Marketplace Morning Report

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Subscribers: 1175
Reviews: 2

tanner
 May 29, 2020
I love this program so much, great reporting

John
 Oct 1, 2019
Doesn't post early enough to be useful. Usually half the cast is not news.

Description

In less than 10 minutes, we’ll get you up to speed on all the news you missed overnight. Throughout the morning, Marketplace’s David Brancaccio will bring you the latest business and economic stories you need to know to start your day. And before U.S. markets open, you’ll get a global markets update from the BBC World Service in London. 

Episode Date
Is your employer observing Juneteenth?
00:08:15

Juneteenth, commemorating the end of slavery, is now a federal holiday. Many federal workers get the day off today, but what about private employers? Plus, the first test voyages for cruise ship operators hoping to set sail again. And, reporting from The New York Times sheds light on human resources dysfunction at Amazon, including a pattern of mistaken worker terminations during the pandemic.

Jun 18, 2021
All of the workers who leave Amazon
00:08:09

According to reporting by The New York Times, attrition at Amazon warehouses is much higher than is typical in the warehousing and retail industry. Among the questions: Is all that leaving seen as a bug or a feature? We speak with the Times reporters who took a closer look at the Amazon customers don’t see. And, the Supreme Court yesterday ruled in favor of a Catholic foster care agency that says its religious views prevent it from working with same-sex couples. The high court ruled that city of Philadelphia violated the First Amendment rights of Catholic Social Services when it stopped working with the agency. How will this ruling affect other organizations?

Jun 18, 2021
Doggy day care is booming as people return to offices
00:07:23

From the BBC World Service: That’s because millions of people bought pets when COVID struck and many workers were instructed to work from home. But who will look after our furry friends now? Plus, commodity prices slide after a strong year as the U.S. and countries across Europe continue to lift COVID restrictions. And, promoters in England continue trials for how to run an outdoor music festival during a pandemic.

Jun 18, 2021
When prison records stand in the way of getting work
00:09:49

Despite work experience and training for people who are incarcerated, many worry about finding employment once they get out. What, then, does rehabilitation mean? Plus, in a trend reversal, more people, not fewer, signed up for unemployment benefits last week. Also, support in the Senate continues to build for a bipartisan plan to fix infrastructure. And, why we’ve seen so many IPOs so far this year.

Jun 17, 2021
The central role of prisons in the U.S. economy
00:08:36

In June, our documentary film selection for the “Econ Extra Credit” series is “The Prison in Twelve Landscapes.” It takes the approach of “visual poetry” to look at the culture of incarceration in the U.S. from many angles — all of them personal, many of them economic. Also, the news out of the Federal Reserve yesterday is that interest rates, steady for now, will likely start rising sooner than policymakers thought.

Jun 17, 2021
U.K. scouts can now earn a badge for money skills
00:08:04

From the BBC World Service: Scouts in the U.K. introduce the organization’s first financial literacy skills badge. Plus, 500 police officers raided the offices of the pro-democracy Apple Daily newspaper alleging its reporting breaches a national security law. The paper’s editor-in-chief and other senior bosses were arrested at their homes. And, the World Bank says it won’t help El Salvador implement Bitcoin as a form of legal tender.

Jun 17, 2021
Yep, there’s a market for used plants, too
00:10:14

And we’ve got the story of one French landscape gardener who saves and sells abandoned plants. Plus, have lumber prices hit their peak? Also, awaiting new analysis from the Federal Reserve on economic recovery, inflation and interest rates. And, the U.S. and EU set aside disputes over aircraft subsidies for now to focus their attention on China.

Jun 16, 2021
Why the Fed wants to keep its policies in pandemic mode
00:08:44

The Federal Reserve is not expected to raise interest rates. But it turns out some of the Fed’s peers around the world are starting to put away their pandemic relief tools. Also, a major heat wave hitting the West and Southwest means the air conditioners are on and the power grids are stressed. And, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un says the food situation there is difficult and that shortages are possible.

Jun 16, 2021
The EU is starting to roll out its COVID recovery funds
00:08:24

From the BBC World Service: Spain is set to be one of the biggest beneficiaries from European Union funding, and it’s planning labor reforms to tackle the seasonal nature of its tourism sector. Plus, digital sex crimes in South Korea have increased along with advances in spy camera technology. And, despite being Africa’s most powerful economy, Nigeria has many firms that struggle to access a regular electricity supply.

Jun 16, 2021
Why Americans are driving older cars
00:08:59

If it hasn’t rusted through, has good tires and an airbag, why trade? The quality of cars these days and, yes, the pandemic, have something to do with an aging car fleet in the U.S. Plus, more data on increasing prices equals more anticipation for what the Federal Reserve will say about its forecasts for interest rates. And, the systemic failure to equitably invest in Black entrepreneurs in the U.S., how that’s changing and whether the wave of commitments by corporations and venture capitalists over the last year represents a temporary blip or a lasting shift in how money is allocated.

Jun 15, 2021
Who decides if a newly reopened workplace is safe?
00:08:55

One answer is giving rank-and-file employees, those not in management roles, a strong voice at the table. New York’s “Hero ACT” requires just that. It will require companies with more than 10 employees to implement a series of safety protocols to help prevent transmission of airborne diseases. Plus, today is the day California ends most of its pandemic restrictions. And, a report this week from the New York Federal Reserve found that people are finding it easier to obtain credit now compared with a year ago.

Jun 15, 2021
The U.K.’s first bespoke trade deal since Brexit includes Australian beef
00:07:59

From the BBC World Service: People in Britain will be able to buy tariff-free beef from Australia, though farmers in the U.K. are worried about being undercut on price. Plus, India faces protests against the dominance of e-commerce giants like Amazon and Walmart-backed Flipkart. And, research is underway in New Zealand to see if protective masks and gowns can be decontaminated and used again.

Jun 15, 2021
Where people moved to and from during 2020
00:09:53

There’s new data on the changing views of where people want to live and work, given the experience of the pandemic year. The trends are those we’ve heard anecdotally: smaller cities, bigger houses. Plus, preparing for the Fed meeting on policy and interest rates this week. And, the latest in our “Vanishing America” series: fabric stores going out of business.

Jun 14, 2021
In some states, it’s the 1st week without an extra $300 in jobless benefits
00:08:22

The benefits expired in Alaska, Iowa, Mississippi and Missouri on Saturday. Will this drive more applicants to jobs that have remained unfilled? We speak with a couple of economists who explain how it’s more complicated than that. Plus, in a closely watched case, a federal judge has ruled that a health care company can order its employees to get COVID vaccinations. And, changing rules for tax-protected retirement accounts.

Jun 14, 2021
A $100 billion G-7 plan to tackle climate change
00:07:40

From the BBC World Service: G-7 leaders say the pledge will offer lower-income countries a new source of infrastructure finance and an alternative to Chinese loans from the “Belt and Road” initiative. Plus, after hosting the G-7 summit, we hear about plans in Cornwall to extract lithium for electric car batteries from underground hot springs. And, WhatsApp says it will resist attempts by governments to weaken end-to-end encryption of messages.

Jun 14, 2021
A different deal on infrastructure takes shape
00:08:11

With the main talks on fixing infrastructure at an impasse, a side group of 10 Democrats and Republicans in the Senate say they’ve come up with a deal, although details are scant and it’s unclear if others key players will embrace this. Plus, among the things that have gotten more expensive over the past year and last several months: food away from home. We look at the rise in restaurant prices. And, decisions from the G-7 summit on getting more vaccine doses to the countries that need them.

Jun 11, 2021
The new, limited OSHA rules for workplace safety
00:08:11

More than a year into the pandemic, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has released emergency standards for the workplace, but they’re only for health care workers. Also, ahead of the G-7 summit, there were reports that President Joe Biden was going to raise concerns about tensions in Northern Ireland in his talks with U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson yesterday. Johnson, speaking with the BBC, said that did not happen. And, new guidelines this week call for banks to take extra care in case cryptocurrency investments go bad.

Jun 11, 2021
G-7 countries to pledge donation of 1 billion COVID vaccine doses
00:06:58

From the BBC World Service: Leaders gathering in Britain for the G-7 summit are expected to pledge the shots for lower-income nations as part of a global push to end the pandemic. Plus, Hong Kong will ban films that violate its national security law, further restricting artistic freedom. And, congestion at Chinese ports due to pandemic lockdowns means warnings of disruption to global shipping routes.

Jun 11, 2021
Keystone XL pipeline project is canceled
00:08:58

The company that was building the Keystone XL oil pipeline has canceled the project. President Joe Biden had already revoked the pipeline’s permit. Plus, G-7 leaders gather for a summit with ambitions to set a new global economic agenda. And, a significant increase in U.S. energy storage abilities and what it means cleaner power in the face of climate change.

Jun 10, 2021
Hybrid work is sticking around
00:08:13

The latest data point when it comes to what the post-pandemic future of work will look like: Facebook is giving more employees the option to keep working remotely, and Mark Zuckerberg said he plans to spend part of his time working remotely well into 2022. We have more on how CEO actions set the tone. Plus, the world’s largest meat processing company paid an $11 million ransom to get control of their systems back. And, an agenda for global economic resilience and restructuring ahead of the G-7 summit featuring President Biden.

Jun 10, 2021
G-7 summit: U.K., U.S. to renew Atlantic Charter
00:08:04

From the BBC World Service: U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and President Joe Biden meet ahead of the G-7 summit in England, planning to unveil a renewed Atlantic Charter focused on trade and travel. Plus, JBS, the world’s biggest meat packing company, paid a ransom of $11 million to put an end to a cyberattack which disrupted its operations in the U.S., Australia and Canada. And, how animation and music production are helping tackle Zimbabwe’s high youth unemployment.

Jun 10, 2021
Spending big to expand government’s role in new tech
00:08:33

That’s what the Senate just held a very bipartisan vote on, passing a bill that aims to boost U.S. semiconductor production and the development of artificial intelligence and other technology in the face of growing international competition, most notably from China. Also, new analysis of Fortune 500 companies finds overall progress on diversifying corporate boards is moving “painfully slow.” We look at the reasons why. And, could the future of the museum be in the form a drive-thru?

Jun 09, 2021
A World Bank warning on wasted potential
00:08:46

The World Bank is warning that the human potential of nearly 2 billion young people could be wasted because they can’t get training to help them recover from the pandemic. Plus, retailers already buying for the 2021 holiday season are facing shortages and delays of computer chips, plastics and more. And, is it wrong that sometimes retail spaces are important to us and we miss them when they’re gone? The latest from our “Vanishing America” series is about a thrift store.

Jun 09, 2021
France welcomes diners indoors again, easing COVID restrictions
00:10:12

From the BBC World Service: Bars, restaurants and gyms in France are allowed to have customers indoors for the first time this year, and some international travel rules have been relaxed. Plus, a post-Brexit row is sizzling between Britain and the EU over transporting sausages and other chilled meat products from mainland Britain into Northern Ireland. And, consumer confidence has returned in China, where livestream selling could grow to more than $250 billion this year.

Jun 09, 2021
Will people return to packed convention centers?
00:08:21

We’ll start getting answers to that question this week from Las Vegas, where the World of Concrete trade show for the construction industry is kicking off. Las Vegas did $11 billion in trade show and convention business back in 2019. Also, the annual price tag on a newly approved drug to treat Alzheimer’s is about $56,000, even as there are lingering questions about the drug’s effectiveness in slowing the progression of disease. And, an update on a proposed law in China seen as a response to U.S. sanctions.

Jun 08, 2021
Reasons to be reluctant to go back to the office
00:08:33

For many Black workers, there are particular concerns about going back to inequitable workplaces. Plus, the U.S. has recovered some of the ransom paid to those who carried out the Colonial Pipeline cyberattack. And, keeping an eye on the price of oil and whether increased demand will push it to $100 per barrel.

Jun 08, 2021
India will roll out free COVID shots for all adults
00:08:49

From the BBC World Service: Following heavy criticism of the slow pace of its inoculation drive, the Indian government has also performed a U-turn and will now run vaccine distribution centrally rather than asking states to coordinate it themselves. Plus, travelers rush back from Portugal as new COVID travel restrictions take hold in Britain. And, the U.K. faces a shortage of truck drivers.

Jun 08, 2021
Challenging the corporate game of HQ chess
00:08:39

If national legislatures approve the new G-7 deal on taxing multinational companies, corporations would have to pay a new global minimum tax no matter where they put their headquarters. So far, this is just a pledge from G-7 countries, though, not a law. Plus, Apple’s developer conference gets underway with data privacy in focus. And, a push to diversify city-appointed boards in Nashville.

Jun 07, 2021
What the G-7 deal means for digital taxes
00:08:40

The world’s biggest economies have agreed on a global minimum corporate tax rate of at least 15%. Part of that agreement concerns how multinational corporations are taxed for selling digital services like advertising around the world. Plus, new data on how many people were forced to retire because of the COVID-19 pandemic and what it could mean for inequality. And, tribal governments prepare for the rollout of more federal COVID relief money.

Jun 07, 2021
El Salvador could become first country to make Bitcoin legal tender
00:07:39

From the BBC World Service: El Salvador could become the world’s first country to adopt the cryptocurrency Bitcoin as legal tender. Plus, Ireland faces the prospect of losing more than $2 billion a year from a proposed global corporation tax agreed to by G-7 nations. And, Thailand is launching a mass vaccination program in a bid to bring back foreign tourists.

Jun 07, 2021
We should not be disappointed in the May hiring numbers
00:10:38

From Christopher Low, chief economist at FHN Financial: “We went into this number with economists expecting 675,000 hires. We got 559,000. I’d say that’s still pretty good.” We unpack more of the data from today’s government report on jobs and unemployment. Plus, the Justice Department is increasing its information-gathering efforts on cyberattacks amid a rise in the frequency and size of ransomware attacks. And, the Biden administration is pushing new incentives for people to get vaccinated. What do we know about how well they work?

Jun 04, 2021
Jane Goodall wins 2021 Templeton Prize
00:07:50

And with it, $1.5 million. The scientist and conservationist says some of the money will go to Roots & Shoots, the youth program Goodall founded in 1991 that encourages students to engage in projects in their own communities that benefit people, animals and the environment. Plus, expected job growth for May, but a mismatch between the jobs that are open and the workers who need jobs. And, how can financial companies and the financial system combat climate change?

Jun 04, 2021
Key EU finance ministers say a new global tax system is “within reach”
00:09:43

From the BBC World Service: Ahead of a G-7 meeting in London, finance chiefs from the European Union’s four largest economies say now is the time to overhaul corporate tax around the world. And, pandemic volunteers in England’s health system have seen a well-being boost that’s equal to getting a $2,500 bonus.

Jun 04, 2021
Is this AMC stock moment GameStop 2.0?
00:10:49

Shares of the movie theater chain nearly doubled in value yesterday, driven in part by stock purchases from retail investors. In a regulatory filing today, AMC warned investors about the risks of buying its shares. We have the latest. Plus, new data that suggests hiring is picking up as spring becomes summer. Also, how delays in manufacturing can affect consumer prices. And, why QR codes at restaurants could be here to stay.

Jun 03, 2021
Chief diversity officers are in demand
00:08:46

Between 2015 and 2020, the number of people with the title “head of diversity” grew 107%, according to LinkedIn data. But they don’t last long: That data shows CDOs stay, on average, just three years. Plus, a global campaign to get vaccine-rich countries to share 1 out of every 5 doses. And, tennis star Naomi Osaka’s decision to withdraw from the French Open is putting renewed focus on mental health and the workplace.

Jun 03, 2021
The Tokyo 2020 chief is 100% certain the Olympics will go ahead
00:08:02

From the BBC World Service: The Japanese government has been looking forward to an economic boost from the games, but there’s strong local opposition and Tokyo’s pandemic emergency has just been extended. Plus, UNICEF is urging rich countries to donate vaccines to 18 African nations that are running out of supply. And, an exhibition featuring Princess Diana’s wedding dress, not seen in public for 25 years, could rely mostly on domestic British tourist traffic.

Jun 03, 2021
Crude oil prices up = optimism for the global economy
00:08:44

The price of crude oil is spiking, with some of that driven by the economies around the world that have been able to move away from pandemic restrictions on travel. Plus, a bulldozer is an uninspiring way to deal with an empty J.C. Penney. What about turning it into affordable housing? And, corporate leaders have pledged to take into account the needs of the earth, communities, employees and other stakeholders beyond shareholders. How do you measure whether they’re meeting that pledge?

Jun 02, 2021
Biden’s strategy to narrow the racial wealth gap
00:09:00

President Biden’s plan, announced in Tulsa, Oklahoma, yesterday, aims to address discrimination in housing access and value for Black Americans. Plus, spelling out the updated guidance to employers about whether they can require workers to get vaccinated and provide incentives for doing so. And, it’s been a little more than a week since a host of nations in Europe told airlines not to fly over Belarusian airspace. A punishment like that leaves millions of dollars hanging in the balance.

Jun 02, 2021
U.S. says cyberattack on meatpacker JBS is likely from Russia
00:08:50

From the BBC World Service: Brazil’s JBS, the world’s largest meatpacker, suffered a targeted attack which disrupted its operations in Australia, Canada and the U.S. Plus, with planes not flying over Belarus for now, how much money could the country lose in overflight fees? And, Wendy’s throws open the doors to its first restaurant in the U.K. in decades, with plans for European expansion.

Jun 02, 2021
How the economy might recover with summer kicking into gear
00:10:11

We’ll hear from one economist who says we could see more than 10% GDP growth in the second quarter on an annualized basis, along with a recovery for the services sector this summer. Also, public skepticism for China’s new three-child policy and what it will actually mean for population growth. Plus, keep an eye out for credit card incentives as companies hope to bring balances back up. And, a labor shortage for lifeguards.

Jun 01, 2021
Have you tried getting an Uber or Lyft lately?
00:08:40

In some cities, the cost of an Uber to the airport could rival that of the flight itself. There are long wait times and elevated prices for rides right now. We take a closer look at why. Plus, a new estimate on how long the global computer chip shortage could last. One CEO says it could be years. Also, the unequal distribution of COVID vaccines is threatening permanent economic recovery, according to leaders from the International Monetary Fund, World Health Organization, World Bank and World Trade Organization. And, how efforts at Howard University’s College of Fine Arts aim to address a lack of diversity in Hollywood’s executive suites.

Jun 01, 2021
A $50 billion plan to help tackle global vaccine inequality
00:08:40

From the BBC World Service: Leaders from the World Bank, IMF, WTO and WHO say the gap between rich and poor countries on COVID vaccines threatens the global economic recovery. Also, the pandemic has taken a toll on India’s burgeoning middle class. Plus, Lebanon’s economic crisis could be one of the worst financial collapses in nearly 200 years. And, Kraft Heinz will start making ketchup in England again.

Jun 01, 2021
What is Zoom’s fate as pandemic starts to fade?
00:07:28

Masks are beginning to come off and hand sanitizer sales are down. So what about that other COVID mainstay, Zoom? The videoconferencing platform reports quarterly results on Tuesday. Plus, the cap on how many children couples in China can have is now up to three. And, a new tool to measure how rising inequality in the U.S. affects Americans as workers, consumers, bill payers and savers.

May 31, 2021
Nashville music scene navigates reopening
00:07:47

Some in the industry want Nashville to step up and better support music venues as pandemic economic recovery continues. Also, an announcement today from China’s government: Married couples may now have up to three children. The change in policy comes after new census numbers showed China’s working-age population shrank over the last decade. And, a look at disaster preparedness in the U.S. with the official start to hurricane season one day away.

May 31, 2021
China looks to boost population growth, but couples say they just don’t want big families
00:08:09

From the BBC World Service: China said it is now allowing families to have up to three children in order to try to boost slowing population growth. But will relaxed rules have the intended outcome? Plus, Taiwan looks to local COVID-19 vaccine production to speed up immunization. And, we look at the problems caused by improper battery recycling.

May 31, 2021
The latest numbers on U.S spending, incomes and inflation
00:10:50

With spending up again, despite incomes being down, it’s clear consumers are driving a continued recovery from the pandemic recession. Meanwhile, a key inflation indicator preferred by the Federal Reserve surged more than expected in April. Also, news the Biden administration is trying to address the root causes of migration from Central America by improving economic opportunity in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. Plus, the hot market for cyber insurance right now. And, Texas could soon become the state with the toughest rules on letting renters know if they’re planning on living in a place at risk of flooding.

May 28, 2021
Good rental deals in cities are getting harder to find
00:08:56

With workplaces reopening and people a little more certain about where they want to be, May apartment and home rental prices rose, on a national basis, at a record pace. Plus, some evidence that company mandates for vaccines can boost employee vaccination rates and aid communities. And, scientists have used artificial intelligence to set up a system that detects COVID-19 by the sound of a cough — with almost 100% accuracy.

May 28, 2021
Russia blocks some flights that are avoiding Belarus
00:07:42

From the BBC World Service: Russia has denied entry to two European airlines because they planned to avoid flying over Belarus to get to Moscow. EU leaders have asked European carriers to avoid Belarusian airspace this week after a Ryanair plane was forced to divert and land in Minsk on Sunday. Belarusian dissident journalist Roman Protasevich and his girlfriend were then arrested.

May 28, 2021
How one Seattle business is reclaiming the narrative around Native art
00:09:41

Eighth Generation is a retailer that had to close its Seattle store early in the pandemic but blossomed online. It features wool blankets and other items produced by Native artists. Also, more signs of recovery in new data on orders for long-lasting goods and weekly unemployment aid claims. And, bank profits were up nearly 30% in the first quarter this year, but the same report finds lending fell, driven by a drop in credit card balances. We take a closer look at how consumers are spending.

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May 27, 2021
The little engine that did … shake up the Exxon boardroom
00:08:36

Activist hedge fund Engine No. 1, pushing for a change in Exxon Mobil’s climate strategy, got enough support from other shareholders to win at least two seats on the oil and gas company’s board. These types of challenges from activist investors tend not to get far. Plus, for the first time since President Joe Biden took office, the top trade representatives from the U.S. and China are talking. And, a study on the need for better, higher-paying jobs for young women as the pandemic recession recovery continues.

Your support powers nonprofit news — become a Marketplace Investor before Thursday to help us reach our fundraising goal: marketplace.org/givemorning

May 27, 2021