Snoozecast: Stories for Sleep

By Snoozecast

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Subscribers: 124
Reviews: 4

Suzette
 Apr 6, 2020
Your stories put me to sleep,,, I listen every night, these are my go to bedtime stories. Thank you so much!😀

beth
 Feb 15, 2020


 Jan 15, 2020

sleepy simmons
 Aug 18, 2019
I find this podcast really helps me sleep. Very calming voice.

Description

Welcome to Snoozecast, the podcast designed to help you fall asleep. New episodes released every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. No in-story ads. Beloved by thousands that fall asleep with us every night.

Episode Date
The Princess and the Goblin pt. 6
1895

Tonight, we’ll read part 6 to "The Princess and the Goblin", a children’s fantasy novel, published in 1872. If you’d like to start from the beginning, the first episode aired on April 15th, 2019. If you’d like to listen to the previous episode, part four aired August 19th, 2020.

One of the most successful and beloved of Victorian fairy tales, George Macdonald’s "The Princess and the Goblin" tells the story of young Princess Irene and her friend Curdie, who must outwit the threatening goblins who live in caves beneath her mountain home. 

When we left off, Curdie, our little hero who works as a miner within the caves of the mountain, secretly follows a family of goblins to see what they are up to. As he rounds a corner, he stumbles upon what may be the headquarters of the Goblin kingdom.

-- read by 'V' --

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Sep 23, 2020
Badger the Mischief Maker | Algonquin Legends
2720

Tonight, we’ll read the story of the mischievous animals of Algonquin Legends, particularly the badger, the weasel fairies, the moose and the marten. 

This story is based on one found in the book “Algonquin Legends of New England”, published in 1884 and compiled by Charles Godfrey Leland. The Algonquians are one of the most populous and widespread North American native language groups. Today, thousands of individuals identify with various Algonquian peoples.

Their legends involve characters who are simultaneously human and at the same time represented by an animal or a magical being, or sometimes both, as is the case of the weasel fairy sisters.

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Sep 21, 2020
The Exhilaration of the Road
1838

Tonight, we’ll read a short work by John Burroughs called "The Exhilaration of the Road". It is taken from a compilation titled "The Footpath Way", an anthology for walkers published in 1911. 

John Burroughs was an American nature essayist, active in the U.S. conservation movement. Burroughs accompanied many personalities of the time in his later years, including Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Ford (who gave him an automobile), and Thomas Edison. According to Ford, "John Burroughs, Edison, and I made several vagabond trips together. We went in motor caravans and slept under canvas.”

-- read by 'N' --

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Sep 18, 2020
The Secret Garden pt. 4
1955

Tonight, we’ll read the fourth part to "The Secret Garden", a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett first published in 1911. Set in England, it is now one of Burnett's most popular novels and seen as a classic of English children's literature.

If you’d like to start from the beginning, the first episode aired March 9th, 2020. The most recent episode, part 3, aired August 5th, 2020. In the last episode, little Mary and the maid Martha get acquainted. 

They are both surprised by the other. Mary is shocked by Martha’s thick Yorkshire dialect and casual, direct manner. Martha is shocked that Mary is helpless to dress herself and is wasteful of eating good food, when her own numerous siblings may go hungry. Where we pick up, Martha has encouraged Mary to walk around outside.

-- read by 'V'

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Sep 16, 2020
Arthur's Court | Tales of King Arthur
2490

Tonight, we’ll read more stories from "King Arthur and His Knights". If you’d like to listen to the first stories in this series, you can find our episode titled “The Sword Excalibur” that aired on April 10, 2020. 

If you’d like to listen to the most recent previous episode again, “The Great Feast” aired August 3rd, 2020. King Arthur was a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances,  led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries. 

The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention,  and modern historians generally agree that he is unhistorical. The Knights of the Round Table are the knightly members of the legendary fellowship of the King Arthur in literature.

-- read by 'V' --

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/snoozecast)

Sep 14, 2020
Pride and Prejudice pt. 7
1927

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to "Pride and Prejudice", written by Jane Austen. If you’d like to listen from the beginning, episode one aired on August 28th, 2019. If you’d like to listen to the last episode, it aired on July 27th, 2020. 

"Pride and Prejudice" follows Elizabeth Bennet, the dynamic protagonist, who learns about the repercussions of hasty judgments and eventually comes to appreciate the difference between superficial goodness and actual goodness. 

In the previous episode, Jane Bennet continues to recover from her illness slowly; and in the evening Elizabeth joined the drawing-room party. Mr. Darcy was writing, and Miss Bingley, was watching the progress of his letter and repeatedly calling off his attention by messages to his sister.

Elizabeth took up some needlework, and was sufficiently amused in attending to what passed between Darcy and Miss Bingley. Miss Bingley gets jealous with Darcy’s interest in Elizabeth. Mr. Darcy is relieved that Elizabeth is so beneath him that he can’t be tempted into a relationship with her.

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Sep 11, 2020
The Twelve Dancing Princesses
2777

Tonight, we’ll read a fairy tale by listener request called "The Twelve Dancing Princesses". 

This tale is best known as part of the German Brothers Grimm collection, but there are variants of it from around the world including the folk tales of Russia, Iceland, India, Armenia, France,  Turkey and Portugal. 

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Sep 09, 2020
Little Women ch. 9 pt. 1 "Vanity Fair"
1943

Tonight, we’ll read the first part of the ninth chapter of “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868, titled “Meg Goes to Vanity Fair”. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters.

If you would like to start at the beginning, find the first episode that aired on December 18th, 2019. If you would like a refresher from the last chapter, it aired on July 22nd, 2020. 

In the previous chapter, "Jo Meets Apollyon" (Napolean), Jo comes to terms with her fiery temper when little sister Amy falls through thin ice due to Jo’s negligence.

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Sep 07, 2020
The Blue Carbuncle | Sherlock Holmes
2288

Tonight, we’ll read the story "The Adventure of The Blue Carbuncle" from "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes", published in 1891. 

The dermatological term “Carbuncle” refers to a painful cluster of boils on the skin. In this case, however, The Blue Carbuncle is a missing and near-priceless gemstone.

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Sep 04, 2020
The Magic Cloak pt. 4
1873

Tonight, we’ll read the fourth part to our "The Magic Cloak" series, from the book "Queen Zixi of Ix, or The Story of the Magic Cloak", a children's book written by L. Frank Baum and published in 1905. The Magic Cloak episode one aired on Nov 11, 2019. If you’d like to listen to the previous episode again, Part 3 aired July 15th, 2020. 

The events of the book alternate between Noland and Ix, two neighboring regions to the Land of Oz. Baum, who also wrote the Wizard of Oz, commented this was the best book he had written. This episode will start at the opening of Chapter Four. 

In the last episode, orphaned siblings Timothy (who everyone calls "Bud"), the orphaned son of a ferryman who, with his sister Meg (nicknamed "Fluff"), enter town with their stern Aunt Rivette. Timothy is declared the new king of Noland. His sister becomes Princess Fluff, and they take residence in the royal palace. 

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Sep 02, 2020
The Good Anna | Three Lives
2640

Tonight, we’ll read The Good Anna, a short story written by Gertrude Stein as part of her first published book, titled “Three Lives” published in 1909. Stein was an American novelist, poet, playwright, and art collector. Born in the United States, she moved to Paris as an adult and stayed there the rest of her life. She hosted a Paris salon, where the leading figures of modernism in literature and art, such as Pablo Picasso,Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Henri Matisse would meet. Two quotes from Stein’s works have become widely known: "Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose," and "there is no there there ”The Good Anna is set in the fictional city of Bridgepoint, which is modeled after Baltimore, MD where Stein lived at one time.‍

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Aug 31, 2020
Watching Seabirds | Birdwatching
1824

Tonight, we’ll be reading another chapter from the book "Bird Watching" published in 1901 by Edmund Selous, titled "Watching Gulls and Skuas".If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to our "Blackbirds" episode and the "Watching Birds from a Haystack" episode from this series as well. 

The author started as a conventional naturalist of his time, but Selous developed a hatred of the common practice at the time of killing animals for scientific study and was a pioneer of bird-watching as a method of scientific study. The author was a solitary man and was not well known in ornithological circles. 

He avoided both the company of ornithologists and reading their observations so as to base his conclusions entirely on his own observations.

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Aug 28, 2020
Peter Pan pt. 6
1810

Tonight, we shall read the sixth chapter to "Peter Pan", the 1911 novel by J.M. Barrie. If you’d like to start this story from the beginning, you can find the first part aired on March 20th, 2019. If you’d like a refresher by listening to the last most recent episode, part 5 aired on July 20th, 2020. 

In the last episode, the pirates have figured out the lost boys underground hiding spot and wait to plot their attack. Tinkerbell is a vengeful, jealous little fairy and not only attacks the flying Wendy with an assault of mid-air pinches, but tricks the boys on the ground to shoot poor Wendy with an arrow.

-- read by 'V' --

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Aug 26, 2020
Heidi pt. 7
1872

Tonight, we’ll read part 7 of the classic children’s story "Heidi", published in 1881 by Swiss author Johanna Spyri. If you’d like to start from the beginning, you’ll find that the very first episode aired on March 8th, 2019. If you’d like to listen to the last episode before this one, it aired on July 13th, 2020. 

Heidi is a novel about the life of a young girl in her grandfather's care in the Swiss Alps. Heidi is one of the best-selling books ever written and is among the best-known works of Swiss literature. 

We will pick up at the start of chapter 8. In the last episode, Heidi has only been living in Frankfurt  at the grand Sesemann house for a day but she is already missing her mountain home with her grandfather. She mistakes the sounds of the street coaches for the wind racing through fir trees and runs outside. The stern Miss Rottenmeier has been trying to figure out a way to send Heidi back where she came from.

-- read by 'V' -- 

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Aug 24, 2020
Snow Man
1744

Tonight, we’ll read a short story by O. Henry titled “Snow Man” published posthumously in 1917. 

William Sydney Porter, pen name O. Henry, is known for his stories with surprise twist endings. This particular story had to be left unfinished by the author as he was dying, so he asked a friend and fellow writer to finish the it for him. 

-- read by 'M' --

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Aug 21, 2020
The Princess and the Goblin pt. 5
1968

Tonight, we’ll read part 5 to "The Princess and the Goblin", a children’s fantasy novel, published in 1872. If you’d like to start from the beginning, the first episode aired on April 15th, 2019. If you’d like to listen to the last episode, part four aired July 3rd, 2020. 

One of the most successful and beloved of Victorian fairy tales, George Macdonald’s The Princess and the Goblin tells the story of young Princess Irene and her friend Curdie, who must outwit the threatening goblins who live in caves beneath her mountain home. 

When we left off, Curdie stayed late to mine in the mountain on his own. In the past he would sometimes hear possible Goblin noises, but on this night he heard an actual conversation between a Goblin family, through a thin wall of rock. 

-- read by 'V' -- 

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Aug 19, 2020
Maggie's Start Date
3040

Tonight, we’ll read a Snoozecast original titled “Maggie’s Start Date.” Maggie is the Green family’s loyal dog, however she may have ambitions beyond being household pet...

-- read by 'V' -- 

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Aug 17, 2020
History of Bread | Breadtime pt. 2
1808

Tonight, we’ll read about the history of bread-making in Europe and America, from “The History of Bread”, written by John Ashton and published in 1905.

The text mentions visigoths, which were an early Germanic people, and part of the larger political entity of the Goths within the Roman Empire. 

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Aug 14, 2020
Doctor Dolittle pt. 4
1960

Tonight, we’ll be reading the fourth part to "Doctor Dolittle", written in 1920 by British author Hugh Lofting. The full title being, “The Story of Doctor Dolittle, Being the History of His Peculiar Life at Home and Astonishing Adventures in Foreign Parts”. It is the first of Lofting’s "Doctor Dolittle" books, a series of children's novels about a man who learns to talk to animals and becomes their champion around the world. 

Hugh Lofting started writing the Dolittle stories as imaginative letters to his children from the battlefield trenches of World War I.If you’d like to start with episode 1, it aired on December 2nd, 2019. Episode 3 aired on May 27th, 2020. 

Previously, the good doctor had to deal with all the monkeys. He vaccinated the healthy ones and created a hospital for the sick ones. 

-- read by 'M' --

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Aug 12, 2020
Prince Darling
1890

Tonight, we’ll read "Prince Darling", a french fairy-tale credited to Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont. 

The author is also known for the best known version of "Beauty and the Beast". She was one of the first to include folk tales as moralist and educational tools in her writings. Her third husband was the French spy Thomas Pichon.

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Aug 10, 2020
The Magic Carpet
1860

Tonight, we’ll read short stories including "The Magic Carpet" from the compilation called "The Day Before Yesterday" by Richard Middleton, published posthumously in 1912. 

Middleton was a tragic figure- a young man impatient for success, who managed to live the archetypal life of the Romantic Bohemian poet, complete with poverty, unrequited love for an impossible woman, and an early, tragic death. 

No novels were published while he was alive. Soon after his death, he was quote unquote discovered and critically acclaimed for the brilliance of his work and the brevity of his life.Four volumes of his collected works were published, including this one...

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Aug 07, 2020
The Secret Garden pt. 3
1808

Tonight, we’ll read the third part to "The Secret Garden",a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett first published in 1911. Set in England, it is now one of Burnett's most popular novels and seen as a classic of English children's literature.If you’d like to start from the beginning, the first episode aired March 9th, 2020. 

The most recent episode, part 2, aired April 29th, 2020. In the last episode, Mary and Mrs. Medlock take the train to Misselthwaite Manor. Mary sees the moor for the first time. It reminds her of the sea because of the sound of wind rushing across it. In the manor, she only meets her uncle Mr. Craven’s servants because Mr. Craven doesn’t care to see her. 

She meets a young maid named Martha when she wakes up. Martha speaks in a Yorkshire dialect Mary has trouble understanding.This is where we will pick back up. 

-- read by 'V' --

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Aug 05, 2020
The Great Feast | Tales of King Arthur
2040

Tonight, we’ll read more stories from "King Arthur and His Knights", published in 1903 by Maude L. Radford. If you’d like to listen to the first stories in this series, you can find our episode titled “The Sword Excalibur” that aired on April 10, 2020. King Arthur was a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries. 

The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and modern historians generally agree that he is unhistorical. The Knights of the Round Table are the knightly members of the legendary fellowship of the King Arthurin literature. 

-- read by 'V' --

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/snoozecast)

Aug 03, 2020
Tears of Gold pt. 2
2368

Tonight, we’ll read the second part to the story "Tears of Gold", known as "The Blessing of the Mendicant", from from Folk-Tales of the Khasis compiled by Mrs. Rafy in 1920. 

The Khasi people are an indigenous ethnic tribe from India. A unique feature of the Khasi people is that they follow the matrilineal system of descent and inheritance.In part 1, a boy named U Babam Doh grows up not knowing that the father he had never known had was eaten by the dragon U Yak Jakor. 

The boy was bestowed the ability to cry tears of gold nuggets, because the boy’s mother had eaten some magical rabbit stew. The rabbit was a gift from a wise beggar. U Babam Doh grows up with another boy that is the heir apparent to rule his chiefdom. The prince grows jealous of U Babam Doh’s uncanny luck at winning, and charges him with witchcraft.

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Jul 31, 2020
Tears of Gold pt. 1
2080

Tonight, we’ll read a story from Folk-Tales of the Khasis called "The Blessing of the Mendicant" (or Beggar), compiled by Mrs. Rafy in 1920. 

The Khasi people are an indigenous ethnic tribe from India. A unique feature of the Khasi people is that they follow the matrilineal system of descent and inheritance. A mendicant is a person who relies on alms to survive. This person is often a monk or otherwise part of a religious order. 

-- read by 'V' -- 

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Jul 29, 2020
Pride and Prejudice pt. 6
1928

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to Pride and Prejudice, written by Jane Austen. If you’d like to listen from the beginning, episode one aired on August 28th, 2019. If you’d like to listen to the last episode, it aired on June 15th, 2020. 

Pride and Prejudice follows Elizabeth Bennet, the dynamic protagonist, who learns about the repercussions of hasty judgments and eventually comes to appreciate the difference between superficial goodness and actual goodness. In the previous episode, Mrs. Bennet arrives with two more of her daughters, Lydia and Catherine, to visit Jane and Elizabeth at Netherfield. 

Mrs. Bennet makes a general fool of herself, trying too hard to convince Bingley to remain there, and boasting about Jane’s beauty. Fifteen year old Lydia Bennet boldly asks Bingley whether he will hold a ball at Netherfield. 

-- read by 'V' -- 

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Jul 27, 2020
The Man with the Twisted Lip | Sherlock Holmes
1784

Tonight, we’ll read the story "The Man With The Twisted Lip from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes", published in 1891. This mystery deals with London opium dens, missing gentleman and their worried wives.

[Editor's note: This episode contains themes that may not be suitable for some listeners].

-- read by 'N' --

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Jul 24, 2020
Little Women ch. 8 "Jo Meets Apollyon"
3000

Tonight, we’ll read the eighth chapter of “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868, titled “Jo Meets Apollyon”. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters.If you would like to start at the beginning, find the first episode that aired on December 18th, 2019. 

If you would like a refresher from the last chapter, it aired on June 3rd, 2020. In the previous chapter, Amy’s Valley of Humiliation, Amy borrows money in order to obtain trendy pickled limes, and gets in trouble for it with the teacher. Her harsh punishment leads to her mother, Marmee, allowing her to take a break from going to school, although Marmee also warns Amy about her conceited nature. 

-- read by 'V'

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Jul 22, 2020
Peter Pan pt. 5
2264

Tonight, we shall read the fifth chapter to Peter Pan, the 1911 novel by J.M. Barrie. If you’d like to start this story from the beginning, you can find the first part aired on March 20th, 2019. If you’d like a refresher by listening to the last most recent episode, part 4 aired on April 15th, 2020. 

In chapter 4, Peter Pan, Wendy, John, Michael, and Tinker Bell fly toward Neverland for many days. They approach Neverland as the sun is setting. The island looks ominous at dusk. Pirates fire at them as they approach, and Tinker Bell thinks of a jealous plan to rid herself of Wendy.

-- read by 'V' -- 

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Jul 20, 2020
Count Rumford's Substitute for Tea & Coffee
1944

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from 1892’s The Chemistry of Cookery by W. Mattieu Williams titled Count Rumford’s Substitute for Tea and Coffee. Who is this Count Rumford, you may ask? Well, to summarize Count Rumford’s life in modern words: Benjamin Thompson was an interesting fellow. Born in Massachusetts in 1753, he charmed and married an heiress from Concord, New Hampshire, then called Rumford NH. He was a British loyalist when the American Revolutionary War began. When a rebel mob attacked his house, he abandoned his house and family to join the British side of the war and conducted experiments on gunpowder. Then he moved to Bavaria, and among other things applied his scientific skills to establishing workhouses for the poor and inventing the method of cooking called Sous Vide. For his efforts in science and society his awarded the title of Count. He chose the name Rumford for the town he was married in some twenty years earlier.

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Jul 17, 2020
The Magic Cloak pt. 3
1964

Tonight, we’ll read the third part to our The Magic Cloak series, from the book Queen Zixi of Ix, or The Story of the Magic Cloak, a children's book written by L. Frank Baum and published in 1905. 

The Magic Cloak episode one aired on Nov 11, 2019. If you’d like to listen to the last episode again, Part 2 aired March 30th, 2020. The events of the book alternate between Noland and Ix, two neighboring regions to the Land of Oz. 

Baum, who also wrote the Wizard of Oz, commented this was the best book he had written. This episode will start at the opening of Chapter Four. In the last episode, the kingdom of Noland’s high counselors are trying to decide how to choose a successor to the dead king. It turns out that there is an obscure law that the forty-seventh person to pass through the gates would be declared ruler. Meanwhile, orphaned children Meg, AKA Fluff, and Timothy, AKA Bud, along with their stern Aunt Rivette, are headed for town when Meg is gifted a magic cloak by a fairy. The magic cloak brings her a magical happiness.

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Jul 15, 2020
Heidi pt. 6
2016

Tonight, we'll read pt. 6 from Johanna Spyri's "Heidi" first published in 1881.

-- read by 'V' -- 

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Jul 13, 2020
The White Cat pt. 2
2000

Tonight, we’ll read the second part to the fairy tale called "The White Cat", credited to Madame d’Aulnoy. In part 1, the old king devises to distract his sons from taking over the throne with a sort of fool’s errand to find him the perfect beautiful lap dog. Whoever won would also take over the kingdom. 

The youngest son stumbles upon a magical castle with a lovely talking cat, known as the White Cat. She gives him an acorn that she says carries the tiniest, most perfect dog, to bring to his father. 

As an aside, the story mentions that the prince brings with him a “turnspit dog”. This was a lowly breed of dog that is now extinct. It was kept in kitchens and ran on a wheel to turn the spit, or rotisserie that meat cooked on. The turnspit may have been an ancestor to either a modern Corgi, or the Glen terrier. 

In order not to overexert a dog with this hot and unpleasant work they were often kept in pairs, so that they could be worked in shifts. It is believed that this is the origin of the proverb 'every dog has his day.’The Turnspit dog was also used as foot warmers at church, and it is said that Queen Victoria kept retired turspits as pets. 

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Jul 10, 2020
The White Cat
1863

Tonight, we’ll read a fairy tale called The White Cat, credited to Madame Comtesse d’Aulnoy. Madame d’Aulnoy’s tales were designed to entertain literary salon attendees for hours so they tended to be long, complicated and political. She could not openly criticize the regime of Louis the Fourteenth, or the way aristocratic women were entrapped within it, but she could tell her fairy tales, as in this one. 

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Jul 08, 2020
If on a Summer's Night a Traveler...
1716

Tonight, we’ll read “If On a Summer’s Night a Traveler...”, a Snoozecast original. 

The story is an homage to Julio Cortazar’s “The Continuity of Parks” and Italo Calvino’s “If on a winter’s night a traveler”. This meta-fiction follows a group around the campfire deciding what story to tell, while eventually settling on one that seems to converge — with their own reality. 

— read by 'M' — 

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Jul 06, 2020
The Princess and the Goblin pt. 4
1803

Tonight, we’ll read part 4 to "The Princess and the Goblin", a children’s fantasy novel, published in 1872. If you’d like to start from the beginning, the first episode aired on April 15th, 2019. If you’d like to listen to the last episode, part three aired March 23rd, 2020.One of the most successful and beloved of Victorian fairy tales, George Macdonald’s "The Princess and the Goblin" tells the story of young Princess Irene and her friend Curdie, who must outwit the threatening goblins who live in caves beneath her mountain home. When we left off, the princess and her nurse Lootie go for a walk and get lost. As they try to make their way back, the day gets later and the shadows longer. Lootie is afraid of breaking the most important rule- to never let the princess be out in the dark, due to goblin issues.  Luckily, they meet a mining boy named Curdie who helps them back to safety.

-- read by 'V'

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Jul 03, 2020
The Lazy Tour
2048

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to "The Lazy Tour of Two Idle Apprentices", written in collaboration by Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins. The book reads as an autobiographical tour taken by the two of them in the north of Britain. The Lazy Tour takes place in the year 1857 and provides insight into the friendship and adventures of the pair of titans of Victorian literature.

-- read by 'M'

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Jul 01, 2020
At Sea
1844

Tonight, we’ll read excerpts from the book "Fresh Fields" by John Burroughs, published in 1896. The main section we will read is titled At Sea. John Burroughs was an American nature essayist, active in the U.S.conservation movement. Burroughs accompanied many personalities of the time in his later years, including Theodore Roosevelt,Henry Ford(who gave him an automobile),and Thomas Edison.

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Jun 29, 2020
The Talking Bird pt. 2 | 1,001 Nights
1704

Also known as "The Arabian Nights", "One Thousand and One Nights" is a collection of Middle Eastern folk tales compiled in Arabic during the Islamic Golden Age, which ran from the 8th to the 14th centuries.

In the first part of the story, we meet the Persian emperor Kosrouschah. We also meet 3 sisters- one who becomes the emperor’s queen, and the other two become wives of the emperor’s baker and his royal chef.  These two become jealous of the queen so when she gives birth to two sons and a daughter, the sisters secretly steal and abandon each baby. The royal babies are all found by the emperor’s gardener and raised as his own.

-- read by 'V'

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Jun 26, 2020
The Talking Bird pt. 1 | 1,001 Nights
1906

Tonight, we are offering the first part of the story “The Talking Bird, The Singing Tree and the Golden Water” from One Thousand and One Nights. This episode is remastered and rebroadcast- the original air date was on January 11th, 2019. Our next episode will feature part two of this story. A

lso known as "The Arabian Nights", "One Thousand and One Nights" is a collection of Middle Eastern folk tales compiled in Arabic during the Islamic Golden Age, which ran from the 8th to the 14th centuries. Some tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Greek, Indian, Jewish and Turkish folklore and literature. What is common throughout all the editions of the "Nights" is the initial frame story of the ruler and his wife and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves. The stories proceed from this original tale; some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord. Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.

-- read by 'V'

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Jun 25, 2020
Wild June
1862

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from “In New England Fields and Woods”, written by Rowland Evans Robinson in 1896. Robinson was, in his time, one of Vermont’s best known writers. This collection of short essays follows New England's changing seasons and moods in all its natural beauty. This particular selection covers the month of June, along with bullfrogs and angler fishing. Angling is the type of fishing, unlike trolling or long lining for example, that one typically assumes when one thinks of the activity- that of a hook on a line with a rod.

-- read by 'N'

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Jun 22, 2020
Rocky Mountain Lady
1909

Tonight, by Patreon supporter request, we’ll read "A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains", a travel book, by Isabella Bird, describing her 1873 trip to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The book is a compilation of letters, that Isabella Bird wrote to her sister, Henrietta. Women were scarce enough in the Western United States of the late nineteenth century, and a middle-aged English lady traveling alone, by horseback, was quite a phenomenon. Bird was a nineteenth-century British explorer, writer,photographer,and naturalist. From early on, Bird was frail and suffered from headaches and insomnia. Doctors recommended open air and exercise, so Bird learned to ride horseback.

-- read by 'V'

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Jun 19, 2020
Jane Eyre pt. 3
1919

Tonight, we’ll read the third part to the classic 1847 novel "Jane Eyre", by English writer Charlotte Bronte. It is the story of a young, orphaned girl who lives with her Aunt and cousins and is mistreated by them. The novel is considered one of the greatest works of English fiction. If you’d like to find episode 1, it aired on September 9th, 2019. Episode 2 aired January 29, 2020. 

-- read by 'V'

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Jun 18, 2020
Pride and Prejudice pt. 5
1860

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to "Pride and Prejudice", written by Jane Austen. If you’d like to listen from the beginning, episode one aired on August 28th, 2019. If you’d like to listen to the last episode, it aired on March 11th, 2020. "Pride and Prejudice" follows Elizabeth Bennet, the dynamic protagonist, who learns about the repercussions of hasty judgments and eventually comes to appreciate the difference between superficial goodness and actual goodness. In the previous episode, Jane Bennet falls ill on a visit to Bingley’s house, and is forced to remain there sick. Her sister Elizabeth goes to visit her. Jane insists that her sister spend the night. That night, while Elizabeth visits Jane, the Bingley sisters poke fun at the Bennets. Darcy and Mr. Bingley defend them, though Darcy concedes that the Bennets’ lack of wealth and family make them poor marriage prospects.

-- read by 'V'

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Jun 15, 2020
An Old Road
1790

Tonight, we’ll read a chapter titled “An Old Road.” from A Rambler’s Lease by Bradford Torrey, published in 1892. Torrey was an American ornithologist. He also edited a book of Thoreau’s journal writings. He wrote a preface to A Rambler’s Lease paraphrased as follows: “The writer of this little book has found so much pleasure in other men's woods and fields that he has come to look upon himself as in some sort the owner of them. Their lawful possessors will not begrudge him this feeling, he believes, nor take it amiss if he assumes, even in this public way, to hold a rambler's lease of their property. His private opinion is that the world belongs to those who enjoy it.”

read by -- 'V'

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Jun 12, 2020
The Invisible Man
2128

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to, "The Invisible Man", a science fiction novel by H.G. Wells, published in 1897. The Invisible Man refers to a scientist named Griffin, devoted to research into optics. He invents a way to become invisible. He tests it on himself successfully, only to find that he cannot reverse it. The novel is considered influential, and helped establish Wells as the "father of science fiction".

read by -- 'V'

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Jun 10, 2020
The Golden Goose
1820

Tonight, we’ll read The Golden Goose, from Katherine Pyle’s 1918 Mother’s Nursery Tales. The Golden Goose was collected by The Brothers Grimm. In this tale, The Golden Goose, a simple and sweet man named John finds a goose with golden feathers- and it turns his whole world on its head.

-- read by 'V'

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Jun 08, 2020
The Flight of the Golf Ball
1990

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt from “The Soul of Golf” by P.A. Vaile, published in 1912. Vaile was born in 1866, and wrote many books on the subject of golf. The modern game of golf originated in 15th century Scotland, but it’s ancient origins are unclear and much debated. Versions of the game may harken back to ancient Rome or China.

-- read by 'M'

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Jun 05, 2020
Little Women ch. 7 "Amy's Valley of Humiliation"
1715

Tonight, we’ll read the seventh chapter of “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868, titled “Amy’s Valley of Humiliation”. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters. If you would like to start at the beginning, find the first episode that aired on December 18th, 2019. If you would like a refresher from the last chapter, it aired on April 1, 2020. In the previous chapter, shy Beth and old Mr. Laurence become friends. Beth reminds Mr. Laurence of his beloved but deceased granddaughter. He gives Beth a piano as a gift. 

-- read by 'V'

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Jun 03, 2020
Snow White
2001

Tonight, we’ll read "Snow White", a 19th-century German fairy tale which is today known widely across the Western world. The Brothers Grimm published it in 1812. 

The seven dwarfs were first given individual names in the 1912 Broadway play Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and then given different names in Walt Disney's 1937 film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. 

The Grimm story, which is commonly referred to as "Snow White", should not be confused with the story of "Snow-White and Rose-Red", another fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm.

-- read by 'V' 

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Jun 01, 2020
Marbles & Kites
1840

Tonight, we’ll read excerpts from "Healthful Sports for Boys", by A.R. Calhoun. Also known as Alfred Rochfort, born in 1844, Calhoun was an American soldier, author, journalist and critic. He served in the Union army during the U.S. Civil War. He was born in Kentucky and died in Brooklyn in 1912. 

-- read by 'V'

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May 29, 2020
Doctor Dolittle pt. 3
2150

Tonight, we’ll be reading the third part to "Doctor Dolittle", written in 1920 by British author Hugh Lofting. The full title being, “The Story of Doctor Dolittle, Being the History of His Peculiar Life at Home and Astonishing Adventures in Foreign Parts”. 

It is the first of Lofting’s Doctor Dolittle books, a series of children's novels about a man who learns to talk to animals and becomes their champion around the world. 

Previously, the good doctor’s animal collection grows. Dr. Dolittle takes a ship to Africa to help with an epidemic, and introduces himself to the native people. 

— read by 'M' 

  • pt. 1 air date: December 2, 2019 
  • pt. 2 air date: February 3, 2020 

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May 27, 2020
Roughing It
1910

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to Roughing It, by Mark Twain, published in 1872. It is a semi-autobiographical travel memoir following a young Twain through the Wild West during the 1860s. US Astronauts Frank Borman and Jim Lovell read Roughing It aloud to pass the time aboard a two week long mission orbiting the earth in 1965.

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May 25, 2020
Lorna Doone
1739

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to "Lorna Doone", a Romance of Exmoor, a novel published in 1869 and written by English author Richard Doodridge Blackmore. "Lorna Doone" is based on a group of historical characters set in the late 17th century. John Ridd is the son of a farmer who is murdered by a member of the Doone clan. The Doone’s were once noble but now outlaws. John falls in love with a girl named Lorna who turns out to be from this very clan he loathes. -- read by 'V'

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May 22, 2020
Fortunatus
1802

Tonight, we’ll read a story called, "Fortunatus". It is inspired by a German tale regarding a legendary hero popular in 15th and 16th century Europe.  

"Fortunatus" is a tale which marks the passing of the feudal world into the more modern, globalized, capitalist world.  

The moral of the story is that it is far too easy, without wisdom, to lose one's fortune, no matter how it was acquired.  

— read by 'V'  


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May 20, 2020
The Fisher-Boy Urashima
1910

Tonight, we’ll read a Japanese folk tale called "The Story of Urashima Taro, the Fisher Lad", compiled in Japanese Fairy Tales by Yei Theodora Ozaki. 

Urashima is a fisherman rewarded for rescuing a turtle. The tale, sometimes called the “Japanese Rip van Winkle”, originates from 8th century Japanese literature. 

It is considered a national fairy tale. 

— read by 'V' 


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May 18, 2020
Terra Nova
1809

Tonight, we’ll read "Terra Nova", a Snoozecast original. 

In this short story, a young man meets a trio of travellers who provide a new perspective on the isolated village he wants to leave. Set in Canada’s Gros Morne National Park, a World Heritage Site, this tale draws inspiration from The Tablelands. 

The striking, desert-esque landscape is notable for illustrating the theory of plate tectonics. 

— read by 'V'  



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May 15, 2020
The Swiss Family Robinson pt. 2
1770

Tonight, we’ll read the second part to, "The Swiss Family Robinson".

"The Swiss Family Robinson" is an 1812 novel by Johann David Wyss, about a Swiss family shipwrecked in the East Indies en route to Australia. Wyss, a Swiss pastor, originally wrote this book to entertain and instruct his four sons.

In part 1, The Robinsons' ship wrecks and the family decide to explore what is left the next day. They make a boat and decide to set sail for an island on the horizon.

— read by 'N'

  • pt. 1 air date: January 22, 2020


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May 13, 2020
The Princess of Babylon pt. 2
2100

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the second and final part to the story, "The Princess of Babylon". 

This story is taken from a lesser known philosophical tale by Voltaire, written in 1768. The story focuses on Amazan, a handsome, unknown shepherd, and Formosanta, the Princess of Babylon, whose love and jealousy drive them to travel the world. 

In the first episode, the king holds a competition of the world’s rulers who were interested in marrying his daughter, the princess. The games would be impossibly difficult. A handsome and magical stranger appears out of seeming thin air to win the games, however he is suddenly called away to care to matters at home. 

— read by 'V'  

  • pt.1 air date: January 6, 2020 


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May 11, 2020
Concerning the Spiritual in Art
1908

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to Wassily Kandinsky’s, “Concerning the Spiritual in Art”, published in 1911.

Kandinsky, a Russian painter and art theorist, is credited as the pioneer of abstract art. This text is the artist’s meditation on how the creative process feeds a spiritual hunger within the artist.

— read by 'V'


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May 08, 2020
Tristram Shandy
1847

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to, "The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman" by Laurence Sterne and published in 1759. As its title suggests, the book is about Tristram's narration of his life story. But one of the central jokes of the novel is that he cannot explain anything simply; he must make diversions to add interest to his tale, to the extent that Tristram's own birth is not even reached until far into the book. Its style is marked by digression,double entendre, and graphic devices. -- Read by 'V'

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May 06, 2020
The Yellow Dwarf pt. 2
1903

Tonight, by Patreon supporter request, we’ll read part two to "The Yellow Dwarf" from The Blue Fairy Book, edited by Andrew Lang in 1889. "The Yellow Dwarf" story originated from the Countess d'Aulnoy, a 17th century French writer known for her fairy tales. In part I, Bellissima is a beautiful princess who has a spell put on her by the yellow dwarf that her and him should marry. Bellissima moves forward with her life in hopes that the spell isn’t true, and plans to marry one of the many kings who want to betroth her. -- Read by 'V'

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May 04, 2020
Black Beauty pt. 4
1939

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the fourth installment to 1877’s "Black Beauty" by Anna Sewall. "Black Beauty" is one of the best-selling books of all time. When we left off, we learned Ginger’s story. Ginger is a mean-spirited horse- or so she seems, until you hear her experience and mistreatment. Even the well behaved pony named Merrylegs sometimes has trouble with human behavior, but Merrylegs is wiser in how he responds.

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May 01, 2020
The Secret Garden pt. 2
1909

Tonight, we’ll read the second part to "The Secret Garden",a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett first published in 1911. Set in England, it is now one of Burnett's most popular novels and seen as a classic of English children's literature. In the first episode, we learn of the unloved and unloving Mary. When cholera breaks out, she is left all alone in the world. She is then sent from India to England to live with her uncle, Archibald Craven. 

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Apr 29, 2020
Himalayan Folk-Tales
1881

Tonight, we’ll read some selected Himalayan Folk Tales from a 1906 book called "Simla Village Tales", written by Alice Elizabeth Dracott. From the author in her preface: "Himalayan folk-lore, with its beauty, wit, and mysticism, is a most fascinating study, and makes one grieve to think that the day is fast approaching when the honest rugged hill-folk of Northern India will lose their fireside tales under the influence of modern civilisation....From their cradle under the shade of ancient deodars, beside the rocks, forests and streams of the mighty Himalayan mountains, have I sought these tales to place them upon the great Bookshelf of the World.”

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Apr 28, 2020
Breadtime
1878

Tonight, we’ll read about the basics of bread making, from Volume 1 of 1925’s "Woman’s Institute Library of Cookery", written by The Woman’s Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences. This institute was founded by Mary Brooks Picken in Scranton, PA. An expert on fashion, Picken also wrote the first dictionary to be published by a woman in the English language. -- 'V'

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Apr 24, 2020
Moonfleet
1979

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to "Moonfleet", a 1898 novel written by English writer J. Meade Falkner. The plot is an adventure tale of smuggling, treasure, and shipwreck set in 18th century England. Falkner is best known for writing this book. A feature of the narrative is a continuing reference to the board game of backgammon which is played by the patrons of the "Why Not? Inn" on an antique board which bears a Latin inscription that translates to:“As in life, so in a game of hazard, skill will make something of the worst of throws.” -- Read by 'N'

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Apr 22, 2020
Princess Belle Etoile
1824

Tonight, we’ll read "Princess Belle Etoile", written by the 17th century French writer and mother of modern western fairy tales, Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de Barneville, AKA the Madame Countess d'Aulnoy. She originated the term that is now generally used for the genre. "Princess Belle Etoile" was itself inspired by an Italian fairy tale, which may have originally spun from an Arabic tale. -- Read by 'V'

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Apr 20, 2020
Wild April
1860

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from, “In New England Fields and Woods”, written by Rowland Evans Robinson in 1896. Robinson was, in his time, one of Vermont’s best known writers. This collection of short essays follows New England's changing seasons and moods in all its natural beauty. This particular selection covers the month of April, along with woodchucks, chipmunks and garter snakes.

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Apr 17, 2020
Peter Pan pt. 4
1803

Tonight, we shall read the fourth installment to Peter Pan, the 1911 novel by J.M. Barrie. In the last part, chapter 3, Peter promises Wendy to teach her to fly if she will come to Neverland and tell stories to him and “the lost boys”. Nanna the dog nanny does her best to alert the parents, but it is too late. All the children, along with Peter and Tinkerbell, had just flown out the window into the night. -- Read by 'V'

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Apr 15, 2020
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
1891

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, a classic American 1903 children's novel by Kate Douglas Wiggin. It tells the story of Rebecca and her aunts, one stern and one kind, in the fictional village of Riverboro,Maine. Rebecca's joy for life inspires her aunts, but she faces many trials in her young life, gaining wisdom and understanding. -- Read by 'V'

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Apr 13, 2020
The Sword Excalibur | Tales of King Arthur
1698

Tonight, we’ll read the opening stories in Tales of King Arthur and the Round Table, published in 1918 by Andrew Lang. King Arthur was a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defense of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and modern historians generally agree that he is unhistorical. The Knights of the Round Table are the knightly members of the legendary fellowship of the King Arthurian literature. -- Read by 'V'

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Apr 10, 2020
A Case of Identity | Sherlock Holmes
1630

Tonight, we'll read A Case of Identity, a short story from the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, written by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1892. In general the stories in Sherlock Holmes identify, and try to correct, social injustices. In this story, a wealthy woman’s fiancé disappears and she hires the detective to help find him. -- Read by 'N'

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Apr 08, 2020
Rip Van Winkle pt. 2
1456

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll finish the story of Rip Van Winkle. "Rip Van Winkle" was originally a short story by the American author Washington Irving, published in 1819. It follows a Dutch-American villager in colonial America named Rip Van Winkle who falls asleep in the Catskill Mountains and wakes up 20 years later, having missed the American Revolution. Irving wrote it while in England and later admitted he had never been to the Catskill Mountains when he wrote the story. When we left off, Rip awakens from his long sleep on the mountain, and walks back to town, unaware of how long he had been asleep. -- Read by 'V'

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Apr 06, 2020
The Yellow Dwarf
1861

Tonight, we’ll read "The Yellow Dwarf" from "The Blue Fairy Book", edited by Andrew Lang in 1889. "The Yellow Dwarf" story originated from the Countess d'Aulnoy, a 17th century French writer known for her fairy tales. She originated the term that is now generally used for the genre. -- Read by 'V'

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Apr 03, 2020
Little Women ch. 6 "Beth Finds the Palace Beautiful"
1741

Tonight, we’ll read the sixth chapter of “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868, titled “Beth Finds the Palace Beautiful”. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters.In the previous chapter, on a snowy day Jo finds that Laurie is shut in his mansion, lonely and with a cold, and she brings in the warmth of friendship. -- Read by 'V'

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Apr 01, 2020
The Magic Cloak pt. 2
1971

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the next section to "Queen Zixi of Ix, or The Story of the Magic Cloak", a children's book written by L. Frank Baum and published in 1905. The events of the book alternate between Noland and Ix, two neighboring regions to the Land of Oz, and Baum himself commented this was the best book he had written. In Chapter 1, the fairy Queen Lulea calls their merrymaking to a halt, and suggests they do something practical and helpful for a change. The fairies decide to create a magic cloak that can grant its wearer one wish. A fairy is set forth to give the cloak to the first unhappy person they meet. -- Read by 'V'

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Mar 30, 2020
Among the Wildflowers
2019

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to "Riverby" by John Burroughs. The section is titled "Among the Wild Flowers". John Burroughs was an American nature essayist, active in the U.S.conservation movement. Burroughs accompanied many personalities of the time in his later years, including Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Ford (who gave him an automobile),and Thomas Edison. According to Ford, "John Burroughs, Edison, and I made several vagabond trips together. We went in motor caravans and slept under canvas."

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Mar 27, 2020
Sketches of Gotham
1921

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to "Sketches of Gotham: A Collection of Unusual Stories Told in an Unusual Way", written by Owen Gould Davis in 1906. Davis was an American dramatist. In 1919, he became the first elected president of the Dramatists Guild of America. He penned hundreds of plays and scripts for radio and film. Before the First World War, he also wrote racy sketches of New York City high jinks and low-life like this one under the pen-name. Ike Swift.

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Mar 25, 2020
The Princess and the Goblin pt. 3
1984

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll be reading the third part to "The Princess and the Goblin", a children’s fantasy novel, published in 1872.  One of the most successful and beloved of Victorian fairy tales, George Macdonald’s. "The Princess and the Goblin" tells the story of young Princess Irene and her friend Curdie, who must outwit the threatening goblins who live in caves beneath her mountain home.When we left off, the Princess had met a mysterious old woman introduced to her as her grandmother. The Grandmother keeps magical pigeons and eats their eggs. When the princess goes back downstairs to her nurse-maid, she doesn’t believe the Princess’s tale to be true. We will start again at the beginning of Chapter 5. -- Read by 'V'

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Mar 23, 2020
Heidi pt. 5
1919

-- Read by 'V'

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Mar 20, 2020
The Golden Mermaid
1804

Tonight, we’ll read The Golden Mermaid, a story found in Andrew Lang’s The Green Fairy Book. In this story, a beautiful mermaid falls in love with a prince. But it’s not The Little Mermaid, it’s different. We promise. Because she’s golden.

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Mar 18, 2020
Rip Van Winkle
1456

Tonight, we’ll read an 1888 excerpt titled The Banshee, written by D. R. McAnally Jr., and compiled later into a book called "Irish Wonders, Tales of Ghosts, Giants, Pookas, Demons, Leprechawns, Banshees, Fairies, Witches, Widows, Old Maids & Other Marvels of the Emerald Isle."

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Mar 16, 2020
Abigail Adams
1878

Tonight we’ll read an excerpt from the book “Abigail Adams and Her Times”, by Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards. Richards wrote more than 90 books including biographies,poetry, and several for children. Her father was an abolitionist and her mother wrote the words to the Battle Hymn of the Republic. -- Read by 'V'

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Mar 13, 2020
Pride and Prejudice pt. 4
1931

Tonight, we’ll read the next part to "Pride and Prejudice", part to the 1813 romantic novel of manners Pride and Prejudice, written by Jane Austen, starting with Chapter 7. The novel follows Elizabeth Bennet, the dynamic protagonist, who learns about the repercussions of hasty judgments and eventually comes to appreciate the difference between superficial goodness and actual goodness. In the previous episode, the relationships between Jane and Elizabeth Bennet and the Bingley sisters develops as the girls make their formal visits.

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Mar 11, 2020
The Secret Garden
1922

Frances Hodgson Burnett, 1911 -- Read by 'V'

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Mar 09, 2020
Vegetable Candy
1904

Tonight, we'll read excerpts from Candy-Making Revolutionized: Confectionery from Vegetables by Mary Elizabeth Hall, printed in 1912. Hall wrote that her hope was that through this book “the more vegetable candy is made, the less unhealthful confectionery there will be consumed." -- Read by 'V'

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Mar 06, 2020
Little Women ch. 5 "Being Neighborly"
2182

Tonight, we’ll read the fifth chapter of “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868, titled “Being Neighborly”. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters.In the previous chapter, Burdens, the holidays are over and the girls return to their work, and to the burdens of life. -- Read by 'V'

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Mar 04, 2020
Greyfriars Bobby
1985

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to "Greyfriars Bobby", a 1912 novel by Eleanor Atkinson based on the true story of the dog Greyfriars Bobby. This novel is written from the point-of-view of the dog, Bobby, and uses Scottish dialogue as the novel is set in Edinburgh,Scotland. The book is written from the mind of a dog, which makes every-day events strange —the opening line references a church clock as a "time-gun", for example. -- Read by 'M'

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Mar 02, 2020
A Dream of the 1890s, Portland
1558

Tonight, we’ll read excerpts from “Oregon, Washington And Alaska: Sights And Scenes for the Tourist” written in 1890 by E.L. Lomax. Officially incorporated in 1851, Portland grew steadily, forming an identity as an industrial trading town. Up into the 1890s,Portland hosted the Pacific Northwest's largest port, only to be surpassed later by Seattle.

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Feb 28, 2020
The Scarlet Pimpernel
2038

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to "The Scarlet Pimpernel", a historical fiction novel by Baroness Orczy, published in 1905. The novel is set during the Reign of Terror following the start of the French Revolution. The title is the nom de guerre of its hero, a chivalrous Englishman who rescues aristocrats before they are sent to the guillotine. Sir Percy Blakeney leads a double life: apparently nothing more than a wealthy fop, but in reality a formidable swordsman and a quick-thinking escape artist.

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Feb 26, 2020
A Little Princess
2055

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to "A Little Princess", a children's novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, first published as a book in 1905. It is considered one of the top children’s books in the US of all time, along with Burnett’s other book, "The Secret Garden". -- Read by 'V'

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Feb 24, 2020
Wild February
1864

Tonight, we’ll read another excerpt from “In New England Fields and Woods”, written by Rowland Evans Robinson in 1896. Robinson was, in his time, one of Vermont’s best known writers. This collection of short essays follows New England's changing seasons and moods in all its natural beauty. This particular selection is part of the late winter time section. -- Read by 'N'

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Feb 21, 2020
The Juno
1797

Tonight, we'll read "The Juno," a Snoozecast original. In this story, an unexpected guest causes a stir aboard a tall ship bound for Antarctica. Told through journal entries written by the ship's fictional navigator, this tale is inspired by the Ross expedition. The voyage lasted from 1839 to 1843 and made substantial contributions to the fields of botany and zoology. It proved to be the final significant voyage of discovery powered only by sail. -- Read by 'M'

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Feb 19, 2020
My Father's Dragon pt. 2
1689

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the second part to "My Father’s Dragon", written by Ruth Stiles Gannett in 1948. We released the first episode quite a while ago so you may need to scroll back a ways if you want to listen to that first. The novel is about a young boy, Elmer Elevator, who runs away to Wild Island to rescue a baby dragon.We will start at the beginning of Chapter 5, where the boy has finally made it to the island, where he encounters a pack of hungry tigers. -- Read by 'V'

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Feb 17, 2020
A Dialogue Between Head and Heart
1801

Tonight, we’ll read a letter Thomas Jefferson sent to Maria Cosway in 1786. Jefferson, a widower, met Cosway, who was married, while travelling in France and was rather charmed by the Italian-English artist. In this letter, a sorrowful Jefferson pines for her and imagines a debate between his head and his heart. He writes, the only “effective security against such pain of unrequited love, is to retire within ourselves and to suffice for our own happiness.” -- Read by 'M'

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Feb 14, 2020
Little Women ch. 4 "Burdens"
2385

Tonight, we’ll read the fourth chapter of “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868, titled “Burdens”. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters.In the previous chapter, Meg and Jo attend a party, and Jo gets acquainted with the Laurence boy, aka Laurie. -- Read by 'V'

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Feb 12, 2020
Peter Pan pt. 3
2197

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the third installment to "Peter Pan", the 1911 novel by J.M. Barrie. In the last part, chapter 2, Nanna the dog catches Peter Pan’s shadow in the nursery and Mrs. Darling the mother stashes it away. Mr. Darling treats Nanna badly and ties her up outside, and the Darling parents go out for the night, leaving the children alone inside. -- Read by 'V'

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Feb 10, 2020
The White Seal
1440

Tonight we’ll read a story called "The White Seal" from 1894’s "The Jungle Book" written by Rudyard Kipling. Kipling was born in India and raised both there and in England, working in India before settling to write these tales from a home he built in Vermont, USA. It is believed that Kipling wrote the collection of stories for his daughter Josephine, who died from pneumonia in 1899, aged 6. Many names in the White Seal story are Russian, as the Pribilof Islands had been bought (with Alaska) by the United States in 1867, and Kipling had access to books about the islands. -- Read by 'V'

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Feb 07, 2020
The Mysteries of Udolpho
1839

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to 1794’s "The Mysteries of Udolpho" by English author Ann Radcliffe. Radcliffe was a pioneer of Gothic fiction and the most popular author of her day. Later the author Dostoevsky would write that he had been influenced by Radcliffe as a child. "I used to spend the long winter hours before bed listening... agape with ecstasy and terror, as my parents read aloud to me from the novels of Ann Radcliffe. Then I would rave deliriously about them in my sleep.” The Mysteries of Udolpho tells of Emily St. Aubert, who suffers, among other misadventures, the death of her mother and father, supernatural terrors in a gloomy castle and machinations of an Italian brigand. -- Read by 'V'

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Feb 05, 2020
Doctor Dolittle pt. 2
1739

Tonight, we’ll be reading the second part to "Doctor Dolittle", written in 1920 by British author Hugh Lofting. The full title being, “The Story of Doctor Dolittle, Being the History of His Peculiar Life at Home and Astonishing Adventures in Foreign Parts”,It is the first of Lofting’s Doctor Dolittle books, a series of children's novels about a man who learns to talk to animals and becomes their champion around the world. -- read by 'M'

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Feb 03, 2020
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
1981

Tonight we’ll read an excerpt from Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography where he describes his childhood. “The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin”is the traditional name for the unfinished record of his own life memoirs written by Franklin,from 1771 to 1790. Only published well after his death, this work has become one of the most famous and influential examples of an autobiography ever written. -- 'M'

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Jan 31, 2020
Jane Eyre pt. 2
1893

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll listen to the second part to the classic 1847 novel "Jane Eyre" by English writer Charlotte Bronte. It is the story of a young, orphaned girl who lives with her Aunt and cousins and is mistreated by them. The novel is considered one of the greatest works of English fiction. In Part 1, we read Chapter 1 and the opening of Chapter 2. Poor little Jane is bullied by hear entire adopted family of an aunt and cousins, along with being misunderstood and treated meanly by their servants. After she is unfairly punished for standing up for herself by being locked in a guest room, she starts to examine this red colored room further.

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Jan 29, 2020
The Treasure Seeker
1901

Tonight we’ll read "The Treasure Seeker", a story found in the "Crimson Fairy Book" written by Andrew Lang and published in 1903. In this story, a party of shepherds sat one night telling of the strange things that had happened to them in their youth. One of their stories was more exciting than expected, regarding a mysterious dark spirit who was The Treasure Seeker of the mountain. -- 'V'

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Jan 27, 2020
Madame Blavatsky Visits Bombay
1811

Tonight, we’ll read the opening section from, "From the Caves and Jungles of Hindustan" written by Helena Blavatsky and published in 1883. Madame Blavatsky was a Russian occultist and philosopher who traveled around the world, including India, before moving to New York City. She co-founded the Theosophical Society in 1875 and gained an international following from the esoteric religion that the society promoted. Madame Blavatsky was a controversial figure, championed by supporters as an enlightened guru and derided as a fraudulent charlatan by critics. Her Theosophical doctrines influenced the spread of Hindu and Buddhist ideas in the West as well as the development of Western esoteric currents like the New Age Movement.

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Jan 24, 2020
The Swiss Family Robinson
1860

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to "The Swiss Family Robinson", a novel by Johann David Wyss, about a Swiss family shipwrecked in the East Indies en route to Australia. Wyss, a Swiss pastor, originally wrote this book to entertain and instruct his four sons. Years later, one of his sons, persuaded his father to allow him to complete and edit the unfinished manuscript. It was published in Zurich in 1812.

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Jan 22, 2020
Black Beauty pt. 3
1860

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the third part to 1877’s "Black Beauty" by Anna Sewall. "Black Beauty" is one of the best-selling books of all time. When we left off, our young main character has been trained by his kindly master and wise mother to learn the ways of a properly “broken in” horse. In the last episode, Black Beauty bonds with his stable boy John, who is considerate and pleasant to work with. Our protagonist also starts to learn the ways of his carriage partner, Ginger. Black Beauty also expresses a sense of melancholy over the tedium of being a stable horse, and his desire for more freedom. -- 'V'

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Jan 20, 2020
A Micronesian Fish Drive
1801

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt titled "A Micronesian Fish Drive", from a book of short stories called "Ridan the Devil", by Louis Becke, published in 1899. Becke was an Australian Pacific trader, short-story writer and novelist. -- 'V'

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Jan 17, 2020
Heidi pt. 4
1858

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll be reading the next section of the classic children’s story "Heidi", published in 1881 by Swiss author Johanna Spyri. It is a novel about the life of a young girl in her grandfather's care in the Swiss Alps. "Heidi" is one of the best-selling books ever written and is among the best-known works of Swiss literature. We will pick up where we left off towards the end of chapter 3, with Heidi coming back to her grandfather after an amazing first day of wonderful experiences on the mountain with Peter and his goat herd. -- 'V'

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Jan 15, 2020
The Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor
1804

Tonight, we’ll read the opening stories of "Sinbad the Sailor and His Seven Voyages", taken from "The Arabian Nights", edited by Andrew Lang and published in 1898. Sinbad is a fictional mariner and the hero of a story-cycle of Middle Eastern origin. He is described as hailing from Baghdad during the 9th century. In the course of seven voyages, he has fantastic adventures in magical realms, encountering monsters and witnessing supernatural phenomena. -- 'V'

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Jan 13, 2020
Ventriloquism and Polyphony
1680

Tonight, we’ll read a chapter from "Three Hundred Things a Bright Boy Can Do", titled "Ventriloquism and Polyphony", written by “Many Hands” and published in 1914. Ventriloquy, an act of stagecraft in which a person changes their voice so that it appears that the voice is coming from elsewhere, usually a puppet, known as a “dummy". Originally, ventriloquism was a religious practice among the ancient Greeks. The noises produced by the stomach, for example were thought to be the voices of the unliving, who took up residence in the stomach of the ventriloquist. The ventriloquist would then interpret the sounds, as they were thought to be able to speak to the dead, as well as foretell the future. -- 'M'

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Jan 10, 2020
New Amazonia
1892

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening chapters of “New Amazonia: A Foretaste of the Future”, written by Elizabeth Burgoyne Corbett under the pen name “Mrs. James Corbett” and first published in 1889. Categorized as “feminist utopian”, it was one element in the wave of utopian and dystopian literature that marked the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In her novel, Corbett envisions a successful suffragette movement eventually giving rise to a breed of highly evolved "Amazonians" who turn Ireland into a utopian society. -- 'V'

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Jan 08, 2020
The Princess of Babylon
1804

Tonight, we’ll read the story "The Princess of Babylon", taken from "The Strange Storybook" by Mrs. Lang, published in 1913. The story is taken from a lesser known philosophical tale by Voltaire, written in 1768. The story focuses on Amazan, a handsome, unknown shepherd, and Formosanta, the Princess of Babylon, whose love and jealousy drive them to travel the world. Through their travels they encounter the basic values of the Enlightenment. -- 'V'

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Jan 06, 2020
Mazes and Labyrinths
1808

Tonight, we’ll read the opening chapters to "Mazes and Labyrinths: A General Account of their History and Development", written by W. H. Matthews and published in 1922. The history of the maze is paradoxically explored as both a tool for spiritual inquiry and as a vexing trap. Apparently he wrote the heavy tome in less than three years — and it may have been a way for Matthews to deal with the aftermath of his time as a soldier in the labyrinthine trenches of World War I. -- 'N'

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Jan 03, 2020
Little Women ch. 3 "The Laurence Boy"
2223

Tonight, we’ll read the third chapter of “Little Women”, by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868, titled “The Laurence Boy”. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters.In the previous chapter, on Christmas morning, the girls wake to find books under their pillows. They find their mother has gone to aid poor neighbors. When she returns, she asks her daughters to give their delicious Christmas breakfast to the starving family. That evening, they perform their play, in which Jo gets to play male roles. After the performance, the girls come downstairs to find a feast laid out on the table, provided by another neighbor, who has a grandson that Jo would like to meet. -- 'V'

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Jan 01, 2020
Sleeping Beauty
1902

Tonight, we’ll read the story of "Sleeping Beauty", from the Lang’s "Blue Fairy Book" published in 1889. It is a classic fairy talea bout a princess who is cursed to sleep for a hundred years by an evil fairy, where she would be awakened by a handsome prince. The earliest known version of the story is found in the narrative “Perceforest”, composed in the 14th century. "Perceforest" provides an original Genesis of the Arthurian World. -- 'M'

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Dec 30, 2019
Watching Birds at a Straw Stack | Bird Watching
1807

Tonight, we’ll be reading another chapter from the book "Bird Watching" published in 1901 by Edmund Selous, titled "Watching Birds at a Straw Stack". If you enjoy this episode, be sure to listen to the "Blackbirds and Nightingales" episode from this book as well. The author started as a conventional naturalist, but Selous developed a hatred of the common practice at the time of killing animals for scientific study and was a pioneer of bird-watching as a method of scientific study. The author was a solitary man and was not well known in ornithological circles. He avoided both the company of ornithologists and reading their observations so as to base his conclusions entirely on his own observations. And to be clear, Straw Stacks are similar to Hay Stacks in that both are field crops, although hay is the remains of grasses and straw is made from the stalks of wheat. -- 'V'

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Dec 27, 2019
Little Women ch. 2 "A Merry Christmas"
2257

Tonight, we’ll read the second chapter titled “A Merry Christmas” to “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters.In Chapter 1, the March sisters lament that they won’t receive Christmas presents as their family has fallen into poverty. They discuss a Christmas play they are going to put forth, and their mother arrives with a letter from their father who is away in the Civil War. They resolve to practice  their Christian faith’s values in their daily lives in order to rise above their material complaints. -- 'V'

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Dec 25, 2019
Balsam Fir
1799

Tonight, we’ll read “Balsam Fir”, a Snoozecast original. Experience tromping through an evergreen tree farm to pick the perfect tree to bring home. -- 'N'

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Dec 23, 2019
Alpine Resort
1805

Tonight, we’ll read an excerpt about traveling to a high alpine winter resort, from a book called Winter Sports in Switzerland, written by E. F. Benson in 1913. Benson was an English novelist, biographer, memoirist, archaeologist and short story writer.

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Dec 20, 2019
Little Women ch. 1 "Playing Pilgrims"
2358

Tonight, we’ll read the opening chapter to “Little Women” by American author Louisa May Alcott, published in 1868. Following the lives of the four March sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy—the novel details their passage from childhood to womanhood and is loosely based on the author and her sisters.Alcott wrote the books over several months at the request of her publisher.She later recalled that she did not think she could write a successful book for girls and did not enjoy writing it. "I plod away," she wrote in her diary, "although I don't enjoy this sort of things.” The book's immediate success surprised both her and her publisher. -- 'V'

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Dec 18, 2019
The Blue Parrot
1830

Tonight, we’ll be reading a story called "The Blue Parrot", taken from The Olive Fairy Book by Andrew Lang and H. J. Ford, and published in 1907. The story originated from a French book of tales titled Contes de Fée from the late 1700s. -- 'M'

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Dec 16, 2019
Afloat and Ashore
1889

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to "Afloat and Ashore" a nautical fiction novel by James Fenimore Cooper, published in 1844. Set at the turn of the 19th century, the novel follows the maritime adventures of Miles Wallingford Jr., the son of wealthy New York landowners who chooses to go to sea after the death of his parents. The novel is partially autobiographical, in part by Cooper's own experiences as a sailor. Throughout his career, Cooper wrote profusely with the objective of countering European prejudices and nurturing an original American art and culture.

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Dec 13, 2019
The Woman in White
1861

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the opening to "The Woman in White", written in 1859 by Wilkie Collins. It is considered to be among the first mystery novels, and an early example of detective fiction. Modern critics and readers regard it as Collins's best novel, although at the time of publication, critics were generally hostile. The novel opens with Walter Hartright, a young art teacher, who encounters a mysterious and distressed woman dressed entirely in white, lost in London; he is later informed by policemen that she has escaped from an asylum.



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Dec 11, 2019
Beauty and the Beast pt. 2
2404

Tonight, we’ll read the second and final part to the classic tale "Beauty and the Beast", taken from the Blue Fairy Book by Andrew Lang, published in 1889. When we left off, the merchant and father to Beauty was caught picking a rose from the Beast’s garden as a gift to Beauty. In punishment, the Beast demanded that the father bring back one of his daughters. The catch was that she must choose to come willingly. Of course, the kind-hearted Beauty offers to go despite the sacrifice it entailed.  Father and daughter arrive at the Beast’s castle and are about to meet him.



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Dec 09, 2019
Sunday Dinner
1761

Tonight, we bring you “Sunday Dinner” a Snoozecast Original. In this story, experience visiting an old friend’s cozy farm home and the comforting meal prepared and enjoyed inside.



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Dec 06, 2019
Pride and Prejudice pt. 3
1918

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll be reading the third part to the 1813 romantic novel of manners "Pride and Prejudice", written by Jane Austen. The novel follows Elizabeth Bennet, the dynamic protagonist, who learns about the repercussions of hasty judgments and eventually comes to appreciate the difference between superficial goodness and actual goodness. In the last episode, discussion of the ball continues when the daughters of the Bennets' neighbor visit. The oldest daughter, Charlotte, is Elizabeth's close friend, and commiserates with Elizabeth over Mr. Darcy's snub. Charlotte acknowledges, however, that Mr. Darcy's family and wealth give him the right to be proud. Elizabeth agrees, noting that her resentment of his proud nature stems from his wounding her own pride. We will pick up at the start of chapter 6.



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Dec 04, 2019
Doctor Dolittle
1890

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening chapters to "Doctor Dolittle", written in 1920 by British author Hugh Lofting. The full title being, “The Story of Doctor Dolittle, Being the History of His Peculiar Life at Home and Astonishing Adventures in Foreign Parts”. It is the first of Lofting’s "Doctor Dolittle" books, a series of children's novels about a man who learns to talk to animals and becomes their champion around the world. It was one of the novels in the series which was adapted into the 1967 film "Doctor Dolittle".



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Dec 02, 2019
Winter Voices
1888

Tonight, we’ll be reading another excerpt from “In New England Fields and Woods” written by Rowland Evans Robinson in 1896. Robinson was in his time one of Vermont’s best known writers. This collection of short essays follows New England's changing seasons and moods in all its natural beauty. This particular selection is part of the November and December time of year.



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Nov 29, 2019
Thanksgiving Recipes
1888

Tonight, we’ll be reading Thanksgiving recipes and sample menus from a magazine called "American Cookery", published in 1921.  This periodical was formerly titled less succinctly “The Boston Cooking-School Magazine of Culinary Science and Domestic Economics.



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Nov 27, 2019
Peter Rabbit
1895

Tonight, we’ll be reading, "Tales of Peter Rabbit and Friends", from "The Great Big Treasury of Beatrix Potter", written by Beatrix Potter. "The Tales of Peter Rabbit" was first self-published in 1902, when she was in her thirties. Potter was an English writer, illustrator, natural scientist, and conservationist best known for her children's books featuring animals. Though Potter was typical of women of her generation in having limited opportunities for higher education, her study and watercolors of fungi led to her being widely respected in the field of mycology. In all, Potter wrote thirty books; the best known being her twenty-three children's tales.



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Nov 25, 2019
Sea and Sardinia
1920

Tonight we’ll be reading the opening to “Sea and Sardinia”, a travel book by the English writer D. H. Lawrence. It describes a brief excursion undertaken in January 1921 by Lawrence and his wife from Sicily to the interior of Sardinia. Despite the brevity of his visit, Lawrence distills an essence of the island and its people that is still recognizable today.



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Nov 22, 2019
Black Beauty pt. 2
1808

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll read the next part to 1877’s "Black Beauty" by Anna Sewall. This novel became an immediate best-seller at the end of Sewall’s life, but she lived long enough to briefly see her only novel would become.Black Beauty is one of the best-selling books of all time.



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Nov 20, 2019
Robin Hood
1920

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll be reading the opening to the 1883 novel by American illustrator and writer Howard Pyle, "Robin Hood". Consisting of a series of episodes in the story of the English outlaw Robin Hood and his band of Merry Men, the novel helped solidify the image of a heroic Robin Hood, which had begun in earlier works such as Walter Scott's 1819 novel "Ivanhoe".



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Nov 18, 2019
Myths of the Cherokee
1824

Tonight, we’ll read some of the folklore of the Cherokee people from the 1900 book "Myths of the Cherokee" by James Mooney. Mooney was an American ethnographer who lived for several years with the Cherokee. He became a self-taught expert on American tribes by his own studies and his careful observation during long residences with different groups.



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Nov 15, 2019
A Tale of Two Cities
1920

Tonight, we’ll read the opening two chapters of 1859’s "A Tale of Two Cities", written by Charles Dickens. It is a historical novel, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution. The novel tells the story of the French Doctor Manette, his 18-year-long imprisonment in Paris and his release to live in London with his daughter Lucie, whom he had never met. The story is set against the conditions that led up to the French Revolution and the Reign of Terror. It has become Dickens’ best known work of historical fiction.



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Nov 13, 2019
The Magic Cloak
1848

Tonight, we’ll read "Queen Zixi of Ix", or "The Story of the Magic Cloak", a children's book written by L. Frank Baum and published in 1905. The events of the book alternate between Noland and Ix, two neighboring regions to the Land of Oz, and Baum himself commented this was the best book he had written. The book was made into the 1914 film "The Magic Cloak of Oz". Although no part of the book's story takes place in the Land of Oz, by the time the movie was made, it had become clear that the Oz franchise was Baum's most popular creation.



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Nov 11, 2019
Moon Shot
1736

Tonight, we'll be reading a couple famous speeches by President John F. Kennedy: His 1961 inauguration speech and his 1962 moon speech. The youngest president elected in United States history, he was the first man born in the 20th century to hold that office. His speeches inspired the nation to reach for the stars



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Nov 08, 2019
Cowboy Smith
1848

Tonight, we'll be reading the opening to the 1911 novel titled “Me-Smith” written by Caroline Lockhart. Lockhart was a journalist, a newspaper owner, and a ranch owner along with writing novels set in her adopted home of Cody, Montana. The Caroline Lockhart Ranch is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.In 2018, the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame inducted her. Me-Smith was her first novel.



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Nov 06, 2019
Beauty and the Beast
1800

Tonight, we’ll read the classic tale "Beauty and the Beast", taken from the Blue Fairy Book by Andrew Lang, published in 1889. The original story of Beauty and the Beast was written by Gabrielle-Suzanne de Villeneuve, within the culture of the aristocratic salons of the 1700s. It is thought that it has roots even longer ago, in the tale of "Cupid and Psyche", the ancient chronicle from the Latin novel "Metamorphoses".



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Nov 04, 2019
Mushrooms in the Paris Caves
1824

Tonight, we’ll read a section of the book “Mushrooms: How to Grow Them” called “Mushroom Growing in the Paris Caves”, written by William Falconer and published in 1892. The famous architecture of Paris was built using the limestone extracted from underneath the city. The resulting catacombs were also used to grow the Paris mushroom, a variety of the button variety. Legend has it that mushroom farming in these caves started when some deserters of Napoleon’s army, along with their horses, discovered that mushrooms naturally flourished on the mixture of limestone and horse manure within.



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Nov 01, 2019
The Dunwich Horror
1472

Tonight, as the final episode of our October classic horror series, we’ll be reading the opening to "The Dunwich Horror", written in 1928 by H.P. Lovecraft. It takes place in Dunwich, a fictional town in central Massachusetts. It is considered one of the core stories of the Cthulhu Mythos.



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Oct 30, 2019
Heidi pt. 3
1800

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll be reading the next section of the classic children’s story "Heidi", published in 1881 by Swiss author Johanna Spyri. It is a novel about the life of a young girl in her grandfather's care in the Swiss Alps. Heidi is one of the best-selling books ever written and is among the best-known works of Swiss literature. We left off at the end of chapter 2, with Heidi’s first night at grandfather’s house on the mountaintop. Heidi and Grandfather get along better than would be expected, given his reputation as a surly recluse. Heidi falls to sleep in her new hay loft bedroom, dreaming of the two captivating goats she met that day.



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Oct 28, 2019
A Crystal Age
1664

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to 1887’s "A Crystal Age by W. H. Hudson.The book, a pastoral Utopian novel has been called a "significant sci-fi milestone" and has been noted for its anticipation of the "modern ecological mysticism" that would evolve a century later.



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Oct 25, 2019
The Turn of the Screw
1856

Tonight, as part of our October classic horror series, we'll be reading the opening to The "Turn of the Screw", an 1898 gothic ghost story by Henry James. The novella focuses on a governess who, caring for two children at a remote estate, becomes convinced that the grounds are haunted. Some critics have argued that the brilliance of "The Turn of the Screw" results from its ability to create an intimate sense of confusion and suspense within the reader.



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Oct 23, 2019
Pride and Prejudice pt. 2
1920

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll be reading the second part to the 1813 romantic novel of manners "Pride and Prejudice", written by Jane Austen. The novel follows Elizabeth Bennet, the dynamic protagonist, who learns about the repercussions of hasty judgments and eventually comes to appreciate the difference between superficial goodness and actual goodness. In the first episode, news that a wealthy young gentleman named Charles Bingley has moved in nearby causes a stir among the Bennet family. The Bennet’s have five unmarried daughters so are eager to matchmaker with the stranger. The daughters attend a ball also attended by Bingley, along with a friend of Bingley named Darcy. The impression others get of Bingley at the ball is charm and of Darcy- rude and snobbish. We will pick up with the daughters coming home to tell their father about the evening.



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Oct 21, 2019
Get This Bread
1936

Tonight, we’re bringing you a Snoozecast original titled “Get This Bread”. In this soft-boiled who-dun-it, a rising star editor is suddenly fired, leaving a pair of co-workers to pick up the pieces -- and the clues, to solving the mystery.



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Oct 18, 2019
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
1968

Tonight, as part of our October classic horror series, we’ll be reading the opening to "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde", a Gothic novella by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, first published in 1886. It is about a London legal practitioner named Gabriel John Utterson who investigates strange occurrences between his old friend, Dr Henry Jekyll, and the evil Edward Hyde. The novella's impact is such that it has become a part of the language, with the phrase "Jekyll and Hyde" entering the vernacular to refer to people with an unpredictably dual nature: usually very good, but sometimes shockingly evil.



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Oct 16, 2019
The Count of Monte Cristo
1824

Tonight, we'll be reading the opening chapter to "The Count of Monte Cristo", completed in 1844 by french author Alexander Dumas. Considered a literary classic today, the story takes place in France, Italy, and islands in the Mediterranean during the historical events of 1815–1839: the era of the Bourbon Restoration through the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy, and forgiveness; it centres on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune, and sets about exacting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. His plans have devastating consequences for both the innocent and the guilty.



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Oct 14, 2019
The Princess
1530

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening to Lord Tennyson’s 1847 "The Princess". Tennyson was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1850 to 1892 and remains one of the most popular English poets. The poem tells the story of a heroic princess who forswears the world of men and founds a women's university where men are forbidden to enter. The prince to whom she was betrothed in infancy enters the university with two friends, disguised as women students.



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Oct 11, 2019
Frankenstein
1696

Tonight, as part of our October classic horror series (every Wednesday this month), we'll be reading the opening to "Frankenstein, or, the Modern Prometheus", written by Mary Shelley and published anonymously in 1818 when she was just 20 years old. It tells the story of a scientist named Victor Frankenstein who creates a hideous humanoid creature. Since the novel's publication, the name "Frankenstein" has often been used to refer to the monster itself, although in the novel the monster is never given a formal name. Shelley’s story of Frankenstein has been referred to as the first true science fiction novel.



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Oct 09, 2019
The Adventures of a Spanish Nun
1848

Tonight, we'll be reading a story called "The Adventures of a Spanish Nun" from the "Strange Storybook" by Mrs. Andrew Lang -- Leonora Blanche Alleyne, published in 1913. This story tells of a young woman who had been raised in a convent but had dreams of exploring the world. She then acts upon them, dressed as men, and full of exploits and daring.



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Oct 07, 2019
A Voyage in the Dark
1864

Tonight, we’ll be reading, "A Voyage in the Dark" an excerpt from “In New England Fields and Woods” written by Rowland Evans Robinson in 1896. Robinson was in his time one of Vermont’s best known writers. This collection of short essays follows New England's changing seasons and moods in all its natural beauty. This particular selection is part of the late summer, early autumn



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Oct 04, 2019
The Fall of the House of Usher
1920

Tonight, as part of our October classic horror series (every Wednesday this month), we’ll be reading the opening to "The Fall of the House of Usher", written by Edgar Allen Poe and published in 1839. This short story is a work of Gothic fiction and includes themes of madness, family, isolation, and metaphysical identities. Poe's inspiration for the story may be based upon events of the Hezekiah Usher House, located near what is now Downtown Crossing in Boston, MA. When the Usher House was torn down in 1830, two bodies were found embraced in a cavity in the cellar.



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Oct 02, 2019
Aladdin pt. 2
1680

Tonight, we’ll be reading the second part to "Aladdin", our version is out of the Blue Fairy Book, edited by Andrew Lang in 1889. Aladdin is a middle eastern folk tale and is one of the tales from the Book of One Thousand and One Nights otherwise known as The Arabian Nights. In Part One, Aladdin is a lazy boy without a trade to earn money from, until a magician posing as his uncle tries to use him for a spell to receive great powers. By luck, Aladdin receives the magical powers of a magic lantern and a wish-granting genie for himself. He uses his powers to gain the daughter of the Sultan as his wife. We pick up at their marriage.



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Sep 30, 2019
Tao Te Ching
1920

Tonight, we'll be reading from the "Tao Te Ching". This Chinese classic text is traditionally credited to the 6th-century BC sage Laozi. The text's authorship, date of composition and date of compilation are debated. The "Tao Te Ching" has multiple translations, in general "Tao" means "the way" or "the path", here's some examples of different opening lines:

  • "The Tao that can be trodden is not the enduring and unchanging Tao."
    • Translated by James Legge (1891)
  • "The Tao-Path is not the All-Tao. The Name is not the Thing named."
    • Translated by Aleister Crowley (1918)
  • "The tao that can be told, is not the eternal Tao."
    • Translated by Stephen Mitchell (1988)
  • "If you can talk about it,it ain't Tao."
    • Translated by Ron Hogan (1994)
  • "The way you can go, isn't the real way."
    • Translated by Ursula Le Guin (1998)


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Sep 27, 2019
Black Beauty
1848

Tonight, we'll be reading the opening to the 1877 novel, "Black Beauty" by English author Anna Sewell. Due to a severe injury early in life, Sewell needed to use crutches to walk and developed a love for horses, as horseback riding gave her a sense of freedom.This novel became an immediate best-seller at the end of her life, with Sewell dying just five months after its publication, but having lived long enough to see her only novel become a success. With fifty million copies sold,Black Beauty is one of the best-selling books of all time. While forthrightly teaching animal welfare, it also teaches how to treat people with kindness, sympathy, and respect.

Sep 25, 2019
The Golden Bough
1808

Tonight, we'll be reading an excerpt focused on tree spirits, from the 1890 book, "The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion" written by Scottish anthropologist Sir James George Frazer. The book scandalized the public when first published because it compared biblical stories to pagan rituals. Despite the controversy generated by the work, "The Golden Bough" inspired many authors from the period including: HP Lovecraft, James Joyce, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and T.S. Elliot.

Sep 23, 2019
Butterflies Worth Knowing
1672

Tonight, we’ll be reading from “Butterflies Worth Knowing” by Clarence Moores Weed in 1926. Weed was a New England based naturalist. He was the author or co-author of more than 20 books, many of them on insect pests and insect-plant relationships.

Sep 20, 2019
The Red-Headed League | Sherlock Holmes
1440

Tonight, we’ll be reading "The Red Headed League", a short story from "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes", written by Arthur Conan Doyle in 1892. In this story, which Doyle ranked as number 2 of his favorite top 12 Sherlock stories, the focus is on Jebez Wilson, the owner of a pawnbroker shop who sports a head of bright red hair and receives an invitation to join an exclusive club.

Sep 19, 2019
South African Folk-Tales
1824

Tonight, we’ll reading a selection of South African folk-tales collected during the 19th century. It includes animal tales with classic wisdom, including The Monkey’s Fiddle and The Lost Message. These stories were collected by Dr. James Honey and published in 1910. 

Sep 17, 2019
The Art of Lawn Tennis
1792

Tonight, we’ll be reading from "The Art of Lawn Tennis", written by William “Big Bill” Tilden, published in 1921. Tilden was considered one of the greatest tennis players of all time. Born into wealth, Tilden earned large sums of money during his long career and he spent it lavishly, keeping a suite at the Algonquin Hotel in New York City. Much of his income went towards financing Broadway shows that he wrote, produced, and starred in,

Sep 13, 2019
My Ántonia
1804

Tonight, we’ll read the opening to Willa Cather’s 1918 novel My Ántonia .It is the final book of her "prairie trilogy" of novels, preceded by O Pioneers! and The Song of the Lark. The novel tells the stories of an orphaned boy from Virginia, Jim Burden, and the elder daughter in a family of Bohemian immigrants, Ántonia Shimerda, who are each brought as children to be pioneers in Nebraska towards the end of the 19th century. This novel is considered Cather's first masterpiece. Cather was praised for bringing the American West to life and making it personally interesting. 

Sep 11, 2019
Jane Eyre
1808

Tonight, by listener request, we will read the opening to the classic 1847 novel "Jane Eyre" by English writer Charlotte Brontë and published under the pen name “Currer Bell”. It is the story of a young, orphaned girl who lives with her Aunt and cousins and is mistreated by them. The novel is considered one of the greatest works of English fiction. It revolutionized writing style by being the first to focus on its protagonist's moral and spiritual development through an intimate first-person narrative, where actions and events are coloured by psychological intensity. Charlotte Brontë has been called the "first historian of the private consciousness", and the literary ancestor of writers like Proust and Joyce.

Sep 09, 2019
Baseball
1505

Tonight, we'll be reading a Snoozecast original story, "Baseball." Settle in and watch a Little League game unfold during the waning days of summer. Without a clock to keep time, baseball, otherwise known as America's Pastime, is always played at its own pace. 

Sep 06, 2019
The Awakening
1671

Tonight, we’ll be reading from the 1899 novel by Kate Chopin, "The Awakening". Set in New Orleans and on the Louisiana Gulf coast at the end of the 19th century, the plot centers on Edna Pontellier and her struggle between her increasingly unorthodox views on femininity and motherhood. It is widely seen as a landmark work of early feminism, and a precursor of American modernist literature.

Snoozecast makes sleep stories, put on a Snoozecast before you get into bed to help you fall asleep.

Sep 04, 2019
Jack and the Beanstalk
1804

Tonight, we’ll be reading “Jack and the Beanstalk”, from the 1918 Mother’s Nursery Tales by Katherine Pyle. Born in 1863, Pyle was an American artist, poet and children’s book writer. “Jack and the Beanstalk” is the best known of the “Jack Tales”, a series of stories featuring the archetypal hero and stock character “Jack.” According to researchers, the story originated more than five millennia ago.

Snoozecast makes sleep stories, put on a Snoozecast before you get into bed to help you fall asleep.

Sep 02, 2019
The Wonderful Visit
1694

Tonight, we’ll be reading from the 1895 novel "The Wonderful Visit", by H.G. Wells. With an angel—a creature of fantasy unlike a religious angel—as protagonist and taking place in contemporary England, the book could be classified as contemporary fantasy, although the genre was not recognized in Wells's time. The Wonderful Visit also has strong satirical themes, gently mocking customs and institutions of Victorian England as well as idealistic rebellion itself.

Aug 30, 2019
Pride and Prejudice
1808

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening to the 1813, romantic novel of manners, "Pride and Prejudice", written by Jane Austen. The novel follows Elizabeth Bennet, the dynamic protagonist, who learns about the repercussions of hasty judgments and eventually comes to appreciate the difference between superficial goodness and actual goodness. Filled with comedy, its humor lies in its honest depiction of manners, education, marriage and money during the Regency era in Great Britain.

Aug 28, 2019
Rip Van Winkle
1804

Tonight, for our 100th episode, we’ll be reading "Rip Van Winkle" originally a short story by the American author Washington Irving, published in 1819. It follows a Dutch-American villager in colonial America named Rip Van Winkle who falls asleep in the Catskill Mountains and wakes up 20 years later, having missed the American Revolution. Irving wrote it while living in England and later admitted he had never been to the Catskill Mountains.

Aug 26, 2019
Sunshine Sketches
1808

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening to Stephen Leacock’s 1912, "Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town." This humorous and affectionate account of small-town life in the fictional town of Mariposa is inspired by the author’s experience living in Ontario, Canada. The book illustrates the inner workings of life in Mariposa—from business to politics to steamboat disasters.

Aug 23, 2019
The White Heart of Mojave
1824

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening to the 1922 travel memoir "The White Heart of Mojave: An Adventure with the Outdoors of the Desert" by Edna Brush Perkins. It recounts the adventure of Perkins and her friend Charlotte Hannahs Jordan, both independent-minded and early suffragettes; at the end of the Great War, the two friends wanted nothing more than to escape the crowded, oppressive city for wild, open space.

Aug 21, 2019
The Nodding Tiger
1856

Tonight, we’ll be reading a folk tale called "The Nodding Tiger" from the 1919 “A Chinese Wonder Book”, by Norman Hinsdale Pitman. In the story, a tiger kills an old woman’s only son. To make amends, the mother convinces the court’s judge to require the tiger to take the son’s place in her life. (Note: There is some mild "off-screen" violence in this vintage folk-tale.)

Aug 19, 2019
The Voyage of the Beagle
1824

Tonight, we’ll be reading Charles Darwin’s "The Voyage of the Beagle", the title most commonly given to the book published in 1839 as his "Journal and Remarks", bringing him considerable fame and respect. The book is a vivid travel memoir as well as a detailed scientific field journal covering biology, geology, and anthropology that demonstrates Darwin's keen powers of observation.

Aug 16, 2019
After London
1792

Tonight, we’ll be reading "After London", a Science Fiction precursor by Richard Jefferies first published in 1885. In it’s day referred to as Fantasy or Romance, now we may describe it as eco-apocalyptic. The story tells of how London becomes a swampland after an unspecified natural disaster delivers England over to the mercy of nature.

Aug 14, 2019
Heidi pt. 2
1834

Tonight, we’ll be reading the next selection of the classic children’s story Heidi, published in 1881 by Swiss author Johanna Spyri. It is a novel about the life of a young girl in her grandfather's care in the Swiss Alps. Heidi is one of the best-selling books ever written and is among the best-known works of Swiss literature.

Aug 12, 2019
Luck on the Wing
1472

Tonight, we'll be reading "Luck on the Wing" by Major Elmer Haslett. This 1920 book offers a first hand account of combat in the air by an American observer or "sky spy." World War I was the first conflict where combat took to the skies in machines that provided powered and maneuverable flight. This was a risky profession where brave young men flew into battle in machines made of fabric and wood. The author was regarded as one of the finest practitioners of his craft.

Aug 09, 2019
Sense and Sensibility
1816

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening to Jane Austen’s 1811, "Sense and Sensibility". It was published anonymously; 'By A Lady' appears on the title page where the author's name might have been. It tells the story of the Dashwood sisters as they must move with their widowed mother from the estate on which they grew up.

Aug 07, 2019
Little Two Eyes
1568

Tonight, we’ll be reading a fairy tale called "Little One Eye, Two Eyes and Three Eyes" from The Green Fairy Book, published in 1892 and published only by Andrew Lang, according to the original book. The Wikipedia page for the series of Langs’ Colored Fairy Books explains that Lang’s wife Nora Lang took over the editing of the many more published starting in the 1890s. There were 25 collections of stories total published between 1889 and 1913 by the couple. These collections have been immensely influential; the Langs gave many of the tales their first appearance in English. British fairy tale collections were rare at the time; fairy tales were seen as brutal, escapist and unrealistic and thus a bad influence for young readers. Over a generation, Lang's books worked a revolution in this public perception.

Aug 05, 2019
Blackbirds and Nightingales | Bird Watching
1832

Tonight, we’ll be reading a chapter from the book, "Bird Watching" titled "Watching Blackbirds, Nightingales, Sand-martins, etc. “Bird Watching” was published in 1901 by Edmund Selous. The author started as a conventional naturalist, but Selous developed a hatred of the killing of animals for scientific study and was a pioneer of bird-watching as a method of scientific study. He was a strong proponent of non-destructive bird-study as opposed to the collection of skins and eggs. The shooting of birds for scientific purposes, like building museum collections, he strongly rejected. The author was a solitary man and was not well known in ornithological circles. He avoided both the company of ornithologists and reading their observations so as to base his conclusions entirely on his own observations. Selous continued bird-watching and writing until near the end of his life.

Aug 02, 2019
Araby | Dubliners
1344

Tonight, we’ll be reading the short story "Araby", from the collection "Dubliners", written by James Joyce in 1914. The stories in Dubliners form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak, and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences.

Jul 31, 2019
The Princess and the Goblin pt. 2
1856

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll be reading the second part to "The Princess and the Goblin", a children’s fantasy novel, published in 1872. One of the most successful and beloved of Victorian fairy tales, George MacDonald’s The Princess and the Goblin tells the story of young Princess Irene and her friend Curdie, who must outwit the threatening goblins who live in caves beneath her mountain home. When we left off, the little princess found herself lost in a labyrinth of halls and rooms. She then is introduced to a beautiful, kind and strange old woman sitting at a yarn spinning wheel.

Jul 29, 2019
Gentlemen's Book of Etiquette
1808

Tonight, we’ll be reading selections from, "The Gentlemen’s Book of Etiquette and Manual of Politeness" written by Cecil B. Hartley in 1860. Snoozecast was surprised to find nothing online about the author besides having written another book on the life of Daniel Boone. Perhaps it is not coincidental that the author of, "The Ladies Book of Etiquette" was published the same year by an author with the same last name - Florence Hartley.

Jul 26, 2019
A Trip to Venus
1696

Tonight,we’llbereadingfrom, "A Trip to Venus"publishedin1897andwrittenby John Munro.In the story, Our Narrator, his old friend Professor Grazen an astronomer, Mr. Carmichael an engineer, and his daughter Miss Carmichael, travel in a spaceship to the planet Venus. We pick up in Chapter 6, "In Space" just after the crew has launched out of Earth's atmosphere.

Jul 24, 2019
Wuthering Heights
1792

Tonight, we’ll be reading, "Wuthering Heights"published in 1847, it was Emily Brontë's only novel. Early critics were mixed in their assessment and many were puzzled by the novel's multiple narrators and non-chronological structure. Much of the Victorian public believed the novel was written by a man based on the violent and passionate imagery. Even though the novel received mixed reviews when it came out, it has since become an English literary classic, and tells the tale of a tempestuous romance between Heathcliff, an orphan, and Catherine Earnshaw who becomes his close companion.

Jul 22, 2019
Madame Bovary
1856

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening to the fantastic classic, "Madame Bovary". It was the debut novel of French writer, Gustave Flaubert, published in 1856. Madame Bovary lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life. A seminal work of literary realism, the novel is now considered Flaubert's masterpiece, and one of the most influential literary works in history.

Jul 19, 2019
Acadia National Park
1920

Tonight, we’ll be reading a Snoozecast original,“Acadia National Park”. Come wander inside this 108 square mile oasis on your way to Blackwoods campground where ultimately you plan on falling asleep to the rhythmic waves of the Atlantic.

Jul 17, 2019
The Cowherd and the Weaver
1320

Tonight, by listener request, we’ll be reading two versions of a traditional Chinese folk-tale called "The Cowherd and the Weaver" a story about star-crossed lovers that spurred the Qixi Festival, a romantic festival that is often regarded as Chinese Valentine's Day. The Qixi festival inspired the Tanabata festival in Japan and the Chilseok festival in Korea.

Jul 15, 2019
The Oregon Trail
1280

Tonight, we'll be reading from a book called, "The Oregon Trail: Sketches of Prairie and Rocky-Mountain Life" by Francis Parkman. It was originally serialized in Knickerbocker's Magazine and subsequently published as a book in 1849. The account of a summer tour of the High Plains of Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, and Kansas met with the acclaim of early reviewers like Herman Melville, who, though he on the whole lauded the book for "the true wild-game flavor," complained of its demeaning presentation of Native Americans and its misleading title. Parkman's excursion led him only along the first third, the flat stretch of the 2,100 mile trail; he never saw the cruelest parts across the mountains and deserts.

Jul 12, 2019
A Scandal in Bohemia | Sherlock Holmes
1760

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening to, "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1892. "The Adventures" are a collection of twelve short stories, starting with, "A Scandal in Bohemia". Holmes is portrayed as offering a new, fairer sense of justice.

Jul 10, 2019
Don Quixote pt. 2
1536

Tonight, we’ll be reading the second part to Miguel de Cervante’s, “Don Quixote”. Written in the early 1600s of Spain, Don Quixote is considered to be, perhaps, the most influential work from Spanish history. It depicts a nobleman who reads so many romantic adventure novels that he decides to become a knight. In pt. 1, we read chapter one, where Don Quixote decides to become a knight, and sets about in preparation for his adventure: he fashions a homemade suit of armor and cardboard, names his old frail horse, “Rocinante”, and officially proclaims a pretty village girl named Aldonza Lorenzo to be in knightly love with. He renames her Dulcinea del Toboso. He has never actually met her and she may or may not actually exist.

Jul 08, 2019
How to Amuse Yourself and Others
1864

Tonight we'll be reading two selections from, "How to Amuse Yourself and Others" published in 1893 and written by Lina and Adelia Beard. A listener wrote to us asking for a Snoozecast about pressed flowers, so the passages tonight include that and other flower crafts, along with how to build a hammock.

Jul 05, 2019
4th of July
1568

Tonight, we’ll be reading a medley of poems concerning Independence Day. Titles include, "The New Colossus" by Emma Lazarus, "Concord Hymn" by Ralph Waldo Emerson, "I Hear America Singing" by Walt Whitman, "To The Fourth of July" by Swami Vivekanada and, "The Building of a Ship" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. We'll begin with, "Paul Revere's Ride" also by Longfellow. The poem commemorates the actions of Paul Revere on April 18, 1775. Modern critics emphasize the poem's many historical inaccuracies, most significantly perhaps is Longfellow giving sole credit to Revere for the collective achievements of multiple riders.

Jul 03, 2019
Aladdin
1792

Tonight, we’ll be reading, "Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp", a story out of the Blue Fairy Book, edited by Andrew Lang in 1889. "Aladdin" is a middle eastern folk-tale thought to be originally written by Hanna Diyab, and is one of the tales from the book, "One Thousand and One Nights",  otherwise known as "The Arabian Nights. Since it first appeared in the early 18th century, Aladdin has been one of the best known and most retold of all folk-tales.

Jul 01, 2019
Autobiography of a Yogi
1856

Tonight, we’ll be reading the opening to the 1946 autobiography by Paramahansa Yogananda, titled, "Autobiography of a Yogi." Yogananda lived from 1893-1952 and was born in India. Besides detailing his life, the book is an introduction to the methods of attaining God-realization and to the spiritual thought of the East, starting with his childhood search for a Guru. The book inspired many people, including Steve Jobs who read it once a year throughout his life, and gave it away as a gift to attendees at his posthumous memorial service.

Jun 28, 2019
The Lady with the Dog
1920

Tonight, we’ll be reading the 1899 short story by Russian author Anton Chekhov titled, "The Lady with a Dog". The story describes a surprising love affair between two unhappily married people — Dmitri and Anna. This is one of Chekhov's most famous pieces of short fiction. Vladimir Nabokov, for instance, considers it as one of the greatest short stories ever written.

Jun 26, 2019
The Study of Plant Life
1712

Tonight, we'll be reading the opening to, "The Study of Plant Life" by M.C. Stopes, published in 1910. M.C. Stopes, short for Marie Charlotte, lived from 1880-1958 and was a British author, paleobotanist, and women's rights campaigner.

Jun 24, 2019
Ladies' Book of Etiquette
1504

Tonight, we'll be reading from the, "Ladies' Book of Etiquette" written in 1860 by Florence Hartley. Hartley was a Victoria-era writer whose work was meant for women of the era, covering topics of etiquette and needlework. She was also an advocate for women's health. (Don't worry fellas, we'll be dropping the "Gentleman's Book of Etiquette", also by Hartley in a future episode.

Jun 21, 2019
Youth
1736

Tonight, we’ll be reading from Isaac Asimov’s 1952 science fiction short story titled, “Youth”. "Youth" is one of the rare Asimov stories with alien characters. It features two boys and some strange alien creatures.

Jun 19, 2019
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
1440

Tonight, we'll be reading from, "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" an 1865 novel written by Lewis Carroll. It tells the story of a young girl named Alice who falls through a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar creatures. The tale plays with logic, giving the story lasting popularity with all ages. It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre.

Jun 17, 2019
A Princess of Mars
1792

Tonight, we’ll be reading “A Princess of Mars”, the 1912 science fantasy novel by American author Edgar Rice Burroughs. Full of swordplay and daring feats, the novel is considered a classic example of 20th-century pulp fiction, and of planetary romance. The story is set on Mars, imagined as a dying planet with a harsh desert environment.

Jun 14, 2019
Mount Monadnock
1568

Tonight, we’ll be reading a Snoozecast original, "Mount Monadnock". Learn about the majestic New Hampshire mountain and experience a leisurely hike up it and perhaps - the opportunity for a well earned snooze.

Jun 12, 2019
The Velveteen Rabbit
1664

Tonight, we'll be reading, "The Velveteen Rabbit" by listener request. "The Velveteen Rabbit" is a British children's book written by Margery Williams in 1922. It chronicles the story of stuffed rabbit's desire to become real through the love of his owner.

Jun 10, 2019
Nature
1472

Tonight, we’ll be reading from, "Nature", an essay published in 1836 by Ralph Waldo Emerson. In the essay Emerson puts forth the foundation of transcendentalism, a belief system that espouses a non-traditional appreciation of nature. Transcendentalism suggests that the divine, or God, suffuses nature, and suggests that reality can be understood by studying nature.

Jun 07, 2019
The Voyage Out
1600

Tonight we'll be reading from, "The Voyage Out" by Virginia Woolf, first published in 1915. In the story Rachael Vinrace embarks for South America on her father's ship and is launched on a course of self-discovery in a kind of modern mythical voyage. The novel also introduces Clarissa Dalloway, who would become the central character of Woolf's later novel, "Mrs Dalloway."

Jun 05, 2019
The Jungle Book
1856

Tonight, we'll be reading the opening to, "The Jungle Book", an 1894 collection by the English author Rudyard Kipling. Most of the characters are animals such as a tiger and a bear, though a principal character is the boy or "man-cub" Mowgli, who is raised in the jungle by wolves. The stories are set in a forest in India.

Jun 03, 2019
The Island of Dr. Moreau
1680

Tonight, we’ll be reading from, "The Island of Dr. Moreau" an 1896, classic, early science-fiction novel, by author H. G. Wells. The novel is the earliest depiction of the science fiction 
motif "uplift" in which a more advanced species intervenes in the evolution of an animal species to bring the later to a higher level of intelligence. In this story, a shipwrecked man is rescued by a passing boat who is let on the island home of Dr. Moreau, a mad scientist who creates human-like hybrid beings from animals. This remains one of Wells' best-known works.

May 31, 2019
This Side of Paradise
1664

Tonight, we’ll be reading “This Side of Paradise”, the 1920 debut novel from F. Scott Fitzgerald, who later wrote "The Great Gatsby". The book examines the lives and morality of post–World War I youth. The novel famously helped F. Scott Fitzgerald gain Zelda Sayre's hand in marriage; its publication was her condition of acceptance.

May 29, 2019
Bamboo and the Turtle
1792

Tonight, we’ll be reading a classic Chinese folk tale, “Bamboo and the Turtle” from “A Chinese Wonder Book”, written by Norman Hinsdale Pitman in 1919. The tale features a boy named Bamboo and a special talking turtle.

May 27, 2019
Walden pt. 2
1744

Tonight, I'll be reading another snoozy excerpt from Walden, chapter 9, "The Ponds”, by transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau. Originally published in 1854, it is a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings. The work is part personal declaration of independence, social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and—to some degree—a manual for self-reliance.

May 24, 2019
Bartleby, The Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street
1808

Tonight, we'll be reading "Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street". A short story, by Herman Melville, first serialized anonymously in two parts in 1853. In the story, a Wall St. lawyer hires a new clerk who, after an initial bout of hard work, refuses to do any task required of him. Though no great success at the time of it's publication "Bartleby, the Scrivener" is now among the most noted of American short stories, and is considered a precursor of absurdist literature.

May 22, 2019
My Father's Dragon
1744

Tonight, we’ll be reading the beginning of, “My Father’s Dragon” by Ruth Stiles Gannett, first published in 1948. A Newbery Honor Book, this children’s story follows the adventures of a young boy, Elmer Elevator, who runs away to Wild Island to rescue a baby dragon.

May 20, 2019
New Hampshire
1557

We'll be reading from Robert Frost's, 1924 Pulitzer Prize winning poetry collection titled, "New Hampshire" tonight. Frost was an American poet who was much admired for his depictions of the rural life of New England, his command of American colloquial speech, and his realistic verse portraying ordinary people in everyday situations.

May 17, 2019
Following the Equator
1457

Mark Twain's, "Following the Equator" (sometimes titled "More Tramps Abroad") is a non-fiction social commentary in the form of a travelogue published in 1897. Twain found himself nearly bankrupt at the age of 60 -- so he took a lecture tour of the British Empire to generate funds and published this book, which was critical of Imperialism.

May 15, 2019
The Bell
1408

Tonight, we’ll be reading a tale from Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales called The Bell. In a village, everyone can hear the sounds of a mysterious bell. The townspeople set out to find the source. Hans Christian Andersen, a Danish writer, is known as one of the world’s classic storytellers.

May 13, 2019
The Prophet
1664

"The Prophet" by the Lebanese American poet and writer Kahlil Gibran, was first published in 1923. "The Prophet" has been translated in over one hundred languages making it one of the most translated books in history, and it's never been out of print.

May 10, 2019
The Age of Innocence
1664
Tonight, we'll be reading from, "The Age of Innocence", a 1920 novel by American author Edith Wharton. It won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, making Wharton the first woman to win the prize. The story is set in the 1870s, in upper-class, "Gilded-Age" New York City.]]>
May 08, 2019
Momotaro
1600
Tonight, we'll read the classic Japanese folk tale, "Momotaro", or, "The Story of the Son of a Peach." The story is about a boy who comes from heaven inside a giant peach to be the son of an old childless couple. This English translation is from Yei Theodora Ozaki, who included it in her 1911 compilation, Japanese Fairy Tales.]]>
May 06, 2019
Night Swim
1312

Tonight, we're pleased to read a Snoozecast original story, "Night Swim" is a short, 2nd person narrative that finds you meeting an old friend to find a secret swimming spot, a lake within the hills, as the night slips away...

May 03, 2019
The Call of the Wild
1216

"The Call of the Wild" is the classic 1903 adventure story by Jack London. The novel is set in Yukon, Canada, during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush, when strong sled dogs were in high demand. The central character of the novel is a dog named "Buck". The story opens at a Californian ranch, when Buck is stolen from his home and sold into service as an Alaskan sled dog. The story, which was enormously popular at the time of publication, is a tale of survival and return to primitivism.

Apr 30, 2019
Peter Pan pt. 2
1632

Tonight, we'll continue reading, "Peter Pan" the 1911 novel by J. M. Barrie. When we last left off the Darling children, Wendy, Michael and John, as well as Mrs. Darling herself were fast asleep in the nursery, while Peter Pan, the free-spirited boy from Neverland sneaks into the room. We pick up at the start of Chapter 2, "The Shadow."

Apr 29, 2019
The Mysterious Affair at Styles
1536

Tonight, we’ll be reading from the detective novel "The Mysterious Affair at Styles", which is the very first published novel by Agatha Christie. She wrote it in the middle of World War I, and it was first published in 1920. The story features many of the elements that have become icons of the Golden Age of Detective Fiction, largely due to Christie's influence. “The Mysterious Affair at Styles” launched Agatha Christie's writing career. It is set in a large, isolated country manor. Christie and her husband subsequently named their house "Styles".

Apr 26, 2019
Anne of Green Gables
1696

Tonight, we'll be reading the classic 1908 novel, "Anne of Green Gables", written by Lucy Maud Montgomery. Written for all ages, it recounts the adventures of an orphan named Anne on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

Apr 24, 2019
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
1504

"The Hunchback of Notre Dame", is a French Gothic novel by Victor Hugo, published in 1831. Hugo wrote it largely to make his contemporaries more aware of the value of the Gothic architecture, which was neglected and often destroyed to be replaced by new buildings or defaced by replacement of parts of buildings in a newer style.The story is set in Paris in 1482 during the reign of Louis XI.

Apr 22, 2019
Old Fashioned Flowers
1600

Belgian author, Maurice Maeterlinck, wrote essay collection, "Old Fashioned Flowers" in 1905. Maeterlinck, who lived from 1862-1949, was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1911. This book is an ode to flowers and springtime

Apr 19, 2019
The Picture of Dorian Gray
1600

We'll read the opening to, "The Picture of Dorian Gray" written by Oscar Wilde and first published in 1890. The Gothic and philosophical story was considered offensive and indecent by Victorian English sensibilities.It was thus censored, sparking much controversy. The title character, Dorian Gray, sells his soul to make a portrait of himself age, rather than himself.

Apr 17, 2019
The Princess and the Goblin
1600

Published in 1872, "The Princess and the Goblin" is a children's fantasy novel. One of the most successful and beloved of Victorian fairy tales, George MacDonald's, "The Princess and the Goblin" tells the story of young Princess Irene and her friend Curdie, who must outwit the threatening goblins who live in caves beneath her mountain home. Anne Thaxter Eaton writes in, "A Critical History of Children's Literature" that, "The Princess and the Goblin" and its sequel, "quietly suggest in every incident ideas of courage and honor."

Apr 15, 2019
Flatland
1536

Written in 1884 by Edwin Abbott Abbott, "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" was written under the pseudonym, "A. Square." The book used the fictional two dimensional world of Flatland to comment on the hierarchy of Victorian Culture. The novella's more enduring contribution is it's examination of different dimensions.

Apr 12, 2019
Moby Dick
1600

"Ceteology" is the title of Chapter 32 of Herman Melville's 1851 "Moby Dick". This chapter is a detour from the progress of the plot, and Melville delves into the study of marine mammal like dolphins and whales. Moby Dick was a commercial flop at the time, out of print by Melville's death, and only found it's reputation as a great American novel in the 20th century. Author D.H. Lawrence called it, "one of the strangest and most wonderful books in the world," and "the greatest book of the sea ever written."

Apr 10, 2019
The Sea Fairies pt. 2
1600

Tonight, I'll be reading another excerpt from L. Frank Baum's, "The Sea Fairies", picking up more or less where we left off. Baum is best known for, "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz". "The Sea Fairies" is a magical underwater fantasy following Mayre Griffiths, nicknamed Trot, as she fulfills her wish of seeing a mermaid for the first time. Her adventure is filled with a journey through an underwater kingdom where she meets kings, queens, and villains along the way. When we left off, Trot and her old sailor friend, Cap'n Bill are paddling on a row boat along the shore and looking at sea caves.

Apr 08, 2019
The Early History of the Airplane
1600

Tonight, we'll be reading, "The Early History of the Airplane" written by Orville and Wilbur Wright. This book consists of three short essays about the beginnings of human flight. The Wright Brothers weren't the first to build and fly and aircraft, but they were the first to invent the ability to control the aircraft's wings and make modern flight possible in 1903. This is their recounting.

Apr 05, 2019
The Meaning of Relativity
1399

Tonight, I’ll be reading from Albert Einstein’s, "The Meaning of Relativity". This compilation of Princeton lectures address the consequences of Einstein's theories of relativity. Einstein 
developed these theories which became one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). Special relativity applies to elementary particles and their interactions, describing all their physical phenomena except gravity. General relativity explains the law of gravitation and its relation to other forces of nature. It applies to the cosmological and astrophysical realm.

Apr 03, 2019
The Bamboo-Cutter & The Moon-Child pt. 2
1504

Tonight, I’ll be continuing where we left off from a Japanese folk story called The Bamboo-Cutter and the Moon-Child. It is taken from a book originally published in 1908 by Yei Theodora Ozaki, from Tokyo. The author’s story was inspired by the Japanese classic, "Taketari Monogatari.” In the story, the father, the bamboo-cutter, beseeches his beautiful and magical moon-princess adopted daughter to pick one of five gallant knights as her husband. She has demanded further trials to vie for her love.

Apr 01, 2019
Vistas in Sicily
1600

"Vistas in Sicily" is a 1912 travel memoir by Arthur Stanley Riggs. Riggs was an American writer and historian, in 1898 he served in the navy for the Spanish American War, and decades later served as librarian for the Office of Censorship during World War II.

Mar 29, 2019
The Man in the Arena
1568

Tonight, I'll be reading the opening to the 1910 speech by Theodore Roosevelt entitled, "Citizenship in a Republic" at the Sorbonne in Paris. The speech is popularly known as "The Man in the Arena." To this day, someone who is heavily involved in a situation that requires courage, skill, or tenacity is sometimes referred to as "the man in the arena."

Mar 27, 2019
Viking Tale
1696

Tonight, I’ll be reading from the beginning of a book called "Viking Tales", written in 1902 by Jennie Hall. This book is focused around the story of Harald Fairhair, first king of Norway around the year 900, but also draws upon other sources to produce a view of Viking life.

Mar 25, 2019
The Flower Garden
1656

"The Flower Garden", by Ida Dandridge Bennett is a 1903 "how-to" horticultural book.

Mar 22, 2019
Peter Pan
1584

Tonight, I'll be reading the opening to the 1911 novel, "Peter Pan" by J. M. Barrie. Peter Pan is a mischievous boy who can fly and has many adventures on the island of Neverland.

Mar 20, 2019
Cave Diving in Tulum
1377

"Cave Diving in Tulum", is a story by Snoozecast. Tulum is the site of a pre-Columbian Mayan walled city which served as a major port for Coba, in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo . Cave diving is a popular attraction as the area boasts thousands of cenotes, or underground caves.

Mar 18, 2019
The Moonstone
1280

Generally considered to be the first detective novel, "The Moonstone", originally published in 1868, set the groundwork for the genre's format to come. The Moonstone of the title is a diamond, not to be confused with the semi-precious moonstone gem. It gained its name from its association with the Hindu god of the moon, Chandra. It was said to be protected by hereditary guardians on the orders of Vishnu, and to wax and wane in brilliance along with the light of the moon.

Mar 15, 2019
Song of Myself
1248

Tonight, I'll be reading part of a poem by Walt Whitman titled, "Song of Myself", found in his 1855 collection, "Leaves of Grass". "Song of Myself" is considered one of the most influential poems in American history. Rather than being written in a structured, metered form, it is written in a rhythmic, chant-like quality through a series of vignettes.

Mar 13, 2019
East of the Sun and West of the Moon
1248

Tonight, I'll be reading a story out of the "Blue Fairy Book" called, "East of the Sun and West of the Moon", edited by Andrew Lang in 1889. This story is a Norwegian fairy tale about the search for a lost husband.

Mar 11, 2019
Heidi
1216

Tonight, I’ll be reading the classic children’s story, "Heidi" published in 1881 by Swiss author Johanna Spyri. It is a novel about the life of a young girl in her grandfather's care in the Swiss Alps. Heidi is one of the best-selling books ever written and is  is among the best-known works of Swiss literature.

Mar 08, 2019
Mysticism and Logic
1216

Tonight, I’ll be reading the opening to a 1918 collection of essays titled, "Mysticism and Logic", by Bertrand Russell. Russell, a Nobel Prize winner, is one of the world’s best-known authorities on logic. In it, he challenges the romantic mysticism of the 19th century, positing instead his theory of logical atomism.

Mar 06, 2019
The Bamboo-Cutter & The Moon-Child
1392

Tonight, I’ll be reading a Japanese folk story called, "The Bamboo-Cutter and the Moon-Child". It is taken from a book originally published in 1908 by Yei Theodora Ozaki, from Tokyo. The author’s story was inspired by the Japanese classic, "Taketari Monogata."

Mar 04, 2019
Drifting North
1216

"Cattle Brands" by Andy Adams is a collection of short stories best heard around a campfire. This tale, called "Drifting North" is a brief anecdote of the troubles a band of cow punchers run into while moving a herd through some dangerous country. The author, whose most famous work "Log of a Cowboy", writes from personal experience. Adams spent ten years driving cattle on western trails in Texas during the 1880s.

Mar 01, 2019
Folk-Tales of Ceylon
1280

"Village Folk-Tales of Ceylon, Volume 3" was written by a British engineer living in colonial Ceylon during the Victorian era named Henry Parker. During his work as an engineer he developed an admiration for the skills displayed by the ancient Sinhalese at the time of the construction of their reservoirs.

Feb 27, 2019
The Sea Fairies
1240

While L. Frank Baum is best known for the 14 novels in the “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” series the prolific children’s author explored other fantastical worlds. “The Sea Fairies” is an magical underwater fantasy following Mayre Griffiths, nicknamed Trot or occasionally "Tiny Trot” as she fulfills her wish of seeing a mermaid for the first time. Her adventure is filled with a journey through an underwater kingdom where she meets kings, queens and villains along the way.

Feb 25, 2019
The Kentish Coast
1240

“The Kentish Coast” by Charles G. Harper is one of many self-illustrated travel books, exploring the regions, roads, coastlines, literary connections, old inns and more- of Britain.

Feb 22, 2019
Our Family Affairs, 1867-1896
1320

Originally published in 1920, “Our Family Affairs, 1867-1896” by E. F. Benson is a memoir by the precocious and prolific British author. Many of his works are famed for their wry and dry camp humor and social observation.

Feb 20, 2019
The Toboggan Nationals
1024

Tonight I'll be reading a Snoozecast original titled, "The Toboggan Nationals" - the story is a second person narrative that takes you on a cold winter car ride through the Maine's coastal landscape from owls head to your destination at The Toboggan National Championships in Camden.

Feb 18, 2019
Walden
1360

"Walden" is Henry David Thoreau's reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, originally published in 1854. The work is part personal declaration of independence , social experiment, voyage of spiritual discovery, satire, and — to some degree — a manual for self reliance.

Feb 15, 2019
The Prince and the Pauper
1360

Originally published in 1881, “The Prince and the Pauper” was Twain’s first attempt at historical fiction. In the novel, two boys identical in appearance exchange identities. Although written for children, “The Prince and the Pauper" is a critique of social inequality and has been adapted for the screen and television a number of times.

Feb 13, 2019
Beethoven, a character study
1240

Originally published in 1905, this biographical book on Beethoven gives a glimpse of the great composer who died in 1827.

Feb 11, 2019
Creation of the Teton Landscape
1360

Tonight I'll be reading an excerpt from, "Creation of the Teton Landscape" by David Love, John Calvin Reed and Kenneth Lee Pierce, originally published in 1968. This booklet, prepare by members of the U.S. Geological Survey, discusses how geological phenomena are responsible for the magnificent scenery of the Teton region.

Feb 08, 2019
Siddhartha
1248

"Siddhartha" by Herman Hesse was originally published in 1951. It deals with the spiritual journey of self-discovery by a man named Siddhartha during the time of the Gautama Buddha. The word Siddhartha is made up of two words in Sanskrit language, siddha (achieved) + artha (what was searched for), which together means "he who has found meaning (of existence)" or "he who has attained his goals." In fact, the Buddha's own name, before his renunciation, was Siddhartha Gautama, Prince of Kapilavastu. In this book, the Buddha is referred to as "Gotama."

Feb 06, 2019
My Robin
1240

"My Robin” by Frances Hodgson Burnett was originally published in 1912. Burnett was an American-English novelist and playwright. She is perhaps best known for her children’s stories, in particular “The Secret Garden.” “My Robin” is a charming anecdote that further expands upon the Robin featured in “The Secret Garden.”

Feb 04, 2019
The Flower Fields of Alpine Switzerland
1344

Tonight I'll be reading a snoozy opening to, "The Flower Fields of Alpine Switzerland" by George Flemwell, originally published in 1911. You'll hear lots of descriptions of mountains and flowers, and flowers on mountains.

Feb 01, 2019
The Young King
1072

Tonight I'll be reading the opening to "The Young King", a shorty story within Oscar Wilde’s "A House of Pomegranates". "A House of Pomegranates" was written in 1891 as a collection of fairy tales that Wilde may have said was "intended neither for the British child nor the British public.” "The Young King" tells the story of the illegitimate shepherd son of the recently dead king's daughter, and now the only heir to the kingdom.

Jan 30, 2019
What Murfee Remembered
1504

Tonight, I'll be reading a Snoozecast original story titled, “What Murfee Remembered”. In this short story, Murfee is a dog who lives in a city apartment building with his two humans. He has something important on the tip of his mind that he spends his day trying to remember.

Jan 28, 2019
The Time Machine
1421

Published in 1895, Wells paints a vision of the distant future in his first novel. Considered to be one of science fiction’s most important authors, Wells contributed to the genre with many notable works; “The Island of Doctor Moreau”, “The Invisible Man”, and “The War of the Worlds”. In his non-fiction futurologist works, Wells predicted the advent of airplanes, space travel and even Wikipedia – although he called it “Permanent World Encyclopaedia”. The term itself “Time Machine” was coined by Wells and is now universally used to refer to any such vehicle. - 'M'

Jan 25, 2019
Great Expectations
1329

"Great Expectations" is the thirteenth novel by Charles Dickens and one of his last completed novels. It depicts the personal growth and personal development of an orphan nicknamed Pip. It is Dickens's second novel, after David Copperfield, to be fully narrated in the first person. The novel was first published as a serial in a periodical between 1860 and 1861, and shortly thereafter was published as a novel. The novel is set in Kent and London in the early to mid-19th century and contains some of Dickens's most memorable scenes.

Jan 23, 2019
Miss Ludington's Sister
1568

"Miss Ludington’s Sister", written in 1885, is an earlier work by Edward Bellamy. The author later found fame as a socialist Utopian science fiction writer. This particular book, however, is a standard love story with a twist.

Jan 21, 2019
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
1440

Most listeners are familiar with the highly successful film adaptation starring Judy Garland released in 1939, "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" was originally published in 1900 written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by W. W. Denslow. The Library of Congress has declared Oz to be "America's greatest and best-loved homegrown fairy-tale." The story follows Dorothy a young girl from Kansas who is transported via cyclone (along with her dog Toto) to the magical Land of Oz.

Jan 18, 2019
How a Dear Little Couple Went Abroad
1472

This cutesy turn of the century children's book was originally published in 1900 by Mary Dow Brine, a New York based author who published several works in Harper's Magazine in the 1800s.

Jan 16, 2019
A House of Gentlefolk
1336

Also known as "Home of the Gentry" and "A Nest of the Gentry", "A House of Gentlefolk" is a novel by Ivan Turgenev published in 1859 Russia. It was enthusiastically received by Russian society and remained Turgenev's least controversial and most widely read novel until the end of the 19th century.

Jan 14, 2019
The Talking Bird | 1,001 Nights
1552

Also known as "The Arabian Nights," "One Thousand and One Nights" is a collection of Middle Eastern folk tales compiled in Arabic during the Islamic Golden Age, which ran from the 8th to the 14th centuries. Some tales themselves trace their roots back to ancient and medieval Arabic, Persian, Greek, Indian, Jewish and Turkish folklore and literature. What is common throughout all the editions of "Nights" is the initial frame story of the ruler and his wife and the framing device incorporated throughout the tales themselves. The stories proceed from this original tale; some are framed within other tales, while others begin and end of their own accord. Some editions contain only a few hundred nights, while others include 1,001 or more.

Jan 11, 2019
Journey to the Center of the Earth
1280

 This 1864 science fiction novel tells the story of professor Otto Lidenbrock, his nephew Axel and their guide Hans as they encounter many adventures and hazards traveling through the center of the earth (The english language edition which I'll be reading tonight changes the professor's name to Hardwigg and Axel's name to Harry) . The book was inspired by Charles Lyell's "Geological Evidences of the Antiquity of Man" written in 1863. Although this genre of subterranean fiction already existed long before Verne, "Journey to the Center of the Earth" considerably added to the genre's popularity and influenced later such writings.

Jan 09, 2019
Don Quixote
1224

Written in early 1600s Spain, "Don Quixote" is considered to be perhaps the most influential work from Spanish history. It depicts a nobleman who reads so many romantic adventure novels that he decides to become a knight. Don Quixote sees what he wants in the world, and the word "Quixotic" stems from this character - meaning impractically idealistic.

Jan 06, 2019