at RAND. Joel Hillison is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Bin Li, CEO of Chinese electric vehicle start-up NIO Inc., celebrates after ringing a bell as NIO stock begins trading on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) during the company’s initial public offering (IPO) at the NYSE in New York, U.S., September 12, 2018. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Oct 01, 2018
BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD
23:40
How do I stay true to two masters--the Army & Air Force, and also the employers? Our series on Senior Leader Perspectives continue with an interview with the 28th Chief of the National Guard Bureau, Air Force General Joseph Lengyel. In the past two decades, the roles and commitments of the National Guard have grown tremendously, with ten percent of the force engaged worldwide whether for contingencies overseas or in response to state level missions, such as disaster response. But many men and women of the National Guard also work for an employer at home, and the demands of military service can put stress on relationships with employers. How does the Bureau Chief deal with these relationships at the national and state levels so to sustain and enhance the readiness of the National Guard?   Joseph Lengyel is a General in the U.S. Air Force and the 28th Chief of the National Guard Bureau. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Soldiers with the South Carolina National Guard conduct traffic as they build a barrier to prevent flooding off of Highway 501 in Conway, S.C. Photo Credit: U.S. Army National Guard/Staff Sgt. Jorge Intriago
Sep 28, 2018
DITCH THE CHECKLISTS: LET’S EDUCATE LEADERS!
26:07
There's twenty-four outcomes that you're supposed to do, they would come in and go 'Prove to me your assessment on all twenty-four of these things.' The 2018 National Defense Strategy includes the following stark assessment of Professional Military Education, or PME: "PME has stagnated, focused more on the accomplishment of mandatory credit at the expense of lethality and ingenuity." Externally, PME has been a regular subject of criticism and target of calls for reform for the past decade. But internally, PME institutions have (without much fanfare) been embracing change and innovating their curricula and methodologies to ensure its graduates are prepared to re-enter the joint force with the requisite skills and knowledge. So what continues to be the problem and what barriers still must be overcome. The 51st Commandant of the U.S. Army War College John Kem, who also serves as Deputy Commandant of the Army University, addresses these questions with Andrew A. Hill, WAR ROOM's Editor-in-Chief.   Major General John S. Kem, U.S. Army, is the 51st Commandant of the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College and WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. The views expressed in this warcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Maj. Gen. John Kem, Commandant, congratulates Air Force Lt. Col. John A. Lesho III, who completed the Joint Studies Program and earned Joint Professional Military Education - level II credit, at the USAWC graduation ceremony, July 27, 2018 Photo Credit: U.S. Army War College photo, public domain.
Sep 25, 2018
TAKING TIME TO REFLECT ON MILITARY PROFESSIONALISM
26:09
We want ... to start the conversation with this current generation of military officers. The half-life of a military officer's career is pretty short The U.S. military and the militaries of many of its partner nations regard themselves as professional organizations and comrades in the profession of arms. The military is heralded as a profession composed of professionals who enact a unique domain of expert knowledge. But the meaning of this changes over time through the evolution of civil-military relations, global security, and new or emerging threats. The Army underwent a period of reflection at the turn of the century based on its Cold War experiences and renewed its commitment to professionalism. Is the time nigh for another such period? This and other questions are discussed between Ty Mayfield of Strategy Bridge and WAR ROOM's Podcast Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt.   Ty Mayfield is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force and a founding member and Editor of Strategy Bridge. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this program are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: The 8th Theater Sustainment Command welcomed a new command sergeant major during a change of responsibility ceremony Sept. 10, 2018 at Hamilton Field on Schofield Barracks. Photo Credit: U.S. Army Photo.
Sep 21, 2018
HANNIBAL AND THE MARCH THROUGH THE ALPS (GREAT CAPTAINS)
28:14
His strategy was to strike directly at the heart of Rome ... [he selected] terrain well and positioned himself in a way that almost secured victory Hannibal Barca (247-183 BC) was a Carthaginian general at a time when the Roman Empire was growing in power and influence across the Mediterranean. Hannibal demonstrated his prowess as a tactical commander and strategic leader during the Second Punic War as he marched from the Iberian Peninsula, through the Pyrenees, Gaul, and the Alps, eventually reaching northern Italy. A string of victories--Trebia, Lake Trasimere, and Cannae--followed, but he was unable to approach Rome before having to retreat to his homeland. Despite his ultimate defeat in the Battle of Zama, Hannibal is considered one of the greatest commanders in military history. Hannibal's story is presented by U.S. Army War College Professor of Strategic Landpower GK Cunningham. WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Andrew A. Hill moderates.     GK Cunningham is Professor of Strategic Landpower at the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is the WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Hannibal Barca crossing the Rhone, by Henri Motte (1846-1922). Image Credit: From Wikimedia Commons, public domain. Other Releases from the Great Captains series: KNOWING WHEN A WAR IS UNWINNABLE — GENERAL FREDERICK C. WEYAND (GREAT CAPTAINS)AN UNBEATEN ROMAN GENERAL: SCIPIO AFRICANUS (GREAT CAPTAINS)KNOW THY ENEMY: OSAMA BIN LADEN & RISE OF THE NON-STATE ACTOR (GREAT CAPTAINS)GEORGE C. MARSHALL & LEADING THE NATIONAL WAR EFFORT (GREAT CAPTAINS)THE PARTNERSHIP OF ROBERT E. LEE AND STONEWALL JACKSON (GREAT CAPTAINS)HANNIBAL AND THE MARCH THROUGH THE ALPS (GREAT CAPTAINS)WILLIAM T. SHERMAN: THE FIRST ‘MODERN’ GENERAL (GREAT CAPTAINS)GEORGE WASHINGTON: THE LESSONS OF FAILURE (GREAT CAPTAINS)
Sep 19, 2018
THE ART OF WRITING HISTORY (ON WRITING)
33:02
Write in a way that is interesting to you. Write in a way that you think would be interesting to your readers When military historians study battles or campaigns, what purpose does it serve? To immerse oneself deeply in the period and master the details, or to connect events of the past to the present? These and other questions are addressed in this conversation between two renowned military historians--Robert Citino of the World War II Museum and Michael Neiberg of the U.S. Army War College. They also address questions of what constitutes good historical writing and why it is especially important to develop such writing skills today.     Rob Citino is a senior historian at the National World War II Museum. Michael Neiberg is the Chair of War Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Tom Galvin, using copies available in the U.S. Army War College Library Other releases in the "On Writing" series: THE VALUE OF WRITTEN THOUGHT: STEPHEN VOGEL (ON WRITING)TWO AUTHORS UNDER THE SAME ROOF (ON WRITING)THE MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION: ALEXANDRA RICHIE (ON WRITING)FACT AND FICTION: THE RECOUNTING OF WWII WITH JAMES HOLLAND (ON WRITING)THE U.S. ARMY IN THE 20TH CENTURY: AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN LINN (ON WRITING)LIBERATION FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF THE LIBERATED (ON WRITING)PARIS 1919: A CONVERSATION WITH MARGARET MACMILLAN (ON WRITING)THE CHALLENGES OF WRITING BIOGRAPHIES (ON WRITING)FINDING “WOW” MOMENTS (AND OTHER WRITING TIPS FOR SENIOR LEADERS) (ON WRITING)
Sep 14, 2018
FROM THE DEAD OF WINTER: WASHINGTON AND VALLEY FORGE
26:50
[Washington] believes that if the Army is forced to disperse in order to feed itself, he will lose this part of the war. The harsh winter of 1777-1778 saw the American Revolution at a crossroads. Despite growing popular support among colonists for independence, the Continental Army was in a difficult state. Battle weary and low on money and supplies, the Army was neither in a position to mount a winter campaign nor defend Philadelphia and instead chose to encamp at Valley Forge. General George Washington's leadership would be tested as the Army suffered from starvation and disease due to continued supply problems, yet still managed to re-organize and re-train for renewed fighting that summer. The lessons of this experience are discussed between Professor Rick Herrera of the School of Advanced Military Studies in Fort Leavenworth and U.S. Army War College Professor of Strategy Jacqueline E. Whitt.   Rick Herrera is Professor of Military History in the School of Advanced Military Studies, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas and author of For Liberty and the Republic: The American Citizen as Soldier, 1775-1861. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Painting of George Washington and Lafayette at Valley Forge by John Ward Dunsmore, 1907 (public domain).
Sep 11, 2018
WILLIAM T. SHERMAN: THE FIRST ‘MODERN’ GENERAL (GREAT CAPTAINS)
21:18
He understands the psychology of war matters, and he is intent on trying to get the war over as quickly as possible. We continue our series on Great Captains with a look at William Tecumseh Sherman, one of the more controversial figures in the Civil War due to his actions in the South during the latter stages. A brilliant leader who understood well the impact that war has on soldiers and societies, Sherman was credited by Liddell-Hart as being the first "modern" general. But as the architect of a brutal campaign that severly weakened the Confederacy, Sherman also invoked fear and anger from enemies and friends alike. War College professors Jacqueline E. Whitt and Andrew A. Hill take a close look at Sherman and his legacy and one of histories Great Captains.   Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and Andrew A. Hill is the Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Cropped portrait of William T. Sherman by Mathew Brady, listed as between 1865 and 1880. Digitally enhanced from original negative. Photo Credit:  Prints and Photographs Division, Brady-Handy Collection, Library of Congress (public domain)
Sep 07, 2018
VIETNAM — ONE MARINE’S PERSPECTIVE
27:39
I wrote to my mother, who was living in France, saying, 'We're not going to win this war. We're making the same mistakes the French made only on a larger scale.' Every late summer, resident War College students immerse themselves in the Theory of War and Strategy, a challenging core course that covers the fundamentals of war at the national level. But for those who have fought, war is anything but an abstract concept. The experiences of war leave indelible impressions that last a lifetime. In this podcast, former U.S. Marine Corps pilot David Bennett tells his story of Vietnam a half-century ago, relaying memories that remain as vivid now as the original experiences.   David Bennett is a retired foreign service officer and veteran of the Vietnam War. Andrew A. Hill is the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Paul McErlane
Sep 04, 2018
PRESERVING PEACE THROUGH ECONOMIC STRENGTH — ECONOMICS SERIES
20:46
The real competitive strength of the U.S. is in our [political and economic] system, particularly the interaction between the two. The politics generally keeps its hands off. C. Richard Neu, former economist at RAND and U.S. Army War College Professor Joel Hillison return to the WAR ROOM studio for the second installment of our podcast series on economics and strategic leadership. "Preserving Peace Through Economic Strength" looks at the uneasy nexus between U.S. grand strategy and its economic instrument of power. While America's strategic position is strong and has withstood challenges from other emerging powers for the past decade, it is because of a hands-off (rather than hands-on) approach toward its economic development. This has implications for economic stability both at home and abroad, and for America being able to use economic incentives to foster partnerships and influence opponents.   C. Richard Neu is a Professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and a former senior economist at RAND. Joel Hillison is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image Credit: Poster of then-Presidential Candidate McKinley's campaign courtesy the National Archives. Background picture of cash from pexels.com (public domain). Image assembled by Tom Galvin.
Aug 30, 2018
WHAT DO WE EXPECT OF OUR YOUTH?
28:38
Young people are capable of extraordinary things as long as they are given the opportunity by the adults in their lives An all-volunteer force depends on the willingness, capabilities, and capacities of a nation's youth to serve. While much has been made of the paucity of youths who meet the physical and moral qualifications to serve in the military, there are also open questions about the desire of upcoming generations to serve. But what builds that desire, and what roles should older generations play? The film High School 911 tells the story of an emergency medical service in Darien, Connecticut staffed and run entirely by high school students. The results not only include a needed enhancement in a town's emergency services but also the development of important life skills and empowerment of youth. High School 911 director Tim Warren and WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Andrew A. Hill discuss these and other topics related to the development of our future generations.     Tim Warren is director and producer of the documentary "High School 911." Andrew A. Hill is Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Photograph of members of Darien Post 53 Emergency Services from 2008, showing four teens and one of the adult mentors. Photo Credit: Kevin Robinson, used with permission
Aug 28, 2018
THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS
21:06
They saw airplanes ... come into reality as weapon systems ... and they became strong advocates. We continue our Great Strategists series with a look at three pioneers of airpower -- Giulio Douhet from the Italian Armed Forces, Billy Mitchell of the U.S., and Hugh Trenchard, the "father" of the British Royal Air Force. In the early 20th century, these three great innovators and thinkers saw the battlefield changing as a result of the introduction of airplanes. Only a decade would pass from the Wright Brothers' first flight to use of aircraft in World War I -- and controlling the skies have been vital to military success ever since. Presenting these pioneers is Dr. Tami Davis Biddle, U.S. Army War College Professor of National Security Affairs, and Dr. Jacqueline E. Whitt, U.S. Army War College Professor of Strategy.   Tami Davis Biddle is Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College. Images: (L-R) Portraits of Giulio Douhet, Billy Mitchell, and Hugh Trenchard; background image is of a Sopwith Camel from the British Royal Air Force. All photos are in the public domain. Image Credit: Composite assembled by Tom Galvin. Releases in the "Great Strategists" series: ON CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ – GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 1)SUN TZU AND THE ART OF WAR — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 2)KAUTILYA, THE ARTHASHASTRA, AND ANCIENT REALISM — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 3)MAHAN AND SEA POWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 4)THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTSJOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
Aug 24, 2018
THE STRANGE BLOODLESS COUP IN ZIMBABWE — SIX MONTHS LATER
19:13
Subsequent events after the election seem to bear out that perhaps we do have old wine in new bottles. In February 2018, Chris Wyatt and Jacqueline E. Whitt discussed the Strange Bloodless Coup in Zimbabwe in which Robert Mugabe was quietly deposed and new President Emmerson Mnangagwa assumed power. At the time, there were a lot of questions about what would happen next. Would Zimbabwe normalize its international relations? Would Zimbabwe transition to a peaceful democracy? Or would the roots of authoritarian rule stand firm and the military retain a stronghold on power? With the 2018 Presidential elections complete, Chris and Jackie return to the studio to report on what has happened in the six intervening months and what it portends for the future.   Chris Wyatt is a colonel in the U.S. Army and is the Director of African Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Activists and demonstrators protest following election results in Zimbabwe, outside the Zimbabwe embassy in London, Britain, August 4, 2018. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Toby Melville
Aug 21, 2018
THE FRAGILITY OF U.S. ECONOMIC PROSPERITY — ECONOMICS SERIES
26:42
For the past decade or so, the economics profession has been scratching its head hard to figure out why has [the engine of U.S. production] started to falter? Without question, the state of the U.S. economy shapes the conversation between national leaders and the military over strategies, requirements, and capabilities. But economics is not a true science and therefore it can be difficult to understand the meaning behind economic indicators and the impacts on policy. This podcast leads off a three-part series on the intersection of economics and politics at the national level to help frame on-going discussions. Why does significant growth not necessarily lead to a stronger economy, and what does the level of the federal debt really mean? These and other topics are discussed by C. Richard Neu, former economist at RAND and U.S. Army War College Professor Joel Hillison.   C. Richard Neu is a Professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School and a former senior economist at RAND. Joel Hillison is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: PXhere.com (released to public domain)
Aug 16, 2018
WILL ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE SOLVE OUR NATIONAL SECURITY PROBLEMS, OR CREATE THEM?
28:56
We should focus [artificial intelligence] in assisting and helping us make more timely and effective decisions Artificial intelligence (AI) is making a lot of noise today, what does its continued development mean for national security? Will AI solve problems, or are there important limits to the technology that AI is unlikely to overcome? What should be the role of AI in the future force? Recent U.S. Army War College graduate Mike Navicky discusses these and many other AI-related topics with Andrew A. Hill, WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief.     Mike Navicky is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force and a graduate of the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2018. Andrew A. Hill is the WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: U.S. Marines test new counter-unmanned aerial vehicle technologies during a naval technology exercise at Camp Pendleton in March 2018. Photo Credit: U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Corporal Rhita Daniel
Aug 14, 2018
BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN THE CIVILIAN WORLD AND THE MILITARY
26:36
[The Harold K. Johnson Chair] is an effort to bring civilians into the military in order to chip away at the gap that exists ... between the civilian world and the military As a follow-up to her WAR ROOM article on professional military education, former Harold K. Johnson Chair of Military History Dr. Jennifer Mittelstadt reflects on her one-year tour at the U.S. Army War College. As a lifelong civilian with no experience serving in the military, she noted many cultural differences that highlight a growing gap between military members and civilians in their approaches to education, work, and life. Many service members may take for granted the way things are done on and off post, but others may find them very challenging. She is joined by WAR ROOM Podcast Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt, also a military historian who is not a former service member.     Jen Mittelstadt is the Harold K. Johnson Chair of Military History at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: U.S. Army War College Photo: Official photo of Seminar 6 of the U.S. Army War College resident class during the annual National Security Seminar, held 4-7 June 2018. Seated in the front row are guests of the War College. Dr. Mittelstadt appears at far left of the second row. Note: The National Security Seminar is a four-day event that creates an environment for Army War College students and invited guests to examine current national security issues and exchange candid dialogue. NSS takes place during the first full week of June, immediately preceding resident class graduation, and serves as a capstone event that enhances student learning through exposure to a cross-section of American perspectives.
Aug 10, 2018
HOW MEMORIES OF MY LAI INFLUENCED MILITARY PROFESSIONALISM
33:54
There is one thing for the event to occur; but the manner in which it was handled was more institutionally damning. In a follow-up to his article published in WAR ROOM in June, Richard Lacquement sits down with WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Andrew A. Hill to go over the aftermath of My Lai as it continues to influence Army professionalism today. The atrocities highlighted significant institutional problems across the Army. For example, a damning 1970 U.S. Army War College study exposed numerous morale and careerism problems that contributed to an environment whereby more My Lai events were possible. How did the institution respond, shaping the meaning of the Army as a profession today?     Richard Lacquement is Dean of the School of Strategic Landpower at the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is the WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Unidentified Vietnamese bodies on a road. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Ronald Haeberle
Aug 07, 2018
“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERS
31:01
Stumbling block number one: You start to believe the hype. ... Two: You somehow start to think you deserve it, as opposed to think that you've still got to hustle. WAR ROOM welcomes Dr. Rebecca Johnson to discuss her perspectives on strategic leadership as Dean of Academics at the Marine Corps University. Having witnessed many officers and civilians graduate from senior service college, Dr. Johnson reflects on the challenges of transitioning to senior leadership in the military. Her discussion includes some pitfalls and common traps, avoiding them, and staying focused on improving their organizations and the people within them. WAR ROOM Social Media Editor Buck Haberichter moderates.     Rebecca Johnson is the Dean of Academics at the Marine Corps University. Buck Haberichter is the WAR ROOM Social Media Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque Other Releases in the "Leader Perspectives" series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Aug 03, 2018
WHAT IS THE ROLE OF RELIGION IN THE MODERN MILITARY?
33:13
The shadow of the First Amendment certainly hovers over the chaplaincy... . Religion has long played an important role in sustaining soldier morale, especially in the front lines of war. But, over the past century many questions have surfaced over how religion is institutionalized in the armed forces. Is the existence of a chaplaincy a violation of the U.S. Constitution? What can or should chaplains do or not do? Which religions, faiths, or belief systems are or should be included? These and many other questions are addressed in this conversation between Dr. Ronit Stahl, author of Enlisting Faith: How the Military Chaplaincy Shaped Religion and State in Modern America and U.S. Army War College Professor of Strategy Jacqueline E. Whitt.     Ronit Stahl is a Fellow in the Department of Medical Ethics at the University of Pennsylvania and incoming Assistant Professor of History at UC-Berkeley. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Close-up of "The Four Chaplains" stained glass window located in the Army War College Chapel, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. The window commemorates the heroic actions of four military chaplains on board the U.S.A.T. Dorchester in World War II after being torpedoed by a German submarine in the north Atlantic. Read more about the four chaplains here. Photo Credit: U.S. Army War College photo
Jul 31, 2018
EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARY
36:15
We are better than we were, in that our communities [and individuals] are more integrated, but not necessarily totally so This podcast is the second of two commemorating the seventieth anniversary of EO 9981 and its influence over the U.S. armed forces today. WAR ROOM welcomes Brigadier General Earl Simms, U.S. Army Retired, whose thirty-three year career culminated as Commanding General of the U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute. BG Simms relays his experiences as an African-American officer in the early days of integration and his perspectives on the state of race relations in the U.S. military and society today. Army War College Professor of Leadership and Cultural Studies Chuck Allen moderates.     Brigadier General Earl Simms, U.S. Army Retired, culminated his career as Commanding General, U.S. Army Soldier Support Institute. Charles Allen is Professor of Leadership and Cultural Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Air Force Colonel Fred Vann Cherry attends the unveiling of his portrait in the Pentagon, 1981. Col. Cherry was a colonel and command pilot in the U.S. Air Force. A career fighter pilot, he served in the Korean War, the Cold War and the Vietnam War. Col. Cherry was also the first and highest ranking black officer among U.S. Prisoners of War during the Vietnam War. Photo Credit: National Archives Photo by Mickey W. Sanborn, public domain Other posts in the "Anniversaries" series: EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESLOOKING TO THE PAST TO CHANGE THE FUTUREREMEMBERING THE BATTLE OF THE BULGEREFLECTIONS ON THE HUE CITY MASSACREEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESTHE TET OFFENSIVE: 50 YEARS LATERON BEING A ‘DIFFERENT’ KIND OF COMMAND — AFRICOM AT 10 YEARS (PART 2)
Jul 25, 2018
EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCES
17:15
We are at an all-time high of African-Americans serving at the three-star level, [including two] women. In my thirty-seven years in uniform, I don't recall that many African-Americans at that most senior level It is hereby declared to be the policy of the President that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin. - Harry S. Truman, Executive Order 9981. July 26, 1948 saw a landmark event in U.S. military history, President Harry Truman's signing of Executive Order (EO) 9981 directing the desegregation of the armed forces. Preceding the Civil Rights Act by more than a decade, this Executive Order was a groundbreaker -- recognizing both the exemplary performance of African-Americans during World War II and their acceptance by white officers. This podcast is the first of two commemorating the seventieth anniversary of EO 9981 and its influence over the U.S. armed forces today. WAR ROOM welcomes Major General William Walker, Commanding General of the District of Columbia National Guard, who shares how integrating the armed forces opened doors for him and other African-Americans. U.S. Army War College Professor of Leadership and Cultural Studies Chuck Allen moderates.     Major General William Walker is the Commanding General of the District of Columbia National Guard. Charles Allen is Professor of Leadership and Cultural Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by T. Anthony Bell, Fort Lee Public Affairs Other posts in the "Anniversaries" series: EXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESLOOKING TO THE PAST TO CHANGE THE FUTUREREMEMBERING THE BATTLE OF THE BULGEREFLECTIONS ON THE HUE CITY MASSACREEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESTHE TET OFFENSIVE: 50 YEARS LATERON BEING A ‘DIFFERENT’ KIND OF COMMAND — AFRICOM AT 10 YEARS (PART 2)
Jul 23, 2018
SUSTAINMENT IN A FUTURE COMBAT ENVIRONMENT
22:40
The way we should approach this is 'How do we put ourselves out of a job? How do we make it so logistics is not the operational constraint?' This is the second of two podcasts discussing U.S. Army War College student and faculty research into Army sustainment. This discussion addresses a study on how to organize and design Army systems to make them more sustainable in future combat environments by reducing their dependence on logistics. How can one design weapons systems to consume less fuel, rather than design the system and figure out the logistics later? What about power, food, water, and other critical supplies? Listen in as Matt Shatzkin, Greg Gibbons, and Jacqueline E. Whitt discuss the need to reduce the logistics tail and the challenges of satisfying this need.     Matt Shatzkin recently retired as a colonel in the U.S. Army; his last assignment was in the Center for Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. Greg Gibbons is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army and a graduate of the U.S. Army War College class of 2018. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Soldiers from 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, U.S. Division - Center, and the 3rd Infantry Division attach three fuel blivets to a CH-47F Chinook helicopter for a sling load mission. Photo Credit: 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division Public Affairs Photo by SGT Alun Thomas
Jul 20, 2018
CAN ARMY EXPEDITIONARY OPERATIONS BE SUSTAINED?
26:53
If you go to Disney World, twenty years ago there were no express lines. ... Now we have an express pass where you pay a little extra, you get escorted to the front. ... What happens if everyone who's in line needs to get to the front? This is the first of two related podcasts on strategic sustainment. Historically as an organizing construct, the Army has gone back and forth between two modes. One is based on having a forward posture and deliberately building up the force prior to conflict. The other is the subject of this dialogue, when the Army responds on short notice with limited ability to establish lines of communication before engaging in combat. An Army organized for expeditionary capability has tremendous implications for the military's (and the nation's) sustainment infrastructure. Participating in the dialogue are two recent graduates of the U.S. Army War College resident program, U.S. Army Colonels Bobby Bryant and Fred Maddox; their faculty advisor U.S. Army Colonel Matt Shatzkin from the Center for Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College; and Jacqueline E. Whitt, the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor.     Matt Shatzkin recently retired as a colonel in the U.S. Army; his last assignment was in the Center for Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. Bobby Bryant and Fred Maddox are colonels in the U.S. Army and graduates of the U.S. Army War College class of 2018. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Cargo pallets are loaded onto a Kalitta Air Boeing 747 by 436th Aerial Port Squadron Airmen March 24, 2017, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Zachary Cacicia
Jul 18, 2018
IS “VUCA” A USEFUL TERM OR IS IT ALL “VUCA’ED” UP?
38:26
To treat our own time period as though it is somehow exceptional feels intellectually and morally wrong. Do we need a new lexicon or do we already have the right words that we are misapplying? For a quarter century, a popular term to describe the modern strategic environment has been "VUCA," an acronym meaning "Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous." Coined at the U.S. Army War College in the immediate post-Cold War time, VUCA has been used (and overused) to describe anything not simple at the strategic level. But as Paul Kan, Jacqueline E. Whitt, and Andrew A. Hill discuss, the term is not only devoid of real meaning, it does not even accurately describe the U.S. in the 1990s. So, when one invokes VUCA, what is one intending to say, and how can one say it better or differently?     Paul Kan, Jacqueline E. Whitt, and Andrew A. Hill are members of the U.S. Army War College faculty. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: The Black Death in London, circa 1665, via Wikimedia Commons. Public domain.
Jul 13, 2018
WHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIES
37:22
We're in a support role, and sometimes that's a little bit challenges for folks to wrap their mind around. In the next release in the 'Leader Perspectives' series, WAR ROOM welcomes Brigadier General James Blankenhorn, U.S. Army retired and former Commander of the Command and Control of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Response Force Alpha. In this interview, BG Blankenhorn discusses strategic leadership in the context of defense support to civil authorities, using response to a homeland nuclear attack as an example. How well prepared are the Army's senior leaders to deal in situations where they, as military leaders, have tremendous capability but are not in charge of the response force? What implications may this have on leader development? WAR ROOM Social Media Editor Buck Haberichter moderates.     James Blankenhorn is a retired brigadier general in the U.S. Army and former Commander, Command and Control CBRN Response Element Alpha. Buck Haberichter is WAR ROOM's Social Media Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Submerged freeways from the effects of Hurricane Harvey are seen during widespread flooding in Houston Interstate highway 45 is submerged from the effects of Hurricane Harvey seen during widespread flooding in Houston, Texas, U.S. on August 27, 2017. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Richard Carson Other Releases in the 'Leader Perspectives' Series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Jul 10, 2018
WHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?
22:18
We tend to think about 'strategic leaders' as people who were successful.... But to me, it is the content of their goals that matter. WAR ROOM welcomes Dr. Sarah Sewall, former Undersecretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights under the Obama administration and the inaugural Deputy Assistance Secretary of Defense for Peacekeeping and Peace Enforcement Policy. Dr. Sewell was a guest speaker at the U.S. Army War College's annual Strategy Conference, which explored Strategic Leadership in 2030. In this interview with WAR ROOM Social Media Editor Buck Haberichter, Dr. Sewell provides her perspectives on those traits that separate the great strategic leaders from others, and in the process dispels some popular misconceptions about what it means to be a great strategic leader.     Dr. Sarah Sewall is the Speyer Family Foundation Distinguished Scholar | Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs. Buck Haberichter is the Social Media Editor for WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Print showing Abraham Lincoln, standing on stage before a ground of people, delivering his address at the dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery, November 19, 1863. Image Credit: Library of Congress via Wikimedia Commons (public domain) Other Releases in the 'Leader Perspectives' series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Jul 06, 2018
THE MURKY MIX OF MEDIA, PUBLIC OPINION, AND POLICYMAKING
23:48
We as American citizens have to re-evaluate ... the information we're getting from social media to inform our understanding of foreign policy and world events. A constructive relationship between policymakers and the public is an important enabler for national security policy. When public opinion opposes options that an Administration wishes or needs to consider, that can constrain national action. From the advent of e-mail and round-the-clock cable news coverage a quarter-century ago to today's social media, the avenues available to the public are increasing. What does this mean for policymakers now and in the future? Addressing questions of media and public opinion are Naval War College Fellow for National Security Affairs Samantha Taylor and U.S. Army War College Professor of Strategy Jacqueline E. Whitt.     Samantha A. Taylor is a Post-doctoral Fellow of National Security Affairs at the Naval War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: U.S. Navy Capt. Mark Fox, Commander Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2), is interviewed by a CNN reporter in the ship’s hangar bay aboard the aircraft carrier USS Constellation (CV 64), following a mission over Iraq. Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Prince A. Hughes III
Jul 03, 2018
WHERE DOES INTELLIGENCE GO FROM HERE? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
29:21
The intelligence community typically focuses too much on the here-and-now and urgent, as opposed to the more distant and important future. In this culminating podcast in the Intelligence series, WAR ROOM welcomes former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper to discuss the strategic roles of intelligence and his perspectives on themes presented throughout this series. How do unrealistic expectations on the intelligence community increase risks to national security? What are the unique intelligence challenges that ground combat presents? These and other topics as discussed with Genevieve Lester, Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College.     James Clapper is the former Director of National Intelligence. Genevieve Lester is the DeSerio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image Credit: U.S. Army photo. Composite by Tom Galvin. Other Posts in the "Intelligence" series: THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE TODAYPOLICY SUCCESS VS. INTEL FAILURE?IMPACT (OR NOT) OF INTEL ON STRATEGIC DECISION MAKINGSTRATEGIC ATTACKS AND THEIR FALLOUTNEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS: ANALYZING TODAY’S FLOOD OF INFORMATIONWHERE DOES INTELLIGENCE GO FROM HERE? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPERTHE DOD-CIA RELATIONSHIP: ARE WE MILITARIZING STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE?THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ODNI: AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
Jun 28, 2018
STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPE
29:52
You talk about the capabilities of the War College graduates and the ability as a colonel to transfer from being concerned about [one's unit] into understanding the desires of the entire enterprise WAR ROOM welcomes retired U.S. Army Lieutenant General Mark Hertling to discuss his perspectives on strategic leadership and the solving of difficult strategic problems where the ways and means are not aligned with the ends. LTG Hertling recounts experiences and lessons learned about the transformation of the U.S. Army in Europe from service as a staff director in the early 2000s to restationing the Headquarters from Heidelberg to Wiesbaden years later, and as Division Commander, 1st Armored Division cobbling together a team of disparate units as part of the surge in Iraq. WAR ROOM podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   Mark Hertling is a retired U.S. Army lieutenant general with 37 years of active service. His last assignment was Commander, U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army in Wiesbaden, Germany. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Scene from a ceremonial "Grand Tattoo" held at Schloss Biebrich in Wiesbaden, Germany" to farewell LTG Ben Hodges as the outgoing U.S. Army Europe commander in August 2017. Image Credit: U.S. Army homepage Releases from the Leader Perspectives series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Jun 26, 2018
NEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS: ANALYZING TODAY’S FLOOD OF INFORMATION
19:05
How do we take an institution ... that is designed to collect sensitive material and incorporate everything else that is out there [-- Journalism, social media, academic literature, etc.]? WAR ROOM welcomes Adam Wasserman, a former political analyst from the Central Intelligence Agency to discuss the particular challenges of conducting strategic intelligence analysis in today's environment. For example, historically the intelligence community organized and functioned to pursue an adversary's inner secrets, but now must apply its resources to combing through all the open source information in the environment, as though looking for all the needles in the haystack. How does such change affect the timely and relevant provision of quality analysis to national leaders? U.S. Army War College resident student Chris Todd moderates, and the Intelligence series editor Genevieve Lester provides the introduction.     Adam Wasserman is a retired political analyst from the Central Intelligence Agency and former faculty member of the U.S. Air War College. Chris Todd is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force and a student of the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2018. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image Credit: U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Danielle Prentice. Composite by Tom Galvin. Posts in the "Intelligence" series: THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE TODAYPOLICY SUCCESS VS. INTEL FAILURE?IMPACT (OR NOT) OF INTEL ON STRATEGIC DECISION MAKINGSTRATEGIC ATTACKS AND THEIR FALLOUTNEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS: ANALYZING TODAY’S FLOOD OF INFORMATIONWHERE DOES INTELLIGENCE GO FROM HERE? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPERTHE DOD-CIA RELATIONSHIP: ARE WE MILITARIZING STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE?THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ODNI: AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
Jun 21, 2018
“STAR WARS” AS A LENS FOR GRAND STRATEGY?
29:37
Instead of what the Melian dialogue tells us, which is that 'Might Makes Right,' ... when it comes to Supreme Command, 'Right Makes Might.' Whoever has the superior decisions wins. Science fiction has a long history of helping provide simple explanations for complex phenomena. Few phenomena are as complex, and as elusive, a grand strategy. In this podcast, active Army strategist Major ML Cavanaugh, co-editor of Strategy Strikes Back: How Star Wars Explains Modern Military Conflict (recently published by Potomac Books), explains how he uses the Star Wars universe as a lens to explain grand strategy in simple terms, and then applies the lessons learned to several historical examples of strategy in action. Just as Yoda taught Luke Skywalker the ways of the Force, perhaps he can also teach us about the ways of strategy. WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Andrew A. Hill moderates.     Matt Cavanaugh is a major in the U.S. Army and an Army strategist. Andrew A. Hill is the Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: REUTERS/Charles Platiau
Jun 19, 2018
THE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATION
23:42
30 years ago, we still talked about deterrence a lot in this country. We still talked about nuclear weapons in this country. Today, the broader population does not, and therefore part of my job is to make sure that that becomes part of the dialogue again. What happens when an important strategic message is simply not salient to the audience? How does a senior military leader overcome disinterest or lack of understanding? The U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM) offers an interesting case study -- a unique organization with a broad mission of deterring "strategic attack" across a range of major threats -- nuclear, space, missile, and others. But topics such as nuclear attack or missile defense are not as central to the public discourse as they were in decades past. General John Hyten, U.S. Air Force and Commander of STRATCOM, addresses the challenges facing senior leaders who must tell the organization's story to a wide range of internal and external audiences -- believers, skeptics, and the indifferent alike. WAR ROOM editor-in-chief Andrew A. Hill moderates.     John Hyten is the Commander of U.S. Strategic Command. Andrew A. Hill is the WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. Photo Credit: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Julie R. Matyascik Other posts in the Leader Perspectives series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Jun 15, 2018
STRATEGIC ATTACKS AND THEIR FALLOUT
21:46
It's silly to expect that intelligence will always get it right. WAR ROOM welcomes Dr. Richard Betts from Columbia University to discuss what success and failure really mean in the intelligence community. For example, when adversaries successfully strike U.S. targets, the results are tragic and are often followed by soul searching and, unfortunately, blame. Success stories, such as the thwarting of probable attacks, are far more numerous but attract less attention. What does this mean for intelligence professionals? U.S. Army War College resident student Adam Dietrich moderates, and the Intelligence series editor Genevieve Lester provides the introduction.     Richard Betts is is the Arnold Saltzman Professor of War and Peace Studies in the Department of Political Science, the director of the Institute of War and Peace Studies, and the director of the International Security Policy Program in the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. Adam Dietrich is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve and a student in the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2018. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by SrA Sean Wornell. Composite by Tom Galvin. Posts in the "Intelligence" series: THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE TODAYPOLICY SUCCESS VS. INTEL FAILURE?IMPACT (OR NOT) OF INTEL ON STRATEGIC DECISION MAKINGSTRATEGIC ATTACKS AND THEIR FALLOUTNEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS: ANALYZING TODAY’S FLOOD OF INFORMATIONWHERE DOES INTELLIGENCE GO FROM HERE? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPERTHE DOD-CIA RELATIONSHIP: ARE WE MILITARIZING STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE?THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ODNI: AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
Jun 12, 2018
IMPACT (OR NOT) OF INTEL ON STRATEGIC DECISION MAKING
15:47
What a President or any other senior leader brings with him or her to office in inevitably a simplified view of how the world works. Is it critical that national leaders have an open mind? Or is it sometimes necessary? In this third episode in the WAR ROOM series on Intelligence, special guest Paul Pillar, a 28-year veteran of the Central Intelligence Agency discusses the inconsistent role that intelligence often plays in strategic decision making. Preconceived notions and personal choices may lead to intelligence being joined at the hip of strategic decisionmakers or shut out of the room. What does that mean for the quality of the decisions and likely outcomes? The answers may surprise you. U.S. Army War College resident student Ms. Dawn Hicks moderates, and the Intelligence series editor Genevieve Lester provides the introduction.     Paul Pillar is a 28-year veteran of the Central Intelligence Agency and a senior fellow at Georgetown University. Dawn Hicks is a Department of Defense civilian and a student in the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2018. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image Credit: Photo from U.S. National Archives (public domain). Composite by Tom Galvin. Posts in the "Intelligence" series: THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE TODAYPOLICY SUCCESS VS. INTEL FAILURE?IMPACT (OR NOT) OF INTEL ON STRATEGIC DECISION MAKINGSTRATEGIC ATTACKS AND THEIR FALLOUTNEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS: ANALYZING TODAY’S FLOOD OF INFORMATIONWHERE DOES INTELLIGENCE GO FROM HERE? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPERTHE DOD-CIA RELATIONSHIP: ARE WE MILITARIZING STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE?THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ODNI: AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
Jun 07, 2018
THE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADER
26:30
If they come out with an after-action review or lessons learned from Iraq and all it talks about is how officers executed the war, then you know the Army missed an opportunity. WAR ROOM welcomes Command Sergeant Major Christopher Martinez who retired from the U.S. Army after culminating his career as Command Sergeant Major of the U.S. Army War College. In this interview with WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief Andrew A. Hill, CSM Martinez reflects on his thirty years of military service. How have the responsibilities of senior enlisted leaders has changed over time, and how can they uniquely contribute to strategic decision making?   Christopher Martinez is a retired command sergeant major from the U.S. Army whose most recent assignment was Command Sergeant Major of the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is Editor-in-Chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Collage depicts current or retired command sergeants major from the U.S. Army as of May 2018. Top row from left -- CSM Paul E. Biggs (CSM, Military District of Washington), CSM Christopher Martinez (U.S. Army War College until May 2018), CSM Rakimm Broadnax-Rogers (CSM, Martin Army Community Hospital, Fort Leonard Wood), CSM John W. Troxell (Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff). Bottom row from left -- CSM Steven L. Payton (CSM, United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command and U.S. Forces Korea), Sergeant Major of the Army Daniel A. Dailey, CSM Charles Tobin (Senior Enlisted Advisor, Defense Logistics Agency until July 2017), and CSM Mulholland (Command Sergeant Major, 86th Training Division until February 2016) Image Credit: Tom Galvin Releases from the Leader Perspectives series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Jun 05, 2018
POLICY SUCCESS VS. INTEL FAILURE?
28:08
Failure is not just the result of one part of the equation. [Sometimes] you can give the right piece of intelligence and they won't act on it. What does it take to be a successful intelligence officer or civilian? Or perhaps, what negative traits indicate the likelihood of failure? In this second episode in the WAR ROOM series on Intelligence, special guest Dr. Rose McDermott of Brown University discusses the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that intelligence professionals need (or must avoid), along with a political culture where success is often miscredited to policy while intelligence is blame for any perceived failure. U.S. Army War College resident student Mr. Paul Mekkelson moderates, and the Intelligence series editor Genevieve Lester provides the introduction.     Rose McDermott is the David and Mariana Fisher University Professor of International Relations at Brown University and a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Paul Mekkelson is a Department of Defense civilian and a student in the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2018. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image Credit: Photo of the Operations Deputy's Conference Room in the National Military Command Center located at the Pentagon (1984) by Robert D. Ward (public domain). Composite by Tom Galvin. Posts in the "Intelligence" series: THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE TODAYPOLICY SUCCESS VS. INTEL FAILURE?IMPACT (OR NOT) OF INTEL ON STRATEGIC DECISION MAKINGSTRATEGIC ATTACKS AND THEIR FALLOUTNEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS: ANALYZING TODAY’S FLOOD OF INFORMATIONWHERE DOES INTELLIGENCE GO FROM HERE? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPERTHE DOD-CIA RELATIONSHIP: ARE WE MILITARIZING STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE?THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ODNI: AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
Jun 01, 2018
DO ETHICS MATTER IN WARFARE TODAY?
21:05
People say, "Well, people break the rules of warfare all the time, so why should we have rules?" Is there an absolute moral and ethical framework that guides forces in war, or is it no more than the rules chosen by the powerful to justify their actions? What is the benefit of such frameworks in a world where adversaries appear free to act immorally? These and other questions are presented by special guest Dr. Pauline Shanks-Kaurin, professor of military ethics at Pacific Lutheran University and Andrew A. Hill, Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College.   Pauline Shanks-Kaurin is professor of military ethics at Pacific Lutheran University and the author of "Achilles Goes Asymmetric." Andrew A. Hill is the Chair for Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: U.S. Army
May 29, 2018
THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE TODAY
14:56
For national security officials who are wading through floods of information, how do they find that nugget, ... that piece of information that fits with all the other pieces? What is the role of intelligence in a world where information is everywhere and the global security environment moves and evolves at breakneck speed? Answering this question is the purpose behind this exciting six-part podcast series on Intelligence. Dr. Genevieve Lester, the DeSerio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College, is the host for the series and she leads off the series with a discussion of the purpose and present-day challenges facing the intelligence field. With her for this discussion is Jacqueline E. Whitt, Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM podcast editor.     Genevieve Lester is the De Serio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image Credit: Photo from the National Guard Command Center during response to Hurricane Irene (Department of Defense photo). Composite by Tom Galvin. Posts in the "Intelligence" series: THE ROLE OF INTELLIGENCE TODAYPOLICY SUCCESS VS. INTEL FAILURE?IMPACT (OR NOT) OF INTEL ON STRATEGIC DECISION MAKINGSTRATEGIC ATTACKS AND THEIR FALLOUTNEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS: ANALYZING TODAY’S FLOOD OF INFORMATIONWHERE DOES INTELLIGENCE GO FROM HERE? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPERTHE DOD-CIA RELATIONSHIP: ARE WE MILITARIZING STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE?THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ODNI: AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES CLAPPER
May 23, 2018
MAKING THE CASE FOR THE CASE METHOD
28:10
A story ... breaks down more complicated theoretical concepts into something that is relatable. Among the challenges of educating senior national security professionals is that the dynamics and complexity of the strategic environment inhibits the creation of clean models or simple how-to guides. The context of each problem is different, as even the same type of problem will vary according to the relationships and histories of the actors and entities involved. So how can one teach career military officers, who have served mostly at unit level, think and make quality decisions and recommendations at the strategic level? One tool is the case method which is described in this presentation by Dr. Volker Franke from Kennessaw State University and Dr. Jacqueline E. Whitt, Professor of Strategy from the U.S. Army War College.     Volker C. Franke is Professor of Conflict Management at Kennesaw State University. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Charity Murtorff
May 16, 2018
LEARNING STRATEGY THROUGH FILM
25:15
Films can bring to life war's battles, leaders, examples of strategic decisions, and examples of less successful strategic decisions. As Mark Gagnon and Jacqueline E. Whitt show in this presentation, there are many ways that films can be used in professional military education. From learning about strategic decisions and their impacts to broadening the world views and perspectives, films help viewers visualize the dynamics and complexity of strategic environments better than other media. For example, the U.S. Army War College's Strategic Art Film Program provides a terrific forum for students and faculty to view a film and discuss both its context and lessons learned for today's military. Also on WAR ROOM is an article about the classic film Tunes of Glory, an example of such a film with important insights and lessons for today's leaders.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-043-Gagnon-Whitt-Film-and-Strategy-RLS-v3.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   Mark Gagnon is a colonel in the U.S. Army and Professor of German in the Department of Foreign Languages at the U.S. Military Academy. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Still from All's Quiet on the Western Front, an anti-war film from 1930 that won the Academy Awards for Outstanding Production and Best Director (Lewis Milestone). Film is now in the public domain.
May 15, 2018
STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVE
21:25
There's an old saying, "Command can be lonely." But it doesn't have to be. WAR ROOM welcomes Major General Mick Ryan, Australian Army and Commander of the Australian Defense College to the studio to discuss matters of strategic leadership in conjunction with the U.S. Army War College's annual Strategy Conference. What separates successful strategic leaders from the less successful? WAR ROOM Podcast Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates. Major General Mick Ryan, Australian Army, is the Commander of the Australian Defence College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this program are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, Australian Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Australian National Audit Agency Releases from the Leader Perspectives series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
May 09, 2018
WHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?
23:51
You assume professional competence at [the strategic] level, ... but the more senior you get in the armed forces or defense, the more you are looking for issues of character. WAR ROOM welcomes special guest Lieutenant-General Patrick Sanders CBE, DSO of the British Army, who addressed the 2018 resident class of the U.S. Army War College as part of the annual Kermit Roosevelt Exchange Lecture series. In this discussion, Lieutenant-General Sanders presents a British perspective on senior military leadership and success at the national strategic level. A fascinating discussion loaded with British history and perspectives on qualities of successful American officers. WAR ROOM Podcast Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-044-Sanders-Whitt-Senior-Leader-Perspectives_FIX.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   Lieutenant-General Patrick Sanders CBE, DSO serves as the Commander Field Army in the British Army and was the United Kingdom's lecturer for the 2018 edition of the Kermit Roosevelt Exchange program. Jacqueline E. Whitt is WAR ROOM's Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Portrait of Kermit Roosevelt from the Library of Congress. Public domain. Image Credit: Tom Galvin Releases from the Leader Perspectives series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
May 08, 2018
THE VEXING AND COMPLEX CIVIL WAR IN SYRIA
21:09
It is difficult to describe just the unbelievable amount of destruction that Syria has gone through... since 2011.   WAR ROOM welcomes Dean of the U.S. Air War College Christopher Hemmer to the studio to explain the historical and present-day contexts of the on-going civil war in Syria. With possibly over 500,000 killed and untold destruction, it is easily one of the bloodiest wars in recent times. What are the factors fueling the war? Why has it drawn so much international attention? What can be done to stop it? These and many other questions are addressed with the assistance of WAR ROOM podcast editor and Professor of Strategy Jacqueline E. Whitt.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-056-Hemmer-Whitt-Syria.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   Christopher Hemmer is Dean of the U.S. Air War College and expert on U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, Air War College, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, or the Department of Defense. Photo: A veteran Syrian Democratic Forces soldier teaches a group of recruits about improvised explosive devices in Northern Syria on Oct. 10, 2017. Photo Credit: Staff Sergeant Richard Lutz/US Army
May 03, 2018
WHAT IS THE STATE OF U.S. RELATIONS WITH AFRICA?
23:21
One in five people on the planet by 2050 will be an African. One in ten will be a Nigerian. You have tremendous potential. ... And it all depends on one thing. It's a question of governance. With North Korea and other national security challenges dominating headlines, Africa is garnering less attention than before. So what are the important interests that the U.S. has with Africa today? And what interests do Africans have nowadays with the U.S.? To answer these and other questions, WAR ROOM welcomes special guest Ambassador (Retired) Phil Carter. Ambassador is the former Deputy to the Commander for Civil-Military Engagement of U.S. Africa Command and former U.S. Ambassador to Guinea and Ivory Coast. U.S. Army War College Director of African Studies Chris Wyatt moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-025-Carter-Wyatt-US-Africa-in-21st-Century.mp3 You may also download the podcast here.   Ambassador (Retired) Phil Carter is the former Deputy to the Commander for civil-military engagement of U.S. Africa Command and former U.S. Ambassador to Guinea and Ivory Coast. Chris Wyatt is a colonel in the U.S. Army and serves as the Director of African Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: A Senegalese soldier with 1st Paratrooper Battalion carries an 81mm mortar tube during a patrol July 22, 2016 in Thies, Senegal as part of Africa Readiness Training 16. ART16 is a U.S. Army Africa exercise designed to increase U.S. and Senegalese readiness and partnership through combined infantry training and live-fire events. Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Candace Mundt/U.S. Army
Apr 24, 2018
THE LAW OF THE SEA: PROVIDING ORDER OR INTRUDING ON SOVEREIGNTY?
25:49
The United States says over and over that the U.S. supports a rules-based international order but is not party to one of the most important rules-based [international treaties]. The United Nations' Convention on the Law of the Sea is an important international agreement from the 1970s that establishes the rights and responsibilities of States engaging in any maritime activity. 164 United Nations Member States have signed and ratified the treaty. Meanwhile, the United States signed it in 1994, but has never ratified it. What is the treaty? What are its provisions? What does the US object to, and what are the implications of this decision? U.S. Army War College professors Al Lord and Jacqueline E. Whitt discuss.     Al Lord is a retired Captain from the U.S. Navy and serves as Professor of Theater Planning at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and WAR ROOM's podcast editor. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speaker and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andre T. Richard/U.S. Navy
Apr 17, 2018
IS TRANSATLANTICISM DEAD?
16:50
How should Europe respond to a US that might be pivoting away or might not see Europe as useful anymore? There's a number of camps, one might say. The relationship between US and Europe has faced many stresses and strains over the years, especially in present times as European leaders debate over the transatlantic partnership. Thus, WAR ROOM is pleased to welcome to the studio special guest Peter Sparding, a transatlantic fellow in the Washington office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States. As the US faces increased competition from other regions of the world, whither Europe? And what does Europe have to say about the US?     You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   Peter Sparding is a transatlantic fellow in the Washington office of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, where he works on foreign and economic policy developments in the United States and Europe. Darrell Driver is a colonel in the U.S. Army and the Director of European Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo Credit: NATO  
Apr 10, 2018
CLOSE FRIEND IN A DANGEROUS NEIGHBORHOOD: ON JAPAN-US RELATIONS
26:30
We need to consider what's important here. We need to worry ... a lot more about protecting our allies Japan and the Republic of Korea. WAR ROOM welcomes Wallace "Chip" Gregson (Lieutenant General, U.S. Marine Corps Retired), former Assistant Secretary of Defense, Asian and Pacific Security Affairs and former Commander of U.S. Marine Corps Forces Pacific to discuss the current and future relations between Japan and the U.S. and other issues of the Asian-Pacific Region. The long-standing friendship between U.S. and Japan remains vital as Japan reconsiders its military posture under the emergence of North Korea, China, and other regional competitors and challenges. What are U.S. options to keep this alliance strong in the years ahead? https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-027-Gregson-Greene-Japan-US-Relations.mp3   You may also download a copy of the podcast here   Wallace "Chip" Gregson (Lieutenant General, U.S. Marine Corps Retired) is a former Assistant Secretary of Defense, Asian and Pacific Security Affairs and former Commander of U.S. Marine Corps Forces Pacific. Ray Greene is a career foreign service officer with the Department of State specializing in the Asia-Pacific Region and a faculty instructor at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this warcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: U.S. Air Force Gen. Terrence J. O'Shaughnessy, right, Pacific Air Forces commander, greets Japan Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF) Gen. Yoshiyuki Sugiyama, center, JASDF chief of staff, upon the arrival of attendees on day two of the 2017 Pacific Air Chiefs Symposium at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Kamaile Casillas
Apr 04, 2018
GOOD (BORDER) FENCES MAKE GOOD NEIGHBORS? ON THE U.S. AND LATIN AMERICA
22:22
The direction that Latin America takes is going to be, of course, up to the people of the region, but the region could look quite differently a year from now. WAR ROOM welcomes special guest Eric Farnsworth, Vice President of the Washington Office from the Council of the Americas, to discuss Latin American relationships with the U.S. Among the topics discussed are the North American Free Trade Agreement, Venezuela's political situation, Brazil's economic development, and the peace agreement in Colombia. Meanwhile, the U.S.'s role in the region is changing as other world powers are taking active interest, especially China. U.S. Army War College Director of American Studies Ian Lyles moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-026-Farnsworth-Lyles-Latin-American-Security.mp3   You may also download a copy of the podcast here.   Eric Farnsworth is the Vice President and Head of the Washington Office, Americas Society and Council of the Americas. Ian Lyles is a colonel in the U.S. Army and serves as the Director of Americas Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this warcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo:  The Colombian team stands in formation and renders honors during the opening ceremony for Fuerzas Comando 2014 on Fort Tolemaida, Colombia, July 23, 2014 (Department of Defense Photo).
Mar 28, 2018
SOUTH AFRICA’S ELECTIONS AND THE MATURING OF DEMOCRACY
17:59
If [President Mnangagwa] wants a genuine legacy of someone who has restored Zimbabwe to great prominence, he has an opportunity here, but ... they have to show us. The elections in South Africa signal a potential turning point in the nation's politics. Since of end of apartheid, the Africa National Congress, or ANC, has been the dominant party both politically and symbolically with Nelson Mandela being the first President of the newly-integrated nation. However, due to systemic corruption and other problems, the ANC is facing growing competition from other parties for the first time. What does this mean for the nation as national elections approach. Join Dan Hampton from the Africa Center for Strategic Studies and the Army War College's Director of African Studies Chris Wyatt as the as they discuss South Africa's present and future.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-029-Hampton-Wyatt-South-Africa-Elections-NEW-INTRO.mp3   You can also download the podcast here.   Dan Hampton is Chief of Staff and Professor of Practice at the Africa Center for Strategic Studies. Chris Wyatt is a colonel in the U.S. Army and is the Director of African studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo: A woman looks at documents as she gets ready to cast her ballot during municipal elections at a polling station on August 3, 2016 in Soweto's Freedom Park, South Africa. Photo Credit: JOHN WESSELS/AFP/Getty Images  
Mar 20, 2018
“UNITED IN DIVERSITY”: THE EUROPEAN UNION LOOKS FORWARD
15:19
At the NATO-Warsaw summit [this past year], there was a joint declaration, and I would say a historic [one] between NATO and the EU to decide to work together. WAR ROOM welcomes special guest Ludwig Blaurock, Counsellor for Political and Military Affairs, Security and Development Section from Delegation of the European Union (EU) to the U.S. He discusses current EU initiatives to address the emerging security challenges on the continent, and the EU's relationships with the U.S. and NATO. The latter is important as both EU and NATO are moving toward greater integration and setting aside old rivalries. U.S. Army War College's Director of European Studies Darrell Driver moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-015-Blaurock-with-Driver-EU-Integration-and-Security.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   Ludwig Blaurock is Counselor for Political and Military Affairs in the Security & Development Section in the Delegation of the European Union to the United States of America, Washington, DC. Darrell Driver is the Director of European Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo: A view of the Berlaymont building, headquarters of the European Union Commission. Photo Credit: DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images
Mar 13, 2018
HOW DO GREAT STRATEGIC LEADERS DEVELOP OTHERS?
36:43
How do you really make a difference to inspire people around you? WAR ROOM welcomes special guest Major General John S. Kem, the 51st Commandant of the U.S. Army War College to discuss leader development. Who does it well, and why is it so hard to do in the Army? What principles can leaders adopt to build good developmental climates in units in an era of omnipresent technology, short attention spans, and intense pace of work? The U.S. Army War College Chair of Strategic Leadership and WAR ROOM's Editor-in-Chief Andrew A. Hill moderates.     Major General John S. Kem, U.S. Army, is the 51st Commandant of the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College and WAR ROOM Editor-in-Chief. The views expressed in this warcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: The US Capitol seen at dusk behind the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images
Mar 09, 2018
PRESERVING MILITARY HISTORY: AN INDIAN PERSPECTIVE
20:54
Military history has been seen [in India] by the political and academic establishment as a forgettable legacy of our colonial past. WAR ROOM welcomes special guest Air Vice Marshal (Dr.) Arjun Subramaniam, who retired from the Indian Air Force after 36 years of service, to provides his perspectives on relationships between India and the U.S., and discuss the importance of preserving a nation's military history. His well-researched and thought-provoking book India’s Wars: A Military History 1947-1971 shows the importance of India's military in sustaining its young democracy, and that its military history belongs in the mainstream of historical discourse. U.S. Army War College Director of South Asia studies Patrick Bratton moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-014-Subramaniam-Bratton-Indian-Military-History.mp3   You may also download a copy of the podcast here.   Air Vice Marshal (Dr.) Arjun Subramaniam is a pilot-scholar-author who retired from the Indian Air Force after 36 years of service. Patrick Bratton is Associate Professor of National Security at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this warcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, Department of Defense, or the Indian Defense Forces. Photo: Indian National Cadet Corps (NCC) members salute as they take part in 'Flags of Honour', an event held at The National Military Memorial Park in Bangalore on July 26, 2011, held to commemorate The Kargil War between India and Pakistan in 1999. The Kargil war was an armed conflict between India and Pakistan in the Kargil district of Kashmir, between May and July 1999. The conflict led to heightened tension between the two nations and a noticeable increase in national military spending. Photo Credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images
Mar 03, 2018
ORGANIZED CRIME: NOT WHAT YOU SEE ON TV
19:01
Clausewitz talkS about war being an extension of politics; for criminals, violence is ... an extension of the profit motive. Paul Kan and Jacqueline E. Whitt discuss organized crime as an important force in the global security environment. Whether organized criminal activity by large transnational groups or networks of smaller groups perpetrating similar criminal behaviors like money laundering, organized crime has a destablizing effect on governments and societies. The speakers discuss the challenges of separating legal from illegal activity and the dispels a number of myths surrounding organized crime built up in popular media.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-022-Kan-Whitt-Organized-Crime.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   Paul Kan is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and the WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo: Police and military specialized units personnel custody an assortment of assault rifles seized to members of the Barrio 18 and Mara Salvatrucha gangs after an operation launched at the Marco Aurelio Soto national penitentiary in Tamara, 20 km north of Tegucigalpa, on August 29, 2017. Photo Credit: ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images
Feb 23, 2018
THE STRANGE BLOODLESS COUP IN ZIMBABWE
23:27
If [President Mnangagwa] wants a genuine legacy of someone who has restored Zimbabwe to great prominence, he has an opportunity here, but ... they have to show us. For nearly four decades, Robert Mugabe reigned over the African nation of Zimbabwe, a reign that ended as the result of a struggle over his succession followed by a military coup. But unlike military coups elsewhere, Zimbabwe's was bloodless and long-time minister Emmerson Mnangagwa would assume the Presidency peacefully. U.S. Army War College Director of African Studies Chris Wyatt tells the long and complicated story of how the transition occurred and what it means for the future of Zimbabwe and relations with African Union and United States. WAR ROOM podcast Editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-020-Wyatt-Whitt-Zimbabwe-Coup.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   Chris Wyatt is a colonel in the U.S. Army and is the Director of African Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Protesters demonstrate outside the Embassy of Zimbabwe in London to call on the leader of the country Robert Mugabe to resign on November 18, 2017 in London, England. Photo Credit: Jack Taylor/Getty Images
Feb 16, 2018
MAX BOOT ON THE LURE OF SIMPLE MILITARY SOLUTIONS — A PODCAST
23:32
I would urge your listeners ... Don't fall under this illusion that there are easy military answers to difficult geo-political questions. WAR ROOM welcomes Max Boot, Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow in National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. Boot is a critic of the Trump Administration, and during this podcast he challenges the President's approach to national decision making. He expresses concerns that the Administration's approach is ill-suited to today's challenges. He also directs some of his concerns toward military officials, especially on the potential of the U.S. to become too enamored with military solutions. Could the U.S. find itself again embroiled in unconventional fights where tactical successes are undermined by strategic setbacks? WAR ROOM podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-024-Max-Boot-NDS.mp3   You can also download the podcast here.   Max Boot is the Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow in National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: U.S. President Donald Trump and his senior national security staff attend a briefing with senior military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House in October 2017.  Photo Credit: Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images
Feb 08, 2018
COOK’S ‘MIDNIGHT DRAWINGS’ AND THEIR HAUNTING VIEWS OF WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)
25:13
[COOK SAID,] 'These faces. I didn't get to know all their names. They joined my platoon, and many of them were dead by morning.' For forty-six years after the Korean War, veteran John A. Cook would be haunted by the memories of fighting and of his fellow soldiers being killed or wounded. What is now recognized as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD had no name at the time, and veterans like Cook had nowhere to turn to get help. Instead, as the horrific images of war would waken him at night, he began drawing those images on paper as a way of dealing with his inner pain. The resulting collection of his "Midnight Drawings" are now in the possession of the Army Heritage and Education Center, and the subject of this podcast. Jim McNally, AHEC's Curator of Art, tells this powerful, moving story with Jacqueline E. Whitt, War Room podcast editor.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-004-McNally-Whitt-DS-Cook-artwork.mp3   You can also download the podcast here. Click here to access the Army Heritage and Education Center page on the Cook "Midnight Drawing" collection. Below is the drawing referenced in the podcast, titled "Mattson - Head and Back Wounds."   Jim McNally is Curator of Art at the Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is the WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Close-up of "Mattson - Head and Back Wounds" by John A. Cook. Posts in the "Dusty Shelves" series: BOOK LOVERS NEED APPLY: A DUSTY SHELVES PODCASTHOW A HOMING PIGEON SAVED THE LOST BATTALION OF WORLD WAR I (DUSTY SHELVES)COOK’S ‘MIDNIGHT DRAWINGS’ AND THEIR HAUNTING VIEWS OF WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)BUILDING THE CONTINENTAL ARMY: VON STEUBEN’S “BLUE BOOK” (DUSTY SHELVES)RECEIPT: BOMB, ATOMIC, 1 EACH (DUSTY SHELVES)NSC-68: THE POLICY DOCUMENT THAT SHAPED THE COLD WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)RIDGWAY’S MEMO: “WHY WE ARE HERE” (DUSTY SHELVES)
Feb 06, 2018
THE TET OFFENSIVE: 50 YEARS LATER
23:45
What becomes the dominant narrative? [The Vietnam War has] been examined principally through American eyes. The Tet Offensive was an important event during the U.S. war in Vietnam. After three years of direct involvement by U.S. combat troops, the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong were convinced that the relationship between the U.S. and South Vietnam was fragile, and that military action could drive a wedge between them. This could bring about an uprising by the South Vietnamese people against their own government and severely weaken the ARVN, the South's military. Despite being arguably a military victory for the U.S. and its South Vietnamese ally, the Offensive was ultimately a strategic defeat. WAR ROOM welcomes U.S. Army War College Professor of Security Studies Dr. Frank Jones to discuss why this is so and what it means for the U.S. fifty years later.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-018-Jones-Whitt-Tet-50th-Anniversary.mp3   You can download a copy of the podcast here.   Frank Jones is Professor of Strategic Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and WAR ROOM's podcast editor. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Leathernecks of the 3d Bn., Fourth Marine Regiment salute fallen Marines during Memorial Services held at Khe Sanh. The unit of the 3d Marine Division was joined by soldiers of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam during the Memorial Services. Photo Credit:  SSgt Fred Lowe III, U.S. Marine Corps, accessed via DoDLive.mil Posts in the "Anniversaries" series: ON BEING A ‘DIFFERENT’ KIND OF COMMAND — AFRICOM AT 10 YEARS (PART 2)THE TET OFFENSIVE: 50 YEARS LATEREXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYREFLECTIONS ON THE HUE CITY MASSACREREMEMBERING THE BATTLE OF THE BULGELOOKING TO THE PAST TO CHANGE THE FUTUREEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARY
Jan 31, 2018
WE WON … NOW WHAT? HOW TO SECURE VICTORY
18:42
Iraqis came up to [COL Rick Schwartz] and said, 'Thanks for getting rid of Saddam. What do we do now?' Rick had no answer. That coalition forces were ill-prepared and ill-equipped to secure the peace after capturing Baghdad is well understood. How has the joint community evolved its doctrine and postured itself better to address the demands of post-conflict environments? WAR ROOM welcomes Bill Flavin and Scott Braderman from the U.S. Army War College's Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute to present on-going discussions at joint and interagency levels.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-002-Securing-Victory-FIXED.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   Bill Flavin is Assistant Director at the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute (PKSOI) at the U.S. Army War College. Scott Braderman is PKSOI's chief of research. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: US soldiers deploy in a street during clashes with Iraqis in the northern city of Mosul 13 June 2003. Photo Credit: Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images
Jan 30, 2018
PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMAND
21:01
I tell people today that history makes you smarter, but your heritage makes you prouder. The U.S. Army War College routinely hosts senior military and civilian leaders who come to meet and work with faculty and students on matters of national security, strategic leadership, and professional military education. WAR ROOM is pleased to welcome Gen Robin Rand, U.S. Air Force, Commander of the U.S. Air Force Global Strike Command who graciously accepted our invitation to come to the studio and provide his perspectives on strategic leadership. WAR ROOM Social Media Editor Buck Haberichter moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-005-Rand-Haberichter-Senior-Leader-Perspectives.mp3 You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   General Robin Rand, U.S. Air Force, is commander of the U.S. Air Force Global Strike Command and Commander, Air Forces Strategic - Air, U.S. Strategic Command, Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana. Buck Haberichter is a colonel in the U.S. Air Force and is WAR ROOM's Social Media Editor. Photo Credit:  Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker, U.S. Air Force Releases from the Leader Perspectives series: A TRANSATLANTIC PERSPECTIVE ON NATO (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)OBSERVATIONS FROM NATO’S NORTHERN FRONT (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)ALLIES ARE MORE THAN FRIENDS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)THE CHALLENGES OF KEEPING SPACE SECURE (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)TENSIONS AND PARADOXES FACING SENIOR LEADERS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEADING AND WINNING IN GREAT POWER COMPETITION (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)LEARNING ABOUT LEADERSHIP THROUGH THE CLASSICS (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)WHAT IT TAKES FOR COLONELS TO BE SUCCESSFUL (LEADER PERSPECTIVES)BALANCING BETWEEN CIVILIAN LIFE AND SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL GUARD“WHAT GOT YOU HERE WON’T GET YOU THERE” — AND OTHER CAUTIONARY TALES FOR LEADERSWHEN THE MILITARY IS NOT IN CHARGE: DEFENSE SUPPORT TO CIVIL AUTHORITIESWHAT DOES ‘SUCCESS’ MEAN AS A STRATEGIC LEADER?STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP AND CHANGING THE US ARMY IN EUROPETHE CHALLENGES OF SENIOR LEADER COMMUNICATIONTHE SENIOR NCO AS A STRATEGIC LEADERSTRATEGIC LEADERSHIP FROM AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVEWHAT DO THE BRITS THINK OF AMERICAN OFFICERS?PERSPECTIVES ON STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP — GEN. ROBIN RAND, U.S. AIR FORCE GLOBAL STRIKE COMMANDGROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
Jan 23, 2018
BUILDING THE CONTINENTAL ARMY: VON STEUBEN’S “BLUE BOOK” (DUSTY SHELVES)
20:36
[VON STEUBEN] WAS THE RIGHT MAN AT THE RIGHT PLACE AND THE RIGHT TIME. In the next installment of in our Dusty Shelves series, "Building the Continental Army: Von Steuben's 'Blue Book'," Jack Giblin and Jacqueline E. Whitt tell the story behind the Continental Army's first training manual. Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben was a Prussian Army officer who volunteered to come to the American colonies and serve as inspector general for the Continental Army. His book, entitled Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States would become the standard U.S. Army drill manual through 1812.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-003-Giblin-Whitt-DS-vonSteuben-Blue-Book-Final.mp3   You may also download a copy of the podcast here. Click here to access a full PDF version of the Blue Book (warning: 26MB!). Or, click here to access the Blue Book at the U.S. Library of Congress, which allows access to individual pages.   Jack Giblin is the Chief of Visitor and Education Services at the Army Heritage and Education Center. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and WAR ROOM podcast editor. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: Portrait extracted from "Major General Friedrich Wilhelm Augustus, Baron von Steuben," by Ralph Earl 1786 (public domain) via the U.S. National Park Service. Inside cover of the Blue Book from the U.S. Army website. Composite assembled by Tom Galvin.   Posts in the "Dusty Shelves" series: BOOK LOVERS NEED APPLY: A DUSTY SHELVES PODCASTHOW A HOMING PIGEON SAVED THE LOST BATTALION OF WORLD WAR I (DUSTY SHELVES)COOK’S ‘MIDNIGHT DRAWINGS’ AND THEIR HAUNTING VIEWS OF WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)BUILDING THE CONTINENTAL ARMY: VON STEUBEN’S “BLUE BOOK” (DUSTY SHELVES)RECEIPT: BOMB, ATOMIC, 1 EACH (DUSTY SHELVES)NSC-68: THE POLICY DOCUMENT THAT SHAPED THE COLD WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)RIDGWAY’S MEMO: “WHY WE ARE HERE” (DUSTY SHELVES)  
Jan 19, 2018
ARMY WAR COLLEGE ROUNDTABLE ON THE NEW(?) NATIONAL SECURITY STRATEGY
34:29
This [National Security Strategy] sort of fits the mold, in that it is strong on ends, aspirations, and vision, but vague on ways. In this podcast, four members of the U.S. Army War College engage in dialogue about the Trump Administration's National Security Strategy (NSS), released in December 2017. Beyond focusing on the content of the strategy itself, they look at it through a historical lens. What is new and what is unchanged from previous strategies may be surprising.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-011-NSS-roundtable-Final.mp3   You can also download the podcast here.   Mark Duckenfield is Chair of the Department of National Security Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. Richard Lacquement is Dean of the School of Strategic Landpower at the U.S. Army War College. Michelle Ryan is a colonel in the U.S. Army and Director of the National Security Policy Program at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College and WAR ROOM's Podcast Editor. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, and Department of Defense. Photo Credit:  The White House.  
Jan 11, 2018
GEORGE WASHINGTON: THE LESSONS OF FAILURE (GREAT CAPTAINS)
32:23
Washington [will] realize early on that he is playing a losing hand and has to change how he plays that hand. This inaugural episode of the Great Captains series focuses on George Washington from his early career aspirations as a colonel in the British (!) Army to leadership of the American Revolution. Throughout, Washington's ability to learn from previous failure, understanding of British weaknesses, concern for his troops helped him overcome the uncertainty about the revolution's success. Len Fullenkamp and Andrew A. Hill discuss this compelling but lesser known side of General George Washington. WAR ROOM podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt introduces the episode with a backgrounder on the Great Captains series.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/18-001-Fullenkamp-Hill-GC-Washington.mp3   You may also download the podcast here.   Len Fullenkamp is a military historian and retired Professor of National Security Studies from the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is editor-in-chief of WAR ROOM. The views expressed in this production are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image: George Washington on horseback in snow at Valley Forge. By Percy Moran, 1911. Posts in the "Great Captains" series: KNOWING WHEN A WAR IS UNWINNABLE — GENERAL FREDERICK C. WEYAND (GREAT CAPTAINS)AN UNBEATEN ROMAN GENERAL: SCIPIO AFRICANUS (GREAT CAPTAINS)KNOW THY ENEMY: OSAMA BIN LADEN & RISE OF THE NON-STATE ACTOR (GREAT CAPTAINS)GEORGE C. MARSHALL & LEADING THE NATIONAL WAR EFFORT (GREAT CAPTAINS)THE PARTNERSHIP OF ROBERT E. LEE AND STONEWALL JACKSON (GREAT CAPTAINS)HANNIBAL AND THE MARCH THROUGH THE ALPS (GREAT CAPTAINS)WILLIAM T. SHERMAN: THE FIRST ‘MODERN’ GENERAL (GREAT CAPTAINS)GEORGE WASHINGTON: THE LESSONS OF FAILURE (GREAT CAPTAINS)
Jan 03, 2018
OPERATION CHRISTMAS DROP: SPREADING CHEER ACROSS THE PACIFIC
16:12
[Operation Christmas Drop] says a great thing about the ability to train and operate in the real world environment. ... The humanitarian mission has always been a part of the military. Sometimes great traditions happen by accident or circumstance. Spur of the moment actions by an aircrew in 1952 have grown to become an annual multinational humanitarian assistance event. Operation Christmas Drop is a airdrop mission conducted each December to deliver supplies to citizens of remote Pacific Islands. In this podcast, U.S. Air Force officer Buck Haberichter tells the history and significance of the mission, along with his own personal experiences. War Room podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   Buck Haberichter is a colonel in the U.S. Air Force and a faculty instructor at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is a professor of strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, or the Department of Defense. Photo Description: A C-130 Hercules from Yokota Air Base, Japan, drops a low-cost, low-altitude bundle over the Federated States of Micronesia during Operation Christmas Drop Dec.13, 2015. Operation Christmas Drop is the Department of Defense`s longest running humanitarian mission covering 56 remote islands in Micronesia. Photo Credit:  U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Melissa K. Mekpongsatorn
Dec 21, 2017
RECEIPT: BOMB, ATOMIC, 1 EACH (DUSTY SHELVES)
15:20
This is a hand receipt unlike any other. … Imagine instead of signing for an office key or a computer, … you’ve just taken responsibility for the first atomic weapon. Military historian Con Crane tells the story behind an unusual hand receipt, showing the transfer of responsibility of the components of the ‘Little Boy’ atomic weapon to Thomas Ferrell, Deputy Director of the Manhattan Project. Mr. Ferrell kept the receipt in his wallet for the rest of his life, and it eventually came into possession of the Army Heritage and Education Center. A fascinating story of bureaucracy at work! War Room podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/17-102-Crane-Whitt-Atomic-Bomb-Hand-Receipt-RLS.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here. Below is a graphic of the hand-receipt.   Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center and associated editor of War Room. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in the podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo: Photograph of a mock-up of the Little Boy nuclear weapon dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, in August 1945.  Photo Credit: U.S. National Archives. Posts in the "Dusty Shelves" series: BOOK LOVERS NEED APPLY: A DUSTY SHELVES PODCASTHOW A HOMING PIGEON SAVED THE LOST BATTALION OF WORLD WAR I (DUSTY SHELVES)COOK’S ‘MIDNIGHT DRAWINGS’ AND THEIR HAUNTING VIEWS OF WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)BUILDING THE CONTINENTAL ARMY: VON STEUBEN’S “BLUE BOOK” (DUSTY SHELVES)RECEIPT: BOMB, ATOMIC, 1 EACH (DUSTY SHELVES)NSC-68: THE POLICY DOCUMENT THAT SHAPED THE COLD WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)RIDGWAY’S MEMO: “WHY WE ARE HERE” (DUSTY SHELVES)
Dec 19, 2017
HOW STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE HAS CHANGED SINCE 9/11
24:01
[9/11] was a mixture of the intensity of doing my job with the surreal. Strategic intelligence plays a vital role in the national security policy arena, but it is not well-understood because of its secret nature and the tendency for both policymakers and the public to pay attention to it generally only after a crisis has occurred. The terrorist attacks of 9/11 signaled a major shift in the way strategic intelligence functions within the U.S. This podcast presents an insider’s view of this evolution. War Room welcomes special guest Michael Morell, former Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 2010-2013, culminating a thirty-three year career in the agency. This included being with President George W. Bush during 9/11 and witnessing the deliberations of key strategic decisions that followed. Dr. Genevieve Lester, the War College’s De Serio Chair of Strategic Intelligence, moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/17-110-Morell-Lester-War-on-Terror-RLS.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here.     Michael Morell is former Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 2010-2013. Genevieve Lester is the De Serio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
Dec 15, 2017
NSC-68: THE POLICY DOCUMENT THAT SHAPED THE COLD WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)
24:54
[PRESIDENT TRUMAN] WAS INTERESTED IN TAKING A LOOK AT AMERICA'S POSITION IN THE WORLD. In 1950, competition between the U.S. and its Allies and the Soviet Union was growing in intensity. Concerned over debt and seeming fragility of post-World War II peace, President Truman felt was time to re-examine “our objectives in peace and war and the effect of these objectives on our strategic plans.” The resulting document, National Security Council Report no. 68, would become the foundation of national security policy through the Cold War. Dr. Tami Davis Biddle examines the policy and the individuals responsible for its preparation, particularly Paul Nitze and George Kennan. She also discusses NSC 68 as an example of grand strategy and why it is so difficult to craft such a powerful and broad national security policy today. War Room podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/17-105-Biddle-Whitt-NSC-68-RLS.mp3   You can also download a copy of the podcast here.   Tami Davis Biddle is Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy and the U.S. Army War College and War Room's podcast editor. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Image composed by Tom Galvin. Eagle photo from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, cover of NSC 68 from the Truman Presidential Archives. Posts in the "Dusty Shelves" series: BOOK LOVERS NEED APPLY: A DUSTY SHELVES PODCASTHOW A HOMING PIGEON SAVED THE LOST BATTALION OF WORLD WAR I (DUSTY SHELVES)COOK’S ‘MIDNIGHT DRAWINGS’ AND THEIR HAUNTING VIEWS OF WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)BUILDING THE CONTINENTAL ARMY: VON STEUBEN’S “BLUE BOOK” (DUSTY SHELVES)RECEIPT: BOMB, ATOMIC, 1 EACH (DUSTY SHELVES)NSC-68: THE POLICY DOCUMENT THAT SHAPED THE COLD WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)RIDGWAY’S MEMO: “WHY WE ARE HERE” (DUSTY SHELVES)  
Dec 08, 2017
WHY IS THE VIETNAM WAR EXPERIENCE STILL RELEVANT?
27:35
The success of the Fifties was giving away to the uncertainty of the Sixties, and we were fighting a war that frankly was a peripheral event. The 2017 release of a television series on Vietnam War from director Ken Burns has renewed interest and controversy surrounding the purpose of the war and its effects. In this podcast, military historian, retired U.S. Army War College professor, and Vietnam veteran Len Fullenkamp presents his perspective on why the U.S. became involved. He also discusses the social and political change that happened at the same time, and how institutions such as education and political structures changed as a result. What does the Vietnam experience teach us about matters of national security policy today? What should military leaders learn from Vietnam so they may better render best military advice to their civilian overseers? Len Fullenkamp is a military historian and retired Professor of National Security Studies from the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is editor-in-chief of War Room. The views expressed in this production are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo: American youths stage a rally 30 November 1965 in front of the White House in Washington, D.C. protesting United States military involvement in the Vietnam war. Photo Credit: AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Dec 05, 2017
WHY AN AIR FORCE? TOWARD NEW THINKING ON SERVICE ARCHITECTURE
26:51
When the military is pressed into offering solutions, one of the things that comes out of the tool kit is airpower, because we have an entire bureaucracy dedicated to airpower. War Room welcomes Dr. Rob Farley, author of Grounded: The Case for Abolishing the United States Air Force, to discuss and critique the National Security Act of 1947 which included the establishment of an independent Air Force. Was it wise to separate the Air Force from the Army and pursue an unrealized promise of airpower solving national security problems on its own? Is the interservice rivalry that followed more destructive than helpful – and did the Goldwater-Nichols Act do enough to mitigate it? What can one learn from the establishment of an independent air force when considering new or emerging domains such as space or cyber? These and other questions are debated under the moderation of Dr. Mark Duckenfield, Chair of the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/Box_17-108-Why-Have-an-Air-Force.mp3   You may download the podcast here.   Rob Farley is an assistant professor at the Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce at the University of Kentucky. Mark Duckenfield is the Chair of the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo credit: Cecilio Ricardo/U.S. Air Force
Nov 28, 2017
LEARNING STRATEGY BY WALKING THE GROUND
22:24
It’s not that we learn from the past, it’s that we use the past to better understand our present. In this podcast, military historian Len Fullenkamp reflects on the importance of immersing oneself in the minds of strategic leaders facing dynamic and complex situations. One tool is the staff ride, an opportunity to walk a battlefield and understand the strategic perspective of the leaders prosecuting a campaign. What was the decision made then and what can it teach us about strategic decisions now?   Len Fullenkamp is a military historian and retired Professor of National Security Studies from the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is editor-in-chief of War Room. The views expressed in this production are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo Credit:  Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images
Nov 21, 2017
U.S. INTERESTS IN ITS GEOGRAPHIC PERIMETER, PAST & PRESENT
20:12
Down south, one or two degrees of temperature doesn’t mean anything, but in the High North it means the ice freezing or starting to melt, and that’s a real problem for a lot of people. The Arctic may be a very cold region, but in matters of national security today it is a hot topic. War Room welcomes guest podcaster Dr. Dawn Berry, a renowned expert in the Arctic region. She presents the geographic perimeter of U.S. security interests from the late 19th to early 20th century, which includes far-flung and diverse locations such as Greenland and the Virgin Islands. Presently, both get a lot of attention due to their historical strategic importance, such as Greenland's special minerals and Virgin Islands' proximity. How important is this region to U.S. interests today? War Room podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates.   https://warroom.armywarcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/Box_17-103-Security-Interests-in-the-Arctic.mp3   You can also download the podcast here.   Dr. Dawn Alexandrea Berry is a Diplomatic historian whose work examines U.S. foreign policy in the Polar Regions, and other remote spaces, in moments of global crisis and War. She previously held positions at Cornell University, and the University of Oxford. Jacqueline E. Whitt is professor of strategy at the U.S. War College and podcast editor for War Room. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Photo: Russian tanker Renda powers toward Nome, Alaska with the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy's assistance in the Bering Sea. Photo Credit:  Sara Francis/U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images
Nov 15, 2017
GROWING AFRICAN PEACEKEEPING CAPACITY
14:50
War Room welcomes our distinguished guest, Brigadier General Emmaneul Kotia, Deputy Commandant of the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC) in Ghana. BG Kotia stopped by while visiting War Colleges in the U.S. to discuss opportunities for further collaboration in peace operations and training. In this podcast, BG Kotia explains the roles and offerings from the KAIPTC and addresses the complexity of peace operations in Africa, such as the high number of disparate factions usually involved in conflicts and the challenge of brokering peace agreements so the peacekeepers can operate under clear guidance and rules of engagements. Brian Foster from the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute moderates. Take [Central African Republic, Somalia, AND Liberia] during the first conflict where America intervened. These are examples of where there have been no peace agreement. …  The missions and the responsibilities and the types of peacekeepers keep changing.   Emmanuel Kotia is the Deputy Commandant of the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Center in Ghana. Brian Foster is a colonel in the U.S. Army and a member of the U.S. Army War College’s Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo: A military trainer from the French 13th Half-Brigade conducts a joint training session with Ugandan troops at Singo military base outside Kampala. Photo Credit: BEN SIMON/AFP/Getty Images
Nov 03, 2017
RIDGWAY’S MEMO: “WHY WE ARE HERE” (DUSTY SHELVES)
15:42
Lieutenant General Matthew B. Ridgway assumed command of Eighth U.S. Army after it had been driven south in the early phases of the Korean War. Faced with a broken and dispirited force, Ridgway had to turn the situation around quickly. His memorandum of January 1951, “Why We Are Here,” was a message to the troops about what was at stake, and embodied his belief in the cause and faith in the fighting spirit of the force. In six months, a rejuvenated Eighth U.S. Army had driven the Chinese north of the 38th parallel. It is one of the great stories of U.S. military history. This inaugural episode of the Dusty Shelves series, Army historian Con Crane and War Room podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt present the memorandum and the story of Lieutenant General Ridgway. The memorandum, displayed and transcribed below, comes from the collection of Ridgway’s papers available at the Army Heritage and Education Center. It is an example of transformational leadership at the tactical, operational, and strategic level that has a major impact on a major conflict. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE "DUSTY SHELVES" SERIES Con Crane is a military historian with the Army Heritage and Education Center and associated editor of War Room. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in the podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo: American General Matthew Ridgway commanding the 8th Army talks to US officers before his departure to the Korean front line 05 January 1951 in Seoul. Photo Credit: AFP/Getty Images   Posts in the "Dusty Shelves" series: BOOK LOVERS NEED APPLY: A DUSTY SHELVES PODCASTHOW A HOMING PIGEON SAVED THE LOST BATTALION OF WORLD WAR I (DUSTY SHELVES)COOK’S ‘MIDNIGHT DRAWINGS’ AND THEIR HAUNTING VIEWS OF WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)BUILDING THE CONTINENTAL ARMY: VON STEUBEN’S “BLUE BOOK” (DUSTY SHELVES)RECEIPT: BOMB, ATOMIC, 1 EACH (DUSTY SHELVES)NSC-68: THE POLICY DOCUMENT THAT SHAPED THE COLD WAR (DUSTY SHELVES)
Oct 27, 2017
PROTECTING HUMAN DIGNITY IN WAR: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
26:27
War Room welcomes special guest Martin Lacourt, the senior armed forces delegate to the International Committee for the Red Cross (ICRC) regional delegation to the US and Canada. In addition to discussing the role the ICRC plays in monitoring conflict and protecting human rights and dignity during war, M. Lacourt also discusses the relationship that the ICRC has had with the U.S. military, a relationship that has grown since the turn of the 21st Century. He discusses the urgency of keeping the laws of warfare current and relevant in today’s dynamic and increasingly dangerous world, and offers advice for strategic leaders on how to properly engage with international actors. War Room associate editor Ryan McCannell moderates. Most of the time, law [of warfare] is one war or two wars late. … [The] law should evolve if it is clear that it is not enough.   Martin Lacourt is the senior armed forces delegate to the International Committee for the Red Cross regional delegation to the US and Canada. Ryan McCannell is the senior advisor of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, the ICRC, or the U.S. Department of Defense. Photo: Syrians unload boxes from a lorry after an aid convoy of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent entered the rebel-held town of Rastan, in central Homs province, on November 22, 2016. Photo Credit: MAHMOUD TAHA/AFP/Getty Images
Oct 11, 2017
CAN SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES DO ‘EVERYTHING’? DISPELLING THE MYTH
20:51
Josh Kennedy and Buck Haberichter the popular but wrong perception that special operations forces are capable of resolving all national security dilemmas without the need for conventional forces. The elite selection process, specialized training, and long history of success are what make special operations forces ‘special.’ But, as the podcasters explain, they are neither superhuman nor endowed with magical powers. Yet they are often treated that way, viewed as a simple and cheap solution to the thorny problems of the world. Listen in as the podcasters discuss the effects this misperception has on strategic decisionmaking, resourcing, and civil-military relations. Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates. Most special operations go through some sort of elite assessment and selection program. … So to most people on the outside believe that [special operators] are some kind of superhero and their abilities are [EXCEPTIONAL].   Josh Kennedy is a lieutenant colonel in the Army and a faculty instructor at the U.S. Army War College. Buck Haberichter is a colonel in the U.S. Air Force and a faculty instructor at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is a professor of strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, or the Department of Defense. Photo: A member of the Afghan Air Force 777 Special Mission Wing looks out of an MI-17 helicopter during a training mission on September 13, 2017 outside of Kabul, Afghanistan. Photo Credit: Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images
Oct 06, 2017
ON BEING A ‘DIFFERENT’ KIND OF COMMAND — AFRICOM AT 10 YEARS (PART 2)
29:03
In this War Room podcast, Ambassador Alexander M. Laskaris, current civilian deputy to the commander, reflects on the uniqueness of the command and growing importance of interagency cooperation, a hallmark of AFRICOM’s first decade.  Along with reflections on strategic leadership, Ambassador Laskaris discusses the challenges of AFRICOM’s identity between being a 'hard power' warfighting command and a 'soft power' organization focused on preventing war and building security capacity. War Room associate editor Ryan McCannell hosts. AFRICOM was never conceived to be a warfighting command. It was conceived to be a soft-power hybrid command. Then history intervened and the Libya situation came about. Every day I see this dramatic tension played out – ‘Are we soft-power based or a warfighting command? And the answer is ‘yes’! Alexander M. Laskaris is Deputy to the Commander for Civil-Military Relations at U.S. Africa Command. Ryan McCannell is the U.S. Agency for International Development’s senior advisor to the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, U.S. Africa Command, Department of Defense, or Department of State. Photo: Djibouti Armed Forces Lt. Idriss Abdallah Daoud prepares to hand launch  a RQ-11 Raven remotely piloted aircraft during a demonstration in an airfield in southern Djibouti, August 21, 2017. U.S. Army Soldiers of the 1st Battalion, 153rd Infantry Regiment, Task Force Warrior, as associated unit of Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa, gave the demonstrtation in an effort to help the Djoboutian Armed Forces determine if the Raven might be beneficial in helping to maintain stability and security in and around Djibouti. Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Eboni Prince.   Posts in the "Anniversaries" series: THE TET OFFENSIVE: 50 YEARS LATEREXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARYREFLECTIONS ON THE HUE CITY MASSACREREMEMBERING THE BATTLE OF THE BULGELOOKING TO THE PAST TO CHANGE THE FUTUREEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: DESEGREGATING THE ARMED FORCESEXECUTIVE ORDER 9981 AT 70: WHAT INTEGRATION MEANS FOR TODAY’S MILITARY
Sep 28, 2017
MAHAN AND SEA POWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 4)
16:14
In this fourth episode of War Room’s special series on Great Strategists, Patrick Bratton explores Alfred Thayer Mahan's The Influence of Seapower upon History and its relevance to the 21st century. Writing at the turn of the 20th century, Mahan was explicitly thinking about the role of sea power for the United States as it emerged onto the world stage, and his ideas, though very influential at the time, have fallen somewhat out of favor in more recent thinking about sea power. Mahan's emphasis on big fleets and decisive battles have led some to dismiss Mahan as hopelessly out of date, but Mahan was also writing about broader political questions about the maritime domain. And in the 21st century, rising powers, particularly in Asia, are reading Mahan quite seriously, so it remains a text worth reading and exploring seriously. War Room podcast editor Jacqueline E. Whitt moderates. There [are] a lot of preconceived notions about Mahan. . . I got it. Big fleet. Big guns. Big battleship. World War II proved him wrong. Moving on! There's a . . . way of dismissing Mahan and a lot of his more interesting aspects to his writing. Patrick Bratton is Associate Professor of Strategy and National Security at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline Whitt is Associate Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in the podcast are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Image: The Battle of Trafalgar by William Clarkson Stanfield. Image Credit: Clarkson Frederick Stanfield [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons   Posts in the "Great Strategists" series: ON CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ – GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 1)SUN TZU AND THE ART OF WAR — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 2)KAUTILYA, THE ARTHASHASTRA, AND ANCIENT REALISM — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 3)THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTSJOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
Sep 15, 2017
THINKING CRITICALLY ABOUT CRITICAL THINKING
31:49
In this War Room podcast, War Room Editor-in-Chief Andrew Hill sits down with Professor of Behavioral Sciences Steve Gerras to discuss critical thinking, a key skill that senior leaders should develop. Gerras argues that it is, indeed, possible to improve one’s ability to think with training and practice—even while recognizing that doing so can be counterintuitive, unappreciated, and difficult. Gerras and Hill discuss the problems of confirmation bias, fake news, and clarified concern, and how we can learn to combat these problems by seeking out disconfirming information, using Wikipedia and the Internet to our advantage, and thinking more deeply about problem design and construction. In a hierarchical organization like the military…we have a hard time having very honest discussions. We don’t want to be politically incorrect. We don’t want to offend people…So we will address problems. Or say something is the concern. When in fact, the real concern is three root causes to the left, and we won’t even have that conversation. Stephen Gerras is Professor of Behavioral Science at the U.S. Army War College. Andrew A. Hill is the Editor-in-Chief of War Room and Chair of Strategic Leadership at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the podcasters and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo Credit:  General Photographic Agency / Hulton Archive / Stringer / Getty Images
Sep 08, 2017
KAUTILYA, THE ARTHASHASTRA, AND ANCIENT REALISM — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 3)
26:38
In this third episode of War Room’s special series on Great Strategists, Larry Goodson presents the writings of Kautilya, who is lesser known to military audiences that Clausewitz or Sun Tzu. As counsel to a young emporer in 4th century BCE India, Kautilya developed and published the earliest known works explaining the international relations philosophy known today as realism. ‘Conquer or be conquered’ and ‘the friend of my enemy is my enemy’ are among the teachings originating from the Arthashastra, a collection of 14 books that covered matters of both military and civilian governance. [Kautilya] is considered the first great political realist. Most international relations scholars treat [his Arthashastra] as a treatise of unvarnished realism.   Larry Goodson is Professor of Middle East Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in the podcast are those of the podcasters and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or the Department of Defense. Photo credit:  NARINDER NANU/AFP/Getty Images Posts in the "Great Strategists" series: ON CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ – GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 1)SUN TZU AND THE ART OF WAR — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 2)MAHAN AND SEA POWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 4)THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTSJOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
Sep 01, 2017
SUN TZU AND THE ART OF WAR — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 2)
11:42
In “Sun Tzu and the Art of War,” Paul Kan explains the impacts of Sun Tzu’s famed treatise on war. Although little is known about Sun Tzu, The Art of War has been applied to many contemporary contexts from sports to relationships. Military educators often align this book with unconventional war in contrast to the supposed conventional war teachings of Carl von Clausewitz. The podcasts explore the impacts of the book and compare it to those of other Chinese philosophies of the time. You have Sun Tzu saying, 'This is kind of the environment in which we live. It's bloodier; it's more warlike, so you probably can't be more peaceful. You probably can't re-establish the old order. So maybe we can just make warfare less bloody and have it end more quickly.'   Paul Kan is Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. Jacqueline E. Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are of the podcasters and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army, U.S. Army War College, or the Department of Defense. Photo credit:  STR/AFP/Getty Images   Posts in the "Great Strategists" series: ON CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ – GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 1)KAUTILYA, THE ARTHASHASTRA, AND ANCIENT REALISM — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 3)MAHAN AND SEA POWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 4)THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTSJOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
Aug 29, 2017
ON CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ – GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 1)
20:32
This podcast is the first episode of a War Room special series featuring some of history’s greatest strategists. Featured is Carl von Clausewitz, famed for his book On War (Vom Kriege) which is a staple of professional military education in the U.S. and many partner nations. This is remarkable given that the original text of On War is an unfinished manuscript published posthumously by his wife Marie. Clausewitz scholar Vanya Eftimova Bellinger and War Room podcast editor Jacqueline Whitt explore the book’s major theses and implications they present for modern scholars and practitioners of strategy. This is the biggest idea. . . . There is no cookbook [of] how to wage war. There is no formula, people. There is no secret out there. Clausewitz believed that war is such a complex activity, shaped by its own time and circumstances, depending on a thousand little details, which can go wrong. And also on individuals, who can also act irrationally. Vanya Eftimova Bellinger is Professor of Clausewitz Studies at the U.S. Army War College and Jacqueline Whitt is Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army War College, U.S. Army, or Department of Defense. Featured Image: 1807, Friedland by Ernst Meissonier (French, Lyons 1815-1891 Paris) Image Credit:  Gift of Henry Hilton, 1887 / Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (public domain)   Posts in the "Great Strategists" series: SUN TZU AND THE ART OF WAR — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 2)KAUTILYA, THE ARTHASHASTRA, AND ANCIENT REALISM — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 3)MAHAN AND SEA POWER — GREAT STRATEGISTS (EPISODE 4)THREE PIONEERS OF AIRPOWER — GREAT STRATEGISTSJOHN BOYD AND THE “OODA” LOOP (GREAT STRATEGISTS)JOHN WARDEN AND THE ENEMY AS A SYSTEM (GREAT STRATEGISTS)BEYOND THUCYDIDES: HERODOTUS, XENOPHON & UNDERSTANDING WAR (GREAT STRATEGISTS)THE NATURE AND CHARACTER OF WAR — THUCYDIDES (GREAT STRATEGISTS)A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO WAR? ANTOINE-HENRI JOMINI (GREAT STRATEGISTS)
Aug 22, 2017
CHRONOS, KAIROS, AND THE USE OF TIME IN STRATEGY
21:46
In this War Room podcast, “Time as a Dimension of Strategy,” Joe Brooks and Doug Douds take a critical look at concepts that may too often be taken for granted in strategy – time and space. Drawing from philosophy, political science, and culture, the podcasters discuss a range of perspective on how time and space have defined and measured throughout history. How do our understandings of time shape our strategy? And how do we develop strategies that shape an environment occupied by those whose perspectives on time differ? America has been very good at accelerating conflict. We have the technology, we have the means, and we have the strategy … but a lot of times, you may look at it and wonder if our opponents are playing a longer game. Joe Brooks is a civilian employee of the Department of Defense, and a graduate of the U.S. Army War College class of 2017. Doug Douds is a colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps and a faculty member of the U.S. Army War College. The views in this article are the author’s and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army or U.S. Government. Photo credit:  Detail of portable horizontal nocturnal sundial and altitude sundial, Gift of Mrs. Stephen D. Tucker, 1903 / Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Aug 10, 2017
WHY WAR COLLEGES?
19:23
In this War Room Podcast, “Why War Colleges?” Andrew A. Hill interviews the 50th Commandant of the U.S. Army College, U.S. Army Major General Bill Rapp to discuss the history, roles, and responsibilities of war colleges to develop future strategic leaders, both military and civilian, and to develop ideas that address current and future needs of the defense enterprise. They explore why the Army’s performance during the Spanish-American War necessitated the Army War College’s founding, and how it has evolved in the century since. IT IS LEADERS AND IDEAS THAT MAKE THE WAR COLLEGES, ESPECIALLY TODAY, NECESSARY AND VITAL Bill Rapp is a major general in the U.S. Army and the 50th Commandant of the U.S. Army War College.  Andrew A. Hill is editor-in-chief of War Room. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Army or the U.S. Government.  Photo:  Left -- Close-up of U.S. Army War College resident class of 1952. Right -- Close-up of U.S. Army War College resident class of 2017. Photo credit:  U.S. Army War College
Jul 27, 2017
LOOKING BACK AT THE 1988 NATIONAL SECURITY STRATEGY: WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED?
29:18
Don Snider reflects on his experiences in the drafting of the 1988 National Security Strategy (NSS) and what purpose that document serves. With Matt Scalia interviewing, Don describes the political context within which the NSS was written and the five audiences that the NSS must serve. He also discusses the challenges facing new Administrations in building political consensus and forging strategies that reflect the preferred agenda of the President. [The National Security Strategy] is not really a strategy document. When everything is said and done, the National Security Strategy ... is a political document of the first order. ... Every Administration has to create political consensus internally and that’s what this document does.   Don Snider is a professor emeritus with the U.S. Army War College. Matt Scalia is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College resident class of 2017.  The views expressed in this podcast are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Army or the U.S. Government. Photo Credit:  Michael Evans/The White House/Getty Images
Jul 05, 2017
CHINA’S BELT AND ROAD INITIATIVE & IMPLICATIONS FOR THE U.S.: A PODCAST
16:59
In 2013, Chinese President Xi Jinping announced the “One Belt, One Road” strategy as a national effort ostensibly to improve the economic integration and regional security of the Eurasian landmass. Also known as the “Belt and Road Initiative,” the strategy emphasizes development projects within underdeveloped east European and Asian nations. However, critics question both the motivations of the Chinese and the potentially low returns on investment. So why are the Chinese pursuing this? Join the podcast as Rakesh Kapoor and Paul Kan explore this question. Economic integration … and security for the whole region … is the articulated Chinese representation of the Belt Road Initiative, but is that really true? Rakesh Kapoor is a brigadier general in the Indian Army. Paul Kan is a faculty member of the U.S. Army War College.  The views expressed in this podcast are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Army, the Indian Army, the Indian Government, or the U.S. Government. Photo Credit: Mark Schiefelbein-Pool/Getty Images
Jun 14, 2017
RETHINKING STRATEGIES FOR DEFENSE MODERNIZATION: A PODCAST
23:49
The defense acquisition system has been the subject of much controversy and criticism. From the “Sisyphus Paradox” to more recent studies on defense acquisition reform, critics have complained about the process of acquisition being too slow and cumbersome. But far less attention has been given to the strategy of acquisition. How should defense leaders make investment choices that address shorter-term needs while preserving long-term opportunities? Mark Kappelmann and Andrew Hill provide analysis and offer ideas and recommendations in this War Room Podcast. Watch Colonel Mark Kappelmann in a panel discussion on military innovation at the Center for New American Security. We haven’t been able to buy everything we want, even during the Reagan build-up era. … If we look at a strategy for force modernization, [what would it be]? Mark Kappelmann is a Colonel in the U.S. Army and a member of the U.S. Army War College class of 2017. Andrew Hill is a Professor at the U.S. Army War College. The views in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army or the U.S. Government. Photo Credit:  Jordan Pix / Getty Images
May 31, 2017
FOREIGN FIGHTERS IN THE CARIBBEAN: A PODCAST
17:11
In this War Room Podcast, Jamaican Defense Force Colonel Jaimie Ogilvie discusses with U.S. Army War College faculty member Dr. Paul Kan the challenges of foreign fighters operating within the Caribbean, the “third border” of the U.S. as named by former President G. W. Bush. By foreign fighters, Colonel Ogilvie refers to the David Malet's definition from his book Foreign Fighters: Transnational Identity in Civic Conflicts, "a non-citizen of a state experiencing civil conflict or arrives from another state to join a civil insurgency." This definition differs from more common usage which treats foreign fighters as a type of terrorist. They explore the broad range of reasons why individuals become foreign fighters; the impact of foreign fighters on the economically fragile states in the Caribbean, particularly on tourism; and the potential expansion of violent extremist organizations into the region. They also discuss why the U.S. should be concerned about the presence and activities of foreign fighters so close to its homeland, and that the U.S. should assist its Caribbean partners as many lack the resources to deal with the problem themselves. Colonel Ogilvie is Jamaican’s first officer to attend the U.S. Army War College, and the podcast is based on his strategy research project in satisfaction of resident program requirements.  Each year, the U.S. Army War College resident class includes over 75 international officers from 70 different partner nations all over the globe. If the Caribbean as a region that is so well known for its sun, sea, and sand … suddenly becomes ‘ground zero’ for terrorist activities or even violent crime … it’s going to have a huge impact, not just within the Caribbean but also with our neighbors and the United States. Jaimie Ogilvie is a colonel in the Jamaica Defense Force. Dr. Paul Kan is a Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College. The views expressed in this podcast are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Army, the Jamaica Defense Force, the Jamaican Government, or the U.S. Government. Photo Credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images. Police and pedestrians help a man wounded 11 July 2005 after an explosive artifact exploded in a busy shopping district in downtown Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, wounding 13 people.
May 17, 2017