Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny

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Mark Kenny takes a weekly look at politics and public affairs with expert analysis and discussion from researchers at The Australian National University and beyond.

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Episode Date
Australia’s big chance with Jim Chalmers
36:37

Treasurer of Australia Jim Chalmers joins Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga to discuss the future of Australia’s economy and society on the first episode of Democracy Sausage for 2023.


Despite the simultaneous and interconnected crises ravaging the global economy, can Australia find a way forward that leaves the country stronger? How can the economy support a more robust and inclusive democracy? And what legacy does the new treasurer want to leave? On this first episode of Democracy Sausage for 2023, the Hon Dr Jim Chalmers MP joins Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to discuss Australia’s economic future and his forthcoming essay in The Monthly, ‘Capitalism after the crises’.


The Hon Dr Jim Chalmers MP is Treasurer of Australia and Member for Rankin.


Dr Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts.


This podcast is produced by The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jan 26, 2023
The third Annual Democracy Sausage Awards
55:58

Roll out the red carpet and prepare to get fancy, it’s that time of year again - we present the third edition of the very serious and highly revered Annual Democracy Sausage Awards.


Which international leader stood tall in the performance of a lifetime? Who stole the show as Best New Musical Talent? And who selflessly gave it all for the ensemble as Best Supporting Minister? On the Democracy Sausage night-of-nights, Mark Kenny, Marija Taflaga and Frank Bongiorno give out the gongs for the best and worst of politics in 2022.

 

Frank Bongiorno AM is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian and Professor of History at The Australian National University (ANU).


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Dec 13, 2022
Severed ties and succession plans
59:19

On the penultimate episode of Democracy Sausage for 2022, Benjamin Jones joins us to discuss the future of the republican movement, before Ian McAllister and Sarah Cameron examine the results of the new Australian Election Survey.


A referendum to change Australia’s head of state might be off the cards for now politically, but how might the republican movement proceed as its proponents seek to break from Britain? Is the election of a large parliamentary crossbench a one-off, or are Australians giving the major parties the flick? And why did women divorce themselves from the Coalition in record numbers at this year’s federal election? Dr Benjamin Jones from Central Queensland University joins Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to discuss what an Australian republic might look like in practice, before Professor Ian McAllister and Dr Sarah Cameron join the barbecue to pour over the findings of the Australian Election Survey.


Benjamin T Jones is Senior Lecturer in history at Central Queensland University, with a focus on Australian political history, especially republicanism and national identity.


Ian McAllister is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at The Australian National University, and from 1997 until 2004 was Director of the Research School of Social Sciences at the ANU.


Sarah Cameron is Senior Lecturer in Public Policy at Griffith University’s School of Government and International Relations. Her research focuses on comparative political behaviour, the politics of crises, elections, and Australian politics.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Senior Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Dec 06, 2022
Putting down the megaphone
54:11

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, author and head of The Australia Institute’s international and security affairs program Allan Behm joins Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s diplomatic challenges and the fallout from the Victorian election.


Has the new federal government changed the way Australia does diplomacy? Will progress in reconciling internal divisions over race and gender change how Australia is perceived, and how the country carries itself, on the international stage? And after a comprehensive loss in the Victorian state election, is the Liberal Party suffering an identity crisis? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Head of the International and Security Affairs program at The Australia Institute Allan Behm joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s diplomacy in Asia and the Pacific and the results of Victoria’s state election.


Allan Behm is Head of the International and Security Affairs program at The Australia Institute. He spent 30 years in the Australian Public Service, was Chief of Staff to Minister for Climate Change and Industry Greg Combet, and Senior Advisor to the Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs Senator Penny Wong.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Show notes | The following were mentioned during this episode:


‘Sean Turnell speaks to 7.30 on how he coped in Myanmar prisons’, 7.30, Australian Broadcasting Corporation


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Nov 29, 2022
Victoria votes after a ‘nasty’ campaign
48:48

With just days remaining before Victorians head to the polls in the first state election since the pandemic, Andrea Carson and Phoebe Hayman from Melbourne’s La Trobe University join Democracy Sausage to discuss the campaign.  


In an election that’s included hundreds of promises from both major parties, why has so much of the coverage focused on personality politics? With the statewide lockdowns still fresh in people’s minds, what role is health policy playing in the Victorian election campaign? And what electoral impact might the ‘teal’ and other independent candidates have, just months after the federal crossbench reached record numbers? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Andrea Carson and Phoebe Hayman from La Trobe University join Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to preview the Victorian election.


This episode was recorded on Tuesday 22 November.


Andrea Carson is a Professor of Political Communication in the Department of Politics, Media and Philosophy at La Trobe University.


Phoebe Hayman is a PhD candidate and casual academic in politics at La Trobe University. Her current research focuses on the political participation of independent candidates in the 2022 federal election.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Senior Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Nov 22, 2022
Trump’s midterm misfires
51:38

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Jennifer Hunt joins Marija Taflaga and Mark Kenny to discuss the Republican ‘red wave’ that wasn’t in the United States midterm elections.


With the predicted ‘red wave’ of Republican victories at the United States midterm elections failing to materialise, what does the future hold for the party? Will Trump run again in 2024 and, if he does, what are his chances of securing the Republican nomination? And, buoyed by an above-expectations performance, will Biden be on the ticket in 2024 as well, or are Democrats working on a succession plan? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Macquarie University’s Dr Jennifer Hunt joins Dr Marija Taflaga and Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the results of this month’s midterm elections in the United States.


Jennifer Hunt is a Senior Lecturer in Cyber and Security Studies at Macquarie University, specialising in the national security of critical systems such as cyber and energy.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Nov 15, 2022
Dreamers and schemers with Frank Bongiorno
49:48

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, historian and pod regular Frank Bongiorno joins Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga to talk about Australia’s political history and his new book, Dreamers and Schemers.


How do colonial attitudes towards resource extraction impact Australia’s political culture today? How did events in other parts of the British Empire shape debates in Australia prior to federation? And what role has religious sectarianism played throughout Australia’s political history? The Australian National University’s Professor Frank Bongiorno joins Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to discuss political actors and movements in Australia, from prior to European contact through to the pandemic, and his new book, Dreamers and Schemers: A Political History of Australia.


Frank Bongiorno AM is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian and Professor of History at The Australian National University (ANU).


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Nov 08, 2022
Britain's bad decade?
46:45

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, regular UK-based guests Elizabeth Ames and Sophia Gaston join Mark Kenny to discuss the British government’s leadership chaos and the ongoing Brexit fallout.


Is the elevation of Rishi Sunak to the prime ministership the end of the Conservative Party’s leadership turmoil? What impact might this instability have at the next national election? And what will a new prime minister mean for the United Kingdom’s relationships with Europe and beyond? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Chair of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London Elizabeth Ames and Head of Foreign Policy and UK Resilience at Policy Exchange Sophia Gaston join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the recent upheaval in British politics.


Sophia Gaston is Head of Foreign Policy and UK Resilience at Policy Exchange, one of the United Kingdom's leading think tanks. She is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Global Affairs at the London School of Economics and Political Science and an Academic Fellow at the European Policy Centre in Brussels.


Elizabeth Ames is the Chief Operating Officer of Atalanta, a mission-driven firm with a focus on advancing women’s leadership worldwide. She is the Chair of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London and a Director of the Britain-Australia Society.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Nov 01, 2022
Windfalls, storm clouds, and the ‘r' word
50:52

On this Democracy Sausage, The Conversation’s Peter Martin and The Australian National University’s Jenny Gordon join Mark Kenny to examine the new Australian government’s first federal budget.


Why is Australia experiencing fears of a recession and high levels of household spending simultaneously? Will an ‘honest conversation’ about the economy include the possibility of raising taxes - or scrapping the Stage 3 tax cuts? And what should opposition leader Peter Dutton do in response to the new government’s first budget? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, former Department of Foreign Affairs Chief Economist Dr Jenny Gordon and Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation Peter Martin AM join Professor Mark Kenny to examine Australia’s federal budget.


Jenny Gordon is an Honorary Professor at the Centre for Social Research and Methods at The Australian National University and a non-resident fellow at the Lowy Institute.


Peter Martin AM is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Oct 26, 2022
In for the long haul?
42:17

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Bill Browne from The Australia Institute joins political scientist Marija Taflaga and host Mark Kenny to discuss what leads to one-term governments, political instability, and the razor-thin margins between success and failure in politics.


Why have Australian states and territories seen a rise in one-term governments in recent years while there hasn’t been a similar trend at the federal level? How have governments at all levels responded to global volatility? And how do governments with a thumping majority behave differently from those with a very small one? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Director of The Australia Institute’s Democracy and Accountability Program Bill Browne joins Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to discuss his new research on one-term state and territory governments.


Bill Browne is the Director of the Democracy and Accountability Program at The Australia Institute. His work spans the use of opinion polling, carbon capture and storage, truth in political advertising reforms, digital technology, proportionate fines and the role of the states and the Senate in Australian democracy.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of the ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode


One-term state and territory governments in Australia, Bill Browne, (2022)


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.




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Oct 10, 2022
The big teal with Simon Holmes à Court
40:56

Climate 200 Convenor Simon Holmes à Court joins Marija Taflaga and Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage to discuss the success of independent candidates at the 2022 federal election and his new book, The Big Teal.


Why were so many independent candidates successful at Australia’s May 2022 federal election, a number of whom won in traditionally safe Liberal Party seats? Will this shift mean that more people - especially professional women - have a permanent pathway into politics that bypasses the major parties? And how has technology disrupted the traditional business model of Australian politics? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, clean energy investor, philanthropist and Convenor of Climate 200 Simon Holmes à Court joins Dr Marija Taflaga and Professor Mark Kenny to discuss his new book, The Big Teal, and what’s next for Climate 200.


Simon Holmes à Court is a clean technology investor, Convenor of Climate 200, and author of The Big Teal.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Oct 04, 2022
Will Russia ‘escalate to de-escalate’?
42:28

International relations expert Charles Miller joins Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage to discuss the Ukrainian forces’ ability to strike back against Russia, Putin’s chaotic military mobilisation, and the nuclear threat.


What does the effectiveness of Ukraine’s offensive operations to push back against Russian forces mean for the future of the conflict? What does the incompetence of the Russian government’s attempts to mobilise citizens to fight reveal about the regime? And what is the likelihood that nuclear weapons are used by Russian President Vladimir Putin in this conflict as it drags on? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Lecturer in International Relations at The Australian National University Dr Charles Miller joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the status of Russia’s illegal war on Ukraine.

 

Charles Miller is a Lecturer in strategic studies at ANU School of Politics and International Relations. His research is focused on global strategy, military effectiveness and public opinion, and foreign policy.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Sep 27, 2022
Humanity’s moment with Joëlle Gergis
43:50

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, climate scientist and lead author of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Sixth Assessment report Joëlle Gergis joins us to discuss climate change and why this may be the most significant moment in human history. 


Will the 2020s be the decade when humanity rises to the challenge of climate change? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Dr Joëlle Gergis - award-winning climate scientist from The Australian National University - joins Dr Marija Taflaga and Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the science of climate change, the opportunity for the international community to change course, and her new book, Humanity’s Moment : A Climate Scientist’s Case for Hope.


Joëlle Gergis is a Senior Lecturer at ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society and an award-winning climate scientist and writer. Her latest book is Humanity’s Moment: A Climate Scientist’s Case for Hope.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Sep 20, 2022
Orders of precedence
39:59

On this Democracy Sausage, journalist David Speers, political scientist Marija Taflaga, and host Mark Kenny discuss the passing of Queen Elizabeth II and the politics surrounding Australia’s slated stage three tax cuts.


What will the death of Australia’s head of state mean for the future of both the republican debate and the Voice to Parliament? And is the government facing a choice between bad policy and broken promises on the legislated stage three tax cuts? David Speers, host of Insiders on the ABC, joins Dr Marija Taflaga and Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the difficult choices facing the government around the stage three tax cuts and what the death of Queen Elizabeth II means for Australia on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


David Speers is an Australian journalist and host of the ABC’s Insiders.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Sep 13, 2022
Fair game with Andrew Leigh
41:32

This week on Democracy Sausage, parliamentarian Andrew Leigh laces up the boots to give 110 per cent alongside Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga, tackling the economy, wrestling with Australian sporting culture, and serving his ace new book, Fair Game. 


Should business leaders be better at giving ‘full credit’ to the team? How can Australia be better at scouting up-and-coming economic talent? And why has sport increasingly decided to hit social issues head on, rather than trying to side-step them? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, the Hon Dr Andrew Leigh MP, Assistant Minister for Competition, Charities and Treasury, joins Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to talk about the future of the Australian economy, last week’s Jobs and Skills Summit in Canberra, and his new book, Fair Game: Lessons from Sport for a Fairer Society & a Stronger Economy


Andrew Leigh is Assistant Minister for Competition, Charities and Treasury and Member for Fenner.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Sep 05, 2022
Crikey! Is Murdoch’s defamation case an own goal?
39:39

Defamation expert and President of the Australian Bar Association Matt Collins joins Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga on this episode of Democracy Sausage to discuss Lachlan Murdoch’s defamation suit against Crikey and what it might mean for the future of Australian media.


Will Lachlan Murdoch’s defamation case against Private Media, a small Australian media company, do News Corp’s reputation more harm than good? Will the defendants be able to prove that the publication of the article in question was in the public interest? And are Australia’s defamation laws fit for purpose in this digital age? President of the Australian Bar Association Matt Collins AM QC joins Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga on this episode of Democracy Sausage to discuss Lachlan Murdoch’s defamation action against Australian news publication Crikey.


Matthew Collins AM QC is President of the Australian Bar Association and a Senior Fellow at the Melbourne Law School. He is the author of Collins on Defamation, a leading text on the law of defamation in England and Wales, and all three editions of The Law of Defamation and the Internet, the standard international text on the application of principles of defamation law to online publications.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Aug 30, 2022
The messiah complex
44:53

Kieran Gilbert, Chief News Anchor at Sky News Australia, joins The Australian National University’s Marija Taflaga and Mark Kenny to discuss former Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s secret ministerial appointments. 


Why did Scott Morrison secretly appoint himself as minister in five portfolios during his tenure? What are the implications of the former prime minister’s actions for Australia’s democracy? And why did the leaders of the National Party or the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet not do more to ensure there was greater transparency? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Kieran Gilbert from Sky News Australia and Dr Marija Taflaga from ANU School of Politics and International Relations join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss Scott Morrison’s multiple ministries.


Kieran Gilbert is an Australian journalist currently serving as Chief News Anchor at Sky News Australia.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Aug 23, 2022
The net good of the net
40:28

Shirley Leitch, Paul Pickering and Katrina Grant from The Australian National University join Mark Kenny to discuss how to make social media a safe and constructive space.


How has social media changed the way we see the world? In the wake of the 2019 Christchurch massacre and the January 6 insurrection, how can policymakers ensure these platforms don’t continue to be hives of violence and discrimination? And is social media a threat or a positive for democracy? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, The Australian National University's Emeritus Professors Shirley Leitch and Paul Pickering and Dr Katrina Grant join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the Internet, democracy, and their new publication, Rethinking Social Media and Extremism.


Rethinking Social Media and Extremism, edited by Shirley Leitch and Paul Pickering, is free to download from ANU Press.


Shirley Leitch is Emeritus Professor and a Professorial Fellow at The Australian National University (ANU) Australian Studies Institute. She was formerly Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education & Global Education at ANU, and Dean at the ANU College of Business and Economics.


Katrina Grant is Senior Lecturer in Digital Humanities at ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences.


Paul Pickering is a Professor and Director of ANU Australian Studies Institute.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Aug 16, 2022
Ukraine's journey from cold war flashpoint to crowdfunded war
46:39

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Charles Miller and Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to review the past six months of the war in Ukraine and the road ahead for democracy.


Following Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s national address with The Australian National University last week, and as Russia’s invasion of Ukraine enters its sixth month of warfare, how have Ukraine and its Western allies responded? What have those allies learnt from this invasion? And what does this geopolitical situation mean for the rising tensions over the status of Taiwan? Dr Charles Miller and Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Charles Miller is a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations with a focus on military conflict.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Full show notes at policyforum.net. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Aug 09, 2022
The dismal science of economic management
57:38

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Peter Martin joins Mark Kenny to unpack the latest economic update to the nation, and challenges ahead for the Australian and global economy.


What do unemployment and inflation numbers actually tell us about the state of the economy? How do economists account for Australia’s most vulnerable people? And what does an independent review of the Reserve Bank of Australia say about the government's approach to the economy? Peter Martin joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Peter Martin AM is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU) and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Full show notes at policyforum.net. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Aug 02, 2022
Back in the bubble
46:59

On this parliamentary sitting day after Australia’s “earthquake election”, Frank Bongiorno, Marija Taflaga and Mark Kenny discuss some of the challenges facing the new government and what kind of prime minister Anthony Albanese might be.


How will the new Labor government manage negotiations with the Greens and the independent members of the crossbench? How will the Liberal-National opposition manage the question of action on climate change? And how might Anthony Albanese draw on the leadership styles of Labor Party prime ministers of the past? The Australian National University’s Professor Frank Bongiorno, Dr Marija Taflaga, and Professor Mark Kenny discuss these questions and more on the new episode of Democracy Sausage.


Frank Bongiorno AM is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian and Professor of History at The Australian National University (ANU).


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jul 26, 2022
Multiculturalism in Australian politics
52:05

Host Mark Kenny discusses multiculturalism in the Australian political system with Sukhmani Khorana, Fan Yang, and Marija Taflaga on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


What did we learn about the make-up of Australian society from the national census? How have migrant voters engaged with, and sometimes been instrumentalised by, political parties? And is it time for political actors to stop thinking about migrant groups as ‘voting blocs’ and instead show greater appreciation for the diversity and complexity of these communities? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Western Sydney University’s Dr Sukhmani Khorana, Deakin University’s Fan Yang, and Dr Marija Taflaga from The Australian National University join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss multiculturalism in the Australian community and political system.


Sukhmani Khorana is Vice-Chancellor’s Senior Research Fellow at the Young and Resilient Research Centre at Western Sydney University. Sukhmani's research focuses on diasporic film and culture, refugee media and empathy, and multiculturalism.


Fan Yang is a Research Assistant in the Faculty of Arts and Education at Deakin University. Fan researches the effects of large-scale international social media platforms in terms of cross-jurisdictional tensions and expectations, and their cross-border effects on political activity and identity.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jul 19, 2022
Bye bye, Boris
47:05

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Elizabeth Ames and Sophia Gaston join Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga to unpack the Conservative Party’s leadership spill and the legacy of Boris Johnson.


What will Boris Johnson’s political legacy be and how might it shape the future of the United Kingdom? How will the current economic crisis influence the policies and priorities of Britain’s Conservative Party into the future? And what qualities will voters look for in a new leader - more ‘pizzazz’ or just competence? Britain-based pod regulars Elizabeth Ames and Sophia Gaston join Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to discuss these questions and more on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Elizabeth Ames is the Chief Operating Officer of Atalanta, a mission-driven firm with a focus on advancing women’s leadership worldwide. She is the Chair of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London and a Director of the Britain-Australia Society.


Sophia Gaston is Director of the British Foreign Policy Group, an independent think tank focusing on advancing knowledge and debate around Britain’s international affairs. She is also a Research Fellow in the Institute for Global Affairs at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and an Academic Fellow at the European Policy Centre in Brussels.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Full show notes at policyforum.net. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jul 12, 2022
Judging America’s democratic decline
48:30

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Jennifer Hunt joins Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga to discuss recent events in the United States, including the Supreme Court’s overturn of Roe v Wade, loosening gun control, and the Capitol riot hearings against the backdrop of the health of the country’s democracy.


Is former President Trump’s influence only now finding its full expression? Is the politicisation of the Supreme Court diminishing the separation of church and state and chipping away at the bones of democracy? How closely do Australians share values with Americans, and will tendencies of tyranny or patriotism creep into Australian politics too? Jennifer Hunt joins Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to discuss these questions and more on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Jennifer Hunt is a Lecturer at the US Studies Centre and a Lecturer at Macquarie University's Department of Security Studies and Criminology. Recently she worked with the World Health Organization on combating COVID-19 disinformation, publishing a report with the Global Health Security Network examining the national security ramifications of COVID-19 conspiracy theories.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


If you or someone you know is impacted by sexual assault, family or domestic violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit www.1800RESPECT.org.au. In an emergency, call 000.


Full show notes at policyforum.net. Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jul 05, 2022
The voters’ verdict
53:57

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Nicholas Biddle and Intifar Chowdhury join Mark Kenny to discuss what was important to Australian voters at the recent federal election.


How did voters’ priorities change throughout the election campaign? Did the COVID-19 pandemic lead to a rise in electoral empathy? And do younger Australians think about their vote differently to older age groups? Associate Director of the ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods Nicholas Biddle and PhD Candidate at the School of Politics and International Relations Intifar Chowdhury join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more based on the findings of a new ANUpoll/Comparative Study of Electoral Systems survey.


Intifar Chowdhury is an Associate Lecturer at the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her research focuses on young people and aversion towards democratic participation.


Nicholas Biddle is Associate Director of the Centre for Social Research at ANU. He previously held a Senior Research Officer and Assistant Director position in the Methodology Division of the Australian Bureau of Statistics.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jun 28, 2022
The digital age of political advertising
57:09

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Ed Coper joins Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga to discuss how the teals’ disrupted the traditional media and political machine. 

 

What are the secrets behind the teals’ communication success? How does digital and creative messaging disrupt the media machine? And what can the major parties learn from the way teals’ candidates ran their campaigns? Communications strategist and a director at media agency Populares, Ed Coper joins Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to discuss these questions and more on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Ed Coper is a director of Populares, the communications agency responsible for the digital advertising for the major teal independent campaigns. He is also the author of Facts and Other Lies: Welcome to the Disinformation Age.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Show notes | The following publications and articles were mentioned in this episode:


Secrets from the teals’ digital war room: we created a direct line to voters and now TV political ads are dead, Ed Coper, (2022)

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jun 22, 2022
Sub failures and Australia's gas crisis with Rex Patrick
52:45

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, independent Senator Rex Patrick joins Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga to discuss Australia’s “total policy failure” on submarines, solving issues in the gas market, and why this parliament must be more transparent than the last.


How did Australia get to a point of policy failure in its Future Submarine program? Despite producing “more gas than you can poke a stick at”, why is Australia experiencing a ‘gas crisis’? And what comes next for the self-described “accidental senator”? Outgoing independent Senator for South Australia Rex Patrick joins Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga to discuss these questions and more on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Rex Patrick is an Independent Senator for South Australia, having held office since 2017.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jun 07, 2022
The independents
54:47

On this episode, our panel of political scientists - Carolyn Hendriks, Shirley Leitch and Marija Taflaga - join Mark Kenny to discuss the unprecedented success of independent candidates in the federal election.


How important was grassroots community engagement to the success of independent candidates in the recent federal election? What might the future hold for regional candidates who, despite not being elected to parliament like many of their metropolitan counterparts, picked up a significant proportion of the first preference vote? And how will the new independent members of the crossbench fare in parliament without the logistical and organisational support of a political party? Professor Carolyn Hendriks and Emeritus Professor Shirley Leitch from The Australian National University join Dr Marija Taflaga and Professor Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s so-called ‘teal wave’ on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Shirley Leitch is Emeritus Professor and Professorial Fellow at The Australian Studies Institute at The Australian National University.


Carolyn Hendriks is Professor of Public Policy and Governance at Crawford School of Public Policy. Carolyn’s work examines the democratic aspects of contemporary governance, particularly with respect to participation, deliberation, inclusion, and representation.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

May 31, 2022
A new political climate?
38:53

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, acclaimed journalists Karen Middleton and Malcolm Farr join Mark Kenny to pick apart the Australian federal election result. 


After a massive election loss, how will the Liberal Party recover - and will it do so by stepping to the left or the right? Is the ‘teal wave’ likely to be temporary, or will a more varied electoral map become a permanent feature of Australian politics? And what impact will the make-up of the senate have on the Albanese government’s legislative agenda? Karen Middleton, Chief Political Correspondent for The Saturday Paper, and Malcolm Farr, former National Political Editor of news.com.au, join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the outcome of Australia’s federal election and what it might mean for the country’s future.


Karen Middleton is Chief Political Correspondent for The Saturday Paper.


Malcolm Farr is a political journalist with over 40 years' experience. He was National Political Editor of news.com.au and worked for a number of publications including The Daily TelegraphThe Daily Mirror, Brisbane Sun and The Australian.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

May 24, 2022
The final countdown
1:00:19

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, journalist Kieran Gilbert, author Judith Brett, and political scientist Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny fire up the barbecue one last time before Australians head to the polls. 


After months of anticipation, Australia’s political future is about to be decided. So how have Scott Morrison and Anthony Albanese performed throughout the federal election campaign? What will the result on Saturday mean for critical policy issues like climate change and economic reform? And how will the losing party recover? Acclaimed author and Emeritus Professor at La Trobe University Judith Brett and Chief News Anchor at Sky News Australia Kieran Gilbert join Dr Marija Taflaga and Professor Mark Kenny on this special live recording of Democracy Sausage.


Kieran Gilbert is an Australian journalist currently serving as Chief News Anchor at Sky News Australia.


Judith Brett is Emeritus Professor of Politics at La Trobe University. Her books include Doing Politics: Writing on Public LifeRobert Menzies’ Forgotten PeopleThe Enigmatic Mr DeakinFrom Secret Ballot to Democracy Sausage, and four Quarterly Essays.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

May 19, 2022
The state of the debate
46:20

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Frank Bongiorno, Marija Taflaga and Mark Kenny fire up the barbecue for the sizzling penultimate episode before Australia's election day.


Will the second prime ministerial debate of this election campaign go down as the worst ever? What might the record numbers of voters pre-polling mean for the major parties’ chances of winning government? And what might the future hold for the Labor, Liberal and National parties after the election? Historian Professor Frank Bongiorno joins Dr Marija Taflaga and Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Join Mark and our expert panel in the last week of the election campaign for our final Democracy Sausage live show before polling day. Refreshments will be served from 5.30pm and the show starts at 6.30pm on Wednesday 18 May. Tickets are free but registrations are essential.


Frank Bongiorno AM is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian and Professor of History at ANU.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

May 10, 2022
LIVE SHOW | Election policy peril
1:00:20

In this live Democracy Sausage and Policy Forum Pod crossover episode, Nicholas Biddle joins Sharon Bessell, Arnagretta Hunter and Mark Kenny to talk about what issues matter to voters and why good policy so often gets lost in translation in Australia’s political system.


How can political candidates and policymakers address long term, intergenerational issues like climate change? What do voters mean when they report being concerned about cost of living? And what might it mean for the legislature if Australians voted in a significant number of independents and members of minor parties at this federal election? Associate Director of The Australian National University (ANU) Centre for Social Research and Methods Professor Nicholas Biddle joins Professor Sharon Bessell, Dr Arnagretta Hunter and Professor Mark Kenny for this special live election crossover episode.


Nicholas Biddle is Associate Director of the Centre for Social Research at ANU. He previously held a Senior Research Officer and Assistant Director position in the Methodology Division of the Australian Bureau of Statistics.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of both the Children’s Policy Centre and the Poverty and Inequality Research Centre at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Arnagretta Hunter is the Human Futures Fellow at ANU College of Health and Medicine, a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

 

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

May 05, 2022
Australia’s crunch point
48:48

With political and economic storm clouds brewing across the globe, Mark Kenny, Marija Taflaga, and University of New South Wales economist Richard Holden discuss what these challenges mean for Australia and the federal election campaign.


How concerned should Australians be about the state of the global economy? What might these economic storm clouds mean for Australian politics? And how do the economic policy proposals put forward in the federal election campaign stack up? Professor Richard Holden from the University of New South Wales and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the rise of populism and the Australian economy on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Join us at The Australian National University on Wednesday 4 May for our Policy Forum Pod x Democracy Sausage election live show. Recording starts at 5.45pm, refreshments will be provided, and tickets are free. Register now.


Richard Holden is Professor of Economics at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Director of the Economics of Education Knowledge Hub UNSW Business School, and President of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

 

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Apr 26, 2022
LIVE SHOW | Federal election special
58:56

On the 200th episode of Democracy Sausage, recorded live at The Australian National University, youth advocate Yasmin Poole, journalist Ross Solly, and political scientist Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to discuss the first week of the election campaign and what it means for Australia.


How important are election campaigns, really? What surprises may emerge from women and young people voting? And should journalists be asking ‘gotcha’ questions, or should they ‘just Google it?’ Youth advocate and Plan International’s National Ambassador Yasmin Poole, journalist Ross Solly, and political scientist Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny in front of a live audience at The Australian National University to discuss the first week of the election campaign.

 

Yasmin Poole is a public speaker, board director and youth advocate. Yasmin is currently Plan International's National Ambassador and an advocate for girls' rights to be recognised around the world.


Ross Solly is an experienced journalist and broadcaster, having spent 20 years with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. In his time at the ABC, he was a breakfast radio presenter, political journalist and sports editor.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Apr 21, 2022
The federal election and Ukraine’s resistance
52:24

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, the Australian Electoral Commission’s Evan Ekin-Smyth joins us to talk about the incredible logistical effort that’s going into this federal election, before political scientist Charles Miller joins Mark Kenny to discuss the Ukraine crisis.


How is the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) preparing for the country’s largest peacetime logistical exercise, the federal election? And what impact is the COVID-19 pandemic having on the organisation of next month’s vote? Director of Media and Digital Engagement at the AEC Evan Ekin-Smyth joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the mechanics of the upcoming federal election, before Dr Charles Miller from The Australian National University joins the show to examine the Ukraine crisis.


Evan Ekin-Smyth is Digital Engagement Director at the Australian Electoral Commission, the independent federal agency in charge of organising, conducting and supervising federal Australian elections, by-elections, and referenda.


Charles Miller is a Lecturer in strategic studies at ANU School of Politics and International Relations. His research is focused on global strategy, military effectiveness and public opinion, and foreign policy.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Want to see Democracy Sausage live? On Wednesday 20 April, we’ll be celebrating our 200th episode with a live election special. Join Mark, Marija and some very special guests at The Australian National University for our first ever live show - register now.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Apr 12, 2022
On your marks…
45:59

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, historian Chris Wallace and political scientist Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to discuss the imminent federal election campaign.


Did Prime Minister Scott Morrison miss an opportunity to call an election at the end of 2021? How important is approval of a prime minister or opposition leader for a party’s prospects at an election? And how will the internal turmoil in the Liberal Party that’s gone public impact the campaign? University of Canberra’s Associate Professor Chris Wallace and The Australian National University’s Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Chris Wallace is Associate Professor at the University of Canberra and author of How To Win An Election.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 05, 2022
Factional fights and budget booby traps
49:12

Mark Kenny takes a look at the federal budget and pre-election politics with political scientists Marija Taflaga and Jill Sheppard and economist Leonora Risse on this episode of Democracy Sausage


Are the measures in the federal budget the right ones for Australia’s economic recovery? With factional battles holding up Liberal Party preselections in New South Wales, will Scott Morrison call the election this week or will he be forced to wait? And what have the accusations levelled by Senator Concetta Fierravanti-Wells at the prime minister and others meant for the government’s ability to sell its budget? Dr Leonora Risse, Senior Lecturer in Economics at RMIT University, and Dr Jill Sheppard and Dr Marija Taflaga from ANU School of Politics and International Relations join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss this pre-election budget on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Leonora Risse is a Senior Lecturer in Economics at RMIT University. She specialises in gender equality in the workforce and is a Research Fellow with the Women’s Leadership Institute Australia.


Jill Sheppard is a researcher and Lecturer in the School of Politics and International Relations at The Australian National University. Her research focuses on why people participate in politics, what opinions they hold and why, and how both are shaped by political institutions and systems.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 31, 2022
Will the government get a budget bounce?
45:55

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny previews the federal budget with Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation Peter Martin and Marija Taflaga from The Australian National University.


What will the Morrison government’s recent attempts to deliver services, rather than leaving delivery to the states and territories, mean for it electorally? What can voters expect to come out of the upcoming federal budget? And will the government get a post-budget bounce just before an election is called? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Visiting Fellow at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy Peter Martin and Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny.


Peter Martin AM is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU) and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 24, 2022
No enemies, no friends with Allan Behm
38:55

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Allan Behm - former public servant and advisor to Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs Penny Wong - joins Mark Kenny to discuss how Australia could gain greater relevance on the international stage.


What impact does Australia’s failure to reconcile with dark aspects of its past have on its position on the international stage? Despite having many structural advantages, why does the country fail to execute its role as a middle power? And how is the securitisation of politics in Australia undermining public policy-making? Allan Behm, Director of International Affairs and Security at the Australia Institute and author of No enemies No Friends: Restoring Australia’s Global Relevance, joins Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Allan Behm is Head of the International and Security Affairs program at The Australia Institute. Allan spent 30 years in the Australian Public Service, as a member of the Australian diplomatic service, the Prime Minister’s Department, the Department of Defence and the Attorney General’s Department. He specialised in international relations, defence strategy, counter-terrorism and law enforcement policy.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 15, 2022
When trust collapses
36:53

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Tony Ward and Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to talk about perceptions of corruption and the importance of trust in the political process.


Why has Australia fallen down the Corruption Perceptions Index in recent years? What does this mean for the country’s economy and political institutions? And what can governments do to restore trust and prevent cynicism from becoming corrosive? Dr Tony Ward from the University of Melbourne joins The Australian National University (ANU)’s Dr Marija Taflaga and Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Tony Ward is a Fellow in Historical Studies at the University of Melbourne.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

 

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 08, 2022
Russia and the invasion of Ukraine
37:17

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, former Russia correspondent Monica Attard and Dean of ANU College of Asia and the Pacific Helen Sullivan join Mark Kenny to discuss the crisis in Ukraine.


What lessons should policymakers be learning from recent Russian history? How are Russian citizens responding to President Vladimir Putin’s aggression in Ukraine? And what will be the economic impacts of the invasion and subsequent sanctions in Russia and throughout the world? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, former Russia correspondent for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) Professor Monica Attard and Dean of The Australian National University (ANU) College of Asia and the Pacific Professor Helen Sullivan join Professor Mark Kenny.


Monica Attard OAM is Co-Director of the Centre For Media Transition at the University of Technology Sydney's Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. She is best-known for hosting some of the ABC's flagship programs, including PM, The World Today and Media Watch, and was the ABC’s Russia correspondent during the collapse of the Soviet Union.


Helen Sullivan is Dean of the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 01, 2022
The Ukraine crisis and Britain’s #PartyGate
40:47

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Director of the British Foreign Policy Group Sophia Gaston joins Mark Kenny in the studio to discuss the investigation into alleged lockdown breaches at Downing Street and the unfolding Ukraine crisis.

 

What does the Ukraine crisis mean for the rest of Europe and the world? What implications will the conflict have for China and ongoing tensions in Asia? And will Boris Johnson weather the political storm over allegations that lockdown restrictions were breached repeatedly at Number 10 during the height of the pandemic? Pod regular Sophia Gaston, Director of the British Foreign Policy Group, joins Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage to discuss these questions and more.


Sophia Gaston is Director of the British Foreign Policy Group, an independent think tank focusing on advancing knowledge and debate around Britain’s international affairs.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 22, 2022
Morrison’s pre-election pitch
42:31

On the first episode of Democracy Sausage of 2022, Marija Taflaga and Frank Bongiorno join Mark Kenny at the barbecue hotplate to discuss the Omicron omnishambles and public perceptions of the prime minister.


What did Australia’s chaotic COVID-19 summer reveal about the country’s policy-making? Are the prime minister’s attempts to curry favour with the public resonating? And what do the events of the last few months mean for the upcoming federal election? Professor Mark Kenny, Dr Marija Taflaga, and Professor Frank Bongiorno look back on what unfolded in Australia over summer and the lasting impact of the ‘Hawaii’ narrative on the prime minister’s public approval on this year’s first episode.


Frank Bongiorno AM is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian and Professor of History at ANU.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 15, 2022
The second (and possibly last) Annual Democracy Sausage Awards
55:24

As the curtain comes down on Democracy Sausage for another year, Frank Bongiorno, Chris Wallace, Marija Taflaga and Mark Kenny look back at the best and worst of 2021.


Who performed this year’s most flagrant and self-interested political backflip? Who has been the most effective political leader? And what do Scott Morrison and the Beatles have in common? On the final episode of Democracy Sausage for 2021, we roll out the red carpet and give out the gongs for the best and worst in politics of 2021.


Frank Bongiorno AM is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian and Professor of History at ANU.


Chris Wallace is Associate Professor at the University of Canberra and author of How To Win An Election.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Dec 14, 2021
Lying with a smile
36:59

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, London-based pod regular Elizabeth Ames joins Mark Kenny to discuss the United Kingdom's ‘sleaze crisis’, the pandemic situation, and British politics ahead of the Christmas break.


With great uncertainty around the Omicron variant and case numbers in the tens of thousands, is the United Kingdom facing another round of COVID-19 restrictions ahead of Christmas? Why has Prime Minister Boris Johnson failed to achieve the expected popularity boost following the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow? And how is the British Government ‘learning’ from the Australian approach to asylum seeker arrivals and its system of third-country detention? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Elizabeth Ames - Chair of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London - joins Professor Mark Kenny to examine British politics amidst a ‘sleaze crisis’ and what the new year might hold for Johnson.


Elizabeth Ames is Chief Operating Officer at advocacy firm Atalanta, Board Director of the Britain-Australia Society, and Chair of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Dec 07, 2021
On the money
41:31

On this Democracy Sausage, political scientists Ian McAllister, Anne Tiernan and Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to talk about political integrity and why pork-barrelling may not be an effective way to win votes. 


Why is pork-barrelling so commonplace in Australian politics? Does it actually have an impact on how people vote? And will the spotlight on the well-publicised ‘sports rorts’ and car park scandals have a sobering effect on the practice at the next federal election, or will it be business-as-usual? The Australian National University (ANU)’s Professor Ian McAllister, co-author of a new paper on the electoral impact of the Australian sports grants scandal, and Professor Anne Tiernan from Griffith University join Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Ian McAllister is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at The Australian National University (ANU), and from 1997 until 2004 was Director of the Research School of Social Sciences at ANU.


Anne Tiernan is Adjunct Professor of Politics at Griffith University, Managing Director of Constellation Impact Advisory, and Fellow at the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG).


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 30, 2021
Lies, damned lies, and election campaigns
44:02

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, journalist Bernard Keane and political scientists Judith Brett and Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to discuss truth in politics, cynicism in the electorate, and what it all might mean at the next federal election.


Is there a growing sense among voters that ‘all politicians lie’, and what does that mean for faith in Australia’s democracy? And how will the global COVID-19 situation affect the upcoming federal election? Crikey political editor Bernard Keane, La Trobe University’s Emeritus Professor Judith Brett, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage to explore these questions and more.


Judith Brett is Emeritus Professor of Politics at La Trobe University. Her books include Doing Politics: Writing on Public LifeRobert Menzies’ Forgotten PeopleThe Enigmatic Mr DeakinFrom Secret Ballot to Democracy Sausage, and four Quarterly Essays.


Bernard Keane is Crikey’s Political Editor. Before that, he was Crikey’s Canberra press gallery correspondent, covering politics, national security, and economics. He is also author of several books, including the recently released Lies and Falsehoods: The Morrison Government and the New Culture of Deceit.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 23, 2021
Getting a go
53:26

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga discuss the week that was in federal politics, before Glyn Davis and Liz Allen join the show to discuss the Australian myth of the ‘fair go’ and breaking cycles of disadvantage.


Will Scott Morrison be able to connect with voters despite claims he is untrustworthy, as John Howard once did? Or will the prime minister’s claims that his government is handling the economy well fall flat? And do the Australian welfare and tax systems need a major overhaul to ensure Australia doesn’t keep people stuck in cycles of disadvantage? Professor Glyn Davis, Chief Executive Officer of the Paul Ramsay Foundation and co-host of Life’s Lottery, and Dr Liz Allen, demographer at The Australian National University (ANU), join Professor Mark Kenny and Dr Marija Taflaga on this Democracy Sausage.


Glyn Davis is a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, Chair of the Australia and New Zealand School of Government Research Committee, CEO of the Paul Ramsay Foundation, and co-host of Life’s Lottery.


Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at ANU, and author of The Future of Us: Demography gets a makeover.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 16, 2021
With friends like these
41:26

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Director of the British Foreign Policy Group and COP26 attendee Sophia Gaston joins Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga to discuss the ‘last chance’ climate conference, European and British politics, and the Morrison-Macron fracas.


What’s life like on this inside of the ‘circus’ that is an international climate change negotiation? What are the prospects for serious commitments on emission reduction before COP26 ends? And with Angela Merkel stepping down as German Chancellor after 15 years at the helm, what does the future hold for European Union politics? Sophia Gaston from the British Foreign Policy Group joins Dr Marija Taflaga and Professor Mark Kenny to share her insights from COP26 in Glasgow and on British and European politics.


Sophia Gaston is Director of the British Foreign Policy Group, an independent think tank focusing on advancing knowledge and debate around Britain’s international affairs.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of The Australian National University (ANU) Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 09, 2021
The game with Sean Kelly
50:07

On this Democracy Sausage, columnist and former political advisor Sean Kelly joins Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga to discuss Scott Morrison, political performance, and Sean’s new book, The Game.


What does the way Scott Morrison has crafted his political image reveal about his leadership style? While it’s been politically effective thus far, will the prime minister’s performance of a ‘flat character’ ultimately damage his chances at the next election? And what will the current diplomatic spat between Morrison and French President Emmanuel Macron mean for Australia on the international stage? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Sean Kelly, columnist for the Nine papers and former advisor to Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard, and Dr Marija Taflaga from ANU School of Politics and International Relations join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and Sean’s new book, The Game: A Portrait of Scott Morrison


Sean Kelly is a weekly columnist for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, a former adviser to Australian prime ministers Julia Gillard and Kevin Rudd, and author of The Game: A Portrait of Scott Morrison, published by Black Inc in November 2021.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of The Australian National University (ANU) Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 02, 2021
Kevin Rudd on climate, AUKUS and reconciliation
47:23

Former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd joins Mark Kenny on this week’s episode of Democracy Sausage to discuss the country’s climate policy ahead of COP26 and why the Australian government might be underestimating the public when it comes to reconciliation.


How is the Australian prime minister likely to be received at the upcoming United Nations climate conference in Glasgow? What might the AUKUS arrangement mean for Australian national security policy in the decades to come? And might there be more public support for reconciliation efforts than governments think? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny speaks with former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd about these questions and more.


Kevin Rudd served as Australia’s 26th Prime Minister. He is currently President of the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 26, 2021
Money talks
45:46

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny speaks with Craig Reucassel - formerly of The Chaser and director of the new two-part ABC film Big Deal - about the flaws in Australia’s political donation laws and what needs to happen to fix the system.


Does Australia need to introduce a cap on political donations? What can be done to provide an impetus for the major parties to come together to introduce real-time reporting and transparency? And can policymakers end the ‘arms race’ for donations in political campaigning? Craig Reucassel, director of Big Deal - a new documentary about Australia’s political lobbying industry - joins Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Craig Reucassel is an Australian writer, comedian, and journalist best known for being a member of satirical team The Chaser. In 2021, he directed the two-part ABC documentary Big Deal: Is our democracy for sale?


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Big Deal premieres on ABC iview and ABC TV at 8.30pm, Tuesday 19 October.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 19, 2021
Holding government to account
42:36

On this Democracy Sausage, journalist David Crowe and political accountability expert Yee-Fui Ng join Mark Kenny to discuss how a federal integrity commission might work and the political obstacles to ensuring such an institution is strong and effective.


Following the resignation of former New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian, debate has raged around the need for a federal integrity commission and how strong such a commission should be. Despite committing to its creation as an election promise, the Morrison government’s proposal has fallen short of the expectations of many in the community. So how could such a body be designed so that it’s robust and effective? What lessons can be learned from integrity commissions at the state level? And will this debate be used by the federal opposition as an election issue? Chief Political Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age David Crowe and Deputy Director of the Australian Centre for Justice Innovation Associate Professor Yee-Fui Ng join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Yee-Fui Ng is an Associate Professor and the Deputy Director of the Australian Centre for Justice Innovation at Monash University.


David Crowe is Chief Political Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and a regular commentator on national affairs on the ABC’s Insiders program. In a career spanning 25 years, he has covered federal politics as the national affairs editor of The Australian and the Chief Political Correspondent of The Australian Financial Review.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 12, 2021
Into the rip with Damien Cave
42:21

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Australia bureau chief for The New York Times Damien Cave joins us to discuss Australia’s attitude to risk, the importance of positive messaging in the vaccine rollout, and the progress of the Biden administration.


Is there an Australian ‘way of risk’? How can policymakers do more to encourage more Australians to get vaccinated? And what does the performance of the Biden administration reveal about the realities of US politics after the Trump presidency? Damien Cave, journalist for The New York Times and author of the new book Into the Rip, joins Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Damien Cave is Australia bureau chief for the The New York Times. His new book Into the Rip was published in September 2021.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 05, 2021
What Australia thinks
47:46

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, The Australian National University’s Matthew Gray joins Mark Kenny to discuss the impact of the pandemic on Australian attitudes and how data can help us better understand ourselves. 


Has the pandemic affected the views of Australians about migration? How do young people in the country feel about the direction the country is heading in? And are governments missing their chance to permanently improve economic and environmental outcomes in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis? Professor Matthew Gray, Director of the ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods, joins Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage to discuss the What Australia Thinks project, a nation-wide public conversation that provides a comprehensive and continually evolving outlook on Australian attitudes.


Matthew Gray is Professor in the ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences and Director of the Centre for Social Research and Methods.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 28, 2021
In deep water
46:41

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Frank Bongiorno and Chris Wallace join us to discuss ministerial standards and the new Australia-United States-United Kingdom security arrangement.


How significant is Australia’s decision to torpedo its submarine deal with France in favour of a new arrangement with the United States and the United Kingdom? Is the federal government's habit of front-running in opposition to China in Australia’s long-term strategic interests? And what does the handling of Christian Porter’s departure from the ministry reveal about Scott Morrison’s leadership? Associate Professor Chris Wallace from the University of Canberra and Professor Frank Bongiorno from The Australian National University (ANU) join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss this and more on the new episode of Democracy Sausage.


Frank Bongiorno AM is Professor of History at ANU and an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian.


Chris Wallace is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra and author of How To Win An Election.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 21, 2021
The accidental prime minister with Annika Smethurst
50:20

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, journalist and author Annika Smethurst joins Mark Kenny to discuss political accountability and her new biography of Scott Morrison, The Accidental Prime Minister.


Not expected to win the 2019 election, Scott Morrison has been Australian Prime Minister during a time of great uncertainty. But how did he come to be selected, then elected, for top political office? Might an aversion to scrutiny come to be his Achilles’ heel? And what does his ‘daggy dad’ persona reveal about his leadership style, but also about what the Australian public expects of their political figures? Annika Smethurst, state political editor at The Age and former member of the federal press gallery, joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss her new biography of Australia’s 30th prime minister.


Annika Smethurst is state political editor for The Age newspaper in Melbourne and a Director on the Board of the National Press Club.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


The Accidental Prime Minister by Annika Smethurst is available from Wednesday 15 September.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 14, 2021
After Afghanistan
41:05

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, journalist Karen Middleton and foreign policy specialist Gorana Grgić join Mark Kenny to discuss the 20-year war in Afghanistan, the prospects for the country with the Taliban back in power, and the damage done to the United States’ reputation.


With the departure of American and allied troops, the nearly 20-year war in Afghanistan - the longest in United States history - is over. But what does the future now hold for the country and its people, who are now back under the control of the Taliban? What are other global powers making of the manner of the Biden administration’s withdrawal? And what impact will the decision have on the credibility and reputation of the United States in the years ahead? Author of An Unwinnable War: Australia in Afghanistan Karen Middleton and Dr Gorana Grgić from the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney join Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Karen Middleton is Chief Political Correspondent for The Saturday Paper.


Gorana Grgić is a jointly appointed Lecturer at the Department of Government and International Relations and the United States Studies Centre at University of Sydney.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 07, 2021
Pandemic planning and political plasticity
59:28

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Insiders host David Speers and regular podleague Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to talk about the federal government’s COVID-19 recovery plans and how pandemic politics might play out at the next federal election.


In a time of great uncertainty, is the Australian Government unnecessarily locking itself into a COVID-19 recovery strategy that may need to be revised? Is the federal opposition falling behind or doing a good job with a difficult hand? And will the popularity of the Labor state governments in Queensland and Western Australia pose a major challenge for the federal government at the next election? Journalist David Speers and political scientist Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny at the barbecue hotplate for this week’s episode of Democracy Sausage.


David Speers is an Australian journalist. He has been the host of PM AgendaThe Last Word, and Speers, and is currently host of ABC’s Insiders.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 31, 2021
The justice so deserved
34:37

On this Democracy Sausage, guest host Virginia Marshall has a yarn with Yawuru man Peter Yu, who reflects on his 40 years in Indigenous development and advocacy.


What responsibility do universities have to ensure research contributes to advancing the interests of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians? And while sporting codes have taken a role in condemning racism, what more can governments do to tackle the issue? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Yawuru man and inaugural Vice-President (First Nations) at The Australian National University Professor Peter Yu AM joins guest host Dr Virginia Marshall to discuss his experiences of racism growing up in Western Australia, societal and institutional change, and the importance of education.


Peter Yu is a Yawuru Man from Broome in the Kimberley region in North West Australia with 40 years experience in Indigenous development and advocacy, and is inaugural Vice-President (First Nations) at The Australian National University.


Virginia Marshall is the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow with The Australian National University’s School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the Fenner School of Environment and Society. She is a Wiradjuri Nyemba woman from New South Wales.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 24, 2021
Belonging to Country
1:00:32

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, guest host Virginia Marshall takes over the tongs, fires up the barbie, and speaks to community pastor and advocate Ray Minniecon.


How can Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander conceptions of truth-telling inform global reconciliation efforts? And why haven’t Australian governments and society fully acknowledged the history and the damage of the frontier wars in the country? On this Democracy Sausage, guest host Dr Virginia Marshall speaks with Pastor Ray Minniecon, who reflects on life under Queensland’s Aboriginal Protection Act, recognising the sacrifices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander servicemen and women, and what it means to belong to Country.


Ray Minniecon is a community Pastor at St John's Anglican Church, Glebe and Director of Bunji Consultancies, which supports Aboriginal leadership and business initiatives.


Virginia Marshall is the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow with The Australian National University’s School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the Fenner School of Environment and Society. She is a Wiradjuri Nyemba woman from New South Wales.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 17, 2021
In the public interest
53:36

On this Democracy Sausage, our panel of distinguished scholars - Glyn Davis, Catherine Althaus and Andrew Podger - join Mark Kenny to discuss creating a more effective public service and celebrate the career of John Wanna.


How can the bureaucracy and political system better serve the Australian people and rebuild trust? And with the importance of expertise front-of-mind during the COVID-19 crisis, how can policymakers and experts ensure that this relationship is for the long-term and not just a one-off? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Distinguished Professor Glyn Davis, Professor Catherine Althaus and Honorary Professor Andrew Podger AO joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss politics, policy and public administration, and the extensive contribution Professor Emeritus John Wanna has made to the fields.


Glyn Davis is a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, Chair of the Australia and New Zealand School of Government Research Committee, and CEO of the Paul Ramsay Foundation, Australia's largest philanthropic trust.


Catherine Althaus is a Professor and Chair of Public Service Leadership and Reform at the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG), based at the University of New South Wales in Canberra, and Deputy Dean (Teaching and Learning) at ANZSOG.


Andrew Podger AO is an Honorary Professor of Public Policy at The Australian National University, a former Australian Public Service Commissioner and a former Secretary of the Department of Health and Aged Care.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Politics, Policy and Public Administration in Theory and Practice: Essays in Honour of Professor John Wanna is available from ANU Press.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 10, 2021
Policy pivots and car park ploys
52:35

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Chris Wallace and Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to discuss the 2024 tax cuts, how to be an effective opposition, and accountability in federal politics.


Is the Australian Labor Party’s decision to retain tax cuts slated for 2024 a good political decision, an abandonment of core values, or both? What lessons does contemporary political history hold for how to be effective from opposition? And with Australia’s auditor-general finding a $660 million pre-election car park program was not up to scratch, what can be done to increase accountability in government? Associate Professor Chris Wallace and Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


Chris Wallace is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra. Entering the history profession after a first career as an economic and political journalist in the Canberra Press Gallery, her work focuses on political, international and global history with special reference to leadership. Her book historicising the 2019 Australian federal election, How To Win An Election, is out now.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 03, 2021
Gridlock with John Daley
55:12

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, inaugural chief executive of the Grattan Institute John Daley joins Mark Kenny to discuss why policy reform in Australia has come grinding to a halt, and what policymakers can do to get things moving again.


It’s said that the 1980s and 1990s were the ‘golden age’ of policy reform - but how productive were those years in reality? What impact is the corrosion of institutions like the public service and the swelling ranks of unaccountable ministerial advisers having on the reform process? And have recent governments been less willing to get out on the hustings and convince the public their reform proposals are worth supporting. John Daley, author of Gridlock: removing barriers to reform, joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss good governance and ensuring policy reform doesn’t become a dying art.


John Daley was the inaugural Chief Executive Officer of the Grattan Institute and is one of Australia’s leading public policy thinkers.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 27, 2021
Britain’s ‘freedom day’
47:59

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, London-based regular guests Bevan Shields and Elizabeth Ames join Mark Kenny to discuss the British Government’s decision to lift COVID-19 restrictions with the prime minister self-isolating and case numbers soaring.


Is the United Kingdom’s decision to end COVID-19 restrictions in England a moment to celebrate or a dangerous experiment? With masks now optional, what are the ethical responsibilities for individuals in a situation where case numbers are skyrocketing? And should Britain now be vaccinating school children, or should those vaccines be sent to developing countries to bolster the protection of vulnerable populations abroad? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Europe correspondent Bevan Shields and Atalanta’s Elizabeth Ames join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss ‘freedom day’ in the United Kingdom. 


Elizabeth Ames is Chief Operating Officer at advocacy firm Atalanta, a Board Director of the Britain-Australia Society, and Chair of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London.


Bevan Shields is Europe Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. He was previously Federal Editor and Canberra Bureau Chief.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Jul 20, 2021
The price of primacy with Hugh White
59:49

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, eminent strategic studies expert Hugh White joins Mark Kenny to examine Australia’s strategy for dealing with rising tensions between the United States and China and the prospect of armed conflict in the region.


For decades Australian leaders have said the country doesn’t need to choose between its history and its geography - between the United States and China - but has this position now been abandoned? Is the Chinese Government making an example of Australia by putting it in the diplomatic deep freeze? And how are other governments in the region, such as New Zealand and Japan, managing their relationships with the United States and China? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, principal author of the 2000 Defence White Paper, Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies Hugh White, joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss regional tensions and Australia’s strategy for managing its relationships with China and the United States.


Hugh White is Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies at the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 13, 2021
Finger pointing, federalism and alternative facts
55:52

After a week of finger pointing between the federal government and some of Australia’s states and territories over COVID-19 management and the vaccine rollout, Mark Kenny speaks with federalism scholar Tracy Beck Fenwick and media expert Margaret Simons about how the federation is functioning.


Is the sense of national unity between the federal government and the states and territories, perhaps best demonstrated through the early days of the National Cabinet, now gone? Is federalism the problem in these increasingly fractious relationships or just a convenient scapegoat? And what role does the media play in their reporting on COVID-19, especially around misinformation? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Director of the Australian Centre for Federalism Dr Tracy Beck Fenwick and Dr Margaret Simons from the University of Melbourne's Centre for Advancing Journalism join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more.


Tracy Beck Fenwick is the Director of the Australian Centre for Federalism and Senior Lecturer in the School of Politics in the College of Arts and Social Sciences at The Australian National University.


Margaret Simons is an award-winning freelance journalist, author, and Honorary Principal Fellow at the University of Melbourne's Centre for Advancing Journalism.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 06, 2021
History, reinvented: 100(ish) years of the Chinese Communist Party
49:37

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, China experts Yun Jiang and David Goodman join us to discuss the 100-year history of the Chinese Communist Party and what it might reveal about the country’s present and future.


On 1 July 2021, China will mark 100 years of the Communist Party (CCP). So how has the party evolved from its formation through to the present day? Why is Chinese President Xi Jinping’s government seeking to eliminate alternative versions of history that challenge the official party line? And with the party and its leader focused on control, what might the future hold for the country? On this Democracy Sausage, Managing Editor of the China Story blog Yun Jiang and Emeritus Professor of Chinese Politics David Goodman join Professor Mark Kenny to look back at the history of the CCP ahead of its centenary, and to discuss the future under Xi Jinping.


David Goodman is Emeritus Professor of Chinese Politics in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at University of Sydney and in the Department of China Studies at Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University in Suzhou. He is also a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.


Yun Jiang is a managing editor of the China Story blog at The Australian National University (ANU) and a researcher at ANU Australian Centre on China in World.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 29, 2021
The Nordic edge with Andrew Scott
47:53

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, academic and author Andrew Scott joins us to discuss the effective, progressive social and economic policies of the Nordic countries and how they might work in Australia.


Australian policymakers tend to look to the United States and the United Kingdom as examples, but should they be looking further afield? Europe’s Nordic countries perform strongly on a wide range of social and economic indicators and Andrew Scott, Professor of Politics and Policy at Deakin University and co-editor of The Nordic Edge: Policy Possibilities for Australia, says they might hold more lessons for Australian policymakers than many previously thought. On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Scott joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss how the Nordic countries have got it right in so many policy areas, and why they might hold the key to creating a fairer, happier, wealthier, and more environmentally responsible country.


Andrew Scott is Professor of Politics and Policy in the Faculty of Arts and Education at Deakin University. His books and articles have been extensively discussed in Australia and overseas and he is the co-editor of the upcoming book Nordic Edge: Policy Possibilities for Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


The Nordic Edge: Policy Possibilities for Australia is edited by Andrew Scott and Rod Campbell, published by Melbourne University Press, and is available in bookstores from July 2021.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 22, 2021
Departure in the absence of victory?
49:49

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, political correspondent Karen Middleton, diplomacy and Afghan politics expert William Maley, and gender equity advocate Virginia Haussegger join Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s nearly two decades in Afghanistan.


Two years into the war in Afghanistan, United States President George W Bush said it was “mission accomplished”. But nearly two decades after the September 11 attacks, the Taliban has negotiated a favourable agreement with the United States and Australia has closed its embassy, citing security concerns amidst the withdrawal of Australian and international forces. So what was it all for? And, crucially, what does this mean for the Afghan people? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, journalist and author of An unwinnable war: Australia in Afghanistan Karen Middleton, scholar of Afghan politics Emeritus Professor William Maley, and gender equity advocate Virginia Haussegger join Mark Kenny to look back on Australia’s time in Afghanistan and discuss what the future may hold for the country.


Karen Middleton is Chief Political Correspondent for The Saturday Paper.


William Maley AM is Emeritus Professor at The Australian National University, where he served as Professor of Diplomacy at the Coral Bell School of International Affairs from 2003 to 2021, and Foundation Director of the university's Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy.


Virginia Haussegger AM is an award-winning television journalist, writer, and commentator, whose extensive media career spans more than 25 years. She is Chair of the 50/50 by 2030 Foundation and Chief Editor of BroadAgenda at the University of Canberra.


Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 15, 2021
Full circle with Scott Ludlam
51:03

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Scott Ludlam, former Greens Deputy Leader and author of the new book Full Circle: A search for the world that comes next, joins Mark Kenny to discuss what he learnt from his time in politics and Australian climate policy.


What role do corporate and private interests play in shaping Australian policy-making? Will the country make changes to political donation rules to make the system more transparent? And how can Australia make meaningful progress on climate policy? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny speaks with former Greens Senator Scott Ludlam about Australian politics, his new book, and Section 44 of the Constitution.


Scott Ludlam was Senator for Western Australia in the Australian Senate from 2008 to 2017, and served as Deputy Leader of the Australian Greens. In May 2021 he authored Full Circle: A search for the world that comes next, published by Black Inc.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 08, 2021
Telling the truth about Australia’s past
47:59

On this special episode of Democracy Sausage for National Reconciliation Week, Virginia Marshall, Peter Swanton, and Tahlia King from The Australian National University join us to discuss why Australia needs to have uncomfortable conversations about its past in order to achieve genuine reconciliation.


Are there examples internationally Australia can look to as it goes through its own truth-telling process? Should all Australians be given the opportunity to learn Indigenous Australian languages? And how are some young Aboriginal scholars working to decolonise their fields? This week on Democracy Sausage, lawyer and legal scholar Dr Virginia Marshall, astrophysicist Peter Swanton, and psychology student Taliah King share their personal stories and professional insights in this special National Reconciliation Week episode. Listen now: 

 

Virginia Marshall is the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow with The Australian National University (ANU)’s School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the Fenner School of Environment and Society.


Peter Swanton is an astrophysics graduate from ANU and Gamilaraay/Yuwaalaraay man from Mackay, Queensland.


Taliah King is a final-year psychology student at The Australian National University and a proud Aboriginal woman from the Yuin and Waanyi people.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Peter Swanton’s Sky Stories discussion from 2020 is available on YouTube.


In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 01, 2021
Risks and rewards - improving Australia’s vaccine rollout
49:17

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, former Surgeon General of the Australian Defence Force Tracy Smart and economist Quentin Grafton join Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s vaccine strategy.


The Australian Government messaging of ‘stay home, save lives’ in the early days of the pandemic proved to be highly effective, with Australians by-and-large complying with unprecedented nationwide lockdown measures. But with the country’s vaccine rollout hitting a series of speed bumps in recent months and the vast majority of the population still unvaccinated, has the government messed up its messaging? How can federal and state governments get the program back on track to ensure the Australian community is protected? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, ANU Crawford School of Public Policy’s Professor Quentin Grafton and Professor Tracy Smart AO, retired Air Vice-Marshall and former Surgeon General of the Australian Defence Force, join Professor Mark Kenny to examine Australia’s vaccine rollout.


Tracy Smart AO is an Australian physician, medical administrator, and retired Surgeon General of the Royal Australian Air Force. Tracy is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators, the Australasian of College of Aerospace Medicine, the Aerospace Medicine Association, and the Centre for Defence and Strategic Studies.


Quentin Grafton is Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy, Professor of Economics at Crawford School, an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 25, 2021
Is Australia stuck in policy limbo?
52:13

Governance expert Mark Evans joins Mark Kenny this week at the Democracy Sausage hotplate to discuss achieving change in Australia’s policy and political landscape, plus Keir Starmer’s struggles as British opposition leader. 


Has Australia missed an opportunity to adopt a more shared, decentralised decision-making structure through the National Cabinet? Why hasn’t the country seen a stronger push for major policy change in the wake of the pandemic? And after a major by-election loss, why is United Kingdom Opposition Leader Sir Keir Starmer struggling to cut-through in British politics? On the new Democracy Sausage, Director of the Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis at the University of Canberra Professor Mark Evans joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more.


Mark Evans is Director of Democracy 2025 at the Museum of Australian Democracy and Professor of Governance at University of Canberra.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 18, 2021
The federal budget with John Hewson and Miranda Stewart
47:50

On this special post-budget episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny speaks to former Federal Opposition Leader John Hewson and tax expert Miranda Stewart.


Who are the winners and losers in the federal government’s new budget? What do its assumptions, especially around border closures and the COVID-19 pandemic, suggest about what the future might hold for Australia? And is this a budget that sets the government up for an election this year? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, former Liberal Party leader Dr John Hewson and Director of the University of Melbourne’s Tax Group Professor Miranda Stewart join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the new federal budget.


John Hewson AM is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy. He is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system.


Miranda Stewart is a Professor at University of Melbourne and Honorary Professor at the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 12, 2021
The prosperity gospel
48:28

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Peter Martin and Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to discuss religion, politics, and the upcoming federal budget.


Should national leaders leave their faith ‘at the door’ when making decisions while in office, or is it more important that those leaders articulate how their faith influences their decision-making? What role has religious identity played in Australian politics in contemporary history? And how does the Australian Government plan to achieve its unemployment targets? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, pod regulars Peter Martin and Dr Marija Taflaga join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss religion, identity politics, and the federal budget.


Peter Martin AM is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU) and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 04, 2021
How good is Scott Morrison? With Peter van Onselen
1:05:16

On this special episode of Democracy Sausage, recorded live as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series, academic, author, and journalist Peter van Onselen joins Mark Kenny to discuss the prime minister’s performance and his new book, How Good is Scott Morrison?


What was life like behind the scenes in Australian politics in the early days of the COVID-19 crisis? How has the political system and in particular Prime Minister Scott Morrison engaged with experts and expertise amidst both the bushfire crisis and the pandemic? And with the pandemic dragging on, what challenges lie ahead for the government? On this live episode of Democracy Sausage, academic, author and journalist Dr Peter van Onselen joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s 30th prime minister and his new book, co-written with Wayne Errington, How Good is Scott Morrison?


Peter van Onselen is Network Ten's Political Editor, co-host of The Sunday Project, and author of the book How Good is Scott Morrison? He is also a professor of Australian politics and foundation chair of journalism at the University of Western Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 29, 2021
Technology, targets, and Australia’s climate challenge
45:12

In the wake of the Biden climate summit, researchers Emma Aisbett and Frank Jotzo join Mark Kenny to discuss climate policy in Australia and around the world on this episode of Democracy Sausage.


What does growing ambition to reduce carbon emissions in the United States and elsewhere mean for Australia? How concerned should Australian policymakers be about the prospect of the imposition of carbon tariffs? And how can the Australian Government support communities to transition away from the carbon-intensive industries they’ve traditionally relied on? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) Dr Emma Aisbett and Professor Frank Jotzo join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s climate policies in the context of President Joe Biden’s recent climate summit.

 

Frank Jotzo is Professor of Environmental Economics and Climate Change Economics at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy, where he directs the Centre for Climate and Energy Policy.


Emma Aisbett is a Fellow at ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and Associate Director, Research for ANU Grand Challenge - Zero Carbon Energy for the Asia Pacific.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 27, 2021
With the falling of the dusk with Stan Grant
1:01:00

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, acclaimed journalist and author Stan Grant joins Mark Kenny live at The Australian National University to discuss the major challenges facing the world and his new book, With the Falling of the Dusk.


What does China’s trajectory mean for Australia and other countries in the region? Will President Joe Biden be able to address the deep structural challenges facing the United States? And why was 1979 such a watershed year in contemporary history? Recorded live as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series, Stan Grant joins Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage to discuss a world in crisis and his new book, With the Falling of the Dusk.


Stan Grant is the Vice Chancellor’s Chair of Australian-Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University and the ABC‘s International Affairs Analyst.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 23, 2021
Reset with Ross Garnaut
53:47

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, eminent economist Ross Garnaut joins Mark Kenny to discuss the choices facing Australian policymakers in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis.


The COVID-19 pandemic has been a major shock to the Australian economy and, with the crisis dragging on, policymakers face key questions as they try to ensure continued prosperity. Would Australians benefit from the integration of the tax and social security systems? Should Australia rethink its skilled migration policies? And how important is reaching full employment to the country’s economic recovery? On the new episode of Democracy Sausage, one of Australia’s leading economists Professor Ross Garnaut AC joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the way forward for the Australian economy and the consequences of policy inaction.


Ross Garnaut AC is Professorial Research Fellow in Economics at the University of Melbourne. His career has focused on the analysis of and practice of development, economic, and international policy in Australia, Asia, and the Pacific and he has held senior roles in universities, business, government and other Australian and international institutions.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 20, 2021
Malcolm Turnbull: Australia post-coal
56:16

On this special episode of Democracy Sausage, former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull discusses the treatment of former Australia Post CEO Christine Holgate, the abandonment of the National Energy Guarantee, and special interests in Australian politics.


Is Australia at risk of being seen as a ‘Trumpian government in exile’ because of its unwillingness to do more to reduce emissions? Are moderates in the Coalition being ‘held hostage’ on climate policy by the Murdoch media and those in the party room who don’t believe in the science of climate change? And should the government apologise to former Australia Post Chief Executive Officer Christine Holgate over the Cartier watch saga? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss climate politics and policy, the treatment of women in public life, and much more.


Malcolm Turnbull AC was the 29th Prime Minister of Australia from 2015 to 2018. He served twice as Leader of the Liberal Party, from 2008 to 2009 when he was Leader of the Opposition, and from 2015 to 2018.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 14, 2021
Biden’s America with Matthew Knott
44:08

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, North America correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age Matthew Knott joins Mark Kenny to discuss President Joe Biden’s initiatives on climate, COVID-19, and infrastructure, and what this means for the political landscape in the United States.


After a traumatic period in American politics, a tone of relative calm has returned to the United States. Now providing millions of vaccines a day, how is the country’s COVID-19 response tracking? Is new President Joe Biden’s two trillion dollar infrastructure plan - including a proposal to lift the corporate tax cut from 21 to 28 per cent - the right way to get the economy moving again? And how is the Republican Party responding without Trump? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, foreign correspondent Matthew Knott joins Mark Kenny to discuss the beginning of the Biden presidency and American politics after Trump.


Matthew Knott is North America correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 08, 2021
Does Australia’s vaccine rollout need a shot in the arm?
50:56

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by epidemiologist Mary-Louise McLaws and head of ANU Australian Studies Institute Paul Pickering to discuss the pace of Australia’s vaccine rollout and how it can be improved.


An international leader in infection control during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, Australia now seems to be falling behind other nations in its vaccine rollout. Why isn’t Australia hitting its vaccination targets? Is a return to politics-as-usual holding the country back? And given their high number of social contacts and thus greater risk of contracting the virus, should 20 to 39-year-olds be further up the list to receive the vaccine? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mary-Louise McLaws from the University of New South Wales and Professor Paul Pickering from The Australian National University join Professor Mark Kenny to examine the rollout why it’s not going as smoothly as many had hoped.

 

Mary-Louise McLaws is a professor and epidemiologist at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) with expertise in hospital infection and infectious diseases control.


Paul Pickering is a professor and the Director of the ANU Australian Studies Institute.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 06, 2021
Australia’s Cabinet reshuffle and women in politics
50:52

On this landmark episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by Marija Taflaga, Chris Wallace, and Sarah Ison to discuss the reshuffle of the Australian Cabinet and women in parliament.


Will the Cabinet reshuffle lead to better outcomes for women in Australia? Why hasn’t the government re-introduced gender budgeting? And will the Coalition look to introduce gender quotas? On the 150th episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny chats with Associate Professor Chris Wallace from the 50/50 by 2030 Foundation, journalist for The West Australian Sarah Ison, and podleague Dr Marija Taflaga about women’s policy and Australia’s new front bench.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of The Australian National University (ANU) Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a Lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Chris Wallace is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra. Entering the history profession after a first career as an economic and political journalist in the Canberra Press Gallery, her work focuses on political, international and global history with special reference to leadership.


Sarah Ison is a political correspondent for The West Australian.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 01, 2021
The tempest
46:21

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, researchers Rebecca Colvin and Jamie Pittock join Mark Kenny to discuss Australian attitudes to climate change, how they influence people’s voting patterns, and Australia’s increasingly severe weather events.


Was the so-called climate election of 2019 lost, or simply never fought? Will a shock event like the recent floods in New South Wales, or Australia’s Black Summer a little over a year ago, change the way people vote? And what will more frequent and more severe weather events mean for vulnerable Australian communities? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, social scientist at Crawford School of Public Policy Dr Rebecca Colvin and environmental scientist at Fenner School of Environment and Society Professor Jamie Pittock join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss climate politics, and whether leadership can move Australia in line with the growing number of countries making more substantial emissions reductions commitments.


Bec Colvin is a Lecturer at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy with the Resources, Environment & Development Group. Prior to joining Crawford, she was a knowledge exchange specialist for the ANU Climate Change Institute.


Jamie Pittock is a Professor in the Fenner School of Environment and Society. Jamie is a member of the Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists and the World Commission on Protected Areas and chairs the Eminent Scientists Group of the World Wide Fund For Nature Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 30, 2021
Energy and integrity with Helen Haines
39:20

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Independent Member of Parliament Helen Haines joins Mark Kenny to discuss her plan for renewable energy in regional communities and integrity in Australia’s parliament.


How can the Australian Government both harness and support the development of renewable energy for the benefit of regional communities? How can local communities be given a level of ownership over their energy supply? And what changes need to be made to ensure that Parliament House is a safe workplace for all? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Independent Federal Member for Indi Dr Helen Haines MP joins Professor Mark Kenny to talk about her proposal to democratise and localise energy supply in regional Australia, integrity in parliament, and the COVID-19 vaccine rollout.


Helen Haines is an Australian politician who has served as independent Member of Parliament for the Victorian seat of Indi since the 2019 federal election.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 23, 2021
Truth and treaty with Lidia Thorpe
38:37

On this Democracy Sausage, Gunnai Gunditjmara and Djab Wurrung woman and Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe joins Mark Kenny to discuss truth-telling, the right to self-determination, and the idea of a black caucus.


What changes need to occur for Australia’s First People to achieve self-determination? Will the Yoo-rrook Justice Commission in Victoria put pressure on the Federal Government to begin a truth-telling process? And is Australia’s Parliament ready for a treaty? On this episode of Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny talks to Gunnai Gunditjmara and Djab Wurrung woman and Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe about addressing past and current injustices against Australia’s First People, returning to grassroots conversations, and the lessons from New Zealand’s Treaty of Waitangi. 


Lidia Thorpe is the first Aboriginal person elected to Victorian parliament as the Greens MP for Northcote and is currently Senator for Victoria. She is The Greens Federal spokesperson for First Nations, Justice, and Sport.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 18, 2021
The Quad, geoeconomics, and Australia's place in the region
50:55

On the new Democracy Sausage, the ‘airport economist’ Tim Harcourt and China scholar Jane Golley join Mark Kenny to discuss the Quad leaders meeting, geoeconomics, and what it all means for Australia.


What does the first ever Quad leaders meeting indicate about President Biden’s approach to China? Are calls for exporters to diversify away from China realistic for smaller Australian producers who’ve spent decades building relationships in the country? And how should Australian leaders be responding to the shifting dynamics in the region? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor of Practice at the University of New South Wales Tim Harcourt and Director of ANU Australian Centre on China in the World Professor Jane Golley join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss China, the Quad, and how Australia is responding to a rapidly changing region.


Tim Harcourt is Professor of Practice at the University of New South Wales. His best-known book The Airport Economist is an international business bestseller and has been translated into several languages and television projects around Asia.


Jane Golley is an economist, Professor, and Director of the Australian Centre on China in the World at The Australian National University.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 16, 2021
Vaccine victories and royal pains in Britain
40:56

On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Europe correspondent Bevan Shields and COO of Atalanta Elizabeth Ames join Mark Kenny to discuss the status of COVID-19 in the United Kingdom, the unfolding royal family train wreck, and Mathias Cormann’s bid to become OECD head.


With small freedoms set to return and the COVID-19 vaccine rollout well under way, the British Government has set 21 June as the earliest date the country will see all restrictions on social contact lifted. But is that timeline realistic? What’s the state of the British economy? And how has Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Meghan Markle and Prince Harry managed to push COVID-19 and Brexit off the front pages? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny touches base with friends-of-the-show Bevan Shields, Europe correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and Elizabeth Ames, COO of Atalanta, to take the pulse public sentiment in Britain on COVID-19 and the royal family, and discuss whether Mathias Corman has a shot at becoming the OECD secretary general.


Bevan Shields is Europe Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. He was previously Federal Editor and Canberra Bureau Chief.


Elizabeth Ames is an international trade policy expert and Chief Operating Officer of Atalanta, a mission-driven firm with a focus on advancing women's leadership worldwide and accelerating programmes that tackle the root causes of gender inequality. She is also a Director of the Britain-Australia Society and Chair of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 11, 2021
Will Australia-China relations continue to spiral?
45:05

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by China experts Yun Jiang and Graeme Smith to discuss Chinese politics, and the country’s relationships with the United States and Australia.


How will relations between China and the United States progress under the new Biden administration? Is the proposal by a Chinese company to build a new fishing hub in Papua New Guinea a security threat to Australia or a case of confirmation bias on the part of Australian commentators? What impact are the souring relations between China and Australia having on Asian-Australians? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, former policy adviser and China Story blog editor Yun Jiang and co-host of The Little Red Podcast Dr Graeme Smith join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss competition between China and the United States, plus Sino-Australian relations.


Yun Jiang is a managing editor of the China Story blog at The Australian National University (ANU) and a researcher at ANU Australian Centre on China in World.


Graeme Smith is a fellow at ANU Department of Pacific Affairs and co-host of The Little Red Podcast.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 09, 2021
Reducing unemployment for good with Peter Martin
47:31

On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Peter Martin joins Mark Kenny to discuss why the COVID-19 recession has presented Treasurer Josh Frydenberg with the chance to permanently reduce unemployment.


Is it possible for Australia to permanently lower its unemployment rate to around 3.5 per cent? What can policymakers learn from the last recession, after which the country was able to dramatically reduce inflation? And how bold is Treasurer Josh Frydenberg willing to be in pursuit of what could be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation Peter Martin and Professor Mark Kenny discuss unemployment and the Australian economy in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis.


Peter Martin AM is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU) and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 04, 2021
Efficacy, equity, and Australia’s vaccine rollout
51:13

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Quentin Grafton and Sharon Friel join Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s vaccine rollout and dealing with the country’s ongoing healthcare challenges.


While the COVID-19 vaccines approved in Australia are safe, will the government’s current plan provide the necessary herd immunity to allow borders to open? What public health policies will likely have to remain even after the vaccination rollout? And how can governments ensure there is greater equity in Australia’s approach to healthcare in the future? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, economist Professor Quentin Grafton and health equity and governance expert Professor Sharon Friel join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss Australia’s vaccine plan and ensuring the long-term health of the population.


Sharon Friel is Professor of Health Equity and Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) at The Australian National University. She was Director of RegNet from 2014 to 2019.


Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics at Crawford School, UNESCO Chair in Water Economics and Transboundary Water Governance, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Mar 02, 2021
Scarcity with Liz Allen
48:40

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Liz Allen joins us to discuss social security, living with scarcity, and whether Australia needs a reset in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis.


What impact does the ‘othering’ of people experiencing disadvantage have on Australia’s most vulnerable citizens? Why does Australians’ postcode have such an impact on their health outcomes? And what demographic changes is the COVID-19 pandemic bringing about around the world? On this week’s Democracy Sausage Extra, Dr Liz Allen (Dr Demography herself!) joins us to take a very personal look at living with scarcity, plus the future of Australian society.


Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University, and author of The Future of Us: Demography gets a makeover.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 25, 2021
Unfriending Australia
42:09

Last week Australians woke up to a bizarre state of affairs - Facebook without any news. On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Shirley Leitch and Paul Pickering from ANU Australian Studies Institute join Mark Kenny to discuss the stoush between Facebook and the Australian Government.


What does Facebook’s decision to restrict the ability of its users to post and read news in Australia mean for ordinary people and their participation in public debate? Is this a case of Australians being stuck in the middle of a stoush between media giants? And what is the end game for Facebook and the government? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these issues on this episode of Democracy Sausage are Emeritus Professor Shirley Leitch and Professor Paul Pickering from ANU Australian Studies Institute. 


Shirley Leitch is Emeritus Professor and a Professorial Fellow at The Australian National University (ANU) Australian Studies Institute. She was formerly Pro Vice-Chancellor of Education & Global Education at ANU, and Dean at the ANU College of Business and Economics.


Paul Pickering is a Professor and Director of ANU Australian Studies Institute.


Mark Kenny is a Professor at ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 23, 2021
Trumpism in Australia with Frank Bongiorno
46:13

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, political historian Frank Bongiorno joins Mark Kenny to discuss whether it is Trumpism that has undermined Australian politics or whether Australia’s problems are primarily of its own making.


Has Trumpism been the cause of a decline in Australian ministerial responsibility or has this degradation been a result of a longer-term trend? Are Australian political leaders a product of the Trump era, or do some just strategically employ Trump-like tactics? And has anyone found the ‘weatherboard nine’? On the new episode of Democracy Sausage, Head of ANU School of History Professor Frank Bongiorno joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss ministerial accountability, political leadership, and the influence of Trumpism in Australia.


Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History and Professor at The Australian National University (ANU). He is an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 18, 2021
Knowledge is power? Universities in the COVID-19 crisis
41:53

On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny discusses the state of Australia’s university sector with education policy expert Andrew Norton, head of Australia’s science and technology peak body Misha Schubert, and the father of Australia’s HECS system Bruce Chapman.


While universities had a very tough 2020, what does the continued closure of international borders mean for the future of the sector? Will the government’s plan to produce more ‘job-ready’ graduates achieve the intended result? And with the importance of cooperation between the researchers and policymakers highlighted during the pandemic, can universities and governments work more closely together to address the other major challenges facing Australia and the world? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by an expert panel to discuss the challenges facing Australia’s university sector in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Andrew Norton is an Australian author and Professor in the practice of higher education policy at the Centre for Social Research and Methods at The Australian National University.


Misha Schubert is Chief Executive Officer of Science and Technology Australia - the nation’s peak body for the science and technology sectors - and Visiting Fellow at the Australian National Centre for the Public Awareness of Science at ANU.


Bruce Chapman AM is a Professor and economist at The Australian National University. He has extensive experience in public policy, including the motivation and design of the Higher Education Contribution Scheme - the first national income contingent loan scheme using the income tax system for collection - in 1989.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 16, 2021
Presidential trials and tribulations with Jennifer Hunt
39:59

On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Jennifer Hunt joins Mark Kenny to discuss the Senate trial of former President Donald Trump, the future of the Republican Party, and whether President Biden’s new cabinet is a case of ‘back to the future’.


He is the only president to be impeached twice, but will Donald Trump be held to account in the wake of the riots at the Capitol building on 6 January? Will the Republican Party change course now Trump has been voted out of office? And will the new Biden administration be able to govern effectively in a fractious political environment? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Dr Jennifer Hunt joins Professor Mark Kenny in the Crawford School studio to discuss the tenuous status of democracy in the United States.


Jennifer Hunt is a research associate at the US Studies Centre and has recently been appointed to the Macquarie University Department of Security Studies and Criminology.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 11, 2021
Climate, the coronavirus, and the costs of uncertainty
46:05

Australian policymakers may have dealt with the COVID-19 pandemic effectively so far, but can they heed the lessons of this crisis in order to be ready for those still to come? Joining Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage to discuss public policy in the wake of the pandemic are Helen Sullivan and Warwick McKibbin.


Australia has managed the joint health and economic crises brought on by COVID-19 better than most countries. But with the pandemic far from over and the damages of climate change becoming increasingly obvious, can Australian policymakers translate this short-term success across to the long-term challenges they have thus far failed to address? What price are the Australian people paying for policy uncertainty, particularly in regards to climate and energy policy? And does the country need a new macroeconomic framework if it hopes to be properly prepared for a post-pandemic world? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, ANU Crawford School of Public Policy’s Professor Helen Sullivan and Professor Warwick McKibbin AO join Professor Mark Kenny to discuss public policy-making in the ‘new normal’.


Helen Sullivan is Director of Crawford School of Public Policy. She has published widely on public policy, public governance and public service reform, and in 2013 established the Melbourne School of Government.


Warwick McKibbin AO is the Director of the Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis in the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 09, 2021
The new pandemic playbook with Sanjaya Senanayake
43:31

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by infectious diseases expert Sanjaya Senanayake to discuss what we’ve learned about the disease.


The COVID-19 pandemic caused over two million deaths worldwide and turned life on its head for billions more. While pandemics aren’t a new phenomenon, many governments were unprepared for the severity and scale of this new virus. So what have health experts and policymakers learned over the last year? What remains uncertain? And what impact will this crisis have on how the world prepares for the next pandemic? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Associate Professor Sanjaya Senanayake from The Australian National University (ANU) joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more.


Sanjaya Senanayake is an Infectious Diseases Physician at Canberra Hospital and Associate Professor at ANU Medical School.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 03, 2021
Climate change and Australia’s leadership vacuum
52:06

On this Democracy Sausage, former Liberal Party leader John Hewson, health and policy expert Arnagretta Hunter, and physicist Kenneth Baldwin join us to discuss the need for political leadership and better policy to strengthen Australia’s efforts to tackle climate change.


Despite the impacts of climate change becoming increasingly real for many Australians in the wake of the Black Summer, the country still lags behind many others on international commitments to reduce carbon emissions. While the shift to renewables is happening anyway, would it be happening faster and cheaper if the country had put in place better policies in recent years? What does the Labor Party’s shadow cabinet reshuffle mean for their stance on climate change? And what impact might the new Biden administration in the United States have on Australia’s willingness to make stronger climate commitments on the international stage? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by former Federal Opposition Leader Professor John Hewson, ANU Energy Change Institute Director Professor Kenneth Baldwin, and health and public policy expert Dr Arnagretta Hunter.


Kenneth Baldwin is Director of the Energy Change Institute at The Australian National University.


John Hewson AM is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy. He is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system.


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Feb 02, 2021
These days with Stan Grant
51:11

On the first episode of Democracy Sausage for 2021, journalist and author Stan Grant joins Mark Kenny to discuss whether President Joe Biden can address the serious challenges facing the United States, plus the trajectory of the Australia Day debate.


It was meant to be a reset, but will 2021 actually be a year of reckoning in the United States, with the country struggling to address its deep divisions? Can Biden do what his predecessors couldn’t (or wouldn’t) and tackle entrenched inequalities? And is a change to the date of Australia Day now inevitable? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Stan Grant joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss what changes the new year might bring in the United States, plus continuity and change in Australia’s national identity.


Stan Grant is the Vice Chancellor's Chair of Australian-Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University and the ABC's International Affairs Analyst.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jan 28, 2021
The first (and possibly last) Annual Democracy Sausage Awards
1:03:41

Dust off the tuxedo, bring out the ballgowns, and prepare your lengthy speeches. In the final Democracy Sausage for 2020, we reveal the winners of our first Annual Awards. Who were the big winners, and the biggest losers, of 2020? Our panel rip open envelopes and reveal all.


Who performed the biggest political backflip of the year? What was the most risible explanation for a government failure? And what has been 2020’s maddest moment (outside of the Trump presidency)? They are all hotly-contested categories in what has been a memorable and testing year. But on the final Democracy Sausage Extra for 2020, our panel – Professor Mark Kenny, Dr Marija Taflaga, and Professor Frank Bongiorno - reveal the nominees and winners of the first – and possibly last – Annual Democracy Sausage Awards.


Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History and Professor at The Australian National University (ANU). He is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Dec 17, 2020
Can democracy be mended?
58:44

Politics and policymaking can feel very distant from people’s everyday lives, and that disconnection can make individuals and communities feel powerless. So how are people helping to bridge this chasm and put the personal back into policy?


From the community push to get an independent elected in the Victorian seat of Indi, to the knitting nannas of northern New South Wales challenging coal seam gas, citizens are finding new ways of connecting community to policy challenges. Are there lessons in these cases that could be scaled up and rolled out for other communities, and to tackle other challenges? Joining Professor Mark Kenny and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga are two of the authors of the new book Mending Democracy, Associate Professor Carolyn Hendriks and Dr Selen Ercan.


Carolyn Hendriks is Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance at Crawford School of Public Policy.


Selen Ercan is Associate Professor at the Centre for Deliberative Democracy and Global Governance at University of Canberra.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Dec 14, 2020
How to be a liberal with Ian Dunt
49:49

On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Ian Dunt - host of the Oh God, What Now? podcast and author of How to be a liberal - joins Mark Kenny to discuss the history of liberal thought, how it has shaped present day politics, and the origins of the ‘culture wars’.


Have the culture wars emerged out of the failures of liberalism? Why haven’t contemporary political actors done more to protect people from prejudice and the tyranny of the majority? And is liberalism a natural corollary to democracy? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, author, political journalist and broadcaster Ian Dunt joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the history of political thought, present day politics, and liberalism’s trajectory.


Ian Dunt is a British author, political journalist and broadcaster. He is the Editor of Politics.co.uk and a host on the Oh God, What Now? podcast. His most recent book, How To Be A Liberal, was published in September 2020.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Dec 10, 2020
Trade-offs and troubles in the Australia-China relationship
54:23

Australia’s relationship with China continues to deteriorate, whether that’s through inflammatory tweets or trade troubles. And while there may be bipartisan support for Morrison’s response to the latest Twitter provocation, what is the government’s end game in its relationship with China?


Australia’s relationship with China has been spiralling downwards, seemingly hitting new lows each week. So what are the strategies at play, and can the tensions be dialled back? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these questions and more are China experts Professor Jane Golley and Yun Jiang, as well as regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga.


Yun Jiang is a researcher at The Australian National University (ANU) Australian Centre on China in World and Co-Editor of China Neican, a newsletter that decodes China issues with concise, timely, and policy-focused analysis.


Jane Golley is an economist, Professor at ANU, and Director of ANU Australian Centre on China in the World.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


The 2020 Australian Centre China in the World Annual Lecture, 'Five Eyes, One Tongue and Hard of Hearing – Australia and Asia in China’s Century' by Professor Louise Edwards, is available here.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Dec 07, 2020
Navigating Australia’s annus horribilis with David Speers
44:58

What has 2020 taught us about Australia’s political leadership? From the devastating bushfires that affected so many in the early part of the year, to the states leading the charge on border closures to tackle the coronavirus, this year has seen dramatic challenges and some difficult choices from the country’s leaders. Insiders host David Speers joins Mark Kenny to take a look back at the year in politics.


What started as a bad year for Prime Minister Scott Morrison – marked down by a poor bushfire response and ill-judged comments about going to the footy during a pandemic – seems to be ending on a high note, with stronger than expected economic growth and a virus largely under control. But he’s not been the only leader learning on the job – with Victorian Premier Dan Andrews and opposition leader Anthony Albanese also having testing years. In this special Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Insiders host David Speers to run the rule over the performance of Australia’s leaders in a difficult year.


David Speers is an Australian journalist. He has been the host of PM Agenda, The Last Word, and Speers, and is currently host of ABC’s Insiders.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Dec 03, 2020
John Kerry and the changing global climate
1:00:43

John Kerry being appointed as President-elect Joe Biden’s special climate envoy has the potential to encourage much stronger action by the world’s nations to tackle climate change. But it comes at a time when the great powers of the US, China, and Russia are at loggerheads on a wide variety of issues. So how will the global climate change, and what does this mean for Australia?


President-elect Joe Biden’s win in the US election, and his appointment of John Kerry as his special climate envoy, could finally shift global action to tackling climate change more assertively. But can the world come together to tackle this emergency even as its great powers divide on issues such as trade and the coronavirus? And where does this rapidly changing global environment leave Australia? On this Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Professor John Blaxland and Dr Siobhan McDonnell to talk climate change, the history of disaster in Afghanistan, great power contestation, whether Australia can rise above its climate wars, and more.

 

Siobhan McDonnell is a legal anthropologist with over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous people in Australia and the Pacific on land use, gender, and climate change. She is a Senior Lecturer at Crawford School of Public Policy, and the lead negotiator on climate change for the Vanuatu government.


John Blaxland is Professor of International Security and Intelligence Studies and former Head of the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University (ANU).


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 30, 2020
Truth is trouble with Malcolm Knox
48:26

On this Democracy Sausage Extra, award-winning journalist and author Malcolm Knox joins Mark Kenny to discuss the saga of Israel Folau - former star rugby union player sacked for sharing anti-LGBTQ views on social media - and how free speech got so complicated.


The sacking of former star player Israel Folau by Rugby Australia for his comments on social media once again revealed faultlines which had recently been laid bare during Australia’s marriage equality plebiscite. So what did the saga reveal about freedom of expression in Australia? What is the significance of groups like the Australian Christian Lobby in Australia’s public discourse? And, with ‘free speech’ very much a political battleground, what might the future hold? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny speaks with Australian journalist and author Malcolm Knox about the Israel Folau issue, Australia’s evangelical movement, and the ‘culture wars’. This episode was recorded live as part of the ANU/Canberra Times ‘Meet the Author’ series.


Malcolm Knox is the former literary editor and an award-winning journalist at The Sydney Morning Herald. Malcolm is the winner of three Walkley Awards. His novels include A Private Man, winner of the Ned Kelly Award, The Life, The Wonder Lover, and Bluebird. His most recent book is Truth Is Trouble: The Strange Case of Israel Folau, Or How Free Speech Became So Complicated.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 26, 2020
Coronavirus backcasting and Britain’s omnishambles
1:03:09

A study released last week looked at the true numbers of COVID-19 infections based on mortality rates. In doing so, it painted a grim picture for a number of countries including the United Kingdom. On this Democracy Sausage, we hear from one of the authors of that report, Professor Quentin Grafton.


Australia may have the coronavirus largely under control for now, but elsewhere in the world countries are still suffering staggeringly high numbers of infections and deaths. But a study published last week ‘backcasted’ true rates of infections based on mortality. In doing so, it found infection rates in some countries far higher than official statistics suggest: in the UK the study suggested infection rates are 16 times higher than the published numbers. On this Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga and one of the authors of the report, Professor Quentin Grafton. The panel talk about Europe and the US’ COVID-19 challenge, Australia’s response, and Quentin makes his pitch to Netflix for a new documentary called The Clown.


Quentin Grafton is Professor of Economics, Australian Laureate Fellow, Convenor of the Water Justice Hub, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy. He is also chairholder of the UNESCO Chair in Water Economics and Transboundary Water Governance and Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 23, 2020
The best bits
1:00:21

From Brexit Britain to Trump’s obsession with the stock market, and from era-defining infections to ideology vs interests, this week on Democracy Sausage Extra we look back over some of our favourite bits of the podcast from the last 18 months.


Why do some Brits have a ‘yearning for chaos’? Is it really ideology that drives government spending decisions? What do Donald Trump and stock market ‘day traders’ have in common? And how has disease defined human progress? These questions and many many more are answered on this week’s very special Democracy Sausage Extra. With Mark Kenny away, Martyn Pearce takes charge of the barbecue tongs as we take a look back at some of our favourite interviews over the last 18 months of The Sausage.


Kieran Gilbert is Chief News Anchor for Sky News, co-anchor of First Edition and anchor of AM Agenda on Sky News Live.


David Speers is an Australian journalist and outgoing Political Editor at Sky News Australia. He has been the host of PM AgendaThe Last Word, and Speers. Beginning in 2020, he now hosts ABC’s Insiders.


Brian Schmidt AC is Vice-Chancellor and President of The Australian National University. He was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics.


Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University and author of The Future of Us: Demography gets a makeover.


Stan Grant is the Vice Chancellor’s Chair of Australian/Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University. He was formerly ABC’s Global Affairs and Indigenous Affairs Analyst.


Jim Chalmers has been the the Shadow Treasurer since 2019 and the Member for Rankin in the Australian Parliament since 2013.


Richard Denniss is Chief Economist and former Executive Director of The Australia Institute. He is a prominent Australian economist, author and public policy commentator, and former Associate Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy.


Ros Taylor is Research Manager for the LSE Truth, Trust & Technology Commission and Managing Editor of the LSE Brexit blog.


Bevan Shields is Europe Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. He was previously Federal Editor and Canberra Bureau Chief.


Fintan O’Toole is one of Ireland’s leading political and cultural commentators. He is a columnist and writer for The Irish Times, the 2017 winner of both the European Press Prize and the Orwell Prize, and author of Heroic Failure: Brexit and the Politics of Pain.


Jonathan Swan is National Political Reporter for Axios, covering Republican leaders in the United States federal government and the White House.


Jane Golley is an economist and Director of the Australian Centre on China in the World at The Australian National University.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The...


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Nov 18, 2020
Talk is cheap
55:28

On this Democracy Sausage, we discuss how policymakers get their messages right (and so badly wrong) with government media and communications experts Fiona Benson and Jannette Cotterell, plus pod regular Marija Taflaga.


How can governments build public trust at a time when following public health directions is literally a matter of life and death? With COVID-19 vaccinations showing promising signs, how can governments convince citizens that it’s safe and beneficial in the midst of a vocal anti-vaccine movement? And how has the changing media and social media landscape impacted the way governments communicate with their constituents? On this special episode of Democracy Sausage presented as part of the GovComms Festival, we discuss the dark art of government communications with former ministerial press secretary Fiona Benson, government relations consultant Jannette Cotterell, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga.


Jannette Cotterell is a Managing Director of Executive Counsel Australia, a government relations and media consultancy. Prior to entering strategic communications and lobbying, she was a television producer with the Nine network, BBC Television in London, and Seven Network in Australia.


Fiona Benson is founder of FJ Partners Strategic Advisory. She is a former press secretary to two federal cabinet ministers, and specialises in devising innovative stakeholder engagement, media, and communications strategies.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Policy Forum Pod is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyStitcherSubscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.



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Nov 16, 2020
'Don, it’s time to go' with Zoe Robinson
47:18

Despite a clear result in the US election, Donald Trump is refusing to accept that his presidency will come to an end on 20 January. So will the Trump campaign's legal challenges achieve anything? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Mark Kenny speaks with expert in judicial politics, Zoe Robinson.


The United States presidential election has been called, but President Trump is refusing to accept the outcome. So will the president’s legal strategy work? Is the partisan nature of the United States’ legal system likely to have any impact on the proceedings? And is Australia’s judiciary as apolitical as many Australians like to think? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Zoe Robinson from ANU School of Politics and International Relations joins Professor Mark Kenny to discuss judicial politics and legal challenges to the presidential election result.


Zoe Robinson is a Professor of Political Science at ANU. She also holds a position as Professor of Law at DePaul University College of Law in Chicago.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 12, 2020
And breathe…
1:00:11

After days of waiting the US finally has a new president. But while Donald Trump may have been comprehensively beaten, Trumpism, and Trump’s supporters, are far from defeated. So what comes next for this toxically-intensified partisan polity? Mark Kenny is joined by US analysts Jen Hunt and Charles Miller, as well as regular podleague Marija Taflaga.


Arguably the most contentious election of our time has been concluded – pending legal cases – and Donald Trump has become a one-term president. And while Trump was able to get more votes this time around - and the second highest tally of any presidential candidate in history - he wasn’t able to pull off an electoral college win over his rival Joe Biden. But what comes next for the US? Will Trump’s call to get his supporter base out on the streets to protest work? Do any of his team’s legal challenges have any chance of success? And will Trump spend his remaining time in office doing what he can to protect himself from future prosecution? Our stellar cast of stars and stripes experts - Dr Jennifer Hunt and Dr Charles Miller - tackle these issues and many more with Professor Mark Kenny and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga.


Jennifer Hunt is a Lecturer at ANU National Security College and a Research Associate at the US Studies Centre.


Charles Miller is a Lecturer at ANU School of Politics and International Relations with a focus on military conflict.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 09, 2020
Riled Britannia with Bevan Shields and Elizabeth Ames
51:40

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced a new month-long lockdown as the country grapples with high COVID-19 infection rates and a stretched National Health Service. But will the British people and its politicians – so compliant and supportive of the threat first time around – be as willing to back the new measures? Mark Kenny talks to Democracy Sausage UK regulars Elizabeth Ames and Bevan Shields.


In the face of staggeringly high infection rates, a track and trace system that has long since been overwhelmed, and a National Health Service under serious threat, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has locked down the country to tackle its second wave of coronavirus crisis. But while the first time around the UK population was behind the measures, this time around Johnson is facing intense criticism from the public and within his own party. Joining Professor Mark Kenny to talk about the UK’s COVID-19 response are Democracy Sausage regulars Elizabeth Ames and Bevan Shields. The panel also discuss the unfolding US election result, and the merits of Clumber spaniels.


Elizabeth Ames is an international trade policy expert. She is currently Director of the Britain-Australia Society and Trustee of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London.


Bevan Shields is Europe Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. He was previously Federal Editor and Canberra Bureau Chief.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 05, 2020
COVID-19 and climate change lessons
53:49

The bushfire royal commission report released last week put climate change at the front and centre of its analysis, if not its recommendations. But as Australia has achieved such success in using scientific advice to respond to COVID-19, can it also start following the advice of scientists on tackling climate change? Mark Kenny is joined by Arnagretta Hunter, Mark Howden, and Marija Taflaga to talk bushfires, state vs federal responses, and the roadmap for addressing climate risk.


Last week’s report from the bushfire royal commission once again shone a light on the importance of tackling climate change, even as we navigate a global pandemic. But it arrived in the same week that Australia was able to achieve zero new COVID-19 infections – a result that has been driven by listening to and acting on scientific advice and modelling. So can Australia’s leaders take those lessons and apply them to the climate crisis? Could it be that the states lead the federal government in acting on the issue? And will the messages from the Commission’s report change the way we talk about economic risk when it comes to climate? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Professor Mark Howden, Dr Arnagretta Hunter, and Dr Marija Taflaga.

 

Mark Howden is the Director of the Climate Change Institute at the Australian National University (ANU).


Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Nov 02, 2020
It's the government, stupid
45:36

From health concerns over obesity to drug dependency, governments have the power to creatively solve widespread societal problems. So why does the blame for these issues so often fall at the feet of individuals? Mark Kenny talks to Keith Dowding about his new book, It’s the Government, Stupid.


While individuals can and do make bad decisions, governments have the power to influence behaviour and tackle widespread societal issues – from the health issues associated with obesity to problem gambling. But has a cult of personal responsibility blinded us to recognising the responsibility that government has to act and respond? In this Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny talks to Professor Keith Dowding about his new political philosophy book, It’s the Government Stupid: How governments blame citizens for their own policies.


Keith Dowding is Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Political Philosophy at The Australian National University's College of Arts and Social Sciences.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 29, 2020
Gone by Christmas?
51:00

Australia’s two most populous states – New South Wales and Victoria – are facing intense political leadership questions for very different reasons. So what does the future hold for Daniel Andrews and Gladys Berejiklian? Mark Kenny discusses ministerial judgement, controlling narratives, and asking the right questions with Kieran Gilbert, David Caldicott, and Marija Taflaga.


In New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian still appears to have strong public support, but just how damaging will the ICAC revelations be for her? Meanwhile, in neighbouring Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews has been decisive in his response to COVID-19, but has it come at a cost of diminishing public support and an inability to reimpose restrictions if coronavirus infections pick up again? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to answer these questions and more are Sky News Chief News Anchor Kieran Gilbert, emergency medicine consultant Dr David Caldicott, and regular podleague and political scientist Dr Marija Taflaga.


Kieran Gilbert is Chief News Anchor for Sky News, co-anchor of First Edition and anchor of AM Agenda on Sky News Live.


David Caldicott is an emergency consultant at the emergency department of the Calvary Hospital in Canberra and a Senior Lecturer in the College of Health and Medicine at The Australian National University.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 26, 2020
Can Australia close the gap?
54:53

On this Democracy Sausage Extra, we talk to Indigenous experts Professor Ian Anderson AO and Dr Virginia Marshall about the new National Agreement on Closing the Gap, the importance of shared decision-making, and whether Australia is taking meaningful steps towards genuine reconciliation.


Will the commitment of governments to sharing decision-making with Indigenous Australians through the new National Agreement on Closing the Gap be a turning point for Indigenous health and wellbeing? What does this agreement mean for the broader reconciliation agenda? And with little for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in the recent Federal Budget, will governments ensure progress is supported financially in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, we’re joined by Dr Virginia Marshall, the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow at the Australian National University (ANU), and Professor Ian Anderson AO, former Indigenous health practitioner, senior public servant, and now Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Student and University Experience) at ANU.


Ian Anderson AO is Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Student and University Experience) at The Australian National University. Before that, he spent three years leading Closing the Gap negotiations on behalf of the Australian government. Ian is a Palawa man from the northwest coast of Tasmania.


Virginia Marshall is the Inaugural Indigenous Postdoctoral Fellow with The Australian National University’s School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet) and the Fenner School of Environment and Society. She is a Wiradjuri Nyemba woman from New South Wales.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 21, 2020
The opposition in residence
55:08

The elections in New Zealand and the Australian Capital Territory delivered strong results to incumbent governments. But with Jacinda Ardern poised to govern without needing to form a coalition, and with a rising Greens vote in Canberra, what challenges are ahead for the victors? Plus we look at accountability in government and why there is no federal version of ICAC.

 

New Zealand’s election delivered a resounding victory to Jacinda Ardern, while in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Labor returned, the Greens grew, and the Liberals slumped. But could those strong results create challenges from inside their parties and, in the ACT’s case, their coalition partners? Analysing the election results with Professor Mark Kenny, as well as looking at public accountability from politicians, are Professor Paul Pickering and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga.


Professor Paul Pickering is the Director of the ANU Australian Studies Institute.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 19, 2020
Creating a future without poverty
59:02

On this Democracy Sausage Extra during Anti-Poverty Week, Mark Kenny discusses creating a future without poverty with three of the world’s leading voices on poverty measurement, research, and eradication – former United Nations Special Rapporteur Philip Alston, Oxford University’s Sabina Alkire, and Crawford School’s Sharon Bessell.


How can policymakers better measure and understand poverty? Is ideology the main impediment to poverty alleviation? And are the Sustainable Development Goals insufficient to deal with major global challenges like climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic? On this Democracy Sausage Extra for Anti-Poverty Week, Professor Mark Kenny discusses poverty eradication with former Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights Professor Philip Alston, Director of the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative Dr Sabina Alkire, and Crawford School of Public Policy’s Professor Sharon Bessell.


Sabina Alkire is Director of the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative, an economic research centre within the Department of International Development at the University of Oxford. She is also a Fellow of the Human Development and Capability Association.


Philip Alston is John Norton Pomeroy Professor of Law at New York University and served as United Nations Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU).


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 15, 2020
How to miss an open goal
49:10

The COVID-19 pandemic has given the government the chance to reshape the economy. But by slipping on the hi-vis of infrastructure spending and ‘real jobs’, has the government missed a golden opportunity? Mark Kenny talks tax, ‘credible’ women, and class-based values and priorities with Helen Sullivan, Robert Breunig, and Marija Taflaga.


The Federal Budget shovelled vast sums of money out of the door of government and into the pockets of Australians. But with little in there for women, climate change, or to support structural change to the economy, were the funding decisions based on ideology and an outdated idea of Australia? And in structuring the budget towards tax cuts and infrastructure, has the government missed a free hit to make a better Australia and instead hoofed the ball into row Z of the stands? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss the criticisms being levelled against the budget are Crawford School Director Professor Helen Sullivan, tax expert Professor Robert Breunig, and regular guest Dr Marija Taflaga.

 

Professor Helen Sullivan is Director of ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Professor Robert Breunig is the director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute. He conducts research in three main areas: economics of the household, empirical industrial organisation, and statistical and econometric theory.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 12, 2020
Opportunity lost? The cost of Australia’s new federal budget
45:25

On this post-budget episode of Democracy Sausage Extra, we’re joined by an outstanding panel of scholars - Liz Allen, Miranda Stewart, and Marija Taflaga - to examine the new federal budget, whether it does enough to help those struggling during the pandemic, and the demographic changes shaping the country’s future.


While this budget may include massive spending, is it investing in making Australia fairer and more equitable? What does the document reveal about the government’s priorities, values, and ideology? And will changing demographics leave the country smaller, poorer, older, and whiter? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, host Professor Mark Kenny is joined by demographer Dr Liz Allen, tax expert Professor Miranda Stewart, and political scientist Dr Marija Taflaga to examine perhaps the most significant budget in Australia’s history.


Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University and author of The Future of Us: Demography gets a makeover.


Miranda Stewart is a Professor at University of Melbourne and Fellow at the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.


Marija Taflaga is Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 08, 2020
The long cry of Indigenous peoples to be heard
1:10:35

In this special episode of Democracy Sausage, recorded live at the National Press Club, Indigenous leader and activist Pat Turner AM discusses the struggle of Indigenous peoples in Australia to be heard and why 2020 is a defining moment for the nation.


Why is Australia lagging behind other democratic nations in developing the institutions and structures that allow Indigenous peoples to be heard? Is the new National Agreement on Closing the Gap a turning point in terms of shared decision-making between governments and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people? And will this benchmark of shared decision-making translate into the establishment of an Indigenous voice at local, regional and national levels? In this special episode of Democracy Sausage, we bring you the live recording of the ‘Australia and the World’ annual lecture, delivered by Gurdanji-Arrernte woman and National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation CEO, Pat Turner AM.


Pat Turner AM is an Aboriginal Australian activist of Gurdanji-Arrernte heritage. She is CEO of Aboriginal Health in Aboriginal Hands, the Coalition of Peaks Convenor, and Co-Chair of the Joint Council on Closing the Gap. She was awarded the Order of Australia in 1990 for her service.


Professor Brian Schmidt AC is Vice-Chancellor and President of The Australian National University. He was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 04, 2020
When America stopped being great with Nick Bryant and Brian Schmidt
34:05

On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Mark Kenny speaks with BBC New York correspondent Nick Bryant and Australian National University Vice-Chancellor Brian Schmidt about the first presidential debate, America's future, and its deep divisions.


After a presidential debate that many found disheartening, even disturbing, what’s next for Joe Biden and Donald Trump with the election fast approaching? What role did the media play in Trump’s political rise? And with the country’s divisions going far deeper than this election campaign, can the United States arrest what some are describing as a serious decline? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny chats with Australian National University Vice-Chancellor Professor Brian Schmidt, and United States-based journalist and author of When America Stopped Being Great, Dr Nick Bryant.


Dr Nick Bryant is the BBC’s New York and United Nations correspondent. He is also the author of The Rise and Fall of Australia: How a great nation lost its way.


Professor Brian Schmidt is Vice-Chancellor and President of The Australian National University. He was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Oct 01, 2020
Policy shapeshifters and the upcoming federal budget
57:59

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, journalist Sarah Ison, political scientist John Warhurst, Marija Taflaga, and Mark Kenny discuss the federal budget and the return of ‘fibre to the premises’.


After years of political battles over the National Broadband Network, why has the government now decided to build ‘fibre to the premises’? What lies ahead in next week’s federal budget, possibly one of the most important in Australia’s recent history? And is the federal opposition losing a fight for relevance, or is Labor leader Anthony Albanese just doing what he can with a difficult hand? On this Democracy Sausage, our expert panel - political correspondent for The West Australian Sarah Ison, Emeritus Professor John Warhurst, regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga, and host Professor Mark Kenny - talk about the federal budget and helping voters make more informed decisions at election time.


John Warhurst AO is an Emeritus Professor of political science at ANU. His expertise is centred on Australian government and politics, especially parties, elections, lobbying, and church-state relations.


Sarah Ison is a political correspondent for The West Australian.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


You can access smartvote Australia, a project of The Australian National University, here.


This year’s ‘Australia in the World’ lecture with Pat Turner AM will be broadcast live on ABC News and Sky News at 12.30pm on Wednesday 29 September. You can find more details here.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 28, 2020
Low emissions technologies and Australia’s energy future with Kenneth Baldwin
52:50

On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Director of ANU Energy Change Institute Kenneth Baldwin joins Mark Kenny to discuss the five priority technologies in the government’s new Technology Investment Roadmap, and whether they will put Australia on the right track to quickly and effectively reduce emissions. 


This week, as part of its Technology Investment Roadmap, the Australian government revealed the five low-emission technologies it will prioritise for investment: clean hydrogen, energy storage, low emissions steel and aluminium production, carbon capture and storage, and soil carbon sequestration. But what are these technologies and how do they work? What is their outlook in Australia’s future energy marketplace? And will they be enough to counter the threat of climate change? On this episode of Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny and Director of ANU Energy Change Institute Professor Kenneth Baldwin put the five technologies under the microscope to reveal their strengths, the challenges they face, and discuss why policymakers shouldn’t give up on the prospect of a carbon price just yet. 


Professor Kenneth Baldwin is Director of the Energy Change Institute at The Australian National University.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 24, 2020
Health inequity and energy power plays
50:55

On this Democracy Sausage, Sharon Friel, Helen Sullivan, Meegan Fitzharris, and Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny at the hotplate to talk about improving health and wellbeing beyond the coronavirus crisis, and whether Scott Morrison’s gas plan is more than just hot air.


As a result of the COVID-19 crisis, more Australians are focused on health policy now than possibly at any point in the country’s contemporary history. But will this increased awareness during the crisis translate into long-term, whole-of-government health reform? How can policymakers ensure Australians receive both equity of access and equity of outcomes in healthcare? And is Scott Morrison’s gas plan meaningful policy or just a political power play? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Sharon Friel, Professor Helen Sullivan, former ACT Health Minister Meegan Fitzharris, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga chat with Professor Mark Kenny about health inequality and the future of Australia’s energy policy.

 

Professor Helen Sullivan is Director of the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Sharon Friel is Professor of Health Equity and Director of ANU School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet). She is also Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance and Co-Director of the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.


Meegan Fitzharris is a Senior Fellow in Health Policy and Leadership at ANU College of Health and Medicine. She is a former Labor Member of the Legislative Assembly for Molonglo and Yerrabi and was the ACT government's Minister for Health and Wellbeing.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 21, 2020
Scott Morrison and pandemic politics with Katharine Murphy
1:00:56

Once an outsider to win the last Australian federal election, Scott Morrison’s ‘miracle’ 2019 electoral victory put him at the helm during one of the most difficult years in the country’s contemporary history. So what has the COVID-19 crisis revealed about the prime minister, and Australian politics and society? Recorded live as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series, Guardian Australia’s political editor Katharine Murphy joins Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage Extra to discuss Scott Morrison, pandemic politics, and her new Quarterly Essay, The end of certainty.


Katharine Murphy is Guardian Australia‘s political editor. She has worked in Canberra’s parliamentary gallery for 15 years. In 2008, she won the Paul Lyneham award for excellence in press gallery journalism, while in 2012 she was a Walkley award finalist in the best digital journalism category. She is the presenter of The Guardian’s Australian Politics Live podcast and recently authored a Quaretrely Essay, The End of Certainty: Scott Morrison and Pandemic Politics.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 17, 2020
The identity crisis of conservatism
55:57

Mark Kenny is joined by Arnagretta Hunter, Marija Taflaga and Frank Bongiorno to take a look at how conservatives have responded to the coronavirus crisis and how that compares to responses to the climate crisis.


Conservative governments have had a mixed record on dealing with COVID-19, from Australia’s relatively effective response to public health disasters like in the UK, but underpinning strategies in both countries is the protection of the economy. But if conservatism is about preserving and protecting the status quo, why can’t that approach be taken to protecting the climate and ensuring we have an economy built for the challenges to come? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to take a look at the state of conservatism from Australia to the UK are Dr Arnagretta Hunter, Professor Frank Bongiorno, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga.

 

Dr Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer at ANU Medical School.


Professor Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History at ANU and is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 14, 2020
How to win an election with Chris Wallace
1:01:51

On this episode, Chris Wallace chats with Mark Kenny about Labor’s 2019 election loss, the machinery of politics, and her new book, How to Win an Election.


The 2019 Australian election produced a surprise result showing, not for the first time, that every election is there for the winning - including the next one. Labor's surprise loss in 2019, like the Liberal and National parties' defeat in the so-called 'unloseable' 1993 election, showed how careful attention to basic political craft can yield big dividends - and how inattention to it can turn apparently certain favourites into losers. Recorded live as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series, Chris Wallace joins Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage Extra to discuss her new book, How to Win an Election.


Dr Chris Wallace is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra. Entering the history profession after a first career as an economic and political journalist in the Canberra Press Gallery, her work focuses on political, international and global history with special reference to leadership. Her book historicising the 2019 Australian federal election, How To Win An Election, is expected in November of 2020.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 11, 2020
The on-purpose recession and women in the COVID-19 crisis
1:02:05

On this episode, we chat with Katrine Beauregard and Marija Taflaga about the impact of the crisis on women, truth in political advertising, and political donations. In part two, Peter Martin joins us to talk about Australia’s recession and where to from here.


Officially in recession and with households holding onto their money at an unprecedented scale, what does the future hold for the Australian economy? What might happen if spending never recovers? And what impact will the crisis have on women's participation in the political system? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, we discuss Australia’s economic outlook with Peter Martin AM, Crawford School visiting fellow and Business and Economy Editor at The Conversation. Dr Katrine Beauregard and Dr Marija Taflaga also step up to the hotplate to chat about the impact of the crisis on women’s political participation, transparency in political donations, and truth in political advertising.

 

Peter Martin AM is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University (ANU) and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation.


Dr Katrine Beauregard is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her work focuses on political behaviour, and why people vote the way they do.


Dr Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


You can register here for the live virtual launch of Associate Professor Chris Wallace's new book, How to win an election, where Chris will be in conversation with Professor Mark Kenny.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 07, 2020
Australia, China and the Belt and Road Initiative with Jane Golley
39:04

On this special bonus Democracy Sausage Extra, we’re joined by one of Australia’s most preeminent China scholars, Professor Jane Golley, to help us understand China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and what it means for Australia.


A three-decade, $1 trillion infrastructure investment plan that currently involves over 60 countries, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) is a vast economic and foreign policy initiative led by Chinese President Xi Jinping. But the scheme hasn’t been universally welcomed - indeed Victoria’s 2018 to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with China on the deal has been met with criticism by the Federal Government. But what are the economic and foreign policy factors driving the BRI? How valid are the national security concerns about the scheme, including those about so-called ‘debt-trap diplomacy’? And how should Australia be responding? On this special extra Democracy Sausage Extra, we’re joined by one of Australia’s most preeminent China scholars, Professor Jane Golley, to help us understand the BRI and Australia-China relations.


Professor Jane Golley is an economist and Director of the Australian Centre on China in the World at The Australian National University.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 05, 2020
The surfer and the warship with Ian Cohen
52:30

On this episode, Mark Kenny chats to former New South Wales (NSW) Greens politician Ian Cohen about his life in politics, Australia’s history of environmental activism, and grabbing onto the front of a US warship in Sydney Harbour. 


Rising to prominence after surfing the bow wave of a US Destroyer during a nuclear disarmament protest, Ian Cohen became the first Greens politician to be elected to the NSW Legislative Council. After a political career spanning 16 years, Ian chats with Professor Mark Kenny in paradise on the NSW Far North Coast on this Democracy Sausage Extra. The pair chat about the history of environmental activism in Australia, the importance of protecting and preserving the delicate ecological balance in his local community, and what the future might hold for the Australian Greens.

 

Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Ian Cohen is a former Australian Greens politician. Ian was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Council in 1995 as its first Green member. He retired from parliament in 2011.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Sep 03, 2020
In the national interest
1:14:37

On this special 100th episode of Democracy Sausage, we’re joined by Frank Bongiorno, Jacinta Carroll, Marija Taflaga, and Mark Kenny to talk Australian attitudes towards COVID-19 surveillance, security agencies on social media, and accountability for former political figures.


What do Australian attitudes towards surveillance amidst the COVID-19 crisis suggest about trust in society? After weeks of icy diplomatic exchanges, what is the Australian government’s long-term goal for its relationship with Beijing? And why are Australia’s security agencies taking to social media? On the 100th episode of Democracy Sausage, we’re joined by national security expert Jacinta Carroll, historian Professor Frank Bongiorno, regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga and, taking a break from his holiday to appear as guest, Professor Mark Kenny.


Jacinta Carroll is Senior Research Fellow at ANU National Security College and was the inaugural Head of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s Counter-Terrorism Policy Centre.


Professor Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History at ANU and is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 31, 2020
From crisis to calamity? The UK's coming COVID-19 and Brexit challenges
1:01:36

While the coronavirus crisis in the United Kingdom has abated somewhat in recent months, is life in the country going to get tougher if winter brings about a growing risk of transmission and Brexit negotiations falter? With us this week to discuss the challenges facing Britain are Remainiacs and The Bunker host Ros Taylor, pod regular Elizabeth Ames, and Brexit researcher Georgina Wright.


It has been a very tough year in the UK, but some fear that very difficult times still lie ahead. With schools reopening and winter set to force Britons back indoors, will the colder months bring with them another spike in COVID-19 cases? While the country has seen an outpouring of support for frontline workers, is the pandemic actually undermining the social contract in the UK? And with Brexit negotiations forced down the priority list, what impact is the uncertainty about the future of UK-European relations having on British business already struggling? On this Democracy Sausage Extra we’re joined by a top panel of UK-based experts - Ros Taylor, Elizabeth Ames and Georgina Wright - to look at the challenges facing Britain as it tries to manage Brexit negotiations and a global pandemic.


Georgina Wright is a Senior Researcher at the Institute for Government, where she focuses on the United Kingdom's engagement and influence in the European Union after Brexit. Her research interests also include Franco-British relations and the future of the European Union.


Ros Taylor is Research Manager for the LSE Truth, Trust & Technology Commission and Managing Editor of the LSE Brexit blog, and the host of the Remainiacs and The Bunker podcasts.


Elizabeth Ames is an international trade policy expert. She is currently Director of the Britain-Australia Society and Trustee of the Menzies Australia Institute at King's College London.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 27, 2020
The politics of hope in a pandemic
50:45

On this week’s fry up of politics and public affairs, our outstanding panel of John Hewson, Quentin Grafton and Marija Taflaga join us to talk about the COVID-19 aged care inquiry, tensions over state border closures, and whether or not a coronavirus vaccine should be mandatory.


It was a “week of hope” in the words of Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, after signing a letter of intent to access the promising Oxford University coronavirus vaccine and falling infection numbers in Victoria. So after weeks of restrictions in Victoria following its second wave outbreak, is this week another turning point in Australia’s coronavirus response? Should Aged Care Minister Richard Colbeck face sanctions for failing to recall how many aged care residents have died from the virus in a Senate Inquiry? And is making a COVID-19 vaccine compulsory essential to ensure community safety in the wake of the pandemic? With Mark Kenny on a well-earned break, Martyn Pearce fires up the barbeque this week, joined by former Opposition Leader Dr John Hewson, Crawford School’s Professor Quentin Grafton, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga.


Dr John Hewson AM is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy. He is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system.


Professor Quentin Grafton is an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Martyn Pearce is a presenter for Policy Forum Pod and the Editor of Policy Forum.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 24, 2020
The gallery view with Phil Coorey and David Crowe
57:08

The coronavirus crisis is posing new questions and serious challenges to Australia’s political leaders. And those leaders are responding assertively – closing borders, slowing the economy, and working hard to keep infection numbers down. But are they making the right choices? On this Democracy Sausage Extra Mark Kenny talks with the insiders who ask the tough questions of those leaders every day – press gallery veterans David Crowe and Phil Coorey.


Initial political optimism from an early Federal Government response and subsequent low infection numbers has now given way to fear, with Australia’s internal borders closed, and soul searching and inquiries about community protection and service provision. So what does this unprecedented political time look like to the insiders – the people who report from Canberra’s press gallery? Joining Professor Mark Kenny are Phil Coorey of the Australian Financial Review and David Crowe of the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. The panel discuss the questions the pandemic raises about Australia’s federated system, why every leader gets judged on the numbers, whether Australia’s good performance through the Global Financial Crisis encouraged complacency about the impacts of COVID-19, and the ‘bad men’ in charge of the world. 


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Phillip Coorey is an Australian journalist, currently political editor for The Australian Financial Review. Phillip has covered federal politics since 1998, beginning as political correspondent for The Advertiser.


David Crowe is Chief Political Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and a regular commentator on national affairs on the ABC’s Insiders program. In a career spanning 25 years, he has covered federal politics as the national affairs editor of The Australian and the Chief Political Correspondent of The Australian Financial Review.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 20, 2020
The crisis in aged care
1:00:53

Has a failure to properly value care led to poor decisions driven by profit, and in doing so entrenched inequality for women? On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at the crisis unfolding in Australia’s aged care sector, the gendered dimensions playing out in the pandemic, and why we need to rethink how we value human beings in society.


Even before the coronavirus hit, it was clear that the aged care sector had significant problems - a sector largely privatised and governed by profit, and built on the back of low-paid, poorly-valued, and precariously employed women workers. On this episode of Democracy Sausage Mark Kenny speaks to Meegan Fitzharris, Helen Sullivan, and Sharon Bessell about what the crisis in aged care tells us about how governments deliver the services people need, what we value in society, and what we want society to look like after the crisis.


Meegan Fitzharris is a Senior Fellow in Health Policy and Leadership at ANU College of Health and Medicine. She is a former Labor Member of the Legislative Assembly for Molonglo and Yerrabi and was the ACT Government's Minister for Health and Wellbeing.


Professor Helen Sullivan is Director of the ANU Crawford School of Public Policy.


Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 17, 2020
The future of us with Liz Allen
46:54

On this episode, academic and author Dr Liz Allen joins us to talk about the myth of the Australian ‘fair go’ and why COVID-19 could be leading Australia into demographic disaster.


Political leaders often pitch Australia as the land of ‘a fair go’. But with real social mobility so hard to come by for many Australians, is this more national myth than reality? What can policymakers do to ensure demography doesn’t equal destiny for Australians experiencing disadvantage? And is the COVID-19 crisis creating a ‘perfect storm’ for demographic trouble in Australia? On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by demographer Dr Liz Allen to talk about what demography reveals about Australia’s democracy, why economic uncertainty might be preventing a COVID-19 baby boom, and her new book The Future of Us


Dr Liz Allen is a demographer and social researcher with quantitative and qualitative expertise at The Australian National University and author of The Future of Us: Demography gets a makeover.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 13, 2020
Leadership in the time of COVID-19 with Niki Savva
1:00:44

What does it take to be a political leader? What’s the magic mix of talent and time? And do Australia’s treasurer and shadow treasurer have that mix? Joining Mark Kenny to talk about what it takes to do the top job are commentator Niki Savva and Marija Taflaga.


After botching the bushfire response, many argue Prime Minister Scott Morrison has performed strongly in the pandemic. But while he’s riding high in the polls, showing flexibility in policy, and moving quickly to sure up a struggling economy, the real political test will come with the predicted deep and long recession to come. If he or opposition leader Anthony Albanese struggle, both government and opposition have potential leaders in waiting in Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers. But what does it take to lead? Do you need 20 years’ experience in politics? Or has the accelerated rate of change that has afflicted Australian politics over the last two decades changed the political paradigm? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to talk leadership, recession, and recovery are journalist and commentator Niki Savva and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga.


Niki Savva is an Australian journalist, author, and former senior adviser to Prime Minister John Howard and Treasurer Peter Costello.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 10, 2020
Is Trump cooked?
39:53

Days after a presidential interview with one US-based Australian correspondent went viral, Mark Kenny chats with another stateside Aussie journalist Matthew Knott about the Jonathan Swan interview and Trump’s chances of reelection in November.


Electoral surprises may have become the norm in recent years, so US presidential hopeful, Joe Biden, may not be resting as easy as many think. But with postal voting set to open soon in some states, is President Trump’s window to shake up the campaign closing too fast for the surprise 2016 victor to secure a second term? Plus with the president decrying ‘mail-in’ voting as opening the door for fraud, will the election results be seen as legitimate by his rusted on supporters? And does the US need an independent, non-partisan, federal electoral service like the Australian Electoral Commission to sure-up its famous democracy? In a week for Australian correspondents in the US, we talk to Matthew Knott from The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald about Trump’s electoral prospects, Biden’s options for running mate, and that interview.

 

Matthew Knott is North America correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 06, 2020
Understanding China
51:55

On this special Democracy Sausage we launch a new book on governance systems in China, Taiwan and Australia with its co-editor Andrew Podger and ANU Chancellor Julie Bishop, and discuss how COVID-19 is affecting Australia’s elderly.


What does reform look like in China and how does the country’s governance stack up against Australia’s? Has reform in the country actually gone backwards under Xi Jinping? And how can business navigate the increasingly tense relations between China and other countries? On this Democracy Sausage Professor Andrew Podger, ANU Chancellor and former Foreign Minister the Hon Julie Bishop, and Dr Marija Taflaga join Mark Kenny to launch and discuss the new book, Designing governance systems for performance and accountability, co-edited by Professor Podger. The panel also examines COVID-19 in the aged care sector and whether Australia is doing enough to protect its elderly people.


The Hon Julie Bishop is Chancellor of The Australian National University and was Australia's Minister for Foreign Affairs.


Andrew Podger AO is an Honorary Professor of Public Policy at ANU, former Australian Public Service Commissioner and former secretary of several government departments.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Aug 03, 2020
Annika Smethurst – On Secrets
1:01:46

Mark Kenny talks with Annika Smethurst about the police raid that changed her life and her new essay, On Secrets.


On 4 June 2019, Federal Police raided the home of Walkley award-winning journalist Annika Smethurst, changing her life forever. Smethurst was expecting a cleaner - instead it was the federal police with a warrant. Five of them turned her place inside out, including going through her underwear drawer. In this special Democracy Sausage Professor Mark Kenny speaks to Annika Smethurst about the raid, its impact on her personally and professionally, and her new essay, On Secrets.

 

A year before the raid, Smethurst had written an article about a proposal to allow the Australian Signals Directorate to spy on Australians. The AFP was investigating the possibility of the communication of classified material. Smethurst became the accidental poster woman for press freedom with her employer calling it a 'dangerous act of intimidation'.

 

On April 15 2020, the High Court ruled the warrant invalid and on 27 May 2020 the AFP announced that Smethurst would not be charged over her stories that "... relied on classified intelligence documents". But the impact of the ordeal remains, and Smethurst joins us in this episode to discuss the raid that changed her life, and its implications for journalists all over the country.

 

This discussion was recorded as part of the ANU/Canberra Times Meet the Author series.


Annika Smethurst is National Political Editor for the Sunday News Corp mastheads The Herald Sun, news.com.au, The Daily Telegraph and The Courier-Mail. She is also a Director on the Board of the National Press Club.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 30, 2020
Will the show go on? With David Wenham
51:14

On this Democracy Sausage Mark Kenny is joined by actor David Wenham, theatre producer Caroline Stacey, and performer-producer Tracy Bourne, as well as regular guest Marija Taflaga, to talk about how COVID-19 has affected the dramatic arts.


Few industries have been impacted as severely by the coronavirus restrictions as the performing arts. And while the government has set aside $400 million to attract foreign film and television productions to Australian shores, far less is on offer for the country’s home-grown productions. So will COVID-19 spell the last act for local film, television and theatre? Mark Kenny is joined by an A-list cast of actor David Wenham, theatre producer Caroline Stacey, and actor and teacher Dr Tracy Bourne, as well as regular co-star Marija Taflaga. Listen here: 

 

David Wenham is one of Australia's most well-known and respected actors, having appeared in movies, television series and theatre productions in Australia and abroad. He is perhaps best known or his roles in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, Van Helsing, and 300, and for his role as Diver Dan in Australian television series SeaChange.


Caroline Stacey is Artistic Director and CEO of The Street Theatre, Canberra’s leading creative producer dedicated to ambitious contemporary live performance.


Dr Tracy Bourne is a singer, singing teacher, writer and director, and is Artistic Director of SEAM (Sustainable Environment Arts Movement) Inc, an organisation that aims to engage people with the issue of climate change through community art and performance projects.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership...


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Jul 27, 2020
Debt, deficit, and disaster?
49:13

On this special Democracy Sausage Second Serve Mark Kenny and Peter Martin discuss today’s economic update from the Treasurer and the impact of the corona-crunch on the nation’s future.


The economic update given by Treasurer Josh Frydenberg today made for a sobering read, with net debt expected to rise to $677 billion by 30 June 2021, GDP down seven per cent in the June quarter, and unemployment expected to hit more than nine per cent at the end of the year. So has the coronavirus crisis led Australia into a debt and deficit disaster? And with the pandemic far from over, what does the future hold for Australians in this bleak economic climate? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to crunch the numbers is The Conversation’s Business and Economy Editor Peter Martin. 


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Peter Martin is a Visiting Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University and the Business and Economy Editor of The Conversation.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 23, 2020
COVID-19 and hitting the wrong notes for the arts
1:04:50

On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at how the arts world has been impacted by COVID-19, plus whether the crisis has changed what Australians want from their governments, with historian Paul Pickering and composer and musician Kim Cunio.


Even before the coronavirus crisis struck, artists were doing it tough – with crushingly-low incomes, and a sector withering from low funding, a reliance on philanthropy, and a workforce who have to take on additional skill sets to survive. But lockdowns around the world have highlighted how reliant we all are on the escapism and diversions that art of all kinds provide. So what could and should governments be doing to provide the support our creative artists need? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss this and more are historian Professor Paul Pickering and head of ANU School of Music Associate Professor Kim Cunio.


Kim Cunio is an Associate Professor studying composition and musicology in the School of Music of The Australian National University. He is an accomplished researching composer and performer and was awarded an ABC Golden Manuscript Award in recognition of his work with traditional music.


Paul Pickering is a Professor at The Australian National University and Director of the ANU Australian Studies Institute.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


This week's episode includes the song 'Riches to rags in COVID time' performed and written by Kim Cunio.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 20, 2020
The Dismissal (the Palace Letters Director's edition)
1:00:08

The Palace Letters – finally released to the public this week – detail the long road to one of the world’s great constitutional crises. On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by Frank Bongiorno and Chris Wallace to discuss what we now know about The Dismissal.


On 11 November 1975, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam was dismissed from his role by the Governor-General, Sir John Kerr. Nearly 25 years later the correspondence between the Governor-General and the Queen’s Private Secretary is now public. The letters, dating back more than a year before that historic day and running to more than 1,000 pages, shed new light on a political and constitutional crisis. Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss what we’ve learned from the Palace Letters are historians Dr Chris Wallace and Professor Frank Bongiorno.

 

Dr Chris Wallace is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra. Entering the history profession after a first career as an economic and political journalist in the Canberra Press Gallery, her work focuses on political, international and global history with special reference to leadership. Her book historicising the 2019 Australian federal election, How To Win An Election, is expected in November of 2020.


Professor Frank Bongiorno is the Head of the School of History at ANU and an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 16, 2020
Is going to the footy fair play or foul?
59:30

On this episode of Democracy Sausage we take a look at the rising infection rate in Victoria, the optics of Scott Morrison going to the football on the weekend, what the modelling tells us about the virus’ trajectory, and Trump’s troubles in the US.


With Melbourne in lockdown and rising rates of community transmission in Victoria and beyond, did Prime Minister Scott Morrison play it badly by going to the football, or would staying away have sent the wrong message? Do the COVID-19 numbers suggest that Australia has missed the boat on going for a policy of elimination? And with the economy likely to struggle for some time, will there be a move to raise the rate for those left unemployed? On this episode of Democracy Sausage Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Professor Quentin Grafton and News Corp Australia’s Annika Smethurst.


Professor Quentin Grafton is an ANU Public Policy Fellow, and Director of the Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Policy Forum.


Annika Smethurst is National Political Editor for the Sunday News Corp mastheads The Herald Sun, news.com.au, The Daily Telegraph and The Courier-Mail. She is also a Director on the Board of the National Press Club

.

Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 13, 2020
China’s rise - is history repeating?
58:47

On this Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny is joined by former long-time public servant Allan Behm to discuss community values in the COVID-19 crisis, the “serious vacancies in leadership” around the world, and learning the lessons of history to understand China’s behaviour.


In launching Australia’s new Defence Strategy Update recently, Prime Minister Scott Morrison drew parallels between the strategic and economic threat Australia currently faces with that faced by the world in the 1930s and 40s. While China’s growing assertiveness is not the only cause of this uncertainty, it is likely front of mind for many in the Australian government. But is this analogy with contemporary Western history useful, or should we be digging deeper into China’s own history to better understand the present? What does the recent lack of ‘subtlety’ in the actions of the Chinese government say about its self-perception? And, with many major Western democracies struggling to cope with the COVID-19 crisis, how fit are their leaders to navigate this changing global order and prevent major conflict? On this Democracy Sausage Second Serve, we’re joined by experienced former public servant, now head of The Australia Institute’s International and Security Affairs program, Allan Behm.


Allan Behm is Head of the International and Security Affairs program at The Australia Institute, CEO of FearLess - a charity that works with people living with the consequences of post traumatic stress - and Chair of the Canberra Writers Festival board.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 09, 2020
From Southeast Asia to Eden-Monaro
55:23

This time on Democracy Sausage we take a look at Southeast Asia: how the governments of the region are responding to Australia’s new defence stance, how they have responded to COVID-19, and how they are balancing the great powers of the US and China. The panel also takes a look at the outcome of the weekend’s Eden-Monaro by-election.


Just as Australia is carefully calibrating its relationship with China, the countries of Southeast Asia are having to balance their role now and into the future between two great powers, and do this while battling a pandemic. So how does the region view Australia’s new defence stance, and can the countries of ASEAN walk the strategic tightrope in this era of volatility? Joining Professor Mark Kenny to discuss these issues, as well as the outcome of the Eden-Monaro by-election, are Associate Professor Bjoern Dressel, James Massola of the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga.


Dr Bjoern Dressel is Associate Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University. His research focuses on issues of comparative constitutionalism, judicial politics and governance, and public sector reform.


James Massola is Southeast Asia Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. He has been a Walkley and Quills finalist on three occasions, won a Kennedy Award for outstanding foreign correspondent, and is the author of The Great Cave Rescue.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 06, 2020
Annabel Crabb on Australia’s moment of change
49:32

The success of the National Cabinet has shown politicians the value Australians place on political cooperation. But can the government use this changed landscape to tackle the policy challenges facing the country and disarm the weaponised political disagreement of the climate wars? Mark Kenny talks to Annabel Crabb of the ABC about how the country’s politics has changed as a result of the coronavirus crisis.


After a sluggish response to Australia’s bushfires and a resulting brush with political mortality, Prime Minister Scott Morrison has been informed by the science on COVID-19, brought state and territory leaders together with the National Cabinet, and shown Australians a different way to do politics. On this episode of Democracy Sausage Second Serve, Professor Mark Kenny talks to Annabel Crabb of the ABC about how the country and its politics have changed as a result of the crisis, and whether Morrison can turn his political capital into substantial lasting policy reform.


Annabel Crabb is the ABC’s Chief Political Writer and presenter of Back in Time for Dinner, The House, and the highly acclaimed Kitchen Cabinet series. She is also a regular contributor and presenter on ABC's Insiders and The Drum.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jul 02, 2020
COVID-19 and climate – dealing with the diabolical
55:17

On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at tackling the climate crisis as Australia is still battling the coronavirus. Mark Kenny is joined by Kieran Gilbert, Frank Jotzo, and Marija Taflaga.


Australia’s attempts to tackle climate change have been a catastrophic failure of public policy. But can Labor and the Coalition park partisanship to find policies that tackle the problem without stumbling on the politics? Joining Professor Mark Kenny at the Democracy Sausage hotplate are Professor Frank Jotzo, Sky News’ Kieran Gilbert, and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga. The panel also look at how the upcoming US election might affect international pressure to address the climate crisis, and whether Australia has the potential to be a green energy superpower.


Kieran Gilbert is Chief News Anchor for Sky News Australia where he hosts AM Agenda and First Edition.


Professor Frank Jotzo is Director of the Centre for Climate Economics and Policy at Crawford School of Public Policy and an ANU Public Policy Fellow.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 29, 2020
Stopping the presses
40:40

In the decade to 2018, 106 local and regional newspapers closed in Australia. As a consequence, 21 local government areas are now without a local newspaper. On this episode Mark Kenny talks to Associate Professor Kristy Hess about the high price of losing local newspapers, and how communities are responding.


From death notices to court reporting and holding councils to account, local newspapers and the journalists working for them play an essential role in serving and informing communities. But around Australia, local newspapers are in crisis – suffering a long-term decline in advertising revenue, falling sales, and battered by the impact of COVID-19. So what’s the price of losing local papers, and are there new business models that could ensure their survival? Joining Professor Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage Second Serve is Associate Professor Kirsty Hess of Deakin University.


Kristy Hess is an Associate Professor at Deakin University whose research focuses on local and community media.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 25, 2020
Are you job-ready?
33:05

Are the government’s changes to university degree funding about getting graduates job-ready, or hostility towards the humanities?


The government is changing university funding to encourage students into ‘job-ready’ degrees and away from humanities and the social sciences. But is this about meeting future employment demands or something else? Joining Mark Kenny to discuss the changes are Dr Jill Sheppard and regular podleague Dr Marija Taflaga.

 

Dr Jill Sheppard is a political scientist at the School of Politics and International Relations at The Australian National University. Her research focuses on why people participate in politics, what opinions they hold and why, and how both are shaped by political institutions and systems. 


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 22, 2020
You stand on a plinth of lies
1:01:22

From white settlement of Australia and the massacres of Indigenous peoples that followed, to statues commemorating slave traders, around the world protesters are starting important new conversations on history. Joining Mark Kenny to discuss the lessons we really should be learning from the past are journalists Stan Grant and Julia Baird, and historian Professor Paul Pickering.


From the blowing up of sacred Indigenous sites by a mining company, to the removal by an angry crowd of the statue of slave trader Edward Colston, around the world history is being destroyed, revisited, contested, and reassessed in real time. But is pulling statues down erasing history, or a necessary reckoning against the trauma of the past? And are the statues scattered in our cities and towns reinforcing a version of history that needs to be challenged? Joining Mark Kenny on this Democracy Sausage Second Serve are journalist and Vice-Chancellor’s Chair of Australian/Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University Stan Grant, author and journalist Julia Baird, and Professor Paul Pickering of the ANU Australian Studies Institute.


Paul Pickering is a Professor at The Australian National University and Director of the ANU Australian Studies Institute.


Julia Baird is an author, broadcaster and journalist, currently hosting The Drum on ABC 24.


Stan Grant is the Vice Chancellor's Chair of Australian/Indigenous Belonging at Charles Sturt University. He was formerly ABC's Global Affairs and Indigenous Affairs Analyst.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 18, 2020
Hey, big spenders
1:01:23

The coronavirus crisis has thrown the rule book out on what it means to be a better economic manager. On this Democracy Sausage we take a look at what it will take to chart an economic road to recovery with The Australia Institute’s Dr Richard Denniss.


The government is keen to paint the options for economic recovery as a choice between spenders and enablers. But with both Labor and the Coalition willing to splash the cash – albeit on different policy priorities – isn’t it really a battle between big spenders? And would economic growth be better served by continuing free childcare, or by major construction projects? On this Democracy Sausage Mark Kenny takes a look at Australia’s economics with Dr Richard Denniss of The Australia Institute and regular guest Dr Marija Taflaga.

 

Dr Richard Denniss is Chief Economist and former Executive Director of The Australia Institute. He is a prominent Australian economist, author and public policy commentator, and former Associate Professor at Crawford School of Public Policy.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 15, 2020
Is the government failing women in its COVID-19 policy responses?
41:12

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Mark Kenny chats with Barbara Pocock AM and Trish Bergin about the government’s decision to roll back free childcare and the impacts of Australia’s COVID-19 policy responses on women.


The Federal Government’s decision to roll back free childcare has caused much consternation in the community. Still undertaking a disproportionate amount of the unpaid caring responsibilities, what will be the impact of this decision on women? What are the economic impacts of the crisis on women? And how can Australian governments ensure their policy responses are equitable? On this week’s Democracy Sausage Second Serve, we talk to economists Barbara Pocock AM and Trish Bergin about the rolling back of free childcare and why women are bearing the brunt in Australia’s policy responses to COVID-19.


Barbara Pocock AM is an Emeritus Professor in the Business School at the University of South Australia. Barbara founded and was Director of the Centre for Work and Life at the University of South Australia and has been researching work and employment in Australia for more than thirty years.


Trish Bergin is Co-Director, Governance of the 50/50 by 2030 Foundation at University of Canberra.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group. This podcast is produced by Policy Forum at Crawford School of Public Policy in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 11, 2020
The New Zealand election, and the politics of protest in a pandemic
56:19

Mark Kenny is joined by New Zealand experts Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment and Professor Janine Hayward to talk about the upcoming New Zealand election, and the panel discuss the global Black Lives Matter protests.


On this episode we head across the Tasman to talk about New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, arguably the world’s most successful anti-Trump leader. Will her high popularity in New Zealand and overseas translate into votes at the upcoming election? And we discuss the recent Black Lives Matter protests in Australia, why Indigenous incarceration rates and deaths in custody demand urgent policy attention, and whether politicians’ criticism of protesters is tone deaf. Joining Professor Mark Kenny at the hotplate are Professor Jennifer Lees-Marshment, Professor Janine Hayward, and regular guest Dr Marija Taflaga.


Jennifer Lees-Marshment is an Associate Professor in political science at The University of Auckland in New Zealand. Jennifer is an expert in political marketing and leadership.


Professor Janine Hayward is the head of the department of politics at the University of Otago.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is Director of the Australian Politics Studies Centre in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 08, 2020
A new Accord and The Airport Economist
45:59

The Australian Government faces some big choices ahead about how to get the economy flying again. Will that include a new ‘Accord’ struck with the unions, and if so, what should be in it?

 

The coronavirus crisis has hammered global economies, including Australia where for the first time in 30 years it has slumped into recession. But the crisis also offers opportunities to rethink the Australian economy, and there has been talk of a new ‘Accord’ between employers and unions. On this special Democracy Sausage Second Serve, we speak to the Airport Economist, Tim Harcourt, about rebooting Australia’s economy and the future of industrial relations.


Tim Harcourt is the JW Nevile Fellow in Economics at University of New South Wales Business School. His best-known book The Airport Economist is an international business bestseller and has been translated into several languages and teleivision projects across Asia.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Jun 04, 2020
Chaos, curfews, and COVID-19
1:13:24

With cities under curfew and the national guard called out, the Democracy Sausage panel take a look at how populism and a president abdicating responsibility is dividing the US.


On this episode of Democracy Sausage Mark Kenny is joined by 10 News’ National Affairs Editor Hugh Riminton, Frank Bongiorno, and regular podleague Marija Taflaga to take a look at the violent crisis unfolding in the US, how populism is ill-equipped to respond to a pandemic, the Palace Letters, and the quiet death of robodebt.


Hugh Riminton is National Affairs Editor for 10 News and co-host of the Professor and the Hack podcast. He is a multi-award-winning journalist and the author of Minefields: A Life In The News Game.


Professor Frank Bongiorno AM is the Head of the School of History at ANU and is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian. His books include The Eighties: The Decade That Transformed Australia; The People’s Party: Victorian Labor and the Radical Tradition 1875-1914; and The Sex Lives of Australians: A History. He was co-editor of Elections Matter: Ten Federal Elections that Shaped Australia.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.



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Jun 01, 2020
Divisions and decisions - US politics ahead of the 2020 elections
54:24

On this gourmet Second Serve, we speak with US-based Australian analysts, Anne Summers and Jonathan Swan, about the COVID-19 pandemic in the US and what lies ahead this US election year.


Despite a catastrophic COVID-19 death toll, is Trump’s refusal to play ‘mourner-in-chief’ good politics with a presidential election rapidly approaching? How has the president been able to successfully capture the Republican Party while being perhaps the country’s most divisive leader? And is the GOP’s willingness to appeal to their base political suicide, or a ticket to Electoral College success? On this Democracy Sausage Second Serve, Professor Mark Kenny speaks to Jonathan Swan and Anne Summers about the US coronavirus crisis, the upcoming elections, and entrenched politics in a fractured nation.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Jonathan Swan is National Political Reporter for Axios, covering Republican leaders in the United States federal government and the White House.


Anne Summers AO is an Australian writer and columnist, best known as a leading feminist, editor, and publisher. She was formerly First Assistant Secretary of the Office of the Status of Women in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 28, 2020
The $60 billion question
1:01:27

With the government’s JobKeeper scheme set to cost $60 billion less than originally forecasted, this week on Democracy Sausage we look at what the government might do with its bonus billions.

 

It was blamed on everything from employers filling out forms incorrectly to the ‘health miracle’ of Australia’s coronavirus response, but the $60 billion budget underspend on JobKeeper raises big questions for the government. So with less stimulus money swashing around in the economy than planned, should the government look at supporting sectors of the economy that are struggling? From the university sector, to employers who didn’t meet the 30 per cent turnover drop, to the nation’s growing unemployed – where should the budget billions be spent? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny crunches the numbers with Peter Burn of Ai Group and The Age and Sydney Morning Herald’s Chief Political Correspondent David Crowe. 


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Peter Burn is Head of Influence and Policy at the Australian Industry Group and is responsible for policy development on a wide range of issues for the group. Previously Director of Policy at the Business Council of Australia, Peter also held academic positions in Economics Departments at the University of Queensland and the University of Newcastle after starting his professional career at the Commonwealth Treasury.


David Crowe is Chief Political Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, and a regular commentator on national affairs on the ABC's Insiders program. In a career spanning 25 years, he has covered federal politics as the national affairs editor of The Australian and the Chief Political Correspondent of The Australian Financial Review.


Marija Taflaga is the Director of ANU Centre for the Study of Australian Politics and a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with 


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May 25, 2020
The NHS and a nation on its knees
44:38

On this week’s Second Serve, Europe Correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age Bevan Shields shares his experience of catching the coronavirus in Britain, and we take a look at the missteps that led to the UK having one of the world’s highest death tolls with Elizabeth Ames.


From flirting with the idea of herd immunity to confused and confusing messaging, coupled with one of the world’s highest infection and death rates, Boris Johnson’s UK Government has struggled to get on top of the coronavirus crisis. This week we welcome back Elizabeth Ames to talk about a British response that has been far from great, and Europe correspondent Bevan Shields tells about his own experience of the virus. The panel also takes a look at why the government has stopped doing international infection comparisons, how British attitudes towards the lockdown have been out of step with government advice, and the worries about how the National Health Service could be impacted beyond COVID-19.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Bevan Shields is Europe Correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age. He was previously Federal Editor and Canberra Bureau Chief.


Elizabeth Ames is an international trade policy expert. She is the National Director of the Britain Australia Society and an international trade policy expert with a strong background in senior business and financial advisory. She is also Trustee of the Menzies Australia Institute at King’s College London.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 21, 2020
Trust us, we’re the government
58:35

Mark Kenny is joined by Phil Coorey, Vanessa Johnston, and Marija Taflaga to talk about Morrison’s first year in charge and getting the message right as Australia takes its tentative first steps out of the coronavirus crisis shutdown measures.


Australian governments moved quickly to prevent the spread of the coronavirus and Australians went along with the measures. But as the virus is still with us, and with the threat of a second wave of infection, will Australians be so compliant as the government tries to kickstart the economy back to life? And as Prime Minister Scott Morrison marks a year in the top job, we look back over the highs and lows, from the bushfire crisis to the global pandemic. Joining Professor Mark Kenny this week are the Australian Financial Review’s Political Editor Phil Coorey, public health physician Associate Professor Vanessa Johnston, and regular guest Dr Marija Taflaga.


Mark Kenny is a professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Phillip Coorey is an Australian journalist, currently political editor for The Australian Financial Review. Phillip has covered federal politics since 1998, beginning as political correspondent for The Advertiser.


Vanessa Johnston is Deputy Chief Health Officer for the Australian Capital Territory and Associate Professor at ANU Medical School.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 18, 2020
Weapons of mass detection
46:19

This week on Democracy Sausage Second Serve, we go stateside to take a look at criticisms levelled at the World Health Organization with US expert Assistant Professor Alexandra Phelan.


The World Health Organization has been the subject of criticism about its response to pandemic, particularly from President Donald Trump in the United States. So, is the WHO still fit-for-purpose, and can it recover from the US suspending funding to the organisation? This week on the Second Serve, we hear from Australian US-based expert Assistant Professor Alexandra Phelan about the challenges to multilateralism, and how the coronavirus crisis response was botched in the USA.


Dr Alexandra Phelan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Georgetown University member of the Center for Global Health Science and Security.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 14, 2020
Australia redux – rebooting the country after the coronavirus crisis
56:06

This week on Democracy Sausage, we look at what’s in store for businesses and workers as Australians and their workplaces are encouraged to emerge from hibernation.


Australia is taking its first tentative steps towards restarting its economy, but what does that mean for business, workers, and industrial relations? Can businesses survive the social distancing requirements that will remain in place as the economy reboots? And is the bigger role for the state that we’ve seen through the crisis here to stay? This week on Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny talks to former Minister for Small and Family Business in the Turnbull Government Craig Laundy, AAP’s Senior Political Writer Katina Curtis, and regular guest Dr Marija Taflaga about business, the economy, and industrial relations.


Mark Kenny is a professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Craig Laundy is a former Australian Liberal Party politician who served as Member of Parliament for Reid from 2013 until his retirement in 2019. He served as Minister for Small and Family Business, the Workplace and Deregulation. Craig is also a business owner.


Katina Curtis is Senior Political Writer at Australian Associated Press in Canberra.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 11, 2020
Anxious, insecure, and unemployed - Australians’ experiences of COVID-19
38:15

New research has revealed massive job losses, high levels of anxiety, and a picture of hardship and distress among Australians. We speak to the authors of the research to get a picture of Australia in the pandemic.


Two-thirds of Australians say they feel anxious or worried about their own and others’ safety and more than 600,000 have lost their jobs due to COVID-19, according to a new study from The Australian National University. Additionally, almost four-in-10 people say they feel it is either very likely or likely that they will be infected with the coronavirus in the next six months. On this week’s Second Serve, we talk to the authors of the study – Professor Matthew Gray and Professor Nicholas Biddle – about Australians attitudes and experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Professor Matthew Gray is Director of the Centre for Social Research and Methods in the ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences. He has published research on a wide range of social and economic policy issues including those related to Indigenous Australians. He has particular expertise in work and family issues, labour economics, social capital and social inclusion, measuring wellbeing, the economic consequences of divorce, child support, and social and economic policy development.


Professor Nicholas Biddle is Associate Director of the ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods and Director of the newly created Policy Experiments Lab.


Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 06, 2020
Coming clean on COVID-19 costs
49:54

This week on Democracy Sausage, Miranda Stewart and Bruce Chapman join us to discuss budget transparency in a post-coronavirus crisis world, and whether there’s a role for an income-contingent loan scheme in COVID-19 economics.


The coronavirus crisis has seen governments around the world throw the economic rulebook out to pump vast sums into struggling economies. But how can we ensure that balancing budgets is done with transparency? And could there be a role for a HECS-style scheme in post-crisis economics? This week on Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Professor Bruce Chapman AM, the architect of Australia’s higher education income contingent loan scheme, tax and transfer expert Professor Miranda Stewart, and regular guest and political scientist Dr Marija Taflaga.


Mark Kenny is a professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Miranda Stewart is a Professor at University of Melbourne and Fellow at the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.


Professor Bruce Chapman AM is an economist who has worked at The Australian National University since 1984. He has extensive experience in public policy, including: the motivation and design of the Higher Education Contribution Scheme (the first national income contingent loan scheme using the income tax system for collection) in 1989.


Show notes | The following were mentioned in this episode 


Is our democracy due for an upgrade?


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian...


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May 04, 2020
A blurred bigger picture
49:43

On this week’s Second Serve, Mark Kenny talks to Frank Bongiorno about Malcolm Turnbull’s new autobiography, A Bigger Picture.

 

Political biographies can shed valuable light on leaders, decisions, and policy choices. But they can also attempt to rewrite history, apportion blame, and present an air-brushed view on individuals and events. So what have we learned about former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull from his new book, A Bigger Picture? On this Second Serve, historian at The Australian National University and Democracy Sausage regular Professor Frank Bongiorno talks to Professor Mark Kenny about a book that’s “defined as much by the things it doesn’t say as the things it does.”


Professor Mark Kenny is a Professor in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Professor Frank Bongiorno is the Head of the School of History at ANU and an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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May 01, 2020
Coronavirus crisis – there’s an app for that
50:34

On this episode Mark Kenny talks with Anne McNaughton, Mark Evans, and Marija Taflaga about the government’s COVID-19 app, post-crisis tax and economics, and whether consensus politics has any chance of continuing after the crisis.


The government has released its coronavirus-tracing app, but do Australians trust their government with the data it gathers? Could it be time to revisit the findings of the Henry Tax Review as the country charts a course to recovery? And will the consensus politics we’ve seen through the national cabinet continue after the crisis? Professor Mark Kenny is joined at the Democracy Sausage hotplate by Anne McNaughton, Professor Mark Evans and Dr Marija Taflaga to chew over the week in politics and public affairs.


Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Anne McNaughton is a Senior Lecturer at the ANU College of Law and conducts research on the European Union as a unique legal order in international law.


Mark Evans is Director of Democracy 2025 at the Museum of Australian Democracy and Professor of Governance at University of Canberra.



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Apr 27, 2020
Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers on COVID-19 and Australia’s future
44:45

On this special episode, Shadow Treasurer Dr Jim Chalmers MP speaks to Mark Kenny about crisis politics, economic recovery, and ensuring the future story of Australia is an inclusive one.


While Australia has so far avoided the more devastating health impacts of COVID-19 that have befallen other nations, the pandemic has caused one of the most significant economic shocks in the country’s history. With so many in a more precarious financial position than ever, how can policymakers chart an inclusive economic recovery? Does the collegiate approach taken by federal, state, and territory leaders throughout the crisis signal the beginning of a new period of cooperation among Australian governments? And what changes wrought by the pandemic should the country preserve? On this Democracy Sausage Extra, Professor Mark Kenny chats with the Shadow Treasurer and Member for Rankin, Dr Jim Chalmers MP, about COVID-19 and navigating Australia’s economy out of the crisis.



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Apr 25, 2020
Has Britain turned a coronavirus crisis corner?
30:40

On this week’s Second Serve, we catch up with Sophia Gaston for the latest on Britain’s devastating coronavirus toll.

 

With limited testing, struggles to get protective equipment for health workers, and a high death toll, Britain is still in the grip of its coronavirus crisis. But with the British public throwing its support behind the National Health Service, and a high compliance rate with lockdown measures, has the UK put the measures in place to turn the corner? And does the new Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer’s performance in holding the government to account for its mistakes early in the crisis signal that the country’s democracy is repairing after the damage of the Brexit years? On this Democracy Sausage Second Serve, Mark Kenny chats again to Sophia Gaston to talk about the change from the Corbyn years, whether concerns over government performance extend beyond Westminster, and what kind of prime minister the country might have when Boris Johnson resumes the position.



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Apr 24, 2020
Emma Alberici - What type of world will we be left with after COVID-19?
52:44

This week we’re joined by the ABC’s Emma Alberici and Professor Robert Breunig to talk tax, Trump, and what society might be able to snap back to.


Governments around the world are starting to plot a pathway out of the coronavirus crisis, and are under increasing tension to lift restrictions and return life to normality. But what does reality look like after the coronavirus? This week on Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by the ABC’s chief economics correspondent Emma Alberici, Professor Robert Breunig, and Dr Marija Taflaga to talk tax, why the virus hit Italy so hard, the future of the World Health Organization, and Trump - “the most dangerous president in his country’s history.”

 

Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Emma Alberici is an Australian journalist and television presenter, and Chief Economics Correspondent for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Until 2017, Emma was presenter of the ABC's flagship current affairs program, Lateline.


Professor Robert Breunig is the director of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute at Crawford School of Public Policy. He conducts research in three main areas: economics of the household, empirical industrial organisation, and statistical and econometric theory.


Dr Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 21, 2020
The biographers on political leadership and COVID-19
33:53

In this Second Serve, we discuss the best and worst of political leadership during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Has the COVID-19 crisis exposed the failure of ‘Anglophone conservatives’ to listen to expert advice? Is talk of economic and societal transformation wishful thinking on behalf of the political left in the face of huge deficits and economic devastation? And will the crisis lead to big changes in the way governments operate in the future? In this Democracy Sausage Second Serve, Professor Mark Kenny chats to Bloomberg journalist and Angela Merkel’s biographer, Alan Crawford, and Dr Chris Wallace, historian at The Australian National University.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Dr Chris Wallace is a Visiting Fellow at The Australian National University School of History. Entering the History profoession after a first career as an economic and political journalist in the Canberra Press Gallery, her work focuses on political, international and global history with special reference to leadership. Her book historicising the 2019 Australian federal election, How To Win An Election, is expected in November of 2020.


Alan Crawford is a Senior Editor in Bloomberg's Berlin office. He specialises in international government and is the author of Angela Merkel: A Chancellorship Forged in Crisis, a biography of one of Germany's most successful political leaders.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



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Apr 16, 2020
The coronavirus care deficit and scrapping the snapback
52:56

On this episode, we chat with Tim Costello AO and Virginia Haussegger AM about the impact of the coronavirus on charities and women in Australia.


What has the COVID-19 crisis revealed about who is doing the heavy lifting in Australia? With charities struggling to elicit donations, what does that mean for those in need who depend on the support of these organisations? And with a highly gender-segregated workforce and a significant gender pay gap, what do the economic upheavals brought on by COVID-19 in Australia mean for women? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny speaks with Reverend Tim Costello AO, Virginia Haussegger AM, and Dr Marija Taflaga about COVID-19, the charitable sector, and the impact of the virus on women.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Virginia Haussegger AM is an award-winning television journalist, writer, and commentator, whose extensive media career spans more than 25 years. She is Chair of the 50/50 by 2030 Foundation and Chief Editor of BroadAgenda at the University of Canberra.


Reverend Tim Costello AO is a Baptist minister and the Chief Advocate of World Vision Australia. He is currently co-chair of the Charities Crisis Cabinet.


Dr Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Apr 14, 2020
Britain's battle with the coronavirus crisis
39:49

With overwhelmed hospitals, limited testing and a staggering death rate, and a prime minister in intensive care, how will Britain turn its coronavirus curve? In this Second Serve Mark Kenny talks to UK-based experts Sophia Gaston and Elizabeth Ames.

 

After four years of a divisive and damaging debate around Brexit, Britain has now been hit hard by the coronavirus crisis. So with Prime Minister Boris Johnson in intensive care, Dominic Raab deputising in the role, a large number of senior government staff taken ill, and a new opposition leader, Sir Keir Starmer, what’s in store for the UK? In this Democracy Sausage Second Serve Professor Mark Kenny talks to two leading experts about the UK’s crisis curve, challenges at the heart of government, and the ‘constructive bi-partisanship’ of the new Labour leadership.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Sophia Gaston is Director of the British Foreign Policy Group, an independent think tank focusing on advancing knowledge and debate around Britain’s international affairs. She is also a Research Fellow in the Institute for Global Affairs at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and an Academic Fellow at the European Policy Centre in Brussels.


Elizabeth Ames is an international trade policy expert. She is the National Director of the Britain Australia Society and an international trade policy expert with a strong background in senior business and financial advisory. She specialises in working with companies with exposure across multiple markets and has previously supported the expansion of several large European companies into Australia. She is also Trustee of the Menzies Australia Institute at King's College London.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Apr 09, 2020
Imagining Australia after COVID-19
47:46

Our expert panel discusses whether the coronavirus pandemic will lead to major, permanent changes in Australia’s society and economy.


While the immediate devastation of COVID-19 in Australia and around the world is far from over, what are the likely impacts of the pandemic on our political and economic future? Will any economic ‘snapback’ be enough to help the jobless back on their feet? And will changes to the safety net made amidst the crisis remain ‘temporary’, or is this the start of a more permanent shift? On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny chats with Dr Marija Taflaga, Crikey’s Bernard Keane and Dr Arnagretta Hunter about Australia’s political and economic future after the COVID-19 pandemic.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Bernard Keane is Crikey’s Political Editor. Before that, he was Crikey’s Canberra press gallery correspondent, covering politics, national security, and economics.


Dr Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for The Australian National University Medical School.


Dr Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Apr 06, 2020
Sport vs coronavirus
38:08

On this episode, we chat about how sports around the world are responding to COVID-19 and what the future holds for sporting organisations struggling because of the virus.


With most of the world’s professional sport postponed or cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, competitions have come under major financial pressure. But will the crisis lead to a reset in the way sporting organisations operate or, upon resumption, will it be a case of survival of the fittest? On this Democracy Sausage Second Serve, we’re joined by Professor Simon Chadwick to discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the future of professional sport.


Professor Simon Chadwick is a researcher, writer, academic, consultant and speaker with more than 25 years’ experience working across global sport. He has particular expertise working at the intersection of sport, business, politics, and technology, specifically in a Eurasian context.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Apr 03, 2020
COVID-19 and Australia in hibernation
42:55


In this episode, we discuss Australia’s new restrictions on social gatherings, whether the government is explaining its approach effectively, and domestic politics during the crisis.


As Australia has moved into a new phase in the fight against COVID-19 with greater restrictions on social gatherings, has the government effectively explained new measures as they’ve come into force? Does the national cabinet truly live up to its name? And what is the crisis telling us about who our society’s truly essential workers are? On this week’s Democracy Sausage, Professor Mark Kenny, Professor Frank Bongiorno, and Dr Marija Taflaga discuss the government response to the unfolding coronavirus crisis.

 

Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Professor Frank Bongiorno is the Head of the School of History at ANU and an Australian labour, political, and cultural historian. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.


Dr Marija Taflaga is a lecturer in the ANU School of Politics and International Relations. Her major research is on political parties and particularly the Liberal Party of Australia. She has previously worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as a researcher at The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Mar 30, 2020
How can Australia tackle wicked policy problems?
35:22

On this Second Serve, we chat to senior public servant and policy expert Andrew Wear about his new book, Solved: How other countries have cracked the world's biggest problems and we can too.


Why is Singapore such a leader in school education? What’s a small Danish island getting right on renewable energy? And why does Indonesia’s democracy outstrip Australia’s on some measures? On this Second Serve, Professor Mark Kenny chats with Andrew Wear about what Australia can learn from effective public policy abroad.


Andrew Wear is a senior public servant and the author of Solved! How other countries have cracked the world’s biggest problems and we can too, which was published in March 2020.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.

 

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple Podcasts, SpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.


This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Mar 27, 2020
Strategic shifts, polarised policy, and mixed messages
57:47

On this episode, Mark Kenny, John Hewson and Rory Medcalf examine competition and cooperation in the Indo-Pacific in light of COVID-19, and whether Australia’s government has been too cavalier in tackling the outbreak.


With more and more restrictions coming into force across the globe in order to slow the spread of the coronavirus, cooperation has become more crucial than ever – both between and within nations. In this episode, Professor Mark Kenny is joined by Professor Rory Medcalf and Dr John Hewson to discuss how the COVID-19 outbreak could offer an opportunity for medium-sized nations to work together more closely in the Indo-Pacific, and why this crisis requires a coordinated, bipartisan national response


Dr John Hewson AM is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at Crawford School of Public Policy. He is an economic and financial expert with experience in academia, business, government, media, and the financial system. Dr Hewson joined ANU in 2014 and is Chair of the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute.


Professor Rory Medcalf is the head of the National Security College at The Australian National University. His professional background involves more than two decades of experience across diplomacy, intelligence analysis, think tanks, and journalism.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple Podcasts, SpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Mar 23, 2020
Andrew Leigh on coronanomics
44:13

Mark Kenny chats to Dr Andrew Leigh, Member for Fenner in the ACT and former economics professor at the Australian National University about the economics of the coronavirus.


Can the world’s politicians find coronavirus solutions that are good for public health and for the economy? Why are people panic buying and what should supermarkets do about it? Should Australia be closing its schools? And could an upside of coronavirus be the end of ‘hot-desking’? We tackle these questions and more on this this Democracy Sausage Second Serve.


Dr Andrew Leigh is the Shadow Assistant Minister for Treasury and Charities. Prior to being elected in 2010, he was a Professor of Economics at The Australian National University.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.



Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Mar 20, 2020
Extra: Fintan O'Toole – the era of existential risk
48:03

On this very special Democracy Sausage podcast extra, Mark Kenny talks to the noted Irish columnist and author Fintan O’Toole about Brexit and the Irish border, global leadership, and democratic systems in a time of global crisis.


Infection has driven major change in societies, including providing clean water and improved sanitation. So could the coronavirus pandemic crisis be the impetus for progressive and profound global change in public health systems and beyond? In this very special interview, Mark Kenny talks to Fintan O’Toole about the “brutal light” being shone on political systems from the crisis, global leadership, and how COVID-19 could push the world into an era of existential risk. They also discuss Brexit, Irish politics, and threats to the Irish peace process.


Professor Mark Kenny is a Senior Fellow in the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the university after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age, and The Canberra Times.


Fintan O'Toole is one of Ireland's leading political and cultural commentators. He is a columnist and writer for The Irish Times, the 2017 winner of both the European Press Prize and the Orwell Prize, and author of Heroic Failure: Brexit and the Politics of Pain.


Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.

This podcast is produced in partnership with The Australian National University.