Net Assessment

By War on the Rocks

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Description

Hosts Melanie Marlowe and Christopher Preble debate their way through some of the toughest and most contentious topics related to war, international relations, and strategy. This podcast is brought to you by War on the Rocks.

Episode Date
The Meaning of Public Service
46:25

Chris and Melanie sit down with Mark Cancian of CSIS to discuss the final report of the National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service. They discuss what public service is, what role the government should play in encouraging it, and how COVID-19 and the response to it might affect what opportunities people see for service. Looking at military service specifically, they consider possible reforms to the Selective Service System and take up the commission's recommendation that women be required to register for the draft. Finally, Chris is making progress on a new book, Mark applauds the president for talking about COVID-19 and risks we may have to learn to deal with, and Melanie is grateful for the spontaneous public service we see from so many people during this difficult time.

 

Links

Apr 02, 2020
Defending U.S. Interests in Cyberspace
52:18

Amidst the deepening Coronavirus crisis, Melanie and Chris discuss another type of invisible danger: the threats posed by both state and non-state actors in cyberspace. They’re joined by the Marine Corps University’s Benjamin Jensen, senior research director and lead writer for the Cyberspace Solarium Commission, which issued its report earlier this month. Ben offers an insider’s perspective on how the commission approached its work, and outlines its key findings. What strategies should the United States employ to reduce its vulnerability to cyber threats? And what must the U.S. government and private sector do to implement these strategies? Melanie delivers a heartfelt attagirl to her amazing mom; Ben praises Solarium Commission chairmen Sen. Angus King and Rep. Mike Gallagher; and Chris offers thanks to Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health.

 

Links

Mar 19, 2020
Why Is America Leaving Afghanistan Now?
49:08

The Net Assessment crew is back to discuss Carter Malkasian’s Foreign Affairs article, “How the Good War Went Bad: America’s Slow-Motion Failure in Afghanistan.” In this episode, Melanie and Chris are joined by Chris Brose, head of strategy at Anduril Industries. The trio dissect whether this peace deal is better than any other deal the United States could have struck in the past 18 years of fighting, and how much confidence the United States can have in the agreement. Are there facts on the battlefield that have made this agreement possible or is America just tired of fighting the war in Afghanistan? Also, Chris P. gives an attaboy to Mayor Pete, Chris B. tips his hat to Joe Biden, and Melanie gives a shout out to modern medicine.

 

Links

Mar 05, 2020
Show Me the Money
49:48

In this episode, Chris and Melanie are joined by Thomas Spoehr of the Heritage Foundation to talk about President Trump's FY2021 defense budget request: What's good in this budget, what's really bad, and what surprised them the most. Chris presses the issue of hearings on Afghanistan, Melanie recommends a new book on the presidency, and Thomas applauds a celebration of Washington's birthday.

 

Links

Feb 20, 2020
Debating the AUMFs
50:09

Special guest Alice Hunt Friend joins Melanie and Chris for a very timely discussion about the possible repeal of the Authorizations for Use of Military Force (AUMFs) that presidents have used to justify a range of military operations since 9/11. A few members of Congress have been pushing to repeal these AUMFs for years, and even some reliably conservative voices now support such a move in the interest of restoring the proper balance between the legislative and executive branches on the critical question of war and peace. But most House and Senate Republicans oppose repeal. Would they change their tune with a Democrat in the White House? Or is there a partisan divide on the president’s war powers, with Republicans more inclined to defer to the chief executive and Democrats more inclined to rein in such power? Alice gives a shout out to SOCOM and throws shade on U.S. policy toward Libya, while Melanie dishes on former SEAL Eddie Gallagher. Chris doesn’t like Sen. Tom Cotton’s comments on China and the coronavirus, but he does like puppies!

 

Links

Feb 06, 2020
Trying Hard to be Good?
44:47

Chris Brose of Anduril Industries joins Chris and Melanie to talk about Joseph Nye’s Texas National Security Review article, “What is a Moral Foreign Policy?” Should morality be taken into consideration when making foreign policy? How should we assess whether or not a president’s foreign policy is moral? Does using the language of morality make our foreign policy more or less clear? Do people in other countries view our foreign policy as moral? Should perception matter at home or abroad? Also, Chris Preble gets another opportunity to stick it to Saudi Arabia, Melanie shows some love for history, and Chris Brose recognizes the excellent work of some friends.

 

Links

Jan 23, 2020
Is America’s China Strategy Working?
48:17

After a long holiday hiatus, Hudson’s Patrick Cronin joins Melanie and Chris in a spirited discussion of U.S. policy toward China. How is this competition like the Cold War with the Soviet Union, and what’s different? What aspects of China’s behavior are most worrisome? What steps can be taken to reduce the likelihood of conflict? Or is a clash, even if it is mostly non-military in nature, inevitable? Patrick gives a shout out to the heroic men and women fighting wildfires in Australia, Melanie expresses her appreciation for Ricky Gervais, and Chris offers kudos to the U.S. press corps.

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Jan 09, 2020
The Looming End of Pax Americana?
53:32

The Net Assessment crew is back and this week they are breaking down an article written by Brian Stewart in Quillette titled, "Tensions in NATO and the Looming End of Pax Americana." Is NATO worth American attention and money? Why don't the Europeans just get their act together? The crew discusses what threat NATO is designed to counter and whether it should forget about Russia and focus on terrorism. Also, Bryan has a grievance with attorney general Bill Barr, Melanie takes issue with the Danish Atlantic Council, and Chris gives an attaboy to the students at the University of California, Washington Center. Join Melanie, Chris, and Bryan as they dive once more into the breach.

 

Links

Dec 12, 2019
Can Bryan Pass the Turing Test?
52:04

Chris, Bryan, and Melanie talk about the Interim Report issued by the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence last week. What kinds of expectations should we have about AI being used for national security purposes? What kind of investments should be made in this technology, and where will the money come from? What about concerns that AI developed by American companies or the United States government might be used by authoritarian regimes to violate their citizens' human rights? Can we continue to reap the benefits of research collaboration with people from other countries, particularly China, and still protect national security secrets? Finally, Bryan tells us of his exploits in Italy, Chris gives a heartfelt appreciation to a friend and colleague, and Melanie looks forward to some long-awaited playtime with her nephews.

 

Links

Nov 14, 2019
Strategy and Exit Strategies: Essential or Misleading?
48:50

Melanie, Chris, and guest host Claude Berube discuss the promise and pitfalls of exit strategies. When policymakers plan to embark on foreign wars, should they also prepare a plan for extricating the nation from these wars when they are completed? Is an exit strategy a vital component of strategy? Or do exit strategies create unreasonable expectations of easy victory? Can an exit strategy focus attention on a desired end state, and prevent mission creep? Or are prudent adjustments only possible when policymakers are not shackled to pre-war objectives? Chris congratulates New England Patriots’ coach Bill Bellichick on victory number 300, Melanie blasts Sean Duffy for questioning a decorated U.S. Army officer’s patriotism, and Claude delivers a Net Assessment first -- a heartfelt attadog for his beloved four-legged companion, Reagan.

 

Links

Oct 31, 2019
We Just Don’t Make Policy Like We Used To
55:00

Join Chris, Melanie, and Bryan as they dive into Professor Philip Zelikow’s recent article in the Texas National Security Review titled, “To Regain Policy Competence: The Software of American Problem Solving.” Has policymaking gotten worse, or is it a problem with implementation? Or is implementation part of the policymaking process? The gang also discusses whether there is a lack of professionalism in the education and training of future policymakers. This week's episode is a little wonky, but well worth the time. 

At the end of the show, Bryan gives an attaboy for the first person to complete a marathon in under two hours, while Chris gives a shout out to his wife.

 

Links

Oct 17, 2019
Syria: A Sad Tale
53:32

Bryan is celebrating the anniversary of our first episode on a beach, so this week, Chris and Melanie are joined by Tom Karako of CSIS. In this episode they discuss the Syria Study Group Report, which concludes that "the US can still influence the outcome of the Syrian war in a manner that protects US interests." Does America have interests in Syria? If so, can they be managed and protected, particularly with a president who seems uninterested in investing political capital and American resources there? How has the Syrian civil war affected Russia, Iran, and Turkey, and does that matter to America? Finally, is there anything the United States should do about the terrible humanitarian situation, the effects of which have spilled over to other countries?

Tom tells us about taking his son to his first baseball game (go Nats!), Chris has a birthday wish for a former president, and Melanie both sticks it to and congratulates the press. We can't wait for Bryan to return and give us his review of the Downton Abbey movie!

 

Links

Events

Oct 03, 2019
What Can We Do About Terrorism?
50:29

What have we learned in the 18 years since 9/11? Chris, Melanie, and Bryan discuss whether counterterrorism policy takes account of academic research on the subject. Going forward, the goal should be to implement the most cost-effective policies — and over time, to calm public anxiety about terrorism. Bryan gives a shout out to a bipartisan duo of Net Assessment fans, Chris gripes about NFL officiating, and Melanie offers her appreciation of the Constitution via an unlikely source: former Vice President Joe Biden.

 

Links

Sep 19, 2019
Mattispalooza: Deconstructing the Legacy of James Mattis
50:16

Join Chris, Melanie, and Bryan as they assess Jim Mattis' legacy as secretary of defense and the media splash he is making while promoting his new book. Mattis is a complicated character, and his reasons for entering the administration, for leaving the administration, and for coyly restraining his comments after leaving are similarly complicated. Although President Donald Trump's early affinity for having former generals in key positions in his administration has cooled, the debate over the role retired flag and general officers should play in America's national security political discourse rages on.

 

Links

Sep 05, 2019
Does Trump’s Trade War Spell the End of the Global Order?
43:49

This week the gang talks about President Trump’s trade policies and why trade wars can be bad and hard to win. Do we have a strategy for success, or is the president simply venting frustration through erratic policies? What is the endgame? How do America's economic policies, especially with regard to China, affect U.S. national security? Other highlights: Chris condemns Trump’s attempt to buy Greenland, Melanie finds a CEO worthy of immense respect, and Bryan explains why real British royalty isn’t as appealing as the Netflix version.

 

Links

Aug 21, 2019
Explaining Mission Creep in Afghanistan
46:19

Special guest Rick Berger joins Bryan and Chris for a discussion of the U.S. war in Afghanistan and the state of civil-military relations. The post-9/11 mission expanded from counterterrorism to nation-building, but this occurred, according to CSIS’s Mark Cancian, without a serious "discussion about the relationship between the desired end state and the military effort required to reach it." Bryan, Rick, and Chris disagree on whether that’s actually true — and whether it matters. Bryan gives kudos to National Review’s Kevin Williamson for making the case for independent thinking, Chris knocks CNN and the Democratic debaters for spending too little time on foreign policy, and Rick praises newly installed Secretary of Defense Mark Esper for his plan to beef up conventional deterrence in the Asia-Pacific.

 

Links

 

 

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Aug 08, 2019
Bold Strokes from the Commandant of the Marine Corps
50:03

Join Melanie, Chris, and Bryan as they discuss the recently released Commandant's Planning Guidance, a document from the new Marine Corps Commandant General David Berger that has taken the seapower community by storm. In the guidance, Berger slays at least five USMC sacred cows and provides a framework for integration between the Navy and the Marine Corps within the Department of the Navy. Also, Chris has an issue with presidential tweeting and Bryan complains about the weather. 

 

Links

  

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Jul 25, 2019
Is America Poised to Lose the Next War?
46:04

Bryan, Chris, and Melanie take on a new report by Chris Dougherty that argues that, unless America changes how it fights wars to more closely align with the priorities laid out in the 2018 National Defense Strategy (NDS), it is in real danger of losing the next war to China or Russia. Has the thinking in the NDS become conventional wisdom? Is Dougherty's assessment overly pessimistic? Is there sufficient political will to follow through with expensive, long-term changes? Are American military planners up to the intellectual challenge? Finally, Bryan gives us the rundown on his much-anticipated staycation, Chris has some love for the U.S Women's Soccer Team, and Melanie hopes we can do a better job learning our history.

 

Links:

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Jul 10, 2019
Deciphering the Trump Administration’s Iran Policy
49:06

Melanie, Bryan, and Chris discuss the Trump administration’s recent struggles to explain its policy toward Iran. What does President Donald Trump hope to achieve? What evidence is there that the policy of “maximum pressure” will succeed? Does the administration have the authority to launch military attacks against Iran, either under the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) or under Article II of the Constitution? Or must they go to Congress for a new AUMF? And to what extent do various personnel decisions explain the frequent misalignment between Trump’s stated objectives and the actual results? This episode also includes praise for a belated effort to reclaim Congress’s war powers, while Harvard earns scorn for its counterproductive ploy to advance gender equality. There’s criticism, too, for short-sighted opponents of another round of military base closures.

Links

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Jun 27, 2019
Is Realism Realistic?
47:22

Is the Trump administration pursuing a realist foreign policy? In a recent speech, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo indicates that it is, while Brett McGurk, in his article in Foreign Affairs, disagrees. Listen in to hear what Melanie, Chris, and Bryan think, as well as to hear Chris' views on Canadian sportsmanship.

 

Links

  

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Jun 14, 2019
Hypersonic Weapons - Gimmick or Game Changer?
43:05

Chris is on a big adventure, so Bryan and Melanie are left alone to discuss hypersonic weapons and the challenges and opportunities they present for America's national security. Do they represent a "game-changer" for defense planners, or simply an incremental shift in technology? Will developing hypersonic weapons increase the likelihood of war? While the United States is beginning to invest in the offensive side of these weapons, is it doing enough to defend against a Chinese or Russian threat? Finally, Bryan gives his expert opinion on the series finale of Game of Thrones and Melanie shows some love for a public interest law firm working to help military families. 

  

Links

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

May 30, 2019
A Failure of Leadership? Americans’ Views of U.S. Foreign Policy
49:14

Donald Trump won the Republican nomination in 2016 and then beat Hillary Clinton in the general election, in part, by pledging to focus on America’s domestic problems, including raising worker wages, solving the problem of unemployment and underemployment, and repairing the nation’s failing infrastructure. But he was hardly alone in taking this stance. The last four U.S. presidents were elected on promises to fight fewer foreign wars. Recent surveys show why such appeals are successful: The American people want to do more nation-building at home — and less of it abroad. Chris, Bryan, and guest co-host Rachel Hoff unpack the latest survey of U.S. public attitudes on foreign policy. Does Americans’ desire for a different form of global engagement, one that is less dependent upon U.S. military power, reflect a failure on the part of America’s foreign policy elite to explain the continued value of U.S. primacy? Or should those elites do more listening and less lecturing? Related, in the grievances portion of the podcast, Bryan and Chris disagree over whether war weariness is a sign of a mature foreign policy debate or rather evidence of Americans’ collective adolescence. Rachel offers attaboys to Sen. Marco Rubio and Rep. Mike Gallagher, Bryan praises Larry Kudlow, and Chris gives kudos to Sen. Chris Murphy.

 

Links

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

May 16, 2019
The Revolution in Military Affairs - Is Anything Different This Time?
49:31

Join Melanie, Chris, and Bryan as they dive into Christian Brose's Foreign Affairs piece on the revolution in military affairs and Brose's view that not only are we unprepared for future war, but that we are investing in capabilities that are particularly vulnerable to technologies our adversaries are fielding. You'll come for the chat, but you'll stay for the Game of Thrones references and a discussion of Melanie's packing habits.

 

Links

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

May 02, 2019
Is NATO Showing its Age?
47:25

Chris is on a beach somewhere soaking up the rays, so this week George Mason's Trevor Thrall joins the podcast. The gang discusses NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg's address to Congress on the 70th anniversary of the signing of the Washington Treaty. What is NATO's mission 30 years after the fall of the Soviet Union? What does the addition of member states mean for the Alliance and for American national security? What effect has President Trump's rhetoric regarding the responsibilities of other members and the possibility of the United States leaving the Organization had? Finally, Trevor warms Melanie's heart with puppy stories and Bryan rejoices in UVA's national title and the return of Game of Thrones. 

 

Links

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Apr 18, 2019
The Pentagon Can Count Ships (But Not Much Else)
47:41

In addition to “being the taxpayers’ greatest investment,” Rolling Stone's Matt Taibbi writes that the Pentagon is also “the world’s largest producer of wrong numbers, an ingenious bureaucratic defense system that hides all the other rats’ nests underneath.” Last year, the Department of Defense became the last Cabinet-level department to submit to a comprehensive review of its books — and it flunked the audit. But Defense Department “never expected to pass it,” explained then-Deputy Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan. Whether it ever will — or is even committed to doing so — is an open question. In this week's episode of Net Assessment, Bryan, Melanie, and Chris discuss Taibbi’s scathing feature, aptly titled “The Pentagon’s Bottomless Money Pit,” and unpack his suggestions for how to fix the problem. Bryan has no grievances — life is coming up roses now that his beloved Virginia Cavaliers have made it to men’s college basketball’s Final Four (Cavaliers’ head coach Tony Bennett, naturally, earns his attaboy). Chris faults those who want to keep expanding NATO, and Melanie credits the Southern Poverty Law Center for (belatedly) doing the right thing.

 

Links

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Apr 04, 2019
Masterpiece Theater
49:33

In this episode, Chris, Bryan, and Melanie take a broad look at the administration's FY2020 defense budget request. They discuss whether or not it is the "masterpiece" that Pat Shanahan promised, and agree (!) that the budget process is in need of serious reform. They ask whether it aligns with the National Defense Strategy, what Congress (especially the Democratic House with many domestic priorities) will think of it, and how it will be paid for in a time of ever-growing deficits. Finally, Chris takes the secretary of state to task, Melanie is irritated with what's going on in higher ed, and Bryan welcomes a friend home.

 

Links

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Mar 21, 2019
Playing the China Card
49:31

Join Melanie, Chris, and Bryan for a discussion of how to think about great power competition with China. Using Brookings scholar Tarun Chhabra's recent report "The China challenge, democracy, and US grand strategy" as the impetus for the conversation, our hosts dive into whether China's threat to liberal democracies is more of a challenge than that presented by the former Soviet Union, and if so, what America is willing to do to contest that challenge. Stay to the end to hear Melanie's inspired "Attagirl" for the senior senator from California. 

 

Links

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Mar 07, 2019
Can Conservatism Save the Liberal Order? And What Are We Conserving?
53:31

What is the best way to preserve the liberal international order (such as it is) going forward? Some counsel conservatism. Jennifer Lind and William Wohlforth argue that “the United States and its partners should consolidate the gains the order has reaped,” back away from democracy promotion, and resist the urge to add new members to existing alliances, especially those countries that bring more liabilities than capabilities. Are they right? Must the United States practice more discernment (Bryan’s word) or restraint (Chris’s), or does the order still depend upon American military primacy? Would it collapse or atrophy if the United States were less likely to employ force in the service of certain desirable, but non-essential, ends? Or would democracy and human rights flourish if promoted chiefly by the power of America's example, and carried forward by non-governmental organizations, as opposed to entities of the U.S. government? Also, Chris remembers Rep. Walter Jones, Melanie praises California Gov. Gavin Newsom, and, in a first, Germany earns both a grievance and (minor) attaboy in the same show.

 

Links 

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Feb 21, 2019
To Intervene or Not to Intervene? That is the Question
48:13

The crew looks at the crisis in Venezuela and considers the American and world responses to it. Is it any of Washington’s business what goes on there, and will any result have democratic legitimacy? Will more sanctions help to quickly resolve the situation in a way that benefits the people there, or will they increase the suffering? Are Elliot Abrams and John Bolton making a push for military intervention? Finally, Chris congratulates the Patriots while Melanie and Bryan roll their eyes, and Melanie finds a reason to wholeheartedly praise the Trump administration.

 

Links

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Feb 07, 2019
Learning to Love the Bomb
47:42

Join Chris, Melanie, and Bryan — your Net Assessment podcasters — for a dive into nuclear weapons and grand strategy, and the degree to which they have impacted each other. The story is one of contradiction, of hubris, and of unproven (and unprovable) assertions.

Links

Jan 23, 2019
Is It the End of the World, As We Know It?
51:19

The United States has managed to avoid foreign policy catastrophes during the first two years of the Trump administration, but defenders of American primacy espy trouble on the horizon. Most Americans have no living memory of the 1930s and World War II, and younger Americans, who have known only the inconclusive wars of the last fifteen years, are far less likely than their parents and grandparents to support higher levels of military spending. They favor a different kind of global engagement, one not predicated on American hard power. But can the liberal international order, such as it is, survive without America’s “big stick” military to back it up? And what, if anything, would replace it? On the lighter side, Melanie and Bryan also discuss binge-watching foreign television series over the holidays, and Chris shines the light on our safer, healthier, and wealthier world.

 

Links 

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester 

Jan 10, 2019
Smoking Bonesaw
47:29

In our last episode before the holidays, we take a look at the US-Saudi relationship. With President Trump standing by Mohammad bin Salman even as the CIA blames him for the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, we discuss what weight human rights should have in foreign policy, whether Congress is reasserting its powers in national security matters, and what the United States should do with respect to Yemen. Bryan and Chris lament Navy's loss in the Army-Navy game and Bryan shares a personal interaction between his mother and the late President George H.W. Bush. Finally, in their recap of the Reagan National Defense Forum, we find out what Melanie keeps in her enormous purse, and where Bryan ranks in her choice of dinner mates.

 

Links

Dec 13, 2018
The Establishment Strikes Back
47:59

Hop aboard! In this episode, the crew dissects the recently released report of the National Defense Strategy Commission. Melanie, Chris, and Bryan weigh in on the report’s strengths and weaknesses. Also, Chris and Melanie reveal themselves to be Scrooges by expressing disdain for Hallmark Christmas dramas.  

Links

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Nov 29, 2018
Does the Pentagon Deserve Our Trust?
47:39

This episode kicks off with a discussion of the national security implications of the mid-term elections. With the Democratic Party retaking control of the House of Representatives, we expect to see fights over Pentagon spending, and more oversight of the Trump administration across-the-board. The show then turns to the curious story of a 1,300-page Army study of the Iraq War that has gone unpublished for two whole years. The case raises broader questions about the entire defense establishment’s capacity for self-reflection and analysis. Recent moves to shield the Pentagon from public scrutiny only add to these concerns. We focus our grievances on President Donald Trump in Europe, the New York Times re: North Korea, and Woodrow Wilson (for lots of things), and we mark the 243rd anniversary of the founding of the U.S. Marine Corps – or, as Bryan calls it, the Navy’s land force (Please direct your hate tweets to @ConsWahoo).

Links

Events

Music and Production by Tre Hester 

Nov 15, 2018
INF-inite Assessment
35:47

Under the dark cloud of the synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh, this week’s Net Assessment podcast focuses on President Donald Trump’s that he intends to withdraw the United States from the INF Treaty. Although it’s a bilateral agreement with Russia, China factors heavily into our discussion, as do problems the president might face with allies and Congress going forward, should the withdrawal occur. We offer a few comments on the lack of civility we are experiencing, defense budget cuts, and Jeff Bezos. Finally, Bryan and Melanie politely listen while Chris congratulates the Red Sox on their World Series victory.

Nov 01, 2018
The China Hand
47:57

This week’s Net Assessment podcast featured a deep-dive into the Vice President’s early October speech on the competition with China. Largely drowned out by the Kavanaugh SCOTUS controversy, Melanie, Chris, and Bryan give this important speech due consideration, to include administration views on Taiwan, China’s defense buildup, and its growing global influence.  The crew also discussed foreign aid, the F-35, the deficit, the alleged assassination of Jamal Khashoggi, and the resignation of Nikki Haley. All of this while celebrating Melanie’s birthday.

 

Vice President’s Speech

 

Airing of Grievances

 

Attaboys

 

Music and Production by Tre Hester

Oct 18, 2018
Introducing Net Assessment
39:27
What happens when a libertarian, a conservative hawk, and a constitutional powers specialist walk into a podcast studio? 'Net Assessment' happens. Welcome to the hottest new national security podcast hosted by Melanie Marlowe, Christopher Preble, and Bryan McGrath. This is a show about competing visions of America's role in the world. In each episode, they will be discussing a featured article, airing their grievances, and giving attaboys.  In the first episode of this bi-weekly series, our hosts introduce themselves and their hopes for this podcast. They tackle this episode's featured article, Adrian Lewis' "The Ivory Tower and Academic Ignorance of What the Armed Forces Actually Do," published by Task & Purpose. They also discuss the role of American seapower and, of course, Twitter feuds. Don't forget to subscribe to Net Assessment on your podcast app of choice. 
 

 

 
Music and Production by Tre Hester.
Oct 04, 2018
Net Assessment: The Trailer
03:27

War on the Rocks is excited to introduce an exciting new biweekly podcast: "Net Assessment." This new series features three assertive and experienced national security hands, debating important issues related to strategy, defense, and foreign affairs. Join Melanie Marlowe, Bryan McGrath, and Christopher Preble for "Net Assessment." This trailer gives you a taste of what's to come.

Oct 01, 2018