Post Reports

By The Washington Post

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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post. For your ears. Martine Powers is your host, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays by 5 p.m. Eastern time.

Episode Date
“I hired you because you’re Black.”
1703
On today’s Post Reports, Michelle Singletary has an honest conversation about affirmative action. And, we take your questions about voting this year, starting with a listener in California.

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Introducing Sincerely, Michelle: A personal series by financial columnist Michelle Singletary examining misconceptions involving race and economics. The first topic? Affirmative action. 

Do you have a question about voting this election? Check out The Post’s How to Vote guide, a resource with information broken down by state about how to vote in-person or by mail. 

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Sep 18, 2020
The White women turning away from Trump
1346
On today’s “Post Reports,” Jenna Johnson reports on the White, suburban women who regret putting Donald Trump in office. Matt Zapotosky explains why Attorney General William Barr lambasting the Justice Department matters. And introducing “Canary,” a Washington Post investigative podcast hosted by Amy Brittain. 

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National political correspondent Jenna Johnson reports on the growing number of White female voters who regret voting for Donald Trump in 2016 and plan to vote for Democratic candidate Joe Biden this November. 

On Wednesday, Attorney General William Barr launched a scathing criticism of the DOJ, accusing the department of meddling with politics. National security reporter Matt Zapotosky explains how Barr compared department prosecutors to “preschoolers” and claimed that it was Barr, not career officials, who has the ultimate authority to decide how cases should be handled. 

Introducing The Washington Post’s new podcast, “Canary.” After a sexual assault case in D.C., one woman’s public warning ricochets all the way to Birmingham, Ala., where another woman gives voice to a devastating allegation.
This seven-part investigative series from The Washington Post follows the Alabama woman’s decision to come forward with a claim of sexual assault against a high-ranking figure in the D.C. criminal justice system, and the spiraling effects of that choice.

Hosted by investigative reporter Amy Brittain, coming Oct. 1. 

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Sep 17, 2020
How federal regulators failed meat plant workers
1686
On today’s Post Reports, more than 200 meatpacking workers have died of covid-19. Critics say that federal regulators have endangered employees by failing to respond appropriately. How the pandemic is transforming family practice doctors. And the Big 10 turns a 180. 

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So far, more than 200 meat packing employees have died of covid-19 in the United States. “We’re talking about problems in more than four hundred meat plants,” investigative reporter Kimberly Kindy says, but “two received fines: one Smithfield plant in South Dakota, one JBS in Colorado … And the fines were very small.”

Small, independent family practices are facing greater hardship as the pandemic wears on, especially in rural areas.. “Family doctors are really sort of the front-line physicians in American health care,” says business of health reporter Chris Rowland. “Their role, although they're the lowest-paid in medicine, is absolutely crucial to the functioning of the health system.” 

College football’s Big Ten was the first major conference to postpone its season. On Wednesday, Emily Giambalvo reports, it made a stunning reversal of that decision by announcing the season will resume at the end of October. 

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Sep 16, 2020
The 1963 Birmingham bombing’s ‘Fifth Girl’
1589
Sarah Collins Rudolph survived the Birmingham bombing 57 years ago today. Now, she wants restitution. And, an update on the criminal case in the death of George Floyd.

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The story of Sarah Collins Rudolph, who survived the 1963 Birmingham church bombing. The explosion killed her sister and three other girls. Now, she wants restitution and an apology. “She wants justice for herself,” explains enterprise reporter Sydney Trent. “She feels like she has been overlooked.”

The police officers charged in George Floyd’s killing are turning on each other, according to national political reporter Holly Bailey.

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Sep 15, 2020
After Oregon fires, no house to come home to
1727
Oregon residents struggle to find shelter away from wildfires and dense smoke. Why a Black autistic man is serving 10 years in prison for a car crash. And U.S. Open winner Naomi Osaka sends a strong message with her masks.

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Samantha Schmidt reports from Oregon, where state orders have evacuees sleeping in parking lots and residents find themselves without homes to return to

Video journalist Lindsey Sitz reports on the case of Matthew Rushin, a 22-year-old Black autistic man who is serving 10 years in prison after a car crash.


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Sep 14, 2020
Nineteen children and counting
1773
How one sperm donor found out he has 19 children -- and learned the promises and perils of online genetic testing. And, how dogs can sniff out diseases, including the coronavirus. 

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When Bryce Cleary donated his sperm in 1989, he was told he would have five donor children at most and all would be located on the East Coast, his own role hidden behind anonymity. Kyle Swenson reports that with the advent of genealogical websites like Ancestry.com and 23andMe, Cleary realized he one day might be revealed to the children he helped bring into the world.

As the novel coronavirus continues to ravage the world, researchers are racing to find a faster way to detect it. Frances Stead Sellers reports that nine dogs at the University of Pennsylvania are being trained to sniff out the disease.

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Sep 11, 2020
The American West is burning
2037
On today’s Post Reports, record-breaking wildfires are already spreading up the West Coast – and the fire season has only just begun. How a Homeland Security whistleblower was told to stop reports on potential Russian interference in the 2020 election. And, the issues with the new “Mulan.” 

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The Bay Area skies changed basically overnight, says Washington Post reporter Heather Kelly. One day “it was orange. It looked like Mars. It was dark. It was depressing.” 

As wildfires in the western United States rage on, it’s difficult to imagine the size of the wildfires, says extreme weather editor Andrew Freedman. “It is the entire distance, essentially, from the U.S. border with Canada in Washington state, to the U.S. border with Mexico in Southern California. That entire expanse is affected to some extent.”

A DHS whistleblower was told to cease intelligence reports on the threat of Russian interference ahead of the 2020 election. National security reporter Shane Harris says the whistleblower was told to stop in part because “it made the president look bad.” 

High expectations for Disney’s remake of “Mulan” have been tempered and riddled by geopolitics. Foreign affairs columnist Ishaan Tharoor says it’s a battle that Disney did not plan on having

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Sep 10, 2020
E. Jean Carroll v. the United States?
1636
The Justice Department seeks to intervene to the benefit of President Trump in a defamation case brought by journalist E. Jean Carroll, who accused him of raping her decades ago. Unemployed Americans say they won’t forget inaction by Congress. Plus, whether there’s a future for karaoke.

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Reporter Matt Zapotosky on the Justice Department’s case for defending the president in a year-old defamation suit.

People hurting financially in the U.S. say they won’t forget Congress’s lack of action during the pandemic, according to economics correspondent Heather Long.

Nightlife reporter Fritz Hahn says singing in public isn’t the safest thing to do during a pandemic. But karaoke super fans are eager for the fun to return.

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Sep 09, 2020
The postmaster general’s alleged straw-donor scheme
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The postmaster general faces new allegations of campaign finance violations. Why the pandemic is making it so hard for people to sleep. And your questions about immunity, answered. 

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Investigative reporter Aaron Davis has discovered that Postmaster General Louis DeJoy’s prolific campaign fundraising was bolstered for more than a decade by a practice that left many employees feeling pressured to make political contributions to GOP candidates –– money DeJoy later reimbursed through bonuses, former employees say.

Health and science reporter Karin Brulliard has noticed that the pandemic is making it harder for her (and a lot of other people) to sleep. Experts say this “coronasomnia” could imperil public health.

General assignment reporter Meryl Kornfield recently asked immunologists all your immunity-related questions. Some of their responses are encouraging. 

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Sep 08, 2020
Is it okay to laugh at Florida Man?
974
The beginnings of the Florida Man meme, and what it’s like to go viral on the worst day of your life.

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Is It okay to laugh at Florida Man? Writer Logan Hill investigates what happens after someone goes viral as the “world’s worst superhero”— and the moral implications of laughing along.

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Sep 07, 2020
The U.S. is deporting Nicaraguan asylum seekers
1117
The story of a Nicaraguan dissident who — in fear for his life and his family’s — sought asylum at the border. U.S. officials sent him back instead.

Moises Alberto Ortega Valdivia is a political dissident from Nicaragua who sought asylum in the U.S. He was denied that right. What happened next at the border was “shocking,” says Post correspondent Kevin Sieff. “To them and to basically anyone who follows immigration law.” 

After the Post published this article, Congress members wrote to President Trump, demanding Nicaraguan asylum seekers be allowed to apply. 

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Sep 04, 2020
Why your groceries just got more expensive
1579
On today’s Post Reports, how presidential candidates are shifting their focus to the Midwest. How the pandemic is making us pay more for less at the grocery store. And how grocery store workers morale is at an all-time low.

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Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is shifting his strategy in an attempt to win the Midwest. Matt Viser reports that the intentional contrast with President Trump makes the region the most crucial battleground in the 2020 campaign. 

What’s on your grocery store shelves? Turns out, it’s a lot less, for a lot more. Laura Reiley reports on how the pandemic is affecting the food supply chain

“They don’t even treat us like humans anymore”: Abha Bhatarrai explains how grocery store worker’s morale is at an all-time low

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Sep 03, 2020
The children left behind in online learning
1367
On today’s Post Reports, how distance learning widens the digital divide and leaves disconnected students behind. The unique challenges of special education during the pandemic. And, the toxic side of positivity.

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Education reporter Moriah Balingit on how schoolchildren are being locked out of virtual classrooms because of poor Internet connections. As many of the nation’s classrooms are moving online, more than 17 million students do not have high-speed Internet at home

As schools reopen, education reporter Perry Stein says that “the stakes are high for everyone. They are high for every child who’s not in school. But they are particularly high for special education kids.” 

The world has been turned upside, and experts say it’s okay if you’re not okay with that. Wellness reporter Allyson Chiu reports on the toxic effects of forced positivity. 

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Sep 02, 2020
The TikTok ban, explained
1805
Tech reporter Rachel Lerman on why President Trump wants to ban TikTok, and what a ban could mean for users and employees in the United States. Emily Rauhala explains what the pandemic means for international students in America. Plus, Lauren Lumpkin on what it feels like to start college remotely. 

Read more:




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Sep 01, 2020
What happens when federal workers get political
1921
Lisa Rein reports on the Hatch Act and the uneven way the anti-corruption law has been enforced for the past three years. Matt Zapotosky breaks down what we know about Stephen K. Bannon’s arrest. And remembering actor Chadwick Boseman. 

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As Trump appointees flout the Hatch Act, civil servants who get caught get punished.

Steve Bannon has been charged with defrauding donors in a private effort to raise money for Trump’s border wall.

Chadwick Boseman praised student protesters in his 2018 commencement speech at Howard University. Watch the video.
Aug 31, 2020
Two conventions, two American realities
1651
Political correspondent Dan Balz looks back at two very different conventions that painted two different portraits of America. Plus, NBA reporter Ben Golliver and sports columnist Jerry Brewer on what happened in the bubble and what it means for the role of sports in protests against racial injustice.

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Aug 28, 2020
A story on repeat in America
2067
Today on Post Reports, Kim Bellware is following protests in Kenosha, Wis., where a Black man was shot multiple times by police. Columnist Eugene Robinson on the civil rights moment we’re in, and why we need Black Lives Matter. Elise Viebeck reports on how voting by mail went in the primaries. And, deputy weather editor Andrew Freedman on what happens when you’re dealing with climate change, a pandemic and a Category 4 hurricane. 

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Hurricane Laura struck Louisiana as a Category 4 storm. Read live updates here.

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Aug 27, 2020
The quiet ambition of Mike Pence
1681
Tonight at the Republican National Convention, Mike Pence will accept the nomination for another term as vice president. White House bureau chief Philip Rucker explains how Pence has secured his longevity in the administration. Also on Post Reports, science reporter Carolyn Johnson on the truth behind the plasma treatment Trump has been touting as a coronavirus breakthrough. And climate reporter Sarah Kaplan on what the pandemic can teach us about fighting climate change.

Read more:




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Aug 26, 2020
The invisible hand of Melania Trump
1904
On the eve of Melania Trump’s big speech headlining the second night of the Republican National Convention, politics reporter Mary Jordan discusses the first lady’s reputation. Sarah Kaplan explains how genetic analysis of the coronavirus could help us map and control its spread. And Isabelle Khurshudyan on the mass demonstrations that have erupted in Belarus after a hotly contested presidential election.

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Melania Trump is about to give her biggest speech in four years. The Trump campaign hopes she can be its secret weapon.

Read an excerpt from “The Art of Her Deal”: How Melania Trump blocked Ivanka Trump from encroaching on her domain.

Genetic data show how a single superspreading event sent the coronavirus across Massachusetts –– and the nation.


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Aug 25, 2020
In the words of Trump’s sister: ‘You can’t trust him’
1820
Today on Post Reports, Michael Kranish explores the inner workings of the Trump family. Kevin Sieff looks at how work deemed essential led to one of the largest coronavirus outbreaks in the United States. Plus, Robin Givhan hunts down the rare fashion brand beloved by the women of Trump’s world. 

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For Guatemalans in Florida, essential work leads to a coronavirus outbreak. 


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Aug 24, 2020
Remote learning during a pandemic is hard
1849
Today on Post Reports, a story from the Post’s podcast All Told: As schools across the country wrestle with the question of how to best return to teaching in the fall, the story of one class’s preparation for Advanced Placement exams reveals the highs and lows, successes and struggles, that distance learning brings with it.

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Education reporter Laura Meckler writes about the struggle to prepare for AP exams across the nation.

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Aug 21, 2020
What happened at UNC-Chapel Hill?
1971
Nick Anderson talks about how the outbreak at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill foreshadows how other higher education institutions are reacting to the coronavirus. Matt Viser describes Joe Biden’s decades-long fight for the Democratic nomination. And, Caroline Kitchener explains the debate over Susan B. Anthony’s views on abortion -- and why it matters.

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The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reopened the campus for in-person classes. A week later, those classes went remote.

Former vice president Joe Biden has been imagining this moment for more than 50 years. It’s not exactly the triumph he had in mind.

Some conservatives want to celebrate Susan B. Anthony’s rumored antiabortion stance.

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Aug 20, 2020
How Howard University shaped Kamala Harris
1886
Rosalind S. Helderman on the new Senate report that alleges close ties between Trump’s 2016 campaign team and Russia. Fashion critic Robin Givhan shares Sen. Kamala D. Harris’s journey to a historically Black university. 

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Sen. Kamala D. Harris’s Black identity blossomed at Howard University, according to fashion critic Robin Givhan.

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Aug 19, 2020
Women’s suffrage and the Black women left out
1479
Today on Post Reports, Katie Mettler on the little known story about how the 19th Amendment was ratified. And historian Martha S. Jones on how Black women had to keep fighting for the right to vote after the 19th Amendment passed.

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A mother’s letter, a son’s choice and the little known story about the 19th Amendment’s ratification.

Black women fought to get the right to vote long after White women earned it.


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Aug 18, 2020
Trump vs. the Postal Service
1310
Ashley Parker traces President Trump’s obsession with the U.S. Postal Service. Freelance journalist Kayla Ruble talks about why young Black voters yearn for policy, not promises, from Sen. Kamala Harris. Plus, Dino Grandoni on the hunters and fishers asking Congress to deliver climate change solutions.

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Tracing Trump’s Postal Service obsession — from ‘loser’ to ‘scam’ to ‘rigged election’.

A large portion of young Black voters in the U.S. aren’t entirely convinced Sen. Kamala Harris will be the change they need.

Hunters and fishermen are asking Congress for climate change solutions. Here’s why that’s unusual.

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Aug 17, 2020
Ten bucks left, no place to go
1379
Today on Post Reports, social issues reporter Kyle Swenson explains how America’s unemployment system is stretched to the brink by the pandemic. And reporter Sydney Page on one artist’s random acts of kindness, and what they mean to health-care heroes. 

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Ten bucks left, no place to go: How the pandemic and a broken unemployment system are upending people’s lives.

Health-care workers are opening their mailboxes and finding their own portraits.

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Aug 14, 2020
What’s up with the Postal Service?
1465
On Today’s Post Reports, Jacob Bogage explains how delays and a partisan battle over funding the U.S. Postal Service may affect the election. Jose A. Del Real reports on Latino voters in Arizona, who may hold the key for a Democratic win there. And, Sarah Kaplan with a climate solution for America’s hottest cities. 

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Trump says the Postal Service needs money for mail-in voting but he’ll keep blocking funding.

Latinos transformed Arizona. Do campaigns see them? 

How America’s hottest city will survive climate change

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Aug 13, 2020
Kamala Harris, Joe Biden and the future for Democrats
1773
Today on Post Reports, national political reporter Annie Linskey breaks down the reasons behind Joe Biden’s historic choice of Sen. Kamala D. Harris as his running mate. Sports columnist Sally Jenkins on why it takes courage to hit pause on college football. Sarah Dadouch reports on the shattered lives left behind after the blasts in Beirut last week — plus, the story of a doctor whose wedding video shoot accidentally captured the explosions and went viral. 


Read more:

Inside Biden’s unusual VP pick process: Tough questions, 11 finalists and many lawyers.




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Aug 12, 2020
More mail-in ballots, more problems?
1680
Today on Post Reports, Elise Viebeck on the anxieties around voting by mail ahead of November. Phil Rucker explains how the White House failed to contain the coronavirus as the summer cases crept up. And Shibani Mahtani reports on the crackdown in Hong Kong. 

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Anxieties about mail ballots were on full display in the latest round of primaries, highlighting worries for fall. 

The lost days of summer: How Trump fell short in containing the virus. 

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrested under national security law as political structures unravel. 

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Aug 11, 2020
America’s eviction crisis
1169
Today on Post Reports, Renae Merle reports on why the expiration of rent relief will trigger a wave of evictions in at-risk communities. Dino Grandoni explains the fight to keep the lights on in households across the country. And, Teddy Amenabar on how to read your coronavirus test results. 

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Evictions are likely to skyrocket as jobs remain scarce. Black renters will be hard hit. And landlords are pushing back on a federal moratorium.

Congress faces pressure as states lift electricity shut-off bans during the coronavirus crisis. 


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Aug 10, 2020
A new gentrification crisis
1433
Today on Post Reports: Tracy Jan on how the pandemic is exacerbating the effects of gentrification in cities like Los Angeles. From Linah Mohammad and Hira Qureshi, how the Hulu series “Ramy” tackles taboos, and why it’s gotten criticism from the Muslim community. And Brittany Renee Mayes explains why Black-owned bookstores are seeing a boom in orders of anti-racist literature.

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Ethnic enclaves are struggling to fight gentrification during the pandemic.

The Hulu show “Ramy” tackles taboos. But it’s also gotten criticism from the Muslim community.

Demand for anti-racist literature is up. Black bookstore owners are hoping it will last.

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Aug 07, 2020
How negligence killed scores in Beirut
1686
Today on Post Reports, Sarah Dadouch brings us on the ground in Beirut, and Liz Sly reports on how the massive explosion there has thrown the city into deeper crisis. Columnist Jerry Brewer ruminates on how sports won’t be sports in the time of covid-19. And a Black doctor on how his scrubs are a form of armor.

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Shock turns to anger as Beirut assesses damage inflicted by massive explosion

Sports used to be an escape from the world. Now, they’re a window into it.

A Black doctor on why he wears his scrubs everywhere now.

 
Aug 06, 2020
The organ transplant aftershock
1657
Early on in the pandemic, we solicited queries from Post Reports listeners about covid-19. We received all kinds of responses — about masks, social distancing, food safety, testing, symptoms. And we received an email from one listener, Charlotte Cudd of Jacksonville, Fla., who was curious about whether people who die of covid-19 can still become organ donors. On today’s episode, we seek to answer her question — and we ask a few of our own.



Aug 05, 2020
America’s vanishing economy
1784
Heather Long on the economy’s decline, Madhulika Sikka talks to “Indian Matchmaking” creator Smirti Mundhra. Plus, the “Can He Do That?” podcast examines why we do polling.

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Netflix’s new hit “Indian Matchmaking” misses the full story on arranged marriage

How America votes is inherently unpredictable. So why do polling?
Aug 04, 2020
How the pandemic left America behind
1983
As countries around the world are emerging from lockdowns and cautiously returning to life as normal, it’s beginning to feel like most of the world is showing up to a post-pandemic celebration party where Americans are not invited. On today’s “Post Reports,” we ask the question: Where did the U.S. go wrong? What’s it like in places where the curve has successfully been flattened? Which countries are still struggling with covid-19? And how has the American failure in pandemic response shifted the way that the U.S. is viewed on the global stage?

The crisis that shocked the world: America’s response to the coronavirus

Beijing’s summer is more oppressive than usual, but most prefer the heat over the virus

With American tourists banned from Italy, Amalfi Coast workers are sliding into poverty

Brazil ignored the warnings. Now, while other countries fret over a second coronavirus wave, it can’t get past its first.

Aug 03, 2020
Capital B for Black
1424
In a newsroom, it’s rare that a question of whether to capitalize a word sparks intense discussion and debate. But in June, an issue of textual style became an urgent topic at The Washington Post: Should journalists begin capitalizing the word “Black” when used as a racial identifier? And if so … what does that mean for “White”? And “Brown”? 

“During my lifetime, this decision has come up a lot,” says Jesse Lewis, who leads The Post’s copy editing desk. “I was born in the ’50s, and at the time, ‘Negro’ was the preferred term. … Then you get to the late ’60s, early ’70s, ‘African-American’ was used as the term of discussion. There are things that happen in society that bring these issues to the forefront.” 

The story of how The Post’s final decision came about — with intense discussions within our newsroom and throughout the journalism industry — says a lot about our moment of racial reckoning, and the thoughtfulness and deliberation that moment demands. 

And the results can be controversial — especially when it came to the decision on whether to identify America’s White community with a capital W. 

“There’s a certain denialism to the idea that race isn’t an issue,” Lewis said, arguing for the need to classify White as a racial identity. “Writers have said, maybe you just uppercase ‘White’ because then it’s recognized, or Whites recognize it as a racial category, and they will have to deal with the consequences of being categorized by race.”

Read more:

The Washington Post memo on writing style changes for racial and ethnic identifiers: The Post will capitalize Black to identify groups that make up the African diaspora.


Eve Ewing: I’m a Black Scholar Who Studies Race. Here’s Why I Capitalize ‘White.’


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Jul 31, 2020
Can police learn to de-escalate?
2040
Police officers around the country are fielding an increasing number of mental-health calls. Hannah Dreier documents what it’s been like for one officer who recently completed his department’s de-escalation training. And, Michelle Boorstein reports on how gospel choirs are adapting to the pandemic’s socially distanced reality.

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Converging in a tense section of Huntsville: A White police officer fresh from de-escalation training, a troubled Black woman with a gun, and a crowd with cellphones ready to record.

Her gospel choir brought her closer to God. Now she can only hum from home.

Can a president delay a U.S. election? The Washington Post’s ‘Can He Do That’ podcast unpacks the question.

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Jul 30, 2020
The attorney general’s defense
1750
Amber Phillips recaps Attorney General William P. Barr’s combative testimony on Capitol Hill. Peter Whoriskey uncovers how Johnson & Johnson companies used a “super poppy” to make narcotics for America’s most abused opioid pills. Plus, Michael Andor Brodeur on the sound of the pandemic. 

Read more:




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Jul 29, 2020
No really, how long before a coronavirus vaccine?
1587
Trying to find 30,000 test subjects for a coronavirus vaccine, from Carolyn Y. Johnson. How white moms on the front line of Portland, Ore., protests are trying to balance power with privilege, according to the people who spoke with reporter Marissa Lang. Plus, a seismically quiet Earth during the pandemic’s shutdowns, from science reporter Joel Achenbach.

Read more:

Trials for coronavirus vaccines are underway, but we still have a long way to go.

The “Wall of Moms” participating in Portland’s protests are also becoming the face of the movement. Here’s why that might be a problem. 


Get all of the questions you might have about the coronavirus answered with this FAQ from The Post.

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Jul 28, 2020
Public vs. private: The pandemic education gap
1406
Perry Stein on the private-school choice parents are making as public classrooms remain closed. Geoff Fowler guides us through the privacy risks on TikTok. And Michele Norris explains the significance of John Lewis’s final journey. 

Read more:

As public schools go all virtual in the fall, parents eye private schools that promise to open their campuses.

Is it time to delete TikTok? A guide to the rumors and real privacy risks

The late congressman John Lewis lies in state at the Capitol.

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Jul 27, 2020
Policing while black
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As a black police officer in Plainfield, N.J., Martesse Gilliam thought he could change policing from the inside — until he ended up on the outside. Plus, Steven Zeitchik on how movie theaters are adjusting to the pandemic. 

Read more:




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Jul 24, 2020
A show of force in American cities
1644
Matt Zapotosky dissects the deployment of federal agents to American cities. Max Bearak reports on the surprising effects of the coronavirus on Kenya’s wildlife preservation. And Dave Sheinin on the changes to baseball on Opening Day. 

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Trump announces an increase in the use of federal law enforcement in U.S. cities.

Coronavirus is crushing tourism — and cutting off a lifeline for wildlife.

Opening day amid coronavirus: Masks, empty parks, social justice.


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Jul 23, 2020
A looming deadline for tens of millions of Americans
1776
Today on Post Reports, Jeff Stein tracks the GOP infighting complicating the trillion-dollar stimulus deal. As President Trump nears the end of his first term, Juliet Eilperin explains what’s at stake in the environmental world. And Christopher Rowland, on the race to make enough small glass vials to deliver coronavirus vaccines around the world. 

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Glass vials for vaccines are in demand, as governments and drug companies rush to lock down supply. 


Jul 22, 2020
The Gettysburg Troll
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Investigative reporter Dalton Bennett goes on a quest to find the shadowy figure behind a number of social media hoaxes –– the most recent played out in Gettysburg on Independence Day –– that have riled far-right extremists and repeatedly duped media outlets. 

Read more:



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Jul 21, 2020
Federal agents storm Portland
1385
Today on Post Reports, Devlin Barrett and Marissa Lang explain why federal tactical units have been deployed to Portland, Ore. — over the protest of city officials. And Jonathan Capehart, on the life and legacy of John Lewis.

Read more:

Federal officials ignore city officials’ calls to leave Portland as clashes with protesters continue.


Hear more from and about John Lewis on Post podcasts Cape Up and Constitutional.


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Jul 20, 2020
Inside the Houston surge
2146
Full emergency rooms. Expanded ICUs. Double shifts. 3 a.m. phone calls to patients’ families. A look inside the hospitals at Texas Medical Center in Houston — the epicenter of the state’s new surge in coronavirus cases.

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As coronavirus cases skyrocket across Texas, hospitals grapple with patient influxes.


Jul 17, 2020
A tale of two vaccine searches
1747
Carolyn Y. Johnson explains how the unsuccessful years-long hunt for an HIV vaccine could give scientists a leg up in developing a novel coronavirus vaccine. Carlos Lozada dissects Mary L. Trump’s new book. And Ben Golliver shares a glimpse from inside the NBA bubble at Disney World. 

Read more:

Decades of research on an HIV vaccine boost the bid for one against coronavirus.

The real villain of Mary L. Trump’s family tell-all isn’t Donald. It’s Fred.

What’s it like in the NBA’s Disney bubble? For one reporter: Hotel room workouts and lots of time to think.

Jul 16, 2020
A crisis for education
1565
Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent Austin Beutner on the decision to keep public schools online in the fall. Laura Meckler explains the delicate dance local districts are facing with whether to allow students on campus. And Nick Anderson, on a victory for international college students.

Read more:



The Trump administration has dropped its plan to strip international college students taking only online classes of their visas.

Jul 15, 2020
How some campus health centers fail students
1768
Jenn Abelson describes the state of college campus health-care centers. William Wan reports on the recurring supply shortages challenging health-care workers. And, Emily Heil explains the boycott against Goya.

Read more:

As students return to college amid the coronavirus pandemic, campus health-care centers across the country face their biggest test

What’s your experience been like with college health centers? Tell us your story.



Jul 14, 2020
How Trump rewards loyalty
1487
Toluse Olorunnipa reports on the fallout of Roger Stone’s commutation. Marissa Lang discusses the concerns of organizations that help victims of domestic violence. And Robert McCartney explains how Washington’s NFL team is dropping its name. 

Read more:

Trump commuted his confidant’s sentence. Roger Stone was convicted of lying to Congress and witness tampering.



Jul 13, 2020
A new Hong Kong
1252
Shibani Mahtani reports on the security law sending a chill through Hong Kong. Abha Bhattarai explains why workers are being laid off — again. And Cleve Wootson on the implications of reopening Disney World in Florida.

Read more:


Workers are being laid off for a second time, as coronavirus surge puts the brakes on reopening the economy. 

Florida invited the nation to its reopening. Then it became a new coronavirus epicenter

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Jul 10, 2020
Will we ever see Trump’s taxes?
1814
Today on Post Reports, David Fahrenthold explains the Supreme Court’s rulings on Trump’s tax records, and why the public still may never see them. Debbie Cenziper on how a nursing home administered a cocktail of unapproved drugs to its residents. And music critic Michael Andor Brodeur ventures out to hear live music for the first time since the pandemic began. 

Read more:

Supreme Court rules Manhattan’s District Attorney may subpoena Trump’s tax records, denies Congress access for now. 

‘The covid cocktail’: How a Pa. nursing home gave some veterans hydroxychloroquine even without covid-19 testing.

Going to my first concert of the pandemic felt like preparing for battle. Then I got there

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Jul 09, 2020
Black women to Biden: You owe us
1674
Today on Post Reports, Errin Haines on what black female voters want from the Democratic Party. Michael Scherer explores the relevance of political conventions during a pandemic. And Tiana Clark on getting divorced over videoconference. 

Read more:

Black women show up at the polls. Will the Democratic party show up for them?


The surreal anticlimax of getting divorced over videoconference

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Jul 08, 2020
Teaching the human body to fight covid-19
1632
Today on Post Reports, Carolyn Johnson explains that in the rush to find a vaccine for the coronavirus, scientists are turning to an elegant but unproven method. Jonathan O’Connell  reports on how the Small Business Administration funneled relief funds to major chains and private-equity investors. And, Taylor Turner on how historically black colleges and universities face unique challenges during the pandemic.

Read more:

RNA vaccines have leapt to the front of the fight against the coronavirus. Will they work?

Data shows small business loans went to big business, members of Congress.


Despite the coronavirus, historically black colleges continue to help their students weather any storm. 

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Jul 07, 2020
Will there be another stimulus bill?
1622
Congress has adjourned for a two-week recess without addressing the alarming rise in coronavirus infections or the ongoing economic crisis. Erica Werner explains what might come next. Aaron Blake reports on how some Republicans lawmakers are moving toward mandating masks, even as Trump continues to question how dangerous the coronavirus really is. And Ben Guarino on the new elevator etiquette amid a pandemic. 

Read more:

Congress departs for two-week recess without addressing coronavirus spikes, economic strains.


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Jul 06, 2020
“The Cursed Platoon,” Part 2
1477
This is the second episode of a two-part series. After a second-degree murder conviction, Clint Lorance was pardoned by President Trump and received a hero’s welcome in his small hometown in Texas. Reporter Greg Jaffe started talking to his platoon, and the story that unraveled was about what happens when your reality is questioned by the president and Fox News. 

Read more:

The soldiers of 1st Platoon tell their story

If you’re a veteran, The Post wants to hear your response to this story and what happened with Clint Lorance.

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Jul 03, 2020
“The Cursed Platoon,” Part 1
1909
This is the first episode of a two-part series. After a second-degree murder conviction, Clint Lorance was pardoned by President Trump and received a hero’s welcome in his small hometown in Texas. Reporter Greg Jaffe started talking to his platoon, and the story that unraveled was about what happens when your reality is questioned by the president and Fox News. 

Read more:

The soldiers of 1st Platoon tell their story

If you’re a veteran, The Post wants to hear your response to this story and what happened with Clint Lorance.

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Jul 02, 2020
Why would Russia pay the Taliban to kill U.S. troops?
1675
Ellen Nakashima explains the story behind Russia-backed bounties on American troops in Afghanistan. Sarah Kaplan explains the practical effects of a coronavirus mutation. And, Damian Paletta on the future of the fireworks industry.

Read more:


This coronavirus mutation has taken over the world. Scientists are trying to understand why. 

Trump’s tariffs could fizzle fireworks, an American tradition that’s 95 percent made in China.

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Jul 01, 2020
The child-care problem
1332
How the lack of child care during the pandemic is hurting families and businesses, from Heather Long. Why women are more affected by this economic downturn, from Samantha Schmidt. And what it’s like to join Alcoholics Anonymous over Zoom, from Sarah Pulliam Bailey.

Read more:

The pandemic upended child care. It could be devastating for women.

The pandemic’s effect on the economy is not like the “mancession” of 2007.


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Jun 30, 2020
A reprieve for abortion rights
1759
Robert Barnes and Caroline Kitchener on a Supreme Court decision that upholds abortion rights. Lenny Bernstein on surging coronavirus infections in the United States. And, Mississippi votes to remove the Confederate symbol from its state flag.

Read more:


The Supreme Court just delivered a major victory for abortion rights. Providers say it’s hard to celebrate.


U.S. coronavirus failures exposed by record surge in new infections.


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Jun 29, 2020
Policing the black imagination
1765
Today on Post Reports, Chris Richards on how rapper Drakeo the Ruler dropped an urgent and timely album from jail. And Fredrick Kunkle on the history of germs, and how the discovery of pathogens changed the way we live. 

Read more:

The most urgent rap album of 2020? Drakeo the Ruler just recorded it from jail.

The discovery of pathogens changed the way we function. Will covid-19 do the same?

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Jun 26, 2020
Tamir Rice’s mother on the trauma of loss
1223
In 2014, Tamir Rice was fatally shot by a police officer while playing with a toy gun. He was 12 years old. Video editor Taylor Turner speaks with his mother, Samaria Rice, on the trauma she still carries. And, Samantha Schmidt on why the decrease in reports of child abuse isn’t cause for celebration.

Read more:

WATCH: On Tamir Rice’s 18th birthday, his mother addresses PTSD and police brutality

With kids stuck at home, emergency doctors report more severe cases of child abuse. 

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Jun 25, 2020
The economics of Trump’s visa restrictions
1838
On today’s Post Reports, Nick Miroff explains President Trump’s restrictions on foreign visas and why they are a long-awaited victory for immigration hardliners. Joseph Marks reports on how we can learn from recent primaries ahead of the general election in November. And sports columnist Jerry Brewer explains the deepening NASCAR drama.

Read more:

Trump’s new restrictions on foreign workers, explained.

Reports of mail-in ballots and difficulty voting spell trouble for November

What we see in a flag or a noose or a black racer is telling. Sports opinion writer Jerry Brewer says we can do better. 

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Jun 24, 2020
Times are changing. The president's message is not.
1656
Today on Post Reports, Josh Dawsey and Philip Rucker on how a week of defeat for President Trump could play out. Jerry Brewer explains how NASCAR has become front and center in discussions about systemic racism. 

Read more:

President Trump rallies in red states to a sea of empty blue seats

NASCAR doubles down in support for Bubba Wallace, the only black driver in the major circuit, after a noose was found in his garage after the league bans Confederate flags at its events

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Jun 23, 2020
How to develop a vaccine — quickly and ethically
1815
Carolyn Johnson reports on the race to develop a vaccine for the novel coronavirus and how it could pit countries against one another. Ben Guarino on why bioethicists are thinking hard about coronavirus vaccine testing. And Maura Judkis on why so many people are convinced that they had covid-19 already.

Read more:

The biggest challenge for a coronavirus vaccine could be getting countries to share.


Many are convinced that they’ve already had covid-19.

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Jun 22, 2020
Why Americans don’t learn about Tulsa, or Juneteenth
1718
Michele Norris on what happened in Tulsa — and why Americans don’t learn this history in school. Nicole Ellis on the history of Juneteenth. And Taylor Turner talks about her personal connection to the holiday.

Read more:


Trump rally in Tulsa, site of a race massacre, on Juneteenth was “almost blasphemous,” historian says.

What Juneteenth tells us about the value of black life in America.

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Jun 19, 2020
What’s next for the ‘dreamers’?
1577
Robert Barnes reports on the Supreme Court’s ruling against the Trump administration’s attempt to end DACA. We hear from dreamers about what’s next and why their fight isn’t over. And Marc Fisher on the elderly people becoming radio DJs to connect with one another. 

Read more:

Supreme Court rules against the Trump administration’s attempt to end DACA, a win for undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children.


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Jun 18, 2020
The NFL after George Floyd
1839
Jerry Brewer on the NFL’s moment of reckoning over Black Lives Matter. Amber Phillips on the policing bill unveiled by the Senate GOP. And, Sarah Kaplan on the most famous skyscraper in New York going green. 

Read more:


Senate GOP unveils policing bill that would discourage, but not ban, tactics such as chokeholds and no-knock warrants.


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Jun 17, 2020
How BLM is challenging Big Tech
1788
Geoffrey Fowler describes the questions Black Lives Matter is raising for Big Tech. Ben Golliver considers the future of professional sports. And Marisa Iati, on how one data scientist is pushing back against faulty coronavirus stats in Florida. 

Read more:

Black Lives Matter could change facial recognition forever – if Big Tech doesn’t stand in the way.


Florida fired its coronavirus data scientist. Now she’s publishing the statistics on her own.

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Jun 16, 2020
SCOTUS rules in favor of LGBTQ workers
1548
Robert Barnes walks through the Supreme Court decision that protects gay and transgender people in the workplace. Karla Adam explains why minority and immigrant doctors are feeling the brunt of the coronavirus burden in Britain. And Eugene Scott describes how it feels to be a Black journalist right now. 

Read more:




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Jun 15, 2020
Why Hollywood loves cop stories
2062
Alyssa Rosenberg on 100 years of police in pop culture and why we need to rethink cop stories on TV. And, fashion critic Robin Givhan on the symbolism of clothing on Capitol Hill this week. 

Read more:


Dragnets, Dirty Harry and dying hard: 100 years of the police in pop culture.

Congress’s kente-cloth spectacle was a mess of contradictions.

George Floyd’s brother came to Washington to speak. But his power was in the silences.

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Jun 12, 2020
What it means to ‘defund the police’
1992
Katie Mettler and Georgetown’s Christy Lopez delve into the movement to “defund the police.” Michael Kranish looks into Joe Biden’s complicated history on criminal justice. And Lenny Bernstein reports on a new hope for patients whose lungs have suffered from covid-19.

Read more:

Defund the police? Here’s what that really means

Joe Biden let police groups write his crime bill. Now, his agenda has changed.

Surgeons perform the first known lung transplant for a coronavirus patient in the U.S. 

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Jun 11, 2020
Why a vaccine won’t be a silver bullet
1634
Joel Achenbach tracks the rising coronavirus caseloads in some parts of the country. William Wan explains how the virus could become the next measles or chickenpox. And Ben Guarino talks us through a time-tested method for disease containment. 

Read more:


Coronavirus may never go away — even with a vaccine

Reopening the country safely means deploying “disease detectives” — contact tracers — as soon as possible.

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Jun 10, 2020
A funeral, and a call to justice
1553
George Floyd is laid to rest in Texas. We hear from some of the people who knew him. President Trump and federal law enforcement vs. Washington, D.C. And how a black police officer responded to protests.
Jun 09, 2020
Why police convictions are so rare
1753
Marissa Lang and Clarence Williams report from Washington, D.C., as protests continue across the country. Georgetown University’s Paul Butler explains why it’s so difficult to prosecute police. And Heather Long looks at why black Americans have been left out of the economic recovery. 

Read more:

Protesters gather on the streets of Washington, D.C., and around the world. 

Filing charges in George Floyd’s death was the easy part. Now comes the hard part.

Digging deeper into the latest jobs report — and how black Americans are getting left behind.

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Jun 08, 2020
The legacy of American riots
1288
Kellie Carter Jackson on the double standard that guides who can protest – and how – in the United States. And, Rachel Chason and Rebecca Tan examine what nursing home residents are experiencing during the pandemic.

Read more:


Nursing homes have been hard-hit by the coronavirus. Hear from residents in these facilities.

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Jun 05, 2020
The failure to protect black Americans from covid-19
1575
Reporter Robert Samuels talks about how disastrous and present coronavirus has been in the black community. Emily Rauhala on President Trump’s decision to sever ties with the World Health Organization during a pandemic. And Rachel Lerman on the pros and cons of surveillance for racial injustice protesters and police. 

Read more:

Blacks are suffering from covid-19 at an alarming rate. Here’s how U.S. cities failed one of their most vulnerable populations.

President Trump pledges to divert funds from the World Health Organization and complicates the U.S.’s relationship with Beijing. 

Racial injustice protesters can find themselves in the crosshairs of facial recognition technology, while other cameras seem to help their cause.

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Jun 04, 2020
Racism, protests and the challenge for Joe Biden
1621
How Joe Biden is responding to protests across the United States, from political reporter Cleve R. Wootson Jr. How President Trump uses religion as a political tool, from White House reporter Toluse Olorunnipa. And we hear from the protesters in their own words.

Read more:
Protests pose a challenge for Biden: Appealing to older and younger black voters


We’ve been hearing a lot about the protests in cities across the country after the death of George Floyd — now we hear from the protestors themselves. 

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Jun 03, 2020
Protesters vs. a presidential photo-op
1575
Why gas was used on peaceful protesters outside the White House, from Ashley Parker. How the U.S. has scaled back police reform efforts, according to Matt Zapotosky. And, one young woman says “Let it burn” after her family’s business gets caught up in the destruction.

Read more:

Police cleared the path for President Trump to take a photo, using gas and rubber bullets on a peaceful crowd. 

The Trump administration abandoned Obama-era police reform efforts. Now critics want them restored.

“Let it burn,” says the daughter of business owners in Minneapolis.

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Jun 02, 2020
Anger and anguish across America
1909
Devlin Barrett on how police tactics may be exacerbating tensions. Shane Harris on the officials who are trying to blame outsiders. And Christian Davenport talks about a historic launch into space. 

Read more:

How police are feeding into the violence that erupted over the weekend.


Also, over the weekend: The historic SpaceX launch.

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Jun 01, 2020
One hundred thousand.
1216
The U.S. death toll has reached a stark milestone: 100,000 deaths from the coronavirus. The pandemic has exposed the nation’s vulnerabilities and dangerous divide.

Read more:


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May 30, 2020
‘We woke up to a city of ash’
1963
Holly Bailey reports from Minneapolis, where anger and violence are boiling over in the aftermath of George Floyd’s killing by police. Errin Haines explains what really happened in Central Park. And Sebastian Smee with an appreciation for a powerful painting that captures another unsettling time in America.

Read more:

Protests in Minneapolis raged through the night, following the tragic killing of George Floyd. On Friday, the police officer was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. 

In New York’s Central Park, a white woman called the police on an African American man after he asked her to leash her dog, per park rules. Understanding the fraught dynamic and legacy of calling the cops. 

This powerful painting from 1967 captures another unsettling time in America.

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May 29, 2020
Trump vs. Big Tech
1412
Cat Zakrzewski reports on Trump’s expected executive order, which takes aim at a law that protects big tech companies. Tracy Jan reports that Asian American health-care workers are fighting racism as well as the coronavirus. And, Natalie Compton on what to expect next time you take a flight. 

Read more:

On Thursday, President Trump is expected to sign an executive order that could fundamentally change free speech regulations on social media.

Asian American health-care workers are facing increased discrimination during the coronavirus pandemic. 

More people are traveling by air again. Here’s what to expect at airports and on planes.

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May 28, 2020
It’s not normal for so many Americans to feel depressed
1533
William Wan reports on the staggering numbers of Americans experiencing depression and anxiety during the pandemic. National reporter Reis Thebault on how the pandemic is shifting away from cities and gaining a foothold in rural America. And writer Ellen McCarthy on why we can’t bring ourselves to do the dishes. 

Read more:

One-third of Americans show signs of clinical depression amid coronavirus pandemic, according to new census data. 

The pandemic is making its way into rural America. 

Our hearts are heavy, our sinks are full. Why the dishes will never be done. 

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May 27, 2020
Will Hong Kong be changed forever?
1771
Shibani Mahtani and Emily Rauhala explain what Beijing’s new security laws could mean for the future of Hong Kong. Steven Zeitchik on summer cinema in 2020. And a New York bus driver on the dangers such workers face. 

Read more:


The fate of the summer movie season rests on one Christopher Nolan film


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May 26, 2020
Why the need to go might prevent us from going out
993
Americans are making it clear: They won’t be ready to go out to their favorite destinations until they feel confident about being able to go. To the bathroom, that is.

Read more:

The need to go is a big barrier to going out. Why public bathrooms are a stumbling block for reopening.

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May 23, 2020
Who is Hillary without Bill?
1518
Novelist Curtis Sittenfeld imagines another life for Hillary Rodham –– one without Bill Clinton. And, what we’re missing when we’re missing human touch. 

Read more:

Some readers are calling Curtis Sittenfeld’s new book a work of ‘Pantsuit Nation fanfiction.’ She doesn’t mind at all.  

Skin-to-skin contact is often suggested for newborns. But we all need touch.

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May 22, 2020
The end of retail as we know it?
1743
Abha Bhattarai and Damian Paletta unfold the retail bankruptcies weighing down the greater financial system. Chris Davenport explains the stakes of the first launch of NASA crews from the United States in nearly a decade. And, Hira Qureshi on the online community that’s breaking the fast together, each night of Ramadan.

Read more:

After years of debt, major department store chains are running out of cash –– and fast. 


Millennials can’t celebrate in person this Ramadan. So they’re sharing food photos with strangers instead.

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May 21, 2020
Vote by mail? Harder than it sounds.
1678
Joseph Marks describes the challenges of preparing for massive mail-in voting. Juliet Eilperin breaks down why people aren’t getting tested, in places that have plenty of tests. Plus, Min Joo Kim explains how a new outbreak in South Korea has pushed its LGBTQ community into the spotlight. 

Read more:


As coronavirus testing expands, a new problem arises: Not enough people are getting tested


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May 20, 2020
Fighting covid-19: A tale of two countries
1634
Linah Mohammad reflects on the strict lockdown in Jordan. Ishaan Tharoor unpacks how the “Swedish model” for battling coronavirus is not quite what it seems. Plus, Amanda Coletta explains why expanding your household’s bubble could be a headache. 

Read more:


Sweden’s coronavirus strategy is not what it seems.

Canadian provinces allow locked-down households to pair up – threatening hurt feelings all around.

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May 19, 2020
What happens when the watchdog gets fired
1492
Phil Rucker reports on Trump’s dismissal of the State Department’s inspector general. George Washington University’s Kathryn Newcomer on why these positions matter in overseeing the executive branch. Plus, Faiz Siddiqui investigates the pandemic-time deliveries of alcoholic beverages.

Read more:

The State Department inspector general fired by President Trump was looking into allegations that a staffer for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was performing domestic errands and chores.

According to California regulators, food delivery apps fueled alcohol sales to minors.

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May 18, 2020
What comes after reparations
1156
In 1923, an all-white mob burned down the small mill town of Rosewood, Fla., killing at least six people and driving out black residents. Decades later, the survivors won reparations from Florida legislators, including a scholarship that allowed any Rosewood descendants to attend any of the state’s public universities. Robert Samuels reports on a conversation around the complicated legacy and effects of those reparations. 

Read more:

How a scholarship helped — and didn't help — descendants of victims of the Rosewood racial massacre.

Photos of the Rosewood descendants that keep a once-forgotten history alive. 

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May 15, 2020
Choosing between a paycheck and your health
2090
Today on Post Reports, Holly Bailey and Tony Romm report that as some states begin to reopen, people returning to work face life-or-death decisions. Aaron Davis explains how an ousted U.S. health official testifies that 2020 may be “the darkest winter in modern history.” And, author Mary Beard on what she’s reading during this pandemic — she recommends Rebecca Solnit’s “Recollections of My Nonexistence.”

Read more:

People returning to work in states that are beginning to ease social distancing measures are forced to weigh their financial well-being and the risk of contracting the coronavirus

Ousted U.S. health official Richard Bright is blowing the whistle on the Trump administration’s handling of the early weeks of the pandemic

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May 14, 2020
Is dining out officially dead?
1726
Today on Post Reports, investigative reporter Amy Brittain on the truth about Project Airbridge, a White House program set up to deliver badly needed personal protective equipment. Food reporter Laura Reiley explains the long road to recovery for restaurants. And Rachel Lerman says bartering is back in the time of the coronavirus. 

Read more:

Trump promised that Project Airbridge would deliver essential supplies to medical workers, but a Post investigation reveals the emergency program is swathed in secrecy and exaggeration. 

As some states begin to open up, there’s concern that the dining experience will be forever changed by the pandemic. 

What would you trade for a roll of toilet paper? Bartering is back in the time of the coronavirus. 

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May 13, 2020
Bill Barr’s attempt to undo the Mueller investigation
1448
Matt Zapotosky reports on the Justice Department’s recent moves to undercut the Mueller investigation. Aaron Gregg on the small-business loans that are going to large companies instead. And Monica Hesse on the power and popularity of Purell.

Read more:

Why the Justice Department moved to erase Michael Flynn’s guilty plea in the Russia investigation.

Are Small Business Administration loans — part of coronavirus relief efforts — actually getting to small businesses?

Delving into the history and mystery of a coronavirus staple: hand sanitizer.

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May 12, 2020
What happened with Ahmaud Arbery’s case?
1660
Cleve Wootson on why it took so long for the suspects to be charged in Ahmaud Arbery’s death. William Wan on the coronavirus’s toll on mental health. And Jacqueline Alemany on the young people left out of the virus relief efforts.

Read more:

It took 74 days for suspects to be charged in the death of a black jogger.

The coronavirus pandemic is pushing America into a mental-health crisis.

Young people are being left out of coronavirus economic relief efforts. That could be a big problem.

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May 11, 2020
The sound of silence
768
What does the pandemic sound like? Mostly, silence, according to critic Robin Givhan. 

Read more:


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May 09, 2020
‘You have all the jobs’: Motherhood during the pandemic
1859
What being a working mom is like during a pandemic from Helena Andrews-Dyer. And how learning Bach could be an expression of grief from Philip Kennicott.

Read more:

This Mother’s Day, stories of women balancing careers and kids concede that thriving is out of reach. Surviving is enough in the time of the coronavirus.

How one reporter found solace in Bach after losing his mother.

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May 08, 2020
Your money and the pandemic
1755
Advice for managing your money, from personal finance columnist Michelle Singletary. What happens when people are too scared to seek medical care, from Frances Stead Sellers and Jessica Contrera. And what we wear when we’re stuck at home, and what it says about us, from fashion critic Robin Givhan. 

Read more:

Your money and the pandemic: We answer your most pressing personal finance questions on the economic fallout of covid-19.

Patients with heart attacks, strokes and even appendicitis vanish from hospitals.

Patients in pain, dentists in distress: In a pandemic, the problem with teeth.


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May 07, 2020
A pandemic playbook for political campaigns
1374
Michael Scherer describes how candidates have rewritten their campaigns during the pandemic. Jessica Contrera asks how we weigh risk against necessity, longing and fear. And Emily Heil on the anxiety-filled hellscape that is the grocery store. 

Read more:

Political candidates – and not just the presidential ones – are reinventing how they campaign in the age of the pandemic.


Grocery shopping used to be a mundane errand. Now, we’re all feeling the stress.

Vote for Post Reports in the Webby Awards. 

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May 06, 2020
The deaths that haven’t been counted
1749
Emma Brown on which deaths count toward the covid-19 death toll. Jeff Stein reports on the $500 billion the Federal Reserve plans to lend big corporations with little restrictions. Plus, Reed Albergotti explores what happens when cannabis is deemed an essential service.

Read more:

U.S. deaths soared in early weeks of the pandemic, far more than previously known. 

The U.S. plans to lend $500 billion to large companies. It won’t require them to preserve jobs or limit executive pay.

Weed is deemed ‘essential’ in California, but many pot businesses are on the brink of failure

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May 05, 2020
The changing face of grief
1431
How people are dealing with grief and loss during the pandemic. And Melinda Hunt, the director of Hart Island in New York explains the challenges of burying the city’s dead. 

Read more:

The coronavirus is rewriting how we grieve. Unable to gather in person, people are finding new ways to mourn.

An island in New York that has historically housed the city’s dead is being stretched by the coronavirus. 

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May 04, 2020
The rise of sourdough bread baking
1190
In the pandemic times, sourdough bread is king. Post Reports producer Reena Flores goes on a journey to find out why, with King Arthur Flour co-chief executive Karen Colberg and ancient bread maker Seamus Blackley.
 
Read more:

People are baking bread like crazy, and now we’re running out of flour and yeast.

Now is the ideal time to learn to make sourdough bread. Here’s how.

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May 02, 2020
Two thousand hours of Louis Armstrong
1793
Geoff Edgers on how the Louis Armstrong Museum is finding a new life online during the coronavirus pandemic -- and, just a warning, this segment contains explicit language. From The Post’s podcast “All Told,” how one blues musician is changing his act under self isolation. And Reena Flores on a new kind of romantic comedy on Netflix.

Read more:

Jazz legend Louis Armstrong is being honored in a new way at a nonprofit museum that’s going digital during the pandemic.

Blues in self isolation, with Facebook Live.

Listen and subscribe to “All Told” for more stories from the pandemic. 

A new rom-com with platonic love in focus.

If you love “Post Reports,” vote for us for a Webby Award!

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May 01, 2020
What is Tara Reade accusing Joe Biden of?
1651
Matt Viser on the allegations against the presumptive presidential nominee for the Democratic Party. Rick Noack on how nations that had a robust response to the coronavirus pandemic are beginning to cautiously reopen.

Read more:

Nations around the world that were praised for their robust responses to the coronavirus pandemic are beginning to reopen


If you love Post Reports, vote for us for a Webby Award!

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Apr 30, 2020
What we know — and still don’t — about the coronavirus
1640
Leonard Bernstein on what we know (and still don’t) about the coronavirus. Laura Meckler explains the changes schools might have to make to reopen in the fall. And Anna Fifield on Kim Jong Un, missing in action.

Read more:

What you need to know about the coronavirus.

Alternating schedules. Lunch in the classroom. Students in masks. No football. School districts will have to change things up if they want to reopen in the fall.



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Apr 29, 2020
The pandemic at sea
1541
Rosalind Helderman explains how the cruise industry carried the coronavirus around the globe. Greg Miller on the virus briefings Trump skipped. And, how young caregivers are impacted by social distancing, from Tara Bahrampour.

Read more:

Cruise ships kept sailing for weeks after the coronavirus was first detected, carrying the virus around the globe.

President’s intelligence briefing book repeatedly cited the coronavirus threat. He skipped them


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Apr 28, 2020
The mysterious clotting in covid-19 patients
1611
Two doctors on the mysterious blood-clotting complication killing coronavirus patients. Heather Long explains why the economy won’t just bounce back in a “V-shaped” recovery. Plus, Lindsey Sitz on why washing your hands a lot doesn’t mean you’re “so OCD.” 

Read more:



If you wash your hands a lot, it doesn’t mean you’re “so OCD.” Here’s what it’s really like to have it. 

If you want to learn more about OCD, there are helpful resources at iocdf.org.

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Apr 27, 2020
The history of American antipathy toward masks
1113
Even as governors, mayors and the federal government urge or require Americans to wear masks to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus, the nation is divided about whether to comply.

Read more:

Will Americans wear masks to prevent coronavirus spread? Politics, history, race and crime factor into tough decisions.

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Apr 25, 2020
A coronavirus crisis in the Navy
1387
Dan Lamothe explains how the Navy tried and failed to control a coronavirus outbreak -- and a crisis of confidence -- on the USS Theodore Roosevelt. Plus, child psychiatrist Matthew Biel on how to talk to kids about the global pandemic. 

Read more:

How an outbreak on the USS Theodore Roosevelt became a defining moment for the U.S. military.

Parents are the filter for how kids understand the pandemic. Tips on how to talk to them about the coronavirus.

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Apr 24, 2020
Why reopening states is a ‘deadly mistake’
1191
Georgia will begin reopening businesses Friday, against the advice of experts and the White House. William Wan reports on what will happen next. For survivors of AIDS, an eerie deja vu, from reporter Jada Yuan. And, what Trump’s new immigration policy actually means, from Nick Miroff. 

Read more:

States rushing to reopen are likely making a deadly error, coronavirus models and experts warn.


Trump signs order pausing immigration for 60 days, with exceptions.

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Apr 23, 2020
Can we all be better Earthlings?
1161
On Earth Day, Sarah Kaplan asks how we can be better Earthlings. Seung Min Kim analyzes the new coronavirus response bill working its way through Congress. And Monica Hesse explains why we’re all having extra-weird dreams.

Read more:


The Senate has passed a $484 billion bill that would expand small-business aid and boost money for hospitals and testing. Will it be enough?

You’re not the only one having weird dreams. Being trapped in our homes has made our subconsciouses run wild.

Follow The Post’s live coronavirus coverage here

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Apr 22, 2020
What’s slowing down coronavirus testing
1565
Juliet Eilperin explains the delays in widespread testing. Young people aren’t as vulnerable to the coronavirus, but the crisis is affirming their political frustrations, Hannah Knowles reports. And Michelle Lee on campaign fundraising in a pandemic.

Read more:


Generation Z is fed up with the status quo. Coronavirus could affirm their beliefs.

Joe Biden posted the biggest monthly fundraising haul of his campaign in March. Will the pandemic slow him down?

Follow the Post’s live coronavirus coverage here

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Apr 21, 2020
Why shelves are empty at the grocery store
1680
Laura Reiley explains the kinks in the food supply chain leaving grocery shelves bare. Grocery workers share their well-founded fears with Abha Bhattarai. Erin Patrick O’Connor hears from sanitation workers on the pandemic’s front line.

Read more:

The industry says we have enough food. Here’s why some grocery store shelves are empty anyway.

The grocery workers on the front line of the pandemic never thought of their jobs as risky. Now, they’re scared to go to work.


Follow the Post’s live coronavirus coverage here

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Apr 20, 2020
Finding solace in paintings of parties
555
Over the past few weeks, many people have said they feel like figures in an Edward Hopper painting. On this bonus episode of Post Reports, art critic Sebastian Smee has a reminder from Renoir and Manet that the good times will return. 

Read more:

We’re all alone. So let’s get lost in these paintings of parties.

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Apr 18, 2020
Life for a medical worker in a pandemic
1517
Alaa Daghlas, a physician assistant at a Bronx hospital, grapples with her decision to return to work after recovering from covid-19. And Jon Gerberg reports from an ICU in Brooklyn scrambling to keep up with the influx of coronavirus patients.

Read more:

Alaa Daghlas prepares for her first day back on the front lines of a Bronx hospital after contracting covid-19. 

Inside a Brooklyn ICU, health-care workers risk their lives to care for coronavirus patients in critical condition. 

Follow the Post’s live coronavirus coverage here

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Apr 17, 2020
The coronavirus is killing Americans under age 50
1588
Chris Mooney reports on the science of why some younger people are getting better, while others are dying of covid-19. Griff Witte reports on how parties and gatherings became clusters. And Annie Gowen on coronavirus deniers. 

Read more:


The coronavirus had already reached the United States, but the parties went on. Experts say the inconsistent manner that social gatherings shut down across states gave the illness a head start.

Some people deny the seriousness of the global pandemic as a plot to get President Trump.  

Follow the Post’s live coronavirus coverage here. 

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Apr 16, 2020
How coronavirus will reshape the world’s borders
1816
Martine Powers and Ishaan Tharoor explore the meaning of borders in a pandemic, and how coronavirus might change travel and migration in the future. And Mary Beth Sheridan walks us through public service announcements from around the world.

Read more:

Countries are slamming borders shut.  What will it look like when they reopen? 

From Japan to Uganda, global public service announcements are emerging to help fight coronavirus. 

Check out our episode from December about “sober curiosity,” which one listener said is helping him through social distancing.   

Follow The Post’s live coronavirus coverage here.

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Apr 15, 2020
The economy in limbo
1392
On today’s Post Reports, Heather Long on how opening up the economy will be less like flipping a switch and more like a slow rehabilitation. Drew Harwell on the privacy complications around Zoom. And author J. Courtney Sullivan on what she’s reading for comfort. 

Read more:

The economy came to a grinding halt when the coronavirus hit. The recovery will likely be the opposite

More and more people are relying on Zoom video conferencing for work and staying connected with others, but that comes at a risk: Thousands of videos have been left viewable on the open web. 

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Apr 14, 2020
How do we reopen the country safely?
1556
The president talks about reopening the U.S. economy, but Lena Sun reports that experts say it would require widespread testing and contact tracing to do that safely. Long lines — and no relaxed restrictions — strain the nation’s food banks, Jenna Johnson reports. And, from Anna Fifield, how New Zealand didn’t just flatten the curve, but squashed it.

Read more:


Food banks sought relaxed federal rules to minimize contact. The USDA has stalled those requests, officials say.


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Apr 13, 2020
The great toilet paper shortage of 2020
728
For your weekend listening pleasure, senior editor Marc Fisher reads his story about the great toilet paper shortage, and what we can learn from it.

Read more:


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Apr 11, 2020
Life as a black American in a pandemic
1476
Robert Samuels reports on the stark disparities in how covid-19 affects black Americans. Tracy Jan examines how wearing a face mask in public is different for black men. And Jordan-Marie Smith navigates the politics of hair during a pandemic.

Read more:

The coronavirus is ravaging black communities. One Milwaukee neighborhood is trying to fight back.

As the nation is told to wear masks, how black Americans are weighing the risks of racial profiling.

The underlying meaning behind the care of black men and women’s hair during a pandemic.

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Apr 10, 2020
When you can’t wash your hands in a pandemic
1730
Damian Paletta looks ahead and outlines a bleak, new post-pandemic economic reality. Isaac Stanley-Becker reports on what happens when you can’t wash your hands in the midst of a public health crisis. And Emily Rauhala offers a glimpse into Wuhan before and after the lockdown lifts.

Read more:

With more than 17 million unemployment claims filed in the past four weeks, economists say the unemployment rate is now the worst since the Great Depression.

We’ve all been told to wash our hands to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. But what do you do when the water is shut off


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Apr 09, 2020
The risks of unproven drugs for coronavirus
1855
Bernie Sanders ends his White House bid. Sean Sullivan discusses the impact of his campaign. There have been only a few anecdotal studies showing benefits of antimalarial drugs in coronavirus patients, yet the FDA has authorized the widespread use of the drugs. Chris Rowland reports. Phil Rucker on why Trump has been pushing the drug hydroxychloroquine, despite warnings from some public health officials about dangerous side effects and uncertain results. And Style editor Steve Kolowich remembers musician John Prine, who died Tuesday of coronavirus complications. 

Read more:





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Apr 08, 2020
Voting in a pandemic
1567
Wisconsin’s primary is threatening to become a worst-case scenario for elections amid a pandemic. Amber Phillips reports on why it’s still so hard to put vote-by-mail systems in place. Undocumented workers are often ‘essential’ — but afraid of seeking health care, and won’t get government benefits if they’re laid off, says Tracy Jan. And Nantucket island has just three ventilators, and is preparing for the worst as summer residents flock to the island from cities, reports Caroline Kitchener. 

Read more:

Wisconsin’s decision to hold its primary is threatening to become a worst-case scenario for elections amid a pandemic.


Nantucket has three ventilators. Year-round residents are asking summer residents to stay away, but people have continued to flock to the island as they flee cities like New York.

Follow The Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

Instructions from the Mayor of Kauai, for how to make “MacGyver ice cream”

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Apr 07, 2020
It’s proving really hard to give away $350 billion
1826
Aaron Gregg on the realities of getting a small business loan under the stimulus plan. Nicole Dungca reports that the federal government lagged for months in helping local officials respond to the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, Karin Bruilliard reports that the plight of tigers around the United States goes beyond what we saw in the Netflix documentary “Tiger King.”

Read more:

If you’re a small business, here’s how to get a loan under the $349 billion aid bill.

While President Trump declared the coronavirus under control, local leaders faced confusion and chaos as cases piled up.


Follow The Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

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Apr 06, 2020
Feeling lonely?
1434
Older people can face serious health effects from being isolated — and yet, being isolated is the only thing that can keep them safe, Senior Producer Maggie Penman reports. Plus, Global Opinions writer Jason Rezaian on how he survived solitary confinement in Iran — and how you can survive social distancing, too. And, though we may be apart, a reminder that we’re not alone, from science reporter Sarah Kaplan.

Read more:


Human connection bolsters the immune system. That’s why it’s more important than ever to be kind.

Follow The Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

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Apr 03, 2020
A New York hospital transformed by the pandemic
1926
Inside a New York hospital on the front lines of the pandemic. And how health-care workers are forced to face their own mortality. 

Read more:



Follow The Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

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Apr 02, 2020
Should everyone be wearing a face mask?
1662
How Europe is weathering the crisis, from the U.K. to Hungary. The federal government’s internal debate over whether to tell all Americans to cover their faces in public, from health reporter Lena Sun. And the linen company that’s making medical masks, from reporter Arelis R. Hernández.

Read more:


Memos from the CDC to the White House lay out the rationale for possible widespread use of face coverings.

Cruise ships canceled orders. Then hotels. Now, a linen company is making medical masks.

Follow The Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here.

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Apr 01, 2020
The ethics of incarceration during a pandemic
1800
What coronavirus means for crowded prisons, from reporter Kimberly Kindy. The tension in a community that’s dealing with a deadly outbreak but reluctant to shut down its economy, from Cleve Wootson. And, how the virus is separating extended families, from Caitlin Gibson.

Read more:

Amid fears that the coronavirus will be particularly deadly in the crowded prisons and jails, counties and states are releasing thousands of inmates.



Follow The Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

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Mar 31, 2020
How do you 'shelter in place' when you're homeless?
1594
White House economics reporter Jeff Stein explains how corporations are benefiting from the stimulus package. And Hannah Dreier on why “sheltering in place” isn’t really an option for people who are homeless.

Read more:

What’s in the Senate’s $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus package?


Follow The Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

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Mar 30, 2020
School’s out forever?
1521
School closures are a big deal for kids and parents, says education reporter Moriah Balingit. How the shift to online learning has exposed America’s deep digital divide from Tony Romm. And an audio diary of working from home with kids, from Alexis Diao.

Read more:


The move to online learning is exposing Internet-access inequality among kids in the U.S.


Post Reports producer Alexis Diao keeps a diary of working from home with kids. Here are tips for working from home and keeping your sanity.

Follow the Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

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Mar 27, 2020
Will the biggest stimulus bill in U.S. history be enough?
1703
Many Americans will receive a check during the pandemic –– but how much, and when? Heather Long explains the federal relief package. Emily Heil checks in with laid-off restaurant workers. And, Abha Bhattarai on those who can’t afford to stock up.

Read more:

Who’s set to receive a check from the government during the pandemic? Find out here.

Laid-off restaurant industry workers are trying to find a way to live during this pandemic.

Imagine a 69-year-old woman unable to buy the groceries she needs during the outbreak. She’s not alone.

Follow the Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

Do you qualify for a stimulus check? Find out with this calculator.

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Mar 26, 2020
Why cruises kept sailing despite coronavirus dangers
1764
Cruise ships continued to sail as the coronavirus spread. Beth Reinhard explains why. Michael Scherer reports on the awkwardness of campaigning during a pandemic. And Simon Denyer on how Japan is handling covid-19.

Read more:

Cruises didn’t stop operations until it was too late. Health experts are asking why.

How do you campaign for president during a pandemic?

Japan is handling the coronavirus in its own way. Here’s what that looks like.

Follow the Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

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Mar 25, 2020
The quiet genius of a zombie virus
1336
Brady Dennis reports on the growing number of cases of the novel coronavirus in the United States. Sarah Kaplan explains the science of why this virus is so dangerous. And, Rick Maese on the Tokyo Olympics, now postponed until 2021. 

Read more:

‘It’s going to get bad’: As outbreak surges, nation faces tough start to a grim week.

The science behind what makes this coronavirus so sneaky, deadly and difficult to defeat.

The 2020 Olympics will be postponed. We talked to athletes about how they’re feeling.

Follow the Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here

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Mar 24, 2020
The pandemic warnings that were ignored
1315
Shane Harris on what U.S. officials knew about the global threat of the novel coronavirus, and when they knew it. Chris Mooney on why the coronavirus is killing more men. And, Dan Zak reflects on our shifting sense of time and space during the pandemic.

Read more:


The coronavirus is killing far more men than women. Epidemiologists are trying to figure out why.


Follow the Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus here.

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Mar 23, 2020
Tiny decisions will determine our collective future
1175
William Wan on how the novel coronavirus will radically alter the United States. Maura Judkis on social distancing with roommates. Plus, Julie Zauzmer’s dispatch from churches deciding what’s more important: fellowship and prayer, or public health?

Read more:

Here’s what may lie ahead based on math models, hospital projections and past pandemics

Whose bedroom becomes the infirmary? Group-house living just got a whole lot trickier.


Follow the Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus here.

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Mar 20, 2020
Republicans’ radical about-face on bailouts
1474
Phil Rucker on how Republicans are throwing out the political playbook by supporting a massive bailout for the economy. Chris Rowland on the search for a treatment for the coronavirus. And Min Joo Kim reports on how South Korea got testing right.

Read more:

Trump’s $1 trillion stimulus package composed of bailouts and personal checks is gaining support from Republicans, a tactic the party has traditionally opposed.

As scientists race to find a treatment for the novel coronavirus, they’re looking at experimental drugs from past outbreaks.


Follow the Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus here. 

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Mar 19, 2020
Trump’s economic Hail Mary
1678
Jeff Stein explains Trump’s plan to bail out companies hit hard by the coronavirus. Tony Romm on whether Silicon Valley and the White House could use location data to fight the outbreak. And Julie Zauzmer on the Christians who say this isn’t the end of the world, though it feels like it.

Read more:

In an effort to alleviate the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak, the White House says it is considering different scenarios, including a bailout for hard-hit companies.

The White House and Silicon Valley are considering using location data from mobile phones to help fight coronavirus — but what does that mean for our privacy?

Everything is fine: It’s not the end of the world as we know it (according to biblical texts). 

Follow the Post’s live coverage of coronavirus here

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Mar 18, 2020
Social distancing may be our only hope
1596
Lena Sun clears up what “social distancing” means and why it’s important. William Wan explains why it’ll probably take months — not weeks — for the coronavirus threat to subside. And Caroline Kitchener with tips on how to talk to friends about staying home. 

Read more:

It’s a make-or-break moment with coronavirus to test a basic — but disruptive — public health tool.

How long will social distancing for coronavirus have to last? Depends on a few factors.

How to talk to your friends about social distancing when they’re still hitting the clubs.

Follow the Post’s live coverage here.

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Mar 17, 2020
Will the coronavirus derail the Democratic primary?
1361
Today on Post Reports, Elise Viebeck explains how the coronavirus could impact the presidential election. Andrew Freedman on why the coronavirus won’t necessarily go away in the summer. And how new health screenings at airports are playing out, from Post Reports executive producer Madhulika Sikka. 

Read more:

The coronavirus outbreak is rattling voters and election officials ahead of Tuesday’s primaries.

Will the coronavirus be thwarted by a change of seasons

New travel restrictions are meant to help slow the spread of coronavirus — but they’re also causing headaches for travelers and major delays at airports.

Follow the Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus here.

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Mar 16, 2020
What went wrong with coronavirus testing in the U.S.
1387
Neena Satija explains what went wrong with coronavirus testing in the United States. And Brady Dennis on the effect the outbreak is having on carbon emissions. 

Read more:

Trump has said that “anybody” who wants to be tested for the coronavirus could be, but that’s not true

One consequence of the coronavirus? It could halt emissions growth. 


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Mar 13, 2020
Trump's Europe travel ban causes confusion
1396
Katie Zezima explains the new U.S. travel restrictions from Europe. Peter Whoriskey and Abha Bhattarai report on how paid sick leave, or lack thereof, is exposing vulnerabilities in the U.S. And, Ben Golliver on the NBA’s suspended season.

Read more:

Trump announced late Wednesday that flights from Europe to the U.S. would be halted starting Friday. It’s the most aggressive move by the federal government in response to the coronavirus, but is it enough?

Millions of workers lack sick pay. This will affect how the outbreak will spread in the U.S. 

NBA suspends season indefinitely after a Utah Jazz player tests positive for coronavirus.

Follow the Post’s live coverage of coronavirus here. 

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Mar 12, 2020
Coronavirus is sparing children. No one knows why.
1892
The WHO has declared the coronavirus a global pandemic. On today’s Post Reports, William Wan says the virus is sparing kids — and understanding why could be key to finding a treatment or vaccine. Political reporter Aaron Blake reports on Biden’s “Big Tuesday” wins. And Robert Samuels talks to a Bernie supporter who is second-guessing his behavior online.

Read more:

The results from Tuesday’s primary contests are still coming in, but Joe Biden pulled ahead of Bernie Sanders as the clear front-runner in the Democratic race for the White House. 

Sanders supporters are beginning to wonder whether the campaign tactics help or hurt his chance of a presidency. 

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Mar 11, 2020
Can we quarantine the economy?
1639
Today on Post Reports, Chico Harlan with a dispatch from Italy after a country-wide lockdown goes into effect. Heather Long answers your questions about the coronavirus outbreak’s impact on the markets. And, Ben Guarino on the audacious efforts to reforest the planet to fight climate change.

Read more:

Italy is under lockdown in an attempt to contain the coronavirus. It is the most aggressive step taken in the West to curb the outbreak. 

All eyes are on the stock market Wednesday after a stunning drop on Tuesday over coronavirus concerns. Read the Post’s ongoing coronavirus coverage here. 

The world’s climate is changing. Read about the audacious efforts to stop that with this timeless practice. 

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Mar 10, 2020
The irony of Trump’s casual attitude toward coronavirus
1622
Today on Post Reports, Toluse Olorunnipa on how the coronavirus is testing President Trump’s leadership. Susannah George and Missy Ryan on how Afghanistan’s instability could affect peace talks. And remembering an English village that self-quarantined during the bubonic plague. 

Read more:

More than 500 cases of coronavirus have been confirmed in the United States, including an attendee of a conference where President Trump spoke. Follow our live coverage here. 

In Afghanistan, rival presidential inaugurations took place Monday — a day before negotiations between the government and the Taliban were expected to start. 

As governments around the world impose quarantines to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, it is worth remembering the extraordinary story of an English village that faced an outbreak of the bubonic plague in the 17th century.

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Mar 09, 2020
The fight for the soul of America’s political parties
1259
Political reporter Dan Balz on the ebb and flow of the two political parties and how much power they actually have. And Jada Yuan on whether celebrity endorsements make a difference for presidential candidates.

Read more:

The Democrats seem split between an “establishment” candidate and a candidate who isn’t a Democrat at all. Dan Balz on what’s up with the Democratic Party and how much power the establishment actually has.

Do celebrity endorsements make a difference for presidential candidates? The short answer is no. Well, except for that one time.

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Mar 06, 2020
And then there were two
1743
Annie Linskey and Amber Phillips consider the end of Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s campaign and what it means for the delegates she won. Aaron Blake explains why you should care about a scuffle between Sen. Charles E. Schumer and Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. And, a portrait of a portrait, from Sebastian Smee.

Read more:

Now that Sen. Elizabeth Warren is out of the presidential race, how will her delegates swing?


The beauty of a painting, of a girl arranging her hair

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Mar 05, 2020
So ... Biden?
1550
Today on Post Reports, Philip Bump talks through the Super Tuesday results and the narrowing field of Democratic candidates. Heather Long explains the Federal Reserve’s decision to cut interest rates in response to the coronavirus outbreak. And the proper way to wash your hands, according to a microbiologist.

Read more:

The Democrats’ race for the nomination is reshaped after Joe Biden’s surge on Super Tuesday

The Federal Reserve is cutting interest rates in response to the coronavirus. One economist says it’s like putting a Band-Aid on your arm to cure a headache.

The right way to wash your hands, according to an expert. 

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Mar 04, 2020
Abortion in the age of a conservative Supreme Court
1495
Caroline Kitchener on the abortion restriction being tested at the Supreme Court. William Wan on how the coronavirus epidemic could play out. And an island full of Buttigiegs, from Chico Harlan.

Read more: 

An abortion case out of Louisiana is a first test for Trump’s Supreme Court justices.

How is the coronavirus outbreak going to end? Here’s how similar epidemics played out.

In this village, 1 in every 14 people is a Buttigieg.

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Mar 03, 2020
Super Tuesday, in 16 dispatches.
2123
On Super Tuesday, more states hold contests to pick a presidential nominee, more voters have a chance to go to the polls and more delegates are allotted to candidates than on any other day on the primary calendar. We bring you to each of the 14 states holding primaries, as well as the global primary for Americans abroad and one U.S. territory.  


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Mar 02, 2020
Your questions about coronavirus, answered
1590
Health reporters Lena H. Sun and Lenny Bernstein answer your questions about the coronavirus. Marian Liu talks about the discrimination Asian Americans have experienced since the start of the outbreak. And Week 4 of being quarantined with your partner ... and your mother-in-law.
 
Everything you need to know about the coronavirus outbreak
 
How coronavirus is being used as a justification for racism.
 
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Feb 28, 2020
What millennial voters care about in 2020
1658
Eugene Scott describes the impact young voters may have on the presidential election. Drew Harwell on the psychological toll of Web-connected cameras. And Dan Keating explains whether the stop-and-frisk program is actually what lowered the crime rate in New York City, as former mayor Michael Bloomberg claims. 

Read more:

What do young South Carolina Democrats want most in the upcoming election? Big change.

Ring, Nest and other Internet-connected cameras have normalized surveillance and created a nation of voyeurs

An analysis of crime data in New York City suggests that the stop-and-frisk program championed by former mayor Mike Bloomberg wasn’t a major component in dropping crime rates.

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Feb 27, 2020
The ‘radical feminists’ working against trans rights
1506
Abha Bhattarai unpacks Walmart’s “Great Workplace” program, and why it means layoffs for workers. Samantha Schmidt on a strain of feminism that rejects the existence of transgender identity. And Shibani Mahtani explains how China’s ambitions are choking the Mekong River. 

Read more:

Walmart employees say they’re preparing for job cuts as the retailer rolls out its “Great Workplace” program.

Conservatives have found an unlikely ally in fighting transgender rights: so-called “radical feminists.”


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Feb 26, 2020
Reparations, rebranded
1677
Matt Viser and Lenny Bernstein on how an old field of candidates changes the norms around the presidency. Tracy Jan looks into Rep. James Clyburn’s anti-poverty program, recast as reparations. Plus, Monica Hesse examines how Harvey Weinstein’s conviction changed the way we talk about rape. 

Read more:

Rep. James E. Clyburn (D-S.C.) proposed a race-neutral anti-poverty program a decade ago. Presidential candidates recast it as compensation for slavery.

A historically old field of candidates refuses to release their health records.


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Feb 25, 2020
Mayors back Bloomberg’s bid
1516
Fenit Nirappil asks why D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser supports Michael Bloomberg, even as he gets slammed by critics on race and gender issues. Joanna Slater discusses Trump’s visit to India. And NASA mourns the death of Katherine Johnson, a “hidden figure” during the 1960s space race, who died at 101.

Read more:


Critics slam Bloomberg on race, gender. D.C.’s black, female mayor has his back.

Katherine Johnson, ‘hidden figure’ at NASA during 1960s space race, dies at 101.

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Feb 24, 2020
Shopping under the influence
1347
Shane Harris talks about the lingering threat of Russian election interference and how the administration is responding. Abha Bhattarai on a new gimmick from retailers. And Gillian Brockell and Jessica Contrera on the CIA’s rebellious neighbors.

Read more: 

President Trump chooses a new acting director of national intelligence, following revelations that Russia wants President Trump reelected.

Boozy shopping is a thing now. Find out why stores like Whole Foods and Nordstrom are hooked.

In 1933, two rebellious women bought a home in Virginia’s woods. Then the CIA moved in.

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Feb 21, 2020
Kids are using Trump’s words to bully their classmates
1746
Michael Scherer on the heated Nevada Democratic debate. And John Woodrow Cox andHannah Natanson talk about how President Trump’s rhetoric has affected bullying in American schools. 

Read more: 
Mike Bloomberg made his prime-time debut at the Democratic debate in Las Vegas — and he didn’t get a warm welcome from the other candidates. 

The president’s rhetoric has changed the way hundreds of children are harassed in American classrooms.

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Feb 20, 2020
ICE is using therapy notes to deport young immigrants
1660
Hannah Dreier on how Immigration and Customs Enforcement uses therapists’ notes to keep young immigrants detained. Damian Paletta discusses how the coronavirus is affecting American companies. And Ishaan Tharoor on the Nordic governing Bernie Sanders loves so much.

Read more:

Notes from therapists who work with Immigration and Customs Enforcement can be used against detained young immigrants in court.

The coronavirus is disrupting manufacturing in China. That’s not great for American companies such as Apple and Nike.


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Feb 19, 2020
The profane ‘wit and wisdom’ of Mike Bloomberg
1409
Political investigative reporter Michael Kranish on Mike Bloomberg’s long history of alleged sexism and profanity. And Travis DeShong describes a new kind of card game meant to make even people at dinner parties more vulnerable.

Read more:

Newly uncovered documents show Mike Bloomberg’s long history of alleged sexism and profanity in the workplace

Don’t like people, or even yourself? Try a vulnerability card game.

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Feb 18, 2020
The loves and scandals of President Harding
2755
Steamy love letters. Jazz. Scandal. Psychics. Newspapers. The Hope Diamond.

In this Presidents’ Day special from Post Reports, we revisit an episode of The Post’s “Presidential” podcast with host Lillian Cunningham. Cunningham and Nicole Hemmer of the University of Virginia's Miller Center helps guide us through the wild life and presidency of Warren G. Harding — and the interesting connection between his presidency and The Washington Post.

Read more:
Listen and learn more by checking out the Washington Post podcast “Presidential” — a deep dive into the life and legacy of every U.S. president. 

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Feb 17, 2020
How a non-binary teen claimed their identity
1249
Tara Bahrampour on what coming of age looks like for a non-binary teen. And, revisiting the wisdom of George Washington with historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. 

Read more:

Becoming Eli: Getting their parents to accept their new name means everything to this non-binary teen. 

The wisdom of the first president, with Doris Kearns Goodwin, who spoke with Lillian Cunningham, host of The Post’s “Presidential” podcast.

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Feb 14, 2020
Coronavirus: An epidemic of misinformation
1342
Kim Bellware on how disinformation about the coronavirus is spreading online. Danielle Paquette on the drawdown of Firestone’s factories in Liberia, where the tire company has been central to the economy. And Rick Maese takes us inside a Tokyo dojo.

Read more:

As the coronavirus spreads, so does disinformation about the outbreak, stoking fears and racism.

The tire company Firestone has a long, complicated history with Liberia. The drawdown of its factories is devastating workers there and causing a seismic chasm in the country’s economy.

Tokyo will host the 2020 Olympics, but Japan’s iconic sport will be absent from the lineup. Only men are allowed to compete professionally, but some women are pushing their way in. 

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Feb 13, 2020
The politicization of the Justice Department
1694
Today on Post Reports, Matt Zapotosky reports on the fight for independence within the Justice Department after Attorney General William P. Barr intervened in the sentencing guidelines for Roger Stone. Political reporter Aaron Blake breaks down the New Hampshire primary results, and what they mean for the Democrat’s race for the White House. And columnist Monica Hesse says that questions of Elizabeth Warren’s electability are a self-fulfilling prophecy for her supporters.

Read more:

Four prosecutors quit after Attorney General William P. Barr shortened Roger Stone’s sentencing request, one sign of turmoil engulfing the Justice Department. 

Sanders takes the New Hampshire primary. Can he keep up the momentum to Nevada? 

Since 2016, the question of a candidate’s electability has mutated into an abstract panic over whether any woman can be elected in 2020. 

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Feb 12, 2020
The CIA’s ‘coup of the century’
1921
Greg Miller on how governments all over the world got played by the CIA. Simon Denyer and Lenny Bernstein on the increasingly desperate situation aboard the cruise ship Diamond Princess. And Griff Witte says there are few signs of President Trump’s “blue-collar boom’ in New Hampshire’s poorest city.

Read more:


The increasingly desperate situation aboard the cruise ship Diamond Princess, where cases of coronavirus have doubled


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Feb 11, 2020
What Trump’s company charges the Secret Service
1381
Eugene Scott weighs the stakes of Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary. David Fahrenthold reports on what Trump’s companies are charging the government. And Teddy Amenabar reflects on the gendered perceptions of 2-in-1 shampoos.

Read more:

  • The still-crowded field of Democratic presidential candidates faces its next contest: the New Hampshire primary. Will it narrow the field at all?
  • The Secret Service has paid rates as high as $650 a night for rooms at President Trump’s properties. That’s according to federal records and people who have seen the receipts
  • The Internet’s proof that men don’t care about grooming: 2-in-1 shampoos. But their bad reputation may be undeserved.

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Feb 10, 2020
‘Unshackled and unleashed’: Trump, post-acquittal
1291
Today on Post Reports, Philip Rucker describes what the presidency could look like post-impeachment. And ahead of Sunday’s Academy Awards, Sarah Hashemi considers whether gendered categories should be eliminated from award shows. 

Read more:

Historians and legal experts say President Trump’s acquittal could have profound ramifications for what future presidents consider permissible conduct

The Oscars have a gender problem. Non-binary actors have some solutions.

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Feb 07, 2020
The race to find a cure for the coronavirus
1226
Today on Post Reports, Anna Fifield describes the eerie emptiness that has taken hold across China under the threat of the coronavirus. David Lynch reports on the epidemic’s impact on the global economy. Carolyn Johnson explains the hurdles disease specialists are facing in creating a vaccine for the virus. And Justin George on Bernie Madoff’s plea for “compassionate release.”

Read more:

Major Chinese cities are becoming quiet ghost towns, as residents lock themselves away from the threat of the coronavirus. Read more about how this is affecting domestic and international industry.


Ponzi scheme king Bernie Madoff has asked for compassionate medical release from prison. Hear from the man himself.

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Feb 06, 2020
Iowa and the future of election technology
1250
Today on Post Reports: Tony Romm on the makers of the app that set back the results of the Iowa caucuses. Samantha Schmidt describes how sex education classes in some states are reacting to the #MeToo era. And Mike DeBonis on a surprise moment in the Senate impeachment trial.

Read more:

An untested app rolled out and broke down during the Iowa caucuses. Read more about the company that delivered it.

Propelled by the #MeToo movement, a growing number of states are mandating consent be taught in sex education classes

The Senate impeachment trial went pretty much as predicted — with one notable exception on its last day

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Feb 05, 2020
Inside the chaos of the Iowa caucuses
1681
Today on Post Reports, Jenna Johnson explains the result delays at the Iowa caucuses. Juliet Eilperin fills us in on the many environmental policy changes we’ve missed while distracted by impeachment and the election. And Abha Bhattarai on the mindful appeal of Legos.

Read more:

An epic breakdown in Iowa shines a spotlight on the caucus system as a whole

While impeachment and the election have held our attention, President Trump has dismantled age-old policies in the environmental world –– among them, one protecting migratory birds

The world’s largest toymaker is pitching its bricks as a form of mindfulness. Read more about the adults gladly playing along.

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Feb 04, 2020
The new targets of Trump’s travel ban
1691
Today on Post Reports, national reporter Abigail Hauslohner outlines the expansion of President Trump’s travel ban. Beth Reinhard looks into how presidential pardoning has evolved under Trump. And Dan Balz explores whether a president can be impeached more than once. 

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President Trump’s expanded travel ban has been blasted by Democrats as “clearly discriminatory” against people from predominantly black and Muslim nations

In his first three years of office, Trump issued a record-low number of decisions on pardon requests and left thousands of petitioners in limbo

Can a president be impeached more than once? How that process could go down

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Feb 03, 2020
How do caucuses work, anyway?
1496
Kayla Epstein explains the chaotic, confusing, bizarre process that is the Iowa caucuses. And political reporter Aaron Blake tells us how the GOP succeeded in blocking witnesses in the Senate impeachment trial. 

Read more: 

Kayla Epstein explains how the 2020 primaries begin, with the “giant game of musical chairs” that is the Iowa caucuses.


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Feb 01, 2020
Is the White House ready for the new coronavirus?
1602
Lena Sun and Yasmeen Abutaleb explain the dangers of the coronavirus outbreak. Amber Phillips talks about that moment with Rand Paul. And Michelle Ye Hee Lee on the Trump donors who are going from zero to 60 with big contributions.

Read more:

Impeachment questions come to an end with little resolved.

Lena Sun and Yasmeen Abutaleb on the panic surrounding the coronavirus.

Michelle Ye Hee Lee covers the people throwing hundreds of thousands of dollars at Trump.

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Jan 31, 2020
Majority of black Americans call Trump 'racist'
1708
Aaron Blake says the debate over whether to call witnesses still hangs over the impeachment trial. Vanessa Williams reports on why 8 in 10 black Americans say President Trump is racist. And many questions remain as Britain prepares to leave the E.U.

Read more:

All eyes are on the moderate Republicans as the Senate impeachment trial enters a new phase

Most black Americans say Trump is “racist.”

Impending Brexit leaves loose ends.

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Jan 30, 2020
Who’s paying for Trump’s lawyers?
1466
As the president’s impeachment defense rests, Ann Marimow explains who is paying for his lawyers. Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro tells The Post's Anthony Faiola that he's still firmly in control. And Marian Liu on the branding genius of K-pop group BTS.


Read more:



BTS is more than a K-pop group. It’s a booming business.

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Jan 28, 2020
The Bolton question hangs over impeachment trial
1769
Today on Post Reports, political reporter Aaron Blake breaks down President Trump’s impeachment defense. Kyle Swenson explains the cluster of HIV cases in West Virginia. And sports columnist Jerry Brewer reflects on Kobe Bryant’s stardom on and off the court, as well as his sexual assault case. 

Read more:

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Jan 28, 2020
What reparations mean to one American family
1881
Today on Post Reports, business reporter Tracy Jan tells the story of one family for whom reparations mean more than money. Geoff Edgers explains the hidden history of Roberta Flack’s hit song “Killing Me Softly.

Read more:

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Jan 24, 2020
‘Hello MBS.’ How the world’s richest man was hacked.
1370
Amber Phillips tells us about the latest antics by the world’s greatest deliberative body: One senator read a book Thursday while one doodled through another day of the impeachment trial. After Jeff Bezos and the crown prince of Saudi Arabia exchanged numbers at a dinner party, Bezos was hacked. Marc Fisher explains how the hack went down. And, Emily Yahr on why we’re obsessed with Wikipedia’s “personal life” section.

Background reading: 

 

Jan 24, 2020
Can Democrats keep impeachment spicy?
1533
Amber Phillips on the opening arguments in the Senate impeachment trial. Anna Fifield and Lena Sun on the rapidly spreading coronavirus. And David Fahrenthold reports on how Trump’s D.C. hotel blurs lines of private interests and public life.
Jan 23, 2020
The rules of engagement
1880
Aaron Blake explains Tuesday’s Senate debate on the rules for Trump’s impeachment trial. Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig on their new book “A Very Stable Genius.” And Rosalind Helderman answers your questions on impeachment.
Jan 22, 2020
A crumbling bridge and restorative justice
1210
Robert Samuels on the opportunity black activists see in a city’s crumbling highway section. And DeNeen L. Brown tells the surprising story of how Martin Luther King Jr. got his name.
Jan 20, 2020
The politics of hair for black women
1139
Rep. Ayanna Pressley’s video about her battle with alopecia has renewed conversations around the politics of hair. Jena McGregor outlines the growing protections against race-based hair discrimination. And Chico Harlan on the tensions between two popes.
Jan 17, 2020
Trump, Giuliani and a guy called Lev
1775
The Senate gavels in for the impeachment trial. Paul Sonne unpacks the latest evidence implicating President Trump in the Ukraine scandal. Drew Harwell on the tech companies manufacturing diversity. And Philip Bump brings us the “Impeachment Polka.”
Jan 16, 2020
What’s next in impeachment
1708
Rosalind S. Helderman explains what’s happening with impeachment — and the new documents made public by House Democrats. Robert Costa on Bernie Sanders and the candidate’s quiet rise in Iowa. And a new contract for the WNBA.
Jan 15, 2020
A campaign with unlimited money
1677
Michael Scherer on Mike Bloomberg’s campaign strategy. Shane Harris explains the administration’s conflicting rationales for the strike on Iran’s Qasem Soleimani. And Drew Harwell unpacks the effect of doctored photos on politics.
Jan 14, 2020
Women in the workforce: ‘I’m back, baby!’
1701
Rachel Siegel reports women outnumber men in the U.S. workforce for just the second time. Moriah Balingit on how a book-burning at Georgia Southern ignited a conversation about race. And Arelis Hernández on the earthquakes rattling Puerto Rico.
Jan 13, 2020
Selective memory: The U.S. and Iran
1980
Jason Rezaian contextualizes the current relationship between the United States and Iran and describes what leaders can illuminate from the past about the present.
Jan 10, 2020
Australia burning
1485
Kate Shuttleworth and Sarah Kaplan on the wildfires ravaging Australia. Colby Itkowitz breaks down how President Trump has reshaped the most important courts in the country. And Jennifer Hassan gives context to Britain’s “Megxit.”
Jan 09, 2020
Trump: ‘Iran appears to be standing down’
1515
Ishaan Tharoor unpacks the White House response to attacks from Iran. Paul Kane reports from the chambers of the least deliberative Senate in modern history. And Abha Bhattarai on a new approach to thank-you cards.
Jan 08, 2020
Impeachment trial? What impeachment trial?
1605
Mike DeBonis explains the impeachment trial’s delay. Liz Sly unravels the fraught history of U.S.-Iraq relations. And Kayla Epstein assuages young people’s concerns about the draft.
Jan 07, 2020
Inside the plan to kill Soleimani
1610
Shane Harris explains how Secretary of State Mike Pompeo shaped the decision to kill a top Iranian military commander. Phil Rucker describes President Trump’s wartime posture. And Anthony Faiola on the fight over Venezuela’s National Assembly.
Jan 06, 2020
What Iran’s ‘severe revenge’ vow means for the U.S.
1183
Missy Ryan examines the fallout of a U.S. airstrike that killed Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani. Plus, Sebastian Smee describes the stunning photo that changed how we see our planet.
Jan 03, 2020
What’s in and out for 2020
1329
The Washington Post’s annual guide to what’s out from 2019 and what’s in for 2020. And, how gender bias in science also affects lab rats.
Jan 02, 2020
Black women on race and genre
1328
Martine Powers talks with N.K. Jemisin, Jasmine Guillory and Lauren Wilkinson about challenging narrow perceptions of race in literary genres. And Bilal Qureshi discusses Toni Morrison’s legacy.
Dec 31, 2019
A tale of two billionaires: Trump and Bloomberg
812
Michael Kranish dives into the tumultuous relationship between President Trump and Mike Bloomberg. Plus: Robin Givhan remembers a bombastic legend of the fashion world.
Dec 30, 2019
How the ’60s’ most disastrous concert turned deadly
2334
Altamont 1969 was meant to be the Woodstock of the West. Eyewitnesses recount how this free concert turned into a deadly disaster.
Dec 27, 2019
How the ’60s’ most disastrous concert came to be
1542
It was meant to be the Woodstock of the West, but it was chaos. How the free rock concert in Altamont, Calif., 50 years ago came to be.
Dec 26, 2019
Fashion in the age of climate change
1228
Robin Givhan considers whether it’s possible to dress fashionably and ethically. Caitlin Gibson and Monica Hesse take a day to watch every film adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women” ahead of the new movie.
Dec 24, 2019
The rise of the ‘zombie mall’
1390
Abha Bhattarai explains why most shopping malls are on the decline — and why a few are thriving. Maggie Penman on making sobriety hip. Plus, Lauren Tierney tracks down the origin of your Christmas tree.
Dec 23, 2019
What sex trafficking in the U.S. actually looks like
1638
Jessica Contrera unpacks a legal case challenging how courts understand sexual violence. And Moriah Balingit describes the plight of educators using the impeachment trial to teach history in real time.
Dec 20, 2019
What comes next in impeachment
1864
Amber Phillips previews the Senate’s impeachment trial next month. Griff Witte on why red states are choosing to welcome more refugees. And Sarah Hashemi describes the reach of the new “L Word.”
Dec 19, 2019
The impeachment of President Trump
1619
Mike DeBonis, Seung Min Kim and Paul Kane take the temperature of Capitol Hill. And Aaron Blake breaks down the partisan debate that led to the impeachment of President Trump.
Dec 19, 2019
Voices from the war in Afghanistan
1746
People who experienced the war in Afghanistan respond to uncovered documents and secret audio recordings. Juliet Eilperin on the drilling effort dividing an Arctic village. Joanna Slater shares what’s going on with India’s controversial citizenship law.
Dec 17, 2019
The racial reckoning of Pete Buttigieg
1651
William Booth on what Boris Johnson’s sweeping majority means for Brexit. Robert Samuels on Pete Buttigieg’s often clumsy attempts to understand the black experience. And the downside of a new cutting-edge wireless network.
Dec 16, 2019
Selling treatments to incurable diseases
1864
Rhonda Colvin on the Judiciary Committee vote to advance impeachment articles. Laurie McGinley and William Wan explain how clinics are profiting by selling cellular therapies for incurable diseases. And Michael Rosenwald remembers Caroll Spinney.
Dec 13, 2019
Who’s losing out in the automated economy? Women.
1490
Heather Long on how older women are being left behind in the new automated economy. Reed Albergotti investigates unwanted sexual behavior on iPhone chat apps. And Julie Zauzmer on Trump’s executive order to combat anti-Semitism on college campuses.
Dec 12, 2019
The fight over the FBI’s Russia probe
1781
Matt Zapotosky on the fight over the FBI’s investigation of the Trump campaign. Kevin Sieff on the cycle of debt for migrants. Plus, Lena Felton explores how women use sci-fi to explore gender and sexuality.
Dec 11, 2019
The Democrats’ case against President Trump
1536
Aaron Blake explains House Democrats’ articles of impeachment. Darryl Fears on the disease threatening Florida’s citrus crop. And Hawken Miller on how video gaming creates opportunities for people living with disabilities.
Dec 10, 2019
The Afghanistan Papers
2806
After a three-year legal battle, The Post obtains hundreds of records of candid interviews assessing the war in Afghanistan and its failures.

Dec 09, 2019
The fight for a gender-neutral Spanish
1226
Samantha Schmidt talks to the Argentine teens promoting a more inclusive Spanish. And Kevin Sieff reports from a squalid tent city in Matamoros, Mexico, where refugees are forced to wait for their asylum requests to be processed by the United States.
Dec 06, 2019
Can Boris Johnson keep his seat?
1531
William Booth lays out the factors shaping Britain’s upcoming general election. Ovetta Wiggins on the legal and media battle that won five prison exonerees millions from Maryland. And the House will move forward with drafting articles of impeachment.
Dec 05, 2019
The NBA star courting Congress on Turkey
1781
Shane Harris interprets the House Intelligence Committee’s impeachment report. Jacob Bogage explains why lawmakers are lining up to back NBA player and Turkish dissident Enes Kanter. And Maura Judkis reads her horoscope.
Dec 04, 2019
How the Mueller investigation led Giuliani to Ukraine
1561
Rosalind S. Helderman traces the origin of Rudolph W. Giuliani’s involvement in Ukraine. Eugene Scott on the end of Sen. Kamala Harris’s presidential campaign. And Anna Fifield on China’s rapid robotic revolution.
Dec 03, 2019
The human cost of food delivery in China
1533
Mike DeBonis unpacks the White House’s strategy as the impeachment inquiry unfolds. Gerry Shih describes the human toll of the food delivery industry in China. And Valerie Strauss on the lengths to which teachers will go to get classroom supplies.
Dec 02, 2019
How a black activist managed to take over a neo-Nazi group
1995
Katie Mettler unpacks the complicated life of black activist James Stern and how he came to take control of Jeff Schoep’s neo-Nazi National Socialist Movement.
Nov 29, 2019
What’s stalling the self-driving car revolution
1755
Faiz Siddiqui explains the engineering challenge behind training self-driving cars. Madhulika Sikka shares the story of an author and filmmaker excavating the experiences of black Americans. Plus, Matt Viser unpacks a Dukakis family tradition.
Nov 27, 2019
Trump touts law freeing inmates. But the Justice Department wants them behind bars.
1946
Neena Satija on the tensions underlying a major piece of criminal justice legislation. Amber Phillips outlines what comes next in the impeachment process. And Antonia Noori Farzan describes how one town is addressing its “food desert.”
Nov 26, 2019
How crib bumpers have paralyzed a U.S. consumer regulation agency
1502
Michael Scherer with a look into how Mike Bloomberg’s wealth could influence the 2020 race. Todd Frankel reports on an agency struggling with an internal dispute over crib bumpers. And Alex Horton on a powerful weapon’s role in the impeachment inquiry.
Nov 25, 2019
They escaped China’s crackdown. Now, they wait.
1136
Emily Rauhala tracks the plight of a Uighur family that escaped internment in western China. And Michael Ruane describes a newly digitized wealth of recordings and documents from the postwar Nuremberg Trial.
Nov 22, 2019
Two weeks. Seven hearings. Now what?
1216
Shane Harris recaps the second week of public impeachment hearings. Jay Greene examines the vast counterfeit-product market on Amazon.
Nov 21, 2019
A race to stand out before Democratic field thins
1123
Political reporters Michael Scherer, Annie Linskey and Cleve Wootson break down key moments from Wednesday’s Democratic primary debate in Atlanta.
Nov 21, 2019
‘Was there a "quid pro quo"? … The answer is yes.’
1705
Shane Harris unpacks Ambassador Gordon Sondland’s public testimony. Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez on where he sees the party going. And Michelle Ye Hee Lee explains how merchandise sales have altered the campaign fundraising game.
Nov 20, 2019
The call that sparked the whistleblower complaint
1753
Shane Harris and Lisa Rein share what another day of public impeachment hearings revealed. Mary Beth Sheridan connects the political crises unfolding across Latin America. And Lena Sun describes the growing threat posed by superbugs.
Nov 19, 2019
The free-for-all over Medicare-for-all
1700
Jeff Stein describes how Medicare-for-all would work. Rachel Siegel explains what President Trump’s trade war is doing to lobster fishing towns in Maine. And Michelle Ye Hee Lee on single-dollar donors.
Nov 18, 2019
As Yovanovitch testifies, Trump attacks her on Twitter
1934
Shane Harris on how Marie Yovanovitch’s testimony prompted accusations of witness intimidation. Elahe Izadi describes how comedian Jenny Slate works through her stage fright. And Chico Harlan wades through the tidewaters submerging Venice.
Nov 15, 2019
Late to the party: Even more Democrats enter the race for 2020
1864
Matt Viser on late entries into the 2020 race. Neena Satija investigates the policies that ensnared child migrants in a bureaucratic nightmare. And author Jacqueline Woodson with untold stories about black family life in her latest, “Red at the Bone.”
Nov 14, 2019
The public impeachment inquiry hearings: Day One
1398
Shane Harris explains what we learned on the first day of the impeachment inquiry’s public phase. Shibani Mahtani on a flashpoint in Hong Kong.
Nov 13, 2019
America’s new ‘progressive prosecutors’ are getting pushback
1694
Mark Berman on the reality facing “progressive prosecutors.” Amber Phillips looks into Wednesday’s key witnesses: William B. Taylor and George Kent. Plus, Mustafa Salim on the unconventional role of Iraq’s tuk-tuks.
Nov 12, 2019
The impeachment inquiry finally goes public
1595
Paul Kane previews the next stage of the impeachment inquiry. Annie Gowen on the ongoing mental health crisis facing America’s farmers. Plus, Laura Reiley covers the challenges of marketing and selling CBD products.
Nov 11, 2019
How Pete Buttigieg plans to diversify his base
1328
South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg lays out his plan to capture broader appeal. And Tara Bahrampour on a 94-year-old woman who wanted to leave life on her own terms.
Nov 08, 2019
The future of a drug company blamed for helping fuel the opioid crisis
1601
Chris Rowland explains why one of the companies accused of fueling the opioid epidemic is declaring bankruptcy. Griff Witte looks at why Republican legislators feel they can’t stray from Trump. And Ellen Nakashima discusses Saudi Arabia’s Twitter spies.
Nov 07, 2019
What Tuesday’s election results could mean for 2020
1758
Robert Costa with the major takeaways from Tuesday’s elections. Abby Ohlheiser explains how a tracking app is transforming parent-child relationships. Plus, Rick Noack on what a 10-year-old burger says about capitalism.
Nov 06, 2019
The Texas teenagers who allegedly smuggled immigrants across the southern border
1502
Karoun Demirjian on what we’ve learned from the impeachment inquiry transcripts released this week. Maria Sacchetti on the role U.S. citizens play in immigration smuggling. And Rebecca Tan explains part of the new generation’s enthusiasm for cricket.
Nov 05, 2019
Guns in the gym: The NRA’s charity arm raffles off weapons in American schools
1871
Beth Reinhard on why the NRA is raffling off guns in American schools. Jason Rezaian examines Iran’s history of hostage-taking. And Joel Achenbach considers the uncertain fate of the universe.
Nov 04, 2019
Restoring Afghanistan’s lost era of film
1171
Siobhán O’Grady visits the archivists restoring film reels hidden during the Taliban era. And Peter Finn explains how an adventure-seeking socialite became the first American woman in uniform captured by the Nazis.
Nov 01, 2019
The Canadian islands crumbling into the sea
1555
Brady Dennis examines the effect of climate change on Canadian islands. Karen DeYoung clarifies the complicated U.S.-Turkey relationship. Maura Judkis on a cradle of outlandish Halloween costumes. And Tracy Grant celebrates D.C.’s World Series win.
Oct 31, 2019
A California utility that cut off power to curb wildfires may have caused them
1240
Douglas MacMillan reports on a utility’s controversial plan to prevent California wildfires. Heather Long explains why the deficit is ballooning under Trump. And Ben Strauss on the changing rules for college athletes.
Oct 31, 2019
House Democrats prepare for first impeachment vote
1750
Mike DeBonis on what the upcoming impeachment vote means. Josh White on why the Supreme Court is considering whether a D.C. sniper should be resentenced. And Hawken Miller on the people getting coaches to improve their video game playing.
Oct 29, 2019
How Baghdadi’s death could be rallying cry for ISIS
1525
Missy Ryan on how U.S. troops closed in on ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Peter Whoriskey explains the ethical uncertainty of what goes into a chocolate bar. And Danielle Paquette reports that rising temperatures means more female sea turtles.
Oct 28, 2019
Doors are closing for Syrian refugees
1228
Kareem Fahim travels with a refugee couple seeking a new life outside of Syria. And Julie Zauzmer on a Republican PAC working to get the Amish population out to vote.
Oct 25, 2019
An interview with an algorithm
1494
Drew Harwell and Carolyn Y. Johnson examine the algorithms measuring your worth. Danielle Douglas-Gabriel explains why the Education Department gave millions in student loans to ineligible colleges. And Sarah Dadouch on the ongoing protests in Lebanon.
Oct 24, 2019
A princess, an international custody dispute — and Rudy Giuliani
1546
Dalton Bennett on the unexpected meeting between Rudolph W. Guiliani and an Emirati princess. Aaron Blake sums up the latest developments of the impeachment inquiry. And Rick Maese explains how coastal sports teams are planning for climate change.
Oct 23, 2019
How Vladimir Putin soured the president on Ukraine
1441
Greg Miller describes Vladimir Putin’s role in shaping Trump’s view of Ukraine. Griff Witte spends time with refugees who sought asylum in Australia and ended up in Texas. And Martine Powers on how a city responds to its team’s first World Series.
Oct 22, 2019
Cracks in Trump’s Republican firewall
1701
Ashley Parker on an increasingly embattled White House. Debbie Cenziper on the thousands of children in foster care after their parents fell victim to the opioid epidemic. And William Booth explains the latest fight over Brexit.
Oct 21, 2019
Trump awards a massive government contract – to himself
1840
David Fahrenthold scrutinizes the president’s decision to award a major government contract — to himself. U.S. star Rose Lavelle discusses the future of women’s soccer. And Sonia Rao shares what indie studio A24 is doing right.
Oct 18, 2019
Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg struggles to balance truth and free speech
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Tony Romm examines what Facebook sees as its role in policing speech ahead the 2020 election. Jenna Portnoy and Paul Kane recount the life and legacy of Rep. Elijah Cummings. And Simon Denyer on the cultural tradition behind Japan’s dolphin hunt.
Oct 17, 2019
A Democratic debate, in the shadow of impeachment
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Amber Phillips shares her takeaways from the fourth Democratic presidential debate. Aaron Davis explains the ascent of the U.S. ambassador to the E.U. And Keith Alexander describes how D.C. changed during the reign of drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III.
Oct 16, 2019
Some colleges are tracking students before they even apply
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Douglas MacMillan explains how colleges track potential students before they even apply. Alex Andrejev follows a video-game designer’s path from refugee to CEO. And Louisa Loveluck on the young people who feel locked out of Iraq’s political system.
Oct 15, 2019
As U.S. military plans pullout, a stunning unraveling in Syria
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Missy Ryan talks about how the fight in Syria connects to U.S. diplomacy. Michelle Ye Hee Lee on the army of consultants behind Trump’s reelection campaign. Plus, Scott Wilson on the unpopular way California utility companies are fighting wildfires.
Oct 14, 2019
Why a suburb's integrated schools are still failing black students
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Laura Meckler goes back to her hometown of Shaker Heights, Ohio, to try to understand why integration efforts in schools there are still not closing the achievement gap. And Steve Mufson reports on Jane Fonda’s plan to protest inaction on climate change.
Oct 11, 2019
How China called foul on American businesses
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Jeanne Whalen examines how Western businesses are bowing to political pressure from China. Samantha Schmidt on how a vulnerable community of transgender sex workers takes care of its own. And Luisa Beck unpacks the implications of a shooting in Germany.
Oct 10, 2019
‘Not so much a legal document as a political screed’
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Karoun Demirjian tracks how the White House has pushed back against impeachment. Anna Fifield explains a new phase in China’s forcible assimilation of its Uighur population. And Ben Guarino on the winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in chemistry.
Oct 09, 2019
The fallout of a U.S. troop withdrawal from northern Syria
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Ishaan Tharoor on what the withdrawal of troops from Syria means for the Kurds. Eli Rosenberg reports from the picket line of the United Auto Workers strike. And Caroline Kitchener on the stakes of a Supreme Court case focused on LGBT discrimination.
Oct 08, 2019
Inside the Republican reckoning over Trump’s possible impeachment.
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Phil Rucker on how the impeachment inquiry into the president is paralyzing the GOP. Anton Troianovski reports on what climate change means in Siberia. And voices from the Hong Kong protest movement.
Oct 07, 2019
Why every Jessica you know is turning 30
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The Lily’s Caroline Kitchener explores what it’s like to turn 30 in 2019. Plus, David Betancourt on the best “Joker.”
Oct 04, 2019
The story of Hunter Biden’s dealings in Ukraine
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Michael Kranish looks into Hunter Biden’s dealings in Ukraine. Julie Zauzmer rides along with two pastors working to revive shrinking churches. Plus, Jemar Tisby on the burden of forgiveness for black Americans.
Oct 03, 2019
How the White House rehabilitated Saudi Arabia’s reputation after the death of Jamal Khashoggi
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John Hudson examines the U.S. relationship with Saudi Arabia, one year after Jamal Khashoggi’s murder. Nick Miroff on an interview with DHS’s isolated acting chief. And Mike Ruane with a newly discovered audio recording of the D-Day invasion.
Oct 02, 2019
Uber says safety is its first priority. Employees aren’t so sure.
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Greg Bensinger on Uber’s company-centric safety policies. Matt Zapotsky examines how Attorney General William Barr fits into the impeachment inquiry. And Anne Midgette remembers opera singer Jessye Norman.
Oct 01, 2019
How 2020 Democrats are navigating the impeachment inquiry
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Sean Sullivan tracks how Democratic presidential candidates are responding to the impeachment inquiry. Wesley Lowery unpacks the argument for reparations. And Anna Fifield explains how pork prices are overshadowing China’s national day celebrations.
Sep 30, 2019
50 years, three presidents: How impeachment inquiries change the nation
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Chief political correspondent Dan Balz on covering two presidential impeachment inquiries. And Elahe Izadi examines the rarefied place in pop culture that “Saturday Night Live’s” Kenan Thompson occupies.
Sep 27, 2019
The ‘highly detailed and arresting’ whistleblower complaint against Trump
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Shane Harris takes us through the newly released whistleblower complaint. Juliet Eilperin on the conflicted attitudes of oil and gas executives toward climate change. And Laura Reiley digs into the religious debates behind plant-based meat and shrimp.
Sep 26, 2019
‘A piece of a broader narrative’: Trump’s call at the center of whistleblower complaint
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Shane Harris examines the rough transcript of Trump’s call to Ukraine. Greg Miller unpacks the shadow agenda pursued by Rudolph W. Giuliani in Ukraine. And Samantha Schmidt on the future of the Boy Scouts.
Sep 25, 2019
Impeachment inquiry launched against Trump: How we got here
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Politics reporter Aaron Blake explains House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s decision to move forward with an impeachment inquiry against President Trump, bringing an end to an extended debate within the Democratic Party.
Sep 25, 2019
‘It’s going to be an enormous battle’: Black college students fight for voting access in Texas
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Amy Gardner on a case of alleged racial bias in the administration of a local election in Texas. Jerry Brewer examines where the NFL went wrong with Antonio Brown. And Aaron Gregg tracks the military funding diverted for President Trump’s border wall.
Sep 24, 2019
Whistleblower allegation against Trump revives the call for impeachment
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Rachel Bade explains whether impeachment is on the table after a whistleblower complaint. Gerry Shih on the new targets of China’s crackdown against Muslims. And Zachary Pincus-Roth examines the continued watchability of “The Shawshank Redemption.”
Sep 23, 2019
‘They weren’t listening’: How Congress failed to act on a deadly drug’s harrowing rise
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Katie Zezima on why federal money has a limited impact in communities fighting the opioid crisis. And Emily Giambalvo tracks the lives of the dogs rescued from Michael Vick’s dogfighting operation.
Sep 20, 2019
Intel official blows a whistle on Trump's interaction with world leader
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Shane Harris on the whistleblower rattling the intelligence community. Juliet Eilperin explains the president’s move to take away California’s ability to set its own emission standards. And Maura Judkis on the legal challenges of opening a cannabis cafe.
Sep 19, 2019
‘They see that swagger when Harris speaks’: How Howard University shaped Kamala Harris
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Robin Givhan examines Sen. Kamala Harris’s political and racial identity. Ruth Eglash breaks down the negotiations for a new government in Israel. And Caroline Kitchener on who die-hard Hillary Clinton supporters will back in 2020.
Sep 18, 2019
‘He's got competing instincts here’: Trump’s shifting response to Saudi oil-field attack
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Anne Gearan explains the White House’s shifting messaging on Iran. Drew Harwell on how Beijing-based TikTok is suspected of censoring the Hong Kong protests. And Maura Judkis takes us into the kitchen with “Queer Eye” star Antoni Porowski.
Sep 17, 2019
What the opioid crackdown means for chronic pain patients
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Joel Achenbach reports on chronic pain and opioids. Sarah Kaplan on how American teens are channeling their anxiety over climate change into activism. And Max Bearak visits a Kenyan community whose members say its source of power was stolen.
Sep 16, 2019
‘The city didn’t need another statement of failure’: Baltimore still reeling after Freddie Gray
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Aaron Blake shares his takeaways from the third Democratic debate. And Erin Cox describes the healing and reawakening of Baltimore after the death of Freddie Gray.
Sep 13, 2019
A report card on school segregation in America
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Laura Meckler examines what school segregation looks like today. Heather Long on the minority women changing the makeup of the U.S. workforce. And Nick Miroff explains the Supreme Court’s move on a Trump administration asylum policy.
Sep 12, 2019
The ‘South Atlantic blob’: The vulnerability of the world’s warming oceans
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Chris Mooney, John Muyskens and Carolyn Van Houten on the dangerous hot zones spreading around the world. David Weigel previews the next Democratic presidential debate. And Sarah Kaplan describes mankind’s potential future home.
Sep 11, 2019
What John Bolton’s departure means for Trump’s foreign policy
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John Hudson on the ouster of national security adviser John Bolton. Reed Albergotti describes Apple’s dual role in the app economy. And Lena Sun breaks down the chemical linked to recent vaping-related illnesses and deaths.
Sep 10, 2019
‘As far as I’m concerned, they’re dead.’ How Trump’s peace talks with the Taliban broke down.
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Karen DeYoung explains the collapse of U.S. peace talks in Afghanistan. Rachael Bade on the implications of an impeachment probe. And Anthony Faiola describes the human toll and destruction of Hurricane Dorian.
Sep 09, 2019
The power of black motherhood: Finding joy beyond the numbers on maternal mortality
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Helena Andrews-Dyer looks for joy in her pregnancy in the face of scary statistics about black women and childbirth. And Peter Holley explains what life after death could look like, thanks to new technology.
Sep 06, 2019
Protests, defections, rebellions — a chaotic week for British politics
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Kevin Sullivan breaks down Boris Johnson’s Brexit battle. Caroline Kitchener describes the state of women’s health care in Maine. And Danielle Paquette takes us on a ride with an African delivery service.
Sep 05, 2019
An intoxicated pathologist misdiagnosed 3,000 cases. VA failed to stop him.
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Taylor Telford on Walmart’s response to multiple mass shootings. Lisa Rein looks at oversight failures in the Department of Veterans Affairs. And Jessica Contrera reports from what might be the most dramatic dog park in the country.
Sep 04, 2019
After prison, a different kind of punishment
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Philip Rucker on what White House advisers and aides are really thinking as the summer winds down. Tracy Jan explains what’s missing in the conversation about criminal justice reform. And Jason Samenow forecasts the hurricanes of the future.
Sep 03, 2019
Getting through the world with face blindness
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Post reporter Sadie Dingfelder used to think she was just really bad at recognizing people. Then she learned she might have a condition called prosopagnosia — better known as face blindness — and set about getting an official diagnosis.
Sep 02, 2019
How American classrooms gloss over slavery and its enduring legacy
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Joe Heim examines the glossing over of the history of slavery in American textbooks and schools. Plus, Lisa Bonos and Linah Mohammad question the supposed magic of the summer fling.
Aug 30, 2019
‘Finish the wall’: Trump tells aides he’ll pardon misdeeds, say current and former officials
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Nick Miroff explains how the president is encouraging misdeeds to get his wall built. Geoffrey Fowler talks about how his credit cards have let companies buy his data. And Rachel Hatzipanagos on anxiety in the Latino community under Trump.

Aug 29, 2019
Security or surveillance? How smart doorbell company Ring partners with police
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Drew Harwell on doorbell-camera company Ring turning its focus to surveillance. Laura Reiley on the war over what plant-based brands can call themselves. Adam Taylor on Boris Johnson’s move to suspend Parliament, and debate, ahead of the Brexit deadline.
Aug 28, 2019
“This is a landmark.” The court decision that could shape the future of the opioid crisis.
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Lenny Bernstein on what a court ruling in Oklahoma could mean for the opioid epidemic. Carol D. Leonnig reports on Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers speaking out in court. And transportation reporter Luz Lazo explains why there may be Braille on your e-scooter.
Aug 27, 2019
Goodbye Biarritz, Hello … Trump National Doral? Trump makes a pitch for next year’s G-7
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David Fahrenthold explains President Trump’s unusual pitch for next year’s G-7 summit: hosting it at his own resort. Sari Horowitz on how fentanyl is crossing the border. And Jerry Brewer on quarterback Andrew Luck’s early retirement from the NFL.
Aug 26, 2019
‘Publishing is still a business that is owned by white men’: Three women on race and genre
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Martine Powers talks with N.K. Jemisin, Jasmine Guillory and Lauren Wilkinson about challenging narrow perceptions of race in literary genres. And Marian Liu on the segregation of American music awards.

Aug 23, 2019
‘People were always so welcoming, so kind, so helpful.’ And then the president arrived.
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From a community divided by xenophobic chants, Griff Witte explains what the president’s rhetoric can do on the ground. Jeff Stein on the aging problem in the U.S. And Andrew Freedman on the record-breaking number of fires in the Amazon.

Aug 22, 2019
Where does President Trump stand on gun reform? Depends on the day.
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Josh Dawsey and David Nakamura on the dimming prospect of Trump-led gun reform. Pam Constable and Jon Gerberg track the U.S.-Taliban peace talks and their impact on violence in Afghanistan. And an animal love story from Luisa Beck and Rick Noack.

Aug 21, 2019
The Trump translator: How Stephen Miller became so powerful in the West Wing
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Nick Miroff and Josh Dawsey on the outsize influence of Stephen Miller on Trump’s immigration policy. Former Mass. governor Bill Weld makes a long-shot case for the Republican presidential nomination. And a summer field trip with Joel Achenbach. 

Aug 20, 2019
48 hours at the Iowa State Fair
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Holly Bailey and Kevin Uhrmacher outline 2020 takeaways from the Iowa State Fair. Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.) explains his case to Martine Powers. And Matt Collette introduces us to the fair’s nonpolitical competitors.
Aug 19, 2019
Non-binary, pregnant and taking on the most gendered role of all: motherhood
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Samantha Schmidt on the sacrifices one person has made to become a mother. And Geoff Edgers remembers Aretha Franklin, one year after her death.
Aug 16, 2019
How small-dollar donors could choose our next president
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Anu Narayanswamy crunches the numbers on small-dollar donations. Niha Masih and Joanna Slater explain the changes and turmoil in Kashmir. And Travis DeShong on what it takes to become the voice inside someone’s head.
Aug 15, 2019
He witnessed Michael Brown’s killing. Now Dorian Johnson is trying to get his life back on track.
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Wesley Lowery takes us back to the night Michael Brown was killed in Ferguson. Damian Paletta warns of a possible recession. And Rebecca Tan on the community a simple piano can create.
Aug 14, 2019
For many Americans, dramatic climate change has already arrived
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Chris Mooney shows us where to see the future of climate change right now. Michael Kranish on President Trump’s relationship with his late alcoholic brother. And Timothy McLaughlin and Gerry Shih explain the clashes in Hong Kong.
Aug 13, 2019
‘This is an issue that we can win’: Cory Booker on his gun control plan
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Sen. Cory Booker lays out his gun policy proposal. Matt Zapotosky on what convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s apparent suicide in federal custody can tell us about the case moving forward. And Alex Horton gives us a reality check on a meme.
Aug 12, 2019
Nearly all mass shootings are committed by men. Why isn’t masculinity a bigger part of the debate?
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Nicki DeMarco reports on the often-overlooked connection between masculinity and gun violence. And Geoff Edgers on a run of Vegas shows that defined Elvis’s legacy.
Aug 09, 2019
Forced from Paradise: Finding home after California’s Camp Fire
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Greg Miller unpacks the calls for a redirection of U.S. counterterrorism efforts. Frances Stead Sellers and Whitney Leaming on people’s search for home after the Camp Fire. And Monica Hesse pokes holes in the gender-reveal party trend.
Aug 08, 2019
‘Crops aren’t moving. There’s no market’: Why so many family farms are facing bankruptcy
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Annie Gowen explains how the trade war is impacting American farmers. Joy Sharon Yi on one woman’s unseen losses after the Charleston, S.C., shooting. And Drew Harwell on the shutdown of a site that’s become a refuge for racists and extremists.
Aug 07, 2019
Why China is playing the long game in its trade battle with the U.S.
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Damian Paletta unpacks the most recent battles in the trade war with China. Mike DeBonis on the many retiring House members leaving Republicans in a lurch. And Bilal Qureshi on Toni Morrison’s legacy.
Aug 06, 2019
After mass shootings, Trump condemns white supremacy. Critics say he inspires it.
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Mark Berman tracks the mass shootings that happened over the weekend in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio. Plus, Philip Rucker on President Trump’s response to the tragedies. And Andrew Freedman on last month’s record-breaking heat.
Aug 05, 2019
Finding America’s last-known slave ship — and confronting a monstrous past
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Nicole Ellis tells the story of the Clotilda, the last-known ship of the illegal slave trade in the U.S. And Oyinkan Braithwaite ruminates on the unexpected relatability of her novel, “My Sister, the Serial Killer.”
Aug 02, 2019
For the Democratic field, the path to nomination goes through Joe Biden
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Amber Phillips analyzes the liberal-moderate divide on display at the Democratic debates. Plus, Beth Reinhard details President Trump’s history with Jeffrey Epstein. And Elahe Izadi on the politicization of the word “squad.”
Aug 01, 2019
How Trump wants to one-up Democrats on health care
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Yasmeen Abutaleb on the White House’s scramble for a health-care win. Moriah Balingit explains how e-cigarettes may lead to more than nicotine addiction. And Heather Long on the Federal Reserve’s gamble on the economy.
Jul 31, 2019
How secure are U.S. elections? (Hint: Still much less than you might think.)