Resources Radio

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Resources Radio is a weekly podcast by Resources for the Future. Each week we talk to leading experts about climate change, electricity, ecosystems, and more, making the latest research accessible to everyone.

Episode Date
The Dollar Value of Energy Innovation, with Daniel Shawhan
00:34:35
In this week’s episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Resources for the Future (RFF) Fellow Daniel Shawhan about a new working paper that he and several RFF coauthors recently published, about the value of advanced energy funding. The study assesses how government funding for research, development, and demonstration of emerging clean energy technologies can reduce the costs of deploying those technologies in the future. The authors include in their analysis advanced nuclear energy, geothermal energy, carbon capture and storage, electricity storage, and direct air capture of carbon dioxide. Shawhan and his team also estimate how bringing down these costs can benefit society by reducing air pollution, electricity bills, and more. References and recommendations: “The Value of Advanced Energy Funding: Projected Effects of Proposed US Funding for Advanced Energy Technologies” working paper by Daniel Shawhan, Kathryne Cleary, Christoph Funke, and Steven Witkin; https://www.rff.org/publications/working-papers/projected-effects-proposed-us-funding-advanced-energy-technologies/ “The Value of Advanced Energy Funding: Projected Effects of Proposed US Funding for Advanced Energy Technologies” issue brief by Daniel Shawhan, Kathryne Cleary, Christoph Funke, and Steven Witkin; https://www.rff.org/publications/issue-briefs/projected-effects-of-proposed-funding-for-advanced-energy-technologies/ “Benefits of Energy Technology Innovation Part 2: Economy-Wide Direct Air Capture Modeling Results” by Marc Hafstead; https://www.rff.org/publications/working-papers/benefits-energy-technology-innovation-economy-wide-direct-air-capture/ “Why Does Disaster Aid Often Favor White People?” by Christopher Flavelle; https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/07/climate/FEMA-race-climate.html TextAloud text-to-speech software; https://nextup.com/TextAloud/index.html
Jun 14, 2021
Experiments in Sustainable Development, with Kelsey Jack
00:34:18
In this week’s episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Kelsey Jack, associate professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara; director of the Poverty Alleviation Group at UC Santa Barbara’s Environmental Market Solutions Lab; and codirector of the King Climate Action Initiative at the Poverty Action Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jack works at the intersection of environmental economics and international development, studying how environmental issues shape economic development—and vice versa—in developing nations. She discusses some of the experiments she’s done on electricity payments and ecosystem service provision in different parts of the world, and she suggests how her research can inform policymaking on sustainable economic development. References and recommendations: “Good Economics for Hard Times” by Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo; https://www.goodeconomicsforhardtimes.com/ “Ministry for the Future” by Kim Stanley Robinson; https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/titles/kim-stanley-robinson/the-ministry-for-the-future/9780316300162/
Jun 06, 2021
The Lowdown on High Power Prices, with Meredith Fowlie
00:30:36
In this week’s episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Meredith Fowlie, an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, and a faculty director of the Energy Institute at Haas. Fowlie and coauthors recently published a working paper on the causes and implications of high electricity prices in the state of California. These high prices burden low-income households and pose a hurdle to reducing emissions through the electrification of transportation, heating, and other sectors. In today’s episode, Fowlie describes proposals for reforming electricity pricing in California in ways that address this complex and evolving challenge. References and recommendations: “Designing Electricity Rates for an Equitable Energy Transition” by Severin Borenstein, Meredith Fowlie, and James Sallee; https://haas.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/WP314.pdf “Competitors to lithium-ion batteries in the grid storage market” episode of the Voltscast podcast with David Roberts; https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/competitors-to-lithium-ion-batteries-in-grid-storage/id1548554104?i=1000521809537 “Timber Wars” podcast from Oregon Public Broadcasting; https://www.opb.org/show/timberwars/ “Resources Radio” podcast from Resources for the Future; https://www.resources.org/resources-radio/ “Why Animals Don’t Get Lost” by Kathryn Schulz; https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/04/05/why-animals-dont-get-lost
May 30, 2021
Who’s a Big Fan of Offshore Wind? US Challenges and Opportunities, with Jeremy Firestone
00:32:13
In this episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Jeremy Firestone, a wind energy specialist, professor, and director of the Center for Research in Wind at the University of Delaware. For many years, Firestone has explored people’s attitudes and economic preferences related to wind power development. He and coauthors recently published new research about the intersection of offshore wind development and coastal recreation in the journal “Energy Research & Social Science,” a study that Firestone and Hayes discuss; they also talk more broadly about the opportunities and challenges associated with increasing offshore wind development in the United States. References and recommendations: “Uncharted waters: Exploring coastal recreation impacts, coping behaviors, and attitudes towards offshore wind energy development in the United States” by Michael D. Ferguson, Darrick Evensen, Lauren A. Ferguson, David Bidwell, Jeremy Firestone, Tasha L. Dooley, and Clayton R. Mitchell; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2214629621001225 “Wind energy: A human challenge” by Jeremy Firestone; https://science.sciencemag.org/content/366/6470/1206.1 “Expert elicitation survey predicts 37% to 49% declines in wind energy costs by 2050” by Ryan Wiser, Joseph Rand, Joachim Seel, Philipp Beiter, Erin Baker, Eric Lantz, and Patrick Gilman; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41560-021-00810-z “The Economic Costs of NIMBYism: Evidence from Renewable Energy Projects” by Stephen Jarvis; https://haas.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/WP311.pdf “Carbon policy and the emissions implications of electric vehicles” by Kenneth Gillingham, Marten Ovaere, and Stephanie M. Weber; https://www.nber.org/system/files/working_papers/w28620/w28620.pdf “Coffeeland: One Man’s Dark Empire and the Making of Our Favorite Drug” by Augustine Sedgewick; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/316748/coffeeland-by-augustine-sedgewick/
May 23, 2021
Intersections Between Energy and International Development, with Sheila Hollis
00:29:38
In this episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Sheila Hollis, acting executive director of the United States Energy Association (USEA). USEA is an industry association that represents 150 members across the US energy sector, from the largest Fortune 500 companies to small energy consulting firms. The organization supports policy and technical discussions with the US Department of Energy to expand the use of clean energy technology globally; it also works with the US Agency for International Development to expand energy access in developing countries. Hollis describes the changes faced by the energy industry in both mature and developing markets. References and recommendations: “The New Map: Energy, Climate, and the Clash of Nations” by Daniel Yergin; https://www.danielyergin.com/books/thenewmap
May 15, 2021
Big Dollars, Big Rewards? The Roles of Prizes in Driving Innovation, with Zorina Khan
00:36:41
In February this year, we noticed at Resources for the Future that our explainer about carbon capture and storage—which provides an overview of the technology, along with its uses, benefits, and drawbacks—had suddenly skyrocketed in terms of page use on the website. When we investigated what had prompted this sudden expanded interest, we found Elon Musk's announcement from the day prior: Musk had offered $100 million in prize money, through the XPRIZE Foundation, to teams that can envision, prototype, and validate scalable carbon capture and removable technology. At the end of the four-year contest period, several prizes will be awarded: $50 million for first place, $20 million for second place, and $10 million for third. In addition, the program will offer 25 six-figure scholarships to competing academic teams. According to XPRIZE officials, the $100 million on offer represents one of the largest—if not the largest—incentive prizes in history. So, this episode is about prizes: how they've been used, what we can learn from past successes and failures, and how they compare to other instruments that are designed to spur innovation. Zorina Khan joins the podcast to talk about these fascinating issues. Khan is a professor of economics at Bowdoin College and a member of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research examines issues in law and economic history, including intellectual property rights, technological progress in Europe and the United States, antitrust litigation, legal systems, and corporate governance. She's an award-winning author, and her newest book is called "Inventing Ideas: Patents, Prizes, and the Knowledge Economy." References and recommendations: "Carbon Capture and Storage 101" from Resources for the Future; https://www.rff.org/publications/explainers/carbon-capture-and-storage-101/ "$100M prize for carbon removal" from XPRIZE Foundation and Elon Musk; https://www.xprize.org/prizes/elonmusk "Inventing Ideas: Patents, Prizes, and the Knowledge Economy" by B. Zorina Khan; https://global.oup.com/academic/product/inventing-ideas-9780190936082 "Democratization of Invention" by B. Zorina Khan; https://books.bowdoin.edu/book/the-democratization-of-invention-patents-and-copyrights-in-american-economic-development-1790-1920/ “Unlocking history through automated virtual unfolding of sealed documents imaged by X-ray microtomography” by Jana Dambrogio, Amanda Ghassaei, Daniel Starza Smith, Holly Jackson, Martin L. Demaine, Graham Davis, David Mills, Rebekah Ahrendt, Nadine Akkerman, David van der Linden, and Erik D. Demaine; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-21326-w
May 10, 2021
Exploring the Energy Transition on Tribal Lands, with Pilar Thomas
00:38:17
In this episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Pilar Thomas, a partner at Quarles & Brady and a professor of the practice at the University of Arizona and Arizona State University. Thomas is an expert on energy development and environmental management on tribal lands and has served in the US Departments of Justice, Interior, and Energy. Raimi and Thomas discuss how different tribes are approaching fossil and renewable energy development, preparing for the energy transition, and addressing energy poverty on tribal lands. References and recommendations: Tribal Energy Atlas from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory; https://maps.nrel.gov/tribal-energy-atlas Writing and analysis from Wood Mackenzie; https://www.woodmac.com/ Studies and analysis from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; https://www.lbl.gov/ Sandia National Laboratories; https://www.sandia.gov/
May 02, 2021
Problems Cropping Up? The Historical Impact of Climate Change on Agriculture, with Ariel Ortiz-Bobea
00:32:36
In this episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Ariel Ortiz-Bobea, an associate professor of applied economics and policy at Cornell University and a faculty fellow at the Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability. Much of Ortiz-Bobea’s research focuses on the links between climate change and agricultural productivity—which is the topic of this conversation. In particular, Ortiz-Bobea discusses a paper that he and colleagues released recently in Nature Climate Change, which covers the historical impact of anthropogenic climate change on global agricultural productivity. The key word here is “historical.” Whereas a large body of research focuses on future impacts, this study looks back to see how much climate change already has affected agriculture globally. Spoiler alert: the impacts today have been fairly large. References and recommendations: “Anthropogenic climate change has slowed global agricultural productivity growth” by Ariel Ortiz-Bobea, Toby R. Ault, Carlos M. Carrillo, Robert G. Chambers, and David B. Lobell; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-021-01000-1 “Creating Abundance” by Alan L. Olmstead and Paul W. Rhode; http://services.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/history/american-history-general-interest/creating-abundance-biological-innovation-and-american-agricultural-development
Apr 23, 2021
A Conversation about the Civilian Conservation Corps, with Neil Maher
00:34:32
In this week’s episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Neil Maher, professor of history at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University-Newark. Maher’s research focuses on the intersection of environmental and political history, and his scholarship includes a 2008 book called “Nature’s New Deal.” Maher and Hayes discuss the Civilian Conservation Corps’s successes, challenges, and legacy in the American conservation and historical landscape. Maher also describes lessons from the Depression-era program that could apply to current policy and political deliberations. References and recommendations: “Stop Saving the Planet! An Environmentalist Manifesto” by Jenny Price; https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393540871
Apr 19, 2021
Playing God with the Nature of the Future, with Elizabeth Kolbert
00:28:55
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with New Yorker staff writer and Pulitzer Prize–Winning author Elizabeth Kolbert about her new book, “Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future.” The book is a fascinating and darkly funny exploration of how humanity is trying to manage the negative effects we’ve inflicted on the natural world. Using examples such as the Asian carp, endangered desert pupfish, the Great Barrier Reef, and solar geoengineering, Kolbert’s book includes interviews with leading experts around the world who are using new technologies to try and counteract the harms done by old technologies. References and recommendations: “Beloved Beasts” by Michelle Nijhuis; https://michellenijhuis.com/beloved-beasts
Apr 12, 2021
Giving a Fair Shot to Energy Workers and Communities in Transition, with Wes Look and Daniel Raimi
00:34:12
In this episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Wesley Look and Daniel Raimi, Resources for the Future (RFF) colleagues who have led RFF's research on enabling fairness for energy workers and communities in transition. Look is a senior research associate and Raimi is a fellow at RFF, and the work they describe in this episode has been carried out over the past year in partnership with Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), culminating in a synthesis report released on March 25, 2021. Look and Raimi share some of the lessons that they and their EDF colleagues have learned about this complex topic, including the many facets of transition, how the federal government can improve outcomes for workers, and what researchers and policymakers alike can learn from various communities and countries that already face these changing ties to the energy industry. References and recommendations: “Enabling Fairness for Energy Workers and Communities in Transition” synthesis report by Wesley Look, Daniel Raimi, Molly Robertson, Jake Higdon, and Daniel Propp; https://www.rff.org/publications/reports/enabling-fairness-for-energy-workers-and-communities-in-transition/ Fairness for Workers and Communities in Transition report series by Wesley Look, Daniel Raimi, Molly Robertson, Jake Higdon, and Daniel Propp; https://www.rff.org/fairness-for-workers-and-communities/ “Economic Development Policies to Enable Fairness for Workers and Communities in Transition” by Daniel Raimi, Wesley Look, Molly Robertson, and Jake Higdon; https://www.rff.org/publications/reports/economic-development-fairness-workers-communities/ “Environmental Remediation and Infrastructure Policies Supporting Workers and Communities in Transition” by Daniel Raimi; https://www.rff.org/publications/reports/environment-infrastructure-fairness-workers-communities/ “The Role of Public Benefits in Supporting Workers and Communities Affected by Energy Transition” by Jake Higdon and Molly Robertson; https://www.rff.org/publications/reports/public-benefits-supporting-workers-and-communities-affected-energy-transition/ “Labor Policies to Enable Fairness for Workers and Communities in Transition” by Wesley Look, Molly Robertson, Jake Higdon, and Daniel Propp; https://www.rff.org/publications/reports/labor-policies-to-enable-fairness-for-workers-and-communities-in-transition/ Just Transition Initiative at the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS); https://www.csis.org/programs/energy-security-and-climate-change-program/projects/just-transition-initiative The American Jobs Plan from the Biden administration; https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/03/31/fact-sheet-the-american-jobs-plan/
Apr 04, 2021
Progress Amid the Pandemic: Carbon Markets in 2020, with William Acworth
00:34:09
In this episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with William Acworth, Head of Secretariat at the International Carbon Action Partnership (ICAP). ICAP recently released its 2021 status report on global emissions trading, and we're highlighting the group's status report for the second year in a row. This time, Acworth gets us up to speed on China's recently launched national emissions trading scheme, along with programs from elsewhere in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Acworth and Raimi discuss how markets have responded to the pandemic, where prices might be headed, and how markets are expanding to cover new sectors such as buildings and transportation. References and recommendations: "Emissions Trading Worldwide: Status Report 2021" from the International Carbon Action Partnership; https://icapcarbonaction.com/en/icap-status-report-2021 “Prices in the world’s biggest carbon market are soaring” from the Economist magazine; https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2021/02/24/prices-in-the-worlds-biggest-carbon-market-are-soaring "2020 China Carbon Pricing Survey" from China Carbon Forum; http://www.chinacarbon.info/sdm_downloads/2020-china-carbon-pricing-survey/ "Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life" by William Finnegan; https://www.pulitzer.org/winners/william-finnegan "Under a White Sky" by Elizabeth Kolbert; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/617060/under-a-white-sky-by-elizabeth-kolbert/ "How to Avoid a Climate Disaster" by Bill Gates; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/633968/how-to-avoid-a-climate-disaster-by-bill-gates/
Mar 28, 2021
Space, Satellites, and Society: New Tools for Policymakers, with Danielle Wood
00:37:41
In this week's episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Danielle Wood, assistant professor and director of the Space Enabled research group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab. Wood uses her expertise in aerospace engineering, aeronautics and astronautics, and technology policy to enhance societal development, bringing together tools not just from space and engineering, but also from economics and other social sciences. Wood discusses her recent research in Brazil and collaborations with policymakers around the world, who use space-based technologies to improve life here on Earth. References and recommendations: VALUABLES Consortium; https://www.rff.org/valuables/ "Combining Social, Environmental and Design Models to Support the Sustainable Development Goals" by Jack Reid, Cynthia Zeng, and Danielle Wood; https://www.media.mit.edu/publications/combining-social-environmental-and-design-models-to-support-the-sustainable-development-goals/ "Interactive Model for Assessing Mangrove Health, Ecosystem Services, Policy Consequences, and Satellite Design Using Earth Observation Data" by Jack Reid and Danielle Wood; https://www.media.mit.edu/publications/interactive-model-for-assessing-mangrove-health-ecosystem-services-policy-consequences-and-satellite-design-in-rio-de-janeiro-using-earth/ "Decision Support Model and Visualization for Assessing Environmental Phenomena, Ecosystem Services, Policy Consequences, and Satellite Design" by Jack Reid and Danielle Wood; https://www.media.mit.edu/publications/decision-support-model-and-visualization-for-assessing-environmental-phenomena-ecosystem-services-policy-consequences-and-satellite-desig/ Zora Neale Hurston’s books; https://www.zoranealehurston.com/books/ "Barracoon: The Story of the Last 'Black Cargo'" by Zora Neale Hurston; https://www.harpercollins.com/products/barracoon-zora-neale-hurston "Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America" by Ibram X. Kendi; https://www.nationalbook.org/books/stamped-from-the-beginning-the-definitive-history-of-racist-ideas-in-america/ "In & Of Itself" movie; https://www.inandofitselfshow.com/
Mar 21, 2021
Assessing Pathways to a Net-Zero Energy System, with Erin Mayfield
00:31:05
In this week’s episode, Daniel Raimi talks with Erin Mayfield, a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University. Mayfield is part of a team of researchers that recently released a report titled “Net-Zero America,” which lays out a variety of pathways for the United States to reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. In the conversation, Mayfield discusses key findings from the report, including how much the transition might cost, how much new infrastructure we’ll need to build, what effects we might see on energy sector employment, and the models the team used to generate these results—including a discussion of the limitations of models in addressing complex social issues. References and recommendations: “Net-Zero America” by Eric Larson, Chris Greig, Jesse Jenkins, Erin Mayfield, Andrew Pascale, Chuan Zhang, Joshua Drossman, Robert Williams, Steve Pacala, Robert Socolow, Ejeong Baik, Rich Birdsey, Rick Duke, Ryan Jones, Ben Haley, Emily Leslie, Keith Paustian, and Amy Swan; https://acee.princeton.edu/rapidswitch/projects/net-zero-america-project/ “The Foxes” painting by German expressionist artist Franz Marc; https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/the-foxes/dwF1pkUhw9uZpg The art of Erin Mayfield’s eight-year-old nephew, Vinny “Accelerating Decarbonization of the U.S. Energy System” from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, by Stephen W. Pacala, Colin Cunliff, Danielle Deane-Ryan, Kelly Sims Gallagher, Julia Haggerty, Christopher T. Hendrickson, Jesse D. Jenkins, Roxanne Johnson, Timothy C. Lieuwen, Vivian Loftness, Clark A. Miller, William A. Pizer, Varun Rai, Ed Rightor, Esther Takeuchi, Susan F. Tierney, and Jennifer Wilcox; https://www.nap.edu/catalog/25932/accelerating-decarbonization-of-the-us-energy-system
Mar 15, 2021
Illuminating the Future of Electric Power in the United States, with Karen Palmer
00:35:58
In this week’s episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Karen Palmer, a senior fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF) and director of RFF’s Future of Power Initiative. Palmer has deep expertise in the US power sector and has authored numerous publications on electricity policy drivers and options in power market design and electrification of various sectors of the economy. This episode features two very capable and kind women in celebration of International Women’s Day on March 8. Hayes and Palmer discuss a new report released by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine entitled “The Future of Electric Power in the United States.” Karen and her coauthors on this study, including RFF Board of Directors Chair Susan Tierney, were tasked with framing a broad set of issues facing the US power sector over the next several decades and with providing recommendations to a range of decisionmakers on how to address those drivers. References and recommendations: “The Future of Electric Power in the United States” interactive site; https://www.nap.edu/resource/25968/interactive/ “The Future of Electric Power in the United States” from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, by Granger Morgan, Anuradha Annaswamy, Anjan Bose, Terry Boston, Jeffery Dagle, Deepakraj Divan, Michael Howard, Cynthia Hsu, Reiko A. Kerr, Karen Palmer, H. Vincent Poor, William H. Sanders, Susan Tierney, David Victor, and Elizabeth Wilson; https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/the-future-of-electric-power-in-the-us#sectionPublications “Enhancing the Resilience of the Nation’s Electricity System” from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, by M. Granger Morgan, Dionysios Aliprantis, Anjan Bose, W. Terry Boston, Allison Clements, Jeffery Dagle, Paul De Martini, Jeanne Fox, Elsa Garmire, Ronald E. Keys, Mark McGranaghan, Craig Miller, Thomas J. Overbye, William H. Sanders, Richard E. Schuler, Susan Tierney, and David G. Victor; https://www.nap.edu/catalog/24836/enhancing-the-resilience-of-the-nations-electricity-system Transmission episodes of the “Voltscast” podcast, with host David Roberts; https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/transmission-month-everything-in-one-place/id1548554104?i=1000509879797 “Lessons from the Texas mess” episode of the “Voltscast” podcast, with host David Roberts; https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/lessons-from-the-texas-mess/id1548554104?i=1000510532364 “A Shock to the System: Restructuring America’s Electricity Industry” by Timothy J. Brennan, Karen L. Palmer, Raymond J. Kopp, Alan J. Krupnick, Vito Stagliano, and Dallas Burtraw; https://www.routledge.com/A-Shock-to-the-System-Restructuring-Americas-Electricity-Industry/Brennan-Palmer-Kopp-Krupnick-Stagliano-Burtraw/p/book/9780915707805 “Alternating Currents” by Timothy J. Brennan, Karen L. Palmer, and Salvador A. Martinez; https://www.routledge.com/Alternating-Currents-Electricity-Markets-and-Public-Policy/Brennan-Palmer-Martinez/p/book/9781891853074
Mar 07, 2021
Updates to the Social Cost of Carbon, with Kevin Rennert
00:31:26
In this week’s episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Kevin Rennert, a fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF) and director of RFF’s Social Cost of Carbon Initiative. Rennert has prior experience as deputy associate administrator for the Office of Policy at the US Environmental Protection Agency, senior advisor on energy for the US Senate Committee on Finance, and senior professional staff for the US Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Rennert’s expertise and leadership in these areas make him the perfect candidate to discuss the recently released interim estimate for the social cost of carbon—what it is, why it matters, how it’s evolved, and what will happen next with this important number. References and recommendations: “Discounting 101” explainer by Brian Prest; https://www.rff.org/publications/explainers/discounting-101/ “Estimating the Value of Carbon: Two Approaches” by Resources for the Future and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority; https://www.rff.org/publications/reports/estimating-the-value-of-carbon-two-approaches/ “Assessing Approaches to Updating the Social Cost of Carbon” from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, by Maureen L. Cropper, Richard G. Newell, Myles R. Allen, Maximilian Auffhammer, Chris E. Forest, Inez Y. Fung, James K. Hammitt, Henry D. Jacoby, Robert E. Kopp, William Pizer, Steven K. Rose, Richard Schmalensee, and John P. Weyant; https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/assessing-approaches-to-updating-the-social-cost-of-carbon#sectionPublications “Accelerating Decarbonization of the U.S. Energy System” from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, by Stephen W. Pacala, Colin Cunliff, Danielle Deane-Ryan, Kelly Sims Gallagher, Julia Haggerty, Christopher T. Hendrickson, Jesse D. Jenkins, Roxanne Johnson, Timothy C. Lieuwen, Vivian Loftness, Clark A. Miller, William A. Pizer, Varun Rai, Ed Rightor, Esther Takeuchi, Susan F. Tierney, and Jennifer Wilcox; https://www.nap.edu/catalog/25932/accelerating-decarbonization-of-the-us-energy-system
Mar 01, 2021
Shedding Light on Electricity Blackouts, with Severin Borenstein
00:33:38
In this episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Severin Borenstein, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, faculty director of the Energy Institute at Haas, and member of the Board of Governors of the California Independent System Operator. As the state of Texas struggles to keep the lights on due to extreme cold, Raimi asks Borenstein about lessons learned from California’s blackouts during the summer of 2020: the cause of the outages, the role of renewables, and market reforms that could help reduce the risk of blackouts in the future. Raimi and Borenstein also discuss how California’s experience can help Texas and other regional electricity networks plan for a future with more renewable power. References and recommendations: “An empirical analysis of the potential for market power in California’s electricity industry” by Severin Borenstein and James Bushnell; http://faculty.haas.berkeley.edu/borenste/download/JIE99Cournot.pdf “Measuring Market Inefficiencies in California’s Restructured Wholesale Electricity Market” by Severin Borenstein, James B. Bushnell, and Frank A. Wolak; http://faculty.haas.berkeley.edu/borenste/download/AER02BBW.pdf “Capacity Markets at a Crossroads” by James Bushnell, Michaela Flagg, and Erin Mansur; https://haas.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/WP278.pdf “The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger” by Marc Levinson; https://press.princeton.edu/books/paperback/9780691170817/the-box “The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble over Earth’s Future” by Paul Sabin; https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300198973/bet “Under a White Sky” by Elizabeth Kolbert; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/617060/under-a-white-sky-by-elizabeth-kolbert/
Feb 22, 2021
Assessing the Promise and Peril of Wood Pellet Products, with Francisco X. Aguilar
00:33:54
In this episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Francisco X. Aguilar, a professor at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and leader of the Team of Specialists on Wood Energy of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. Aguilar and coauthors recently published a study on the environmental effects of the rapid growth of the wood pellet industry. Because wood pellets are viewed as carbon neutral, the boom in wood pellets may help meet climate targets in Europe. This conversation focuses on how the wood pellet industry’s growth has affected the number of trees and carbon stocks in the southeastern United States, where most wood pellets are produced. The key questions are whether wood pellets are truly renewable and whether they truly produce net-zero emissions. Aguilar helps us make sense of it all. References and recommendations: “Expansion of US Wood Pellet Industry Points to Positive Trends but the Need for Continued Monitoring” by Francisco X. Aguilar, Ashkan Mirzaee, Ronald G. McGarvey, Stephen R. Shifley, and Dallas Burtraw; https://www.rff.org/publications/journal-articles/expansion-us-wood-pellet-industry-points-positive-trends-need-continued-monitoring/ “Wood Energy in America” by Daniel deB. Richter Jr., Dylan H. Jenkins, John T. Karakash, Josiah Knight, Lew R. McCreery, and Kasimir P. Nemestothy; https://science.sciencemag.org/content/323/5920/1432 “Wood Energy Efficiency: More Heat with Less Wood” by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe; https://unece.org/node/20841 “Net-Zero America” by Eric Larson, Chris Greig, Jesse Jenkins, Erin Mayfield, Andrew Pascale, Chuan Zhang, Joshua Drossman, Robert Williams, Steve Pacala, Robert Socolow, Ejeong Baik, Rich Birdsey, Rick Duke, Ryan Jones, Ben Haley, Emily Leslie, Keith Paustian, and Amy Swan; https://environmenthalfcentury.princeton.edu/sites/g/files/toruqf331/files/2020-12/Princeton_NZA_Interim_Report_15_Dec_2020_FINAL.pdf “The Overstory” by Richard Powers; https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393356687
Feb 13, 2021
Hug a Bus: How Cities Are Tackling Climate Change, with David Miller
00:34:36
In this episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with David Miller, former mayor of the city of Toronto and author of the book, “Solved: How the World’s Great Cities are Fixing the Climate Crisis.” The book came out in late 2020 and argues that cities are, in many ways, uniquely central to climate change action—and are, in fact, some of the best-equipped jurisdictions to take on the climate challenge. Miller draws from his own experience as a mayor in reflecting on these issues, but also draws on his experience in working with the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group. The book includes anecdotes and lessons learned from a number of municipalities across the globe—accounts of tangible actions that are tremendously refreshing, when so much of the climate conversation can feel intractable. The conversation touches on Miller’s motivation in putting the book together and what he’s discovered along the way. References and recommendations: “Solved: How the World’s Great Cities are Fixing the Climate Crisis” by David Miller; https://utorontopress.com/us/solved-3 “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” by Thomas Piketty; https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674979857 “The Bicycling Big Book of Cycling for Beginners” by Tori Bortman; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/593171/the-bicycling-big-book-of-cycling-for-beginners-by-tori-bortman/
Feb 07, 2021
Can the Oil and Gas Industry Lead on Climate?, with Tisha Schuller
00:31:50
In this episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Tisha Schuller, principal of Adamantine Energy and author of a new book, “The Gamechanger’s Playbook.” The book is a provocative and insightful look at how oil and gas companies can play a leading role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Schuller lays out the case for why these companies need to change, how companies can approach the climate challenge in a new way, and what practical steps the oil and gas industry can take today to lay the groundwork for future success. References and recommendations: “The Gamechanger’s Playbook: How Oil & Gas Leaders Thrive in an Era of Continuous Disruption” by Tisha Schuller; https://energythinks.com/gamechanger/ “After the Pandemic: Hope and Breakthroughs for 2021” by Ted Nordhaus and Alex Trembath at the Breakthrough Institute; https://thebreakthrough.org/issues/energy/after-the-pandemic “CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuels May Have Peaked in 2019” by Zeke Hausfather at the Breakthrough Institute; https://thebreakthrough.org/issues/energy/peak-co2-emissions-2019 “How to Be an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi; https://www.ibramxkendi.com/how-to-be-an-antiracist “On Fire: The Burning Case for a Green New Deal” by Naomi Klein; https://naomiklein.org/on-fire/
Feb 01, 2021
Tracing the Historical Arc of US Climate Policy, with David Hawkins
00:32:48
In this episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with David Hawkins, director of climate policy in the Climate & Clean Energy Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council and a member of the board of directors at Resources for the Future. Hawkins has decades of experience working on energy and climate policy issues in NGOs and government. He walks us through the past 60 years of federal climate policy in the United States; helps us understand the scientific, political, and economic drivers that have shaped policy decisions from the 1960s all the way up through today, including a reflection on the Trump years; and takes a look ahead to the next four years under a new administration. References and recommendations: "Braiding Sweetgrass" by Robin Wall Kimmerer; https://milkweed.org/book/braiding-sweetgrass "Coffeeland" by Augustine Sedgewick; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/316748/coffeeland-by-augustine-sedgewick/
Jan 25, 2021
Defining, Measuring, and Addressing Energy Poverty, with Tony Reames
00:30:23
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Tony Reames, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability, and a leading scholar on the closely related topics of energy justice and energy poverty. In his conversation with Raimi, Reames describes what energy poverty is, how the federal government currently addresses energy poverty, and how quantifying the problem can lead to good policy solutions. References and recommendations: “An incandescent truth: Disparities in energy-efficient lighting availability and prices in an urban U.S. county” by Tony G. Reames, Michael A. Reiner, and M. Ben Stacey; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0306261918302769 “Three Scenarios for the Future of Climate Change” by Elizabeth Kolbert; https://www.newyorker.com/news/annals-of-a-warming-planet/three-scenarios-for-the-future-of-climate-change “The Warmth of Other Suns” by Isabel Wilkerson; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/190696/the-warmth-of-other-suns-by-isabel-wilkerson/
Jan 17, 2021
Gambling on the Growth of Global Emissions, with Ken Caldeira and Ted Nordhaus
00:36:20
In this episode, we get the details on a friendly wager between Ken Caldeira, a senior scientist at the Carnegie Institution, and Ted Nordhaus, founder and executive director of the Breakthrough Institute. Caldeira also is a senior advisor to Gates Ventures, but is not speaking on their behalf. Nordhaus is betting that global CO₂ emissions peaked in 2019, but Caldeira disagrees. Host Daniel Raimi asks each of them to lay out the arguments for and against the assertion that emissions peaked in 2019, and they explore the underlying factors that will likely drive the outcome of the wager. Raimi, Caldeira, and Nordhaus discuss the role of Covid-19, energy technologies, human behavior, and even the extinction of the dinosaurs. References and recommendations: The origin of the bet on Twitter; https://twitter.com/KenCaldeira/status/1344783094553800705?s=20 "How to Avoid a Climate Disaster" by Bill Gates; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/633968/how-to-avoid-a-climate-disaster-by-bill-gates/ "Growth" by Vaclav Smil; https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/growth
Jan 09, 2021
What Counts as an “Environmental” Issue?, with Neil Lewis Jr.
00:22:53
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Neil Lewis Jr., an assistant professor of communication and social behavior at Cornell University, about how different socioeconomic groups define what is—and what is not—an “environmental” issue. Lewis’s research touches on a variety of policy issues, from industrial pollution and housing policy to climate change and unemployment. In this episode, Lewis describes how individuals define “environmental” issues differently and asserts that recognizing these differences can help inform policymaking. References and recommendations: “What counts as an ‘environmental’ issue? Differences in issue conceptualization by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status” by Hwanseok Song, Neil A. Lewis Jr., Matthew T. Ballew, Mario Bravo, Julie Davydova, H. Oliver Gao, Robert J. Garcia, Sofia Hiltner, Sarah M. Naiman, Adam R. Pearson, Rainer Romero-Canyas, and Jonathan P. Schuldt; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0272494419304220 “Palaces for the People” by Eric Klinenberg; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/557044/palaces-for-the-people-by-eric-klinenberg/ “Rediscovery of Abandoned Wells in the World’s First Oil Field” StoryMap from the National Energy Technology Laboratory; https://www.netl.doe.gov/node/9367
Jan 02, 2021
So Long, 2020! Reviewing Energy and Environmental Policy, with Sarah Ladislaw and Barry Rabe
00:38:11
In this episode, we say, "So Long, 2020!" and look ahead to 2021. To do so, host Daniel Raimi talks with two of the smartest energy and environmental thinkers around: Sarah Ladislaw, from the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Barry Rabe, from the Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. Ladislaw and Rabe reflect on the crazy year that was 2020—in particular, by noting which developments in energy and environmental policy likely will stay with us; some of the legacies of the Trump presidency; and what climate policy might look like under a Biden administration, which has laid out ambitious climate goals but likely faces a challenging political landscape. References and recommendations: "Trust" by Pete Buttigieg; https://wwnorton.com/books/9781631498770 "Theories of Change" podcast; https://www.csis.org/podcasts/theories-change "Power Grab" by Paasha Mahdavi; https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/politics-international-relations/political-economy/power-grab-political-survival-through-extractive-resource-nationalization "Carbon Province, Hydro Province" by Douglas Macdonald; https://utorontopress.com/us/carbon-province-hydro-province-4 "The Wizard and the Prophet" by Charles C. Mann; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/220698/the-wizard-and-the-prophet-by-charles-c-mann/
Dec 28, 2020
Rare Earths 101: Digging Up the Facts, with Jordy Lee
00:32:31
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Jordy Lee, a senior research associate at the Payne Institute for Public Policy at the Colorado School of Mines. Lee discusses rare earth minerals, which are used widely in clean energy technologies, including wind, solar, and energy storage. Raimi and Lee talk about what rare earth minerals are, whether they're literally “rare,” how they’re mined and processed around the world, and their geopolitical implications. References and recommendations: "Sustain What?" podcast from the Earth Institute at Columbia University; https://www.earth.columbia.edu/videos/channel/sustain-what
Dec 20, 2020
Navigating Challenges to the Clean Water Rule, with Sheila Olmstead
00:39:31
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with Sheila Olmstead, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin, a university fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF) and a senior fellow at the Property and Environment Research Center in Bozeman, Montana. She spent time at the Council of Economic Advisers during the transition from the Obama to Trump administrations, and she has coauthored a recent report, commissioned by the External Environmental Economics Advisory Committee (E-EEAC), which is the subject of this episode. The E-EEAC is an independent organization dedicated to providing up-to-date, nonpartisan advice on the state of economic science as it relates to programs at the US Environmental Protection Agency. Regular listeners may recall that Hayes discussed a previous E-EEAC report on Resources Radio, with coauthors Mary Evans and Matt Kotchen, about the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) rule. This week, Hayes and Holmstead talk about the newly released report commissioned by the E-EEAC, this time about the 2015 Clean Water Rule and its eventual replacement, the Navigable Waters Protection Rule. They discuss what the rules are all about, how the rules have shifted under different presidential administrations, and Holmstead's views on how to improve the economic analysis that underpins the development and finalization of these rules. References and recommendations: "Report on the Repeal of the Clean Water Rule and its Replacement with the Navigable Waters Protection Rule to Define Waters of the United States (WOTUS)" by David A. Keiser, Sheila M. Olmstead, Kevin J. Boyle, Victor B. Flatt, Bonnie L. Keeler, Daniel J. Phaneuf, Joseph S. Shapiro, and Jay P. Shimshack; https://www.e-eeac.org/wotusreport "Bowlaway" by Elizabeth McCracken; https://www.harpercollins.com/products/bowlaway-elizabeth-mccracken?variant=32205511360546 "The Giant's House" by Elizabeth McCracken; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/110879/the-giants-house-by-elizabeth-mccracken/
Dec 13, 2020
Learning Lessons for Lion Conservation in West Africa, with Nyeema Harris
00:30:00
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Nyeema Harris, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Michigan. Harris has coauthored a recent study that shows how communities of lions are distributed across national parks and hunting concessions in West Africa. Harris and Raimi discuss how these different environments affects patterns in lion movement and distribution, how those findings can inform conservation policy, and the controversial and fascinating topic of trophy hunting. References and recommendations: “Where lions roam: West African big cats show no preference between national parks, hunting zones” by Jim Erickson; https://news.umich.edu/where-lions-roam-west-african-big-cats-show-no-preference-between-national-parks-hunting-zones/ "Comparable space use by lions between hunting concessions and national parks in West Africa" by Kirby L. Mills, Yahou Harissou, Isaac T. Gnoumou, Yaye I. Abdel-Nasser, Benoit Doamba, and Nyeema C. Harris; https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1365-2664.13601 Black Mammalogists Week; https://blackmammalogists.com/ "A Terrible Thing to Waste" by Harriet A. Washington; https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/titles/harriet-a-washington/a-terrible-thing-to-waste/9780316509428 “Trophy hunting—can it really be justified by ‘conservation benefits’?” by Melanie Flynn; https://theconversation.com/trophy-hunting-can-it-really-be-justified-by-conservation-benefits-121921
Dec 06, 2020
Can the Magic Glue of Cement Turn Green?, with Mahmoud Taha
00:33:17
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Mahmoud Taha, a professor and chair of the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of New Mexico. Taha is an expert on many things related to materials science; in this episode, he talks about cement, which he calls the “magic glue” of construction. Taha and Raimi discuss the greenhouse gas footprint of cement, options for reducing that footprint, how the use of new materials might affect the cost and performance of cement, and government policies that can help spur innovation and speed deployment. References and recommendations: “Good Economics for Hard Times” by Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo; https://www.goodeconomicsforhardtimes.com/ “Sweden’s HYBRIT starts operations at pilot plant for fossil-free steel” in Reuters; https://www.reuters.com/article/us-sweden-steel-hydrogen/swedens-hybrit-starts-operations-at-pilot-plant-for-fossil-free-steel-idUSKBN25R1PI
Nov 29, 2020
Getting Goods through the Circular Economy, with Apala Mukherjee
00:32:47
In this episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Apala Mukherjee, circular economy leader and sustainability director at BASF Corporation. BASF is one of the largest chemical companies in the world and has been considering how best to reduce waste—for both sustainability and cost-reduction reasons. As noted on the BASF website, the concept of a circular economy isn't just about waste reduction; Mukherjee helps define the term, explains what "circular economy" means in practice at a large multinational firm like BASF, and describes some implementation challenges that businesses must confront, if they're committed to circular economy principles. References and recommendations: "The Circular Economy Handbook" by Peter Lacey, Jessica Long, and Wesley Spindler; https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781349959679 “Breaking the Plastic Wave: Top Findings for Preventing Plastic Pollution” by Simon Reddy and Winnie Lau; https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/articles/2020/07/23/breaking-the-plastic-wave-top-findings
Nov 23, 2020
The Future of Cost-Benefit Analysis, with Michael Livermore and Richard Revesz
00:36:33
In this week's episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with the coauthors of the new book “Reviving Rationality: Saving Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Sake of the Environment and Our Health," Michael A. Livermore and Richard Revesz. Livermore was the founding executive director of the Institute for Policy Integrity at New York University (NYU) and now serves as one of its senior advisors. He is a professor at the University of Virginia’s School of Law. Revesz is the Lawrence King Professor of Law at NYU and the current director of the Institute for Policy Integrity. Oxford University Press released the new book last week; in this episode, Livermore and Revesz talk about why they chose to invest their time in this project, what messages they intend the book to convey, and how they see the issues described in the book playing out over the next few years. References and recommendations: “Reviving Rationality: Saving Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Sake of the Environment and Our Health" by Michael A. Livermore and Richard Revesz; https://global.oup.com/academic/product/reviving-rationality-9780197539446 "Mindscape" podcast; https://www.preposterousuniverse.com/podcast/ "Nice White Parents podcast; https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/23/podcasts/nice-white-parents-serial.html
Nov 15, 2020
Evaluating and Enhancing Corporate Climate Action, with Mark Tercek
00:31:52
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Mark Tercek, longtime investment banker at Goldman Sachs, a former CEO of The Nature Conservancy, and a current member of the President's Council at Resources for the Future (RFF). Tercek talks about his current work advising private companies on how to take more ambitious steps to address environmental problems—particularly climate change. He and Raimi discuss some examples of what companies are doing, why they’re doing it, and how a skeptical public can evaluate the veracity of corporate climate commitments. References and recommendations: "The Instigator" newsletter by Mark Tercek; https://marktercek.substack.com/ "Reimagining Capitalism in a World on Fire" by Rebecca M. Henderson; https://reimaginingcapitalism.org/ "Playing the Enemy: Nelson Mandela and the Game that Made a Nation" by John Carlin; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/530626/playing-the-enemy-by-john-carlin/ Amy Harder's interview with Bernard Looney via Axios on HBO; https://www.axios.com/bp-ceo-climate-reinvention-axios-on-hbo-624c3a9c-9ad4-4fb1-9b38-552c558a3544.html
Nov 08, 2020
Big Decisions in Data-Driven Policymaking, with Richard G. Newell and Susan Tierney
00:29:40
In this week's episode, guest hosts Richard Newell and Sue Tierney talk with each other about the difference it makes for policymakers to have access to sound economic and policy analysis, economic and climate policy in the near and longer term, the best ways to deploy resources to achieve ambitious policy outcomes, and highlights from prior episodes in the "Big Decisions" series they've spearheaded on the Resources Radio podcast. Newell is president and CEO of Resources for the Future (RFF). Tierney serves as the chair of RFF's Board of Directors and is a senior advisor at Analysis Group. This is the final episode of our month-long spin-off series, “Big Decisions: The Future of US Environmental and Energy Policy.” For this series, which has aired in our same Resources Radio time slot every Tuesday in October, RFF Board of Directors Chair Sue Tierney and RFF President Richard G. Newell have shared guest-hosting duties and talked with leading decisionmakers, analysts, researchers, and reporters about the big decisions that will impact US environmental and energy policy in the years to come. References and recommendations: "The New Map" by Daniel Yergin; https://www.danielyergin.com/books/thenewmap "Growth" by Vaclav Smil; https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/growth "Occupied" TV series; https://www.netflix.com/title/80092654 "The Comey Rule" TV miniseries; https://www.sho.com/the-comey-rule "The Trial of the Chicago 7" film; https://www.netflix.com/title/81043755 "The Splendid and the Vile" by Erik Larson; https://eriklarsonbooks.com/book/the-splendid-and-the-vile/ "A Crisis Wasted" by Jeffrey L. Cummings and Reed Hundt; https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/A-Crisis-Wasted/Reed-Hundt/9781948122313
Oct 30, 2020
Big Decisions in Equitable Energy Policy, with Paula Glover
00:35:39
In this week's episode, guest host Sue Tierney talks with Paula Glover, president and CEO of the American Association of Blacks in Energy and incoming president of the Alliance to Save Energy. Glover and Tierney discuss policy priorities for Black professionals in the energy industry; creating coalitions to make progress with good policy; support systems and professional pipelines that help diversify the energy field; and energy justice as the intersection between energy, the environment, social justice, and community collaboration. This episode is the penultimate in our month-long spin-off series, “Big Decisions: The Future of US Environmental and Energy Policy.” For this series, which airs in our same Resources Radio time slot every Tuesday in October, RFF Board of Directors Chair Sue Tierney and RFF President Richard G. Newell share guest-hosting duties and talk with leading decisionmakers, analysts, researchers, and reporters about the big decisions that will impact US environmental and energy policy in the years to come. The final episode next week will be a conversation between Sue and Richard. References and recommendations: "The Energy within Us" by Joyce Hayes Giles, Carolyn Green, Rose McKinney-James, Hilda Pinnix-Ragland, and Telisa Toliver; https://www.google.com/books/edition/_/YJfawQEACAAJ
Oct 25, 2020
Big Decisions in Air Quality Regulations, with Mary Nichols
00:38:28
In this week's episode, guest host Richard G. Newell talks with Mary Nichols, chair of the California Air Resources Board and an environmental lawyer with prior experience at the US Environmental Protection Agency and in the California state government. Nichols and Newell discuss what comes next when a new law is "ready to be interpreted" and what it's like for a lawyer to bring some of the first cases under a new statute, regulating environmental health in a cost-effective way, the viability of carbon pricing and market-based policies, and how recognizing that global systemic injustice contributes to pollution is critical to identifying environmental solutions. This episode continues our month-long spin-off series, “Big Decisions: The Future of US Environmental and Energy Policy.” For this series, which will air in our same Resources Radio time slot every Tuesday in October, RFF President Richard G. Newell and RFF Board of Directors Chair Sue Tierney will share guest-hosting duties; they will talk with leading decisionmakers, analysts, researchers, and reporters about the big decisions that will impact US environmental and energy policy in the years to come. References and recommendations: "All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions to the Climate Crisis" edited by Ayana Elizabeth Johnson & Katharine K. Wilkinson; https://www.allwecansave.earth/ Octavia Butler; https://www.octaviabutler.com/work "Squeeze Me" by Carl Hiaasen; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/558233/squeeze-me-by-carl-hiaasen/
Oct 19, 2020
Big Decisions in Administrative Law, with Jody Freeman and Jeff Holmstead
00:35:54
In this week's episode, guest host Sue Tierney talks with Jody Freeman and Jeffrey Holmstead. Freeman is a professor who specializes in administrative law and environmental law at Harvard, founded their Environmental and Energy Law Program, and established the Harvard Law School’s first environmental law clinic. Holmstead is an attorney at the Houston-based law firm Bracewell LLP and a former assistant administrator of the US Environmental Protection Agency; he is also a member of the president's council at Resources for the Future. Tierney, Freeman, and Holmstead discuss past "shenanigans" in presidential transitions; how a new or sitting president will prioritize goals in office, particularly during a troubling pandemic and highly unstable economy; the need for congressional action to make headway on climate change; and more. This episode continues our month-long spin-off series, “Big Decisions: The Future of US Environmental and Energy Policy.” For this series—which will air in our same Resources Radio time slot every Tuesday in October—RFF Board of Directors Chair Sue Tierney and RFF President Richard G. Newell share guest-hosting duties and talk with leading decisionmakers, analysts, researchers, and reporters about the big decisions that will impact US environmental and energy policy in the years to come. References and recommendations: "This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage" by Ann Patchett; https://www.harpercollins.com/products/this-is-the-story-of-a-happy-marriage-ann-patchett "Chernobyl" miniseries; https://www.hbo.com/chernobyl "The Rule of Five" by Richard J. Lazarus; https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674238121 "Borgen" TV series; https://www.netflix.com/title/70302482 "Schitt's Creek" sitcom; https://www.netflix.com/title/80036165 "Watchmen" TV series; https://www.hbo.com/watchmen
Oct 11, 2020
Big Decisions in Federal Legislation, with Amy Harder
00:25:36
In this week's episode, guest host Richard G. Newell talks with Amy Harder, a reporter at Axios who covers energy, the environment, and climate change issues. Previously, Amy covered similar topics for the Wall Street Journal and the National Journal; she also was the inaugural journalism fellow for the University of Chicago's Energy Policy Institute in 2018. Harder and Newell discuss the likelihood of bipartisan policies moving forward, given various election result scenarios; how to effectively use political capital; "climate hawks" and the viability of climate policy; implications of changes in the Supreme Court for environmental cases; and more. This episode is the first in our month-long spin-off series, “Big Decisions: The Future of US Environmental and Energy Policy.” For this series, which will air in our same Resources Radio time slot every Tuesday in October, RFF President Richard G. Newell and RFF Board of Directors Chair Sue Tierney will share guest-hosting duties; they will talk with leading decisionmakers, analysts, researchers, and reporters about the big decisions that will impact US environmental and energy policy in the years to come. References and recommendations: "The New Map" by Daniel Yergin; https://www.danielyergin.com/books/thenewmap "The Golden Spruce" by John Vaillant; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.ca/books/182225/the-golden-spruce-by-john-vaillant/9780676976465
Oct 03, 2020
Accessing Nature through Canada’s Parks, with Dawn Carr
00:33:03
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Dawn Carr, executive director of the Canadian Parks Council, a network of national, provincial, and territorial parks across Canada. Raimi and Carr discuss why connecting with nature is important, how the Canadian Parks Council works to enhance access to the natural world, how climate change is affecting the ways that governments need to manage their parks into the future, and strategies of making access to parks more equitable. Editor’s Note: Next week, we’ll release the first episode of our month-long spin-off series, “Big Decisions: The Future of US Environmental and Energy Policy.” For this series, which will air in our same Resources Radio time slot every Tuesday in October, RFF President Richard G. Newell and RFF Board of Directors Chair Sue Tierney will share guest-hosting duties; they will talk with leading decisionmakers, analysts, researchers, and reporters about the big decisions that will impact US environmental and energy policy in the years to come. Stay tuned for more. References and recommendations: "The Vanishing Half" by Brit Bennett; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/576782/the-vanishing-half-by-brit-bennett/ “Public Land Conflicts and Controversies: The Designation of National Monuments in the Western United States” by Margaret Walls; https://www.rff.org/publications/journal-articles/public-land-conflicts-and-controversies-designation-national-monument-journal-publication/
Sep 28, 2020
Space Resources: Exploring the Final Frontier, with Alex Gilbert
00:34:43
This week, host Daniel Raimi learns more about space mining with Alex Gilbert, a fellow at the Payne Institute for Public Policy at the Colorado School of Mines. In their discussion of the fundamentals of space mining, Gilbert and Raimi address key questions like the following: What resources are people interested in mining? What technologies are necessary to extract resources? How is the ownership of space resources governed? What environmental risks might we encounter—or create—in outer space? References and recommendations: “Life on Venus? Astronomers See a Signal in Its Clouds” by Shannon Stirone, Kenneth Chang, and Dennis Overbye; https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/14/science/venus-life-clouds.html “Phosphine gas in the cloud decks of Venus” by Jane S. Greaves , Anita M. S. Richards , William Bains, Paul B. Rimmer, Hideo Sagawa , David L. Clements, Sara Seager, Janusz J. Petkowski, Clara Sousa-Silva, Sukrit Ranjan, Emily Drabek-Maunder, Helen J. Fraser, Annabel Cartwright, Ingo Mueller-Wodarg , Zhuchang Zhan, Per Friberg , Iain Coulson, E’lisa Lee, and Jim Hoge; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-020-1174-4.pdf “The Space Force has a horse, for some reason” by Kathryn Krawczyk; https://theweek.com/speedreads/927152/space-force-horse-some-reason
Sep 20, 2020
The Environmental Impacts of Digital Technologies, with George Kamiya
00:34:24
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with George Kamiya, an analyst at the International Energy Agency (IEA) and an expert on the emissions of information and communications technology. Kamiya leads the IEA's analysis on the energy impact of digital technologies and coordinates cross-agency efforts on tracking clean energy progress, digitalization, and automated and shared mobility. Kamiya and Hayes discuss the environmental footprint of the many digital technologies that have now become fixtures of many of our lives. The discussion focuses on energy consumption—Kamiya's primary area of expertise—but also touches on other broader issues and impacts, along with some technologies that most people probably don't use on a daily basis, such as Bitcoin mining. While some recent sensational media coverage has suggested otherwise, Kamiya emphasizes that the environmental impacts of digital technologies still pale in comparison to those of bigger sectors, such as transportation and industry. References and recommendations: “Factcheck: What is the carbon footprint of streaming video on Netflix?” by George Kamiya; https://www.carbonbrief.org/factcheck-what-is-the-carbon-footprint-of-streaming-video-on-netflix “Calculate your emissions” data tool, from the International Energy Agency; https://www.iea.org/commentaries/the-carbon-footprint-of-streaming-video-fact-checking-the-headlines “Bitcoin energy use—mined the gap” by George Kamiya; https://www.iea.org/commentaries/bitcoin-energy-use-mined-the-gap “Digitalisation and Energy” from the International Energy Agency; https://www.iea.org/reports/digitalisation-and-energy Carbon Brief newsletter; https://www.carbonbrief.org/daily-weekly-briefing-sign-up "The Citizen’s Guide to Climate Success" by Mark Jaccard; https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/citizens-guide-to-climate-success/49D99FBCBD6FCACD5F3D58A7ED80882D “The AI Revolution: The Road of Superintelligence” from the Wait But Why blog by Tim Urban; https://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-1.html “Tackling Climate Change with Machine Learning” interactive summary; https://www.climatechange.ai/summaries
Sep 14, 2020
Hot Rocks: Drilling into Geothermal Energy, with Tim Latimer
00:34:46
This week, Daniel Raimi talks with Tim Latimer, cofounder and CEO of Fervo Energy, a geothermal energy developer. Geothermal is a relatively small source of energy in the United States, but it has the potential to grow substantially. Latimer and Raimi discuss how the technology works, where it’s deployed in the United States and around the world, how it might grow in the years ahead, and its environmental risks. And, along the way, they make very bad puns about hot rocks. References and recommendations: "GeoVision" report by the US Department of Energy; https://www.energy.gov/eere/geothermal/downloads/geovision-harnessing-heat-beneath-our-feet The Broken Earth trilogy by N.K. Jemison; https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/articles/n-k-jemisin-broken-earth-trilogy-books-in-order/ “How the World’s Largest Garbage Dump Evolved Into a Green Oasis” by Robert Sullivan; https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/14/nyregion/freshkills-garbage-dump-nyc.html
Sep 07, 2020
California’s Wildfires: Climate Change, COVID, and Consequences, with Matthew Wibbenmeyer
00:33:20
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Resources for the Future Fellow Matthew Wibbenmeyer. Wibbenmeyer provides an update on the recent spread of wildfires in California. He and Raimi discuss the severity of the fires; the impacts of the fires on people and places; and the causes of these fires, including the role of climate change. They also talk about how public policies can help reduce the risks of wildfires, including the roles of prescribed burning and housing policy. References and recommendations: “The Ongoing Trauma of California’s Wildfires, in ‘Last Days at Paradise High’” by Rachel Riederer; https://www.newyorker.com/culture/the-new-yorker-documentary/the-ongoing-trauma-of-californias-wildfires-in-last-days-at-paradise-high “How Prosperity Transformed the Falklands” by Larissa MacFarquhar; https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/07/06/how-prosperity-transformed-the-falklands
Aug 31, 2020
Surveying American Public Opinion on Climate Change and the Environment, with Jon Krosnick
00:37:38
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with Jon Krosnick, a university fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF) and professor in humanities and social sciences, communication, and political science at Stanford University, where he directs the Political Psychology Research Group. In his spare time, Krosnick is a professional jazz drummer who tours a third of the year with his band, the Charged Particles—but during the day, Krosnick is a social psychologist who researches survey methods and the psychology of political behavior. Krosnick has collaborated with RFF for a number of years on his work related to surveying American public opinion on global warming, and the partnership continues with additional key collaborators this year. Today's discussion focuses on the overall trend results from the "Climate Insights 2020" survey. For more information on the survey, visit rff.org/climateinsights for an interactive web tool that shows the comprehensive findings in robust detail. References and recommendations: "Climate Insights 2020: Surveying American Public Opinion on Climate Change and the Environment" by Jon A. Krosnick and Bo MacInnis; https://www.rff.org/publications/reports/climateinsights2020 Climate survey data tool; https://www.rff.org/publications/data-tools/climate-insights/ "The Rational Public" by Benjamin I. Page and Robert Y. Shapiro; https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/R/bo3762628.html "Uninformed" by Arthur Lupia; https://global.oup.com/academic/product/uninformed-9780190263720?cc=us&lang=en&
Aug 21, 2020
Equity and Electricity: Race Gap in Household Energy Use, with Eva Lyubich
00:28:09
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Eva Lyubich, a PhD student in the Economics Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and at the Energy Institute at Haas. Lyubich recently released a fascinating working paper on the gap in household energy spending between white and black households. Lyubich and Raimi discuss this new working paper: how big that race gap is, whether it’s changed over time, and what might account for its origin. The long-ranging conversation includes not just energy, but also the history of discriminatory housing policies in the United States. References and recommendations: "The Race Gap in Residential Energy Expenditures" by Eva Lyubich; https://haas.berkeley.edu/wp-content/uploads/WP306.pdf "Drilled" podcast; https://www.criticalfrequency.org/drilled "Merchants of Doubt" by Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway; https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/merchants-of-doubt-9781596916104/ "There’s Something in the Water" by Ingrid Waldron; https://fernwoodpublishing.ca/book/there8217s-something-in-the-water "There’s Something in the Water" documentary; https://www.netflix.com/title/81206890 "The Case for Reparations" by Ta-Nehisi Coates; https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/06/the-case-for-reparations/361631/ "What Drives Racial and Ethnic Differences in High Cost Mortgages? The Role of High Risk Lenders" by Patrick Bayer, Fernando Ferreira, and Stephen L. Ross; https://www.nber.org/papers/w22004 "Housing Discrimination and the Toxics Exposure Gap in the United States: Evidence from the Rental Market" by Peter Christensen, Ignacio Sarmiento-Barbieri, and Christopher Timmins; https://www.nber.org/papers/w26805 "A community-based approach to low-income residential energy efficiency participation barriers" by Tony Gerard Reames; https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13549839.2015.1136995 "Targeting energy justice: Exploring spatial, racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in urban residential heating energy efficiency" by Tony Gerard Reames; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0301421516304098 "Resources Radio" episode: “The Economics of Environmental Justice, with Samuel Stolper and Catherine Hausman”; https://www.resourcesmag.org/resources-radio/economics-environmental-justice-samuel-stolper-and-catherine-hausman/
Aug 17, 2020
Taming the Sun in India’s Power Sector, with Varun Sivaram
00:35:10
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Varun Sivaram, a visiting senior fellow at Columbia’s Center on Global Energy Policy. Sivaram is an expert on all things energy and recently spent two years working in India on solar energy. Sivaram and Raimi discuss the evolution of India’s power grid, including its rapid expansion of energy access and its historical dependence on coal; the rise of solar, wind, and storage; and the challenges that lie ahead. References and recommendations: "Taming the Sun: Innovations to Harness Solar Energy and Power the Planet" by Varun Sivaram; https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/taming-sun "The Next Phase of India's Renewable Energy Transition" by Varun Sivaram; https://www.aspeninstitute.org/blog-posts/the-next-phase-of-indias-renewable-energy-transition/ "Short-Circuiting Policy" by Leah C. Stokes; https://www.leahstokes.com/book "Columbia Energy Exchange" podcast; https://energypolicy.columbia.edu/podcast/columbia-energy-exchange "Our Daily Planet" newsletter; https://www.ourdailyplanet.com/ "After Coal: Stories of Survival in Appalachia and Wales" by Tom Hansell; https://aftercoal.com/book/
Aug 09, 2020
The Environmental Appeal of Green Steel, with Chris Bataille
00:31:32
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Chris Bataille, associate researcher at the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations in Paris. Steel accounts for almost 10 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, and Bataille considers the potential for reducing and perhaps eliminating carbon dioxide emissions from the steelmaking process. Bataille also discusses how the industry currently works, which approaches and technologies can reduce emissions, and how policy can help drive innovation. References and recommendations: "The Entrepreneurial State" by Mariana Mazzucato; https://marianamazzucato.com/entrepreneurial-state/ "Doughnut Economics" by Kate Raworth; https://www.chelseagreen.com/product/doughnut-economics-paperback/ "U.S. renewable energy consumption surpasses coal for the first time in over 130 years" from the US Energy Information Administration’s "Today in Energy;" https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=43895
Aug 03, 2020
Driving Behavior: How COVID-19 Pumped the Brakes on Transportation, with Abel Brodeur
00:36:38
This is the third episode in an ongoing webinar series, which is providing Resources Radio listeners the chance to listen to a podcast recording live and ask guests their own questions about pressing energy, environment, and economics issues. In this episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Abel Brodeur about how the coronavirus lockdown orders have affected the transportation sector. Brodeur, an associate professor at the University of Ottawa's Department of Economics, talks about his recent research on the decrease in car collision incidents during the lockdowns, along with his recently coauthored literature review about the economic impacts of the pandemic across a range of other dimensions. References and recommendations: "On the Effects of COVID-19 Safer-At-Home Policies on Social Distancing, Car Crashes and Pollution" by Abel Brodeur, Nikolai Cook, and Taylor Wright; http://ftp.iza.org/dp13255.pdf "A Literature Review of the Economics of COVID-19" by Abel Brodeur, David M. Gray, Anik Islam, and Suraiya Jabeen Bhuiyan; https://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izadps/dp13411.html "English Passengers" by Matthew Kneale; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/93872/english-passengers-by-matthew-kneale/
Jul 27, 2020
Getting Filled In on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, with Annalise Blum
00:27:33
In this episode, Annalise Blum fills us in on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. Blum, a policy fellow with the American Association for the Advancement Science, has worked for years on the technical and geopolitical aspects of hydropower. Host Daniel Raimi talks with Blum about the controversial dam project on the Blue Nile River in Ethiopia, whose reservoir could begin filling as soon as this week. The Renaissance Dam has been the subject of international negotiations for years, and has even prompted some threats of armed conflict. The issues surrounding the dam are complex, important, and discussed infrequently here in the United States—but Blum and Raimi jump right into the topic. References and recommendations: "Timbuktu" film; https://www.reuters.com/article/us-awards-oscars-timbuktu/oscar-nominee-timbuktu-tackles-everyday-view-of-radical-islam-idUSKBN0LI0HV20150214 Aaron Wolf’s research about international agreements; https://www.texastribune.org/2017/07/11/q-aaron-wolf/ "William Mulholland and the Rise of Los Angeles" by Catherine Mulholland; https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520234666/william-mulholland-and-the-rise-of-los-angeles "Chinatown" film; https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071315/
Jul 19, 2020
Air Quality Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic: A View from Two Epicenters, with Valentina Bosetti
00:38:15
This is the second episode in an ongoing webinar series, which is providing Resources Radio listeners the chance to listen to a podcast recording live and ask guests their own questions about pressing energy issues. In this episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Valentina Bosetti, a Bocconi University professor and a senior scientist at the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment, who has closely studied air quality in Northern Italy. Bosetti finds that, while air pollution decreased in the region during the pandemic lockdowns, pollution did not fall nearly as much as expected, largely because lockdown measures hardly impacted agricultural emissions. In addition, Bosetti warns that the public health benefits of improved air quality pale in comparison to the lives lost from COVID-19, and unless governments take action, pollution will surge again once economic activity returns to pre-pandemic levels. References and recommendations: "Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic" by David Quammen; https://wwnorton.com/books/spillover/ "When Breath Becomes Air" by Paul Kalanithi; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/258507/when-breath-becomes-air-by-paul-kalanithi/
Jul 12, 2020
AC/DC: Unequal Access to Air Conditioning, with Kelly T. Sanders
00:33:37
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Kelly T. Sanders, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Southern California. With her coauthors, Sanders has recently published a series of studies on air conditioning use in southern California, with a focus on who does—and does not—have access to cooling on hot days. This work, which touches on issues of energy and environmental justice, has big implications for managing the COVID-19 pandemic this summer—and managing climate change in the decades to come. References and recommendations: "Utilizing smart-meter data to project impacts of urban warming on residential electricity use for vulnerable populations in Southern California" by Mo Chen, George A. Ban-Weiss, and Kelly T. Sanders; https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/ab6fbe/meta "Growth: From Microorganisms to Megacities" by Vaclav Smil; https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/growth "These Truths: A History of the United States" by Jill Lepore; https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393357424
Jul 06, 2020
Resources Radio Live: How COVID-19 Has Powered Down the US Economy, with Steve Cicala
00:36:09
This is the first episode in an ongoing webinar series, which is providing Resources Radio listeners the chance to listen to a podcast recording live and ask guests their own questions about pressing energy issues. In this episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Professor Steve Cicala of the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy (soon to be moving to Tufts University’s Department of Economics). Expounding on research recently highlighted in the New York Times, in which he undertook one of the earliest looks at electricity demand during the peak of the pandemic lockdowns in the United States, Cicala details how electricity demand can serve as a valuable—if incomplete—tool to assess the health of the economy and the outlook for recovering from a recession. Cicala notes that the current crisis has shifted renewable penetration and affected energy consumption, but researchers remain uncertain about the duration of the pandemic and its long-term impacts on the electric grid. References and recommendations: "Another Way to See the Recession: Power Usage Is Way Down" by Quoctrung Bui and Justin Wolfers; https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/04/08/upshot/electricity-usage-predict-coronavirus-recession.html "Early Economic Impacts of COVID-19 in Europe: A View from the Grid" by Steve Cicala; https://home.uchicago.edu/~scicala/papers/real_time_EU/real_time_EU.pdf "What Is Owed: It Is Time for Reparations" by Nikole Hannah-Jones; https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/06/24/magazine/reparations-slavery.html
Jun 28, 2020
The Challenge of Diversity in the Environmental Movement, with Dorceta Taylor (Rebroadcast)
00:31:38
These past few weeks, people across the United States have been horrified by the continuing violence against people of color. Resources for the Future has been working toward contributing energy and thoughtful work—not just words and statements—to support and incorporate diversity in our environmental mission. Toward that end, we are rebroadcasting this Resources Radio episode from last July with Dorceta Taylor. In this episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Professor Dorceta E. Taylor of the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability (soon to be moving to the faculty at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies). Raimi asks Taylor about her research on the history of the environmental movement, focusing on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion within environmental groups—both historically and today. While some progress has happened over the years, major challenges remain, and the field has plenty of room for improvement. References and recommendations: "The Rise of the American Conservation Movement" by Dorceta E. Taylor; https://www.dukeupress.edu/the-rise-of-the-american-conservation-movement "The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations" by Dorceta E. Taylor; https://www.diversegreen.org/the-challenge/
Jun 22, 2020
Space: The Next Great Market Opportunity, with Michael Toman
00:37:49
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with Michael Toman, lead economist on climate change for the World Bank’s Development Research Group. Toman worked at Resources for the Future (RFF) for many years, during which he collaborated with former RFF Vice President for Research Molly Macauley in her pioneering effort to develop the economics of outer space as a topic for research and policy analysis. Hayes and Toman discuss the commercialization and privatization of space, both in light of the recent successful SpaceX launch to the International Space Station, and given that the day of recording (June 10) would have been Molly’s 63rd birthday. References and recommendations: "Racism and Injustice: A Letter from RFF President Richard G. Newell" from RFF; https://www.rff.org/racism-and-injustice-letter-rff-president-richard-g-newell/ "In Loving Memory of Molly K. Macauley" from Resources magazine; https://www.resourcesmag.org/archives/in-loving-memory-of-molly-k-macauley/
Jun 13, 2020
Growing the Power Grid in Africa, with Todd Moss
00:35:17
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Todd Moss, executive director of the Energy for Growth Hub and a nonresident fellow at Rice University's Baker Institute. Moss has years of experience expanding access to energy around the world, particularly in Africa. Here, Raimi and Moss discuss the current strategies that countries, companies, and international organizations are implementing to expand access in Africa; how COVID-19 is affecting these efforts; and the intersection between expanding energy access and mitigating climate change. References and recommendations: "Power Trip: The Story of Energy" show on PBS; https://powertripshow.com/ "Power Trip: The Story of Energy" book by Michael E. Webber; https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/michael-e-webber/power-trip/9781541644380/ "Between the World and Me" by Ta-Nehisi Coates; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/220290/between-the-world-and-me-by-ta-nehisi-coates/
Jun 07, 2020
Adding Subtraction to the Climate Toolkit: Discussing Carbon Dioxide Removal with Wil Burns
00:31:39
In this episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with Wil Burns, co-director of the Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy at American University. Raimi and Burns discuss the approaches and technologies that might be helpful in removing large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, what governments and companies are doing to encourage the deployment of these options, and some of the risks and challenges that each approach brings. References and recommendations: "Dam Breaches in Michigan Raise Questions for Dam Maintenance Across the Nation," a Q&A with RFF's Margaret Walls; https://www.resourcesmag.org/common-resources/dam-breaches-michigan-raise-questions-dam-maintenance-across-nation/
Jun 01, 2020
Decarbonizing Global Industry, with Jeffrey Rissman
00:35:30
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with Jeffrey Rissman, the industry program director and head of modeling at Energy Innovation, a research firm focused on accelerating clean energy. He leads modeling efforts for the firm’s energy policy solutions focus area, to determine the policies that most effectively help meet climate and energy goals. Rissman is the lead author on a new paper released recently in the journal "Applied Energy," which dives deep into the technologies and policies that might drive decarbonization across global industry. This sector is notoriously difficult to decarbonize, but it's critical to meeting long-term emissions reduction goals. References and recommendations: "Technologies and policies to decarbonize global industry: Review and assessment of mitigation drivers through 2070" by Jeffrey Rissman, Chris Bataille, Eric Masanet, Nate Aden, William R. Morrow III, Nan Zhou, Neal Elliott, Rebecca Dell, Niko Heeren, Brigitta Huckestein, Joe Cresko, Sabbie Miller, Joyashree Roy, Paul Fennel, Betty Cremmins, Thomas Koch Blank, David Hone, Ellen D. Williams, Stephane de la Rue du Can, Bill Sisson, Mike Williams, John Katzenberger, Dallas Burtraw, Girish Sethi, He Ping, David Danielson, Hongyou Lu, Tom Lorber, Jens Dinkel, and Jonas Helseth; https://www.rff.org/publications/journal-articles/technologies-and-policies-decarbonize-global-industry/ Energy Policy Simulator; www.energypolicy.solutions "Sustainable Materials without the Hot Air" by Julian M. Allwood and Jonathan M. Cullen; https://www.ipgbook.com/sustainable-materials-without-the-hot-air-products-9781906860301.php
May 25, 2020
China's Emerging Policies for Emissions Reductions, with Dick Morgenstern
00:28:46
Along with several co-authors, Resources for the Future (RFF) Senior Fellow Dick Morgenstern has recently released an RFF working paper on China’s new emissions trading program: a “tradable performance standard,” which sets a ratio of emissions to output that individual firms have to meet. Host Daniel Raimi talks with Morgenstern in this episode about the goals of the trading program, how it's designed, some of its strengths and weaknesses, and how the policy fits into the framework of international negotiations on climate change. While the standard is not as efficient as more typical models, it stands to significantly reduce emissions once it expands beyond the power sector—without necessarily curbing China’s economic growth. References and recommendations: "China's Unconventional Nationwide CO2 Emissions Trading System: The Wide-Ranging Impacts of an Implicit Output Subsidy" by Lawrence H. Goulder, Xianling Long, Jieyi Lu, and Richard D. Morgenstern; https://www.rff.org/publications/working-papers/chinas-unconventional-nationwide-co2-emissions-trading-system/ "The Wizard and the Prophet" by Charles C. Mann; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/220698/the-wizard-and-the-prophet-by-charles-c-mann/ "Alaskan glaciers melting 100 times faster than previously thought" by Jenny Howard; https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/07/alaskan-glaciers-melting-faster-than-previously-thought/ (and other "National Geographic" glacier coverage) "The Big Thaw" by Daniel Glick; https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/big-thaw/ (and other "National Geographic" glacier coverage)
May 19, 2020
Reflecting on Solar Geoengineering, with David Keith
00:31:26
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Harvard University Professor David Keith about solar geoengineering. Keith describes the variety of ways that solar geoengineering could work; some of its risks at local, regional, and global scales; recent small-scale experiments; and what might be needed to deploy a larger-scale research program. Raimi and Keith also discuss public policies related to potential deployment technologies, including the substantial issues surrounding governance and geopolitics. References and recommendations: "Inner Ranges" by Geoff Powter; https://rmbooks.com/book/inner-ranges/ "Pilgrims of the Vertical" by Joseph E. Taylor III; https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674052871 "Environmental Insights" podcast with Robert Stavins; https://scholar.harvard.edu/stavins/environmental-insights-podcast
May 12, 2020
Going Deep on Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS), with Julio Friedmann
00:34:05
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks about carbon capture, use, and storage (CCUS) with Julio Friedmann, a senior research scholar at Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy. Friedmann gives an overview of the status of CCUS deployment worldwide, describes the costs of CCUS relative to other approaches for reducing emissions, and notes some emerging federal policies that aim to increase deployment of CCUS in the United States. References and recommendations: "Capturing Investment: Policy Design to Finance CCUS Projects in the US Power Sector" by Julio Friedmann, Emeka Ochu, and Jeffrey D. Brown; https://energypolicy.columbia.edu/research/report/capturing-investment-policy-design-finance-ccus-projects-us-power-sector "To Tackle Climate Change, the (Industrial) Heat Is On" by Julio Friedmann; https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-10-21/amid-climate-change-the-heat-is-on-heavy-industry-to-decarbonize "Low-Carbon Heat Solutions for Heavy Industry: Sources, Options, and Costs Today" by Julio Friedmann, Zhiyuan Fan, and Ke Tang; https://energypolicy.columbia.edu/research/report/low-carbon-heat-solutions-heavy-industry-sources-options-and-costs-today "Engineers of Victory" by Paul Kennedy; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/91616/engineers-of-victory-by-paul-kennedy/ "Innovation and Its Enemies" by Calestous Juma; https://global.oup.com/academic/product/innovation-and-its-enemies-9780190467036?cc=us&lang=en& "45Q&A" blog series about the 45Q tax credit for CCUS; https://www.resourcesmag.org/common-resources/45q-series-comments-45q-tax-credit-carbon-capture-utilization-and-storage-ccus/
May 05, 2020
Is the Trump Administration Ditching WOTUS?, with Ellen Gilinsky
00:34:17
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Ellen Gilinsky about Waters of the United States, or WOTUS, which refers to the 2015 Clean Water Rule that defined the scope of federal water protection, particularly for streams and wetlands that share a hydrologic system with "navigable waters." Gilinsky was the associate deputy assistant administrator for water at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); she is an expert on all things WOTUS. Raimi and Gilinsky discuss why WOTUS is so important for federal regulation of surface waters; why the waters that fall under regulation are so tricky to define; and how the Trump administration has sought to change the definitions, with implications that reduce regulation. Just last week, EPA and the US Army Corps of Engineers published their Navigable Waters Protection Rule to change the definition of WOTUS and "navigable waters," demarcating four categories for waters under jurisdiction. The new rule becomes effective on June 22 this year, although lawsuits already are challenging it. References and recommendations: "Replenish: The Virtuous Cycle of Water and Prosperity" by Sandra Postel; https://islandpress.org/books/replenish "Where the Crawdads Sing" by Delia Owens; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/567281/where-the-crawdads-sing-deluxe-edition-by-delia-owens/ "Cadillac Desert" by Marc Reisner; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/323685/cadillac-desert-by-marc-reisner/
Apr 25, 2020
Lessons from 50 Years of the Clean Air Act, with Maureen Cropper
00:34:13
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Maureen Cropper, an economics professor at the University of Maryland and senior fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF). Raimi asks Maureen about a paper she recently coauthored, which takes a retrospective look at the Clean Air Act, as this year we mark the 50th anniversary of its 1970 amendments. With more than 50 years of data since the original Clean Air Act came into existence in 1963, Cropper et al.'s new paper reviews how the law has been implemented, drawing out key lessons and research questions that we may be able to apply to good effect in the next 50 years. References and recommendations: "Looking Back at Fifty Years of the Clean Air Act" by Joseph E. Aldy, Maximilian Auffhammer, Maureen L. Cropper, Arthur G. Fraas, and Richard D. Morgenstern; https://www.rff.org/publications/working-papers/looking-back-at-fifty-years-of-the-clean-air-act/ Fall 2019 issue of the Journal of Economic Perspectives (vol. 33, no. 4), which focuses in part on the fiftieth anniversary of the Clean Air and Water Acts; https://www.aeaweb.org/issues/568 "What Do Economists Have to Say about the Clean Air Act 50 Years after the Establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency?" by Janet Currie and Reed Walker; https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jep.33.4.3 "Policy Evolution under the Clean Air Act" by Richard Schmalensee and Robert N. Stavins; https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jep.33.4.27 "US Water Pollution Regulation over the Past Half Century: Burning Waters to Crystal Springs?" by David A. Keiser and Joseph S. Shapiro; https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jep.33.4.51 Purple Air, a personal monitor for real-time air-quality assessments; https://www2.purpleair.com/
Apr 19, 2020
Has Good Benefit-Cost Analysis Been Swept under the MATS?, with Mary Evans And Matthew Kotchen
00:34:10
In this week's episode, Kristin Hayes talks with Mary Evans and Matthew Kotchen, two of the authors on a new study published in the journal "Science" last week, which takes a critical look at how the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently updated the benefit-cost analysis of its Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, or MATS. At the risk of skipping to the punchline, the paper's authors suggest that EPA’s analysis is seriously flawed. Evans and Kotchen discuss why they and their colleagues reached this conclusion, what the perceived flaws in the analysis could mean for human health and the environment, and how EPA and the Trump administration should proceed from here. References and recommendations: "Deep flaws in a mercury regulatory analysis" by Joseph Aldy, Matthew Kotchen, Mary Evans, Meredith Fowlie, Arik Levinson, and Karen Palmer; https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2020/04/08/science.aba7932 "Lead pollution tracks the rise and fall of medieval kings" by Ann Gibbons; https://science.sciencemag.org/content/368/6486/19 DJ D-Nice spinning on Instagram Live with Club Quarantine; https://www.instagram.com/dnice
Apr 13, 2020
The Value of a Statistical Life and Coronavirus, with Alan Krupnick
00:38:59
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with RFF Senior Fellow Alan Krupnick about the value of a statistical life, or VSL. As we all try to stay safe during the coronavirus pandemic, some analysts have started to ask the question, How much economic pain is appropriate to withstand to protect public health? The question is studded with ethical and moral land mines that, to some extent, VSL helps to address. In today’s episode, Krupnick takes us through the history of the VSL concept, different methods for calculating VSL, and how VSL might (or might not) be applied in today’s rapidly changing world. References and recommendations: "Mengele: Unmasking the 'Angel of Death'" by David G. Marwell; https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393609530
Apr 05, 2020
A Status Report on Global Emissions Trading, with Stephanie La Hoz Theuer
00:29:21
This week, Daniel Raimi talks with Stephanie La Hoz Theuer, a senior project manager at adelphi, an environmental think tank, as well as a member of the International Carbon Action Partnership (ICAP) Secretariat. Each year, ICAP releases a valuable report on the status of emissions trading around the world, and the 2020 report was released just last week. In this episode, La Hoz Theuer provides updates on emissions trading policies around the world, including Europe, North America, Asia, and elsewhere. She and Raimi also discuss other policies that countries are deploying to reduce emissions, including in non-energy sectors such as agriculture. References and recommendations: "Emissions Trading Worldwide: Status Report 2020" by the International Carbon Action Partnership (ICAP); https://icapcarbonaction.com/en/icap-status-report-2020 "An amateur Chinese marathon runner under coronavirus lockdown ran 31 miles in his living room to pass the time"; https://www.businessinsider.com/chinese-man-under-coronavirus-lockdown-runs-31-miles-living-room-2020-2 "Thinking, Fast and Slow" by Daniel Kahneman; https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374533557 "Collapse" by Jared Diamond; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/288954/collapse-by-jared-diamond/
Mar 27, 2020
Do National Monuments Help or Hinder Local Economies?, with Margaret Walls
00:28:13
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with RFF senior fellow Margaret Walls. Along with coauthors Patrick Lee and Matthew Ashenfarb, Walls published a study last week on the economic impacts that result from the establishment of national monuments. The study looks at how the designation of a national monument affects businesses and employment in the surrounding area. While some have argued that monuments stifle economic activity by making land off-limits to extractive activities like oil and gas drilling, others argue that national monuments generate growth in other industries, such as tourism. In their new study, Walls and colleagues provide answers. References and recommendations: "National monuments and economic growth in the American West" by Margaret Walls, Patrick Lee, and Matthew Ashenfarb; https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/12/eaay8523 "Cadillac Desert" by Marc Reisner; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/323685/cadillac-desert-by-marc-reisner/ "The Source" by Martin Doyle; https://wwnorton.com/books/The-Source "Nuclear explained: Where our uranium comes from" by the US Energy Information Administration; https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/nuclear/where-our-uranium-comes-from.php
Mar 23, 2020
Oil Markets in the Time of COVID-19, with Amy Myers Jaffe
00:35:23
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with Amy Myers Jaffe about what has been unfolding in world oil markets over the past week, as the coronavirus, or COVID-19, continues to spread and radically impact human lives and the global economy. Jaffe is the David M. Rubenstein senior fellow for energy and the environment and director of the Energy Security and Climate Change Program at the Council on Foreign Relations. She is a leading expert on global energy policy, geopolitical risk, energy, and sustainability.
Mar 15, 2020
Managing Flood Risk under Climate Change, with Carolyn Kousky
00:33:45
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with Carolyn Kousky, the executive director of the Wharton Risk Management and Decision Processes Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Kousky is a university fellow at Resources for a future and was a fellow at RFF for a number of years. Kousky's research has examined multiple aspects of disaster insurance markets, the National Flood Insurance Program, federal disaster aid and response, and policy responses to potential changes in extreme events with climate change. In this episode, Hayes and Kousky discuss resilience to natural disasters such as flooding and wildfire, whether the current US system of funding for that resilience is working (and for whom), and what other options for responding to natural disasters the United States might want to consider. References and recommendations: "Insuring Nature" by Carolyn Kousky and Sarah E. Light; https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3481896 "The Cure for Catastrophe" by Robert Muir-Wood; https://oneworld-publications.com/the-cure-for-catastrophe-hb.html
Mar 07, 2020
The Economics of Environmental Justice, with Samuel Stolper and Catherine Hausman
00:31:29
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Catherine Hausman and Samuel Stolper of the University of Michigan about a new working paper they’ve coauthored, called "Inequality, Information Failures, and Air Pollution." Catie and Sam take an economics lens to the problem of environmental justice and identify a new and important channel through which these problems can arise: the role of information. References and recommendations: "Inequality, Information Failures, and Air Pollution: by Catherine Hausman and Samuel Stolper; https://www.nber.org/papers/w26682 "Hop on Pop" by Dr. Seuss; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/43028/hop-on-pop-by-hop-on-pop/ "The Dispossessed" by Ursula K. Le Guin; https://www.ursulakleguin.com/dispossessed
Mar 01, 2020
Which Climate Path Are We On?, with Zeke Hausfather
00:31:58
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Zeke Hausfather, director of climate and energy at the Breakthrough Institute. Hausfather discusses the past, present, and future of global greenhouse gas emissions, the emissions trajectory that the world is currently on, how that pathway looks different from some of the worst-case scenarios that researchers have used in the past, and the crucial uncertainties that remain when it comes to estimating future global warming under any given emissions pathway. References and recommendations: "The End of Nature" by Bill McKibben; http://billmckibben.com/end-of-nature.html "Explainer: Nine 'tipping points' that could be triggered by climate change" by Robert McSweeney; https://www.carbonbrief.org/explainer-nine-tipping-points-that-could-be-triggered-by-climate-change The "Broken Earth" trilogy by NK Jemisin; https://www.hachettebookgroup.com/articles/n-k-jemisin-broken-earth-trilogy-books-in-order/ "Endless Night at -50 Degrees: A Look at Life on an Icebreaker" by Henry Fountain; https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/07/climate/mosiac-mission-arctic-climate-change-photos.html "Wild storms and shifting ice: Two explorers talk about Arctic life" by Henry Fountain and Esther Horvath; https://www.chicagotribune.com/travel/travel-news/sns-nyt-wild-storms-shifting-ice-explorers-talk-arctic-life-20200209-pj2n6kbceraolkjed5wfg364bq-story.html
Feb 24, 2020
On the Job with Florida’s First Chief Resilience Officer, Julia Nesheiwat
00:27:52
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with Julia Nesheiwat, the first chief resilience officer for the state of Florida. Nesheiwat elaborates on how she’s helping support Florida’s climate resiliency efforts by coordinating across communities and organizations across the state and cutting the red tape that tends to stall environmental efforts related to climate change response. Nesheiwat has served in combat with the US Army; she earned her PhD from Tokyo Institute of Technology, MA from Georgetown University, and BA from Stetson University in Florida. She has lectured on the geopolitics of energy, climate, and technology at the US Naval Postgraduate School, Stanford University, and the University of California, San Diego. Fittingly for the Florida resident, Nesheiwat likes to go stand-up paddleboarding and surfing. References and recommendations: "Master the Disaster" from FM Global; https://www.fmglobal.com/insights-and-impacts/2019/master-the-disaster "The Geography of Risk" by Gilbert M. Gaul; https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374160807
Feb 16, 2020
Going Deeper on NEPA, with J.B. Ruhl
00:32:50
In this episode, host Daniel Raimi talks with J.B. Ruhl, a professor at Vanderbilt University Law School who specializes in environmental, natural resources, and property law. Ruhl provides an overview of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the landmark law that permits lawsuits against federal agencies for any actions that are perceived to affect the quality of the environment. Drawing from his years practicing environmental law, Ruhl explains how NEPA lawsuits are especially complex—involving statutes, court opinions, and recent regulatory changes that are often at odds. He also discusses the implications of a proposed rule change by the Trump administration that could limit the types of litigation that can be pursued under NEPA. References and recommendations: "Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Jared Diamond; https://wwnorton.com/books/Guns-Germs-and-Steel/ "Boomtown" podcast; https://www.texasmonthly.com/boomtown/
Feb 09, 2020
Extra! Extra! Listen All About It: A Conversation with Energy and Climate Journalist Amy Harder
00:31:46
In this week's episode, host Kristin Hayes talks with Amy Harder, national energy and climate change reporter at Axios. Harder's reporting includes exclusive scoops and analyses of national and global trends. Previously, she covered similar issues for the Wall Street Journal and National Journal. Harder also was the inaugural journalism fellow for the University of Chicago’s Energy Policy Institute in 2018. Harder has been a longtime friend of RFF and has participated as a moderator in several RFF events. You may have followed her work on shale gas development, carbon pricing, and so many of the other topics of interest in today’s energy and climate policy conversations. Here, Harder discusses how she thinks about environmental journalism—and journalism in general—in this day and age. References and recommendations: RFF's Global Energy Outlook tool; https://www.rff.org/geo/ Wall Street Journal reporter Russell Gold's climate reporting; https://twitter.com/russellgold "See how global warming has changed since your childhood" by Tim Leslie, Joshua Byrd, and Nathan Hoad; https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-06/how-climate-change-has-impacted-your-life/11766018
Feb 03, 2020
Green Growth That Works: Discussing Ecosystem Services, with Lisa Mandle
00:31:55
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Lisa Mandle, lead scientist at the Natural Capital Project, based at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. Lisa is the co-editor of a new book called "Green Growth That Works: Natural Capital Policy and Finance Mechanisms from around the World." The book presents a range of fascinating case studies from around the world, all centered around the tools that governments and others can use to protect and enhance ecosystem services. Raimi and Mandle discuss some of those cases, including New York’s famously unfiltered water, preservation of wetlands, and stormwater management in Washington, DC. References and recommendations: "Green Growth That Works: Natural Capital Policy and Finance Mechanisms Around the World" by Lisa Ann Mandle, Zhiyun Ouyang, James Edwin Salzman, and Gretchen Cara Daily; https://islandpress.org/books/green-growth-works (offer code "GROWTH" provides a discount) "Everyone wants to Instagram the world's most beautiful canyon. Should they?" by Rebecca Jennings; https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/7/11/20686194/antelope-canyon-instagram-page-arizona-navajo "Ice on Fire" documentary; https://www.hbo.com/documentaries/ice-on-fire
Jan 24, 2020
40 Big Ideas for a Sustainable Future, with Daniel Esty
00:30:59
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Daniel Esty, a professor at Yale University and a member of the board of directors at Resources for the Future (RFF). Dan talks about a new book he edited, "A Better Planet: 40 Big Ideas for a Sustainable Future." As its title suggests, the book covers a wide range of topics. Raimi and Esty's conversation focuses on an essay that Esty wrote, which outlines how to design environmental policy in a way that fosters innovation and new technologies. They also touch on the role of finance and politics in shaping environmental outcomes. References and recommendations: "A Better Planet: 40 Big Ideas for a Sustainable Future" edited by Daniel C. Esty; https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300246247/better-planet Hearing on "Building a 100 Percent Clean Economy: Solutions for Economy-Wide Deep Decarbonization" with Daniel C. Esty, Noah Kaufman, David K. Gattie, and Tim Profeta; https://energycommerce.house.gov/committee-activity/hearings/hearing-on-building-a-100-percent-clean-economy-solutions-for-economy "Decarbonizing Space Heating with Air Source Heat Pumps" by Noah Kaufman, David Sandalow, Clotilde Rossi di Schio, and Jake Higdon; https://energypolicy.columbia.edu/research/report/decarbonizing-space-heating-air-source-heat-pumps
Jan 19, 2020
Shifting Sands: Using Taxes to Build the Best Beaches, with Megan Mullin
00:30:03
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Megan Mullin, an associate professor of environmental politics at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment. Mullin talks about her research, which analyzes how communities pay to rehabilitate beaches affected by erosion and how differential tax rates can affect levels of support for these beach nourishment projects. Mullin also makes clear why coastal management is relevant: as climate change accelerates the erosion of beaches, and as federal funding dries up, local communities will increasingly have to grapple with how to pay to replenish their shorelines. References and recommendations: "Paying to save the beach: effects of local finance decisions on coastal management" by Megan Mullin, Martin D. Smith, and Dylan E. McNamara; https://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-018-2191-5 The Conversation, "Where does beach sand come from?" https://theconversation.com/where-does-beach-sand-come-from-126323 "The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance"; https://www.netflix.com/title/80148535
Jan 12, 2020
Pricing Climate Risk in the Markets, with Robert Litterman
00:30:26
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Robert Litterman, a founding partner at Kepos Capital and a board member at Resources for the Future (RFF). Litterman recently was named the chair of a new committee that will be advising US financial regulators on the economic risks of climate change, a new position that leverages Litterman's extensive experience working on risk management in the financial sector and his deep interest in climate change. Raimi and Litterman talk about the scale of the risks to the US financial system from climate change; whether and how markets are currently pricing the risks of climate change for assets like coastal property or energy companies; and the recent paper Litterman coauthored, which takes an unconventional and novel approach to carbon pricing. References and recommendations: "Global Warming of 1.5 degrees," an IPCC special report; https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/ "Declining CO2 price paths" by Kent D. Daniel, Robert B. Litterman, and Gernot Wagner; https://www.pnas.org/content/116/42/20886
Jan 04, 2020
2019 Year in Review: Energy and Environmental Policy, with Susan Tierney and Sarah Ladislaw
00:37:15
This week's episode features a review of the year 2019 in environmental and energy policy, with two amazing guests: Susan Tierney, senior advisor at the Analysis Group and chair of the board at Resources for the Future (RFF); and Sarah Ladislaw, senior vice president, director, and senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, with their Energy and National Security Program. Host Daniel Raimi facilitates a conversation with Tierney and Ladislaw, asking what they consider to be the most interesting environmental and energy policy developments during the past year, at the federal and state level. The discussion touches on everything from vehicles to electricity, to interstate natural gas pipelines, and more. References and recommendations: "Time to move away from old precedents in FERC pipeline reviews" by Susan Tierney; https://www.utilitydive.com/news/time-to-move-away-from-old-precedents-in-ferc-pipeline-reviews/567512/ "FERC’s Certification of New Interstate Natural Gas Facilities" by Susan Tierney; https://www.analysisgroup.com/globalassets/content/insights/publishing/revising_ferc_1999_pipeline_certification.pdf "Blowout" by Rachel Maddow; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/576330/blowout-by-rachel-maddow/ "The River" by Peter Heller; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/576820/the-river-by-peter-heller/ "Made in China: 2025 and the Future of American Industry" by Marco Rubio; https://www.rubio.senate.gov/public/_cache/files/d1c6db46-1a68-481a-b96e-356c8100f1b7/3EDECA923DB439A8E884C6229A4C6003.02.12.19-final-sbc-project-mic2025-report.pdf "Perspectives on the Green New Deal" with Leah Stokes and Jerry Taylor; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMPf9Zf2RSQ Riders in the Sky; https://www.ridersinthesky.com
Dec 29, 2019
Was Madrid a COP-Out? Assessing COP25, with Nathaniel Keohane
00:40:46
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Nathaniel Keohane, senior vice president for climate at Environmental Defense Fund. In this episode, Keohane gives a readout on the outcomes of this year’s annual international climate negotiations, called COP25. He and Raimi talk about the goals of the conference; whether those goals were achieved; and several other issues, including conference protests, the role of the US delegation, and what to look forward to at next year’s COP26. There was so much to talk about that the episode extends about ten minutes beyond the usual length of the podcast. Given the importance and timeliness of this topic, we think you’ll appreciate the extra time. References and recommendations: "What to Expect at COP25 in Madrid" by Robert Stavins; https://www.resourcesmag.org/common-resources/what-expect-cop-25-madrid/ "Elliot Diringer on the conclusion of COP25" from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions; https://www.c2es.org/press-release/elliot-diringer-on-the-conclusion-of-cop-25/ "This Changes Everything" by Naomi Klein; https://thischangeseverything.org/book/
Dec 21, 2019
Understanding Water Use in the US Energy System, with Emily Grubert
00:31:58
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Emily Grubert, an assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Raimi and Grubert discuss how water is used in the energy system, a subset of the topic known as the “Energy-Water Nexus.” They also talk about a 2018 paper that Grubert coauthored with Kelly Sanders—research that provides intricate detail on the life cycle of water consumption for every major fuel source in the United States. Raimi and Grubert compare and contrast the different water profiles of coal, oil, gas, biofuels, and other sources of energy. They also talk in detail about water use in hydraulic fracturing. References and recommendations: “Water use in the United States energy system: A national assessment and unit process inventory of water consumption and withdrawals” by Emily Grubert and Kelly T. Sanders; http://emilygrubert.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/PREPRINT-Grubert-Sanders-Water-for-US-Energy.pdf “Who speaks for Crazy Horse” by Brooke Jarvis; https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/09/23/who-speaks-for-crazy-horse “Gold Fame Citrus” by Claire Vaye Watkins; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/318277/gold-fame-citrus-by-claire-vaye-watkins/9781594634246/ “The Water Knife” by Paolo Bacigalupi; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/237233/the-water-knife-by-paolo-bacigalupi/
Dec 14, 2019
Preparing for the Coming Climate Disruption, with Alice Hill and Leonardo Martinez-Diaz
00:34:32
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with Alice Hill and Leonardo Martinez-Diaz, authors of a new book released this fall by Oxford University Press, called "Building a Resilient Tomorrow: How to Prepare for the Coming Climate Disruption." Hayes, Hill, and Martinez-Diaz delve into the topics covered in the book, including ten lessons for decisionmakers in building a resilient future. To introduce Hill and Martinez-Diaz, using their own words from the book (with some light editing for length): Alice Hill spent the bulk of her career in courtrooms, first as a US federal prosecutor chasing white-collar crooks and, later, as a judge presiding over cases ranging from homicide to medical malpractice. She became immersed in climate change after she joined the US Department of Homeland Security in 2009 as senior counselor to the secretary. She was tasked with helping the department understand how climate could affect its operations. Hill went on to the White House to lead resilience efforts as special assistant to President Obama and member of his climate team. She is now a senior fellow for climate change policy at the Council of Foreign Relations. Leonardo Martinez-Diaz spent several years as an academic before joining the Obama administration, where one of his first tasks as head of the policy office at the US Agency for International Development (USAID) was overseeing the development of a climate change strategy for the agency. Later, as deputy assistant secretary for energy and environment at the Treasury Department, he negotiated finance elements of the Paris Agreement and represented the United States on the governing bodies of major providers of climate finance, including the Green Climate Fund and the Global Environment Facility. He now works at the World Resources Institute as the Global Director for WRI’s Sustainable Finance Center. References and recommendations: "Building a Resilient Tomorrow: How to Prepare for the Coming Climate Disruption" by Alice Hill and Leonardo Martinez-Diaz; https://global.oup.com/academic/product/building-a-resilient-tomorrow-9780190909345 “New elevation data triple estimates of global vulnerability to sea-level rise and coastal flooding” by Scott A. Kulp and Benjamin H. Strauss; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-12808-z "Ultimatum" by Matthew Glass; https://groveatlantic.com/book/ultimatum/
Dec 07, 2019
Public Attitudes toward Climate Activists, with Nathaniel Geiger
00:32:26
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Nathaniel Geiger, assistant professor of communication science at Indiana University. Geiger studies, among other things, how the public responds to communication around climate change. Geiger and Raimi discuss the recent history of advocacy on climate change; how recent movements like the youth-led climate strike might shape public attitudes toward climate policy and toward the activists themselves; communicating with a wide range of audiences about climate issues; and much more. References and recommendations: "Is Climate Change like Diabetes or an Asteroid?" by Ted Nordhaus and Alex Trembath; https://thebreakthrough.org/articles/is-climate-change-like-diabetes "On Fire" by Naomi Klein; https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/On-Fire/Naomi-Klein/9781982129910
Nov 30, 2019
Waive Goodbye? The History and Future of the California Waiver, with Emily Wimberger
00:29:25
On this week's podcast, Emily Wimberger talks with host Kristin Hayes about the so-called "California waiver." The waiver has flown under the public radar for decades, but it’s now getting a closer look from the Trump administration, and it’s been turning up in the headlines. In this episode, Wimberger and Hayes discuss what the waiver is; how it came to be; and why it matters for California, the rest of the United States, and perhaps even the rest of the world. Emily Wimberger is a climate economist at the Rhodium Group, working on the energy and climate team. Prior to Rhodium, she served as the chief economist for the California Air Resources Board, where she analyzed the economic impact of California’s portfolio of climate change and air quality policies, focusing on programs related to carbon markets and transportation. References and recommendations: "Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore" by Elizabeth Rush; https://milkweed.org/book/rising
Nov 22, 2019
Balancing the Ledgers: Pollution and GDP, with Nicholas Z. Muller
00:32:33
Nicholas Z. Muller, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, recently published a paper with coauthors that measures the health damages from air pollution in the United States. The paper looks at how those health damages compare with traditional economic metrics such as gross domestic product (GDP) and describes the harm that some economic activities impose, relative to their contribution to the economy. Raimi talks with Muller about how these trends have changed over time, which parts of the economy account for the most pollution, and what this all means for environmental policy. References and recommendations: "Fine Particulate Matter Damages and Value Added in the US Economy" by Peter Tschofen, Ines L. Azevedo, and Nicholas Z. Muller; https://www.pnas.org/content/116/40/19857 "The Sixth Extinction" by Elizabeth Kolbert; https://www.pulitzer.org/winners/elizabeth-kolbert Impossible Whopper at Burger King; https://impossiblefoods.com/burgerking/
Nov 15, 2019
Carbon Pricing Proposals in Today's Congress, with Marc Hafstead
00:34:07
In this special episode of Resources Radio, host Daniel Raimi partners with the Energy 360° podcast from the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) Energy Program. Raimi and CSIS's Sarah Ladislaw interview RFF Fellow Marc Hafstead, director of RFF's Carbon Pricing Initiative. Raimi and Ladislaw talk with Hafstead about a raft of recent legislative proposals in the US Congress to price greenhouse gas emissions: the major design elements of these bills, such as how revenues are used; how border adjustments can help protect US manufacturers; the political viability of these different proposals, including which policy elements might help build support for a carbon price; and whether other policy approaches, such as a Clean Energy Standard, stand more of a chance in today's political environment. References and recommendations: "The Wizard and the Prophet" by Charles C. Mann; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/220698/the-wizard-and-the-prophet-by-charles-c-mann/ "Paying for Pollution: Why a Carbon Tax is Good for America" by Gilbert E. Metcalf; https://global.oup.com/academic/product/paying-for-pollution-9780190694197 "Paying for Pollution, with Gilbert Metcalf" Resources Radio podcast episode; https://www.resourcesmag.org/resources-radio/resources-radio-paying-for-pollution-with-gilbert-metcalf-of-tufts-university/
Nov 11, 2019
Candidate Tracker: The Future of Fracking, with Daniel Raimi
00:33:44
In this special episode of the podcast mini-series related to RFF's Candidate Tracker, host Kristin Hayes talks with Resources Radio regular Daniel Raimi, a senior research associate at RFF. Hayes and Raimi share thoughts about how the presidential candidates in this election cycle are talking about fracking. Raimi's research has primarily focused on the shale revolution in the United States, but he brings a wealth of experience on topics related to climate impacts, global energy outlooks, and a number of other important energy- and climate-related subjects. If his voice sounds familiar, it's because Raimi is the other regular host of Resources Radio. References and Recommendations: RFF Candidate Tracker: https://www.rff.org/candidatetracker/ "The Ezra Klein Show" with podcast guest Kate Marvel; https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/vox/the-ezra-klein-show/e/64883521 "Acknowledging uncertainty impacts public acceptance of climate scientists’ predictions" published in the journal "Nature Climate Change"; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-019-0587-5 "Getting Real on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of the Shale Revolution" by Daniel Raimi; https://www.resourcesmag.org/common-resources/getting-real-economic-and-environmental-impacts-shale-revolution/ "Yesterday"; https://www.uphe.com/movies/yesterday
Nov 03, 2019
Saving the Snow: A Conversation with Minnesota Senator Tina Smith on Climate Policy
00:23:26
Host Kristin Hayes talks with Senator Tina Smith, the junior senator from the great state of Minnesota. Senator Smith served as the 48th lieutenant governor of Minnesota from 2015 to 2018, after a career in both the private and public sectors in the state, where she has lived since 1984. Senator Smith is a member of several committees in the Senate relevant to natural resource, energy, and climate issues, including the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry and the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Senator Smith talks about her own interests in these issues, her perspective on why they matter to Minnesota and the nation, and recent energy legislation that she has introduced. There is also some talk about loons—a first for Resources Radio. References and recommendations: "One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy" by Carol Anderson; https://www.professorcarolanderson.org/one-person-no-vote "The Secret Commonwealth" by Philip Pullman; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/246698/the-book-of-dust-the-secret-commonwealth-book-of-dust-volume-2-by-philip-pullman/
Oct 25, 2019
The Economics of California’s Power Shutoffs, with Judson Boomhower
00:31:01
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Judson Boomhower, an assistant professor of economics at the University of California San Diego and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Boomhower and Raimi discuss the recent public safety power shutoffs that affected over one million people in northern California, what led to the shutoffs, the effects of the shutoffs, and how planned shutoffs might become more common in the future. The shutoffs have gotten a lot of attention, but Boomhower brings unique expertise to the issue, including a deep understanding of the electricity system, wildfire, and—crucially—the economics of liability. References and recommendations: "Earth as Art" from the US Geological Survey; https://eros.usgs.gov/image-gallery/earth-art "Between Two Fires" by Stephen J. Pyne; https://uapress.arizona.edu/book/between-two-fires
Oct 22, 2019
Candidate Tracker: The Big Picture on Candidates’ Climate Policy Plans, with Joseph Aldy
00:29:11
This week, Kristin Hayes and Joseph Aldy discuss the presidential candidates’ stances on climate change. Aldy is professor of the practice of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and a university fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF). Aldy worked as an RFF fellow in 2005–2008, leaving in 2009 to serve as the special assistant to the president for energy and environment, reporting through both the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate change at the White House. Given this experience as both a researcher and a policymaker, Aldy is the perfect person to kick off the Resources Radio podcast series that accompanies RFF’s new online interactive tool, the Candidate Tracker. The Candidate Tracker has been developed to compare and contrast the positions of the 2020 presidential candidates from both major political parties on a range of climate- and energy-related topics. It’s available online at www.rff.org/candidatetracker. We hope Resources Radio can serve as a great venue for some deeper-dive analysis on several issues under discussion by the candidates; listeners will see episodes posted over the next few months in this mini-series. This first episode in the Candidate Tracker series with Aldy is designed to offer some big-picture commentary on how the candidates are talking about energy and climate, how their plans compare, and how the conversation is evolving. References and recommendations: "Declining CO2 price paths" by Kent D. Daniel, Robert B. Litterman, and Gernot Wagner; https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/09/30/1817444116
Oct 11, 2019
Catalyzing Markets toward Sustainability, with Kyung-Ah Park
00:27:26
This week, host Kristin Hayes talks with Kyung-Ah Park, who leads environmental markets and innovation in the newly formed sustainable finance group at Goldman Sachs; she also serves on the board of RFF. Previously, Park headed the Environmental Markets Group at Goldman Sachs. As the episode title suggests, their conversation focuses on the potential to catalyze markets toward further investments in environmentally beneficial products and services. Hayes and Park talk about the definition of environmental markets and why markets matter in driving change at the scales needed. An edited transcript of this episode also is available as an article in issue 202 of "Resources" magazine: https://www.resourcesmag.org/print-issues/issue-202-satellites-help-keep-communities-safe-toxic-algal-blooms/ References and recommendations: "The Uninhabitable Earth" by David Wallace-Wells; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/586541/the-uninhabitable-earth-by-david-wallace-wells/
Oct 07, 2019
A New York State of Carbon Pricing, with Karen Palmer and Daniel Shawhan
00:30:14
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Resources for the Future (RFF) Senior Fellow Karen Palmer and RFF Fellow Daniel Shawhan. Along with RFF Senior Research Assistant Paul Picciano, Palmer and Shawhan recently released a report called “Benefits and Costs of Power Plant Carbon Emissions Pricing in New York.” Raimi, Palmer, and Shawhan talk about this new work, which examines how a carbon price applied specifically to New York State would affect emissions inside and outside of the state, electricity prices for consumers, what role carbon pricing could play in achieving New York’s ambitious climate targets over the next few decades, and more. References and recommendations: "Benefits and Costs of Power Plant Carbon Emissions Pricing in New York" by Daniel Shawhan, Paul Picciano, and Karen Palmer https://www.rff.org/publications/reports/benefits-and-costs-of-the-new-york-independent-system-operators-carbon-pricing-initiative/ "The Biggest Little Farm"; https://www.biggestlittlefarmmovie.com/ "Free Solo"; https://www.nationalgeographic.com/films/free-solo/ "Electricity Market Design" by Peter Crampton; https://academic.oup.com/oxrep/article/33/4/589/4587939
Sep 28, 2019
What’s Driving the Future of Automobiles?, with Ellen Hughes-Cromwick
00:32:26
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Ellen Hughes-Cromwick of the University of Michigan Energy Institute. Hughes-Cromwick previously served as chief economist in the US Department of Commerce. Before that, she was the chief economist at Ford Motor Company for over 18 years. Raimi asks Hughes-Cromwick about the state of play in the automotive industry, how electric and autonomous vehicles are changing the economic and competitive landscape, which companies are best positioned to take advantage of these new technologies, and what role climate policy can play in planning for the vehicles of the future. References and recommendations: "Energy Transitions and Local Action: The Case of Colorado's Coal Transition"; https://www.forbes.com/sites/thebakersinstitute/2019/08/21/energy-transitions-and-local-action-the-case-of-colorados-coal-transition/#87957a33f23a "The Pioneers" by David McCullough; https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Pioneers/David-McCullough/9781501168680 "The Fifth Risk" by Michael Lewis; https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/311/311900/the-fifth-risk/9780141991429.html "The Undoing Project" by Michael Lewis; https://wwnorton.com/books/9780393354775 Paradigm shifts and the philosophy of science: Thomas Kuhn (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Structure_of_Scientific_Revolutions) and Karl Popper (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Popper)
Sep 19, 2019
Market Solutions for Water Pollution, with Cathy Kling
00:28:14
This week, host Daniel Raimi talks with Catherine Kling, who, among her many titles, is a Tisch University professor at Cornell University and a member of RFF's Board of Directors. They talk about a recent op-ed that Kling published in the New York Times, called “Polluting Farmers Should Pay,” which focuses on nutrient runoff from agricultural land and how the runoff contributes to harmful algae blooms across the United States. They also talk about potential options for federal and state policies to address this problem, as well as Kling's early work on developing a social cost of water pollution. References and recommendations: “Polluting Farmers Should Pay” by Catherine Kling; https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/25/opinion/water-quality-agriculture.html "Lake Michigan has become much clearer in 20 years, but at great cost"; https://phys.org/news/2018-01-lake-michigan-clearer-years-great.html "Wild Geese" by Mary Oliver; https://onbeing.org/blog/mary-oliver-reads-wild-geese/ "Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter" by Ben Goldfarb; https://www.chelseagreen.com/product/eager-paperback/
Sep 13, 2019
A Tribute to Marty Weitzman, with Gernot Wagner
00:35:30
This week's episode pays tribute to the life and work of Harvard Economics Professor Marty Weitzman, who died two weeks ago. Host Daniel Raimi talks with Gernot Wagner, a close collaborator and friend of Weitzman’s and a professor at New York University. Raimi and Wagner talk about two of Weitzman’s seminal contributions to the field of environmental economics, how this work has shaped public policies around the world, and who Marty was as a person. References and recommendations: "Prices vs. Quantities" by Weitzman (1974); https://scholar.harvard.edu/weitzman/publications/prices-vs-quantities "Chutes and Ladders" board game; https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/5432/chutes-and-ladders "The Uninhabitable Earth" by David Wallace-Wells; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/586541/the-uninhabitable-earth-by-david-wallace-wells/9780525576709/
Sep 08, 2019
100 Percent Clean: Understanding Climate Policy in Washington State, with Sharon Shewmake
00:32:13
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Sharon Shewmake, a professor of environmental economics at Western Washington University. Shewmake also represents Washington's 42nd legislative district in the state's House of Representatives. Shewmake discusses Washington's plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the power sector to zero by 2045, other state policies that affect energy and the environment, and how researchers can more effectively engage with policymakers. References and recommendations: "A Trailblazing Plan to Fight California Wildfires” by Nicola Twilley, The New Yorker; https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/08/26/a-trailblazing-plan-to-fight-california-wildfires "So, Should We Recycle?" by Planet Money; https://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=741283641
Sep 03, 2019
Finding a Future for Forests in Energy and Climate Solutions, with Robert Bonnie
00:33:05
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Robert Bonnie, Rubinstein fellow at Duke University. Bonnie is an expert on many things, but in this episode, he talks about the role that forests play in energy, climate change, and more. Raimi asks Bonnie about the past, present, and future of wood energy in the United States and globally, and what role forests might play in helping to achieve deep decarbonization goals. They also talk about the challenges that this issue raises, including developing markets to incentivize reforestation, land use competition, and much more. References and recommendations: "Boom Town" by Sam Anderson; https://buff.ly/2NCsCQb "Between Two Fires" by Stephen Pine; https://uapress.arizona.edu/book/between-two-fires "Sapiens" by Yuval Noah Harari; https://www.ynharari.com/book/sapiens/
Aug 23, 2019
Is the Endangered Species Act Under Threat?, with Ya-Wei Li
00:32:48
This week, we talk with Ya-Wei Li, Director of Biodiversity at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center (EPIC). Ya-Wei is an expert on the Endangered Species Act, a law that's been in the news recently because the Trump administration has proposed a number of changes to the way the Act is administered and enforced. We'll get Ya-Wei's take on which changes are most important, what effect they'll have on species and their habitat, and whether media coverage of the proposed changes has been overwrought. References and recommendations: "A Guide to the Revised Endangered Species Regulations" by Environmental Policy Innovation Center; http://policyinnovation.org/esaregs19/ "Last week's endangered species regulations: what really happened?" by Ya-Wei Li; https://buff.ly/2HgP6lR Sage Grouse Mating Dances; https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sage+grouse "Noah's Choice: The Future of the Endangered Species Act" by Mann and Plummer; https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/329264.Noah_s_Choice
Aug 14, 2019
Paying for Pollution, with Gilbert Metcalf (Rebroadcast)
00:31:16
This week, we are rebroadcasting host Daniel Raimi's 2018 interview with Gilbert Metcalf, the John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service; Professor of Economics; and Graduate Program Director at Tufts University’s Department of Economics. Daniel talks to Gib about his new book, "Paying for Pollution: Why a Carbon Tax is Good for America." We are re-airing this interview because several federal carbon pricing bills have recently been proposed in the US Congress, raising renewed interest in carbon pricing. References and recommendations: "The Year of the Carbon Pricing Proposal" by Marc Hafstead; https://www.resourcesmag.org/common-resources/the-year-of-the-carbon-pricing-proposal/ "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History" by Elizabeth Kolbert; www.goodreads.com/book/show/179100…sixth-extinction "Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America" by Eliza Griswold; www.goodreads.com/book/show/367229…y-and-prosperity "Confronting the Climate Challenge: US Policy Options" by Lawrence Goulder and Marc Hafstead; cup.columbia.edu/book/confronting…ge/9780231179027 "Paying for Pollution: Why a Carbon Tax is Good for America" by Gilbert Metcalf; global.oup.com/academic/product/…97?cc=us&lang=en&
Aug 12, 2019
Community Vulnerability in a "Just" Energy Transition, with Sanya Carley
00:29:35
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Professor Sanya Carley of Indiana University's O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Daniel and Sanya discuss her work on the "just" transition, which addresses questions like, how do climate policies affect energy affordability for low-income households, how do they affect the well-being of energy producing communities, and what approaches might help reduce the unwanted side effects of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the energy sector? References and recommendations: "The Overstory" by Richard Powers; http://www.richardpowers.net/the-overstory/ “Why Setting a Climate Deadline is Dangerous” by Shinichiro Asayama; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-019-0543-4
Aug 05, 2019
Are Climate Communicators Credible?, with Shahzeen Attari
00:29:56
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Professor Shahzeen Attari of the Indiana University's O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Daniel and Shahzeen discuss her work on how the personal behavior of climate change communicators can affect the reception of their message. If a climate scientist uses a lot of energy at home or is a frequent flyer, do they lose credibility? It's a really challenging question—one that Shahzeen's work illuminates. The results, and this conversation, can help all of us think critically about our own energy use. References and recommendations: "Climate Change Communicators’ Carbon Footprints Affect Their Audience’s Policy Support" by Shahzeen Z. Attari, David H. Krantz, and Elke U. Weber; https://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-019-02463-0 "Statements about Climate Researchers’ Carbon Footprints Affect Their Credibility and the Impact of Their Advice" by Shahzeen Z. Attari, David H. Krantz, and Elke U. Weber; https://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-016-1713-2 "The Overstory" by Richard Powers; http://www.richardpowers.net/the-overstory/ "New York 2140" by Kim Stanley Robinson; https://www.kimstanleyrobinson.info/content/new-york-2140 "First Reformed"; https://a24films.com/films/first-reformed "Years and Years"; https://www.hbo.com/years-and-years Author Ursula K. Le Guin; https://www.ursulakleguin.com/
Jul 29, 2019
The Challenge of Diversity in the Environmental Movement, with Dorceta Taylor
00:31:39
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Professor Dorceta Taylor of the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability. Daniel asks Professor Taylor about her research on the history of the environmental movement, focusing on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion within environmental groups, both historically and today. There’s been quite a bit of progress over the years, but there are still big challenges and plenty of room for improvement. References and recommendations: "The Rise of the American Conservation Movement" by Dorceta E. Taylor; https://www.dukeupress.edu/the-rise-of-the-american-conservation-movement "The State of Diversity in Environmental Organizations" by Dorceta E. Taylor, PhD; https://www.diversegreen.org/the-challenge/ Listen to the full interview (40 min) with Dr. Taylor: https://www.resourcesmag.org/resources-radio/challenge-diversity-environmental-movement-dorceta-taylor/
Jul 23, 2019
What Happened at Chernobyl?, with Todd Allen
00:31:37
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Professor Todd Allen, chair of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences at the University of Michigan. Todd and Daniel discuss Chernobyl—what caused the explosion, what is known about its health effects, and what lessons policymakers and nuclear engineers learned from the disaster. Todd and Daniel also comment on the recent HBO miniseries called "Chernobyl"—what did it get right, and where did it miss the mark? References and recommendations: "Lessons of Darkness"; https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0104706/ "Full Body Burden" by Kristen Iversen; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/216565/full-body-burden-by-kristen-iversen/9780307955654/ "The Grid" by Gretchen Bakke; https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/the-grid-9781608196104/
Jul 13, 2019
Economics in the Age of Environmental Policy, with Robert Stavins
00:32:27
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Robert Stavins, the A.J. Meyer Professor of Energy and Economic Development at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Daniel and Rob discuss the role that economics has played in shaping environmental policy, both in the past and today. As major proposals like the Green New Deal seem to be turning away from market-based approaches, long-advocated by most economists, Rob shares how he sees the role of environmental economics in today’s environmental policy landscape. References and recommendations: "Harlan County USA"; http://www.cabincreekfilms.com/films_harlancounty.html "Columbia Energy Exchange"; https://energypolicy.columbia.edu/podcast/columbia-energy-exchange
Jul 08, 2019
Nature and Nurture: Understanding the Psychology of Pro-Environmental Behavior, with Susan Clayton
00:32:58
Host Kristin Hayes talks with Susan Clayton, the Whitmore-Williams Professor of Psychology and Chair of Environmental Studies at the College of Wooster. They discuss questions such as: why do some people care about environmental conservation more than others? How can policymakers and other decisionmakers encourage pro-environmental behavior? And how do we wrestle with our own human limitations in processing and trying to address climate change? References and Recommendations: "Rising" by Elizabeth Rush; https://milkweed.org/book/rising "The Psychology of Climate Change Communication" by the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University; http://guide.cred.columbia.edu/
Jul 02, 2019
An Anthropologist's Take on Climate Change, with Susie Crate
00:30:21
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Susie Crate, a professor of anthropology at George Mason University. Susie discusses how she studies environmental issues through an anthropological lens and describes the community in northern Siberia that she's been studying since 1991. Daniel and Susie talk about how that community is being affected by climate change and how they are planning for the future. References and recommendations: "The Day the Dinosaurs Died" by Douglas Preston; https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/04/08/the-day-the-dinosaurs-died "The Anthropologist"; https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2462276/
Jun 24, 2019
Shedding Light on Rural Energy Access, with Subhrendu Pattanayak
00:31:14
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Professor Subhrendu Pattanayak of Duke University. Over the last several years, Subhrendu has literally trekked the Himalayas to do research on how to provide access to electricity for communities in hard-to-reach places. Daniel and Subhrendu talk about what policy and market factors might make it easier to expand energy access, and Subhrendu explains how dynamics within these communities can affect the likelihood of small-scale electricity projects to succeed or fail. References and recommendations: "Earth" by Lil Dicky; (explicit) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvuN_WvF1to "Power to the Poor" by Morgan D. Bazilian; https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/africa/2015-02-16/power-poor "Reducing Risk for Private Investment in Off-Grid Energy" by Oliver Waissbein; https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/blog/2018/Reducing_risk_for_private_investment_in_off_grid_energy.html "Energizing Finance 2017" Sustainable Energy for All; https://www.seforall.org/interventions/energizing-finance/energizing-finance-2017 "Energizing Finance 2018" Sustainable Energy for All; https://www.seforall.org/interventions/energizing-finance/energizing-finance-2018 "The Lorax" by Dr. Seuss; https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/43157/the-lorax-by-dr-seuss/9780394823379/
Jun 16, 2019
Refined Coal: The Billion-Dollar Subsidy You've Never Heard Of, with Brian Prest
00:26:24
Host Daniel Raimi talks with RFF postdoctoral fellow Brian Prest about a little-known topic: refined coal. Brian and coauthor Alan Krupnick have published a new RFF working paper that takes a close look at a $1-billion-a-year federal subsidy for refined coal. So, what is refined coal? What's the purpose of the subsidy? And does the subsidy deliver? References and recommendations: "How Clean is Refined Coal?" by Brian C. Prest and Alan Krupnick; https://www.rff.org/publications/reports/how-clean-is-refined-coal/ "The Last Lobster: Boom or Bust for Maine's Greatest Fishery" by Christopher White; https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250080851
Jun 07, 2019
The Money Behind Wind Power, with Jay Bartlett
00:28:49
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Jay Bartlett—a research associate at RFF—about his recent work on wind energy development. Jay explains how wind projects actually get built, i.e., how developers raise money for their projects and who they sell their electricity to. Daniel and Jay also discuss how state and federal policies shape these markets, and how the coming changes in the policy landscape are likely to affect future wind development. References and recommendations: "Reducing Risk in Merchant Wind and Solar Projects through Financial Hedges" by Jay Bartlett; https://www.rff.org/publications/working-papers/reducing-risk-merchant-wind-and-solar-projects-through-financial-hedges/ "News of the World" by Paulette Jiles; https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25817493-news-of-the-world "The Son" by Philipp Meyer; https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16240761-the-son "Our Planet;" www.netflix.com/title/80049832
Jun 04, 2019
Biodiversity, Food Security, and Sustainability, with Sue Lieberman
00:32:34
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Dr. Sue Lieberman, vice president for International Policy at the Wildlife Conservation Society. They discuss a major new report that synthesizes the literature on the global state of biodiversity. The report warns about a variety of risks, including species extinction, habitat degradation, food insecurity, and much more. Sue describes the scale of some of these risks, and shares her views on how policymakers can respond to prevent them. References and recommendations: IPBES Summary; https://www.ipbes.net/news/ipbes-global-assessment-preview "The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming" by David Wallace-Wells; https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/41552709-the-uninhabitable-earth "Our Planet;" https://www.netflix.com/title/80049832 "Why the Guardian is Changing the Language it Uses about the Environment;" https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/may/17/why-the-guardian-is-changing-the-language-it-uses-about-the-environment
May 27, 2019
How the Trump Administration's ACE Rule Affects Emissions, with Amelia Keyes
00:25:20
Host Daniel Raimi talks with RFF Research Associate Amelia Keyes about her recent research on the Trump administration's Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) rule. Amelia and several colleagues have estimated the effect of the rule on emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrous oxide, finding that ACE could actually increase these emissions rather than reduce them. References and recommendations: "Mapping America’s Wicked Weather and Deadly Disasters"; https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/national/mapping-disasters/?utm_term=.db65dd6f46e3 "Mothers of Invention"; https://www.mothersofinvention.online/
May 21, 2019
New Mexico's Path to a Low-Carbon Future, with NM Cabinet Secretary Sarah Propst
00:25:50
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Sarah Propst, the Cabinet Secretary of the Energy, Minerals, and Natural Resources Department for the state of New Mexico. New Mexico recently enacted legislation to transition to 100 percent zero carbon electricity by the year 2050, and to provide transition assistance to workers and communities affected by the changing energy landscape. Daniel and Sarah discuss how the bill was developed, how much it's going to cost, and what other steps New Mexico is taking to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. References and recommendations: "The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs" by Steve Brusatte; https://www.panmacmillan.com/authors/steve-brusatte/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-dinosaurs/9781509830091
May 12, 2019
Sen. Whitehouse Dives in on a Carbon Fee and Ocean Pollution
00:23:13
Host Kristin Hayes talks with Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) about the reintroduction of the American Opportunity Carbon Fee Act. Sponsored by the senator and several colleagues, the legislation would impose a carbon fee on fossil fuels, starting at $52 per metric ton of CO2 emitted. They also discuss the challenges facing our planet’s oceans—a topic of great importance to the senator from the Ocean State. Top of the Stack: "Our Planet"; https://www.netflix.com/title/80049832
May 07, 2019
A Master Plan for Protecting Louisiana's Coast, with Denise Reed
00:31:43
Host Kristin Hayes talks with Dr. Denise Reed, an internationally recognized expert in coastal marsh sustainability and the role of human activities in modifying coastal systems. They discuss Louisiana's coastal master plan, on which Denise has be an adviser to state officials leading the plan development. This ambitious, long-term planning process has grown even more important in the face of rising sea levels. References and recommendations: Richard Campanella books on New Orleans; http://www.richcampanella.com/index.php "Do Renewable Portfolio Standards Deliver?" by Michael Greenstone and Ishan Nath; https://bfi.uchicago.edu/working-paper/do-renewable-portfolio-standards-deliver/
Apr 30, 2019
Exploring the Resource Curse and Enhancing Energy Access, with Todd Moss
00:31:07
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Dr. Todd Moss, Executive Director of the Energy for Growth Hub. Todd has worked for years at the intersection of energy and economic development, with a focus on developing economies in Africa and elsewhere. They cover two major topics: avoiding the so-called "oil curse" in the nation of Guyana, and supporting economic growth in the developing world by improving energy access for businesses and industries. References and recommendations: "Amity and Prosperity" by Eliza Griswold; https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374103118 "Rising" by Elizabeth Rush; https://milkweed.org/book/rising IEA Report on Air Conditioners; https://www.iea.org/newsroom/news/2018/may/air-conditioning-use-emerges-as-one-of-the-key-drivers-of-global-electricity-dema.html
Apr 21, 2019
Can We Price Carbon?, with Barry Rabe of the University Of Michigan
00:31:53
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Professor Barry Rabe of the University of Michigan about his new book, "Can We Price Carbon?" Barry shares his insights on some of the real-world challenges for implementing policies that price carbon, and describes some of the key features that might help make them stick. They talk about how experience from previous efforts to price carbon can inform discussions on the Green New Deal, and much more. References and recommendations: "Can We Price Carbon?" by Barry G. Rabe; https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/can-we-price-carbon Senate Bill 181: Protect Public Welfare Oil And Gas Operations; https://leg.colorado.gov/bills/sb19-181 Elections in Canada; https://twitter.com/ElectionsCan_E?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor "Blood Oil" by Leif Wenar; http://www.wenar.info/books#new-page
Apr 15, 2019
Exploring the Farm Bill, with RFF's Ann M. Bartuska
00:28:56
Host Daniel Raimi talks with RFF Vice President for Land, Water, and Nature Ann M. Bartuska about the Farm Bill. The Farm Bill is a massive piece of legislation, so Daniel and Ann discuss some key topics related to land conservation and agricultural research. Ann shares her expertise on those topics, along with the connection between the Farm Bill and forest management, climate change, meatless hamburgers, and more. References and recommendations: Burger King Impossible Burger: https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/01/business/burger-king-impossible-whoppers/index.html USGS Water Data: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/rt
Apr 08, 2019
Carbon Dioxide Removal, with Greg Nemet of the University of Wisconsin-Madison
00:31:20
Host Kristin Hayes talks with Greg Nemet, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the La Follette School of Public Affairs and the Nelson Institute's Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment. They discuss the future of carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere, with a particular focus on negative emissions technologies. References and recommendations: "How Solar Energy Became Cheap: A Model for Low-Carbon Innovation" by Greg Nemet; https://www.routledge.com/How-Solar-Energy-Became-Cheap-A-Model-for-Low-Carbon-Innovation-1st-Edition/Nemet/p/book/9780367136598
Apr 01, 2019
Measuring Methane, with Arvind Ravikumar of Harrisburg University of Science and Technology
00:30:41
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Arvind Ravikumar, assistant professor of Energy Engineering at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology in Pennsylvania. They discuss methane emissions from oil and natural gas systems, their effect on climate change, new technologies, which can detect and reduce those emissions, and what governments are doing to encourage the deployment of those new technologies. Plus, Arvind will give an update on how climate change is affecting the annual Iditarod race in Alaska. References and recommendations: Cows actually burp methane; https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150803-cows-burp-methane-climate-science/ Melting snow and the Iditarod; https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/01/sports/iditarod-climate-change-warming.html "Three Considerations for Modeling Natural Gas System Methane Emissions in Life Cycle Assessment" by Emily A. Grubert and Adam R. Brandt; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652619307875?dgcid=author
Mar 25, 2019
Carbon Pricing in Germany, with Christian Flachsland of the Mercator Research Institute
00:19:23
Host Kristin Hayes talks with Dr. Christian Flachsland, head of the Governance Working Group at Germany's Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change, and an assistant professor for Climate and Energy Governance at the Hertie School of Governance. They discuss the ongoing carbon pricing debate in Germany, the EU Emissions Trading System (EUETS), and ways to make these policies more efficient while still achieving climate goals. References and recommendations made by Christian: "Carbon Budget 2018" by Global Carbon Project; https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/carbonbudget/index.htm
Mar 18, 2019
Coffee in a Changing Climate, with Kim Elena Ionescu of the Specialty Coffee Association
00:30:30
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Kim Elena Ionescu, Chief Sustainability Officer at the Specialty Coffee Association. They discuss how coffee producers are likely to be affected by climate change, how they might adapt, and what resources are available to help them make decisions. They also talk about the role that consumers play in this discussion. References and recommendations made by Kim Elena Ionescu: "Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things" by William McDonough and Michael Braungart; https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5571.Cradle_to_Cradle
Mar 12, 2019
Community Perceptions of Wind Energy, with Sarah Mills of the University of Michigan
00:29:27
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Dr. Sarah Mills, senior project manager at the Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy at the University of Michigan's Ford School of Public Policy. Sarah and colleagues recently published a study looking at how people perceive the positive and negative impacts of wind energy development. We'll talk about what the study found, what the implications are for state and local planning, and what this might mean for the fast-growing industry of wind energy in the United States. References and recommendations made by Sarah Mills: "Exploring Landowners’ Post-Construction Changes in Perceptions of Wind Energy in Michigan" by Sarah Banas Mills, Douglas Bessette, and Hannah Smith; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0264837718307579?via%3Dihub "The Politics of Resentment" by Katherine J. Cramer; https://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo22879533.html
Mar 04, 2019
A Lawmaker's Take on the Green New Deal, with Former Congressman Phil Sharp
00:33:36
Hosts Kristin Hayes and Daniel Raimi team up to interview Phil Sharp, former Indiana congressman, former president of RFF, and current non-resident fellow at the Columbia Center on Global Energy Policy. They ask Phil to share his thoughts on the Green New Deal—the ambitious set of proposals aimed at tackling climate change, inequality, and more. Phil gives his take on the pros and cons of the approach from a political perspective, as well as shares his broader thoughts about the ability of our political system to deal with big, complex challenges like climate change. References and recommendations made by Phil Sharp: "Designing Climate Solutions" by Hal Harvey, Robbie Orvis, and Jeffrey Rissman; https://islandpress.org/books/designing-climate-solutions
Feb 23, 2019
Does the Shale Boom Equal Climate Doom?, with RFF's Daniel Raimi
00:27:41
Host Kristin Hayes talks with Daniel Raimi, host of Resources Radio and a senior research associate at RFF. They discuss Daniel's latest research on the oil and gas industry and his new paper, "The Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Increased US Oil and Gas Production." References and recommendations made by Daniel Raimi: "The Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Increased US Oil and Gas Production" by Daniel Raimi; https://www.rff.org/publications/working-papers/greenhouse-gas-impacts-increased-us-oil-and-gas-production/ "The Golden Age of Industrial Musicals;" https://www.industrialmusicals.com/
Feb 18, 2019
Understanding Climate Models, with Massimo Tavoni of EIEE
00:23:51
Host Kristin Hayes talks with Massimo Tavoni, the director of the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment and an associate professor at the School of Management of Politecnico di Milano in Milan, Italy. They discuss integrated assessment models, what they are, how they're used in studying climate change, and why they matter for decisionmaking. References and recommendations made by Max Tavoni: Carbon Brief; https://www.carbonbrief.org/ "Mountain"; https://www.madmanfilms.com.au/mountain/
Feb 10, 2019
Fracking in Colorado, with Matt Lepore of Adamantine Energy
00:28:18
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Matt Lepore of Adamantine Energy about oil and gas development in Colorado. They'll discuss the controversies surrounding development, how the state has responded, and whether it's done a good enough job. They'll also talk about the results of the statewide election, in which Colorado voters rejected a proposal that would have dramatically restricted new oil and gas development. References and recommendations made by Matt Lepore: "Sapiens" by Yuval Noah Harari; https://www.ynharari.com/book/sapiens/ "Blood Meridian" by Cormac McCarthy; https://www.cormacmccarthy.com/works/blood-meridian/
Feb 03, 2019
Demystifying Sea Level Rise, with Robert Kopp of Rutgers University
00:29:58
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Dr. Robert Kopp—Director of the Rutgers Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, a professor at Rutgers University, and co-director at the Climate Impact Lab—about sea level rise. They discuss the latest update on how a changing climate will affect sea levels, and where the major uncertainties lie. Daniel will also ask Robert how he responds when people ask a common question posed of climate scientists: “are we doomed?” References and recommendations made by Robert Kopp: "We Need Courage, Not Hope, To Face Climate Change" by Kate Marvel; https://onbeing.org/blog/kate-marvel-we-need-courage-not-hope-to-face-climate-change/ "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History" by Elizabeth Kolbert; https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17910054-the-sixth-extinction "New York 2140" by Kim Stanley Robinson; https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29570143-new-york-2140
Jan 24, 2019
Paying For Pollution, with Gilbert Metcalf of Tufts University
00:31:08
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Gilbert Metcalf, the John DiBiaggio Professor of Citizenship and Public Service, a Professor of Economics, and Graduate Program Director at Tufts University's Department of Economics. They discuss his new book, "Paying for Pollution: Why a Carbon Tax is Good for America," why he thinks that a carbon tax is the smartest way to deal with the problem of climate change, and his views on why it's preferable to other policy approaches. References and recommendations made by Gilbert Metcalf: "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History" by Elizabeth Kolbert; https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17910054-the-sixth-extinction "Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America" by Eliza Griswold; https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36722972-amity-and-prosperity "Confronting the Climate Challenge: US Policy Options" by Lawrence Goulder and Marc Hafstead; https://cup.columbia.edu/book/confronting-the-climate-challenge/9780231179027 "Paying for Pollution: Why a Carbon Tax is Good for America" by Gilbert Metcalf; https://global.oup.com/academic/product/paying-for-pollution-9780190694197?cc=us&lang=en&
Jan 19, 2019
People, Parks, and Policy, with RFF's Margaret Walls
00:21:35
Host Kristin Hayes talks with Margaret Walls, a senior fellow at Resources for the Future about her work on the economics of national parks and other public lands, including ways to address ongoing funding needs and overcrowding. They also discuss some of the recent concerns related to national parks and the government shutdown. References and recommendations made by Margaret Walls: "The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America's National Parks" by Terry Tempest Williams; https://www.amazon.com/Hour-Land-Personal-Topography-Americas/dp/0374280096 "All The Wild That Remains: Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, and the American West" by David Gessner; https://www.amazon.com/All-Wild-That-Remains-American/dp/0393352374
Jan 13, 2019
The New Energy Geopolitics, with Meghan O'Sullivan of Harvard University
00:31:08
Host Daniel Raimi talks with Meghan O’Sullivan, the Jeane Kirkpatrick Professor of the Practice of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School, about her recent book "Windfall: How the New Energy Abundance Upends Global Politics and Strengthens America's Power." They discuss energy independence, the US-China relationship, energy ties between Europe and Russia, and much more. References and recommendations made by Meghan O'Sullivan: "Windfall: How the New Energy Abundance Upends Global Politics and Strengthens America's Power" by Meghan O'Sullivan; https://amzn.to/2H1g9nI "Rethinking Saudi Arabia" by Karen Elliott House; https://www.wsj.com/articles/rethinking-saudi-arabia-1543595189
Jan 06, 2019
Energy Inefficiency, with RFF's Joshua Blonz
00:26:38
Host Daniel Raimi and Joshua Blonz, a postdoctoral fellow at RFF, talk about his recent research on an energy efficiency program in California, the “principal-agent problem,” and what that means for policymaking on energy efficiency and much more. References and recommendations made by Joshua Blonz: "The Welfare Costs of Misaligned Incentives: Energy Inefficiency and the Principal-Agent Problem" by Joshua Blonz; http://www.rff.org/research/publications/welfare-costs-misaligned-incentives-energy-inefficiency-and-principal-agent "Lyft Doesn’t Cause Congestion, All Vehicles Do" by Severin Borenstein; https://energyathaas.wordpress.com/2018/12/17/lyft-doesnt-cause-congestion-all-vehicles-do/
Dec 30, 2018
Sensing Pollution with Satellites, with RFF's Alan Krupnick and Daniel Sullivan
00:27:06
Host Daniel Raimi and RFF's Alan Krupnick and Daniel Sullivan discuss their recent study using satellite data to better measure air pollution in the United States, what the implications are for public health, and how policymakers might respond. References and recommendations made by Alan and Daniel: "Using Satellite Data to Fill the Gaps in the US Air Pollution Monitoring Network" by Daniel Sullivan and Alan Krupnick; http://www.rff.org/valuables/research/publications/using-satellite-data-fill-gaps-us-air-pollution-monitoring-network
Dec 23, 2018
Communicating Complex Social Problems, with Matthew Nisbet of Northeastern University
00:32:07
Host Kristin Hayes and Matthew Nisbet, a professor of communication, public policy, and urban affairs at Northeastern University, discuss effective communications related to complex social problems such as climate change and political polarization. References and recommendations made by Matthew Nisbet: Antisocial Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy by Siva Vaidhyanathan; https://www.amazon.com/Antisocial-Media-Disconnects-Undermines-Democracy/dp/0190841168
Dec 16, 2018
Agriculture and Climate Change, with Fran Moore of UC Davis
00:32:47
Host Daniel Raimi and Dr. Fran Moore of UC Davis talk about the economic impacts of climate change on agriculture, what a recent study authored by Moore and colleagues found, and what these findings mean for estimating the social cost of carbon. References and recommendations made by Fran Moore: "New Science of Climate Change Impacts on Agriculture Implies Higher Social Cost of Carbon" by Frances C. Moore, Uris Baldos, Thomas Hertel, and Delavane Diaz; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-01792-x?utm American War: A Novel by Omar El Akkad; https://www.amazon.com/American-War-Omar-El-Akkad/dp/0451493583 The End We Start From by Megan Hunter;https://www.amazon.com/End-We-Start-Megan-Hunter/dp/0802126898/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1546633729&sr=8-1&keywords=the+end+we+start+from Odds Against Tomorrow: A Novel by Nathaniel Rich; https://www.amazon.com/Odds-Against-Tomorrow-Nathaniel-Rich/dp/1250043646/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1546633805&sr=8-2&keywords=odds+against+tomorrow
Dec 07, 2018
Wildfires, with RFF's Matthew Wibbenmeyer
00:26:32
Host Daniel Raimi and RFF Fellow Matthew Wibbenmeyer discuss the recent fires in California, looking not only their causes but also how to mitigate their risk. References and recommendations made by Matthew Wibbenmeyer: The Relationship between Trees and Human Health: Evidence from the Spread of the Emerald Ash Borer, a US Forest Service Study by Geoffrey Donovan et al. https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/45049
Dec 01, 2018