Aria Code

By WQXR & The Metropolitan Opera

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: Music

Open in iTunes


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 363
Reviews: 2


 Jun 18, 2019


 Feb 2, 2019

Description

Aria Code is a podcast that pulls back the curtain on some of the most famous arias in opera history, with insight from the biggest voices of our time, including Plácido Domingo, Diana Damrau, Sondra Radvanovsky, and many others. Hosted by Grammy Award-winner and MacArthur “Genius” Fellow Rhiannon Giddens, Aria Code is produced in partnership with The Metropolitan Opera. Each episode dives into one aria — a feature for a single singer — and explores how and why these brief musical moments have imprinted themselves in our collective consciousness and what it takes to stand on the Met stage and sing them. A wealth of guests—from artists like Rufus Wainwright and Ruben Santiago-Hudson to non-musicians like biological anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher and Dr. Brooke Magnanti, author of The Intimate Adventures of a London Call Girl—join Rhiannon and the Met Opera’s singers to understand why these arias touch us at such a human level, well over a century after they were written. Each episode ends with the aria, uninterrupted and in full, recorded from the Met Opera stage. Aria Code is produced in partnership with WQXR, The Metropolitan Opera and WNYC Studios.

Episode Date
Floyd's Susannah: Hopeless in New Hope, featuring Renée Fleming
30:58
<p>When the great American composer Carlisle Floyd wrote his first full-length opera, <em>Susannah</em>, back in the 1950s, he had no way of knowing how the Biblical themes of shame, blame and lust would still resonate today.</p> <p>In this special episode of Aria Code, host <strong><a href="https://www.rhiannongiddens.com/">Rhiannon Giddens</a></strong> joins soprano Renée Fleming, writer and stage director Thomas Holliday, and feminist writer Leora Tanenbaum to consider the haunting folk aria “The Trees on the Mountains,” and the devastating loss of innocence at the heart of the story. You’ll hear Fleming’s performance from the <strong><a href="https://www.metopera.org/">Metropolitan Opera</a></strong>’s 1999 production of <em>Susannah</em>, as well as Rhiannon Giddens’ version from her new album, <strong><a href="https://www.nonesuch.com/albums/there-is-no-other">there is no Other</a></strong>.</p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p>One of the most celebrated singers of our time, soprano <strong><a href="https://reneefleming.com/">Renée Fleming</a></strong> has used her voice to break down the barriers between different genres of music. From opera to Broadway to jazz, and even the movie soundtrack of <em>The Lord of the Rings</em>, this fourteen-time Grammy nominated artist has sung it all.  </p> <p>Stage director and writer <strong>Thomas Holliday</strong> practically became a member of the Floyd family when he embarked on five years of research and interviews for the comprehensive biography <em><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Falling-Up-Carlisle-Authorized-Biography-ebook/dp/B00PZ7L59S">Falling Up: The Days and Nights of Carlisle Floyd</a></em>.</p> <p>Feminist writer <strong><a href="http://www.leoratanenbaum.com/">Leora Tanenbaum</a></strong> has been writing books and articles about slut-shaming and the sexual double standard for over 20 years. When she’s not fighting the good fight for gender equality, Leora can be found at Columbia University, where she is Director of Communications.</p> <p>Special thanks to the Metropolitan Opera, Boosey &amp; Hawkes, and <a href="https://www.nonesuch.com/albums/there-is-no-other">Nonesuch Records</a> for the music in this episode. </p>
Jun 21, 2019
Flower Power: Don José and Dangerous Love in Bizet's Carmen
28:08
<p><span>You hear the message over and over in pop culture: love overcomes everything. But when Don José sings “The Flower Song” in Bizet's <em>Carmen</em>, you're reminded that love has a dark side, too.</span></p> <p><span>In the Season 1 finale, host <a href="http://rhiannongiddens.com/"><strong>Rhiannon Giddens</strong></a><span> welcomes tenor Roberto Alagna, critic Anne Midgette and psychologist Andrew G. Marshall to consider the crazy, possessive side of love and the importance of experiencing art that doesn’t have a fairy-tale ending. Then, you’ll hear Alagna sing the role of the passionate and violent Don José </span><span>onstage at the</span> <a href="https://www.metopera.org/"><strong>Metropolitan Opera</strong></a><span>.</span><span></span></span></p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p><span><span></span>Tenor </span><strong>Roberto Alagna</strong><span> first performed as <span><span>Don José</span></span> when he was 35. Twenty years and many performances later, he thinks he “judged” <span><span><span>José</span></span></span> a little too harshly in the past and now feels more empathy for the character's misguided and obsessive love.</span></p> <p><span><span>As a teenager, </span>Washington Post critic </span><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/people/anne-midgette/?utm_term=.8e140930c428"><strong>Anne Midgette</strong></a><span> dreamed of living in Europe with a boyfriend who sang opera. When she moved there after college and dated a tenor who sang “The Flower Song” on a train platform, she thought, “Oh my god, my dream came true.”</span></p> <p><span><span><span>When writer and marital therapist </span><a href="https://andrewgmarshall.com/"><strong>Andrew G Marshall</strong></a><span> took his parents to see <em>Carmen</em>, they expected to hear some familiar tunes and a sweet love story. Instead, they got “horror and bloodshed.” Pro tip: always read the program notes.</span></span></span></p>
Feb 06, 2019
Massenet's Werther: You've Got Mail!
29:41
<p>A picture may paint a thousand words, but nothing compares to the intimacy and immediacy of a handwritten letter. Hearing the "Letter Aria" from Jules Massenet's <em>Werther</em> will prove it. From an opera based on the Goethe novel, <em>The Sorrows of Young Werther</em>, this scene finds the tortured heroine Charlotte re-reading the letters of the doomed poet.</p> <p><span>In this episode, host </span><a href="http://rhiannongiddens.com/"><span>Rhiannon Giddens</span></a><span> welcomes soprano Isabel Leonard, pianist Mary Dibbern and author Peter Bognanni to explore why the words we write to each other have so much power – sometimes even more than the ones we say aloud. They'll reflect on Massenet's talent for showing Charlotte's deep connection to Werther and you'll even get a real-life story about how email brought two people together. Then you'll hear Isabel Leonard sing the complete scene onstage at the </span><a href="https://www.metopera.org/"><span>Metropolitan Opera</span></a><span>.</span></p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p><span>Mezzo-soprano </span><a href="http://isabelleonard.com/"><span>Isabel Leonard</span></a> <span>can handle many different roles – this season she's sung everything from Nico Muhly to Claude Debussy<em> – </em>but describes Charlotte as one of her most challenging. "The vocal writing is relentless," she says. "Massenet had a way of expressing a very deep understanding of Charlotte's complex struggle."</span><span> <br></span></p> <p><span>Pianist </span><a href="http://marydibbern.sitehappy.com/"><span>Mary Dibbern</span></a><span> began her love affair with French opera began in Paris more than 30 years ago. Since then, she’s translated a biography of Jules Massenet and is currently the Music Director of Education for the Dallas Opera. </span></p> <p><span><span>Minneapolis-based </span><a href="https://www.peterbognanni.com/"><span>Peter Bognanni</span></a><span> fell in love with his wife over email. He is also the author of <em>Things I’m Seeing Without You</em>, a modern-day story about two teens who fall in love over text messages and email. </span></span></p>
Jan 30, 2019
Mozart's Queen of the Night: Outrage Out of This World
26:04
<p>When the Voyager spacecraft set off to explore the galaxy in 1977, it carried a recording to represent the best of humanity. The <span>“</span>Golden Record<span>”</span> featured everyone from Bach to Chuck Berry, but there was only one opera aria: the rage-fest from Mozart<span>’</span>s <em>The Magic Flute</em>.</p> <p><span>In this episode, host</span> <a href="http://rhiannongiddens.com/"><strong>Rhiannon Giddens</strong></a><span> and her guests consider why the Queen of the Night’s big moment – “<span>Der Hölle Rache</span>”<span></span> – is an out-of-this-world achievement, how Mozart created a profound fairy tale for adults and what it takes for a soprano to reach the stratosphere. You’ll hear Kathryn Lewek hit all those high notes <span>onstage at the</span> <a href="https://www.metopera.org/"><strong>Metropolitan Opera</strong></a><span> and</span> talk to Timothy Ferris, the man who produced NASA’s <span>“</span>Golden Record.<span>”</span> </span><span></span></p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p><span>Soprano </span><a href="https://www.kathrynlewek.com/"><strong>Kathryn Lewek</strong></a><span> describes singing “Der Hölle Rache” as throwing darts with your eyes closed. But after performing the part more than 200 times, she certainly knows how to hit the bullseye. </span><span></span></p> <p><span>Harvard University professor </span><a href="https://tdm.fas.harvard.edu/people/carolyn-abbate"><strong>Carolyn Abbate</strong></a><span> once took her son to see <em>The Magic Flute</em> and he declared it to be “bad, but not in the way I expected it be bad.” Her latest book is </span><em><span>A History of Opera: The Last Four Hundred Years.</span></em></p> <p><span>Composer and author </span><a href="http://janswafford.com/"><strong>Jan Swafford</strong></a><span> was a graduate student when he spent his last $50 to buy a copy of <em>The Magic Flute </em>and immediately regretted it: he hated the opera. To say he’s warmed to Mozart over the years would be a wild understatement.</span><span></span></p> <p><span><strong><a href="https://www.timothyferris.com/about">Timothy Ferris</a></strong> produced the Golden Record that went up with NASA’s Voyager space probes in 1977. It was the only record he ever produced, but he's written many books including <em>Coming of Age in the Milky Way</em>, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.<br></span></p>
Jan 23, 2019
Verdi's Rigoletto: First Love, Wrong Love
32:30
<p><span>You’ve probably been there: in love for the first time and enchanted by the very sound of your sweetheart’s name. The problem for Gilda in</span><span> Verdi’s <em>Rigoletto</em></span><span> is that her new love isn’t who he says he is. The worst will come (it’s opera), but for a few brief moments in Act I, Gilda’s innocence sweeps you away. She’s young and head over heels and obsessing over the “caro nome,” the “dear name” of her new love.  <br></span></p> <p>In this episode, host <a href="http://rhiannongiddens.com/">Rhiannon Giddens</a> and her guests consider the dizzying thrill of your first love, Verdi’s brilliant powers of orchestration and why Gilda’s infatuation rings so true even today. You’ll hear soprano Nadine Sierra reminisce about her own formative experiences and then fall in love with the so-called “Gualtier Maldè<span>”</span> onstage at the <a href="https://www.metopera.org/">Metropolitan Opera</a>.</p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p>Before <strong><a href="http://nadinesierra.com/">Nadine Sierra</a></strong> could be accurately described as one of the most talented young artists in opera, she was a self-described “opera nerd.” She had a protective family – like Gilda – but that couldn’t stop her from secretly riding to high school in her boyfriend’s car.</p> <p><strong>Paul Thomason</strong> has combined his lifelong passion for music, colorful storytelling skills and a knack for mid-century slang to become one of the most insightful writers and lecturers on opera. He’s written for far too many publications to list.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.carlpickhardt.com/welcome.html">Carl Pickhardt</a></strong> is a psychologist and author who has spent decades helping parents and children navigate the challenges of adolescence. His most recent book is titled <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Who-Stole-Child-Parenting-Adolescence/dp/1942094833">Who Stole My Child? Parenting Through the Four Stages of Adolescence</a>. </p>
Jan 16, 2019
Donizetti's La Fille du Régiment: Sailing the High Cs
28:29
<p><span>Singing even one high C can be an event for the tenor and his audience. Everyone in the room knows how easily it could go wrong. <span>M</span><span>ultiply that pressure by nine? You get “Ah, mes amis.”</span> </span></p> <p><span>Gaetano Donizetti wrote this high-stakes aria for his opera <em>La Fille du Régiment</em>. The young hero Tonio has just enlisted in the army and received permission to marry the girl of his dreams. “Ah, mes amis” is his celebration: Tonio’s bursting with so much joy that the guy sings nine – count ‘em, NINE – high Cs. </span></p> <p>In this episode, host <a href="http://www.rhiannongiddens.com/">Rhiannon Giddens</a> and her guests consider the sheer athleticism it takes to pull off <span>“</span>Ah, mes amis<span>”</span> and reflect on the power of love to make us do crazy things. And after surveying this <span>Mount Everest of tenor arias</span> with a singer, a vocal coach and a former NFL player, you'll hear tenor Javier Camarena scale its heights from his base camp on the <a href="https://www.metopera.org/">Metropolitan Opera</a> stage.</p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p>Renowned tenor <strong><a href="https://javiercamarena.com/">Javier Camarena</a></strong> made his professional debut singing the role of Tonio, but remembers it as both exciting and terrifying: as a young singer in Mexico, he didn't really speak any French. "<span>I think it was like, Spang-French or something like that," he says, laughing about it now.</span></p> <p>When <strong>Lydia Brown</strong> first came to New York, she used to line up on Saturday mornings to get cheap seats to the Met Opera. Now she's working inside the building as a vocal coach to some of the world’s top singers.  </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.taupupua.com/home.html">Ta’u Pupu’a</a></strong> is a former defensive end for the Cleveland Browns and the Baltimore Ravens. After a career-ending injury, he attended Juilliard Opera Center and transformed from a tackler to a tenor. He now performs at opera houses across the world.</p>
Jan 09, 2019
Saint-Saëns’s Dalila: She's a Femme Fatale
29:36
<p>She seduces, she traps, she destroys. She's a <em>femme fatale</em> and her signature aria is the dangerously alluring “Mon coeur s’ouvre a ta voix” from <em>Samson et Dalila</em> by Camille Saint-Saëns. "<span>My heart opens to your voice,” sings Dalila, "like the flowers open to the kisses of the dawn." It sure sounds like a love song, but just below the surface it’s simmering with seduction and betrayal. </span></p> <p><span>In this episode, host <a href="http://www.rhiannongiddens.com/">Rhiannon Giddens</a> and her guests reflect on the Biblical story of Samson and Delilah, the trope of the <em>femme fatale</em> and how Saint-Saëns created this unforgettable moment that sounds as if Dalila’s slowly removing her clothing, one note at a time. Plus, you'll hear mezzo-soprano <span>Elīna Garanča</span> sing the complete aria from the <a href="https://www.metopera.org/">Metropolitan Opera</a> stage.</span></p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p>Mezzo-soprano<strong><span> </span>Elīna Garanča</strong><span> made her Met debut a decade ago, but the role of Dalila is relatively new to her: she first sang <em>Samson et Dalila</em> at the Vienna State Opera in May 2018. But judging from her <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0h39wHFMHKY">recent appearance</a> at WQXR, the part of a Biblical seductress suits her just fine.<br></span></p> <p><strong>James Jorden</strong><span> is the founding editor of the world's first (and still very popular) opera blog </span><a href="https://parterre.com/"><span>Parterre Box</span></a><span>. He's written for many other publications, including Opera News, The New York Times and the New York Observer. In another life, he used to sing “Mon coeur s’ouvre a ta voix."<br></span></p> <p><strong><strong>Dr. Caroline Blyth</strong></strong> teaches religious studies at the University of Auckland in New Zealand and studies<span> Biblical themes in contemporary culture. She spent eight years researching the Delilah story for her book</span> <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Reimagining-Delilahs-Afterlives-Femme-Fatale/dp/056767312X">Reimagining Delilah’s Afterlives as Femme Fatale: The Lost Seduction</a>.</p> <p><span> </span></p> <p><span><br><span></span></span></p>
Jan 02, 2019
Puccini's Tosca: I Offered Songs to the Stars
24:17
<p><span>When things go from bad to worse for Tosca, Puccini’s tragic heroine, she turns inward and prays. “I lived for art,” she tells God, “I lived for love.” <em>What did I do to deserve all this?</em> Tosca's despair and the moving way Puccini captures it musically speak so directly to artists, to audiences, to all of us, that "Vissi d'arte" has become one of the most famous arias in opera.<br></span></p> <p><span>In this episode, host <a href="http://www.rhiannongiddens.com/">Rhiannon Giddens</a> and her guests consider what it means to "live for art" and how Tosca's lament has given them much needed strength, whether facing personal struggles, the darkest days of the AIDS epidemic or the persistent sexual harassment that sparked the #MeToo movement. Plus, you'll hear soprano Sondra Radvanovksy sing the complete aria from the <span><a href="https://www.metopera.org/">Metropolitan Opera</a></span><span> stage.</span></span></p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.sondraradvanovsky.com/">Sondra Radvanovsky</a></strong><span><strong> </strong>first sang <em>Tosca </em>in Denver and didn't quite anticipate how the high altitude would leave her even more breathless than the music! In the many years since, she's established herself as one of the great Puccini (and Verdi) singers and returns to the Met as Floria Tosca in March 2019.<br></span></p> <p><strong><a href="http://rufuswainwright.com/">Rufus Wainwright</a></strong><span> comes from a famously musical family, but his curiosity took him far beyond his singer-songwriter roots. As a child, he used to stage operas at home with his siblings and, as an adult, he's written the two operas, <em>Prima Donna</em> and <em>Hadrian</em></span><span>.</span></p> <p><a href="http://www.vivienschweitzer.com/"><strong>Vivien Schweitzer</strong></a><span> is a pianist and the author of the new book </span><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Mad-Love-Introduction-Opera/dp/046509693X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1545328815&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=a+mad+love+an+introduction+to+opera"><span>A Mad Love: An Introduction to Opera</span></a><span>. She worked for ten years as a classical music and opera critic for the New York Times. She has also written for the BBC, the Moscow Times, and The Economist.</span></p> <p><br> </p> <p> </p>
Dec 26, 2018
Verdi's Otello: We All Have Demons, But Sometimes The Demons Have Us
26:43
<p><span>The legendary Plácido Domingo says he's not a jealous guy, but he must know <em>something</em> about it because he's played the part of Othello more than 200 times. Shakespeare called jealousy the "green-eyed monster" and no opera captures what happens when that monster takes over better than Verdi's adaptation of the tragedy.<span></span></span></p> <p><span>In this episode, host <a href="http://www.rhiannongiddens.com/">Rhiannon Giddens</a> and her guests consider how jealousy always seems to know where to find us: at work, in our friendships, and of course, in love. Plácido Domingo takes you through his career-defining role, sharing the tragedy of a man undone by his demons, plus you'll hear him sing the complete aria "Dio mi potevi Scagliar" from the <span><a href="https://www.metopera.org/">Metropolitan Opera</a></span><span> stage.</span></span></p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.placidodomingo.com"><strong>Pl<span>á</span>cido Domingo</strong></a> <span>is not only </span><span>Rhiannon's favorite singer, but he is also </span><span>one of the most influential artists in the history of opera. He just celebrated fifty years of performing at the Met and has played the role of Otello (by his count) 225 times.<br></span></p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.cognitivetherapynyc.com/dr-leahy.aspx">Robert L. Leahy</a></strong><span> is teaches at Weill Cornell Medical School and is the director of the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy in New York.</span><span> He's written 27 books, including <em><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Jealousy-Cure-Overcome-Possessiveness-Relationship/dp/1626259755">The Jealousy Cure</a>.</em></span></p> <p><a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0763650/"><strong>Ruben Santiago-Hudson</strong></a><span> is an actor, playwright and director.</span><span> He may best known for his work on TV and on Broadway, but this year he directed <em>Othello</em> for Shakespeare in the Park at the Delacorte Theater.<em><br></em></span></p> <p><span></span><a href="https://www2.clarku.edu/faculty/facultybio.cfm?id=9"><strong>Virginia Mason Vaughan</strong></a><span> is a member of the faculty at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. For more than three decades, she's studied the construct of race in Shakespeare's time and is the author of <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Othello-Contextual-Virginia-Mason-Vaughan/dp/0521587085"><em>Othello: A Contextual History</em></a>.</span><span><br></span><strong><br></strong> Thanks, too, to<strong> <a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm9335662/">Justin Cunningham</a> </strong>who read the part of Othello. He's a Julliard-trained actor and you'll see him next in the new Netflix series about the <span><a href="https://www.netflix.com/title/80200549">Central Park Five</a>.</span></p> <p><strong>The Team</strong></p> <p><em><span>Aria Code</span></em><span> is produced by WQXR in partnership with the Metropolitan Opera. Our team includes Merrin Lazyan, Brendan Francis Newnam, Matt Boynton, Ricardo Quiñones, Ania Grzesik, Khrista Rypl and Matt Abramovitz. Original music by Hannis Brown.</span></p>
Dec 19, 2018
Puccini's La Boheme: Is Love at First Sight Really a Thing?
25:02
<p><span>Love at first sight is not just a cliché of romantic comedies: more than half of all Americans say they’ve experienced it. Can this explain the timeless appeal of Puccini’s </span><em><span>La Bohème</span></em><span>? In this episode, host <a href="http://www.rhiannongiddens.com/">Rhiannon Giddens</a> and her guests consider what love at first sight is really all about, sharing perspectives on the music, the history and, yes, the brain science. Plus, you'll hear tenor Vittorio Grigolo sing the complete aria "Che gelida manina" from the </span><span><a href="https://www.metopera.org/">Metropolitan Opera</a></span><span> stage. </span><span></span></p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.vittoriogrigolo.com">Vittorio Grigolo</a> started singing as a young boy, when the Italian press gave him the nickname Il Pavarottino (“The Little Pavarotti”). Today, he is one of the world’s leading tenors. He debuted as Rodolfo in La Bohème at the Met in 2010.</p> <p><a href="http://www.jameskuslan.com">James Kuslan</a> is a lecturer and writer on opera and culture. His writing has appeared everywhere from the pages of Opera News to the liner notes of Deutsche Gramophon records.</p> <p><a href="http://www.helenfisher.com">Dr. Helen Fisher</a> is a biological anthropologist who studies the brain systems that affect human social behavior. She holds positions at Rutgers University and the Kinsey Institute. She is also the Chief Scientific Advisor to <a href="https://www.match.com/">Match.com</a>.</p> <p><strong>The Team</strong></p> <p><em><span>Aria Code</span></em><span> is produced by WQXR in partnership with the Metropolitan Opera. Our team includes Merrin Lazyan, Brendan Francis Newnam, Matt Boynton, Ricardo Quiñones, Ania Grzesik, Khrista Rypl and Matt Abramovitz. Original music by Hannis Brown.</span></p> <p><br><span></span></p>
Dec 12, 2018
Verdi's La Traviata: Opera's Original 'Pretty Woman'
33:10
<p><span>Verdi’s </span><em><span>La Traviata </span></em><span>revolves around the high-class courtesan Violetta, the quintessential "tart with a heart" who falls for Mr. Right but can’t decide whether she really wants to settle down. (Spoiler alert: it’s an opera, so she never gets the chance.) In this episode, host <a href="http://www.rhiannongiddens.com/">Rhiannon Giddens</a> and her guests reflect on Violetta’s spectacular Act I finale and its deep inner conflicts around love and freedom. Plus, you'll hear the complete aria sung from the Met Opera stage. </span></p> <p><strong>The Guests</strong></p> <p><span><a href="https://diana-damrau.com/en/">Diana Damrau</a> is one of the leading sopranos of our time. She has performed at all the world's major opera companies, specializing in lyric and coloratura roles. She's currently singing the role of Violetta at the <a href="https://www.metopera.org/">Metropolitan Opera</a>. </span></p> <p><span><a href="http://coriellison.com/">Cori Ellison</a> is the company dramaturg for Santa Fe Opera and has also worked with the Glynebourne Festival Opera, New York City Opera and the Juilliard School. She's our go-to opera guru for traditional and contemporary repertoire. </span></p> <p><a href="https://www.brookemagnanti.com/">Brooke Magnanti</a> is a writer who earned her doctorate in forensic pathology, but you might know her as Belle de Jour. Her book, <em>The Intimate Adventures of a London Call Girl</em>, documented her year working as an escort and inspired a TV series and several follow-up books.</p> <p><strong>The Team</strong></p> <p><em><span>Aria Code</span></em><span> is produced by WQXR in partnership with the Metropolitan Opera. Our team includes Merrin Lazyan, Brendan Francis Newnam, Matt Boynton, Ricardo Quiñones, Ania Grzesik, Khrista Rypl and Matt Abramovitz. Original music by Hannis Brown.<br></span></p>
Dec 04, 2018
Welcome to Aria Code with Rhiannon Giddens
2:21
<p>Aria Code is a new podcast that pulls back the curtain on some of the most famous arias in opera history, with insight from the biggest voices of our time, including Plácido Domingo, Diana Damrau, Sondra Radvanovsky, and many others. Hosted by Grammy Award-winner and MacArthur “Genius” Fellow Rhiannon Giddens, Aria Code is produced by WQXR in partnership with The Metropolitan Opera.<br><br>Each episode dives into one aria — a feature for a single singer — and explores how and why these brief musical moments have imprinted themselves in our collective consciousness and what it takes to stand on the Met stage and sing them.</p> <p>Our first episode drops December 4, 2018!</p>
Nov 19, 2018