Talking Taiwan

By Felicia Lin

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Description

Talking Taiwan is a Golden Crane Award Winner and the longest running Taiwan-related podcast. Hosted by Felicia Lin, it's about the interesting people and stories connected to Taiwan and Taiwan's global community – in Taiwan, the US, and around the world. Listen and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Audible, and everywhere - or on www.talkingtaiwan.com.

Episode Date
Ep 206 | Eric Chan Discusses What Led the Taiwan Military to Shoot Down a Chinese Civilian Drone
27:15

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

On September first, the Taiwan military shot down a Chinese civilian drone that flew near Kimen. In this episode of Talking Taiwan. I speak with Eric Chan about what led up the incident, China’s increased gray zone tactics toward Taiwan since U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi visited Taiwan in early August, and other news related to Taiwan’s military, such as the Taiwan Policy Act and UMC founder, Robert Tsao’s donation for civil defense in Taiwan.

 

Eric Chan is a non-resident research fellow at the Global Taiwan Institute, a Washington DC-based think tank dedicated to policy research on Taiwan and its people. He is also a senior airpower strategist with the U.S. Air Force, where he provides USAF with expertise on People’s Republic of China military capabilities, political leadership, and strategic culture.

 

Mr. Chan was previously the China, Korea, Philippines, and Vietnam Country Director with the Air Force. In this role, Mr. Chan was responsible for USAF

engagement with the Chinese Air Force, and for managing security cooperation with key allies and partners.

 

Mr. Chan has published widely on Chinese influence operations and gray zone warfare, Taiwan military reform, and military diplomacy with the People’s Liberation Army. He has written for publications including the Global Taiwan Brief, the USAF Journal of Indo-Pacific Affairs, The Diplomat, and War on the Rocks.

 

Mr. Chan holds a Master’s degree in International Affairs from the George Washington University and a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science/History from the University of California, San Diego.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How China’s gray zone tactics towards Taiwan have changed over the years and since U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan in August
  • Should there be concerns about these changes and China’s use of drones in their gray zone tactics towards Taiwan
  • What kind of intelligence can drones collect and damage they can do
  • When China started sending drones over to Taiwan
  • To date about 30 drones have flown over Kimen
  • What led up to Taiwan’s military shooting down a drone from China on September 1
  • How Taiwan’s military is considering installing anti-drone systems
  • The difference between civilian and miliary drones
  • How Ukraine has rigged civilian drones with grenades in the war with Russia
  • The impact of China’s military actions in response to Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan and was it a blockade
  • How some have called China’s recent military actions against Taiwan the fourth straits crisis
  • What would constitute a military blockade of Taiwan
  • Based on China’s recent military actions, what do we know about China’s military capability
  • How Beijing’s recent white paper “One China, Two Systems” does not include promises made in a previous 1993 paper that Taiwan could have its own administrative, legislative, and judicial institutions, run its own democratic system, have its own military and economic affairs
  • How Beijing will use Taiwan’s rejection of the white paper to justify harsher tactics against Taiwan
  • How has China’s’ recent military actions and white paper affected public perception of people in China
  • UMC (United Microelectronics Corporation) founder, Robert Tsao’s sizeable donation for civil defense of Taiwan
  • The Taiwan Policy Act which has been passed through the Senate Foreign Relations Committee
  • What the Taiwan Policy Act would mean for Taiwan and the Taiwan Relations Act
  • The message that the Taiwan Policy Act would send to China

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/eric-chan-discusses-what-led-the-taiwan-military-to-shoot-down-a-chinese-civilian-drone-ep-206/

Sep 19, 2022
Ep 205 | Rev. Michael Stainton Working with Indigenous People in Taiwan Before and After Martial Law and After Martial Law
01:13:10

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In this episode of Talking Taiwan, I welcome back Reverend Michael Stainton to talk about his time in Taiwan and work with the indigenous people of Taiwan. Much of the time he spent in Taiwan was during the martial law era (before 1987) and he gives an interesting account of what Taiwan was like at the time.

 

Reverend Stainton is the President of the Taiwanese Human Rights Association of Canada and the Founder and Director of the Canadian Mackay Committee. We had Reverend Stainton on as a guest previously (in episode 173) to talk about Canadian missionary George Leslie Mackay’s contributions to Taiwan.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • In the 1970s, while Chiang Kai-shek was President of Taiwan Chinese Communist materials and materials from China were labeled “banditry materials” at the Stanford Center’s library
  • Students could access the “banditry materials” but were required to sign out and promptly return them because the materials had to remain on premises
  • The Garrison Command would periodically stop by the library to check to make sure none of the “banditry materials” was missing
  • How the death of Chiang Kai-shek was covered by the three television stations in Taiwan
  • How Taiwan was a totalitarian police state in the 1970s
  • What happened when Reverend Stainton was sent to Taiwan as a missionary in 1980 to work with the Presbyterian Church of Taiwan
  • Reverend Stainton’s work as the Director of the Taipei Aboriginal University Student Center
  • How students of the Taipei Aboriginal University Student Center were required to report to the political commissary what Reverend Stainton was teaching them
  • How Reverend Stainton tried to encourage the aborigine students to think about their identity and history by inviting various speakers such as local politicians and an academic who had critiqued the myth of Wu Feng (who was beheaded by the Tsou aborigine tribe)
  • How the police were always watching and Reverend Stainton’s mail was opened and censored (during Taiwan’s martial law era)
  • What happened when the police and garrison command arrived to break up a birthday party that students were having at the Taipei Aboriginal University Student Center
  • How Reverend Stainton knew that his phone was being tapped
  • Some students from the Taipei Aborigine University Student Center went on to become leaders and politicians including Icyang Parod who is the Minister of the Council of Indigenous Peoples (CIP)
  • In 1982 Reverend Stainton switched to doing work in a rural aboriginal development in Wulai
  • How Reverend Stainton helped to uncover embezzlement by the director of the Taipei Presbytery’s community development center in Wulai
  • How Reverend Stainton discovered that he was disinvited from continuing to stay in Taiwan and sent back to Canada
  • The Atayal people began to request that they run the aboriginal development in Wulai be under the Atayal Presbytery church instead of the Taipei Presbytery
  • How Reverend Stainton studied at the Coady Institute after returning to Canada in 1983 and learned methods of community of development
  • How Reverend Stainton was invited to return to Taiwan
  • How Reverend Stainton was invited to work at community development centers in Taidong and Hualien
  • How the president of a cooperative ran for and was elected township mayor, but the KMT found a way to oust him
  • People who planned to participate in the Aboriginal return our land movement demonstration march in Taipei on August 25,1988 were harassed by the police and warned not to participate, busloads of people en route to the demonstration were also stopped
  • In this era Cheng Wen Chen’s murder at Taida happened in 1981 and in 1989, Deng Nylon (Cheng Nan-jung) committed suicide by self-immolation rather than be arrested
  • Reverend Stainton and his wife returned to Canada in 1991
  • How Reverend Stainton’s observation of the variations in behavior of different aborigine groups at the Taipei Aborigine University Student Center made him interested in anthropology
  • How Columbus Leo challenged the blacklist after martial law had been lifted
  • Reverend Stainton was sent by the United Church of Canada to be an observer at Columbus Leo’s trial
  • Observers at Columbus Leo’s trial included David Mulroney
  • The Columbus Leo Support Committee was renamed and continued as the Taiwanese Human Rights Association of Canada (THRAC)
  • The Taiwanese Human Rights Association of Canada organized the first nongovernment sponsored delegation (that included three members of Parliament) to observe the 1992 legislative elections in Taiwan
  • The 1992 delegation included: Jim Peterson (Liberal), Bill Blaikie (NDP) and Mary Clancy (Liberal)
  • In 1996 the THRAC organized a visit of indigenous leaders from Taiwan to Canada, the group included Icyang Parod, some clergy, legislators (two KMT and one DPP)
  • The group traveled to various parts of Canada learning about the different approaches to self- government that indigenous people had taken and met Ovide Mercredi
  • The Nisga’a Treaty
  • What is currently happening with indigenous peoples’ rights in Taiwan
  • The “return our land movement” in Taiwan

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/rev-michael-stainton-working-with-indigenous-people-in-taiwan-before-and-after-martial-law-ep-205/

Sep 16, 2022
Ep 204 | Eduoard Roquette Talks About his Life-Changing Scooter Accident and Playing Tiger Man
44:19

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Edouard Roquette is the founder of Rooms.Taipei a co-living business. In episode 192 he spoke to me about his experiences as an entrepreneur and the challenges facing foreign entrepreneurs in Taiwan. I’ve invited him back on to talk about the life-changing scooter accident that happened to him in 2012. It landed him in a wheelchair for six months, and on crutches for eight years. With physical therapy and treatment Edouard has been able to walk and hike again. To this day he continues to consult with physical therapists about his condition. We also spoke about how he took on the role of playing Tiger Man at the annual festivities in Beigang celebrating the birthday of Mazu, the goddess of the sea, and his fascination with Taiwan’s religious festivals and ceremonies.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Edouard recovered enough from his scooter accident to be able to walk
  • How Edouard’s accident happened three days before his visa for Taiwan expired
  • The approach that hospitals in Taiwan take with pain management
  • As a result of overstaying his visa Edouard had to leave Taiwan for a year
  • How Edouard has been able to go from not being able to stand for more than a few minutes to being able to walk and hike
  • Edouard’s physical therapist in Taipei JJ. Physio
  • How Edouard had to advocate for himself to get physical therapy
  • As a result of Edouard’s accident he lost his company, money, health, and relationship
  • How it took eight years for Edouard to walk again and how he got through it
  • How it was important for Edouard to feel a sense of normalcy as he was dealing with his injury and recovering
  • How he dealt with the way that people treated him at various stages of his recovery
  • How Edouard has been open trying all different types of treatments
  • The lessons that Edouard has learned throughout this journey to recover from his accident
  • The importance of connecting with support groups or people who have had similar experiences
  • Edouard’s advice to others who have visa issues in Taiwan
  • How Edouard ended up playing the role of Tiger man for Mazu’s birthday
  • Taiwan’s dense religious practices
  • The Mazu festival in Beigang (北港) attracts 200,000 people
  • The Mazu festival in Dajia (大甲) attracts 2 million people
  • The Wanjin (aka Wanchin) Catholic Basilica in Pingtung, Taiwan
  • Obscure religious festivals in Taiwan
  • Edouard has posted videos of Mazu birthday festivities on Facebook
  • How Edouard has been involved with the Mazu birthday festivities in Beigang for 14 years
  • Edouard’s recommendations for people interested in attending religious festivals in Taiwan
  • Being a tourist in your own country and constantly discovering things about the place you live
  • The Taiwan Gods website

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/eduordo-roquette-talks-about-his-life-changing-scooter-accident-and-playing-tiger-man-ep-204/

 

 

Sep 07, 2022
Ep 203 | John Eastwood: Discusses Areas in Need of Legal Reform in Taiwan
22:45

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

John Eastwood is a partner at the Taipei office of the law firm Eiger. I spoke with John previously in episode 195 about some of the changes he’s seen in Taiwan from a legal perspective, in the 20 years that he’s resided in Taiwan. In this second half of our interview, John and I spoke about other issues and areas in need of legal reform in Taiwan.

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • Legal reforms that John has seen happen in Taiwan
  • Issues that are in need of legal reform
  • The Anti-banditry Act (aka The Act for the Control and Punishment of Banditry)
  • The case of a man who decapitated a child in Taiwan
  • What does it mean to be not guilty by reason of insanity
  • The need for increased awareness and understanding of mental health and mental illness when it comes to making judgments on criminal cases
  • Cases of elder abuse fraud in Taiwan and conservatorship
  • How John’s firm has helped to safeguard their elderly clients’ assets
  • How elder fraud is not just an “old person’s” issue but also a “young person’s” issue
  • How difficult it is to undo things once fraud had been committed

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/john-eastwood-discusses-areas-in-need-of-legal-reform-in-taiwan-ep-203/

Aug 30, 2022
Ep 202 | The History of Mets Taiwan Day with Diana Lee from Hello Taiwan
18:25

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

On this episode of Talking Taiwan I’m speaking with Diana Lee, one of the founders and organizers of Hello Taiwan about Mets Taiwan Day which is in its 17th year. It’s coming up soon on August 28th. We talked about how the event got started, some of the celebrities and notable people who have appeared at Mets Taiwan Day in the past and what sorts of activities and things people will experience at the event. Among the most exciting news for Taiwanese baseball fans is who will be throwing the first pitch of the game, and how to get a limited edition MetsTaiwan No. 1 jersey. Hello Taiwan also sponsors other sporting and cultural events throughout the year.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How and when Mets Taiwan Day started
  • How the NY Mets have several celebration of different culture events in the month of August
  • Activities at Mets Taiwan Day include the Formosan Black Bear mascot, Third Prince, diabolo performance
  • Peng Cheng-min (aka Chia Chia) former Taiwanese baseball player and coach will be throwing the first pitch at this year’s Mets Taiwan Day
  • The Mets Taiwan No. 1 jersey and how to get one
  • How the Mets Taiwan No. 1 jersey will be available in kids sizes for the first time this year
  • Celebrities and famous, notable Taiwanese who have made appearances or thrown the first pitch at past Mets Taiwan Day events
  • Other sports events sponsored by Hello Taiwan include: Rhode Island Dragon Boat Festival, Hello Taiwan Night at Dodgers’ Stadium, Hello Taiwan Night Lunar New Year event with the Long Island Nets
  • Other events that Hello Taiwan has planned throughout the year for Halloween, a Taiwanese night market, Easter, Christmas

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/the-history-of-mets-taiwan-day-with-diana-lee-of-hello-taiwan-ep-202/

Aug 22, 2022
Ep 201 | Shu-Ying Chung Talks About Filmmaking and her Award-Winning Short
01:03:26

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Shu-Ying Chung is a filmmaker based in New York. Her short film Removable has been making the rounds at film festivals. It’s won several awards for best story, best short, best actress, and best director, to name a few. I spoke with Shu-Ying about what motivated her to write, direct and produce the film and how she can identify with the subject matter of the film due to her own past immigration status issues. She also talked about some of the highlights of her career in film and offered some advice for those interested in filmmaking.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What it was like growing up in Taiwan for Shu-Ying
  • Her interest in music, television and film and her parents’ reaction
  • Her short film Removable that is currently making the rounds at several film festivals, which has earned many awards for best short, best actress, and best director, to name a few
  • What inspired her to write, produce and direct her short film Removable
  • Shu-Ying’s own experience with being forced to leave the U.S. due to work visa issues
  • What happened when Shu-Ying had to leave the U.S. to return to Taiwan due to a visa issue and ended up staying there for 1.5 years
  • How she wrote the script for Removable with her husband
  • The research involved in writing the script for Removable
  • How Shu-Ying and her husband did everything required for pre-production of the film in four weeks and a five-day shoot to make the short film, Removable
  • How Removable was self-funded by Shu-Ying and her husband
  • If Shu-Ying has plans to expand Removable into a full-length film
  • Shu-Ying’s career path in film so far and her work at Hearst Magazines
  • How Shu-Ying’s immigrant/work status has been a barrier in her career path
  • How English language proficiency can be a barrier for foreigners to overcome in the U.S.
  • Shu-Ying’s dream of being able to direct full length films full-time
  • What it takes to be a good film director
  • Shu-Ying’s approach to filmmaking
  • The most memorable film/video projects (shown on Shu-Ying’s website) that she has worked on
  • Shu-Ying’s first experience shooting with 35 mm film
  • The difference between shooting on film vs. digitally
  • Shu-Ying’s work on the Artists’ Den documentary series
  • What Shu-Ying misses about Taiwan
  • Some of Shu-Ying’s favorite films
  • One of the films that influenced her short film Removable
  • What Shu-Ying thinks she would be doing if she wasn’t a filmmaker
  • The dream film project that Shu-Ying would like to make about her grandmother
  • How Shu-Ying would like to be remembered
  • What advice Shu-Ying has for others interested in being a filmmaker

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/shui-ying-chung-talks-about-filmmaking-and-her-award-winning-short-ep-201/

Aug 17, 2022
Ep 200 | Charlie Wu Talks About the Annual Event TaiwanFest
01:12:06

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Today Talking Taiwan hits a major milestone with episode 200! We think it’s especially meaningful that the topic of this interview is TAIWANfest, an annual Taiwanese Canadian event that dates back to 1990.

 

Nowadays, TAIWANfest is held annually in Toronto and Vancouver. And my guest on this episode is Charlie Wu, the Managing Director of Asian-Canadian Special Events Association , which organizes TAIWANfest and LunarFest. You may recall that we had Charlie on earlier this year (in episode 167) to talk about LunarFest.



TAIWANfest will be held in Toronto later this month from August 26-28 and in Vancouver from September 3-5. This year’s theme is: The Stories of Independence Indulge in Indonesia, Discover Malaysia.

 

The programming will feature the indigenous band, Kanatal, which is a sort of experiment, that breaks the mold. They are a newly formed band of 4 experienced musicians, that have performing on tour without even having an album released. Other programs at TAIWANfest include a standup comedian, film screenings discussions, and events both in-person and virtual with topics covering: literature, social activism, food and culture.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • TAIWANfest will be taking place in Toronto from August 26-28 and in Vancouver from September 3-5
  • The theme of TAIWANfest 2022: The Stories of Independence Indulge in Indonesia, Discover Malaysia
  • The independence of nations vs. people
  • The newly formed band, Kanatal [ga-na-dal], which means “island” in the Amis language, referring to the small island of Taiwan
  • How Kanatal is touring and will perform at TAIWANfest
  • The opening concert for TAIWANfest Toronto will be performed by an orchestra led by Maestro Ken Hsieh
  • TAIWANfest Vancouver’s closing concert will be performed by a string orchestra
  • Comedian Ed Hill who will be performing at TAIWANfest Toronto and Vancouver
  • TAIWANfest’s virtual programming
  • The Let Taiwan Be Taiwan program
  • Connections between Indonesia and Taiwan
  • There are 300,000 Indonesians living in Taiwan
  • Indonesian migrant workers and their cultural impact on Taiwan
  • Films, performances and food presented at TAIWANfest
  • The “Taiwan Bookstore” concept at TAIWANfest Vancouver
  • The food known in Taiwan, Indonesia and the Philippines, as “lumpia”; “run-bing” in Mandarin Chinese;  and “popiah” in Malaysia
  • The discussion on “Making Taiwan Relevant in Cansda” about the book Charlie wrote with two others about his experiences running TAIWANfest
  • How Indonesian culture will be represented at TAIWANfest
  • How TAIWANfest Vancouveris working with the Brilliant Time Bookstore in Taiwan to collect donated books in Southeast Asian languages for migrant workers in Taiwan
  • The graphic image that represents TAIWANfest 2022 was inspired by batik culture from Malaysia and Indonesia
  • How Charlie and his team decides and curates the content of TAIWANfest
  • Some of the films that will be part of Cinematic Taiwan, such as The Road Forward, a musical documentary by Marie Clements, which will be subtitled in Chinese
  • Kanatal’s song Peace
  • The documentary being made about Kanatal
  • The story of how Kanatal was formed
  • Suana·Emuy·Cilangasay, who assembled the musicians to form Kanatal
  • Eden Liu’s social activism in Indonesia
  • Due to capacity limitations at the Harbourfront Center in Toronto and the pandemic, TAIWANfest in Toronto will be scaled down while TAIWANfest in Vancouver will be at full scale
  • Future plans for the Jade Music Festival

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/charlie-wu-talks-about-the-annual-event-taiwanfest-ep-200/

 

Aug 11, 2022
Ep 199 | Gerrit van der Wees: The Past and Present State of US Taiwan Relations
51:40

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In June I spoke with Gerrit van der Wees about an article that he wrote about U.S. President Biden’s remarks about Taiwan when he was in Tokyo in May.

 

Just last week, Gerrit wrote a very timely article about the controversy over the U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s plans to visit Taiwan.  In April Pelosi had planned to visit Taiwan as part of a tour to the Indo Pacific region but had to cancel because she contracted COVID-19.

 

Last week Pelosi left with a delegation for Asia, but made no mention of visiting Taiwan. There had been speculation that the Chinese would attack if U.S. fighter jets escorted Pelosi's plane into Taiwan, and in a phone conversation with U.S. president Joe Biden, Chinese president Xi Jinping warned Biden against “playing with fire” over Taiwan.

 

In his piece for the Taipei Times, Gerrit stated that it is essential that Pelosi stands her ground and pushes through with her plan to visit Taiwan. We’ll share Gerrit’s Taipei Times article and a few others about this situation on our website for this episode.

 

In my interview with Gerrit I asked him to explain in detail what the Taiwan Relations Act is, and what it tells us about the relationship between the U.S. and Taiwan. We also talked about the so-called U.S. policy of strategic ambiguity, how his work on the Taiwan Communique evolved from 1980 to 2016, and his thoughts on the war in Ukraine, and how it relates to China and Taiwan.

 

About Gerrit van der Wees

 

Gerrit van der Wees is a former Dutch diplomat. From 1980 through 2016, he served as chief-editor of “Taiwan Communiqué.” Also, from 2005 through 2016 he was liaison for the Senate and the State Department at FAPA-HQ.  He currently teaches the History of Taiwan at George Mason University and Current issues in East Asia at George Washington University’s Elliott School for International Affairs.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • U.S. President Joe Biden’s remarks on the U.S.’s willingness to help defend Taiwan
  • The Taiwan Relations Act, the document that contains US commitments to (help) defend Taiwan, and its first two clauses
  • How U.S. Secretary of State Anthony Blinken referred to the second clause of the Taiwan Relations Act in a speech he made at the end of May
  • What the second clause of the Taiwan Relations Act says and means
  • The background of the Taiwan Relations Act
  • How Harvey Feldman of the East Asia Pacific desk of the U.S. State Department was involved in initially drafting the Taiwan Policy Act
  • How in 1979 the U.S. Congress started drafting the Taiwan Relations Act which had security clauses and a human rights clause embedded within it
  • How Senator Ted Kennedy, Senator Claiborne Pell, and Congressman Jim Leach were instrumental in drafting the Taiwan Relations Act and getting it passed in April 1979
  • The establishment of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) in January 1979
  • Mark Chen’s (陳唐山) work with Senators and Congressmen to ensure that the Taiwan Relations Act took into consideration the native Taiwanese perspective
  • The Taiwan Communique and why it was established
  • How news from and about Taiwan while under martial law was obtained, communicated and printed in the Taiwan Communique
  • How dangwai (outside party) magazines: Měilì dǎo aka Formosa Magazine (美麗島) and Bāshí niándài aka 1980s (8十年代) were sources of information for the Taiwan Communique
  • How the George Washington University library has a complete collection of dangwai magazines from Taiwan
  • The censorship of postal mail that was received in and sent out from Taiwan during the martial law era
  • After the Taiwan democratized in the early 1990s the focus of the Taiwan Communique shifted to working to gain more international recognition for Taiwan
  • What the “One China Policy” means from the perspective of the U.S. and China
  • How the “One China Policy” which was based on the 1970s, a time in which Beijing and Taipei that claimed to be the government of China
  • How things have changed since the 1970s, which requires an adjustment in policy to reflect current times
  • What makes the Taiwan Relations Act so unique
  • How Taiwan meets all the requirements of a nation state according to the Montevideo Convention of 1933
  • How Montevideo Convention states that the existence of an independent state does not depend on the recognition of other states
  • When the United States of America declared independence in 1776 there were no other countries that recognized the new government in Washington D.C. for two years
  • For the first 25 years of the United States of America it was only recognized by seven countries
  • The Taiwan Travel Act
  • Why the U.S. policy of strategic ambiguity toward Taiwan is not a policy
  • How the term “strategic ambiguity” dates back to the mid-1990s
  • Robert Suettinger’s 2003 book, Beyond Tiananmen
  • Gerrit’s thoughts on the war in Ukraine and what China is taking away from the situation
  • Gerrit’s observations on how the war in Ukraine has impacted the people of Taiwan
  • Things that Taiwan need to reconsider about its military strategy

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/gerrit-van-der-wees-the-past-and-present-state-of-u-s-taiwan-relations-ep-199/

 

Aug 02, 2022
Ep 198 | Emily Wu Truong: Award-Winning Mental Health Speaker Inspires Others to Find Meaning in Their Struggles
01:27:02

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Emily Wu Truong is a motivational speaker for mental health awareness. She is affiliated with NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness and has been involved with this organization for the last 8.5 years. I’ve invited her on to Talking Taiwan as a guest since July is BIPOC (Black Indigenous People of Color) Mental Health Month. Emily spoke with me about her own struggles with mental health, and suicide. She has a passion for working with youths on mental health related issues. She also shared her thoughts about the oppression and trauma experienced firsthand or as generational trauma by the people of Taiwan, and how it could impact one’s mental health.

 

About Emily Wu Truong:

 

Emily Wu Truong is an award-winning mental health advocate, nationally-recognized motivational speaker, catalytic thought leader, community educator, playwright and published author. For over a decade, Emily has worked tirelessly to create more compassionate & accepting communities by bringing mental health education wherever she goes. As a speaker, Emily utilizes her story from depression to self-actualization, inspiring others to find meaning in life struggles. She has spoken to a variety of audiences, including students from elementary school to graduate school students, school administrators, teachers, families, law enforcement, faith-based communities, medical and mental health professionals and many more. Over the years, in recognition of Emily’s efforts to raise awareness on mental health and emotional resilience, she has been featured in the California Mental Health Movement “Each Mind Matters,” Good Morning America, NBC Asian America, LA 18 and World Journal (世界日報). Emily has also been honored with the “2015 Woman of Achievement Award” by former Senator Ed Hernandez. Also in 2015, Emily was honored with the Youth and Young Adult Leadership Award at the 29th Annual National Alternatives Conference in Memphis, Tennessee. In 2017, the Los Angeles County Supervisors honored Emily's request to establish May 10th as "Asian Pacific American Mental Health Day." In 2018, former Assemblyman Ed Chau honored Emily with the 2018 Make A Difference Award. Emily has become a role model for many, sharing her life lessons and delivering her message that helplessness is not hopelessness and that with help, there is hope.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Why she’s been called the lady in green
  • How Emily tries to talk about mental health in a positive light
  • The struggles that Emily felt growing up
  • How the painting “The Potato Eaters” by Van Gogh reminds her of how she felt disconnected from her family in the past
  • How she started asking existential questions about life when she was in junior high
  • Competitiveness in the Asian culture
  • Comparisons made by Asian parents, families and relatives
  • Emily’s passion for the mental health of youth
  • How important it is for kids to have supportive friends
  • How Emily struggled in elementary school and was bullied in junior high
  • Emily’s best friend in high school Enoch who helped her to get through high school
  • How Emily used dating as a coping skill in the past
  • How Emily is a suicide survivor what her to consider suicide and what stopped her from committing suicide
  • Emily’s thoughts on school shootings
  • Her first experience with a therapist and counseling in college
  • How Emily wants to help young people to develop coping skills to deal with their parents and peers so that they don’t need to internalize things
  • How Emily took an interest Taiwan in order to bond with her mother
  • How Emily competed in the Miss Taiwan pageant
  • How Emily discovered that her mother’s cousin is Taiwanese activist Koh Se Kai and that encouraged her to be more outspoken
  • How Emily got involved in the Write in Taiwanese Census Bureau, TACL and FAPA
  • Emily’s thoughts on how the people of Taiwan have been oppressed and how and trauma experienced firsthand or as generational trauma could impact one’s mental health
  • Author Iris Chang who committed suicide
  • Emily’s work with NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness)

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/emily-wu-truong-award-winning-mental-health-speaker-inspires-others-to-find-meaning-in-their-struggles-ep-198/

Jul 28, 2022
Ep 197 | Ed Lin: Winner of Three Asian American Literary Awards Talks About his New Book "Death Doesn't Forget"
53:16

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Ed Lin is a native New Yorker of Taiwanese and Chinese descent. He is the first writer to win three Asian American Literary Awards. The last time we had Ed on Talking Taiwan (in 2014) we spoke about “Ghost Month” his first book in the Taipei Night Market Series of mysteries. Since then, he’s written a YA novel and now four books in the Taipei Night Market Series. "Death Doesn't Forget," Is the latest book in the series and it will be published in July.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Ed Lin’s Taipei Mysteries books series and how he went about planning and writing them
  • The main character of Ed Lin’s Taipei Mysteries book series, Jing-Nan and how he’s evolved
  • The premise and what inspired Ed to write Death Doesn’t Forget
  • How the indigenous tribe that Ketagalan Boulevard in Taipei is named after is not officially recognized as a tribe in Taiwan
  • The lack of representation of indigenous people in Taiwan’s government
  • The way Ed has described Taipei in his novel
  • The neighborhood of Guangzhou Street west of Longshan Temple and why he described it as seedy
  • The training center located near Longshan Temple in Taipei for aborigine people and why the program was unsuccessful
  • The inconsistent romanization of streets in Taipei
  • How the stops on Taiwan’s MRT system are announced in four languages: Mandarin, Taiwanese (Holo), Hakka and English
  • How safe Taipei and Taiwan is
  • The role of organized crime, good and bad in Taiwan’s society
  • How the population of Taiwan is not monoethnic as some would assume
  • Taiwan’s new immigrants from Southeast Asia
  • The plight of Taiwan’s migrant workers
  • The “island mentality” of Taiwan that Ed describes as people’s kindness and helpfulness
  • Ed’s interactions with complete strangers and gangsters in Taiwan
  • How the characters in Death Doesn’t Forget represent different ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds
  • How Taiwan’s White Terror era has affected the people of Taiwan and its lasting trauma
  • Some of the intriguing characters of Death Doesn’t Forget
  • The abuse of migrant fishermen and migrant workers in Taiwan and Ed’s interest in writing about it
  • The “orphan brigade” of Death Doesn’t Forget and Taiwanese baseball teams from the Japanese occupation period (similar to what was portrayed in the film Kano)
  • How Japan used baseball as a form of soft power in its colonies
  • How Taiwan’s Little League baseball team is a form of its soft power
  • Green Island and how one of the characters of Death Doesn’t Forget in spent time at the prison there
  • Why murder is the crime featured in many of Ed’s novels
  • Ed’s observations and thoughts on the intermingling of religions in Taiwan
  • How Ed would immerse himself in the time period of 1976 when writing his Chinatown Mysteries series
  • Ed’s thoughts on how the war in Ukraine may or may not be giving China ideas about attacking Taiwan
  • Ed’s approach to his book readings
  • How/why the narration of Death Doesn’t Forget was switched to third person, instead of first person for all of the other novels in the Taipei Mysteries series
  • How the writing James T. Farrell, Irish-American author of the Studs Lonigan trilogy and Danny O'Neill pentology, inspired Ed to write Death Doesn’t Forget in third person
  • Ed’s foray into YA (young adult) novel writing with David Tung Can’t Have A Girlfriend Until He Gets Into An Ivy League College
  • How Ed came up with the title Death Doesn’t Forget

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/ed-lin-winner-of-three-asian-literary-awards-talks-about-his-new-book-death-doesnt-forget-ep-197/

Jul 19, 2022
Ep 196 | Susan Chung: Talks About her Career in Mental Health and BIPOC Mental Health Month
01:05:31

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

July is BIPOC (Black Indigenous People of Color) Mental Health Month, which is also known as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, named for the mental health advocate who brought awareness to the unique struggles that underrepresented groups face in regard to mental illness in the US.

 

I’ve invited Susan Chung on to Talking Taiwan to talk about her career in mental health, and BIPOC Mental Health Month. Susan is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, who provides psychotherapy specifically to BIPOC students. We also spoke about key statistics and research findings that inform us about the mental health of Asians, some of the unique challenges facing BIPOC communities and individuals, the racism that Susan has experienced as a mental health professional, and the importance of managing our own mental health.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Susan got interested in studying mental health and social work
  • How Susan realized that there’s a need to have more Asians represented in mental health
  • Susan’s work with forensic social work and how it is different from social work
  • Susan’s work with survivors of human trafficking
  • Susan’s career path
  • Susan has worked with middle school-aged kids in addition to college kids
  • How Susan manages the impact that dealing with victims of human trafficking could have on her own mental health
  • How Susan continues to do forensic social work since moving from New York to North Carolina by accompanying police on raids
  • How Susan felt about being the only Asian-identifying therapist among Black-identifying therapists at the University of North Carolina counseling center
  • Work-related trauma that Susan has experienced
  • Susan’s work experience at the University of North Carolina
  • Susan’s experiences living in Irvine, California, New York City and North Carolina
  • In 2017, according to the Office of Minority Health, the leading cause of death in young Asian Americans in the US was suicide. Citation: Matsuoka, J. K., Breaux, C., & Ryujin, D. H. (1997). National utilization of mental health services by Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders. Journal of Community Psychology, 25(2), 141-145. doi:10.1002/(sici)1520-6629(199703)25:23.0.co;2-0
  • Susan’s research at University of California, Irvine about the higher rate of depression and suicidal thoughts amongst Asian-identifying students
  • The rates of reported and diagnosed mental illness are low for Asian Americans compared to Euro-Americans, averaging between 5-12% Citation: https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=4&lvlid=54
  • According to the nonprofit organization Mental Health America, Asian Americans are the least likely racial group in the United States to seek mental health services
  • Susan’s work in the children’s psychiatric department of a hospital and how many of the students referred to her were Asian, and none had voluntarily sought help for themselves
  • Challenges that BIPOC experience that could affect their mental health
  • Resources provided by Mental Health of America’s web page for BIPOC Mental Health Month
  • How the 2021 BIPOC Mental Health Month tool kit acknowledged that the Western medical model is based on evidence-based approaches (which can be problematic especially for BIPOC)
  • Susan talked about how her Asian-identifying clients often have psychosomatic symptoms that are indicative of a mental health-related issue
  • Mental illness doesn’t have to be about an illness or having a condition like depression, being bipolar, having PTSD, etc.
  • The stigmatization of mental health
  • De-stigmatizing mental health by changing the language we use or referring to it as mental wellness
  • How the pandemic has impacted people’s mental health and the research that Susan did related to this
  • Susan’s thoughts on the Atlanta spa shooting in March of 2021
  • Tips to manage and assess our own mental health
  • What can we do to support friends and family who may be struggling with their mental health
  • The racism that Susan has experienced as a mental health professional
  • The vicarious trauma Susan felt in dealing with a student who was the target of an Asian hate crime at UNC
  • How racial injustice and systemic injustice can affect BIPOC communities
  • Challenges faced by indigenous communities and how they may have some nonevidence-based practices that are therapeutic
  • While Susan has dealt with Black and Latinx students, she doesn’t want to make any generalizations about BIPOC communities or their mental health

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/susan-chung-talks-about-her-career-in-mental-health-and-bipoc-mental-health-month-ep-196/

Jul 12, 2022
Ep 195 | John Eastwood: Talks About the Legal Changes in Taiwan Over the Past 20 Years
01:05:13

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

John Eastwood is a partner at the law firm Eiger. He was previously interviewed for Talking Taiwan in 2012 and we’ve invited John back on to Talking Taiwan to talk about some of the changes he’s seen in Taiwan from a legal perspective, in the 20 years that he has resided in Taiwan.

 

We touched upon how Taiwan’s WTO accession improved the protection of intellectual property rights, LGBTQIA+ rights, migrant worker rights, and laws that should be reformed like the Parade an Assembly law.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women’s Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What brought John to Taiwan
  • John was a journalist before becoming a lawyer
  • John spent time in China as a visiting scholar
  • Eiger has branches in both Taipei and Shanghai
  • John’s experience with COVID-19 in Taiwan
  • What John has been up to since his last interview for Talking Taiwan in 2012
  • John’s involvement with the Democratic National Convention and Democrats Abroad
  • How John feels its important for people to understand the situation and what’s going on in Taiwan
  • Taiwan’s health restrictions in things like pork imports
  • The early days of COVID in Taiwan
  • How mask wearing is perceived in Taiwan
  • How Taiwan has changed from a legal standpoint with respect to intellectual property in the last 20 years, since John has lived in Taiwan
  • How Taiwan’s WTO accession improved the protection of intellectual property rights
  • Human rights issues in Taiwan that could be improved include: LGBTQIA+ adoption and reproductive rights,
  • How manufacturing of counterfeit goods has moved to China
  • How people in Taiwan often call on the police to resolve domestic disputes
  • How public insult laws in Taiwan need to be reformed
  • Misuse of the public insult law and how it can be used against foreigners
  • How the police in Taiwan are often used to harass people
  • How the police in Taiwan don’t necessarily stop people from pursuing frivolous cases
  • The Assembly and Parade Law
  • How migrant workers in Taiwan have been mistreated
  • Other issues in need of legal reform like abortion

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/john-eastwood-talks-about-the-legal-changes-in-taiwan-over-the-past-20-years-ep-195/

Jul 05, 2022
Ep 194 | John Eastwood | Lost Episodes
09:56

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This lost episode of Talking Taiwan features John Eastwood, co-managing partner at Eiger Law. In the original interview with John which was recorded October 2012, John talks about attending the Democratic National Convention of 2012, his involvement with the Democratic National Committee and Democrats Abroad, and the significance of the Japanese Taihoku prison wall in Taipei.

 

Stay tuned for my follow up interview with John next week as we check in with him 10 years later to get an update from him.

 

For the month of June we’ll be slowing things down by sharing lost episodes every other week, and in July we’ll be taking a break from the lost episodes. We’ve got a lot of great new content planned and we just can’t fit it all into our weekly publication schedule.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • At the time of the interview Eiger Law had won Taiwan’s law firm of the year for two years in a row
  • At the time of the interview Eiger Law had won awards for employment and compliance practices, for investment and employment practices (from Acquisition International), for corporate and MNA practices
  • Eiger Law was named Employer of Choice for 2012 (which was based on responses given by Taiwanese lawyers)
  • The Democratic National Convention in September of 2012 in Charlotte, North Carolina
  • How John is the first resident from within Taiwan to be elected to be a member of the Democratic National Convention
  • How John spent the summer of 2012 trying to get American citizens living abroad registered to vote on a nonpartisan basis
  • The politicians who spoke at the Democratic National Convention of 2012
  • The different events that Democrats Abroad Taiwan organizes including Memorial Day and Veteran’s Day activities to remember Americans who served and sacrificed for the freedom of the U.S.A.
  • The Japanese Taihoku prison wall in Taipei where 14 American airmen who held there as prisoners of war were executed in the final weeks of World War II
  • Who can join Democrats Abroad Taiwan

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/ep-194-lost-episodes-john-eastwood/

Jun 30, 2022
Ep 193 | Joyce Teng: The Struggles Facing Couples of Same Sex Marriage in Taiwan
01:06:05

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

It’s been three years since Taiwan became the first country in Asia to legalize same sex marriage in 2019.

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Joyce Teng, the Deputy Executive Director of Taiwan Equality Campaign, previously known as the “Marriage Equality Coalition Taiwan.” We talked what’s happened since 2019. Surveys and polls conducted over the past three years indicate growing support for LGBTQIA+ issues within Taiwan’s society.

 

However, there are still some additional struggles that same sex married couples experience as opposed to heterosexual married couples in Taiwan. Joyce also touched upon a few issues concerning transgender and nonbinary individuals.

 

She mentioned three areas in which same sex married couples face some challenges, the first being transnational couples; problems arise for couples of different nationalities when their marriage cannot be legally recognized in Taiwan; the second issue is co-adoption and dealing with Taiwan’s adoption procedures, and finally reproductive rights. It’s been eye-opening for me to learn about all of this.

 

These are all complex issues and many of them they could also pose challenges for heterosexual married couples in Taiwan. I only recently learned about a woman’s reproductive rights in Taiwan when it comes to freezing her eggs. We’ll include some articles on this topic in the Related Links section of this episode.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by NATWA, the North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

NATWA was founded in 1988, and its mission is:

 

  1. to evoke a sense of self-esteem and enhance women's dignity,
  2. to oppose gender discrimination and promote gender equality,
  3. to fully develop women's potential and encourage their participation in public affairs,
  4. to contribute to the advancement of human rights and democratic development in Taiwan,
  5. to reach out and work with women's organizations worldwide to promote peace for all.

 

To learn more about NATWA visit their website: www.natwa.com

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Taiwan Equality Campaign was previously the “Marriage Equality Coalition Taiwan”
  • How the rights of heterosexual married couples differ from the rights of same sex married couples in Taiwan
  • How heterosexual married couples and single individuals can adopt in Taiwan, but same sex married couple cannot adopt in Taiwan
  • Earlier this year there was a court case that ruled that one of the spouses of a same sex couple, could adopt his spouse’s child who had been adopted when the was still single, however this is only one case, and according to the law in Taiwan a same sex spouse is unable to adopt the adopted child of their spouse
  • What is involved with the adoption process in Taiwan and how it could take up to 3-5 years
  • The gap when it comes to reproductive rights for heterosexual women and lesbian women who want to freeze their eggs in Taiwan
  • Reproductive rights of same sex couples in Taiwan
  • How Taiwan has one of the lowest birth rates in the world
  • The government in Taiwan offers subsidies for heterosexual couples to do IVF but not for same sex couples
  • How birth rates in Taiwan tend to be low during the year of the tiger (February 1, 2022 – January 21, 2023 is a tiger year)
  • How Taiwan has changed in the time that Joyce has been working for the Taiwan Equality Campaign and since same sex marriage was legalized in Taiwan
  • Surveys done by the Taiwan Equality Campaign over the past three years indicate increasing support by the general public for same sex couples to adopt, do IVF
  • Surveys done by the Taiwan Equality Campaign show that over time more of the general public have indicated that they have friends identifying as LGBTQIA+; this indicates that LGBTQIA+ individuals are more willing to come out to their family, friends and peers
  • Surveys have also indicated that since the legalization of same sex marriage in Taiwan, LGBTQIA+ individuals are more comfortable to talk about their personal lives and spouses
  • The different types of survey questions asked to gage people’s acceptance of same sex couples in Taiwan
  • Whether the general public in Taiwan supports teaching school-aged children about gender equality, sexual orientation and expression
  • How attitudes and acceptance of LGBTQIA+ individuals and issues may be indicative of generational differences
  • The film Small Talk, a documentary film about the filmmaker’s difficult relationship with her mother who was a lesbian
  • If having a nonbinary “Digital Minister” in Taiwan, Audrey Tang has had any impact on the general public’s views or acceptance of LGBTQIA+ individuals
  • How there is work to be done when it comes to awareness and understanding of transgender and nonbinary individuals in Taiwan
  • The challenges faced by transgender and nonbinary individuals in Taiwan
  • The question of how transgender and nonbinary individuals would like to be identified on their identification cards/documents
  • How the Taiwan Equality Campaign works with local government officials
  • How Taipei’s MRT bathroom signs will be gender neutral
  • How Thailand may be the next country in Asia to legalize same sex marriage
  • Advocacy to support LGBTQIA+ activists in other Asian countries
  • How Taiwan can serve as a case study of how the legalization of same sex marriage has impacted society
  • Difficulties faced by same sex transnational couples in Taiwan
  • How the Taiwan Equality Campaign has worked with local levels of government to train civil servants how to deal with LGBTQIA+ identifying individuals
  • How the Taiwan Equality Campaign approaches local governments about implementing LGBTQIA+ sensitivity training

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/joyce-teng-the-struggles-facing-couples-of-same-sex-marriage-in-taiwan-ep-193/

Jun 29, 2022
Ep 192 | Edouard Roquette: Today's Challenges Facing Foreign Entrepreurs in Taiwan
58:51

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Edouard Roquette was at the beginning of his experience as an entrepreneur when he was previously interviewed for Talking Taiwan, as you may have heard in the previous lost episode of Talking Taiwan (episode 191) featuring Edouard. We’ve invited Edouard back on as a guest to talk about what he’s been up since then. Edouard talked to us about his clean tech startup and why it failed, and the challenges that many foreign entrepreneurs experience in Taiwan. He also had a life changing accident which we will talk about in a follow up interview, in a future episode.

 

Edouard is currently the founder of Rooms.Taipei a co-living business. If you’d like to check out their COVID newsletter that Edouard mentioned in his interview, the one that provides updates to help people keep up on the visa and immigration situation in Taiwan during COVID, check out the related links section below.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Edouard’s clean-tech start-up CityVolt and why it failed
  • The differences between a gas vehicle and electric vehicle
  • Battery sources for electric vehicles
  • Exchangeable, rechargeable batteries for scooters
  • How Edouard won a competition and was invited to speak at The Economist’s Carbon Economy Summit in Washington D.C. in 2009
  • Eduoard’s thoughts on what makes Gogoru successful
  • The accident that changed Eduoard’s life and led him to consider a co-living business that he started in 2014
  • Edouard’s co-living business, Rooms.Taipei
  • The problems that Edouard’s co-living business aims to solve
  • How Rooms.Taipei is an accelerator for the experiences that a foreigner can have in Taiwan
  • Why it’s difficult to scale a business like this or to differentiate it
  • How businesses in Taiwan are not protected from extreme rent increases that negatively impact their businesses, causing them to close
  • How rent increases can lead to many other “costs” aside from causing businesses to close, these costs include: environmental costs, human costs (jobs lost), economic cost (when companies are constantly closed and new ones started)
  • Edouard’s thoughts about Taiwan’s plans to attract 100,000 foreign workers by 2030
  • Edouard’s business strategy of reaching out to and collaborating with his competitors
  • How difficult it is for foreign entrepreneurs to do business in Taiwan
  • How most of Edouard’s customers are people who have just arrived in Taiwan or are new to Taiwan
  • How housing and banking are two of the most difficult things for foreigners in Taiwan to deal with
  • The E. Sun Bank branch that offers English service and where Edouard is encouraging foreigners to open bank accounts
  • Problems that people have encountered with negligent landlords
  • How Edouard has reached out to the office of the mayor of Taipei through the French Chamber of Commerce about creating a standard of accommodations and contracts
  • How most housing projects in Taipei are luxury apartments targeted to investors but not to the average resident of Taipei
  • Last year Taipei city lost inhabitants
  • Edouard’s thoughts on what to do when the odds are against you
  • Edouard’s private entrepreneur group of business owners who meet regularly and support each other’s businesses
  • Katie Moves Taipei, a business that offers Zumba online classes
  • Taiwan Impact Entrepreneurs Facebook group and what they are doing for foreign entrepreneurs in F&B (food and beverage)
  • The kombucha beverage company, Daoori
  • Elias Ek’s efforts to improve things for foreign entrepreneurs in Taiwan
  • How there needs to be better representation for foreign employees, migrant workers, foreign students
  • How things have changed for entrepreneurs in Taiwan in the past 10 years since Eduoard’s “lost” episode of Talking Taiwan interview
  • Edouard’s advice for foreigner entrepreneurs considering doing business in Taiwan
  • What Edouard loves about Taiwan which includes cycling and being a Tiger Man for the goddess Matsu’s birthday
  • How Edouard founded one of the biggest sports groups for foreigners in Taiwan
  • Outdoor sports groups in Taiwan to check out

 

Related Links:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/edouard-roquette-todays-challenges-facing-foreign-entrepreneurs-in-taiwan-ep-192/

Jun 22, 2022
Ep 191 | Edouard Roquette | Lost Episodes
14:17

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This lost episode of Talking Taiwan features Edouard Roquette, a member of the French Chamber of Commerce talking about entrepreneurship and Taiwan’s foreign entrepreneur community. Next week we’ll be bringing Edouard back on to find out what he’s been up to since then.

 

For the month of June we’ll be slowing things down by sharing lost episodes every other week, and in July we’ll be taking a break from the lost episodes. We’ve got a lot of great new content planned and we just can’t fit it all into our weekly publication schedule.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Edouard was a finalist for the French Chamber of Commerce’s Innovation award in 2010 and 2011
  • Edouard is a member of the French Chamber of Commerce’s SME (Small and Medium Enterprises) committee
  • Edouard’s involvement with the Founder’s Club that meets monthly
  • How to raise money for a business that doesn’t involve equity
  • The different approaches that foreign entrepreneurs in Taiwan take to raising funds
  • Why Edouard has chosen to start his business in Taiwan and not China
  • The variety of ideas that come out of the Taiwan’s foreign entrepreneur community
  • Advice Edouard would give to people on the beginning of their entrepreneurial paths
  • What people should not do when starting a business
  • Why it’s important to consider who you decide to work with and accept money from
  • Local Taiwanese entrepreneurs vs. to foreign entrepreneurs
  • How Edouard learned about entrepreneurship before coming to Taiwan through a program developed jointly by the MIT Sloan Business School and the University of Cambridge called the SEEDA (South East England Development Agency) Enterprisers
  • The lack of support, programs or resources available for entrepreneurs in Taiwan

 

Related Links:

Jun 17, 2022
Ep 190 | Peter Zhao: Tourette Syndrome Awareness and his Own Personal Struggles with Mental Health
48:00

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

May 15 to June 15th is Tourette Syndrome Awareness Month. To learn more about what Tourette syndrome is, I encourage you to listen to the episode that we did last year with Peter Zhao, episode 129. Peter is a Tourette Activist and has been a guest on Talking Taiwan several times. He’s also spoken up about Asian hate crimes.

 

I really appreciate the openness and candor with which he speaks about his personal struggles with mental health. It’s not an easy thing to do. Peter spoke about the challenges he’s faced in dealing with Tourette and bipolar I, and his concerns with the side effects of medication, which he noted has made him lose his “edge.” Dealing with mental health is a process that requires assessment, evaluation, and self-reflection.

 

To learn more about Peter, you can find him on social media as @fabulouslytourette or check out his podcast Fabulously Tourette Radio.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Peter’s podcast Fabulously Tourette Radio
  • Peter’s diagnosis of manic depression, bipolar I with major depressive episodes
  • How Peter is considered neurodivergent
  • How podcasting is a form of talk therapy for Peter
  • The term neurodivergent
  • What happened to lead Peter to get officially diagnosed with bipolar I
  • Peter’s previous struggles in taking an anti-psychotic drug Orap (generic name Pimozide), which he shared in detail in Talking Taiwan episode 129
  • Peter’s Op Ed on AsAm News about dealing with bipolar disorder
  • Peter’s struggles with his mood swings and comorbidities
  • How Peter’s depression affected his job performance and family life
  • The difficulties and challenges of Peter’s day job
  • How Peter has experienced greater anxiety after working remotely since the beginning of the pandemic
  • Peter’s candid posts about mental health on social media
  • What happened after Peter was diagnosed with bipolar I and started taking a new medication
  • The approach Peter took to starting this new medication
  • How the medication stopped many of Peter’s tics and how he feels about that
  • How Peter feels after being on this new medication for four months
  • The side effects of the medication that Peter is taking and how he’s dealing with them
  • The support of Peter’s partner
  • How Peter came to the decision to take a leave of absence from work
  • How Peter handled his leave of absence and used it as a mental health reset
  • Peter’s considerations when it comes to job satisfaction and his career path
  • Peter’s advocacy for Tourette syndrome and bipolar disorder
  • Peter’s tip, the 50-50 mindfulness technique for people dealing with anxiety

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/peter-zhao-tourette-syndrome-awareness-and-his-own-personal-struggles-with-mental-health-ep-190/

Jun 14, 2022
Ep 189 | Why Should you Care About the Taiwan Fellowship Act: A Discussion with Richard Pearson and Shelley Rigger
53:51

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:  

In this episode of Talking Taiwan, my guests are Richard Pearson, the Executive Director of the Western Pacific Fellowship Project and Professor Shelley Rigger. We will be talking about the Taiwan Fellowship Act, a bill which has been decades in the making, and was inspired by the Mansfield Fellowship. This bill which has gotten bipartisan support in both the U.S. and Taiwan. It has been added to the COMPETES Act, and has also passed through both the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate in slightly different versions. Now the House and Senate are in conference committee to resolve differences in order to come up with a final version of the bill.

 

Learn more about what the Taiwan Fellowship Act is, how it serves to strengthen U.S.-Taiwan ties, why you should care about it, and how you can support passage of this bill in to law.

 

About Richard Pearson:

 

Richard Pearson is Executive Director of the Western Pacific Fellowship Project and Managing Director, Taiwan Fellowship. He has roughly two decades of experience in U.S.-Asia economic relations and the political-economy of the Asia-Pacific largely in the public service sector.

 

Mr. Pearson’s professional experience includes time as a business reporter based in Taipei and in public service focusing on the Indo-Pacific. From 2010-2014 Mr. Pearson was an Associate Director at the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation during which time he originally conceived and explored the Taiwan Fellowship concept. Along with Ryan Shaffer and former AIT Director and Chairman Ambassador Raymond Burghardt, Mr. Pearson founded the Western Pacific Fellowship Project in late-2019 to operationalize the Taiwan Fellowship.

 

Mr. Pearson received his undergraduate degree from St. Olaf College and his graduate degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Immediately after college, he held a Fulbright scholarship to Taiwan. His essays on U.S.-Asia relations have been published in various outlets in the U.S. and East Asia including the Taipei Times and The Diplomat.

 

About Shelley Rigger:

Shelley Rigger is the Brown Professor of East Asian Politics at Davidson College. She has a PhD in Government from Harvard University and a BA in Public and International Affairs from Princeton University. She has been a Fulbright scholar at National Taiwan University (2019), a visiting researcher at National Chengchi University in Taiwan (2005) and a visiting professor at Fudan University (2006) and Shanghai Jiaotong University (2013 & 2015). She is a non-resident fellow of the China Policy Institute at Nottingham University and a senior fellow of the Foreign Policy Research Institute (FPRI). She is also a director of The Taiwan Fund, a closed-end investment fund specializing in Taiwan-listed companies. Rigger is the author of two books on Taiwan’s domestic politics, Politics in Taiwan: Voting for Democracy (Routledge 1999) and From Opposition to Power: Taiwan’s Democratic Progressive Party (Lynne Rienner Publishers 2001). She has published two books for general readers, Why Taiwan Matters: Small Island, Global Powerhouse (2011) and The Tiger Leading the Dragon: How Taiwan Propelled China’s Economic Rise (2021)She has published articles on Taiwan’s domestic politics, the national identity issue in Taiwan-China relations and related topics. In 2019-20 she was a Fulbright Senior Scholar based in Taipei, where she worked on a study of Taiwan’s contributions to the PRC’s economic take-off and a study of Taiwanese youth.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The COMPETES Act and the Taiwan Fellowship Act, what they are and the background
  • The Western Pacific Fellowship Project
  • How the China Bill in the COMPETES Act aims to strengthen the U.S. response and monitoring of China’s economic activity, and political and security moves globally
  • How the COMPETES Act aims to strengthen the U.S. semiconductor industry
  • How the COMPETES Act contains a bill to change the name TECRO (Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office) change to Taiwan Representative Office is a part of the Competes
  • How the Taiwan Fellowship Act fits into the larger question of the U.S.’s response to China
  • What the Taiwan Fellowship Act is
  • The Mike Mansfield Fellowship
  • Why Americans should care about getting the Taiwan Fellowship Act passed
  • Why Taiwan matters on its own, apart from China
  • What is the procedure for an Act to get passed and what stage the Taiwan Fellowship Act is currently at
  • The many Taiwanese American civic groups that support the Taiwan Fellowship Act
  • For those who’d like to support the Taiwan Fellowship Act and see it get passed in to law, now is a crucial period; they should contact their members of congress to express their support for getting it passed
  • You can write an email to your member of congress through an automated form on FAPA’s (Formosan Association of Public Affairs) website
  • How the Mansfield Fellowship came from congress vs. the Taiwan Fellowship which has been a more grassroots effort
  • U.S. sentiment toward Japan in the mid-1990s
  • How Richard worked at the Mansfield Foundation and learned the value of the Mansfield Fellowship in strengthening the U.S.-Japan relationship
  • How Richard spent time in Taiwan in 2000 and realized that there could be value in creating a fellowship program similar to the Mansfield Fellowship with Taiwan
  • How Richard has been working on the Taiwan Fellowship Act since 2010
  • How now seems to be the one chance to get the Taiwan Fellowship Act passed
  • If passed the Taiwan Fellowship could endure for decades like the Mansfield Fellowship
  • What will happen if the Taiwan Fellowship Act doesn’t get passed
  • Reaction and support for the Taiwan Fellowship Act in Taiwan
  • How the Taiwan Fellowship Act had gotten bipartisan support in both Taiwan (pan-Green and pan-Blue) and in the U.S. (Democrats and Republicans)
  • How the Western Pacific Fellowship Project is a volunteer-led organization and its funding needs
  • How there are a lot of the leading figures in US-Taiwan relations among the Western Pacific Fellowship Project’s directors and advisors
  • Shelley’s support of the Taiwan Fellowship Act
  • Why there has been such broad support for the Taiwan Fellowship Act

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/why-you-should-care-about-the-taiwan-fellowship-act-a-discussion-with-richard-pearson-and-shelley-rigger-ep-189/

Jun 08, 2022
Ep 188 | Michael Turton Lost Episodes | 5000 Blog Posts
06:48
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:   This lost episode of Talking Taiwan features blogger Michael Turton. At the time Michael had written over 5000 blog posts for his blog The View From Taiwan. Michael began writing his blog in 2005 and I remember how popular Michael’s blog was. That’s how I learned about him when I was living in Taiwan, back in the days before social media.    

Michael has been a guest twice on Talking Taiwan. in episode 119 he spoke with me about China’s ban on Taiwan’s pineapples. And in episode 138 he spoke about his love of biking in Taiwan.  That episode earned Talking Taiwan a Golden Crane Podcast Award. Be sure to give those episodes a listen to learn more about Michael.

 

For the month of June we’ll be slowing things down by sharing lost episodes every other week, and in July we’ll be taking a break from the lost episodes. We’ve got a lot of great new content planned and we just can’t fit it all into our weekly publication schedule.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Michael’s blog the View From Taiwan
  • How Michael has written over 5000 blog posts
  • How long it takes him to write a blog post on average
  • What keeps him going with his blog writing
  • How his blog posts are fact based and he’s been quoted by journalists
  • How being based in Taichung, gives him a different perspective than those living in Taipei
  • Michael’s love of biking in Taiwan
  • The most active English language bloggers in Taiwan

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/ep-188-lost-episodes-michael-turton-5000-blog-posts/

Jun 03, 2022
Ep 187 | Karen Lin: Democratic Candidate for Civil Court Judge Talks About Her Career in the Legal Profession
59:52

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Karen Lin is running as the Democratic candidate for Judge of the Civil Court in Queens, New York. Presently, Karen serves as Court Attorney-Referee in Kings County Surrogate’s Court. She has also served as a Judge in the New York City Housing Court, adjudicating disputes between landlord and tenants in the Bronx and Manhattan.

 

We spoke about her current position as Surrogate Court Referee which involves estate settlement between family members and other matters such as guardianship, which was the central issue of the #FreeBritney movement involving Britney Spears.

 

Karen talked about what she loves about the legal profession and the challenges of working as a Judge in New York City’s Housing Court, which is one of the busiest courts in the nation.

 

Karen also volunteers as Co-Chair of the Pro Bono and Community Service Committee of the Asian American Bar Association of New York (AABANY), she also spearheaded the Queens Pro Bono Clinic and helped to set up and manage AABANY’s Remote Legal Clinic during the pandemic, to assist seniors and low-income families by phone.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Karen’s connection to Taiwan
  • What Karen wanted to be when she grew up and how she got interested in law as a career
  • What Karen does in her current position as Surrogate Court Referee
  • The #FreeBritney movement and guardianship
  • What’s been a challenging moment in Karen’s career
  • What’s have a highlight or high point in Karen’s career
  • What it was like being a judge in housing court
  • The confirmation hearing for Supreme Court Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson
  • How the civil rights movement led to the Immigration and Naturalization Act (1965)
  • How landlord tenant law in New York is very tenant friendly and could be reformed to protect individual homeowner landlords who are renting out a space in their homes
  • The reform of landlord tenant law is an issue for lawmakers to address
  • How New York City’s Housing Court is one of the busiest courts in the nation
  • How Karen’s experience as a judge in New York City’s Housing Court and Surrogate’s Court has prepared her for being a civil court judge
  • How in the Anglo American system (or common law system) that we have in the United States, a judge’s ruling or interpretation of the law can affect or create laws
  • Karen’s pro bono work as Co-Chair of the Pro Bono and Community Service Committee of the Asian American Bar Association of New York (AABANY)
  • Karen’s involvement in setting up AABANY’s Remote Legal Clinic during pandemic
  • Her decision to step down as judge of the New York City Housing Court
  • What a civil court judge does and can accomplish during their 10-year term
  • How Karen would like to see greater access to legal advice and support for those who most need it
  • Karen’s mentors and advice on finding them
  • If Karen would like to be a Supreme Court Judge
  • The difference levels of the U.S. court system
  • The importance of voting
  • In Queens, NY Asian Americans are 25% of the population
  • Karen is running in the Democratic primary, on June 28; only people registered as Democrats and who live in Queens can vote for Karen

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/karen-lin-democratic-candidate-for-civil-court-judge/

 

 

 

May 30, 2022
Ep 186 | Lost Episodes | Dr. Jerome Keating PhD, The Mapping of Taiwan
07:24
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:  

It’s Thursday and we’re releasing another “lost” episode of Talking Taiwan! We’ve discovered some never before published, “lost” episodes of Talking Taiwan that were recorded 10 years ago, when Talking Taiwan was being created, and we’ve decided to re-release them on Thursdays.

 

This week’s lost episode of Talking Taiwan features Jerome Keating, the author of The Mapping of Taiwan, Desired Economies, Coveted Geographies, New Perspectives on Cartography, Competing Monopolies and the Destiny of Taiwan.

 

We’ve had Jerome on Talking Taiwan twice in the past. In fact, in episode 97 he gives a great synopsis of the history of Taiwan. That episode was also the number one episode of 2020. And in episode 98 he talks about the books he’s written. Be sure to check out those episodes to learn more about Dr. Keating.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Jerome Keating’ book, The Mapping of Taiwan, Desired Economies, Coveted Geographies, New Perspectives on Cartography, Competing Monopolies and the Destiny of Taiwan
  • The meaning behind the title of Jerome’s book
  • The purpose behind the Dutch and Spanish colonization of Taiwan
  • How Japan was the first to control the entire island of Taiwan
  • Taiwan’s trade history
  • Taiwan’s fong tian jade
  • How the indigenous people of Taiwan were Taiwan’s first traders
  • The Austronesian empire

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://open.spotify.com/episode/58WZvCkkxoeQ7lrK9mrsO7

May 28, 2022
Ep 185 | Brian Foden Newscaster for ICRT Talks About How Life has Changed in Taiwan
36:23

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In this episode of Talking Taiwan, I’m speaking with Brian Foden. We’re welcoming Brian back on as a guest after discovering his lost episode that was recorded 10 years ago. Originally from Canada, he’s been living in Taiwan for over 20 years now. We spoke about what Taiwan was like when he first arrived, how it’s changed and what life is like for him these days. Brian is a writer/editor and part-time newscaster at ICRT.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • When Brian arrived in Taiwan
  • How life is like in Taiwan now that the government has switched away from a zero-COVID strategy
  • What life was like in the early period of the pandemic when Taiwan had no local COVID cases
  • How Brian manages working remotely and in-person at the office
  • Brian started working at ICRT in May of 2000 and worked there full-time until 2004
  • Brian’s position as morning show news producer at ICRT
  • How Brian left ICRT in 2004 and returned in 2012
  • Brian’s work as a news reader at ICRT
  • Brian’s background in journalism
  • Comparing winters in Regina, Saskatchewan and in Ottawa, Ontario
  • How Brian ended up in Taiwan
  • How Taiwan has changed in the time that Brian has lived there
  • Chen Shui-bian was elected President around the time that Brian moved to Taiwan; it was the first time that a Democratic Progressive Party candidate had been elected President in Taiwan
  • The development of Taiwan’s MRT system
  • The popularity of English learning magazines in Taiwan
  • How ICRT has changed over the years
  • The podcast series Rick Monday made about ICRT (Radioactive Taiwan)
  • The glory days of ICRT and the impact it made on Taiwan’s culture and society in the 1980s
  • How Brian first got his job at ICRT in 2000
  • Brian’s advice for anyone considering living and working in Taiwan
  • The type of writing Brian does for work
  • What Brian found difficult about journalism

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/brian-foden-newscaster-for-icrt-talks-about-how-life-has-changed-in-taiwan-ep-185/

May 25, 2022
Ep 184 | Lost Episodes | Brian Foden
09:39
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

As some of you may know, I started hosting Talking Taiwan in 2013, but Talking Taiwan was actually created back in 2012. And we’ve discovered some never before published, “lost” episodes of Talking Taiwan that were recorded 10 years ago! Some of these guests featured in these “lost episodes” may already be familiar to our listeners and some of them will be reintroduced with a follow up interview for us find out what they’re up to these days.

 

Stay tuned every Thursday a new “lost” episode of Talking Taiwan.

 

This “lost” episode of Talking Taiwan features Brian Foden, a proud Canadian. Next week we’ll be bringing Brian back on to find out how he’s doing and what he’s up to these days.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Where in Canada Brian is from
  • What brought Brian to Taiwan
  • Brian’s work on the ICRT News team
  • How he left ICRT
  • Brian’s travels through South America
  • The Brass Monkey in Taipei’s pub quiz nights and Brian’s pub quiz team The Three Stooges
  • Brian shared what kinds of job opportunities there were in writing, editing, recording or for those with a journalism background

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/ep-184-lost-episodes-brian-foden/

May 19, 2022
Ep 183 | Erin Hale: On Taiwan's Antiquated Banking System and Being an American Journalist Living in Asia
40:43
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Erin Hale is an American Journalist who has lived and worked across Asia. 

She is currently a freelance journalist based in Taiwan. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Independent, Al Jazeera, Voice of America, The BBC News, The New Statesman, The South China Morning Post, Marie Claire, The Southeast Asia Globe, Forbes.com and other outlets.

 

I came across her work through a recent article she wrote about how Taiwan’s banking system is stuck in the 80’s. I happened to discover it the same week we released episode 180 with Paolo Lising. In that episode Paolo and I talked about how people in Taiwan still update their account passbooks by running them through dot matrix printers at the bank.

 

Erin has lived in Asia for seven years. We talked about how she's lived in Hong Kong, China and Cambodia and the reporting she's done on Hong Kong and Cambodia, in addition to Taiwan.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What brought Erin to Taiwan
  • What Erin witnessed of the Hong Kong protests in 2019
  • Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement of 2014
  • John Lee who was elected to succeed Carrie Lam as Hong Kong’s next leader
  • How the recent article that Erin wrote for BBC News about how Taiwan’s banking system is still stuck in the 80s was inspired by a tweet by Catherine Chou (@catielila)
  • The reaction on Twitter to Erin’s article and how she used Twitter to crowdsource research for it
  • How often Erin uses Twitter to do research for her stories
  • How Erin appealed to Twitter for people’s experiences voting in the Philippines presidential election
  • How Erin deals with bots on Twitter, fake news and disinformation as a journalist
  • Taiwan-related visa and immigration issues that Erin has dealt with
  • The bureaucracy that Erin has experienced in Taiwan
  • How Erin gets ideas or sources for her stories
  • Working as a freelance journalist
  • What it takes to succeed as a freelance journalist
  • What Erin enjoyed about writing the story about banking in Taiwan
  • The article that Erin wrote about Taiwan’s indigenous people
  • What it’s been like for Erin to learn Mandarin Chinese in Taiwan and what her goals in studying Chinese are
  • How Erin ended up moving to Asia
  • Beijing’s 'Airpocalypse' in 2013
  • How journalists’ experiences in China have changed over the last five years
  • How Cambodia has changed and become influenced by China

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/erin-hale-on-taiwans-antiquated-banking-system-and-being-an-american-journalist-in-asia-ep-183/

May 16, 2022
Ep 182 | Michael Fahey of Forward Taiwan Talks About the Gold Card Program
01:06:10

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Taiwan’s Employment Gold Card program has come up in several past episodes of Talking Taiwan. I’ve been wanting to bring someone on to talk about what it is, who might be eligible for it and how to apply for it. In this episode I spoke with Michael Fahey, an American lawyer who’s lived in Taiwan for 30 years. He worked with the Taiwan National Development Council on Taiwan’s Gold Card program. Michael is co-founder of Forward Taiwan, an organization founded to improve Taiwan’s immigration laws as they pertain to foreign professionals.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How people may consider Taiwan small but with its population of 23 million people it could be compared to one of the U.S.’s largest states or a mid-sized European country
  • What is the Taiwan Gold Card
  • How the Taiwan Employment Gold Card is a four-in-one card: visa, work permit, resident permit, and re-entry permit, that is valid for three years
  • After three years Gold Card holders who have been in Taiwan for an average of 183 days can apply for permanent residency in Taiwan
  • How there was an increase in Gold Cards issued during the pandemic
  • The government of Taiwan’s goal of getting to 10,000 Gold Cards issued by the end of the year and a long-term goal of having 100,000 foreign professionals in Taiwan by 2030
  • How to apply for a Gold Card
  • The eight fields that people can apply to in order to obtain a Gold Card
  • The special category of consultation for those who don’t fit in to any of the eight fields
  • What documentation needs to be provided in order to apply for a Gold Card
  • The importance of providing objective evidence of your professional accomplishments (e.g. an award, a measurable accomplishment)
  • 60% of Gold Card holders have qualified by meeting the salary qualification in the economy field
  • The type of work that Gold Card holders can seek while in Taiwan
  • Singapore’s Employment Pass program and the backlash it’s gotten from Singaporean citizens
  • Recent changes to the Gold Card program including the requirement for applying for permanent residence was lowered from five years to three years and different tax incentives
  • Changes to ordinary work permit requirements which previously required both a college degree and two years of related experience
  • The American Chamber of Commerce Taiwan Business Topics publication
  • Useful resources for people applying for a Gold Card including: the Taiwan National Development Council’s website Foreign Talent, the Taiwan Employment Gold Card Office Help Desk, Taiwan EZ Permit
  • The challenges faced by some Gold Card holders in finding employment in Taiwan
  • It’s not necessary to speak Chinese to live and work in Taiwan
  • If there is something missing or incomplete with a Gold Card application, you will have 30 days to rectify it
  • Currently Gold Card applications are taking 4-6 weeks to get approved
  • What happens if someone’s application for the Gold Card is not accepted
  • The most competitive sub field under arts and culture is popular music/TV/movies
  • Special considerations for people wanting to live and work in Taiwan
  • Considering places to live in Taiwan other than Taipei
  • Michael’s work with Forward Taiwan
  • How Forward Taiwan is working on access to dual nationality for people naturalizing as Taiwanese citizens
  • How Michael is transitioning to working on migrant workers issues
  • The most meaningful accomplishments of Forward Taiwan: an increased number of countries that Taiwan has working holiday agreements with, making it easier for graduates of Taiwanese universities to stay and live and work in Taiwan
  • How the National Development Council came up with Taiwan’s Gold Card program and modeled it after Singapore’s Employment Pass program
  • Taiwan’s independent artist work permit

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/michael-fahey-of-forward-taiwan-talks-about-the-gold-card-program-ep-182/

 

May 12, 2022
Ep 181 | Yao Huang: Solving Financial Inequalities by Funding Minority Owned Businesses
21:48

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

Yao Huang is funding minority owned businessess to solve the financial inequality problem.

I first met and interviewed Yao Huang, in 2013. She is founder and managing partner of The Hatchery. If you want to learn more about her and the Hatchery you can go back and listen to episode 147 of Talking Taiwan.

 

Last year I looked her up, wondering what she’s been up to and reached out to invite her back on to Talking Taiwan as a guest. A lot can happen in 9 years!

 

I learned that she had done two TED Talks and a stint of standup comedy.

 

Yao has been focusing on some very big things like solving the problem of financial inequality through a $100 million dollar fund for minority-owned small to medium-sized businesses. And from her social media posts it looks like she’s living the life and having a ball at these gatherings called the Wonder Women Dinner Series all across the country.

 

When I asked her what she’s excited about these days she mentioned crypto, blockchain and Web3. To some, these may sound like things of the future but the future is already here. Last year Facebook’s name change to Meta was a nod to the metaverse, and earlier in the year, the buzz over a thing called NFTs hit mainstream media. When it comes to understanding NFTs you’ve got to also understand crypto currency, and blockchain technology. We covered that topic in episode 157: DJ Kaku Trailblazes NFTs in Asia. All of these things together- crypto, blockchain and the metaverse make up Web3.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What the Wonder Women Dinner Series is
  • How the Wonder Women Dinner Series has been going on for 16 years
  • How the Wonder Women Dinner Series is a way for women to network, connect, make friendships, and have fun
  • How Yao did standup comedy at Caroline’s, B.B. King’s and around New York City around 2014
  • Division One Capital a $100 million fund for women and minority small businesses
  • How venture capital only helps 2% of all companies
  • How Division One Capital’s lending is based on a company’s sales or revenues
  • How it is difficult it is for women and minorities to secure a loan from a bank
  • How loans from traditional banks can be at higher rates than funding obtained from Division One Capital
  • How funding from a fund like Division One Capital can stabilize and allow a business to grow
  • How Division One Capital was previously called Diana Capital
  • How Division One Capital is working with cities’ initiatives to help SMBs (small and medium-sized businesses)
  • How Yao believes there is a lot of wealth that can be more equally distributed and easily accessed
  • The businesses that Yao has helped grow e.g. a Black woman owned HVAC company and a woman-led company in the data security space that has raised $3.5 million
  • How crypto, bitcoin and block chain has revolutionized the fintech sector, banking, credit, currency, stocks, and led the wave of Web3
  • How important it is to learn about bitcoin and cryptocurrency and how it works
  • The bitcoin 2022 conference in Miami, FL

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/yao-huang-solving-financial-inequalities-by-funding-minority-owned-businesses-ep-181/

May 03, 2022
Ep 180 | Paolo Lising Startup Taiwan Author: Shares His Knowledge on Starting a Business in Taiwan
01:12:18

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

Paolo Lising shares his knowledge on starting a business in Taiwan.

In February, I did a follow up interview with Paolo Lising, who I’ve had on as a guest previously along with Ramon Ray in episode 168, which was about solopreneurship. Paolo is the author of Startup Taiwan: Foreigners Business Guide, and the founder of MillionDC.com. Startup Taiwan is the second book written to help foreigners wanting to start a business in Taiwan after How to Start a Business in Taiwan, which was written by Elias Ek in 2013. Elias has also been a guest on Talking Taiwan.

 

I spoke in depth with Paolo about his early interest in entrepreneurship, what brought him to Taiwan, and how he transitioned from journalism to corporate life and the startup scene. We had an in-depth conversation about what went into his book Startup Taiwan. For those wanting the most up-to-date information they should subscribe to a digital version of Startup Taiwan, which Paolo regularly updates on his website StartupInTaiwan.com. He also has a podcast by the same name Startup Taiwan, that I’d recommend you check out.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Paolo’s background and upbringing
  • Paolo’s career as a journalist covering the Philippines energy sector and banking
  • When and how Paolo became an entrepreneur
  • Paolo’s first business, which was an antique shop in the Philippines
  • How Paolo decided to go from being a journalist to pursing an MBA
  • How Paolo decided to go Taiwan to purse an MBA degree
  • How the MBA program at NTU (National Taiwan University) is taught in English
  • Paolo worked at ASUS and Rayliant Global Advisors in Taiwan before getting into the startup scene
  • Paolo’s current startup in Taiwan, MillionDC.com, which is a learning platform for entrepreneurs from developing countries
  • The special needs of entrepreneurs from developing countries
  • Where the name MillionDC comes from
  • How his bosses at ASUS and Rayliant Global Advisors were supportive of Paolo’s interest in starting his own company on his own time outside of his work hours
  • How one of the problems for people in the Philippines is having stable internet connection and access to information
  • What led Paolo to write Startup Taiwan
  • How to Start a Business in Taiwanby Elias Ek
  • How so much has changed since 2013 when How to Start a Business in Taiwanby Elias Ek was published and Paolo felt a need to write a book with up dated information
  • How Taiwan has changed it policies towards accepting foreigners and allowing them to open up businesses
  • The two ways that foreigners can enter Taiwan and start a business: entrepreneur visa and Gold Card visa
  • The requirements for an entrepreneur visa include submitting a plan of what you will to do in Taiwan, and the growth potential of your business
  • Incubators in Taiwan and the support they provide to entrepreneurs
  • The Gold Card visa is for those with expertise in their fields, similar to an APRC (lien Permanent Resident Certificate)
  • The requirements for a Gold Card
  • The process of writing and doing research for Paolo’s book, Startup Taiwan
  • There are six steps to starting a business in Taiwan
  • How Paolo’s book includes interviews with entrepreneurs and case studies
  • The KPIs (key performance indicator) for grants given by the government of Taiwan
  • The difference and added value of Paolo’s book, Startup Taiwan compared to Elias’ book, How to Start a Business in Taiwan
  • How the interviews in Paolo’s book, Startup Taiwan offer some real life examples of what people go through in the process of trying to start a business in Taiwan
  • How Taiwan is in general very technologically advanced, but its banking system is not
  • Why there aren’t many venture capitalists setting up in Taiwan
  • How a chop aka seal aka stamp is still commonly used by Taiwan’s banks as form of identification
  • The inspiration behind the book cover art for Startup Taiwan
  • The challenges that Paolo has experienced in doing business in Taiwan
  • Common misperceptions that people have about Taiwan or doing business in Taiwan
  • If any of the case studies from the book Startup Taiwanhave been translated into Chinese
  • How Audrey Tang, Taiwan’s digital minister has received a copy of the book and thought the recommendations were helpful informing policies to make Taiwan a startup hub in Asia
  • How Paolo wanted the first version of the print version of Startup Taiwanto look like a coffee table art book with grey paper vs. white or off-white
  • How there are three versions of the book, Startup Taiwan 1)the print book released in 2020, 2) the online version available at StartupInTaiwan.com which is regularly updated 3) the 2022 version which is available on Amazon Kindle and print (updated up to January 31, 2022)  
  • If you go to StartupInTaiwan.com you can get a digital version of the book with real time updates based on current events and news
  • How it is more challenging for foreign entrepreneurs in Taiwan to get access to funding than local Taiwanese entrepreneurs
  • How helpful it is for startups in Taiwan to have at Taiwanese co-founder
  • How Startup Taiwan includes both failed and successful case studies
  • How Taiwan is a welcoming place for foreigners
  • How foreigners need to do research to make sure they are prepared with realistic expectations before coming to Taiwan
  • 9 out of 10 startups in Taiwan fail
  • What opportunities there are for people who want to do business with Taiwan rather than to do business in Taiwan

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/paolo-lising-startup-taiwan-author-shares-his-knowledge-on-starting-a-business-in-taiwan-ep-180/

Apr 25, 2022
Ep 179 | John Fan Pic Collage CoFounder: Creating Jobs for Taiwan's Most Talented Diaspora Since 2011
46:23

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

So much has happened since I interviewed John Fan, one of the co-founders of PicCollage back in December. PicCollage is an app that allows you to create fun things with your photos and videos. It is one of the most popular apps in the photo and video app category in the app store.

 

We actually spoke the day after Talking Taiwan won a Golden Crane Podcast Award. It was a fascinating conversation not only about PicCollage, but about what it was like for John being in Taiwan when it was one of the few places in the world relatively unaffected by COVID at the beginning of the pandemic, and how it attracted COVID refugees that included some of Taiwan’s most talented influential diaspora. John also talked about how the startup scene in Taiwan has changed in the ten years that he’s lived there.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How PicCollage is an app that allows you to create fun things with your photos and videos
  • How PicCollage as a company that creates a variety of apps related to greetings, video editing, and wellness
  • The WOWSHI app inspired by Japanese washi tapes designed to mimic the tactile experience of applying washi tape, which can be a form of relaxation
  • The idea for the WOWSHI app came out of the realization that during the pandemic people were looking for ways to de-stress
  • How PicCollage was started 10 years ago and was initially designed primarily for the iPad
  • 10 years ago apps like Uber, Instagram and Snapchat were still relatively new
  • How PicCollage was started in Silicon Valley but has much of its operations in Taiwan
  • John’s experience as a Taiwanese American having moved to Taiwan and lived there for 10 years
  • The challenges of running a business in multiple time zones
  • The advantages of running a business in Taiwan
  • The freedom and creativity in Taiwan
  • The popularity of bubble tea and cat cafes of Taiwan
  • How Taiwan is connected to and influenced by China, Japan and the U.S.
  • Taiwan’s kawaii i.e. cute aesthetic which has been influenced by Japan
  • Kawaii culture in the in the campaign for Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) presidential candidate Chen Shui-bian
  • How Bitmoji was created in 2007
  • PicCollage’s Silicon Valley values and Taiwanese employees
  • How PicCollage has offered its team members U.S. $3,500 to spend on learning about or getting training on something of their own choice
  • How PicCollage’s values are a mix from Silicon Valley and Taiwan: Always Be Learning. Be Proactive and Overcommunicate. Win As A Team.
  • How PicCollage has changed and evolved over time
  • John’s work experience prior to PicCollage
  • What it has been like starting and running PicCollage
  • How PicCollage values user feedback and has invited users to come in for user interviews on Fridays
  • What they have learned from user feedback e.g. the ability to save/back up the collages on their phone in the cloud
  • Artist collaborations with PicCollage have included collaborations with individual artists, Sanrio, and tokidoki
  • What it’s been like being in Taiwan when it was relatively unaffected by COVID at the beginning of the pandemic, and attracted COVID refugees
  • How Taiwan was one of the first countries to be aware of the threat of COVID early on in the pandemic and was prepared due to its prior experience with SARS
  • How Taiwan was able to maintain zero COVID cases up until April/May 2021 and attracted COVID refugees, like the founders of Rotten Tomatoes, Twitch and YouTube
  • The use of Gather and Kumospace as Taiwan has gone into partial lockdown and adopted working remotely
  • How has the startup culture in Taiwan changed in the 10 years that John has been in Taiwan
  • How software startups exist in the shadows of Taiwan’s two major industries: the semiconductor industry and ODM (Original Design Manufacturer) industry or contract manufacturing industries
  • How Taiwan can play a role in the software industry
  • How people in Taiwan vs Japan and Korea, are more willing to take a risk and work for smaller companies instead of large companies and conglomerates
  • How the startup Gogoro has been able to get a lot of funding
  • How Appier went public in Japan
  • There’s been greater investor interest in Taiwan startups than in the past
  • 500 Startups has set up a branch in Taiwan
  • How there are more VCs (venture capital) in Taiwan now
  • How there are more VCs investing in software
  • How Taiwan can excel in creativity and design
  • Pinkoi. “the Etsy of Asia” that was started in Taiwan
  • GagaOOLala, an LGBTQ+, “Netflix for Asia” that was started in Taiwan
  • How Taiwan needs people with senior level experience with product marketing, and engineering management, and this void could be filled by Taiwan’s diaspora or those interested in working with Taiwanese companies
  • How PicCollage is hiring

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/john-fan-pic-collage-cofounder-creating-jobs-for-taiwans-most-talented-since-2011-ep-179/

Apr 19, 2022
Ep 178 | Taiwan's Civil Defense Preparedness: T.H. Schee on How to Prepare for the Threat of an Attack
54:40

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has put the reality of war on display for the world, especially for Taiwan, which like Ukraine, has been under the constant threat of military aggression of an unfriendly neighbor. Because of the war that’s been happening in Ukraine there’s been talk of how Taiwan must improve its military defense capabilities and preparedness, but beyond this, there are people in Taiwan wondering what they themselves can do to be prepared, should Taiwan come under attack.

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan, T.H. Schee, a representative of Open Knowledge Taiwan, is one of those people asking these important questions.

 

We’d like to dedicate this episode to the memories of David Kilgour, who passed away on April fifth at the age of 81 and Peng Ming-min who passed away on April eighth at the age of 98. Mr. Kilgour, who I interviewed recently, was a human rights activist, and a former Member of Canada’s Parliament, having served in the House of Commons for nearly 27 years, as Secretary of State for Latin America & Africa from 1997-2002, and Secretary of State for Asia-Pacific from 2002-2003.

 

Dr. Peng Ming-Min was a pro-Taiwan independence/pro-democracy activist. In 1964 he was arrested for sedition for drafting and printing a manifesto advocating for democracy in Taiwan, he served as president of the Formosan Association of Public Affairs from 1986 to 1988, and in 1996 he ran as a Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) candidate in Taiwan's first direct presidential election.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by the Taiwanese United Fund.

 

The Taiwanese United Fund is an arts and culture foundation that celebrates the cultural heritages of Taiwanese Americans. Established in 1986, the foundation's mission is to facilitate cultural exchange between the Taiwanese American community and other American cultural communities, hoping to enrich and expand our cultural experiences. To learn more about TUF visit their website  http://www.tufusa.org/ 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How T.H. became interested and involved with civil defense
  • The 9/21 earthquake in Nantou
  • His work with Open Knowledge Taiwan
  • What is civil defense
  • Great Britain’s Air Raid Wardens Service
  • How T.H. has been dealing with disaster response for over ten years
  • How Taiwan has to deal with disaster response year round due to typhoons and earthquakes
  • What is digital first aid
  • Taiwan’s history of civil defense programs in Kimen and Matsu
  • What is covered in Open Knowledge workshops
  • The last time that preparedness for war was treated as a priority in Taiwan
  • The 1995-1996 missile crisis in Taiwan aka the Third Taiwan Strait Crisis
  • What Taiwan can learn from what’s happening with the war in Ukraine
  • The challenge of evacuating from Taiwan since it is an island
  • How prepared Ukrainian civilians were for war
  • How people can prepare for different levels of crisis: 1) emergency preparation (e.g. power outage/ blackout) 2) natural disaster 3) an attack/invasion/war
  • The importance of establishing several reliable sources of information in case of a natural disaster
  • The emerging discussion about how to handle an attack on Taiwan
  • The importance of being able to identify friend from foe in case of a war in Taiwan
  • The importance of first aid knowledge
  • How civil defense in Taiwan is mandated by the national police agency/law enforcement in Taiwan
  • An explanation of infographics from Open Knowledge that were recently shared on Twitter
  • How general citizens could seek to improve their preparedness by enrolling in courses offered by hospitals
  • Preparedness for military reservists
  • The importance of having secure lines of communication in times of crisis
  • Taiwan’s Ministry of Defense has published a handbook that outlines the roles and responsibilities of the local and central government in times of crisis; the handbook is irrelevant for civilians
  • T.H.’s thoughts on how the government of Taiwan can better prepare its citizens for war
  • How the past civil defense programs in Kimen and Matsu prepared and trained civilians for war and what we can learn from them
  • How the defense sector is a closed circle and Open Knowledge Taiwan is trying to address civilians’ lack of access to defense related information
  • Ukraine’s Territorial Defense Forces
  • How it’s important for Taiwan to improve bi-lateral and tri-lateral exchanges of information
  • Michael Turton’s piece in the Taipei Times about Taiwan’s preparedness for war
  • How it’s important to be able to resist the first 72 hours of an attack
  • How critical points identified at Open Knowledge Taiwan workshops could be turned into policy recommendations for Taiwan’s government

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/taiwans-civil-defense-preparedness-t-h-schee-on-how-to-prepare-for-the-threat-of-an-attack-ep-178/

Apr 10, 2022
Ep 177 | Celebrating Children's Day in Taiwan: Margaret Chiu Greanias Talks About What Inspired her Latest Book "Amah Faraway"
44:47
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:  

April fourth is Children’s Day in Taiwan, which is great timing for this interview with children’s book author Margaret Chiu Greanias. She spoke with me about her latest book Amah Faraway, which has many of its scenes set in Taipei, Taiwan. Margaret shared how she became a children’s book author, what she loves about picture books, how they get created and what she’s working on next.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by the Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 and the Taiwanese United Fund.

 

The Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 was established in 2000 to promote Taiwanese and Taiwanese American arts and literature, and to protect and enhance the human rights, freedom and democracy of the people in Taiwan.

 

 

The Taiwanese United Fund is an arts and culture foundation that celebrates the cultural heritages of Taiwanese Americans. Established in 1986, the foundation's mission is to facilitate cultural exchange between the Taiwanese American community and other American cultural communities, hoping to enrich and expand our cultural experiences. To learn more about TUF visit their website  http://www.tufusa.org/ 

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Amah Faraway is written as a reverse poem
  • What is a reverse poem
  • The reverse poem, “The Lost Generation” by Jonathan Reed that inspired Margaret to write Amah Faraway as a reverse poem
  • What inspired Margaret to write Amah Faraway
  • How much of the book was based on Margaret’s relationship with her amah and on her children’s relationship with their amah (Margaret’s mother)
  • How Margaret’s children react to reading her books
  • Margaret’s memories of visiting Taiwan as a child
  • How Margaret got connected with the illustrator of Amah Faraway
  • Tracy Subisak the illustrator of Amah Faraway who is half Taiwanese and her special contributions to the book, which included the use of Mandarin Chinese
  • The Two Tigers nursery rhyme that amah sings to Kylie in Amah Faraway
  • How children’s picture books can be written first without an illustrator or written with a specific illustrator, in which case the manuscript and sketches would be sent together to an editor
  • How Margaret’s first book Maximillian Villainous was created with illustrator Lesley Breen Withrow, and the manuscript and sketches were sent together to an editor
  • How the movie Despicable Me inspired the idea for Margaret’s first children’s book Maximillian Villainous
  • When the editor chooses the illustrator for a picture book usually the author and illustrator aren’t introduced to each other, and the illustrator works independently to interpret the words of the story in their own way
  • How picture books are half about the words and half about the art
  • How Margaret decided to become a children’s book author
  • What Margaret was doing before she became a children’s book author
  • Margaret’s favorite books as a child
  • How Margaret decides to write about
  • Margaret’s writing process
  • Margaret writes picture books for ages 3-8 but would like to also write chapter books for middle grade (8-12 years old)
  • What Margaret loves about picture books and writing for the 3-8 year old age group
  • World Read Aloud Day
  • The Five Chinese Brothers, an American children's book written by Claire Huchet Bishop
  • What’s involved in the process of getting a children’s book published
  • The challenge of writing a story in 500 words or less
  • Children’s books that Margaret recommends
  • Margaret’s next book, Hooked on Books that will be coming out next summer

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/celebrating-childrens-day-in-taiwan-margaret-chiu-greanias-talks-about-her-latest-book-amah-faraway-ep-177/

Apr 06, 2022
Ep 176 | Taiwan Cares Humanitarian Efforts for Ukraine Raise $9000 in 24 Hours
49:03

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

As she watched the humanitarian crisis unfold due to the war in Ukraine, S. Chien wanted to do something to help. She came up with the idea for the Taiwan Cares project and together with Dr. Monty Wang and Dr. Bo-Chheng Lin, mobilized the efforts of over 30 Taiwanese Americans from New Jersey to raise over $9000 in 24 hours. The funds were used to purchase and ship urgently needed medical supplies and baby formula to people in Ukraine. 

 

  1. Chien is the President of New Jersey Chapter of North America Taiwanese Women's Association.

 

Dr. Monty Wang is a retired physician.

 

[INSERT photo of Dr. Bo-Chheng Lin]

 

Dr. Bo-Chheng Lin, is cofounder of New Jersey Living Well Club and an elder of the New Jersey Taiwanese American Fellowship Presbyterian Church (TAFPC).

 

I learned about their project Taiwan Cares from an email that was forwarded to me with a touching video created by Shi Chien about how over $9,000 was raised in 24 hours in order to send humanitarian relief to people in Ukraine.  

 

With everything that’s been happening in the world today, I think that we need

to tell more stories of the good that people are doing in the world.

 

The Taiwanese Care project team will continue to provide humanitarian assistance to Ukrainian refugees in cooperation with the Taiwanese American Council of Greater New York (TAC-GNY) which has set up the Ukraine-Taiwan Humanitarian Fund Drive.  Donors may contact them for details and/or send checks to:

 

Taiwanese American Council (TAC) of Greater New York

 

TAC / Taiwan Center

137-44 Northern Blvd, Flushing, NY 11354

 

Make checks payable to TAC/GNY.  Please write the following as the check’s memo:  Ukraine – Taiwan Cares

 

TAC-GNY is a 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization. After receiving a donation check, TAC-GNY will send the donor a tax-deductible receipt.  The fundraising drive ends mid-April.

 

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by the Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 and the Taiwanese United Fund.

 

The Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 was established in 2000 to promote Taiwanese and Taiwanese American arts and literature, and to protect and enhance the human rights, freedom and democracy of the people in Taiwan.

 

 

The Taiwanese United Fund is an arts and culture foundation that celebrates the cultural heritages of Taiwanese Americans. Established in 1986, the foundation's mission is to facilitate cultural exchange between the Taiwanese American community and other American cultural communities, hoping to enrich and expand our cultural experiences. To learn more about TUF visit their website  http://www.tufusa.org/ 

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How the Taiwan Cares Project was initiated
  • Dr. Monty Wang talks about how he’s visited both Ukraine and Russia and his impressions
  • Why they only had 24 hours to raise funds
  • How the Taiwan Cares Project team partnered with a Ukrainian Orthodox Church in New Jersey to deliver the supplies to people in need in Ukraine
  • Why they decided to purchase urgently needed baby formula and medical supplies to send to Ukraine rather than sending a cash donation
  • How Dr. Wang planned what items to order and the quick turnaround time in order to get them delivered to the Ukrainian church
  • The Taiwan Care project will be a continued and continuous effort
  • How Taiwan has made disaster relief contributions to Japan (Fukushima earthquake) and Indonesia
  • How Ukraine’s situation is similar and different from Taiwan’s
  • China’s incursions into Taiwan’s ADIZ
  • How people from Taiwan have donated around $240 million U.S, dollars to Ukraine
  • The Holodomor, Ukraine’s Great Famine
  • Possible future initiatives of the Taiwan Cares project
  • The YouTube video S. Chien created about the Taiwan Cares project and the music she used for it
  • The Ukrainian folk instrument, the bandura that was banned by Russia
  • How they purchased 900 pounds of supplies to send as humanitarian relief to Ukraine
  • The design of the Taiwan Cares label and how it includes the Ukrainian words for “Help from Taiwan”

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/taiwan-cares-humanitarian-efforts-for-ukraine-raise-9000-in-24-hours-ep-176/

Mar 30, 2022
Ep 175 | Will China Attack Taiwan? Kuan-Ting Chen Discusses Ramifications of the War in Ukraine on Taiwan
39:26

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:  

Will China attack Taiwan given the current circumstances surrounding the war in Ukraine?

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Kuan-Ting Chen, the CEO of Taiwan NextGen Foundation, which is an NGO (a non-governmental organization) founded in Taipei that focuses on various issues such as Taiwan’s soft power, promoting democracy, educational policy research, public advocacy and issues related to domestic and foreign policy. He shared his thoughts on Russian’s invasion of Ukraine and the comparisons being made between Ukraine and Taiwan. I asked him how people in Taiwan have been reacting to the situation.

 

Prior to serving as CEO of Taiwan NextGen Foundation Kuan-Ting served at the Taipei City government as the chief research officer and deputy spokesperson. He was in charge of various issues related to public affairs, international affairs, and student affairs.

 

Before that Kuan-Ting served on Taiwan’s National Security Council. In that capacity he was responsible for Taiwan-Japan relations.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by the Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 and the Taiwanese United Fund.

The Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 was established in 2000 to promote Taiwanese and Taiwanese American arts and literature, and to protect and enhance the human rights, freedom and democracy of the people in Taiwan.

 

 

The Taiwanese United Fund is an arts and culture foundation that celebrates the cultural heritages of Taiwanese Americans. Established in 1986, the foundation’s mission is to facilitate cultural exchange between the Taiwanese American community and other American cultural communities, hoping to enrich and expand our cultural experiences. To learn more about TUF visit their website  http://www.tufusa.org/ 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Some of the history of the conflict between Ukraine and Russia
  • The famine that Ukraine endured during the early 20thcentury due to the policies of the Soviet Union
  • The Budapest Memorandum
  • Why people are drawing comparisons between Ukraine and Taiwan
  • How the situation in Ukraine and Taiwan are similar and different
  • How the invasion and conflict in eastern Ukraine’s Donbas has been going on for 7-8 years already
  • Comparing China with Russia
  • Kuan-Ting’s thoughts on the relationship between China and Russia
  • How the international reaction to Russia can send a message to China
  • The weaknesses of Russia and China militarily and economically
  • China’s reactions to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine
  • The role that China could play to possibly deter Russia’s invasion of Ukraine
  • Why Kuan-Ting doesn’t think that China will try to attack Taiwan at this time
  • What Taiwan can do as deterrence
  • What has been the reaction in Taiwan to what’s been happening to Ukraine
  • Taiwan’s military preparedness
  • A recent survey of how many Taiwanese would be willing to fight to defend Taiwan
  • The rallies in support of Ukraine in Taiwan
  • How the sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine
  • How thousands have showed up to rallies in support of Ukraine
  • How the government of Taiwan has shown support for Ukraine
  • The Taiwan Can Help campaign
  • How the U.S. has responded to the Russian invasion of Ukraine and what we could infer, if anything about how the U.S. might respond if Taiwan was to be attacked by China
  • What Taiwan can realistically expect in terms of military assistance from the U.S.
  • How Taiwan needs to be better prepared in case China attacks
  • What Taiwan can learn from what’s happening in Ukraine
  • What Kuan-Ting learned about how Ukrainians are reacting to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine when he interviewed a Ukrainian minority

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/will-china-attack-taiwan-kuan-ting-chen-discusses-ramifications-of-the-war-in-ukraine-on-taiwan-ep-175/

Mar 23, 2022
Ep 174 | Reliving the Sunflower Movement from Ground Zero: Jiho Chang Tells the Inside Story
42:11

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Jiho Chang tells us the inside story first hand by reliving the Sunflower Movement from Ground Zero.

March 18th will mark the eighth anniversary of the beginning of the Sunflower Movement during which time activists occupied Taiwan’s Legislative Yuan in order to protest the passing of the Cross-Strait Service Trade Agreement, which was a treaty between Taiwan and China. The roots of the Sunflower Movement go back much further, years before 2014. My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan, Jiho Chang, shares his perspectives on the Sunflower Movement as he looks back upon it, and talks about his involvement with the movement.

 

Jiho has been a guest on Talking Taiwan previously, talking about his work as Keelung City Councilman (episode 149), and remembering the late revolutionary Su Beng (史明) (episode 156).

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by the Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 and the Taiwanese United Fund.

 

The Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 was established in 2000 to promote Taiwanese and Taiwanese American arts and literature, and to protect and enhance the human rights, freedom and democracy of the people in Taiwan.

 

The Taiwanese United Fund is an arts and culture foundation that celebrates the cultural heritages of Taiwanese Americans. Established in 1986, the foundation's mission is to facilitate cultural exchange between the Taiwanese American community and other American cultural communities, hoping to enrich and expand our cultural experiences. To learn more about TUF visit their website  http://www.tufusa.org/ 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Why the Sunflower Movement happened in Taiwan
  • How the Sunflower Movement had roots in protests that started in 2008
  • How former President Ma Ying-jeou tried to “re-sinicize” many things in Taiwan
  • Jiho’s involvement with the Sunflower Movement
  • How there had been an attempt to occupy the Ministry of the Interior a year before the Sunflower Movement in 2014
  • The power struggle between former President Ma Ying-jeou and Speaker of the Legislative Yuan, Wang Jing-ping at the time of the Sunflower Movement
  • Factions between the Kuomintang
  • Jiho’s account of what happened the night activists broke into the Legislative Yuan
  • How the length of the occupation was unexpected
  • The public support for the movement, with crowds of people surrounding the Legislative Yuan for the duration of the occupation
  • How Jiho has to testify in court about the attempted occupation of the Executive Yuan
  • How there was a livestream of what was happening inside of the Legislative Yuan during the occupation
  • How nothing was planned but people (such as doctors and other professionals) stepped up
  • The documentary about the Sunflower Movement that featured Jiho and his colleagues
  • How the Sunflower Movement has affected Taiwan’s political landscape and directions
  • The conditions inside of the Legislative Yuan during the occupation
  • There were 500-600 people occupying the Legislative Yuan
  • How another headquarters of operations was set up at a NTU (National Taiwan University) social sciences building nearby
  • The attempt at occupying the Executive Yuan on March 28, 2014
  • The end of the occupation of the Legislative Yuan
  • March 30thrally in Taipei in which hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in support of the Sunflower Movement
  • Rallies organized globally on March 30thin support of the Sunflower Movement
  • Hong Kong’s protests (in 2014 aka the Umbrella Movement and 2019-2020)
  • In the end as a result of the Sunflower Movement the Cross-Strait Service Trade Agreement was not approved and many young activists went on to serve in politics

  

Related Links:

 

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/reliving-the-sunflower-movement-from-ground-zero-jiho-chang-tells-the-inside-story-ep-174/

Mar 15, 2022
Ep 173 | George Leslie MacKay: Canadian Missionary Iconoclast and his Contributions to Taiwan with Rev. Michael Stainton
01:05:24
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:  

On March 9th Taiwan Post will be issuing a stamp commemorating the 150th anniversary of the arrival of Canadian missionary George Leslie Mackay in Northern Taiwan. Mackay was unlike most 19th century missionaries. He has been referred to as the “son-in-law of Taiwan,” and was a forward thinker. He was one of the first to oppose the Head Tax imposed on Chinese in Canada.

 

To help understand who George Leslie Mackay was and the significance of his contributions, I’ll be speaking with Reverend Michael Stainton, the founder of the Canadian Mackay Committee. Reverend Stainton has worked for the last 25 years to promote the recognition of Mackay in Canada and on several campaigns for Canada Post to issue a stamp to commemorate George Leslie Mackay.

 

Those interested in contacting the Canadian Mackay Committee can email Canadianmackay@gmail.com

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by the Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 and the Taiwanese United Fund.

 

The Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 was established in 2000 to promote Taiwanese and Taiwanese American arts and literature, and to protect and enhance the human rights, freedom and democracy of the people in Taiwan.

 

The Taiwanese United Fund is an arts and culture foundation that celebrates the cultural heritages of Taiwanese Americans. Established in 1986, the foundation's mission is to facilitate cultural exchange between the Taiwanese American community and other American cultural communities, hoping to enrich and expand our cultural experiences. To learn more about TUF visit their website  http://www.tufusa.org/ 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How and when Reverent Stainton first learned about Dr. George Leslie Mackay
  • How Reverend Stainton was a student radical at York University and was involved in the anti-Vietnam War movement and interested in China
  • How Reverend Stainton became disillusioned with the friendship work with China that he was doing
  • How Reverend Stainton was initially reluctant to go to Taiwan to work with the Presbyterian Church in 1979
  • How the Kuomintang had cancelled elections in response to U.S. President Jimmy Carter’s switch in recognition from the Republic of China to the People’s Republic of China as the sole legal government of China (in 1978)
  • The Tangwai movement in 1979
  • How Reverend Kao Chun-ming, who was the guarantor on Reverend Stainton’s visa to Taiwan (in 1979) had gotten arrested for helping to hide Shih Ming-teh
  • How things in Taiwan were in chaos when Reverend Stainton arrived there in 1980
  • Upon arriving in Taiwan Reverend Stainton was assigned to the Aboriginal Student Center
  • At the time the Kuomintang believed the Presbyterian Church in Taiwan was a cat’s paw of the Chinese Communist Party
  • Reverend Stainton was warned that he would be watched and under surveillance with his phone calls tapped and letters opened
  • How Reverend Stainton was asked to play the part of Dr. George Leslie Mackay in a play was put on for the 100th anniversary of the Mackay Memorial Hospital in 1981
  • In 1992 after Reverent Stainton had returned to Canada, he saw the importance of promoting the recognition of Dr. George Leslie Mackay in Canada
  • How Dr. George Leslie Mackay breaks the stereotypes of 19th century missionaries
  • How Joseph Steere a professor of Zoology at the University of Michigan who met Mackay in Taiwan in 1873 wrote that he observed that Mackay treated the Chinese as equals rather than an inferior race
  • How Mackay learned Taiwanese culture and language from his students
  • How Mackay accepted his students’ suggestion and arrangement for him to marry a Taiwanese woman, Tiuⁿ Chhang-miâ (aka Minnie)
  • How Mackay was criticized about his marriage and why he got married at the British Consulate
  • How Mackay told the Foreign Mission Board of his marriage only after he had already gotten married
  • Why Mackay is so beloved in Taiwan and is called the “son-in-law of Taiwan”
  • How Mackay’s upbringing influenced his values
  • Mackay was the youngest son of a Scottish Evangelical Presbyterian family
  • Mackay and his family had gone to Canada as refugees from the Sutherland Highland Clearances in northern Scotland because aristocratic landlords had pushed peasants off their land due to the English Industrial Revolution
  • Mackay along with other refugees had been sent to Oxford county which is present-day South Central Ontario in Canada
  • How highlanders (people from northern Scotland) were also looked down upon in Canada because they weren’t civilized Scots from the south
  • How the early injustice Mackay and his family experienced shaped him
  • How he learned frontier medicine and developed strong resilience from growing up in the frontier
  • The Zorra pioneers and how Zorra refers to part of the province of Ontario
  • How Mackay became known for pulling teeth and was able to gain the trust of local people in Taiwan but he was not a dentist or doctor
  • Mackay was given an honorary doctorate degree in 1881
  • Misconceptions about Mackay
  • How Mackay discouraged foreign women missionaries from coming to teach (sewing and English) in favor of having local Taiwanese women converts teach in his school
  • The great numbers of the Kavalan indigenous people who converted and joined Mackay’s mission
  • The ethnic revitalization among the Kavalan
  • How the Kavalan used a patronymic name system, rather than surnames, but under Chinese rule they were assigned Chinese names and surnames, so some Kavalan adopted Mackay's Taiwanese surname “Kai” (偕) as their own
  • What has changed in terms of what is known about Mackay
  • Up until the 1990s much of what had been written about Mackay was hagiography
  • The first international academic conference on Dr. George Leslie Mackay that Reverend Stainton organized in 1997 and how it boosted the study of Mackay
  • How Mackay ended up in Taiwan and settling near Tamsui
  • How the Taiwanese called foreigners like Mackay and indigenous people “barbarians,” and this created camaraderie between Mackay and the Kavalan people
  • Reverend Stainton’s efforts to try to get Canada Post to issue a stamp commemorating George Leslie Mackay which have included two previous campaigns in 2001 and 2022
  • Comparisons between getting a stamp approved by Canada Post vs. Taiwan Post
  • In 2001 a stamp commemorating Mackay was issued in Taiwan
  • Why Canada Post didn’t approve a stamp commemorating the 150th anniversary of George Leslie Mackay’s arrival in Taiwan
  • The issues that Reverend Stainton has with the stamp that Taiwan Post is issuing on March 9
  • Why Mackay’s wife was given the English name Minnie
  • Mackay’s lasting contributions in Taiwan
  • Mackay’s title of doctor was due to an honorary doctor of divinity
  • Mackay’s opposition of the Head Tax
  • Mackay’s lasting contributions in/to Canada
  • Woodstock, Ontario’s sister city relationship with Tamsui, Taiwan
  • Mackay’s intellectual curiosity and love of nature, astronomy, and botany
  • Mackay’s use of traditional Chinese medicine in his medical work
  • The complete Kavalan people’s bridal outfit on display at the Royal Ontario Museum, which was among the 16 crates of artifacts that Mackay brought back from Taiwan to Canada in 1893
  • Many of the items that Mackay collected are among the oldest collection of indigenous artifacts from Taiwan in the world

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/george-leslie-mackay-canadian-missionary-iconoclast-and-his-contributions-to-taiwan-with-rev-michael-stainton-ep-173/

Mar 08, 2022
Ep 172 | Helping 228 Survivors Deal with Trauma: Dr. Michi Fu and Dr. Tsuann Kuo Work with the Transitional Justice Commission
58:40
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin: Dr. Michi Fu and Dr. Tsuann Kuo are helping 228 Survivors deal with trauma.   This year marks 75 years since the 228 Massacre and this week we continue our discussion on the topic. 228 refers to February 28, 1947, which could be argued is a misnomer because tensions leading up to the massacre of tens of thousands of people had been building for quite some time before February 28th, ever since the Chinese Nationalists (the Kuomintang) had fled from China to Taiwan in 1945. Some Taiwanese dissidents have used the term March Massacre instead of 228 since the massacres that happened were mostly in March of 1947.  

Last week we talked about the lasting impact of 228. Under the subsequent authoritarian rule of the Chiang regime, there was 38 years of martial law and the White Terror era. Anyone could be disappeared, executed or worse for just saying or doing the wrong thing, or for what was seemingly wrong in the eyes of the authorities. The people of Taiwan were horrified and terrified. Generations dared not speak of 228.

 

If you haven’t already listened to last week’s episode, I encourage you to listen to it first to understand the trauma that 228 has inflicted on generations of Taiwanese.

 

My guests on this week’s episode will talk about some of the ways they have helped 228 survivors and their relatives to start to heal their trauma.

 

I am welcoming back Dr. Michi Fu and Dr. Tsuann Kuo to talk about the work they did with the Transitional Justice Commission’s “caring projects” that were set up specifically to help 228 survivors and their relatives. Three sites were set up for the “caring projects” and Tsuann and Michi were at the Taichung site at the end of 2020 up until February 28, 2021. Please note that the comments and experiences they share are limited to the work that they did through the “caring project” in Taichung and their personal opinions. They are not representing the Transitional Justice Commission, which as you’ll hear in the interview, has a much broader scope with five main objectives.

 

The Transitional Justice Commission was set up in 2018 to investigate the actions taken by the Kuomintang between 15 August 1945 and 6 November 1992 (This includes 228, the martial law era and White Terror era).

 

Special thanks to Michi for her help in assembling all the guests for this episode and the previous one, both dedicated to discussing the topic of 228.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by the Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 and the Taiwanese United Fund.

 

The Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社was established in 2000 to promote Taiwanese and Taiwanese American arts and literature, and to protect and enhance the human rights, freedom and democracy of the people in Taiwan.

 

The Taiwanese United Fund is an arts and culture foundation that celebrates the cultural heritages of Taiwanese Americans. Established in 1986, the foundation's mission is to facilitate cultural exchange between the Taiwanese American community and other American cultural communities, hoping to enrich and expand our cultural experiences. To learn more about TUF visit their website  http://www.tufusa.org/ 

 

About this episode’s guests

 

Dr. Michi Fu is a second-generation Taiwanese American and a NATWA II member. She became a Taiwanese citizen after spending a sabbatical year as a mid-life adult. As a Taiwanese returnee, identity politics was an inevitable part of the ethnic identity development process. As such, she has been educating herself on Taiwanese history, including the 228 Massacre, that her family has traditionally remained silent about.

 

 

Tsuann Kuo, Ph.D. was trained as a gerontologist and has had both clinical and managerial work experiences in the United States before returning to Taiwan. Currently, Dr. Kuo works as an Associate Professor at the School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University in Taichung City, Taiwan. She is actively involved in a number of organizations as the President of Taiwan Association of Family Caregivers, the Executive Director of Taichung Dementia Integrated Care Center and the President of Red Cross in Taichung City.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The five objectives of the Transitional Justice Commission
  • How Tsuann and Michi got involved with the Transitional Justice Commission
  • The caring projects that extended help to the survivors of 228 and their descendants at three sites (Taipei, Taichung and Kaohsiung)
  • Michi’s related work with the Museum of Tolerance and survivors of the Armenian genocide
  • The challenges and difficulties in gaining the trust and cooperation of 228 survivors
  • How survivors and their relatives were impacted by 228
  • How the program’s activities helped survivors to reflect on their past and to make sense of it, and to build their social networks
  • How 228 survivors tried to make sense of why their fathers were killed or jailed
  • The workshops that Michi and Tsuann conducted to help 228 survivors deal with their trauma by discussing what PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) and post traumatic growth is
  • How they used art as a creative form of expression
  • How difficult it was for the 228 survivors to see something good in their lives that they could appreciate in their lives
  • How they were able to get the 228 survivors to be more expressive
  • The changes they saw in 228 survivors at the end of the program
  • Michi’s comparisons between the survivors of 228 and the Armenian genocide
  • What Tsuann and Michi learned from the experience of working with 228 survivors
  • How 228 survivors and their relatives struggled to be accepted in society
  • What types of documents were made public and how they impacted the relatives of 228 survivors or victims
  • If the Transitional Justice Commission has achieved its goals
  • How the work of the Transitional Justice Commission is temporary
  • The proposition by some legislators to continue the work of the Transitional Justice Committee as a Human Rights Committee
  • The debate over the Chiang Kai-shek memorial
  • Green Island, where political prisoners were sent
  • Green Island prison museum
  • The Jing-mei Human Rights Museum in Taipei
  • The 228 Peace Park in Taipei
  • How the work of the Transitional Justice Commission in Taiwan compares to transitional justice work done in South Africa
  • The question of who should be held responsible to apologize for the atrocities that happened as a result and connected to 228
  • The challenge for people in Taiwan who are not able to face or identify the perpetrators of crimes related to 228
  • What can we learn from the 228 Massacre
  • How Michi and Tsuann’s families have reacted to their work with 228 survivors through the Transitional Justice Commission
  • Tsuann’s work with the Chinese veterans that came to Taiwan with Chiang Kai-shek and the Kuomintang after World War II

 

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/helping-228-survivors-deal-with-trauma-dr-muci-fu-and-dr-sueanne-kuo-work-with-the-transitional-justice-commission-ep-172/

Feb 28, 2022
Ep 171 | The 228 Massacre: Taboos, Scars, Stigmas, and an Essential Lesson in Taiwan History
01:34:37
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:   The 228 Massacre has been a subject of taboo for those who have had family who lived through it and the White Terror Era that followed.

 

The Lunar New Year holiday and celebrations in Taiwan have just ended, but another national holiday will soon be here, the 228 Peace Memorial Day. But what is 228?

 

It’s been, 75 years and as you’ll hear from my guests on today’s show, it’s still a touchy topic. And frankly it’s not something that can be easily boiled down to a single date, February 28, 1947.

 

The first thing to know is that 228 is actually a misnomer because the events thought to have ignited the conflicts and that led to the massacring of tens of thousands actually happened the night before on February 27th, 1947.

 

Also, tensions had already been mounting for quite some time before then. Two years earlier in 1945, at the end of World War II, the Chinese Nationalists (the Kuomintang) had fled from China to Taiwan bringing with them the Republic of China framework.

 

On the night of February 27th, Tobacco Monopoly Bureau agents tried to confiscate contraband cigarettes from a 40-year-old woman and brutally knocked her out. When an angry crowd gathered in protest, one of the agents fired a shot into the crowd killing a bystander. Within 24 hours, the incident had escalated into bloody violence and massacres.

 

Under the authoritarian Chiang regime, what followed was 38 years of martial law and the White Terror era. Anyone could be disappeared, executed or worse for just saying or doing the wrong thing or for what was seemingly wrong in the eyes of the authorities. The people of Taiwan were horrified and terrified. Generations dared not speak of 228.

 

228 was absent from high school textbooks until relatively recently. Denial, distrust, suppression, and the passage of time have made it hard for many to come to terms with 228.

 

What I’ve presented is of course not the entire story but is meant to provide you with some basic background for the discussion in this episode of Talking Taiwan. If you were previously unfamiliar with 228, I hope that this has piqued your interest, and that you do some further research for yourself on the topic History is not about an isolated date like 228 but understanding its deeper context, significance and repercussions.

 

Since it’s the 75th anniversary of the 228 massacre we will be dedicating two episodes to this topic. In this first episode today, my guests Wei-Wei Chang, Michi Fu, TsuAnn Kuo and Josephine Pan represent different backgrounds and generations of Taiwanese women. Each will share their personal perspectives and experiences related to 228, thoughts on the societal impact of 228. Next week Michi and TsuAnn will return to discuss their work with 228 survivors and their families through the Transitional Justice Commission. Special thanks to Michi for her help in assembling all the guests for these two episodes.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by the Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社 and the Taiwanese United Fund.

 

The Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社was established in 2000 to promote Taiwanese and Taiwanese American arts and literature, and to protect and enhance the human rights, freedom and democracy of the people in Taiwan.

 

The Taiwanese United Fund is an arts and culture foundation that celebrates the cultural heritages of Taiwanese Americans. Established in 1986, the foundation's mission is to facilitate cultural exchange between the Taiwanese American community and other American cultural communities, hoping to enrich and expand our cultural experiences. To learn more about TUF visit their website  http://www.tufusa.org/ 

 

 

About this episode’s guests

 

Weiwei Chang was born and raised in Taiwan during the martial law era. Her parents retreated from China to Taiwan as refugees after World War II. She has been living in the U.S. for over 40 years. Six years ago she retired from her job as registered nurse.

 

Michi Fu is a second-generation Taiwanese American and a NATWA II member. She became a Taiwanese citizen after spending a sabbatical year as a mid-life adult. As a Taiwanese returnee, identity politics was an inevitable part of the ethnic identity development process. As such, she has been educating herself on Taiwanese history, including the 228 Massacre, that her family has traditionally remained silent about.

 

Tsuann Kuo, Ph. D. was trained as a gerontologist and had both clinical and managerial work experiences in the United States before returning to Taiwan. Currently, Dr. Kuo works as an Associate Professor at the School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University in Taichung City, Taiwan. She is actively involved in a number of organizations as the President of Taiwan Association of Family Caregivers, the Executive Director of Taichung Dementia Integrated Care Center and the President of Red Cross in Taichung City.

 

 

Josephine Pan is a proud Taiwanese Hakka from Hsinchu. She immigrated to the US in 1980 after graduating from college, and worked as Immigration Consultant/Paralegal for 25+ years. Currently, she is a business owner of JT & TEA (which imports and distributes several varieties of tea). Josephine is also Founder of Taiwan Elite Alliance, a registered nonprofit corporation in California since 2000, Board Director/Cultural Night Committee Chair/Former President (2011 - 2013) of Taiwanese United Fund (TUF), Coordinator for the Annual 2-28 Commemorative Concert, Community participation for LA River Clean Up and other cultural events promoting Taiwanese American culture.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How each guest first heard of or learned about 228
  • How the 228 was a forbidden topic of discussion
  • How my guests and their families were personally impacted by 228
  • The Formosa Incident aka Kaohsiung Incident
  • The White Terror and Martial Law era of Taiwan
  • The writer who was sent to prison because of his Chinese-language translation of a Popeye comic
  • Why the topic of 228 has been so taboo
  • TsuAnn’s grandfather who was a political prisoner during the White Terror era
  • Post-traumatic stress
  • What TsuAnn’s relatives experienced and witnessed about 228
  • Why TsuAnn decided to try to help 228 victims and their families
  • Green Island, the place where political prisoners were exiled
  • The case of a 15-year-old girl who was jailed
  • How political prisoners, after being released were ostracized by society
  • How things banned during the Martial Law era included books, music, art or any medium related to communism or that was critical of the Kuomintang
  • Personal accounts of people persecuted during the Martial Law era
  • The families whose husbands and fathers disappeared due to 228
  • The privileges and overrepresentation granted to the Chinese vs. local Taiwanese under KMT rule
  • The injustices in Taiwan’s society under the initial rule of the Kuomintang
  • Why it’s important to remember and understand 228
  • The importance of healing from historic trauma
  • Canada’s residential schools
  • What TsuAnn discovered about 228 survivors through her work with the Transitional Justice Committee
  • Why Josephine started organizing an annual concert to commemorate 228
  • How 228 became a national holiday in 1998 but has almost been cancelled as a holiday
  • My guests thought on whether or not 228 remains a national holiday
  • Indigenous Peoples Day
  • How to commemorate 228
  • What young people in Taiwan know about 228
  • What was previously taught to Josephine TsuAnn and Wei-Wei about Taiwan in their textbooks when they were high school students in Taiwan
  • The Jing Mei Prison Museum in Taipei
  • Music that was banned during the White Terror era
  • Experiential ways ro learn about 228

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/the-228-massacre-taboos-scars-stigmas-and-an-essential-lesson-in-taiwan-history-ep-171/

Feb 22, 2022
Ep 170 | David Kilgour Author and Human Rights Advocate: Why 2022 is the China Genocide Olympics
52:28
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:   David Kilgour recently wrote an article that appeared in the Ottawa Citizen, Winter Olympics — here’s why we’re calling them the China Genocide Olympics.

 

For nearly 20 years, he has been outspoken about the human rights abuses and organ trafficking in China. When he and David Matas were asked in 2006 to investigate allegations that the organs of Falun Gong practitioners were being harvested, the disturbing truth was revealed. Following the investigation, Kilgour and Matas co-wrote, Bloody Harvest-The Killing of Falun Gong for their Organs.

 

Mr. Kilgour is a former Member of Canada’s Parliament, having served in the House of Commons for nearly 27 years, Secretary of State for Latin America & Africa from 1997-2002, and Secretary of State for Asia-Pacific from 2002-2003. Prior to his political career he was a prosecutor.

 

In this interview Mr. Kilgour reflected on his career in politics and as a prosecutor, and shared his thoughts on Taiwan.

 

This episode of Talking Taiwan has been sponsored by the Taiwan Elite Alliance 優社

 which was established in 2000 to promote Taiwanese and Taiwanese American arts and literature, and to protect and enhance the human rights, freedom and democracy of the people in Taiwan.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Why he’s calling the 2022 Winter Olympic Games the Genocide Games
  • The protest held in Ottawa of the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing
  • How he became aware of persecution of the Falun Gong and the harvesting of their organs for involuntary transplants
  • The International Coalition to Investigate the Persecution of the Falun Gong approached David Kilgour and David Matas about looking into the allegations of organ harvesting of Falun Gong practitioners
  • The book that he wrote with David Matas, Bloody Harvest
  • Ethan Gutmann who also wrote a book about organ harvesting in China
  • The update on organ harvesting done by David Kilgour, David Matas and Ethan Gutmann
  • The China Tribunal in London chaired by Sir Geoffrey Nice
  • The Uyghur Tribunal
  • How there are 9-10 countries that have banned organ tourism
  • Mr. Kilgour’s efforts to lobby the Canadian Parliament to enact legislation against organ trafficking
  • Accounts from doctors who performed surgeries for involuntary organ transplants
  • How Uyghurs have been persecuted in China
  • The persecution of Falun Gong practitioners in China
  • How Mr. Kilgour is a voluntary advisor to two Uyghur organizations
  • Mr. Kilgour’s recollection of his first visit to China
  • His work to get goods produced by slave labor banned internationally
  • How the U.S. has strengthened laws on importing goods produced by slave labor
  • Volkswagen’s plants in Xinjiang with parts being made by forced labor in China
  • The diplomatic boycotts of the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing
  • Why the International Olympic Committee would award the Olympics to Beijing a second time
  • Taiwan’s early response to COVID-19
  • The last time Mr. Kilgour visited China on a trade mission under Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chrétien
  • The Chinese surgeon who removed the cornea of thousands of Falun Gong
  • Who is profiting from the organ harvesting and transplant business in China
  • Comparing the 2022 Olympics in Beijing to the 1936 Olympics in Berlin
  • What the average person can do about the human rights abuses in China
  • What Mr. Kilgour enjoyed about his political career
  • Where his sense of social justice and activism came from
  • Mr. Kilgour’s position as State Secretary of Asia Pacific
  • Taiwan has laws banning organ trafficking
  • Ryszard Paszkowski, a Soviet-trained spy that Mr. Kilgour wrote a book about
  • Mr. Kilgour’s past visits to Taiwan
  • The trucker protests and Freedom Convoy in Ottawa
  • The Taiwanese politicians that he’s met
  • His work with the Ottawa Mission
  • How the National People’s Congress of China has 91 billionaires
  • Billionaire investor Chamath Palihapitiya’s comments about the Uyghurs
  • The hate email that Mr. Kilgour has received
  •  

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/david-kilgour-author-and-human-rightd-advocate-why-2022-is-the-china-genocide-olympics-ep-170/

Feb 16, 2022
Ep 169 | Michael Cannings of Camphor Press Rescues Notable Books About Taiwan and East Asia
01:05:54
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Michael Cannings is the Publisher at Camphor Press, a British-Taiwanese publishing house focused on East Asia, that he co-founded with John Grant Ross and Mark Swofford, in 2014. Profit was not the motive for setting up Camphor Press, but promoting books, especially those about Taiwan was. Michael spoke with me about how they weathered the challenging, early years of Camphor Press, and shared some insights about the publishing industry. Camphor Press has been responsible for rescuing notable books such as Formosa Betrayed and A Pail of Oysters- among the must-read books for those wishing to understand Taiwan.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What brought Michael to Taiwan
  • Michael’s time in Taiwan
  • How Michael met is Camphor Press co-founders
  • What motivated him personally to start Camphor Press and why he saw the need for a publishing company that focused on books about Taiwan
  • How he witnessed the re-election of Chen Shui-bian as President of Taiwan and the Sunflower Movement during the time he lived in Taiwan
  • The Red Shirts Movement after the re-election of Chen Shui-bian in 2006
  • The book that led to the idea to start a publishing company
  • How they choose the name of the publishing company
  • Michael’s co-founders John Grant Ross, Mark Swofford and how they work together
  • Advice on how to work with your friends on a business
  • The initial challenges after setting up Camphor Press in 2014
  • How Michael has been working on Camphor Press full-time since the beginning of the pandemic
  • How the pandemic has affected Camphor Press
  • How Camphor went from publishing e-books to also publishing print books
  • How Camphor Press acquiredEastBridge Books and the rights to several previously out-of-print books about Taiwan including Formosa Betrayed
  • The oldest book in Camphor Press’ catalog
  • How Michael and his co-founders were able to persist with Camphor Press during the most challenging first years
  • Michael’s book recommendations for people interested in learning more about Taiwan
  • Joe Henley’s book Migrante
  • The new Taiwan-related books that Camphor Press will be publishing
  • Discount code: talktw for Talking Taiwan listeners to get 15% off any online purchase from Camphor Press: https://camphorpress.com/
  • Tin Gate, the hybrid publishing company that Michael is starting and how it is different from Camphor Press
  • Michael’s advice for authors wanting to get their books published
  • The changing stigma of self-published books
  • The podcast Formosa Files that John Ross co-hosts with Eryk Michael Smith
  • Mark Swofford’s website: http://pinyin.info/and his work with the Sino-Platonic Papers

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/michael-cannings-of-camphor-press-publisher-rescues-notable-books-about-taiwan-and-east-asia-ep-169/

Feb 08, 2022
Ep 168 | Ramon Ray and Paolo Lising: How to Become a Solopreneur in Taiwan and the U.S.
44:25
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guests on this episode of Talking Taiwan are serial solo entrepreneurs Ramon Ray and Paolo Lising. Ramon has started 5 companies and sold 2 of them. He is the author of Grow Your Solo, a book about how to grow a solo business.

Paolo Lising is founder of MillionDC.com, a learning platform for entrepreneurs from developing countries. He is the author of Startup Taiwan, a comprehensive guide for foreigners and global Taiwanese who wish to start a business in Taiwan. Ramon and Paolo talked about their experiences running a solo business, why they have chosen to be solopreneurs and what it takes to be successful as a solopreneur.

 

 

About Ramon Ray

 

Ramon is a US based serial entrepreneur focused on making the world a better place.

He's started 5 companies and sold 2 of them.

 

Ramon has authored several books, including Grow Your Solo about how to grow a solo business, and Celebrity CEO, all about personal branding.

 

Ramon has testified to the United States Congress, interviewed President Obama, been fired from the United Nations and graduated from the FBI Citizens Academy.

He's never been to Taiwan but hopes to travel there, one day!

 

About Paolo Lising

 

Paolo Lising is founder of MillionDC.com, a learning platform for entrepreneurs from developing countries. Lising is a digital marketing expert with a decade of experience working for listed tech companies and finance firms in Taiwan. He has won awards as a business journalist and book author in the Philippines. He recently published his book Startup Taiwan: Foreigners Business Guide as the first comprehensive and unbiased guide for foreigners and global Taiwanese who wish to start their business in Taiwan. Paolo took his Masters in Business Administration from National Taiwan University with extensive training in strategy consulting under a joint program at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Ramon’s background and current solo business
  • Paolo’s background and current solo business
  • Ramon’s definition of what a solo business is
  • The pros and cons of running a solo business
  • What Ramon and Paolo like about running a solo business
  • How studies show that businesses started by a solo founder are more likely to be successful than a business started by several co-founders
  • What it takes to be a successful and long-lasting solopreneur
  • Advice for people wanting to start a solo business
  • Paolo’s first small business
  • A hundred-thousand-dollar business vs. a million-dollar business
  • What types of business ideas might be better suited for a hundred-thousand-dollar business
  • Taiwan as a place to start a business and do business
  • The challenges of doing business in Taiwan
  • Resources offered by Paolo’s website: www.startupintaiwan.com
  • How Taiwan is focused on building itself as a tech hub
  • Taiwanese culture and customs as they relate to gift giving
  • The importance of “guanxi” when it comes to doing business in Taiwan
  • How Taiwan compares as a place to do business in the world
  • Tips that Paolo has for foreigners wanting to have a business in Taiwan
  • Banking in Taiwan
  • Ramon’s invitation for people to visit www.SmartHustle.com
  • Ramon’s invitation for people to visit www.GrowYourSolo.com
  • The 5 businesses that Ramon has started including the latest one, Zone of Genius
  • And how Ramon sold 2 of his small businesses
  • Flippa, a company that specializes in selling online companies
  • How to create a business that is more saleable

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/ramon-ray-and-paolo-lising-how-to-become-a-solopreneur-in-taiwan-and-the-u-s-ep-168/

Jan 31, 2022
Ep 167 | Charlie Wu of Lunarfest Celebrates the Year of the Tiger
48:09

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This year, the Lunar New Year falls on February 1st and it’s the year of the tiger. For those of you familiar with Lunar New year celebrations, you may recall some of the traditions, which might include: wearing the color red, receiving or giving red envelopes, eating special foods, lion dances and firecrackers

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is not going to talk about any of that. Charlie Wu is the Managing Director of the Asian-Canadian Special Events Association, which organizes Taiwanfest and Lunarfest. The Lunarfest is a twist on celebrating the Lunar New Year, inspired by the Lantern Festival which marks the end of the Lunar New Year celebrations. Charlie talked about how Lunarfest has evolved over the course of a decade and engages with local indigenous communities in Canada.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • Charlie’s background and upbringing in Taiwan
  • Charlie’s experience assimilating to life in the U.S.
  • The differences between Canadians and Americans
  • Why he wrote an article about being Taiwanese Canadian, not Chinese Canadian
  • Why Charlie was named one of the top 100 influential Chinese Canadians in B.C.
  • What happened when a group of Chinese Canadians asked Charlie to support their fight against anti-Asian and anti-Chinese racism at the beginning of the pandemic
  • When Lunarfest started and its connection to the 2010 Winter Olympics hosted by Vancouver
  • How Lunarfest is the only legacy event from the 2010 Winter Olympics that has continued until present day
  • How Lunarfest has evolved over time and been able to sustain for a decade
  • The challenges in changing the perception from Chinese New Year to Lunar New Year
  • This year’s Lunarfest events in B.C.
  • How the Lunarfest is different from most traditional Lunar New Year celebrations
  • How Lunarfest has engaged the local community by inviting participation of indigenous people
  • The artists who have created the lanterns for Lunarfest
  • There will be a celebration planned on February 5thand 6th at the ---art gallery
  • The Lunarfest installation in association with the Taiwanese Canadian Association of Toronto in Markham
  • The endangered Formosa leopard
  • The Lunarfest’s annual arts and crafts programs for 2000 school-aged kids in the Greater Vancouver Area
  • Past Lunarfest programs and how Lunarfest has changed due to COVID
  • How the Panjabi community is participating in Lunarfest Vancouver
  • Cirque de Soleil’s participation on Lunarfest Vancouver
  • Lunarfest lanterns will be on Granville Island for the first time
  • Indigenous artist Susan Point’s participation in Lunarfest Vancouver
  • How you can participate and see photos of Lunarfest online using the hashtags #lunarfest #lanterncity
  • The Lunarfest lanterns have audio descriptions about the artists accompanied by pipa music in the composition, “Woven Melodies”

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/charlie-wu-of-lunarfest-celebrates-the-year-of-the-tiger-ep-167/

 

Jan 24, 2022
Ep 166 | Bilingual Podcast and Discrimination That Overseas Taiwanese Experience in Taiwan: Talking with Cindy Wu
26:44

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

I’m always interested in listening to other podcasts and to learn about Taiwan-related ones. Late last year I heard about the Bilingual aka Bailingguo (百靈果) News Podcast because there was an episode that generated some heated discussion on Forumosa.com, among English-speaking foreigners in Taiwan. Forumosa is an online discussion forum for English-speakers about Taiwan and in full disclosure, they have been a sponsor of Talking Taiwan.

 

I was wondering what all the controversy was about so I spoke to my friend Cindy about it and this led to a discussion about how foreigners are viewed in Taiwan and oddly enough the discrimination that overseas Taiwanese sometimes experience in Taiwan.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • One of the most popular podcasts in Taiwan the 百靈果(Bilingual) News Podcast
  • How an episode of the 百靈果(Bailingguo) News Podcast generated a lot of discussion amongst the English-speaking expat community in an online discussion forum on Forumosa.com
  • What the discussion on Forumosa.com was about
  • If the slang term lao wai (老外) that refers to foreigners in Taiwan is insulting
  • What makes the 百靈果(Bailingguo) News Podcast so controversial
  • How people have compared the style of the hosts of the 百靈果(Bilingual) News Podcast to Joe Rogan and Howard Stern
  • Why the English-speaking expat community on Forumosa.com were upset by the episode
  • People’s opinions of the 百靈果(Bailingguo) News Podcast
  • The discrimination that foreigners experience in Taiwan
  • The discrimination that some overseas Taiwanese experience in Taiwan

 

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/bilingual-podcast-discrimination-that-overseas-taiwanese-experience-in-taiwan-talking-with-cindy-wu-ep-166/

Jan 17, 2022
Ep 165 | Cindy Wu Music Educator in Taiwan Speaks About Her Music Career and Positivity
01:12:21
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

Cindy Wu is an English and Mandarin Chinese bilingual performer, speaker, and music educator based in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. She loves and enjoys all aspects of life, travel, and culture. I met Cindy years ago when I lived in Kaohsiung. I’ve invited her on to Talking Taiwan to speak about her music career and how she’s dealt with the setbacks and challenges that she’s faced along the way.

When asked about how she’s been able to impact the lives of her students, she responded that it’s her students who have impacted and inspired her with their love support.


Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

• How Cindy and I met in Taiwan
• Cindy’s background and connection to Taiwan
• When she immigrated to the United States
• What brought Cindy back to Kaohsiung, Taiwan in 2005 from the U.S.
• ORIENTED.com and how Felicia organized ORIENTED.com Happy Hours in Kaohsiung
• Where Cindy’s love of music came from
• How Cindy first learned piano by attending Yahama classes
• How the time she spent at Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY affected her
• How Cindy uses music to educate kids
• How Cindy began teaching piano, violin and singing in Taiwan
• How the perception of the Taiwanese language has changed over time
• What Cindy’s done in her music career
• The challenges that Cindy deals with as a vocalist
• The voiceover work that she does
• How Cindy started her first livestream show
• Why she stopped doing her livestream show for a year
• Cindy’s approach to her livestream shows and how she deals with criticism, haters and trolls
• Cindy’s children’s book, Sunny Girl’s Dream World
• Cindy’s approach to teaching junior high and high school students
• The opportunities that Cindy’s livestream show has brought her
• How Cindy works with the Oxford Institute and is on the board the Global Leadership and Learning Association
• How Cindy helps students get a dual high school diploma


Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/cindy-wu-music-educator-in-taiwan-speaks-about-her-music-career-and-positivity-ep-165/

Jan 11, 2022
Ep 164 | Amazin LeThi: Her Journey from Homelessness to World LGBTQ Ambassador
43:08
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Amazin LeThi, a global LGBTQIA+ advocate and one of the first Asian ambassadors for WorldPride at Copenhagen 2021. She reached out to me not long after hearing that Taiwan would be hosing WorldPride 2025.

 

She spoke with me about the challenges she’s faced as an Asian and LGBTQ youth, and how her sports training and deep sense of purpose helped to pull her out of homelessness.

 

About Amazin LeThi:

 

Amazin LêThi was born in Saigon where she was left in an orphanage by her mother. Amazin was bullied constantly as a young child because of her ethnicity and sexuality and it was because of this she went into bodybuilding at the tender age of 6 going onto become a competitive natural bodybuilder in her teens then qualifying as a strength and conditioning coach.

As a young adult, she was homeless for a number of years and it was at this lowest point, contemplating suicide, Amazin realized her passion and love for sport could help her survive.

Gaining physical and mental strength and confidence, from her personal journey of homelessness and against all the odds she has overcome enormous barriers to become one of the most visible and influential leading global rainbow (LGBTQIA+) advocate in the world.

She is also a TV/Film star, entertainment executive and the first Vietnamese internationally published health and fitness author.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Why Amazin travels so much
  • What it means to Amazin personally that WorldPride will be hosted in East Asia for the first time in 2025
  • Her struggles growing up in a predominantly white culture after being adopted from Vietnam
  • What is has been like for her to re-connect with her Asian identity and visit Vietnam
  • How WorldPride 2021 was held in 2 cities, Copanhagen and Malmö
  • It was the first time that WorldPride and Eurogames coincided
  • How many of the WorldPride 2021 events were held virtually
  • How COVID has impacted Amazin personally
  • Amazin’s thought on the prevalence of Asian Hate
  • What advice she has for the WorldPride 2025 Taiwan team
  • How she ended up homeless and what that was like being homeless
  • How she had a mental breakdown as she tried to get out of homelessness
  • Amazin’s struggle with mental health
  • What people can do about homelessness
  • The importance of having a sense of purpose in life
  • How sports have helped her to be more resilient
  • The high percentage of Asian LGBTQ youth that become homeless
  • How Amazin was not able to be “out” in the world of bodybuilding
  • The Amazin LeThi Foundation
  • How 10 states in the United States have banned transgender and nonbinary kids from playing sports
  • The work that Amazin does and how she’s worked with President Obama and President Biden
  • What Amazin is currently working on
  • Amazin’s Olympic ambitions

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/amazin-lethi-her-journey-from-homelessness-to-world-lgbtq-ambassador-ep-164/

 

 

Jan 04, 2022
Ep 163 | Talking Taiwan Award Winner Top 5 of 2021 End of Year Review
17:56

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Now it’s time to announce our Top 5 of 2021 Talking Taiwan episodes.  In doing so we'd like to recognize our wonderful guests, who make what we do possible. 
 
But first, we have some exciting news!
 
On December 21st Talking Taiwan won a Golden Crane Podcast Award. We are so honored to have been recognized for our work and to have been nominated alongside so many other amazing podcasts.

We’ve enjoyed producing new episodes for you every week and it’s been exciting to see our listenership grow. We look forward to breaking new ground in the new year!

 

For links to the top 5 episodes of 2021 check out the Related Links section below.

 

Wishing you a wonderful rest of 2021 and a Happy New Year!

 

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/talking-taiwan-award-winner-top-5-of-2021-end-of-year-review-ep-163/

 

Dec 28, 2021
Ep 162 | Taiwan Hosts WorldPride 2025: Our Conversation with Darien Chen and Amazin LeThi
01:01:55

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In November it was officially announced that Taiwan had been chosen to host WorldPride 2025. The Kaohsiung Pride Team won the bid over Washington D.C. to host World Pride Day. My guest on this episode is Darien Chen, the founder of WorldPride Taiwan 2025.

 

WorldPride 2025 will be first time that a WorldPride will be held in East Asia and this is exciting news indeed! In fact, Amazin LeThi, a global LGBTQIA+ advocate and one of the first Asian ambassadors for WorldPride at Copenhagen 2021 reached out to me not long after hearing the announcement. I invited her to join us in this episode. We’ll have her back on another episode to share her personal story and to talk about her LGBTQIA+ advocacy work.

 

I’d like to congratulate the team that worked so hard to secure the bid for Taiwan to host WorldPride 2025. I know they have a lot pf work ahead of them and we’ll definitely check in on their progress in the future.

 

Darien was previously on episode 82 of Talking Taiwan, talking about how he organized the Taiwan Pride Parade for the World in June of last year when Taiwan one of the safest places to be during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Taiwan Pride Parade for the World in 2020
  • How Kaohsiung Pride is the only pride organization from Taiwan that is a member of InterPride
  • There hasn’t been a previous bid from an Asian city or country to host WorldPride 2025
  • How Asia comprises 60% of the world’s population
  • How Kaohsiung Pride was able to get waivers for 2 of the 13 qualifications to host WorldPride 2025
  • The application process to host WorldPride 2025 which was an 11-month process
  • The naming issue that came up for Taiwan after winning the bid to host WorldPride 2025
  • The parallel between Taiwan’s position in the global arena and the LGBTQIA’s within mainstream society
  • InterPride’s application with the UN for consultative status
  • Why Kaohsiung Pride ended up hosting WorldPride 2025 instead of Taipei or other cities in Taiwan
  • How there are 15 different Pride event held all over Taiwan
  • How events planned for WorldPride 2025 includes Taipei and Kaohsiung, and other parts of Taiwan
  • How WorldPride 2025 will include organizations and events like Taipei Pride which is essentially a protest and Taiwan TransPride hosted by Taiwan Gay Hotline
  • What other cities were bidding to host WorldPride 2025
  • In the end Kaohsiung was competing with Washington D.C. to host WorldPride 2025
  • How June 2025 will be the 50th Anniversary of Pride in Washington D.C.
  • How Taiwan was voted by Muslim women as the safest place
  • Darien’s involvement with Mr. Gay Taiwan and Mr. Gay World
  • What it means to Darien personally that Taiwan is hosting WorldPride 2025
  • How the Kaohsiung Taiwan WorldPride 2025 committee didn’t raise any money to help with the bid
  • Now that gay marriage has been legalized in Taiwan, why is there still a need for Pride events
  • What other WorldPride events Darien has attended
  • What other WorldPride events Amazin has attended
  • The benefit of having virtual events at WorldPride as they did at Copenhagen’s WorldPride 2021
  • The importance of bringing WorldPride to the Asia region
  • How the events being planned for WorldPride 2025 includes a “Taiwanese wedding-style banquet” to raise money for InterPride
  • How a reenactment of the Fire Island Invasion is going to happen during WorldPride 2025 in Kaohsiung
  • Darien and Amazin’s connection to Australia
  • Sydney WorldPride 2023
  • The challenges faced by LGBTQ Asians in Asia vs. in western countries
  • The coming out experience for LGBTQ persons in eastern vs. western societies
  • How the concept of coming out is a very western idea
  • Coming out vs. inviting someone into your story
  • The musical artists that Darien would like to invite to perform at WorldPride 2025
  • How the Taiwan Pride logo was created by a Taiwanese Kaohsiung-based graphic designer Bauer Hung (飽爾)

 

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/taiwan-hosts-worldpride-2025-our-conversation-with-darien-chen-and-amazin-lethi-ep-162/

Dec 20, 2021
Ep 161 | Lee Ming-che Taiwanese Political Prisoner in China: Yibee Huang Speaks Candidly
01:05:29

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:  

To mark the year’s International Human Rights Day, I reached out to Yibee Huang, the CEO of Covenants Watch to talk about Lee Ming-che a Taiwanese activist who has been imprisoned in China since 2017.

 

December 10th is International Human Rights Day. It’s also an important day in Taiwan’s history and a turning point in Taiwan’s transition from authoritarianism to democracy. I’m referring to the Kaohsiung incident, also known as the Formosa Incident which began as a celebration of International Human Rights Day in 1979, but ended with a police crackdown and the arrest of prominent opposition leaders (The Kaohsiung Eight) who were tried in military court and sentenced to terms ranging from 12 year to life imprisonment. For more information about the Kaohsiung Incident visit the Related Links section below.

 

Covenants Watch is an NGO based in Taipei, Taiwan that is committed to promoting human rights and equality for all people. Despite Taiwan not being a member of the United Nations, Covenants Watch ensured that Lee Ming-che’s case was the first from Taiwan that was taken up by a UN special mechanism, namely the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (the WGEID).

 

Yibee talked to me about Lee Ming-che’s case and other Taiwanese who have gone missing or been imprisoned in China.

 

About Covenants Watch:

 

Covenants Watch (CW) is an NGO based in Taipei, Taiwan. It is committed to promoting human rights and equality for all people. Excluded from international society since the 1970s, the Taiwanese government has not been under the supervision of the United Nations system. Under these circumstances, CW strives to introduce a unique treaty review process that can hold the government accountable and ensures its domestic laws, policies and practices are aligned with international human rights standards. In addition to its domestic activities, CW plays an increasing role on the international level by participating in the Special Procedures and the Universal Periodic Review of the UN Human Rights Council.

 

UPDATE: After 5 years, Lee Ming-che has been released from a Chinese prison and returned home to Taiwan. Read the Guardian's interview of Lee Ming-che and his wife Ching-yu, Taiwanese activist Lee Ming-che: ‘I can breathe in the fresh air of freedom,’ by Helen Davidson in Taipei and Chi Hui Lin: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/may/09/taiwanese-activist-lee-ming-che-interview-china-jail-free

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The mission of Covenants Watch and Lee Ming-che’s connection to the organization
  • Lee Ming-che’s early life and background
  • How Ming-che’s political views changed and developed into a sense of Taiwanese identity
  • While in college Ming-che got involved in student-led social movement and pro-democracy activities organized by pro-DPP (Democratic Progressive Party) students, and met his future wife Ching-yu
  • The NGOs and organizations that Ming-che has worked with
  • His involvement with the DPP and Taiwan independence movement
  • What is known about the circumstances of his arrest
  • What Ming-che was doing in China, when he went missing on March 19, 2017
  • The March 24th press conference that Lee Ching-Yu (Lee Ming-che’s wife) and human rights groups organized to call upon the Chinese government to explain what happened to Ming-che
  • The timeline of when Chinese authorities first responded, admitted that Ming-che was under arrest, the date of Ming-che’s trial and sentencing
  • How Lee Ching-yu’s travel documents (Tai bao zheng/台胞證) were nullified when she tried to make plans to travel to Beijing in April 2017 to confront the Chinese government about what has happened to Ming-che
  • Why Ching-yu tattooed the words “Lee Ming-Che, I am proud of you” on her forearms
  • Ming-che’s confession which was revealed at his trial
  • Cases of human rights activists and lawyers who were tortured
  • Swedish NGO worker Peter Dahlin’s forced confession
  • How Ching-yu needs apply for special consent from the Chinese authorities each time she would like to travel to China
  • What a Tai bao zheng (台胞證) is
  • How Covenant Watch appealed to the UN’s Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (WGEID) for help with Lee Ming-che’s case
  • What is the UN’s Universal Periodic Review
  • Why Ming-che’s was transferred from Chishan Prison in Hunan to Yancheng Prison in Hebei in late 2018 and what happened to him as a result
  • How the Chinese government has imposed an additional penalty of two years of deprivation of political rights on Lee Ming-che, which may be imposed at the end of his sentence in April 2022
  • How Ming-che has been treated in prison
  • Ching-yu last saw Ming-che in January 2020
  • The Write a Letter or Postcard to Ming-che campaign that was started on Ming-che’s first birthday after being imprisoned in China
  • The different campaigns that have been organized for Ming-che
  • The purpose behind letters and postcards written for Ming-che
  • The UN Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners (aka The Nelson Mandela Rules)
  • Public support for Lee Ming-che in Taiwan
  • How Lee Ming-che was not able to attend his father’s funeral
  • What support Lee Ming-che has gotten from Taiwan’s government or President Tsai Ing-wen
  • The case of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo
  • The national security legislation that was passed by China’s National People’s Congress in June 2020, criminalizes sedition in Hong Kong
  • The Safeguard Defenders report stating that 600 overseas Taiwanese have been extradited to China

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/lee-ming-che-taiwanese-political-prisoner-in-china-yibbie-huang-speaks-candidly-ep-161/

Dec 14, 2021
Ep 160 | Dr. Bo-Chheng Lin Taiwan's Semiconductor Industry and the Current Chip Shortage
01:06:31
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

When you think about things made in Taiwan what comes to mind? Barbie dolls, textiles, plastics, toys, bicycles, or maybe these days its boba, bubble tea, or semiconductor chips?

 

What’s made Taiwan the leader in the semiconductor industry, what is its competitive advantage, how can it maintain it going forward?

 

The story of how Taiwan’s semiconductor industry was developed is really quite interesting if you consider that Taiwan was previously an agriculturally-based economy and had no expertise in hi-tech.

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Dr. Bo-Chheng Lin, who has a PhD in solid state physics, and worked on semiconductors at AT&T Bell Laboratories. He is currently retired, and is one of founders of Living Well New Jersey, a group for retired Taiwanese Americans. This organization has been around for 10 years and I’m grateful for their support of Talking Taiwan.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • How Taiwan’s semiconductor industry was set up
  • How Taiwan went from an agricultural-based economy to the leader of the global semiconductor industry
  • Taiwan’s first industrial parks
  • The establishment of TSMC (Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Limited)
  • The role of Philips, a Dutch multinational corporation and RCA, an American electronics company in the development of Taiwan’s semiconductor industry
  • How Tsing-Hua University and the Chiat-Tung University are the leading universities in the IC (integrated circuit) industry
  • The establishment of UMC (United Microelectronics Corporation) and TSMC
  • Moore’s Law, the observation that the number of transistors on a microchip doubles about every two years, producing twice the processing power at half the cost
  • The impact on the world’s commerce that would result if Taiwan’s semiconductor manufacturing capacity got disrupted
  • The current semiconductor chip shortage
  • How the semiconductor industry is a cyclical business
  • The impact of COVID-19 on the semiconductor industry
  • How Taiwan’s business model for the semiconductor industry compares to Korea’s
  • The situation between TSMC and Huawei, that resulted due to the U.S.’s concerns over safeguarding its intellectual property from China, and the impact this has on China’s 5G
  • Huawei is TSMC’s second largest customer
  • TSMC’s plans to build a factory in Arizona
  • The IoT industry and what is IoT (Internet of Things)
  • If Apple and other companies start producing their own semiconductor chips what would that mean for the semiconductor industry and Taiwan?
  • What it will take for Taiwan to maintain its competitive advantage in the semiconductor industry
  • How the transistor was invented at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ
  • How Taiwan’s government should encourage engineers from foreign countries to work in Taiwan’s semiconductor industry
  • The Gold Card program
  • How the construction needs of TSMC has influenced the construction of  housing in Taiwan
  • What the next 10-15 years looks like for Taiwan and what other industries it might consider
  • The China 2025 project

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/dr-bo-chheng-lin-taiwans-semiconductor-industry-and-the-current-chip-shortage-ep-160/

 

Dec 07, 2021
Ep 159 | Tim Chng Documents the Overseas Taiwan Independence Movement on Wikipedia
01:03:13
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Tim Chng is one of the founders of ITASA (Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association), and we’ve known each other since those college days. He is currently documenting the overseas Taiwan Independence Movement on Wikipedia.

 

I thought I’d invite him onto Talking Taiwan to talk about some of the media attention that Taiwan’s been getting lately, and the project he’s started to document the contributions of WUFI (World United Formosans for Independence) and overseas Taiwanese to the fight for Taiwan’s freedom and democracy.

 

After a non-Taiwanese friend of mine texted me asking about who Enes Kanter was and why he was speaking up about Taiwan, I realized that it would be a good idea to do an episode about this and other celebrities who have shed light on Taiwan- for good and bad.

 

Enes Kanter, a basketball player for the NBA’s Boston Celtics, has called for boycotting the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics and caused quite a stir by tweeting and speaking out about Taiwan being a free and democratic country, and not a part of China. Twitter was all abuzz over this.

 

I had seen Tim weighing in on the Twitter discussion about Enes, so I thought it would be fun to invite him on to Talking Taiwan to share his thoughts on all of this.

 

I knew that we’d have an interesting conversation. We talked about Enes, John Oliver, John Cena and even Peng Shui, the Chinese women’s tennis player whose safety and whereabouts have been in question ever since her post on a Chinese social media platform (Weibo) about being sexually assaulted by a retired Chinese Communist party leader was deleted.

 

Tim also talked about what motivated him to start documenting the Taiwan independence movement on Wikipedia, and how in a broader sense it is about recognizing the role of Taiwan’s diaspora in the fight for Taiwan’s freedom and democracy during the White Terror era.

 

If you’re interested in helping Tim with this project you can do so simply by creating a login on Wikipedia, which as Tim said is really quite easy to do, and you can start editing and adding to the Wikipedia pages about WUFI or the Taiwan independence movement.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The background of Enes Kanter NBA’s Celtics team, has spoken up for Taiwan
  • How Enes Kanter and his family has been blacklisted by the Turkish government
  • How Enes’ father went to prison for speaking up against Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan
  • Taiwan’s blacklist
  • Comparing the struggles and conflict that the Uyghers, and people of Hong Kong, Tibet and Taiwan’s have with China
  • Badiucao, the artist who created the art and designs for Enes Kanter’s sneakers that called for a boycott of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics and the Stand With Taiwan sneakers
  • The perception that Taiwan’s democracy was a direct result of Chiang Ching-kuo lifting martial law in Taiwan
  • How the father (Dr. Kang-lu Wang) of one of ITASA’s founders (Alvin Wang) was assassinated by the Kuomintang (KMT)
  • What led Tim to start his project to document the Taiwan independence movement, especially the resistance movement amongst overseas Taiwanese
  • How the resistance movement of overseas Taiwanese in the 1950s-1980s is not taught in history books and hasn’t been well documented
  • Documenting WUFI (World United Formosans for Independence) on Wikipedia
  • How difficult it was to get media coverage on Taiwan in the 1950s-1980s
  • How New Bloom was contacted and consulted by John Oliver’s team for his segment about Taiwan
  • How Taiwan needs allies and support as it stands up to China
  • What is problematic about what Enes Kanter is saying about China
  • Tsai Ing-wen’s public statement thanking Enes Kanter for his support
  • Whether or not the U.S. really cares about Taiwan’s self-determination or freedom
  • The KMT’s network of overseas student spies during the martial law era
  • How organizers of the first ITASA conference at Yale University received an anonymous intimidating letter
  • How no one from Yale University was able to attend the Love Boat program in the year following the Yale ITASA conference
  • How Tim and his family were blacklisted and not allowed to return to Taiwan
  • What inspired many WUFI members and overseas Taiwan independence activists to stand up for Taiwan and to attempt to free Taiwan from authoritarian rule
  • How Peter Huang who attempted to assassinate Chiang Ching-kuo was a WUFI member
  • How many overseas Taiwanese students were inspired by the Cuban revolution
  • How within WUFI there were members who were KMT spies
  • The founding of WUFI in 1971 and how it united organizations in Japan, Europe, the United States, and Canada
  • How WUFI members were responsible much of the U.S. media coverage on Taiwan
  • The Taiwanese American Association of America (TAA), the grassroots arm of WUFI
  • Fundraising efforts for the Taiwanese political drama Island Nation 2
  • What motivated Chiang Ching-kuo to lift martial law in Taiwan
  • Tim’s criticism of John Oliver’s segment on Taiwan
  • John Oliver’s criticism of John Cena, the pro wrestler and actor who apologized to China after calling Taiwan a country
  • What happened to Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai and what may have motivated her to speak about how she was sexually assaulted by Zhang Gaoli, a former high-ranking government official and member of the Chinese Communist Party
  • The support that Peng Shuai has gotten from other professional tennis players
  • The Women’s Tennis Association’s (WTA) reaction to Peng Shuai’s statement about being sexually assaulted and her subsequent disappearance
  • The pressure by the WTA and countries like Finland to cancel on the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics
  • Myanmar and the Free Burma movement
  • China's Belt and Road Initiative
  • Lithuania’s support of Taiwan
  • Tim’s call for others to help contribute his Wikipedia project documenting the contributions of overseas Taiwanese (from all over the globe) to Taiwan’s democratization and independence movement
  • WUFI’s 2021 paper calendar commemorating WUFI’s 50thanniversary
  • How Professor Chen Wen-chen was part of the WUFI network
  • The Taiwan History Facebook group
  • The importance of documenting the stories of Taiwan’s diaspora who fought for Taiwan’s freedom and democracy

 

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/tim-chng-documents-the-overseas-taiwan-independence-movement-on-wikipedia-ep-159/

Dec 01, 2021
Ep 158 | Esther Chen Tries her Fortune at Standup Comedy in Taiwan and the U.S.
01:08:28
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Esther Chen is a Taiwanese American actress and comedian. We spoke about how

she got into doing standup comedy, worked with Jerry Seinfeld, and ended up back in Taiwan during the pandemic. Esther shared how she’s had to adjust her standup comedy material to suit the different tastes of audiences in Taiwan, other parts of Asia, and the U.S.

 

While in Taiwan Esther started doing standup comedy more regularly and got recognized by fans. She also talked about the very Taiwanese experiences of going to see a fortune teller for advice about her career in acting and comedy, and the criticism that she and her family have received from Taiwanese discussion forums in response to her comedy.

 

**A quick note to listeners about the audio quality of this episode. There were some issues with the first 8-9 minutes of this interview. We tried our best to improve them so please bear with us and know that the issues resolve at around the 10 minute mark.**

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • How she got interested in doing standup comedy
  • What it was like for her to work with Jerry Seinfeld
  • How she comes up with material for her standup comedy
  • Why she moved back to Taiwan during the pandemic and what she did while she was there
  • Her Chinese Mandarin language podcast 好戲開場: It's Showtime!
  • How humor in English is different than humor in Mandarin Chinese
  • How she had to adjust her standup comedy for audiences in Taiwan vs. New York
  • How her jokes about China were received outside of Taiwan i.e. Malaysia
  • How she hears Taiwan-related news from Ken and Kylie, the hosts of the 百靈果New Podcast 
  • How she hears Taiwan-related news from Ken and Kylie, the hosts of the 百靈果New Podcast (aka, K.K. Show)
  • The segment that John Oliver did on his HBO show, Last Week Tonight about Taiwan
  • Enes Kanter’s tweet boycotting the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics and the Freedom Shoes with the words “No Beijing 2022” “Move the Games” “No Rights No Games” on them
  • How moving back to Taiwan during the pandemic pushed Esther to try new things with her standup comedy
  • How working in Taiwan compares with working in New York or the U.S.
  • When she’s going to be performing standup in New York
  • How she handles stress and anxiety
  • The criticism Esther and her family has received from Taiwanese discussion forums in response to her comedy
  • How her parents have reacted to her work as an actress and comedian
  • What happened when Esther went to see a fortune teller and asked if she should continue with a career in acting and comedy
  • What advice Esther has for anyone thinking of doing standup comedy
  • The standup comedy bit that Esther did about the Atlanta Spa Shootings

 

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/esther-chen-tries-her-fortune-at-standup-comedy-in-taiwan-and-the-u-s-ep-158/

Nov 23, 2021
Ep 157 | DJ Kaku Trailblazes NFTs in Asia
01:19:04
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Earlier this year there was a lot of buzz about this thing called NFTs. These days you know that something’s definitely gone more mainstream when it’s talked about on The Ellen Show and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah.

 

What are NFTs, these non-fungible tokens? I was curious about the whole thing myself which is why I’ve asked Kaku, a Taiwan-based DJ to be my guest on this podcast. He’s a trailblazer in the NFT space, the first influencer not only from Taiwan but from Asia, to get into the NFT market.

 

I did some research in advance, to prepare for this interview as I do when dealing with a topic that I’m less familiar with. But as you’ll hear in the interview, I was learning all about NFTs as Kaku spoke to me. After the interview I did some further research, and re-listened to this interview as part of the editing process. That’s when I noticed that each time I listened to the interview, I picked up on something new.

 

If you’re really interested in learning more about NFTs, I encourage you to listen to this episode more than once to really understand what’s being discussed. Also check out the links to resources and articles that I’ve included in the Talking Taiwan show notes for this episode. And Kaku gives some great advice on how to understand what NFTs are.

 

One last thing, NFTs present an exciting opportunity but they are still in uncharted territory. Ultimately, it is your responsibility to safeguard your own assets, to do your research, and to protect yourself.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Kaku’s upbringing and connection to Taiwan
  • How he started DJing
  • How he made DJing a career
  • What he was doing before becoming a DJ
  • How his style is different from other DJs in Asia
  • His early interest in music
  • His early musical interests and influences
  • What it’s like being a professional DJ
  • The challenges of being an Asian in the entertainment industry
  • How the pandemic has affected him
  • How Kaku was initially known for making the genre of music called Jersey Club
  • A clip of the Jersey Club genre that Kaku is known for
  • The track PASS OUT by Nitti Gritti & Gaeko (개코) & Kaku
  • An exclusive preview of the new track BLINK by Kaku and Freekill featuring Elle Vee (due to be released in December)
  • How Kaku is the first DJ in Asia who’s gotten into the NFT space
  • Origin Protocol
  • Audius
  • 3lau (pronounced: boo-lao), the number one DJ in crypto and NFTs
  • What is an NFT
  • The different ways that NFTs can be used
  • The challenges of protecting your intellectual property in the NFT space
  • How Kaku got interested in NFTs
  • What is blockchain technology?
  • Counterfeit NFTs
  • How NFT lingo is similar to sneaker culture
  • Kaku’s first NFT and how it was related to the (RED) Foundation
  • Kaku’s collaboration with an artist named Jonni Tsayto create his first NFTs to raise money for (RED)
  • Kaku’s NFT collaboration with Jonni for the Inspiration4 NFT auction for SpaceX benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
  • How the Inspiration4 NFT auction raised about 200,00 for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
  • How NFTs can be utilized to raise money for charity
  • How Kaku created NFTs and collaborated with Jonni
  • The events, promotion and education related to Kaku’s first NFT drop
  • NFT projects that Kaku is promoting and working on
  • Kaku’s plans for a future merch drop that’s connected to NFTs
  • How NFT’s are used by musicians
  • 0N1 Force the first anime-based NFT
  • Ethereals art is hand-drawn by artist Jimmy Danko
  • Purchasing NFTs
  • How the profile picture NFT market works
  • Profile picture based NFTs (aka PFP NFTs)
  • When PFP NFTs are minted, it’s like a random raffle and comparable to opening a pack of Pokémon cards
  • How social media has become an asset
  • Bored Ape Yacht Club NFTs
  • The opportunity that NFTs presents for digital artists
  • Protecting your access to NFTs and cryptocurrency
  • Whether or not creators who intend to sell their NFTs need to already had a large following in order to be successful
  • Kaku’s advice to join an NFT community on Discord to learn about NFTs
  • How artists can make money with NFTs
  • The environmental impact of NFTs
  • Kaku’s advice for people who want to create NFTs
  • What Kaku learned from his first NFT drop

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/dj-kaku-trailblazes-nfts-in-asia-ep-157/

Nov 14, 2021
Ep 156 | Remembering Su Beng Taiwanese Revolutionary with Jiho Chang
55:51

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

November 9th would be the 103rd the birthday of the late revolutionary, Taiwan independence activist, and historian Su Beng (史明), who passed away on September 20, 2019. I’ve been working on his English-language biography and I wanted to remember him on this day.

 

In this episode of Talking Taiwan, I spoke with Jiho Chang one of the co-authors of The Oral History of Su Beng (史明口述史), a three-volume book that he and others collaborated on while attending the National Taiwan University. In addition to talking about Su Beng’s legacy, Jiho shared some personal stories about Su Beng, and talked about Su Beng’s role in the Sunflower Movement.

 

At the end of the episode, I share some of my fondest memories of Su Beng.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The public funeral/memorial that was organized for Su Beng on October
  • Su Beng’s lifelong commitment to the cause of Taiwan’s independence
  • The noodle shop that Su Beng opened in 1950s in Ikebukuro, Japan
  • The underground and afterhours activities that happened at the noodle shop
  • The third and fourth floors of the noodle shop is being converted into a museum
  • How Su Beng’s residence in New Taipei has been converted into a museum
  • Su Beng’s connection to Taiwan’s current president Tsai Ing-wen
  • How Jiho first heard of and met Su Beng
  • The 1996 Taiwan Strait Crisis
  • The English language version of Su Beng’s book, Taiwan’s 400 Year History The Chinese language version of Su Beng’s book, 台彎人四百年史(The Taiwanese People’s 400 Years of History)
  • China’s Anti-secession Law
  • Su Beng’s sit-in to protest China’s Anti-secession Law in 2005
  • How Jiho joined Su Beng’s protest of China’s Anti-secession Law and got to know Su Beng
  • The parallels and comparison between Su Beng and Che Guevara
  • How Jiho, Lán Shì-bó / Nâ Sū-phok (藍士博) and others National Taiwan University students started interviewing Su Beng and wrote a three-volume book, The Oral History of Su Beng(史明口述史)
  • Su Beng’s hospitalization for kidney failure in Japan in 2009
  • Su Beng’s life in Japan as a student at Waseda University
  • Su Beng’s family background
  • Su Beng’s Japanese girlfriend/partner who he met while in China
  • Su Beng’s love of Kentucky Fried Chicken
  • Su Beng’s special relationship with his maternal grandmother
  • Su Beng’s role in the 2014 Sunflower movement

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/remembering-su-beng-taiwanese-revolutionary-with-jiho-chang-ep-156/

Nov 08, 2021
Ep 155 | Ed Lin: Ghost Month in Taiwan
18:47

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

We thought it would be a good time to re-share this past episode about the Ghost Month in Taiwan. It’s November first, the day after Halloween, October 31st which is actually short for all Saints’ Eve, and November first is All Saints’ Day, a Christian feast dedicated to celebrating departed saints. When you really get into it there are many festivals around the world that center around celebrating or commemorating dead spirits, souls, and ghosts.

 

In Taiwan the Ghost Month happens during the seventh month of the Lunar calendar, which was not that long ago. Actually, this year it was in August. This week’s episode features an interview that I did in 2014 with author Ed Lin about his novel, Ghost Month.  

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • What the Ghost Month is and how it relates to Ed’s book by the same title
  • The superstitions related to the Ghost Month
  • Ed’s novel the Ghost Month
  • The research that Ed did for his novel
  • Ed’s source in organized crime
  • Ed’s interest in the murder mystery genre
  • How Ed has been inspired by mystery book author Chester Himes
  • Ed’s character Robert Chow, a Chinese American detective who is featured in a number of his mystery novels
  • Ed’s writing process
  • How Ed immersed himself in the time period when he was writing about Chinatown in 1976
  • Why Ed chose to write about Chinatown in 1976
  • Ed’s advice for aspiring authors
  • Ed’s book tour for Ghost Month

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/ed-lin-ghost-month-in-taiwan-ep-155/

Nov 01, 2021
Ep 154 | Ming Chiang: Hello Taiwan Brings Greater Recognition to Taiwan's Name and Identity
28:30
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Ming Chiang, the president of Hello Taiwan. We talked about how Hello Taiwan got started, its charitable contributions and events, its connection to the annual Passport to Taiwan event in New York, what its mission is, how it creates greater recognition of Taiwan, and the unexpected PR generated for Hello Taiwan when Bi-khim Hsiao, Taiwan’s Representative to the United States was seen wearing a Hello Taiwan mask at the airport.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Ming’s background and connection to Taiwan
  • What Ming was doing before he became the president of Hello Taiwan
  • How Ming was previously the president of the Taiwan New York Taiwan Chamber of Commerce
  • Ming’s business ventures
  • The Taiwanese American organizations that Ming has worked with
  • When Hello Taiwan was established and its mission
  • Hello Taiwan concerts and its connection to Passport to Taiwan
  • The Hello Taiwan logo
  • Events organized by Hello Taiwan
  • Hello Taiwan’s partnership with the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce
  • Hello Taiwan Day with the LA Dodgers
  • How Hello Taiwan donated new dragon boats to the Rhode Island Taiwan Heritage Day for the dragon boat races
  • Sponsorship of Taiwanese Waves
  • Taiwan Mets Day
  • Hello Taiwan events and ambassadors around the world
  • How someone can become a Hello Taiwan ambassador
  • The celebrities and influential people that Ming has met
  • Hello Taiwan merchandise
  • The unexpected PR generated for Hello Taiwan when Bi-khim Hsiao, Taiwan’s Representative to the United States was seen wearing a Hello Taiwan mask at the airport
  • The confusion caused by the Republic of China (ROC) and labels such as the Chinese Professional Baseball League, Chinese Taipei in the Olympics, Taipei Economic Cultural Representative Office

 

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/ming-chiang-hello-taiwan-brings-greater-recognition-to-taiwans-name-and-identity-ep-154/

Oct 26, 2021
Ep 153 | Hsinyi Lin Fights to Abolish the Death Penalty in Taiwan Part 2
46:58

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This week’s episode of Talking Taiwan continues with the second half of my conversation with Hsinyi Lin, the Executive Director of the Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty. We continued our conversation by talking about what the public opinion in Taiwan on the death penalty is, the types of surveys that are typically done to gauge public opinion, and the survey of public opinion about the death penalty that TAEDP and the Academia Sinica worked on in 2013-2014.

 

Other topics discussed included a deeper discussion of the alliance’s work which includes educating the public and improving understanding about the death penalty, the two covenants adopted as domestic law in Taiwan, that reflect an intent to gradually abolish the death penalty in Taiwan, and the government of Taiwan’s general handling of the death penalty.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How surveys on the public opinion about the death penalty in Taiwan are done
  • The 2013-2014 survey of public opinion about the death penalty that Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty (TAEDP) worked on with the Academia Sinica
  • What has changed with TAEDP since it was established in 2003
  • How TAEDP works to educate society about abolishing the death penalty
  • The origins of the death penalty in Taiwan
  • Whether or not death penalty effectively deters crime
  • Why the death penalty was not abolished after the by DPP President Chen Shui-bian’s announcement that it would be abolished in 3 years
  • The policy that was introduced in writing in 2005, by the government of Taiwan that the death penalty would gradually be abolished
  • The de facto 2006 moratorium that was put in place until 2009
  • The execution in 2010 was carried out under President Ma Ying-jeou
  • What is the ICCPR, and ICESCR
  • The implementation law on the Two Covenants (ICCPR & ICESCR) that was passed in Taiwan in 2019, making the Two Covenants domestic law in Taiwan
  • How article 6 of the ICCPR states that there should not be any delay to prevent the abolition of capital punishment
  • How executions are done in Taiwan and the problems with the execution process
  • How TAEDP is trying to change the execution process in Taiwan
  • How to deal with the opinions, rights and wishes of victims’ families
  • How TAEDP interacts with victims’ families
  • How TAEDP works to educate or create awareness about the death penalty by organizing film festivals
  • What is the public opinion and surveys in Taiwan on the death penalty
  • The results of a 2013-2014 survey on death penalty conducted by the Academia Sinica
  • How TAEDP works with schools to educate students about the death penalty
  • TAEDP’s book for children that teaches them about punishment and the judicial system
  • The most recent executions that happened in 2018 and 2020
  • Why there is no moratorium currently in place
  • Whether or not citizens in Taiwan take the death penalty issue into consideration when voting
  • TAEDP’s work with international organizations and how this impact’s Taiwan
  • What TAEDP has learned from working with international organizations
  • How to handle cases like Lee Ming-Che, who was incarcerated in China
  • Here’s the corrected text “Lee Ming-Che” was accidentally repeated twice
  • Hsinyi’s involvement with the Free Tibet movement and how she had a chance to ask the Dali Lama for his thoughts on the death penalty
  • President Tsai Ing-wen’s stance on and handling of the death penalty issue
  • The case of Chiou Ho-shun (邱和順) and the TAEDP’s request of President Tsai to grant him amnesty
  • How supportive has the government been of TAEDP’s work
  • What’s been accomplished in the nearly 20 years of TAEDP’s existence
  • TAEDP’s members and supporters
  • How people can learn more and work with TAEDP

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/hsinyi-lin-fights-to-abolish-the-death-penalty-in-taiwan-part-2-ep-153/

Oct 18, 2021
Ep 152 | Hsinyi Lin Fights to Abolish the Death Penalty in Taiwan Part 1
44:24
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Hsinyi Lin, the Executive Director of the Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty. She spoke with me about the movement to abolish the death penalty in Taiwan.

2000 was an exciting year for Taiwan, it was the first time that there was a transition in power from the Kuomintang, and the first time that a Democratic Progressive Party presidential candidate, Chen Shui-bian was elected. That same year President Chen Shui-bian announced that the death penalty would be gradually be abolished. However, in September of 2000 there was an execution.

This is part one of a two-part interview. In next week’s episode, I will get in to a deeper discussion with Hsinyi about the public opinion on the death penalty in Taiwan, why the death penalty has not yet been abolished and the problems with the current death penalty procedure in Taiwan.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Hsinyi got involved in the movement to abolish the death penalty in Taiwan
  • The announcement in 2000 by President Chen Shui-bian (the first Democratic Progressive Party president of Taiwan) that the death penalty would be abolished
  • How Lu Cheng (盧正) a case that was believed to be innocent was executed in September of 2000 after the Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty asked Control Yuan was to review the case
  • This first case proved innocent by the judicial system in Taiwan was the Hsichih Trio (蘇案)
  • Exonerated cases in Taiwan with the year the case started and the year the case was exonerated: Hsichih Trio (蘇案): Su Chieh-ho (蘇建和), Liu Bing-lang (劉秉郎), Chuang Lin-hsun (莊林勳, 1991-2012)

 

Hsu Tzu-chiang (徐自強, 1995-2016), Cheng Hsing-tse (鄭性澤, 2002-2017), Hsieh Chih-hung (謝志宏, 2000,-2020)

  • Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty’s (TAEDP) work on cases believed to be innocent
  • How Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty was formed on December 9, 2003
  • The urgency of the case of Tzu Hsu-chiang (徐自強) who was exonerated in 2016
  • How Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty advocates and deals with all death row inmate cases
  • The NGOs that Taiwan Alliance to End the Death Penalty works with

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/hsinyi-lin-fights-to-abolish-the-death-penalty-in-taiwan-part-1-ep-152/

Oct 13, 2021
Ep 151 | Christina Hu Talks About Documentary Filmmaking and her Blacklist Short Film Series
42:20

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

I recently interviewed Christina Hu, the Director of the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign about the Pew Research report on Asian communities which misrepresented the Taiwanese. For months Christina and the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign team worked with Pew Research to get an official response issued. After several months of communications, Pew reissued the report in question on September 8 with the categories of “Chinese, with Taiwanese,” “Taiwanese,” and “Chinese, except Taiwanese.” When I spoke with Christina in episode 148, she briefly mentioned her documentary filmmaking, so I thought now would be a good time to share an interview that I did with her back in 2018.

 

In 2018, I spoke with Christina about her documentary filmmaking. Her films have focused on presenting history through personal perspectives. She talked about her first film and her love of history. Christina’s films about Taiwan have covered topics like the blacklist and the historic ruling by Taiwan’s High Court that has paved the way for the legalization of same sex marriage.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in the podcast:

 

  • How she got started making documentary films
  • Where the term “blacklist” came from
  • The Blacklist Workshop (aka Blacklist Studio)
  • Her Blacklist Film Series
  • What is the blacklist?
  • Her first documentary film, Her Journey
  • The gap year (in 1999) she spent in Germany in between high school and college
  • When she was in third grade in Taiwan and was disciplined at school for saying that her family was from the province of Taiwan instead of Fujian
  • How she observed the Tiananmen Square massacre in Taiwan
  • The films that she has made about Taiwan
  • How her interest in the history of Taiwan has motivated her filmmaking
  • The challenge of telling the story of Taiwan through film
  • Her documentary film about Taiwanese Canadian Columbus Leo

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/christina-hu-talks-about-documentary-filmmaking-and-her-blacklist-short-film-series-ep-151/

 

Oct 04, 2021
Ep 150 | Jane W. Wang Beats Depression and Navigates a Multicultural Hero’s Journey
54:59
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Jane W. Wang is a self-actualization coach based in Taipei, Taiwan. She spoke candidly with me about the challenges she faced in her journey to become a coach, which involved dealing with imposter syndrome and bouts of depression. She’s channeled these personal experiences into creating her Multicultural Hero’s Journey program. We also talked about the field of coaching, what coaching is, and how it differs from counseling and psychotherapy. I interviewed Jane back in July of this year. We’ve spoken since then and Jane is ever evolving. It’ll be interesting to see what future developments we hear from her.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Jane’s connection to Taiwan
  • How being a third culture kid (TCK) has shaped her identity and life purpose
  • Her career path before becoming a coach
  • Why she wanted to become a coach
  • Her personal journey, the struggles and depression that she dealt with along the way before she became a coach
  • Why she decided not to get a degree in counseling from Columbia University and instead got certified in coaching
  • What is coaching and how it differs from counseling or psychotherapy
  • Jane’s own experiences with coaching, being the person being coached by someone else
  • Jane’s advice on how to pick a coach to work with
  • The challenges Jane faced in becoming a coach
  • The depression and imposter syndrome she experienced in the process of becoming a coach
  • How Jane dealt with her self-judgment and learned to love herself
  • How Jane dealt with three bouts of depression
  • What she learned from going through depression
  • How someone can identify whether or not they themselves or someone they know is experiencing depression
  • How Jane created her Multicultural Hero’s Journey coaching program
  • Who would benefit the most by going through the Multicultural Hero’s Journey coaching program
  • Jane’s advice for people who are interested in becoming a coach
  • What it takes to be a good coach

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/jane-wang-battles-depression-and-navigates-a-multicultural-heros-journey-ep-150/

 

 

 

Sep 28, 2021
Ep 149 | Jiho Chang: City Councilman Talks About his Career in Taiwan Politics
47:56

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Keelung City Councilor, Jiho Chang. Jiho spoke with me about his work as a city councilman, and how his interest and involvement in Taiwan’s politics dates back to his time as a university student, and the 1995-1996 Taiwan Strait missile crisis that happened after KMT presidential candidate Lee Teng-hui visited his alma mater Cornell University and before Taiwan’s first direct presidential election in 1996.

Jiho was among the activists who occupied the Legislative Yuan during the Sunflower movement. He's also one of the co-authors of The Oral History of Su Beng (史明口述史), a biography of the late revolutionary and lifelong Taiwan independence activist Su Beng. We’ll have him back on another episode to talk about all that.

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Jiho’s background and upbringing
  • How/why he decided to return to Taiwan after spending 10 years in Canada
  • His study of political science at university in Canada and Taiwan National University
  • The 1995-1996 missile crisis in Taiwan
  • How he was involved with the 2014 Sunflower movement
  • How his first attempt to get elected as a neighborhood warden aka borough warden aka village warden (里長) failed
  • How he previously worked as a speechwriter for presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen
  • How he got elected as Keelung City Councilor in 2018
  • How he got in trouble for posting about his work on as a speechwriter for President Tsai on Facebook
  • What his work as a city councilor involves
  • How Keelung is one of the smallest cities
  • What it took to campaign for the position of city councilor
  • Why he ran as a DPP candidate
  • The Taiwan People Party and New Power Party
  • How long each city councilor position term lasts
  • The Ghost Month in Taiwan
  • What Jiho finds most rewarding about his work as city councilor
  • How Jiho advocated for and helped the widow and family of a man in his constituency to obtain NT$1,000,000 in compensation for his death from his employer of 20 years
  • Jiho’s future political aspirations

 

Related Links:

 

Jiho Chang’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/JihoTiun/

 

Taiwan’s first direct presidential election (1996): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_Taiwanese_presidential_election

 

Taiwan’s cross strait missile crisis of 1995-1996: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Taiwan_Strait_Crisis#:~:text=The%20Third%20Taiwan%20Strait%20Crisis,1995%20to%2023%20March%201996.

 

Lee Teng-hui: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Teng-hui

 

Sunflower Movement: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunflower_Student_Movement

 

President Tsai Ing-wen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/iingwen

 

Tsai Ing-wen: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsai_Ing-wen

 

DPP (Democratic Progressive Party): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Progressive_Party

 

https://www.dpp.org.tw/en/about

 

Taiwan People Party: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan_People%27s_Party

 

New Power Party: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Power_Party

 

KMT (Kuomintang): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuomintang

 

Ghost Month: https://oftaiwan.org/culture/ghost-festival/

 

Taiwan News article, “12 Ghost Month taboos to watch out for in Taiwan”: https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3990308

 

Su Beng: http://aboutsubeng.com/

Sep 20, 2021
Ep 148 | Taiwanese Census Campaign Challenges The Pew Research Report: Our Interview with Christina Hu and Chieh-Ting Yeh
48:13
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In April of this year, reports published by the Pew Research Center analyzing Asian American communities included footnotes stating that data for “  ‘Chinese’ includes those identifying as ‘Taiwanese.’ ” Soon after, in May, the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign published an open letter and petition on TaiwaneseAmerican.org asking Pew Research to issue an apology to the Taiwanese American community, and to re-publish its findings with Taiwanese as a separate category.

 

Upon hearing this, I reached out to Christina Hu, Director of the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign asking to interview her about this. She was working on getting an apology and correction from Pew, so I agreed to wait until she got an official response from Pew to do the interview.

 

For months, the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign team worked on getting a response from Pew Research and by July Christina told me that she was hoping to get an official response.

 

On Wednesday, September 8, 2021 Pew Research reissued their report on Asian American communities which had previously misrepresented the Taiwanese. To be clear it was a correction, not an apology. Data for 2000, 2010 and 2019 included the categories of “Chinese, with Taiwanese,” “Taiwanese,” “Chinese, except Taiwanese” and “Okinawan.”

 

I spoke with Christina Hu, the Director of the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign and Chieh-ting Yeh, the Media Director of the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign about what transpired after the Taiwanese American community’s response to Pew Research’s initial report on Asian communities, and what led to Pew to re-issue their report.

 

We also spoke about the 2020 Write in Taiwanese Campaign and the decades long advocacy work of the Taiwanese American Citizens League (TACL), that started in 1990 to educate the Taiwanese American community to complete the US Census by not only checking the “Other Asian” box, but also writing in “Taiwanese.”

 

 

The Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign Team:

 

 

Christina Hu

 

Director, Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign

 

Director of Civic Engagement, Taiwanese American Citizens League

 

 

Chieh-Ting Yeh

 

Media Director, Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign

 

Editor-in-Chief, Ketagalan Media

 

 

Leona Chen

 

Creative Director, Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign

 

Editor-in-Chief, TaiwaneseAmerican.org

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Christina got involved in the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign
  • How Ting (Chieh-ting) got involved in the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign
  • The background and history of the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign
  • The evolution of the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign since it started in1990
  • Why it’s important to be counted on the U.S. census
  • It wasn’t until 1960 that people could select their own race on the U.S. census
  • Why it is important for Taiwanese Americans to be counted on the U.S. census
  • How the Pew Research Reports which used U.S. census data misrepresented the Taiwanese
  • The Pew Research Report on Asian American communities that included a footnote stating that data for “ ‘Chinese’ includes those identifying as ‘Taiwanese.’ ”
  • The communications that the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign and Christina had with Pew Research and Neil Ruiz, the Associate Director of Race and Ethnicity
  • The open letter and online petition (posted on TaiwaneseAmerican.org) asking Pew Research to issue an apology to the Taiwanese American community, and to re-publish its findings with Taiwanese as a separate category
  • The various groups that signed the online petition and supported the Taiwanese American community’s campaign to ask Pew Research for an apology and correction of their reports that did not include Taiwanese as a separate category
  • How Christina discovered that the Pew Research report had disappeared Okinawans as a separate category
  • What happened in the four months that the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign tried to get an official response from Pew Research
  • The conversations that Christina had with Neil Ruiz about why it was important for her personally, to identify as Taiwanese, and why Pew could say they were confused by self-reported data from the Taiwanese American community that unequivocally indicated that people wanted to be identified as Taiwanese
  • The slogan of the Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign

 

 

Related Links:

 

Key facts about Asian origin groups in the U.S. (from Pew Research): https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/04/29/key-facts-about-asian-origin-groups-in-the-u-s/

 

Response to Pew Research Reports Hiding Taiwanese Identity: “We made it count. Now tell our stories.” (The open letter and online petition that appeared on TaiwaneseAmerican.org): https://www.taiwaneseamerican.org/2021/05/pew-research-center-taiwanese-american-statement/

 

Some of the responses on Twitter to Pew Research Reports Hiding Taiwanese Identity: https://twitter.com/search?q=taiwanese%20census%202020%20pew&src=typed_query&f=top

 

Pew Research reissues report on Asian Americans after misrepresenting Taiwanese Americans: https://www.taiwaneseamerican.org/2021/09/pew-research-reissues-report-on-asian-americans-after-misrepresenting-taiwanese-americans/

 

Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/write.in.taiwanese.census

 

Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/write.in.taiwanese.census/

 

Write in Taiwanese Census Campaign videos on TACL’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/tacitizensleague/videos

 

Taiwanese American Citizens League (TACL): https://tacl.org/

 

TACL Census 2020 “Write in Taiwanese” Campaign: https://tacl.org/census-2020/

 

How many Taiwanese live in the U.S.? It’s not an easy question to answer: https://medium.com/pew-research-center-decoded/how-many-taiwanese-live-in-the-u-s-its-not-an-easy-question-to-answer-315c042839dc

 

Write in "Taiwanese" - US Census 2010 You Tube video: https://youtu.be/mcFLfw73O30

 

The changing categories the U.S. census has used to measure race (from the Pew Research Center): https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/02/25/the-changing-categories-the-u-s-has-used-to-measure-race/

 

Christina Hu’s You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdfvPGT3zqZPP3rfAFAGLdw

 

Ketagalan Media: https://ketagalanmedia.com/

 

Taking Taiwan interview with Ho Chie Tsai the Founder of TaiwaneseAmerican.org: https://talkingtaiwan.com/tt025-ho-chie-tsai/

Sep 15, 2021
Ep 147 | Yao Huang: Entrepreneur and Venture Capitalist Founder of The Hatchery
22:15

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

Happy Labor Day! We’ve decided to take a break ourselves, so we are sharing one of our past episodes that I think really stands the test of time. In 2013 I interviewed entrepreneur Yao Huang. That year, she was involved with the Entrepreneur Challenge and Competition, which was organized by the Taiwanese American Professionals, New York Chapter and the Taiwan Merchants Association. Yao talked about how she went from a career in pharmacy to venture capital, and how she founded The Hatchery to grow Silicon Alley, New York City’s tech community. I think you’ll find that the perspective and advice that she offers in this interview sound and still relevant today.

Yao is the founder of The Hatchery and she’s been named by Forbes one of 11 women at the center of New York’s digital scene. Her entrepreneurship has been written about in Fortune magazine, and various publications.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Yao’s connection to Taiwan
  • Yao’s involvement with the TAP-NY’s (Taiwanese American Professionals, New York chapter) and Taiwan Merchants Association’s Entrepreneur Challenge and Competition (ECC)
  • Yao’s career prior to becoming an entrepreneur
  • How she advised one of the companies competing in the ECC
  • The first company she started
  • How she made the transition from pharmacy in to entrepreneurship and venture capital
  • What is venture capitalism
  • What The Hatchery does
  • How The Hatchery has been integral in growing New York’s tech community
  • The Hatchery’s incubator program
  • Why Yao founded The Hatchery
  • Silicon Valley vs. Silicon Alley
  • What it was like leaving her job in pharmacy to start a company
  • What advice she has for people who want to start a business
  • What she loves the most about what she does
  • Her passion project, Win4Causes
  • What she finds so rewarding about what she does

 

Related Links:

Yao Huang on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/yaohui/

 

The Hatchery website: https://hatchery.vc/

 

The Hatchery’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/thehatchery/

 

The Hatchery on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thehatchery

 

2013 Entrepreneur Challenge and Competition (ECC) organized by the Taiwanese American Professionals, New York Chapter and the Taiwan Merchants Association: https://bit.ly/3DMaVpd

 

Nomz, the company that Yao advised during the ECC: https://www.eatnomz.com/

 

Talking Taiwan Episode 30, TAP-NY’s Entrepreneur Challenge and Competition: https://talkingtaiwan.com/tt026-tapny/

 

Yao Huang’s TED Talk, Talent incubator: Yao Huang at TEDxBroadway: https://youtu.be/qjFR0F_5K4g

 

Yao Huang’s TED Talk, I for Innovation: https://youtu.be/jbjQYQ3IXj8

Sep 06, 2021
Ep 146 | Tiffany Yu: Empowering the Disabled Through Diversability
01:03:21
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Tiffany Yu is a disability activist, CEO and founder of Diversability, and host of Tiffany & Yu, a social impact podcast. She’s also on the San Francisco Mayor’s Disability Council, a three-time TED Talk speaker and has a list of many more impressive accomplishments that appear on her Wikipedia page.

 

She spoke with tremendous vulnerability about her disability origin story, the trauma she’s experienced, dealing with shame, and her continued healing.

 

Tiffany also shared about the many exciting projects she’s working on for Diversability and in the disability space.

 

 

CORRECTION: At x:xx when Tiffany mentioned a TED Tallk “The Danger of a Single Narrative” she was referring to the TED Talk “The Danger of a Single Story.”

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • How Tiffany spearheaded the Taiwan Necklace Project to raise money for ITASA (Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association)
  • Tiffany’s disability origin story
  • How she came up with the idea for her company Diversability in 2009 while a student at Georgetown University
  • The work that Diversability does
  • How Diversability went from a side hustle to something fulltime years later in 2017
  • How Diversability is about improving the lives and well-being of disabled people
  • How can Diversability make disability a reason to belong and not a reason to exclude
  • What happened in 2019 that made Tiffany realize that she was experiencing PTSD and how she dealt with it
  • Tiffany’s thoughts on her first TED Talk
  • What has changed since Tiffany started Diversability
  • How Tiffany was able to get the mayor of San Francisco to declare July Disability Pride Month in 2020
  • How Tiffany has evolved since she first founded Diversability
  • News about Diversability
  • The “Disability is not a bad word” T-shirt campaign
  • The Diversabillity Leadership Collective
  • The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) goal of economic self-sufficiency
  • How Tiffany has launched an endowment fund at Georgetown University for disability-related initiatives
  • The comments that Tiffany’s mom made about Diversability in 2018
  • How Tiffany deals with her mother’s opinion of the work she does with Diversability
  • Tiffany’s podcast Tiffany & Yu, which she started in 2020 during the Coronavirus pandemic
  • Tiffany’s favorite episode of her podcast Tiffany & Yu
  • Laverne Cox’s term “possibility model”
  • The term ableism
  • How Tiffany enjoys making Tik Tok dance videos
  • The accomplishment that Tiffany is most proud of
  • How the Paralympics may be used as a reason not to care about disability
  • The term inspiration porn
  • How paralympican Rebecca Meyers’ request to have a personal care assistant accompany her was denied

 

Related Links:

 

Tiffany Yu’s website: https://www.tiffanyyu.com/

 

Tiffany and Yu podcast: https://www.tiffanyyu.com/podcast

 

Tiffany Yu on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/imtiffanyyu/

 

Tiffany Yu on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/imtiffanyyu

 

Tiffany Yu on Twitter: https://twitter.com/imtiffanyyuv

 

Tiffany Yu on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tiffanyayu/

 

Tiffany Yu on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/tiffanyayu

 

Tiffany Yu on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiffany_Yu

 

Diversability: https://mydiversability.com/

 

Diversability Facebook Group: http://bit.ly/diversabilitycommunity

 

Diversability Leadership Collective: http://diversability.mn.co

 

 

Diversability Facebook page: http://facebook.com/diversability

 

Diversability on Twitter: http://twitter.com/diversability

 

Diversability on Instagram: http://instagram.com/diversability

 

Disability Empowerment Endowment Fund to support disability initiatives in perpetuity at Georgetown University: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1686/18/giving.aspx?sid=1686&gid=4&pgid=3975&cid=5816&dids=534.144&bledit=1&sort=1&unit=34&appealcode=21HW001312

 

The Georgetown Voice article, “Alumna Tiffany Yu looks to cement legacy of disability justice as students push for Disability Cultural Center” about the endowment fund for disability related initiatives at Georgetown University that Tiffany is raising money for:

https://georgetownvoice.com/2021/08/09/alumna-cements-legacy-of-disability-justice-students-push-for-cultural-center/

 

Tiffany’s first TED Talk, The Power of Exclusion: https://www.ted.com/talks/tiffany_yu_the_power_of_exclusion?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare

 

Tiffany’s second TED Talk, The Truths About Being A Pioneer: https://www.ted.com/talks/tiffany_yu_the_truths_about_being_a_pioneer?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare

 

Tiffany’s third TED Talk, The Problem with Positivity: https://www.ted.com/talks/tiffany_yu_the_problem_with_positivity?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare

 

The Danger of a Single Story (TED Talk): https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_ngozi_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare

 

PTSD (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder): https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/ptsd/what-is-ptsd

 

Post-traumatic growth (PTG): https://www.apa.org/monitor/2016/11/growth-trauma

 

Dr. Robert Bullard: https://drrobertbullard.com/

https://www.unep.org/championsofearth/laureates/2020/robert-bullard

 

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): https://adata.org/learn-about-ada

 

Tiffany &Yu Episode 18, Disability Pride, ADA30 & Diversability’s D-30 Disability Impact List ft. Alex Locust (Glamputee): https://www.tiffanyyu.com/podcast/018

 

Laverne Cox Calls Herself a 'Possibility Model' on Katie Couric: https://taggmagazine.com/laverne-cox-on-katie-couric/

 

Laverne Cox On Why She Still Has Something To Prove: https://www.forbes.com/sites/moiraforbes/2016/06/30/laverne-cox-on-why-she-still-has-something-to-prove/?sh=433c972b5638

 

Talila Lewis’ Working Definition of Ableism: https://www.talilalewis.com/blog/january-2021-working-definition-of-ableism

Tiffany &Yu Episode 17, Leadership Lessons from Yoga Journal Racism & Controversy ft. Nicole Cardoza (Anti-Racism Daily): https://www.tiffanyyu.com/podcast/017

Stella Young’s TED Talk, I’m not your inspiration, thank you very much: https://youtu.be/8K9Gg164Bsw

 

Paralympian Rebecca Meyers’ Op Ed in USA Today, “Paralympic swimmer: I don't want to pull out of Tokyo Games, but I've been given no choice”: https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/voices/2021/07/20/paralympic-swimmer-becca-meyers-covid-19-tokyo-olympic-games/8006062002/

 

Paralympian Rebecca Meyers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_Meyers

 

Tiffany and the Taiwan necklace project featured on Outreach for Taiwan (2014): https://oftaiwan.org/2014/11/13/talk4tw-tiffany-yu/

 

Tiffany talks about being Taiwanese, ITASA and the Taiwan necklace project: https://youtu.be/uaZC9fgdRwo

 

Taiwanese American.org:  https://www.taiwaneseamerican.org/

 

ITASA (Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association): https://itasa.org/

 

TACL (Taiwanese American Citizens League): https://tacl.org/

Aug 31, 2021
Ep 145 | The Golden Age of Taiwan Studies: Our Interview with University of London’s Dr. Dafydd Fell
45:08

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This week I’m welcoming back Dr. Dafydd Fell to talk about the SOAS Center of Taiwan Studies at the University of London. They just had their summer school program in July, which is free and open to the public. It’s a tremendous resource for people interested in learning more about Taiwan. The program included speakers on the topics of Taiwan’s anti-nuclear movement, environmental activism and movements, Taiwan’s Post New Wave Cinema, how to write about Taiwan for a general audience, the campaign to end the death penalty in Taiwan, just to name a few. You can check out their YouTube channel which has videos from the summer school program and other SOAS Center of Taiwan Studies events. Dr. Fell and I talked about how Taiwan studies has changed over the past 20 years and some of the challenges faced by Taiwan studies programs in general.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The establishment of the SOAS Taiwan Studies Program at the University of London
  • How there weren’t any other Taiwan Studies programs in Europe when the SOAS Taiwan Studies Program at the University of London was established in 1999
  • SOAS Taiwan Studies program was founded by Professor Robert Ash
  • Establishment of European Association of Taiwan Studies in 2004
  • Taiwan Studies programs in Europe
  • How we are currently in a Golden Age of Taiwan Studies
  • Taiwan studies programs in Europe vs. the U.S.
  • The collaboration between SOAS Taiwan Studies program and the University of Texas at Austin Taiwan Studies program
  • The challenges faced by Taiwan Studies programs
  • How the SOAS Taiwan Studies program’s focuses on Taiwan Studies teaching  programs and publication (of books that come out of conferences)
  • The types of classes and programs offered at the SOAS Taiwan Studies Program
  • Prominent political figures from Taiwan that have been invited to speak at SOAS
  • The second world congress of Taiwan Studies at SOAS (with 80 speakers and 500 in person attendees)
  • How the SOAS Taiwan Studies Program organizes 50-70 events per year
  • How the events present interesting opportunities for students to actually meet some of the figures on their reading lists
  • What graduates of the SOAS Taiwan Studies Program have gone on to do
  • The major research contributions that have some out of SOAS Taiwan Studies Program
  • The challenges of funding Taiwan Studies programs
  • Whether more Taiwan Studies degree programs will be developed worldwide
  • The relationship between Chinese and Taiwanese studies programs
  • The SOAS Taiwan Studies Program Summer School which has been running since 2007

 

Related Links:

 

SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies’ website: http://www.soas.ac.uk/taiwanstudies/

 

SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies’ Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/

 

SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies’ Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwlZZGmE1e_6PI2e-HOPOQw

 

Professor Robert Ash: https://www.soas.ac.uk/staff/staff30582.php

 

European Association of Taiwan Studies: https://www.eats-taiwan.eu/

 

North American Taiwan Studies Association (NATSA): https://www.na-tsa.org/

 

International Journal of Taiwan Studies: https://brill.com/view/journals/ijts/ijts-overview.xml

 

Taiwan Studies program at the University of Texas at Austin: https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/eastasia/asian-studies-at-ut/Taiwan-program.php

 

Brill Series in Taiwan Studies: https://brill.com/view/serial/BSTS

 

Routledge Research on Taiwan Series: https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Research-on-Taiwan-Series/book-series/RRTAIWAN

 

Camphor Press: https://camphorpress.com/

 

Taiwan Studies Revisited, Edited By Dafydd Fell, Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao: https://www.routledge.com/Taiwan-Studies-Revisited/Fell-Hsiao/p/book/9780367201722


Taiwan’s Contemporary Indigenous Peoples, Edited By Chia-yuan Huang, Daniel Davies, Dafydd Fell: https://www.routledge.com/Taiwans-Contemporary-Indigenous-Peoples/Huang-Davies-Fell/p/book/9780367553579

 

Tsai Ing-wen: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsai_Ing-wen

 

Peng Min-Ming: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peng_Ming-min

 

Frank Hsieh: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Hsieh

 

Su Tseng-chang: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Su_Tseng-chang

 

Second World Congress of Taiwan Studies held at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) June 18-20, 2015: https://www.soas.ac.uk/news/newsitem94890.html

 

Reflections on the Second World Congress of Taiwan Studies (held in 2015): https://www.soas.ac.uk/news/newsitem104787.htxml

 

Academia Sinica: https://www.sinica.edu.tw/en

 

Hakka singer Lin Sheng-hsiang: https://www.soas.ac.uk/taiwanstudies/events/07jul2016-music-of-lin-sheng-hsiang.html

 

SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies 2021 Summer School program: https://www.soas.ac.uk/taiwanstudies/summerschool/

 

The Fourth World Congress of Taiwan Studies (2022) in Seattle, Washington, USA: https://wcts.sinica.edu.tw/wctsIV/zWelcome.html

Aug 23, 2021
Ep 144 | Taiwan's Green Parties and Alternative Politics in Taiwan: A Discussion with Author Dr. Dafydd Fell
43:31

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Dr. Dafydd Fell is the author of Taiwan’s Green Parties Alternative Politics in Taiwan. He spoke with me about his book, which he started working on in 2012. Topics covered in this episode include the Green Party concept, and the impact that Taiwan's Green Parties have had on Taiwan's other political parties and social movements. Dr. Fell's not only talks about some of the most his most interesting research findings, but how he was personally impacted by the subject matter of his book.

 

He’s also the Director of the SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies at the University of London and we’ll have him back on another episode to talk about the SOAS Centre of Taiwan Studies.  

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • How Dr. Fell got interested in Taiwan’s politics
  • The Green Party concept and origin
  • Global Greens Network
  • When Taiwan’s Green Party was established
  • Dr. Fell’s bookParty Politics in Taiwan
  • The focus groups with Green Party activists that led Dr. Fell to write Taiwan’s Green Parties
  • How Dr. Fell is working on a Chinese language version of his book, Taiwan’s Green Parties
  • The main accomplishments and impact of Taiwan’s Green Party
  • How Taiwan’s Green Party compares to other Green Parties around the world
  • The role of Taiwan’s Green Party in the anti-nuclear movement in Taiwan
  • How Taiwan’s Green Party was the first party to advocate same sex marriage and nominate openly LGBT candidates
  • How Taiwan’s Green Party raises alternative issues (death penalty, euthanasia for terminally ill)
  • The Taiwan Green Party’s influence on mainstream political parties
  • How the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) has poached figures from the Green party
  • The Taiwan Green Party’s electoral performance
  • Taiwan’s alternative parties
  • The splinter Green Parties, the Trees Party and GPT-Social Democratic Alliance
  • The most surprising or interesting finding that Dr. Fell discovered in his research for his book, Taiwan’s Green Parties
  • How Taiwan could participate in the Green Party’s global network and gain some international visibility
  • The Asia Pacific Greens network
  • Keli Yen, Global Greens Convenor (2017-2020)
  • How England and Wales Green Party Leader Penny Kemp went to Taiwan in 1996 to show support
  • The current status of Taiwan’s Green Party
  • How Dr. Fell’s book offers a different perspective on Taiwan’s history through the lens of small political parties and social movements
  • How Dr. Fell is now working on the Chinese language version of his book, Taiwan’s Green Parties with three Taiwanese scholars who were formerly leaders of Taiwan’s Green Party
  • How Dr. Fell started working on the book, Taiwan’s Green Partiesin 2012

 

 

Related Links:

 

Taiwan’s Green Parties by Dr. Dafydd Fell: https://www.routledge.com/Taiwans-Green-Parties-Alternative-Politics-in-Taiwan/Fell/p/book/9780367650315

 

Dr. Dafydd Fell on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dafyddfell

 

Facebook Page for Taiwan’s Green Parties: https://www.facebook.com/Taiwans-Green-Parties-Alternative-Politics-in-Taiwan-101639718636953

 

Wild Lily Student Movement: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_Lily_student_movement

 

https://oftaiwan.org/social-movements/wild-lily-student-movement/

 

1989 Elections in Taiwan: https://www.nytimes.com/1989/12/03/world/nationalists-lead-taiwan-elections.html

 

Global Greens Network: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Greens

 

Taiwan’s Green Party: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Party_Taiwan

 

 

Taiwan’s first direct presidential election (1996): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_Taiwanese_presidential_election

 

Taiwan’s cross strait missile crisis of 1995-1996: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Taiwan_Strait_Crisis#:~:text=The%20Third%20Taiwan%20Strait%20Crisis,1995%20to%2023%20March%201996.

 

https://www.jstor.org/stable/2626754

 

Party Politics in Taiwan by Dr. Dafydd Fell: https://www.routledge.com/Party-Politics-in-Taiwan-Partay-Change-and-the-Democratic-Evolution-of-Taiwan/Fell/p/book/9780415650700

 

Blocking of Taiwan’s fourth nuclear power plant:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_Taiwan

 

Reuters article, “Taiwan to halt construction of fourth nuclear power plant”:  https://www.reuters.com/article/taiwan-nuclear/taiwan-to-halt-construction-of-fourth-nuclear-power-plant-idUKL3N0NJ08C20140427

 

Keli Yen, Global Greens Convenor (2017-2020): https://www.asiapacificgreens.org/profile/keli-yen

 

England and Wales Green Party Leader Penny Kemp: https://greenworld.org.uk/article/obituary-penny-kemp-1949-2021

 

Democratic Progressive Party (DPP): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Progressive_Party

 

https://www.dpp.org.tw/en/about

 

Ko Wen-je: https://en.xn--wikipeadia-65a.org/wiki/Ko_Wen-je

 

Taiwan’s People Party: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan_People%27s_Party

 

Kuomintang (KMT): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuomintang

Aug 16, 2021
Ep 143 | Auntie Sewing Squad 3: It's Only Retirement It's Not Goodbye
41:49

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

In May of 2020 I interviewed Valerie Soe and Kristina Wong about the Auntie Sewing Squad, a sewing circle that was formed on March 24th during the global Coronavirus pandemic. Initially the group sewed masks for frontline medical and essential workers, and then for vulnerable marginalized communities. From the outset, Kristina described the Auntie Sewing Squad as a stop gap measure, and said that she had no intention of turning it into a nonprofit. In fact, she stated that the nature of what the Auntie Sewing Squad does is not sustainable in the long run and that the goal would be for the group to eventually retire.

The work of the Auntie Sewing Squad, has gone beyond mask making. So, when I learned that the Auntie Sewing Squad had set a date to retire, I had to invite Valerie and Kristina back on to talk about the Auntie Sewing Squad’s retirement.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Why and when the Auntie Sewing Squad is going into retirement
  • The work that the Auntie Sewing Squad has done aside from sewing masks
  • How the Auntie Sewing Squad is spending $10,000 on N-95 masks for farmworkers who have to work during the wildfires
  • How Kristina and the Auntie Sewing Squad allocates food and supplies from the L.A. food bank to communities in need
  • The Super Aunties of the Auntie Sewing Squad
  • How the Auntie Sewing Squad is not the alternative to FEMA
  • The other ways that Aunties are trying to support communities in need
  • Dealing with the recent passing of Auntie Sally
  • Super Auntie Constance Parng’s breakout case of COVID
  • How Kristina has been able to do more to affect change as an Auntie than an elected official
  • The statement that the Auntie Sewing Squad put out after the Atlanta Spa Shootings
  • The book about the Auntie Sewing Squad that will be coming out this fall (The Auntie Sewing Squad Guide to Mask Making, Radical Care and Racial Justice)
  • The full-length documentary being made about the Auntie Sewing Squad (We Go Down Sewing)
  • How COVID hospitalizations have affected people in need of other medical treatments/procedures
  • The Auntie Sewing Squad retirement party
  • How the Auntie Sewing Squad is nonhierarchical
  • The term mutual aid
  • The unique community and bonds that have formed amongst the Aunties and members of Auntie Sewing Squad
  • What will happen to the group after it retires, and will the community still exist online
  • Kristina’s show about the Auntie Sewing Squad which is set to be performed in New York in November

 

Related Links:

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s website: http://auntiesewingsquad.com/

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad on Instagram: www.Instagram.com/AuntieSewing

 

Auntie Sewing Squad Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2764362993676831/

 

Auntie Sewing Squad Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/auntiesewing

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQrlwkZu_l6F1d9D_M5ZnGQ

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s book, The Auntie Sewing Squad Guide to Mask Making, Radical Care and Racial Justice, 30% off code 17M6662, valid for UC Press website only: https://bit.ly/3iwyEBb

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s HQ (list of notable Aunties): http://auntiesewingsquad.com/about/what-is-hq/

 

FEMA: https://www.fema.gov/

 

World Harvest Food Bank: https://www.worldharvestla.org/

 

Mutual Aid:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutual_aid_(organization_theory)

 

Super Auntie Constance Parng’s Talking Taiwan interview: https://talkingtaiwan.com/constance-parng-super-auntie-to-native-nations-of-the-auntie-sewing-squad-ep-108/

 

Atlanta Spa Shootings: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2021_Atlanta_spa_shootings

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s Statement on Rising Anti-Asian Hate and Violence: http://auntiesewingsquad.com/blog-posts/anti-aapi-hate-statement/

 

Kristina Wong’s website: http://kristinawong.com/

 

Kristina Wong’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ilovekristinawong/

 

Kristina Wong’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYVB9L

 

Valerie Soe’s blog: https://beyondasiaphilia.com/

 

Valerie Soe’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Valerie-Soe-1397194727164610

 

Valerie’s previous Talking Taiwan interview about her documentary film, Love Boat Taiwan: https://talkingtaiwan.com/love-boat-taiwan-interview-asian-american-studies-professor-film-maker-valerie-soe-ep-66/

 

Talking Taiwan Episode 75: Auntie Sewing Squad Combats Covid-19 One Mask at a Time: https://talkingtaiwan.com/auntie-sewing-squad-combats-covid-19-one-mask-at-a-time-ep-75/

Talking Taiwan Episode 107: Auntie Sewing Squad 2: Supporting Communities On the Fringe Through Caring: https://talkingtaiwan.com/auntie-sewing-squad-2-supporting-communities-on-the-fringe-through-caring-ep-107/

Aug 09, 2021
Ep 142 | Sergeant Steven Lee: NYPD Whistleblower Fights to Reform Police Corruption Part 2
25:07

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This is part two of my interview with Sergeant Steven Lee, a 16-year veteran of the NYPD, and whistleblower fighting to reform police corruption. Previously, in part one, we talked about Sergeant Lee’s undercover work and the police corruption that he’s witnessed.

If you haven’t had a chance to hear part one, you might want to go back and listen to it first. In part two Steve talks about what happened after his undercover work and the related court case, his thoughts on how to combat corruption within the NYPD, and why he plans to run for State Assembly next year.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What happened to Steve after his undercover work and the related court case
  • The corruption that Steve has seen in Internal Affairs Bureau of the NYPD
  • Steve’s suggestions for how to independently monitor the NYPD and Internal Affairs Bureau
  • How Steve believes that the police should identity with culture and customs of the communities they work in, and that there are enough police able to speak the languages spoken in their precincts
  • How Steve deals with the pressure of being a whistleblower
  • Steve’s 2020 run for State Assembly in District 40 and how he’s running again next year
  • What changes Steve has seen with the NYPD since the murder of George Floyd
  • Hoops over Hate
  • Ron Kim, Steve’s opponent for State Assembly in District 40

 

Related Links:

 

Ostracized NYPD whistleblower runs for state office in Queens: https://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/ny-steven-lee-ron-kim-assembly-20200211-mp26mhghpnen5altiqxahree3m-story.html

 

Queens Daily Eagle article, " ‘You can't have cops watching cops' — NYPD officer, ex-cop lawyer sue NYC": https://queenseagle.com/all/cops-corruption-harassment-nypd-lawsuit-lee-murray

 

NYPD 109th Precinct: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/nypd/bureaus/patrol/precincts/109th-precinct.page

 

https://twitter.com/nypd109pct?lang=en

 

https://www.facebook.com/NYPD109PCT/

 

Queens Daily Eagle article, "Flushing assembly race gets ugly with claims of ‘cyberbullying’ burner accounts": https://queenseagle.com/all/flushing-assembly-race-gets-ugly-amid-claims-of-cyberbullying-burner-accounts

 

Steven Lee on Ballotpedia: https://ballotpedia.org/Steven_Lee_(New_York)

 

Edwin Raymond: https://www.edwinraymond.com/

https://nypost.com/2020/06/28/cop-suing-nypd-for-racial-profiling-running-for-city-council/

 

NY Post article, "Teen assaulted in anti-Asian attack on Queens basketball court": https://nypost.com/2021/03/17/teen-assaulted-in-anti-asian-attack-on-queens-basketball-court/

 

Hoops over Hate: https://www.facebook.com/events/1811972852291087?ref=newsfeed

 

https://www.facebook.com/asiansinamericainc/posts/111180254400558

 

NY Assemblyman Ron Kim: https://assembly.state.ny.us/mem/Ron-Kim

 

Crime + Punishment (the award-winning Hulu original documentary): https://youtu.be/C6lB9HQnSac

Aug 02, 2021
Ep 141 | Sergeant Steven Lee: NYPD Whistleblower Fights to Reform Police Corruption Part 1
57:47

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Sergeant Steven Lee is a 16-year veteran of the NYPD. He’s a whistleblower fighting to reform police corruption and he shared his story with me.

This is part one of my interview with Steve.  In part two, next week, you’ll hear what happened to him after his undercover work and the related court case, how he’s dealt with the pressure, his thoughts on how to combat corruption within the NYPD, why he ran for State Assembly in 2020 and his plans to run again next year.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What Steve was doing before becoming a police officer
  • How Steve became a police officer
  • Scandals involving police officers writing fake summons
  • What led Steve to go undercover
  • The police corruption that Steve saw when he was undercover
  • What happened during the two years that Steve was undercover

 

Related Links:

 

Ostracized NYPD whistleblower runs for state office in Queens: https://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/ny-steven-lee-ron-kim-assembly-20200211-mp26mhghpnen5altiqxahree3m-story.html

 

Crime+Punishment (the award-winning Hulu original documentary): https://youtu.be/C6lB9HQnSac

Jul 26, 2021
Ep 140 | The Afara Collective: CoFounder Liz Williams Builds A Bridge for Systemic Racism Education
28:30

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Liz Williams is one of the co-founders of The Afara Collective and Jennifer Ho, heads Afara’s film club team. Seeing how the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and others last year sparked Black Lives Matter protests globally, and led to greater dialogue about systemic oppression and anti-racism, Liz and her co-founder Jules Sanders were inspired to create Afara.

 

Afara invites everyone, regardless of ethnic background to work on their personal biases

 

Liz and Jen talked about why the work of Afara matters to them, the types of training and programs that Afara will offer, and how Afara is about creating safe, brave spaces to have difficult conversations about systemic oppression, racism and bias.

 

Liz has been a guest on Talking Taiwan. In episode 88 she and Elissa Russell talked about Being Black in Taiwan and Racism in the United States.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • What inspired Liz and her co-founder Jules Sanders to create The Afara Collective?
  • What is the mission of The Afara Collective?
  • How Afara is about including everyone (regardless of ethnicity, not just Blacks and Whites) in the work of being an anti-racism
  • What does the word afara mean?
  • What is anti-racism?
  • How Afara is about creating safe spaces to discuss racism and bias
  • What have been the challenges in running The Afara Collective?
  • Their approach to working with and managing their team of volunteers
  • Afrara’s film club and book club
  • Afara’s See and Unseen Film Club
  • How Afara creates safe brave spaces for people to discover personal biases
  • The types of training, courses and programming that Afara offers
  • Afara’s Go Fund Me crowdfunding campaign
  • Afara’s vision of empathy in action

 

 

Related Links:

 

The Afara Collective’s Go Fund Me campaign: https://www.gofundme.com/f/The-Afara-Collective-antiracism?qid=68c382c4dac86653f790901ee54ada06&fbclid=IwAR1DTLBW2pLMC5Brdt2KwsNwdqgpYm34KqIL9r4ZLh9epnXzI-RoIFH-A-U

 

The Afara Collective: http://www.weareafara.org/

 

The Afara Collective on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/weareafara/

 

The Afara Collective on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/weareafara

 

George Floyd: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Floyd

 

Breonna Taylor: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killing_of_Breonna_Taylor

https://www.nytimes.com/article/breonna-taylor-police.html

 

BBC News article, “Ahmaud Arbery: What do we know about the case?” https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52623151

 

March 16, 2021 Atlanta Spa Shootings: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2021_Atlanta_spa_shootings

 

Liz Williams and Elissa Russell’s Talking Taiwan interview about Being Black in Taiwan and Racism in the United States: https://talkingtaiwan.com/being-black-in-taiwan-and-racism-in-the-united-states-ep-88/

Jul 19, 2021
Ep 139 | Covid 19 Taiwan Fundraiser: Raising Money for Society's Most Vulnerable
35:14

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

When Taiwan went in to soft lockdown in May, a group of diaspora who had moved there decided a Covid 19 Taiwan fundraiser for organizations assisting society’s most vulnerable was needed. They created the Taiwan Covid Relief Fundraiser and before they launched it, I spoke with three of the seven organizers- Catherine, Kevin and Jane.

 

We talked about how the charities benefitting from the fundraiser provide direct assistance to the homeless, disabled, migrant workers and survivors of domestic violence, and how all donations will go directly to the participating organizations. The fundraiser’s organizing team has pledged to match the first $10,000 donated. The team’s novel approach to organizing the Taiwan Covid Relief Fundraiser has given the charity organizations greater exposure to English language speakers and international donors.

 

The #TaiwanCovidRelief Fundraiser Organizing Team:

 

Catherine Chou is a second-generation Taiwanese-American who writes on Taiwanese history and identity, and tweets at @catielila.

 

Kevin Lin is the Co-Founder and former Chief Operating Officer of Twitch. He was born and raised in New Orleans. Through co-founding groups like Gold House, Kevin is giving back to communities that he cares about through sustainable investing, hoping to support creators of all shapes and sizes. @kevinlin


Jane W. Wang is founder of Build Great Bridges Around Taiwan (BGBAT) and a self-actualization coach who helps multiculturalites navigate their Multicultural Hero's Journey, so they can find home within and live their joy & purpose. 

 

Remaining Members of the #TaiwanCovidRelief Fundraiser Organizing Team  (not shown):

 

Jonathan Liao

 

Kathy Cheng @trickytaipei

 

Laura Huang @laurahuangla

 

Tait Sye

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Catherine, Kevin and Jane, three of the organizers of the Taiwan Covid Relief Fundraiser met and their connection to Taiwan
  • How they came up with the idea for the fundraiser
  • Who’s on the organizing team
  • What it’s been like being under soft lockdown in Taiwan
  • How the fundraiser is meant to benefit vulnerable communities affected by COVID in Taiwan
  • The five charity organizations that that will benefit from the fundraiser: Homeless Taiwan, Hsichulun Hpme, 1919 Foodbank, Serve the People, and Garden of Hope
  • Donations will go directly to the organizations
  • How the Taiwan COVID Relief Fundraiser committee will be matching the first $10,000 of donations made
  • How Catherine approached 15 organizations initially about being a part of the fundraiser
  • How the five charity organizations had to build English landing pages to receive foreign donations
  • NetiCRM, the company that worked with the charities to create new landing pages and donation websites
  • How the Taiwan COVID Relief Fundraiser will help the five charities to internationalize their donor market
  • The fundraiser was initially targeted at diaspora, but it is also for one who may not be able to read Chinese language websites, are primarily English speakers, and friends of Taiwan around the world

 

Related Links:

 

The Taiwan Covid Relief Fundraiser: www.taiwancovidrelief.com

 

 

ITASA (Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association): https://itasa.org/

 

TaiwaneseAmerican.org feature about ITASA - Inspire, Empower, and Activate: ITASA’s “Coming of Age”: https://www.taiawaneseamerican.org/2011/01/inspire-empower-and-activate-itasas-coming-of-age/

 

BGBAT (Build Great Bridges Around Taiwan): https://www.facebook.com/groups/1798268263828078/

 

Articles related to the April 2, 2021 Hualien train crash:

 

NPR article, "More Than 50 Dead, Dozens Injured As Taiwan Train Derails Inside Tunnel": https://www.npr.org/2021/04/02/983763089/nearly-50-dead-as-taiwan-train-derails-inside-tunnel

 

The News Lens article, "Taiwanese American Investors Hold Fundraiser To Support Taroko Train Crash Victims" (about the fundraiser Kevin organized for the April 2, 2021 Hualien train crash): https://international.thenewslens.com/article/149825

 

GoFundMe: https://www.gofundme.com/

 

Tiltify: https://tiltify.com/

 

NetiCRM, a Taiwanese constituent relationship management system for non-profits: https://netivism.com.tw operated by NETivism: https://neticrm.tw

Jul 12, 2021
Ep 138 | Biking in Taiwan with Blogger Michael Turton
35:12
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

A few months ago, before Taiwan went on COVID alert level 3, I spoke with Michael Turton, about biking around Taiwan. I remember when there was a push to make Taiwan more bike-friendly and it became popular for people to bike around the island or along the coast. Michael shared why he loves biking around Taiwan and how it is one of the best places to bike in the world. Surprisingly he advised avoiding cycling route number 1, which is the bicycle route around the island of Taiwan developed by the Taiwan Ministry of Transportation and Communications. He also talked about what he’s learned about Taiwan’s history and aborigines by biking around Taiwan.

 

Michael is a political commentator, Taipei Times columnist and blogger. We’ve had Michael on Talking Taiwan previously in episode 119 when he spoke with me about China’s ban of Taiwan’s pineapples.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What brought Michael to Taiwan
  • How/why he started biking
  • Michael’s website about Taiwan in the 1990s which led to his blog
  • Blogs that have inspired him
  • How he’s learned things about Taiwan’s local history and aborigines while biking around Taiwan
  • How interacting with the land is a way to get to know the land
  • How biking is a way to discover and learn about Taiwan
  • Why Taiwan is one of the best places to bike
  • Tips on how to get around the island easier with a bike
  • How long it takes to bike around the entire island
  • The lighthouse to lighthouse bike ride
  • How he’s able to track changes in Taiwan by regularly biking certain routes
  • The difference between driving around in a car vs. riding around on a bike
  • How Taiwan and Madagascar are the only tropical places in the world that have Badlands
  • Where he recommends you should bike or not
  • Taiwan’s steep bike routes

 

Related Links:

 

Michael Turton’s blog: http://michaelturton.blogspot.com/

 

U.S. Peace Corps: https://www.peacecorps.gov/

 

Michael Fahey: http://www.winklerpartners.com/?page_id=622

 

Scott Sommers/Summers: https://www.intellectbooks.com/scott-sommers

 

TC Lin’s blog: http://poagao.org/pjournal/

 

Roland Soong’s blog East West North South: http://www.zonaeuropa.com/weblog.htm

 

Andrew Kerslake’s blog: https://taiwanincycles.blogspot.com/

 

The award winning Wikipedia page on Taiwan aborigines that Andrew Kerslake wrote: https://bit.ly/3qSTFbS

 

Bunun tribe: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunun_people

 

The film, Island Etudehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Island_Etude

 

Yushan aka Jade Mountain (Taiwan’s highest peak): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yu_Shan

 

Sun Moon Lake Swim: https://www.sunmoonlake.gov.tw/en/event/calendardetail/673

 

Sun Moon Lake: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Moon_Lake

 

Taroko: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taroko_National_Park

 

https://wikitravel.org/en/Taroko_Gorge

 

Badlands: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Badlands

 

Moonscape area of Tainan aka Taiwan’s Badlands: https://spectralcodex.com/exploring-the-badlands-of-southern-taiwan/

 

Taiwan Cycling Route 1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwan_Cycling_Route_No.1

 

Taipei Times article, “Ride to the clouds” by Mark Roche: https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2021/03/11/2003753620

 

Mark Roche’s Blue Sky Adventures: http://www.blueskiestaiwan.com/

 

Alishan: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alishan_National_Scenic_Area

 

Alishan tea farms: https://www.teafromtaiwan.com/blog/alishan-tea-districts/

Jul 05, 2021
Ep 137 | Lee Wong: American Patriot Bears His Chest for Asian Discrimination
44:18

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Lee Wong, is an elected official and Chairman of the board of trustees in West Chester Township, Ohio. During a meeting of the West Chester Township Board of Trustees on March 23rd he stood up and literally bared his chest to make a point about the discrimination and hate that Asian Americans have experienced. That moment was caught on video and went viral. Mr. Lee spoke with me about what compelled him to speak up that day and what’s happened since.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Lee’s upbringing in Malaysia (previously British Borneo)
  • What brought him to the U.S.
  • The Asian hate incident that happened to Lee in 1972 and how that changed the trajectory of his life
  • Lee’s 20 years of service in the U.S. army and the chest injuries he sustained during that time
  • How Lee first got elected to the West Chester Township Board of Trustees
  • What prompted him to speak up at the March 23rdmeeting
  • The feedback and reaction that Lee has gotten since the video clip of him went viral
  • The problem with Asians being perceived as a model minority
  • How Lee works with the Midwest USA Chinese Chamber of Commerce to promote Asian culture and to build more bridges between Asian Americans and the community at large
  • Lee’s message of hope to Asian Americans in these times of increased Asian hate incidents
  • How Lee is now working on writing his memoir
  • The website for Lee Wong that is in the works: wwe.LeeWong.us
  • The voicemail that Lee received from another military service man that recognized Lee after his March 23rdvideo went viral

 

Related Links:

 

The video of Lee Wong speaking at the March 23rd meeting of the West Chester Township Board of Trustees that went viral: https://abc7ny.com/lee-wong-scars-asian-american-hate-west-chester-ohio-military-service/10454881/?fbclid=IwAR0tx9rs7QdKwaANPO0wwohb3UJA3_n0CLchV4sEu_qekuAsJSbK6WE68rA

 

Atlanta Spa Shootings: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2021_Atlanta_spa_shootings

 

The voicemail Lee received from another military service man who recognized Lee after his March 23rd video went viral: https://www.facebook.com/759509573/posts/10159651061469574/?d=n

 

Midwest USA Chinese Chamber of Commerce on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/midwestchamber

 

The Sun Poem by Sara Ting: http://worldunityinc.org/thesunpoem.html

Jun 28, 2021
Ep 136 | How the Term Wuhan Virus Contributed to Anti Asian Sentiment: Minnie Sun of Taiwan Mix
48:52

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Minnie Sun is one of the co-founders of Taiwan Mixed, a platform that aggregates English content on Taiwan. She was in Taipei when I spoke with her recently about Taiwan Mixed and her perspectives on how Taiwan or the Taiwanese Can Help when it comes to the stigmatization of COVID-19 which has been attributed to the recent rise in anti-Asian sentiment.  How #CanTaiwanHelp #StopAsianHate?

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Where the idea for Taiwan Mixed came from
  • Project Taiwan
  • How Taiwan Mixed provides TLDR (too long didn’t read) articles in English about Taiwan
  • How Taiwan Mixed got started
  • The 228, Decolonization and Transitional Justice event that Taiwan Mixed hosted on Clubhouse in March
  • The challenges they’ve experienced with Taiwan Mixed
  • How Taiwan Mixed chooses its partners and news sources to feature
  • What feedback Taiwan Mixed has gotten so far
  • What she hopes to accomplish with Taiwan Mixed
  • The future of Taiwan Mixed
  • The origin of the hashtag #TaiwanCanHelp
  • The CommonWealth article, #TaiwanCanHelp curb anti-Asian sentiment: stop saying "Wuhan pneumonia" written by Minnie Sun
  • The #StopAsianHate community forum hosted by Taiwan Mixed
  • What the Taiwanese can do to combat anti-Asian sentiment
  • The criticisms of and reactions to Minnie’s CommonWeath article
  • How to apply to be a partner of Taiwan Mixed

 

 

Related Links:

 

Taiwan Mixed: https://www.taiwanmixed.org/

 

Taiwan Mixed on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/taiwanmixed

 

Taiwan Mixed on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tw.mixed/

 

Taiwan Mixed on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tw_mixed

 

Project Taiwan: https://www.projecttaiwan.org/

 

Taiwan Can Help: https://taiwancanhelp.us/

 

The article, #TaiwanCanHelp curb anti-Asian sentiment: stop saying "Wuhan pneumonia" written by Minnie Sun: https://english.cw.com.tw/article/article.action?id=2962

 

Video of a DPP Representative, at a forum in Dubai on COVID-19, explicitly using the term “Wuhan Virus” in English: https://twitter.com/tw_mixed/status/1385142073188229122

 

Taiwan Mixed’s Twitter Conversation Thread about the article, #TaiwanCanHelp curb anti-Asian sentiment: stop saying "Wuhan pneumonia" written by Minnie Sun: https://twitter.com/tw_mixed/status/1385140250922557440

Jun 21, 2021
Ep 135 | Yun Hai Taiwanese Pantry: Our Talk with Founder Lisa Cheng Smith
54:33

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan, Lisa Cheng Smith, has channeled her love of Taiwanese food, cooking and premium ingredients into creating Yun Hai Taiwanese Pantry. Yun Hai sources premium ingredients for Taiwanese cooking, directly from artisans, farms, and soy sauce breweries in Taiwan. 

In this interview Lisa not only talks about how and why she started Yun Hai, and her vision for the business, but she shares her favorite Taiwanese restaurants, cookbooks, and some great resources for tips on Taiwanese cooking. 

Taiwanese food lovers, this episode is definitely for you!

I initially spoke with Lisa earlier this year but so much has happened with Yun Hai since then, so a week or so ago we spoke again to get some updates. Be sure to listen to the end of the interview to hear about all of the exciting developments. 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in the podcast:

 

  • What inspired Lisa to start Yun Hai Taiwanese Pantry
  • Where Lisa’s love of Taiwanese food comes from
  • The chili sauce that inspired her to start Yun Hai
  • The slow food movement
  • What Lisa loves about the food in Taiwan
  • How long it took Lisa to set up Yun Hai
  • The story behind the name Yun Hai
  • The challenges of running a small online business
  • How Lisa met her business partner
  • Yun Hai’s collaboration with Rose Bakery for the Lunar New Year
  • Lisa’s favorite Taiwanese holidays and festivals
  • Lisa’s Taiwanese cookbook recommendations
  • Other sources recommended by Lisa for Taiwanese recipes (blogs, YouTube)
  • Products offered by Yun Hai
  • New products
  • How Lisa choses products for Yun Hai
  • Yun Hai’s connection to Win Son
  • Lisa’s Taiwanese restaurant recommendations
  • Future plans for Yun Hai
  • The short documentary that Yun Hai produced about soy sauce makers in Taiwan
  • The newest developments with Yun Hai since the initial interview with Lisa earlier this year
  • Yun Hai’s Kickstarter campaign for Yun Hai Selection Dried Fruit Line (pineapple, mango, guava)
  • New products that Yun Hai is introducing
  • How Yun Hai has been growing
  • Yun Hai’s plans to open a store in East Williamsburg Brooklyn, NY
  • The Yun Hai Stories newsletter

 

 

 

Related Links:

 

Yun Hai Taiwanese Pantry website: https://yunhai.shop/

 

Yun Hai Taiwanese Pantry on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/yunhaishop/

 

Sign up for the Yun Hai newsletter: https://yunhai.substack.com/

 

Yun Hai’s mini-documentary, Time, Terroir, Taiwan: Soy Sauce Brewing in XiLuo:
https://youtu.be/UhJ5wU1jY0E

 

Yun Hai Taiwanese Pantry on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yunhaishop

 

“9 Recipes for a Vibrant Lunar New Year Celebration” by Lisa Cheng Smith for Bon Appétit Magazine: https://www.bonappetit.com/gallery/lunar-new-year-menu-lisa-cheng-smith

 

Taipei Times article about Yun Hai Pantry: https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2019/07/13/2003718573

 

Yun Hai + Rose Bakery Year of the Ox Collaboration: https://yunhai.shop/blogs/articles/year-of-the-ox-yun-hai-rose-bakery

 

Dover Street Market: https://www.doverstreetmarket.com/

 

Alice Waters: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Waters

 

Food of Taiwan by Cathy Erway: https://www.amazon.com/Food-Taiwan-Recipes-Beautiful-Island/dp/0544303016/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Food+of+Taiwan&qid=1623571715&s=books&sr=1-1

 

All Under Heaven cookbook by Carolyn Phillips: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=All+Under+Heaven&i=stripbooks&ref=nb_sb_noss_2

 

Carolyn Phillips’ blog, Madame Huang’s kitchen: https://www.madamehuang.com/blog

 

Choochoo-ca-Cchew (Taiwanese recipes with locally sourced ingredients): https://www.choochoocachew.com/

 

Taiwan Duck (Taiwan Cooking) on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/TaiwanCooking

 

Win Son Restaurant and Bakery: https://winsonbrooklyn.com/

 

Trigg Brown and Josh Ku of Win Son: Taiwanese Restaurant in NYC: https://talkingtaiwan.com/trigg-brown-josh-ku-win-son-taiwanese-restaurant-nyc/

 

Ho Foods restaurant: https://www.hofoodsnyc.com/

 

886 restaurant: https://www.eighteightsix.com/

 

Happy Stony Noodles (restaurant in Elmhurst Queens): https://www.happystonynoodle.com/

 

Q Town restaurant: https://www.qtownasiancuisine.com/

 

Pulau Pinang restaurant: https://menupages.com/pulau-pinang-malaysian-and-taiwanese-cuisine/82-84-broadway-elmhurst

 

Taipei Times Columnist Michael Turton Talks About the Taiwan Pineapple Ban by China: https://talkingtaiwan.com/taipei-times-columnist-michael-turton-talks-about-the-taiwan-pineapple-ban-by-china-ep-119/

 

Taipei Times article about China’s ban of Taiwan’s pinapples, “PRC bans import of Taiwan pineapples”: 

https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/front/archives/2021/02/27/2003752913

 

Yun Hai’s Kickstarter campaign for Yun Hai Selection: Dried Pineapple, Mango, Guava from Taiwan: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/yunhaishop/dried-fruits-made-in-taiwan

Jun 14, 2021
Ep 134 | Why the Surge in Taiwan's Coronavirus Cases? An Interview with Courtney Donovan Smith
31:50

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

There has been a surge in Taiwan's coronavirus cases since about mid-May, and Taiwan is now on COVID alert level 3, one level before full lockdown. I’ve invited Courtney Donovan Smith on to Talking Taiwan to talk about what led to the increase in COVID cases, the current situation and what’s happening with Taiwan’s efforts to acquire COVID vaccines. Courtney Donovan Smith is the central Taiwan correspondent for ICRT News, and one of the co-founders of the Taiwan Report, which I highly recommend as a really great news resource for what’s happening in Taiwan.

 

Since Courtney and I spoke on June 3rd, Taiwan remains at COVID alert level 3, on Friday, Japan sent over one million doses of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine to Taiwan, and the U.S. has promised to donate 750,000 Covid-19 vaccine doses to Taiwan.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • The current situation and atmosphere in Taiwan since COVID cases started to spike
  • How the increase in COVID cases were linked to commercial airline pilots who stayed at the Novotel airport hotel
  • Taiwan is currently at COVID alert level 3
  • What does COVID alert level 3 entail
  • What’s happened since Taiwan has been at COVID alert level 3
  • How the increase in COVID cases in Taiwan are due to the more virulent UK variant of COVID
  • How one of the factors to determine whether Taiwan will go to level 4 (full lockdown), is the number of cases with unknown origin and what constitutes a case of known or unknown origin
  • Taiwan is tentatively going to remain at level 3 until June 14
  • Reasons for the low COVID vaccination rate in Taiwan
  • Why Taiwan has not been able to procure Pfizer vaccines from German firm BioNTech and what happened to the deal
  • What China's Shanghai Fosun Pharmaceutical Group (which claims to handle the Greater China market which includes Taiwan) has to do with Taiwan’s efforts to access COVID vaccines
  • The Chinese made COVID vaccine
  • China’s interference in Taiwan’s efforts to secure COVID vaccines
  • China’s reaction to the Japan’s offer to donate vaccines to Taiwan
  • How China interfered with relief efforts during the 921 Earthquake in Taiwan
  • The most well-known cases of COVID outbreaks in Taiwan involving the Taipei Wanhua district teahouses and “Grape Mother”

 

Related Links:

 

Taiwan Report: https://report.tw/

 

Taiwan Report News Brief – Covid conundrums: https://youtu.be/YCFkROxHjcM

 

Taiwan Centers for Disease Control press releases: https://www.cdc.gov.tw/En

 

Taiwan tightens 5 rules under Level 3 alert: https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/4210925

 

Taiwan announces 1st local coronavirus case in 254 days (Latest domestic COVID-19 infection is woman who came in close contact with New Zealand pilot): https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/4084077

 

2 women in Taipei tea houses test positive for COVID: https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/4201655

 

Taiwan, feuding with China, gets vaccines from Japan: https://apnews.com/article/europe-china-taiwan-business-japan-0c31ddf65eaa81ac101f592ec5697c37

 

‘Urgent need’: US to donate 750,000 Covid vaccine doses to Taiwan: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jun/06/us-taiwan-covid-vaccine-doses-senators-visit-tsai-ing-wen

Jun 07, 2021
Ep 133 | What to Do if You Are the Target of Asian Hate Part Two
58:25

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In celebration of Asian heritage month (which takes place in May), Talking Taiwan participated in United We Stand, the 42nd Annual Asian Pacific American Heritage Festival, and on May 17th, organized a Panel Discussion and Q&A on the topic: What To Do If You Are The Target Of Asian Hate.

 

The event was recorded and this is Part 2, which features the Q&A portion with panelists- Chris Kwok, Steve Lee, Suelain Moy, and Peter Yang Zhao. If you don’t want miss out on any of the useful information shared be sure to go back and listen to Part 1, which was the opening discussion with our panelists and shared in the previous episode, Episode 132.

 

Panelist bios:

Christopher M. Kwok, is a mediator and arbitrator with JAMS, Board Director and Issues Committee Chair for the Asian American Bar Association of New York, and an Adjunct Professor at Hunter College/CUNY and New York City College of Technology/CUNY.

Sergeant Steven Lee, is a 16-year veteran of the NYPD, a whistleblower fighting to reform police corruption, and Anti-Asian Hate Crime Activist.

Suelain Moy, is a New York City mother, writer, journalist, author, and editor who wrote “The 16 Safety Guidelines for the Parents of Asian Children.”

Peter Yang Zhao, is an Anti-Asian Hate Crime and Tourette Activist.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • How we have to fight the legacy of law that perceived nonwhites as legal nonpersons
  • What should/can bystanders or upstanders do if they witness a hate crime
  • Hollaback organization
  • Why panelist Steve Lee does not recommend carrying mace or pepper spray
  • Why panelist Steve Lee recommends carrying around a tactical flashlight
  • What constitutes self-defense
  • The Flushing Bakery case
  • Suggestions of what items are acceptable or not to carry for self-defense
  • What constitutes a hate crime
  • What was done to get Patrick Mateo of the Flushing Bakery case charged with a hate crime and what you can do get an Asian hate crime prosecuted
  • Adopt a case that you want to rally behind or support
  • No matter what your immigration status is you are protected under the law if you are the target of Asian hate
  • Police officers are not allowed to ask about your immigration status
  • It should take 24-48 hours for a police report to be in the system
  • The difference between harassment, assault, and reckless endangerment
  • The stabbing of an Asian man in the Seattle area
  • The importance of connecting with non-Asian communities
  • Suggested action items for event participants from the panelists
  • The importance of self-care and mental health

 

Related Links:

 

United We Stand- 42nd Annual Asian Pacific American Heritage Festival: Https://beacons.ai/aapifest

 

An example of now nonwhites were not considered human or to have the same rights: The 1854 Supreme Court of California case of People v. Hall, which reversed the murder conviction of George W. Hall, “a free white citizen of this State,” because three prosecution witnesses were Chinese: https://www.aabany.org/events/event_details.asp?legacy=1&id=1513147

 

Hollaback: https://www.ihollaback.org/

 

Flushing Bakery incident: [INSERT the 2 jpgs]

 

The stabbing in Seattle that Jolene referred to: Asian American groups push for Bothell murder to be investigated as hate crime: https://www.king5.com/article/news/crime/john-huynh-asian-american-advocates-hate-crime-investigation/281-fd824596-7856-4dc4-ab96-dfc3956764ff

 

Reaction to the murder of an Asian Man being stabbed in Bothell. WA:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=794MprgRsRA

 

CeFaan Kim: https://abc7ny.com/about/newsteam/cefaan-kim/

https://twitter.com/CeFaanKim

 

Dion Lim: https://abc7news.acom/about/newsteam/dion-lim/

https://twitter.com/DionLimTV

 

Coalition of Asian Pacific Americans (CAPA): http://capaonline.org/

 

Korean American Story: https://koreanamericanstory.org/

 

Project by Project: https://www.projectbyproject.org/

 

Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA): https://www.apalanet.org/

 

OCA-NY Asian Pacific American Advocates: http://www.oca-ny.org/contact.html

 

Asian Women Giving Circle: http://asianwomengivingcircle.org/

 

Free yoga class that panelist Suelain Moy mentioned that she took with Joyce Wu, "Gentle Yoga for Terrible Times":  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gentle-yoga-for-terrible-times-tickets-107646048228

More about the class: https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/gentle-yoga-for-terrible-times-offers-hour-long-wellness-session/ar-BB17kInE

Joyce's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneandonlyjoyce/

Asian Mental Health Collective: https://www.asianmhc.org/

Jun 01, 2021
Ep 132 | What to Do if You Are the Target of Asian Hate Part One
01:09:03

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

May is Asian heritage month and Talking Taiwan was one of over 100 organizations and groups that participated in United We Stand, the 42nd Annual Asian Pacific American Heritage Festival, organized by CAPA the Coalition of Asian Pacific Americans. Usually festival is a one-day outdoor event held in New York City, but this year it was run virtually online for the entire month of May.

 

As I thought about how Talking Taiwan could go beyond just being another virtual booth in the festival, and give back to the community, I realized that we could put together an online event simply by inviting some of our past guests, namely Suelain Moy, Steven Lee and Peter Yang Zhao for discussion and Q&A on the topic of: What to do if you are the target of Asian hate. And with the help of my friend Chris Chen, who’s a part of CAPA, the festival’s organizing committee, we added another panelist Chris Kwok, an attorney doing a lot of great work related to anti-Asian hate.

 

The event was held on May 17th and recorded. We are sharing it here in two parts. This is part one featuring a discussion with our panelists. Part two will be the Q&A discussion that followed.

 

Panelist bios:

Christopher M. Kwok, is a mediator and arbitrator with JAMS, Board Director and Issues Committee Chair for the Asian American Bar Association of New York, and an Adjunct Professor at Hunter College/CUNY and New York City College of Technology/CUNY.

Sergeant Steven Lee, is a 16-year veteran of the NYPD, a whistleblower fighting to reform police corruption, and Anti-Asian Hate Crime Activist.

Suelain Moy, is a New York City mother, writer, journalist, author, and editor who wrote “The 16 Safety Guidelines for the Parents of Asian Children.”

Peter Yang Zhao, is an Anti-Asian Hate Crime and Tourette Activist.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • United We Stand, the 42ndAnnual Asian Pacific American Heritage Festival, organized by CAPA the Coalition of Asian Pacific Americans
  • Panelist Suelain Moy talks about an anti-Asian hate incident that happened to her and her son
  • Suelain’s practical tips for dealing with harassment on the street
  • How parents should talk to their kids about how to protect themselves
  • Where to report Asian hate incidents
  • When reporting a hate crime, what constitutes a hate crime
  • When reporting a crime it is important to mention all the details and speak up about what exactly happened
  • Why Asian hate crimes have been underreported
  • You don’t have to file a police report in the precinct where it happened
  • The anti-Asian hate incident that happened to panelist Peter Yang Zhao’s wife
  • Peter’s Tourette activism and mention that May 15-June 15 is Tourette’s Syndrome month
  • Why what happened to Peter’s wife was considered a criminal case
  • The difference between a criminal and civil case
  • How AALDEF does not offer personal direct legal services but does impact litigation
  • What is impact litigation
  • The MinKwon Center does offer personal direct legal services, but only in very specific areas
  • How the timing and prevalence of Asian hate crimes impacted how Peter’s wife’s case was handled
  • When filing a police report the perpetrator is given your information by the district attorney’s office within 48 hours, so it’s not necessary to give all of your personal information (e.g. address or date of birth), you can just give  your first name and an email address
  • How Asians need to be more politically active and speak up

 

 

Related Links:

 

United We Stand- 42nd Annual Asian Pacific American Heritage Festival: Https://beacons.ai/aapifest

 

Panelist Suelain Moy’s 16 Safety Guidelines for the Parents of Asian Children: https://suelain.com/2021/03/25/16-safety-guidelines-for-the-parents-of-asian-children/?fbclid=IwAR2tbE5J3vbKAASQwZBdxEiZRsnyQ34phgyyqxCyX-4NX2ztxRPY-FCYZJk

 

Panelist Peter Zhao’s Op Ed about the Anti-Asian Hate crime that happened to his wife: https://asamnews.com/2021/03/23/oped-finding-real-solutions-to-ending-anti-asian-hate-crimes/
 
Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF): https://www.aaldef.org/

 

MinKwon Center for Community Action: http://minkwon.org/

 

Flushing  Bakery Incident:

 

Queens County's District Attorney, Melinda Katz: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melinda_Katz

May 31, 2021
Ep 131 | How Eva Lou Runs a Multi-Lingual Children's Book Publishing Company
01:05:09

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guest on this episode is Eva Lou a writer and publisher and the founder of Madeleine Editions, a multi-lingual children’s book publishing company, that offers books in English, French and Mandarin Chinese. Madeleine Editions published Monster Dance, a children’s book created to help children deal with and understand the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. For every copy of Monster Dance sold, a donation will be made to Donate PPE.

 

Eva spoke with me about the uniqueness of what Madeleine Editions is doing with their digital books, which are a multisensory experience, that combines animation, and the beauty of the spoken word and music. She shared a particularly memorable story that involved the recording of music for the book, The Little Baby Airplane.

 

We also spoke about her personal writing projects and her perspectives on what It takes to be a writer.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Madeleine Editions got involved in publishing the children’s book, Monster Dance
  • What it took to get Monster Dancepublished so quickly and in a timely fashion
  • What inspired Eva to start Madeleine Editions
  • How Madeleine Editions publishes multi-lingual books in three languages: Chinese, English and French
  • The Taste of a Strawberry, the first book that led to the creation of Madeleine Editions’
  • How Madeleine Editions’ books combine animation, the spoken word and music
  • How Madeleine Editions collaborated with Deutsche Grammophon:
  • How 3-7 years of age is a critical time for children to be exposed languages
  • How Taiwanese supermodel Chiling Lin (林志玲) got involved as the Chinese narrator for Monster Dance
  • How Eva’s personal background set her on the path to run a multi-lingual publishing house
  • How Eva relates differently she when speaks English, Mandarin Chinese and French
  • Eva’s connection to Taiwan
  • The many different languages spoken in Eva’s household
  • The joys and challenges of running Madeleine Editions
  • What it was like working with illustrator Guy Gilchrist
  • One of the highlights of her work with Madeleine Editions involved the recording of music for the book, The Little Baby Airplane
  • The uniqueness of what Madeline Editions does as a multilingual children’s book publisher
  • How Madeleine Editions’ books can expose children to other nonnative languages
  • The musicality of language
  • Eva’s career as a writer
  • The novel that Eva has been working on that is related to Taiwan
  • Madeleine Editions’ plans to adapt The Little Princefor children 3-7 years of age
  • The series of essays that Eva is working on about homes vs. houses
  • Eva’s writing routine
  • The difference between a career in publishing vs. being a writer
  • Eva’s perspective on being a writer and what it takes to be a writer

 

 

Related Links:

 

Madeleine Editions: https://madeleineeditions.com/

 

Madeleine Editions on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MadeleineEditions

 

Madeleine Editions on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/madeleine_editions/

 

Monster Dance (On the Apple App Store): https://apps.apple.com/us/app/monster-dance/id1533424890

 

Monster Dance on Apple iBooks: https://books.apple.com/us/book/monster-dance/id1533431014

 

Monster Dance on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Monster-Dance-Eva-Lou/dp/0578747707

 

Monster Dance on Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.madeleineeditions.ebook.monsterdance&hl=en_US&gl=US

 

Monster Dance’s Kickstarter campaign: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/madeleineeditions/monster-dance

 

The Taste of a Strawberryhttps://madeleineeditions.com/stories/the-taste-of-a-strawberry/

 

Deutsche Grammophon: https://www.deutschegrammophon.com/en/

 

The Little Baby Airplanehttps://madeleineeditions.com/stories/little-baby-airplane/

 

Guy Gilchrist's website: https://www.aguygilchristproduction.com/

 

d'extases rapture by Eva Lou: https://www.amazon.com/dextases-rapture/dp/2851573047

 

228 (February 28, 1947 incident): https://www.taiwandc.org/228-intr.htm

 

Donate PPE: https://donateppe.org/

 

Talking Taiwan Episode 120: Dr. Karen Tsai Brings Monster Dance Children’s Book to Life: https://talkingtaiwan.com/dr-karen-tsai-brings-monster-dance-childrens-book-to-life-ep-120/

May 24, 2021
Ep 130 | Richard Chen: The History of Social Injustice and Discrimination Toward Asian Americans
32:46

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

The wave of Anti-Asian hate crimes over the past year have largely been attributed to blaming the Chinese for the spread of the Coronavirus. However, Asian Americans have experienced hate, social injustice and discrimination since they started immigrating to the U.S. I’ve invited Richard Chen on to the podcast to talk about the history of discrimination toward asian americans, and some of the major events that have galvanized Asian Americans in the past. Richard is Creator of StopAAPIHate.us, Board member of Asian American Action Fund.

Founding moderator of the FB group Asians Now a FB group of Asian diaspora for social awareness.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What motivated Richard to create StopAAPIHate.us
  • Why the model minority myth is problematic
  • Asiatic exclusion league
  • Yellow Peril
  • Page Act
  • Chinese Exclusion Act
  • Geary Act
  • Tydings–McDuffie Act
  • Asiatic Barred Zone Act
  • Immigration Act of 1924
  • Burning of Santa Ana Chinatown
  • Japanese internment camps
  • The Murder of Vincent Chin
  • Rodney King Incident and the 1992 LA Riots

 

 

Related Links:

 

Richard Chen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/richardc020

 

Asian American Action Fund: https://aaafund.org

 

AsiansNOW, a 14,000 member Facebook group to raise the Asian diaspora's social awareness: http://facebook.com/groups/asiansnow 

 

StopAAPIHate.us: https://stopaapihate.us

 

Xenophobia and racism related to the COVID-19 pandemic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenophobia_and_racism_related_to_the_COVID-19_pandemic#New_York

 

Anti-Chinese sentiment in the United States:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Chinese_sentiment_in_the_United_States

 

Atlanta Spa Shootings: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2021_Atlanta_spa_shootings

 

Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA): https://www.aaja.org/

 

Asiatic Exclusion League: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asiatic_Exclusion_League

 

1875 Page Act: https://www.history.com/news/chinese-immigration-page-act-women#:~:text=On%20paper%2C%20the%20Page%20Act,for%20the%20purposes%20of%20prostitution.%E2%80%9D

 

Why Santa Ana, CA Deliberated Burned Down Its Chinatown in 1906: https://www.ocweekly.com/santa-ana-deliberately-burned-down-its-chinatown-in-1906-and-let-a-man-die-to-do-it-6446664/

 

'Model Minority' Myth Again Used As A Racial Wedge Between Asians And Blacks: https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2017/04/19/524571669/model-minority-myth-again-used-as-a-racial-wedge-between-asians-and-blacks

 

The model minority myth says all Asians are successful. Why that's dangerous: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/model-minority-myth-says-asians-are-successful-dangerous-rcna420

 

Geary Act: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geary_Act#:~:text=An%20Act%20to%20prohibit%20the,persons%20into%20the%20United%20States.&text=The%20Geary%20Act%20was%20a,Congress%20on%20May%205%2C%201892.

 

https://immigrationhistory.org/item/geary-act/

 

Tydings–McDuffie Act: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tydings%E2%80%93McDuffie_Act

 

Asiatic Barred Zone Act aka the Immigration Act of 1917 and the Literacy Act: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_Act_of_1917

 

Immigration Act of 1924: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_Act_of_1924

 

Angel Island: https://bit.ly/3wjiW0m

 

Japanese Internment Camps: https://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/japanese-american-relocation

 

Murder of Vincent Chin: https://www.history.com/news/vincent-chin-murder-asian-american-rights

 

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP): https://naacp.org/

 

American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU): https://www.aclu.org/

 

Asian Americans (PBS documentary): https://www.pbs.org/show/asian-americans/

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkIjSx2Ax0U

 

We Need To Talk About Anti-Asian Hate: https://youtu.be/14WUuya94QE

 

Anti-Asian violence has surged in the US since COVID-19. But it didn't start there: https://www.today.com/news/anti-asian-violence-history-anti-asian-racism-us-t210645https://www.today.com/news/anti-asian-violence-history-anti-asian-racism-us-t210645

May 17, 2021
Ep 129 | Living with Tourette Syndrome: Peter Yang Zhao
01:19:33

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

May 15 to June 15th is Tourette Syndrome Awareness Month. Tourette Syndrome is usually diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. According to the Tourette Association of America 1 out of every 160 children between the ages of 5-17 in the United States has Tourette Syndrome and 1 out of every 100 children has Tourette Syndrome or another Tic Disorder.

 

In doing research for this interview, I visited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Tourette Association of America websites. On these websites, I noticed that resources for children with Tourette Syndrome and their parents to deal with bullying were prominently displayed. It’s an important reminder that there needs to be more awareness, tolerance and understanding of Tourette Syndrome, but not just in childhood but in society in general, amongst people of all ages.

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Tourette Activist, Peter Yang Zhao who we’ve had on previous episodes with Sergeant Steven Lee to talk about the topic of Asian hate. In this in depth interview, Peter explains what living with Tourette Syndrome is, how he got diagnosed, and speaks frankly about the challenges he’s had to overcome as a Touretter, and how he advocates for more awareness of Tourette Syndrome.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Peter’s connection to Taiwan
  • Georges Gilles de la Tourette
  • What is Tourette Syndrome
  • Coprolalia
  • The Tourette Syndrome iceberg
  • People with Tourette Syndrome are often affected by another co-occurring condition like Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Depression
  • The connection between OCD and Tourette Syndrome
  • How Peter’s mother dealt with his Tourette Syndrome
  • Peter’s evolution of vocal tics and how he changed his vocal tics over years
  • How Peter was diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome
  • How tics can change over time
  • Cognitive behavior training
  • Peter’s first tic which appeared at 8 years old
  • The stress Peter experienced while being bullied at school
  • The reflexology treatment that Peter initially received to treat his Tourette Syndrome
  • How Peter had to fight other students at school to defend himself and stop  the bullying
  • What happened when Peter started taking an antipsychotic drug (pimozide) to control his tics
  • Coprographia
  • How Peter’s mother and doctors reacted to his complaints of increased intrusive thoughts
  • The physical and mental addiction that Peter developed to the drug
  • How tics are triggered
  • How Peter’s only escape from his intrusive thoughts was to sleep
  • How Peter started having suicidal thoughts
  • How Peter decided to stop taking the antipsychotic drug
  • What happened when Peter quit taking the drug
  • How Peter’s tics are seasonal
  • Tourette Association of America which is located in Bayside, NY
  • How Peter didn’t want to have kids because he was afraid of passing along the genes for Tourette Syndrome
  • Tourette’s Facebook support groups
  • How Peter was interviewed for the Tourette Syndrome podcast
  • #7DaysOfTourettes movement
  • The article Peter wrote about Ted Cruz’s tweet about Tourette Syndrome

 

 

Related Links:

 

Georges Gilles de la Tourette: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Gilles_de_la_Tourette

 

Coprolalia: https://bit.ly/2RhyGl9

 

John Hopkins Medicine: What causes Tourette Syndrome and How Tourette Syndrome can occur differently in boys and girls: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/tourettes-disorder#:~:text=It%20is%20an%20autosomal%20dominant,gene%20on%20to%20each%20child.

 

Tourette Association of America: https://tourette.org/

 

CDC data and statistics on Tourette Syndrome: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/tourette/data.html

 

Dr. Arthur K. Shapiro: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_K._Shapiro

 

Twitch and Shout: A Touretter’s Tale by Lowell Handler: https://www.amazon.com/Twitch-Shout-Touretters-Lowell-Handler/dp/0816644519

 

Coprographia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coprographia

 

Pimozide: https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a686018.html

 

Jumaane Williams: https://bit.ly/3ebDRvW

 

Jumaane Williams talks about Tourette Syndrome: https://council.nyc.gov/jumaane-williams/2017/07/12/jumaane-williams-talks-about-tourette-syndrome/

 

Tourette's Podcast group on Facebook 

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/664680327265761/?ref=share

 

Tic and Tourette's support page 

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/477065749007938/?ref=share

 

Tourette's Syndrome support group

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/tourettessyndromesupport/?ref=share

 

Tourette's Podcast page

 

www.Tourettespodcast.com 

 

https://asamnews.com/2021/01/30/oped-asian-am-with-tourette-tired-of-being-punch-line/

 

Asian In New York: http://www.asianinny.com/

 

ORIENTED.com: http://oriented.com/

 

The Sunflower Movement: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunflower_Student_MovementA note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

May 10, 2021
Ep 128 | Fight to Stop Asian Hate Crimes Part 2: Peter Yang Zhao and Sergeant Steven Lee
57:54

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In this episode I’m welcoming back Peter Yang Zhao and Steve Lee to continue talking about the topic of Asian hate picking up after part 1, episode 125. Both have been active in the fight to stop Asian hate crimes, and have lots to share on the topic. Peter Yang Zhao, is an anti-Asian hate crime activist, and Tourette’s syndrome activist. Sergeant Steven Lee is a 16-year veteran of the NYPD, a whistleblower fighting to reform police corruption and anti-Asian hate crime activist. In 2020 he ran for State Assembly in District 40.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What happened to Peter’s wife after she was punched in the face and the police came
  • Why Peter’s wife was handcuffed by police and remained handcuffed when taken to the hospital to get stitches
  • Bail reform
  • What happened when Peter reached out the Flushing Chamber of Commerce, Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF), Ron Kim and the MinKwon Center for help
  • How Peter’s wife’s case was classified as a criminal case instead of a civil case
  • How the case was delayed and dropped due to the COVID-19 pandemic
  • How Peter wrote an article for AsAmNews about what happened with his wife
  • What a COP program is
  • The Guardian Angels
  • Flushing block watch groups Main Street Patrol and PSP
  • 5 D’s of self-defense: deter, detect, delay, deny defend
  • What is considered self-defense
  • Why Asian hate crimes are underreported
  • What can people do to help stop Asian hate crime
  • Why Steve is fighting police corruption

 

 

Related Links:

 

Peter Yang Zhao on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fabulously_tourette/

 

Peter’s account of the anti-Asian crime involving his wife: https://asamnews.com/2021/03/23/oped-finding-real-solutions-to-ending-anti-asian-hate-crimes/

 

Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALEDF): https://www.aaldef.org/

 

MinKwon Center for Community Action: http://minkwon.org/

 

Shomrim (Jewish COP): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shomrim_(neighborhood_watch_group)

 

Guardian Angels: http://guardianangels.org/

May 03, 2021
Ep 127 | Eric Chang on China's Breach of Taiwan's Air Defense Identification Zone: Threat or Bluff?
01:13:12

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Eric Chang, a writer for Taiwan News. On April 18th we spoke about China’s April 12th incursion into Taiwan’s air defense identification zone, the largest one to date at the time. We also spoke about the longstanding military threat that China poses for Taiwan and the Asia Pacific region, what this means for Taiwan, how Taiwan has responded, the U.S.’s response and why it matters, and how the support and cooperation from neighboring countries is essential to keeping peace in the region.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The difference between a country’s airspace and ADIZ (air defense identification zone)
  • When Taiwan’s ADIZ was set up
  • When China’s ADIZ was set up
  • How China’s air intrusions increased during the last year of Trump’s presidency
  • What prompted China’s April 12th incursion into Taiwan’s ADIZ
  • U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s recent comments about Taiwan
  • The Taiwan Relations Act
  • What the median line is
  • When Taiwan’s Ministry of National Defense started to publicly report China’s incursions into Taiwan’s ADIZ
  • How many incursions there have been this year by China to Taiwan’s ADIZ
  • The significance of Alex Azar (24th U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary) and Keith Krach’s (Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment) visits to Taiwan
  • Taiwan’s response to China’s incursions
  • What damage China can do to Taiwan with their fighter planes
  • The strategy/motivation behind China’s incursions
  • The war of attrition
  • Gray zone tactics
  • China’s history of military aggression aimed at Taiwan
  • China’s reaction to Taiwan’s first direct presidential election in 1996
  • How willing China is to attack Taiwan
  • How concerned people in Taiwan are about the China’s military threat
  • China’s increasing military aggression in the Asia region
  • Taiwan’s defense abilities
  • The new multimission amphibious ships that Taiwan recently launched
  • Asymmetric warfare capabilities and how Taiwan can defend itself
  • U.S. arms sales to Taiwan
  • How the Biden administration has reacted to China’s April 12th incursion
  • How Taiwan can benefit from cooperation and intelligence sharing with neighboring countries in the Asia Pacific region
  • Good sources to learn about Taiwan’s military situation

 

Related Links:

 

Eric Chang on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ahbying

 

Taiwan reports largest incursion yet by Chinese air force:

https://www.reuters.com/world/china/taiwan-reports-largest-incursion-yet-by-chinese-air-force-2021-04-12/

 

25 Chinese military aircraft intrude into Taiwan’s ADIZ:

https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/4175573?fbclid=IwAR3m993hnw9io6q-IOayFBd2ljslUV4HgENika9nj2hshgFrPlAerfXlw_w

 

The Taiwan Relations Act: https://www.ait.org.tw/our-relationship/policy-history/key-u-s-foreign-policy-documents-region/taiwan-relations-act/

 

Biden sends unofficial delegation to Taiwan in ‘personal signal’: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-taiwan-delegation-idUSKBN2C02MS

 

U.S.  President Biden and Japan’s Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga’s April 16th meeting in Washington D.C.: https://www.cnbc.com/2021/04/17/biden-and-japans-suga-project-unity-against-chinas-assertiveness.html

 

Taiwan’s first direct presidential election in 1996 and China’s missile tests aimed at Taiwan: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1996_Taiwanese_presidential_election

                                                                                                                            

Ian Easton – Project 2049 Institute: https://project2049.net/author/ianeaston/

 

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken calls Taiwan ‘country’: https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/4148761

 

Taiwan launches new amphibious vessel with anti-ship missiles: https://bit.ly/3no5Xa9

 

Taiwan’s National Ministry of Defense on Twitter: https://twitter.com/mondefense

 

Taiwan’s National Ministry of Defense’s real-time updates of military activity around its borders:

https://bit.ly/3nnkK4U

 

Focus Taiwan: https://focustaiwan.tw/

Apr 26, 2021
Ep 126 | Mars Rover Driver Dr. Jeng Yen Discusses The Age of Space Exploration
01:13:03

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Dr. Jeng Yen is a NASA scientist and the “driver” of the Perseverance Mars rover. I initially interviewed Dr. Yen on April 9th. We spoke about how he was first inspired to join NASA by the first Mars rover Sojourner, what’s been discovered about Mars since then, the age of space exploration, the work of Mars rover Perseverance and the Mars helicopter Ingenuity which is poised to be the first aircraft to fly on Mars.

 

I spoke with Dr. Yen again this past Friday, April 16th and he gave me an important update on the Mars helicopter Ingenuity which has had to delay the date of its first flight on Mars.

 

We are excited to learn that on Monday April 19th Ingenuity has indeed made history as the first aircraft humans have flown on another planet- Mars! You can watch the first flight of the Ingenuity Mars helicopter live from mission control here on YouTube: https://youtu.be/p1KolyCqICI 

 

I’m so pleased to be sharing my full interview with Dr. Yen on this momentous day. 

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Dr. Yen’s interest in working for NASA was inspired by the first rover on Mars the Sojourner in 1997
  • How Dr. Yen’s previous work in Minnesota on army high performance computing involved vehicle design
  • What it’s like to live and work in Mars time
  • The Mars helicopter Ingenuity
  • The four Mars exploration missions that Dr. Yen has been on and what each accomplished
  • Mars exploration rovers Spirit and Opportunity’s discovery that there was past surface water on Mars
  • Mars rover Curiosity and where it is in relation to the Perseverance rover
  • What the interface used to drive the rover is like
  • The Phoenix lander mission
  • The InSight mission which is still running and learning about the core of Mars
  • What happens if a part of the Perseverance rover breaks
  • What happened when the Curiosity rover dropped its drill
  • How long Perseverance will be on Mars
  • The power that Perseverance runs on that allows it to last for years
  • What is involved in landing a rover
  • How video footage of Perseverance’s landing was captured
  • How the Mars helicopter Ingenuity communicates with the Perseverance rover
  • China’s plans to land a rover on Mars
  • How Perseverance will be taking samples from Mars to see if there is any evidence of life on Mars and how these samples will be found and retrieved by a future rover
  • If Elon Musk’s SpaceX could be the first to land humans on Mars
  • Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin
  • Will it be possible to colonize Mars in the next 30 years
  • Which planet surface will NASA explore next
  • The Europa clipper
  • Why NASA uses the discovery of water as a standard to explore for life
  • The Phoenix lander mission
  • Where the name “Perseverance” for the current Mars rover came from
  • Who names the Mars rovers
  • The quest to answer the question are we alone in this universe
  • STEM (Science Technology Engineering Mathematics) education
  • How Dr. Yen founded the San Marino High School FRC (First Robotics Competition)
  • Dr. Yen’s advice for people interested in working in the field of space exploration or aeronautics

 

 

Related Links:

 

About Dr Jeng Yen: https://www-robotics.jpl.nasa.gov/people/Jeng_Yen/personFull.cfm

 

NASA Website: https://www.nasa.gov/

 

NASA YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLA_DiR1FfKNvjuUpBHmylQ

 

NASA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NASA

 

NASA on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NASA

 

NASA on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/nasa

 

Watch NASA’s Perseverance Rover Land on Mars! (Full video and reporting on NASA’s Perseverance Rover): https://youtu.be/gm0b_ijaYMQ

 

Nasa Mars rover: Key questions about Perseverance:

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53129281

 

First Flight of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter: Live from Mission Control: https://youtu.be/p1KolyCqICI

 

Sojourner NASA’s first rover on Mars:

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/july-4-1997-sojourner-arrives-on-the-red-planet

 

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/nasas-first-rover-on-the-red-planet

 

Info about the Mars rovers: https://go.nasa.gov/2QG5Uuo

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_rover

 

Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity: https://mars.nasa.gov/mars-exploration/missions/mars-exploration-rovers/

 

Mars rover Curiosity: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/index.html

 

Europa Clipper: https://europa.nasa.gov/

 

Phoenix Mars lander: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/phoenix/main/index.html

 

InSight mission: https://mars.nasa.gov/insight/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InSight

 

Who names NASA’s Mars Rovers? https://share.america.gov/who-names-nasas-mars-rovers/

Apr 19, 2021
Ep 125 | Peter Yang Zhao and Steven Lee Fight to Stop Asian Hate Crimes Part 1
39:28

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guests on this episode of Talking Taiwan about the topic of Asian hate are Peter Yang Zhao and Steve Lee. Both have been active in the fight to stop Asian hate crimes, and have lots to share on the topic of Asian hate. Peter Yang Zhao, is an anti-Asian hate crime activist, and Tourette’s syndrome activist.

A quick glance at his Instagram handle @fabulously_tourette reveals how outspoken he is on these topics. We will have him back on as a guest on a future episode to talk about his Tourette’s syndrome and advocacy work. Sergeant Steven Lee is a 16-year veteran of the NYPD, a whistleblower fighting to reform police corruption and anti-Asian hate crime activist. In 2020 he ran for State Assembly in District 40.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The 89-year-old woman who was set on fire in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York on July 14, 2020
  • They Can’t Burn Us All rallies and movement
  • Guardian Angels
  • How early on in the COVID-19 pandemic Steve donated N-95 masks to seniors
  • Early reactions within the Asian community when the Chinese started being blamed for spreading the Coronavirus
  • How Steve posted about crimes against Asians on Facebook saying that we need to start neighborhood block watches
  • How Steve created Asians in America which donated cooked food to first responders
  • The two block watch programs in Flushing: Main Street Patrol and PSP
  • How the Asian Hate Crime Task Force is volunteer-based and not an actual official unit
  • The pushback that the Asian Hate Crime Task Force is getting from cops
  • How cops need to understand the culture of neighborhoods that they work in
  • Peter’s various encounters with Taiwanese after moving to the U.S from China where he was born and raised
  • The Asian hate crime that happened to Peter’s wife

 

Related Links:

 

Peter Yang Zhao on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fabulously_tourette/

 

Elderly woman set on fire in Brooklyn: https://abc7ny.com/woman-set-on-fire-elderly-attack-89-year-old-attacked-bensonhurst-crime/6333749/

 

BREAKING: Teen Suspects Arrested, Charged After 89-Year-Old Woman Set on Fire in Brooklyn: https://nextshark.com/bensonhurst-brooklyn-suspects-arrested-89-year-old-grandma/

 

#TheyCantBurnUsAll: https://www.theycantburnusall.org/

 

Guardian Angels: http://guardianangels.org/

 

The first They Can’t Burn Us All/Asian Unity Rally that started in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York: https://asamnews.com/2020/08/02/asian-americans-rally-to-protest-hate-crimes-in-bensonhurst-neighborhood/

 

The second They Can’t Burn Us All Rally that started in New York’s Washington Square Park: https://nextshark.com/china-mac-second-protest-nyc-chinatown/

 

Asian In New York: http://www.asianinny.com/

 

Su Beng, the Taiwan Independence Revolutionary: http://aboutsubeng.com/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Su_Beng

 

Talking Taiwan on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/talkingtaiwan

Apr 12, 2021
Ep 124 | NASA's Mars Ingenuity Helicopter: First Flight Attempt on Mars
04:47

A Note From Talking Taiwan Host Felicia Lin:

 

I just interviewed Dr Yen the driver of Mars Rover Perseverance for Talking Taiwan and he shared some exciting news with me. 

 

My full interview with Dr. Yen will be published Monday April 19th.

Talking Taiwan is pleased to be the first podcast to interview the NASA scientist.

 

Don’t miss this important and historic interview!

 

Related Links:

 

6 Things to know about NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/6-things-to-know-about-nasas-ingenuity-mars-helicopter

 

Apr 11, 2021
Ep 123 | Dr Karen Tsai: How the CoFounder of Donate PPE Raised $150,000 for Covid-19
33:33

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

It’s been nearly a year since we started publishing episodes of Talking Taiwan on a weekly basis at the beginning of this pandemic, and I’ve really enjoyed seeing the listenership grow.

 

I’d like to acknowledge our listeners here, especially those who have reached out to me directly. One listener who reached out, said that episode 99 with Professor Scott Simon was particularly eye opening.

 

That led me to think about how to cover the topic of Taiwan’s indigenous people and to interview Tony Coolidge (in episodes 112 and 113) about discovering his indigenous roots and his work with the indigenous people of Taiwan. The two episodes I did with Tony are now among the most listened to.

 

Recently we’ve also gotten some wonderful anonymous reviews from listeners: “Amazing podcast. Really enjoy listening to it, love the variety of people that come on!” and just a few days ago, another listener wrote: “Love all the topics that has been discussed in Talking Taiwan!”

 

We are so grateful for all of this feedback. Your reviews help Talking Taiwan to get discovered. It’s great to know that we have a regular listener base, and that our content is resonating with you. Thank you for reaching out and letting us know how we’re doing!

 

This week’s episode features part two of my interview with Dr. Karen Tsai about her work with Donate PPE, a nonprofit that she has co-founded and that has raised over $150,000 to date. This is part two of my interview with her after speaking with her previously in episode 120 about how she spearheaded the creation of Monster Dance, a children’s book created to address the needs of children dealing with a world changed by COVID-19.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How and why Dr. Tsai started the nonprofit organization Donate PPE with Deyu Kong                                                                                                             
  • How the Donate PPE team is entirely Asian American
  • The work of Donate PPE and how it has delivered PPE to different low income, communities in need
  • The various companies and organizations that Donate PPE has worked with to get donations distributed
  • How Donate PPE has made donations internationally
  • How Donate PPE has adjusted as the situation with the pandemic has changed over time
  • How Donate PPE’s initially targeted hospitals and health care workers but later expanded to nursing homes, free clinics, schools, underprivileged communities, Navajo Nations, rural areas in the Midwest, vaccination sites
  • Asian hate crime advocacy organizations
  • The different distribution challenges that Donate PPE has had to deal with
  • How Donate PPE dealt with the distribution challenges presented by the partnership with Norwex to Distribute a Million Masks to Healthcare Workers and how Citizens of Humanity assisted
  • How Donate PPE got its nonprofit 501(c)(3) status during the pandemic by May 2020
  • How Dr. Tsai has worked full-time as a physician while running Donate PPE
  • How the Donate PPE website has changed over time
  • What’s in the future for Donate PPE once COVID-19 gets more under control

 

 

Related Links:

 

Donate PPE: https://donateppe.org/

 

Donate PPE on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/donateppeorg/

 

Donate PPE on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/donateppe/

 

Donate PPE on Twitter: https://twitter.com/donateppe

 

Guy Gilchrist’s Doodles, the FREE coloring pages he created to educate kids about COVID: https://donateppe.org/doodles/

 

DonatePPE.org has Partnered with Norwex to Distribute a Million Masks to Healthcare Workers: https://donateppe.org/2020/04/18/donateppe-org-has-partnered-with-norwex-to-distribute-a-million-masks-to-healthcare-workers/

 

For anyone in need of PPE email Donate PPE at: info@donateppe.org

 

Hate Is A Virus: https://hateisavirus.org/

 

Stop AAPI Hate: https://stopaapihate.org/

Apr 05, 2021
Ep 122 | Suelain and Otter: How to Combat Asian Hate Attacks
51:17

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Since the beginning of the pandemic I’d been hearing about more and more cases of Asian hate attacks that seemed to be related to blaming the Chinese for spreading COVID.  It’s been a year so you could say that I’m kind of late to the game in addressing it here.

 

Perhaps it’s because there wasn’t a single galvanizing event like the murder of George Floyd that mobilized the Black Lives Matter movement.

 

So why now? It wasn’t because of the Atlanta spa shootings that left 8 dead, 6 of whom were Asian women. It was due to a text conversation between friends.

 

In early March, my friend Ariane reached out to me on a group text conversation expressing how troubled she was about all the attacks on Asians and wondering what she could do stop it.

 

Last summer I’d found myself asking similar questions after the murder of George Floyd which is why I specifically sought guests who could talk about Black Lives Matter and what had led up to this latest iteration of the movement and the deeply rooted historical background. I realized that we all need to speak up when we see things like this happening and to let others know that it will not be tolerated. We need to create more awareness with whatever resources and platforms we have.

 

Now it’s time for me to walk the talk on the issue of Anti-Asian hate attacks by addressing it here on Talking Taiwan.

 

I don’t think what’s been happening is strictly a COVID-related issue that is going to go away. Actually, anti-Asian sentiments have been around and have surfaced and resurfaced in many different forms in the past. This will be the first of a few episodes about Asian hate.

 

For this episode I’ve invited Suelain Moy and her son Otter on to the podcast to talk about how they recently dealt with being the target of Asian hate.

 

About Suelain Moy

 

Suelain Moy is a New York City mother, writer, journalist, author, and editor. Her writing has appeared in many outlets, including Parenting, American Baby, Entertainment Weekly, aMagazine, Good Housekeeping, The Fiscal Times, and the New York Daily News. She is the author of Names to Grow On: Choosing A Name Your Baby Will Love. She graduated from Yale, where she earned a BA in English and studied with bell hooks. Suelain was the first Asian face in the Children's Division of Ford Models. She comes from a long line of merchants, small business owners, teachers, and law enforcement officers in the Chinatown community, where her family has lived for generations since 1922. She wrote "The 16 Safety Guidelines for the Parents of Asian Children" in 2021, during a wave of anti-Asian violence and hate crimes in the U.S. They are based on her experiences with racism and misogyny on the streets of New York. You can read her personal essays, including the safety guidelines, at suelain.com.

 

About Otter Lee

 

Otter Lee is a queer actor, comedian, writer, and voiceover artist born and raised in New York City. He currently plays Otter Lin on Stephen Colbert Presents: Tooning Out the News, a political cartoon on Paramount+ that airs as part of The Late Show. His standup, sketch, and improv have appeared at such venues as Buzzfeed, UCB, Face-Off Unlimited, Caveat, Union Hall, The Magnet, and The Asian American Writer’s Workshop. Otter co-produced, hosted, and took the stage for NYC’s First Asian Comedy Festival at the PIT in January 2020, selling out multiple blocks and empowering numerous comedians and groups. He followed this with Crazy Talented Asians and Friends, a virtual showcase at Flushing Town Hall. A graduate of NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study with a degree in acting, playwriting, and history, Otter also trained extensively in the disciplines of classical and musical theatre, improv, and voice acting.  Otter’s performances and projects have been written up and featured in The New York Times, Time Out New York, AsianCrush, and World Journal.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Suelain and Otter’s account of an Asian hate crime incident that happened to them while in New York City’s SoHo district in February of this year
  • How and why Suelain and Otter reacted to their harasser the way that they did
  • How Suelain and Otter’s past experiences with hate crimes has prepared them to react
  • The bystanders who stopped check on Suelain and Otter and offered to help
  • How the incident was the second Asian hate speech incident in a week that happened to Otter
  • The strategies that Suelain’s father suggested to protect her when she had to ride the New York City subway alone after commuting to school in Manhattan from Long Island
  • How Suelain learned to protect herself on the New York City subway
  • What Suelain wants to share with parents and others about how they can handle incidents Asian hate speech or crimes
  • What defines something as a hate crime
  • What defines something as Asian hate speech vs. an Asian hate crime
  • How a lot of incidents seem to happen when people are standing on the corner
  • How parents need to talk to their kids about a safety plan
  • What bystanders can to if they witness someone being attacked
  • How Asian hate speech and crimes are sometimes not taken seriously due to the model minority myth
  • How Suelain once turned the tables on a man who sexually harassed her
  • How summoning your middle-aged indignation or “Mommy shaming” can be strategies to deal with harassers
  • What reactions and press Suelain and Otter have gotten since sharing what happened to them on social media
  • The segment on Stephen Colbert Presents “Tooning Out The News” in which Otter talks about the incident that happened to him and his mother
  • The media coverage that Suelain and Otter have gotten
  • How Asian hate incidents transcend race, social class
  • How Suelain’s list of safety guidelines has grown from 12 to 16 items, and has been translated into Chinese and distributed in schools
  • How the New York City website for Asian hate crimes does not clearly indicate where you can report a crime
  • The under reporting of Asian hate crimes
  • How Asians are easy targets because they are visible minorities
  • How the majority of Chinatown’s residents have been wearing masks since the beginning of the pandemic but they are being blamed for the spread of COVID

 

 

Related Links:

 

Suelain Moy’s blog: https://suelain.com/

 

Suelain’s safety guidelines: https://suelain.com/2021/03/25/16-safety-guidelines-for-the-parents-of-asian-children/?fbclid=IwAR2tbE5J3vbKAASQwZBdxEiZRsnyQ34phgyyqxCyX-4NX2ztxRPY-FCYZJk

 

Suelain on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/suelain

 

Suelain on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/suelain_moy/

 

Suelain on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SuelainMoy

 

Otter on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/otterleemoy/

 

Otter on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Otter.Lee

 

Otter on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OtterLeeMoy

 

 

Lee Statsberg sense memory acting technique: https://strasberg.edu/blog/breaking-down-lees-work-with-david-lee-strasberg/

 

Woman Who Fought Back During Attack to Donate Nearly $1M Raised for Her to Combat Anti-Asian Racism: https://people.com/crime/xiao-zhen-xie-fought-back-alleged-attacker-donate-1-million-raised-combat-anti-asian-racism/?fbclid=IwAR3IgKr6JpP_Myw001DuoIILDSdVEJeHFSLWXnXrSB80DGzgmbuNy_FV-4w

 

Author Min Jin Lee: https://www.minjinlee.com/

 

Otter’s segment on Stephen Colbert Presents “Tooning Out The News”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iaHM699cT20&t=260s

 

Crazy Talented Asians and Friends: Triumphing Over Quarantine: https://flushingtownhall.org/crazy-talented-asians-friends-live-comedy

 

Asian Comedy Festival 2021: https://asiancomedyfest.com/

 

New York City's Toolkit for Addressing Anti-Asian Bias, Discrimination, and Hate: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/cchr/community/stop-asian-hate.page

 

The Analysis of Anti‐Asian Hate Crime Reported to Police in America’s Largest Cities: 2020 (done by the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino): https://www.csusb.edu/sites/default/files/FACT%20SHEET-%20Anti-Asian%20Hate%202020%203.2.21.pdf

 

Cefaan Kim’s reporting and articles: https://muckrack.com/cefaan-kim/articles

 

Chinese Exclusion Act: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Exclusion_Act#:~:text=The%20Chinese%20Exclusion%20Act%20was,all%20immigration%20of%20Chinese%20laborers

 

https://www.history.com/topics/immigration/chinese-exclusion-act-1882

 

 

Japanese American Internment Camps: https://www.britannica.com/event/Japanese-American-internment

 

https://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/japanese-american-relocation

Mar 29, 2021
Ep 121 | Eric Chang on the Occupation of the Executive Yuan During the Sunflower Movement
28:05

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

March 23rd will mark the seventh anniversary of the short-lived occupation of the Executive Yuan by students involved in the Sunflower Movement of 2014. The Sunflower Movement began when students and activists occupied the Legislative Yuan on March 18, 2014 in an effort to block the passage of a trade pact between Taiwan and China. At a press conference on March 23, then President Ma Ying-jeou stated his resolve in passing the trade pact. This led to the students attempt to occupy the Executive Yuan. Five days afterward, on March 28, 2014, I spoke to Eric Chang also known as Ahbying, who was there that night about what he saw firsthand and experienced that night.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • His candid conversation with a cop at the Executive Yuan before the scene turned violent
  • His firsthand account of what he saw and experienced the night that students tried to occupy the Executive Yuan
  • How he reacted when the police hit him
  • The media’s coverage of what happened on March 23rdat the Executive Yuan
  • His thoughts of the occupation of the Legislative Yuan and Sunflower Movement

Related Links:

 

Eric’s Ahbying YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ahbying

 

Sunflower Movement: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunflower_Student_Movement

Mar 22, 2021
Ep 120 | Dr. Karen Tsai Brings Monster Dance Children's Book To Life
31:22

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Learn about the Taiwan connection (namely a physician, publisher and supermodel) that made Monster Dance children’s book story come to life. Monster Dance was created to help children deal with and understand the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Dr. Karen Tsai is a physician based in Los Angeles who has spearheaded the creation of the children’s book, and she spoke with me about how she got some heavy hitters involved in the project like cartoonist and illustrator Guy Gilchrist (best known for his work with the Muppets), Eva Lou (founder of the multi-lingual children's book publishing company Madeleine Editions, which published Monster Dance), actor Denis O’Hare (who did the English narration for the book) and Taiwanese supermodel Chiling Lin (林志玲) who did the Mandarin Chinese narration. For every copy of Monster Dance sold, a donation will be made to Donate PPE.

Dr. Tsai is a co-founder of Donate PPE a nonprofit that has already raised over $150,000. In part two of my interview with her we will talk about her work with Donate PPE.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • Dr. Tsai’s connection to Taiwan
  • What motivated Dr. Tsai to initiate the creation of children’s book, Monster Danceto help children to deal with COVID
  • How Dr. Tsai got Guy Gilchrist (cartoonist and illustrator), Eva Lou (founder of the multi-lingual children's book publishing company Madeleine Editions), actor Denis O’Hare and Taiwanese supermodel Chiling Lin (林志玲) involved in Monster Dance
  • How things started with Guy Gilchrist’s drawings as coloring pages that educated children about social distancing, handwashing, mask wearing and other thing related to COVID
  • Free coloring pages drawn by Guy Gilchrist to educate kids about COVID are available on https://donateppe.org/doodles/
  • How Dr. Tsai was able to get Monster Dancepublished in short time to be relevant for the pandemic
  • How Monster Danceis available in English and Mandarin Chinese
  • How they came up with the title and concept for Monster Dance
  • How Dr. Tsai, Guy Gilchrist and Eva Lou worked on Monster Dancevirtually and have never met in person
  • How Monster Dancestarted as a Kickstarter campaign
  • How Monster Dancehas helped children to deal with COVID
  • For every copy of Monster Dancesold a donation will be made to Donate PPE
  • How copies of Monster Dancehave been donated to children’s hospitals
  • How Monster Dancehas a presence in Taiwan with the Mandarin Chinese version through the involvement of Taiwanese supermodel Chiling Lin (林志玲)

 

Related Links:

 

Monster Dancehttps://madeleineeditions.com/stories/monster-dance/

 

Monster Dance Kickstarter campaign: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/madeleineeditions/monster-dance

 

Monster Dance on the Donate PPE website: https://donateppe.org/monster-dance/

 

Access FREE coloring pages created by Guy Gilchrist to educate kids about COVID: https://donateppe.org/doodles/

 

Madeleine Editions (International children’s publisher): https://www.facebook.com/MadeleineEditions

 

Madeleine Editions (International children’s publisher): https://www.instagram.com/madeleine_editions/

 

Donate PPE: https://donateppe.org/

 

Guy Gilchrist, cartoonist and illustrator (best known for his work with the Muppets) at the Whitehouse 1984.
 
 
 
Taiwanese supermodel Chiling did the Mandarin Chinese narration for Monster Dance.
Taiwanese supermodel Chiling's Charity Foundation: https://www.chilicngjj.org/
 
 
Eva Lou founder of the multi-lingual children's book publishing company Madeleine Editions, which published Monster Dance: https://madeleineeditions.com/
 
 
Actor Dennis O'Hare did the English narration for Monster Dance.
 
Mar 15, 2021
Ep 119 | Taipei Times Columnist Michael Turton Talks About the Taiwan Pineapple Ban by China
32:51

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Michael Turton is a political commentator, writer and Taipei Times columnist based in Taichung, Taiwan.  I first learned about him through his long running blog, The View From Taiwan when I lived in Taiwan myself and started blogging about living there. I’ve invited him on to the podcast to talk about China’s recent Taiwan pineapple ban. We talked about what’s really behind the ban and how trade issues between China and Taiwan led to the 2014 Sunflower Movement and occupation of Taiwan’s Legislative Yuan building.

 

CORRECTION: At 1:28 when Michael says “over in Xiamen” he meant to refer to Fujian. There several towns in Fujian- Yongfu and Qingliu but not Xiamen, that are now using agricultural techniques learned from Taiwan. See link to the CommonWealth Magazine article, “Is Taiwan’s Farm Sector Selling Out to China” for reference.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • Why China banned pineapples imported from Taiwan
  • What has happened since the ban
  • How the ban will impact Taiwan
  • What are the larger issues behind what happened and why China banned Taiwan’s pineapples
  • What can people overseas can do to support Taiwan, aside from buying Taiwan pineapples
  • How consumption is related to Taiwanese identity
  • What trade issues with China have to do with the Sunflower Movement
  • What precipitated the occupation of the Legislative Yuan building by the Sunflower Movement activists in March 2014
  • How the caucus system in Taiwan is set up to slow down the legislature
  • The problems with Taiwan’s constitution
  • How the spat between then President Ma Ying-jeou and Speaker Wang Jin-pyng contributed to the occupation of the Legislative Yuan by the Sunflower Movement activists in March of 2014
  • How the Sunflower Movement strengthened the Taiwanese identity of a generation that grew up in a democratic Taiwan vs. those who previously grew up under Kuomintang rule in the 1970s and 80s

 

Related Links:

 

Taipei Times article, “PRC bans import of Taiwan pineapples”: https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/front/archives/2021/02/27/2003752913

 

Taipei Times article, “China pineapple ban offset in four days”: https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/front/archives/2021/03/03/2003753138

 

Guardian article, “Taiwanese urged to eat ‘freedom pineapples’ after China import ban”: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/mar/02/taiwanese-urged-to-eat-freedom-pineapples-after-china-import-ban?fbclid=IwAR226v7PM6yXUM7UqWsPOyD_jwwpkQNKWpyFnXakMYUgDbtTNJd_OKsWxgc

 

Taiwan News article, "Japanese with 'Taiwan pineapple fever' empty store shelves": https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/4145007?fbclid=IwAR0TLArguULOz7Y3iiZ0VIBHRjFrChPosZu8-fTbqxSJGxAnw6AKe7ANE1g

 

CommonWealth Magazine article, “Is Taiwan’s Farm Sector Selling Out to China”:

https://english.cw.com.tw/article/article.action?id=965

 

Michael Turton’s podcast, Taiwan Contexthttps://anchor.fm/taiwancontext/episodes/Taiwan-Context--Human-Rights-Defender-epmtsm

 

Michael Turton’s blog, The View From Taiwanhttps://michaelturton.blogspot.com/

 

Ian Rowen’s research on Chinese tour groups in Taiwan: https://cpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com/blogs.ntu.edu.sg/dist/f/1564/files/2017/12/Rowen-2014-Tourism-as-territorial-strategy-x64350.pdf

 

Sunflower Movement: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunflower_Student_Movement

 

An article about Taiwan’s pineapple industry in 1960: https://taiwantoday.tw/news.php?unit=8%2C8%2C29%2C32%2C32%2C45&post=14054&fbclid=IwAR1bP4UHEg3rbTacOf9g9N4lPd7rQaSPFOWrcc1lR6a4GMIWV3KuOH6JV8I

 

Mar 08, 2021
Ep 118 | Dr. Michi Fu Straddles Between Living in Taiwan and the U.S.
01:16:02

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Dr. Michi Fu is a professor, psychologist, writer, public speaker and experience creator. She spoke with me about how her mother’s decision to retire in Taiwan led her to decide to take a one-year sabbatical in Taiwan and to apply for Taiwan citizenship- which proved to be an arduous process but well worth it in the end. It has allowed her to more easily travel and straddle between living in the U.S. and Taiwan. As she’s spent more time residing in Taiwan, she’s faced challenges adulting in Taiwan due to limited language and cultural proficiency. We spoke in depth about how she’s dealt with all this by learning to let go of cultural norms and expectations, and found ways to build a community for herself in Taiwan.

 

While in Taiwan she’s connected with expat communities like the Black lives Matter and Burning Man Taiwan communities, participated in a bilingual version of the Vagina Monologues, and she’s also been invited to participate in the 228 Transitional Justice Project. I found that to be a timely topic of conversation indeed, with the 74th anniversary of the 228 Incident having just passed.

 

Also referred to as The 228 Massacre, or The 228 Uprising, 228 is February 28, 1947, the date that the arrest of a cigarette seller in Taipei sparked protests over the corruption and repression of the ruling Kuomintang party at the time. What followed were the disappearance and execution of thousands by the Kuomintang. Some say up to 20 thousand were murdered. It led to the declaration of martial law and it was the beginning of the reign of White Terror in Taiwan that lasted for decades.

 

CORRECTION: At the 45-minute mark of Michi’s interview when she stated that she had arrived on holiday for her dissertation, she had arrived during the Dragon Boat Holiday for her sabbatical not her dissertation.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Michi’s upbringing and where she grew up
  • Michi’s connection to Taiwan
  • The study tour that Michi has co-organized with Dr. Tsuann Kuo (Founder of NATWA II)
  • How Michi’s perception of Taiwan has changed over time
  • How she’s met expats who have made Taiwan their home and out be interested in applying for citizenship in Taiwan
  • The reason why Michi decided to apply for citizenship and residency in Taiwan, and to split her time between the U.S. and Taiwan
  • What’s involved in the process to apply for citizenship and residency in Taiwan if you have a Taiwan birthright (i.e. parents born in Taiwan, and have residency and citizenship in Taiwan)
  • What the Yo yo card is and how to use it
  • Residency status that children of Taiwanese nationals can apply for to stay longer than a passport visa
  • The number of days required to stay in Taiwan in order to able to apply for citizenship
  • Michi’s sense of Taiwanese and Taiwanese American identity
  • Michi’s participation in the 228 Transitional Justice Project
  • The challenges of learning a language later in life
  • How Michi sometimes feels like a Third Culture Kid
  • How Michi has learned from cultural misunderstandings
  • How Michi has connected with and made friends through the expat community in Taiwan
  • What Michi misses about the U.S. when she’s in Taiwan
  • What Michi misses about Taiwan when she’s in the U.S.
  • What advice Michi has for those considering applying for Taiwan residency and citizenship
  • What advice Michi has for those considering spending more of the calendar year living in Taiwan
  • The different cultural expectations of Taiwan and the U.S.
  • The challenges of adulting in Taiwan with limited language and cultural proficiency
  • The wage gap for certain professions in Taiwan vs. the U.S.
  • The things Michi considers in deciding to live in Taiwan full-time
  • How Michi built her own sense of community by connecting with the expat community and Facebook groups

 

 

Related Links and Terms:

 

Michi’s Psychology Today Profile: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapists/los-angeles-county-monterey-park-ca/73177

 

The local love boat program that Michi attended: The 2006 Overseas Young Health Professionals Program OCAC Taipei, Taiwan

 

Love Boat Study Tour Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_Boat_(study_tour)

 

OCAC (Overseas Community Affairs Council): https://www.ocac.gov.tw/OCAC/Eng/

 

NATMA (North American Taiwanese Medical Association): https://www.natma.org/

 

NATWA (North American Taiwanese Women’s Association): http://www.natwa.com/

 

NATWA II: http://natwa.com/natwa2/about.html

 

TECO (Taipei Economic and Cultural Office)

 

TECRO (Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States): https://www.taiwanembassy.org/us_en/index.html

 

Yo yo card 悠遊卡 (Pinyin: Yōu-yóu Kǎ) aka EasyCard: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EasyCard

https://www.easycard.com.tw/en/about

 

Hong Kong’s Octopus card: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopus_card

www.octopus.com.hk

 

Shēnfènzhèng (民身分證) the national identification card of Taiwan: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_identification_card_(Taiwan)

 

What is 228?: http://www.taiwandc.org/228-intr.htm

https://228massacre.org/

 

Third culture kid: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_culture_kid

 

Thrive Tour (private) Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/491147317734655/


A video from the first class of a tour that Michi organized for the Masters of Global Health program for NTU (National Taiwan University): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4K70K9OKd80&feature=youtu.be

 

A list of the Facebook groups that Michi joined and that connected her with the expat community in Taiwan:

 

Taiwan Foodie Girls Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/302771153463762/about

 

Formosa Improv Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/FormosaImprovGroup

 

Women Anonymous Reconnecting Mentally Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/323198761492476

 

Subtle Taiwanese Traits Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/583249345764112/

 

COVID-19 group for returnees Facebook group (in Mandarin Chinese): https://www.facebook.com/groups/889736338130271

 

The play White Rabbit Red Rabbit: https://www.nassimsoleimanpour.com/whiterabbitredrabbit

 

Burning Man community in Taiwan: https://www.facebook.com/groups/BurningManTaiwan

 

Black Lives Matter community in Taiwan: https://www.facebook.com/BLMTaiwan

 

 

Our Talking Taiwan listeners may be interested in these other related episodes:

 

Love Boat Taiwan: Interview with Asian American Studies Professor and Filmmaker Valerie Soe Ep 66: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/love-boat-taiwan-interview-asian-american-studies-professor-film-maker-valerie-soe-ep-66/

 

An Interview With Author Jennifer J. Chow About The 228 Legacy and Her Other Books Ep 65: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/interview-author-jennifer-j-chow-228-legacy-books-ep-65/

 

Black Lives Solidarity Global Initiative: Founders Stefanie Davis and Patrick Springer Ep 84: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/black-lives-solidarity-global-initiative-founders-stefanie-davis-and-patrick-springer/

 

Jaleea Price Talks About Living in Taiwan Ep 90: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/jaleea-price-talks-about-living-in-taiwan-ep-90/

 

Boba: https://www.thrillist.com/eat/nation/what-is-boba-bubble-tea-tapioca-balls

 
Mar 01, 2021
Ep 117 | Anthony Kao of Cinema Escapist Recommends Films About Taiwan
22:11

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This week we welcome back Anthony Kao, the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Cinema Escapist to Talking Taiwan. I’ve asked him to recommend films that help familiarize people with Taiwan. He’ll be recommending films about Taiwan that best represent certain decades, eras or significant historical events.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • Anthony’s recommendations are of films made after the lifting of martial law in Taiwan 1987
  • In selecting films to recommend Anthony tried to select a variety of film genres to suit the different tastes of Talking Taiwan listeners
  • The films Anthony recommends represent a diverse array of Taiwan’s culture and historical phenomena
  • The five films that Anthony recommends: A City of Sadness (1989), Yi Yi (1999), Cape No. 7 (2008)
  • The historical and political relevance of Anthony’s film recommendations
  • The Taiwan history film trilogy by film director Hou Hsiao-hsien (侯孝賢): A City of Sadness (1989), Good Men, Good Women (好男好女1995), The Puppetmaster (1993)
  • New Taiwanese Cinema
  • Second New Wave of Taiwan Cinema

 

Related Links:

 

Cinema Escapist: https://www.cinemaescapist.com/

 

Cinema Escapist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cinemaescapist

 

Cinema Escapist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cinemaescapist

 

 

A City of Sadness (1989): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_City_of_Sadness

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096908/

 

 

Good Men, Good Women (好男好女 1995): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Men,_Good_Women

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113256/

 

 

The Puppetmaster (1993): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Puppetmaster_(film)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0107157/

 

 

Hou Hsiao-hsien (侯孝賢), Film Director: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hou_Hsiao-hsien

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0396284/

 

 

Yi Yi (1999): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yi_Yi

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0244316/

 

 

Edward Yang (楊德昌), Film Director: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0945981/

 

 

Three Times (2005): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Times

 

 

Cape No. 7 (2008): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_No._7

 

 

Seediq Bale (2011): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warriors_of_the_Rainbow:_Seediq_Bale

https://www.imdb.com/title/att2007993/

 

 

We Te-sheng, Film Director: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wei_Te-sheng

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0917669/

 

 

On Happiness Road (2017): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Happiness_Road

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7543904/

 

 

Hsin Yin Sung, Film Director: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm3403663/?ref_=tt_ov_dr

 

 

 

New Taiwanese Cinema: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinema_of_Taiwan#New_Taiwanese_Cinema,_1982%E2%80%931990

 

 

Second New Wave of Taiwan Cinema: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinema_of_Taiwan#New_Taiwanese_Cinema,_1982%E2%80%931990

 

 

The 10 Best Taiwanese Movies of 2019: https://www.cinemaescapist.com/2019/12/best-taiwanese-movies-2019/

Feb 22, 2021
Ep 116 | Anthony Kao of Cinema Escapist Often First Publication to Cover Taiwanese Films
35:45

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Anthony Kao is Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Cinema Escapist, which is often the first or only publication that covers Taiwanese film or television shows. I’ve found it has some really great reviews and recommendations of films from and about Taiwan. Cinema Escapist also covers films from all around the world and takes a look at their social and political context. Anthony spoke with me about how he started Cinema Escapist and their unique approach to discussing film. Next week we’ll have Anthony back to recommend films about Taiwan that represent different decades or historical events significant to Taiwan.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Where Anthony’s interest in film comes from
  • Film as a way to explore the world
  • Cinema Escapist’s focus on international films and the social and political context of films
  • Anthony’s interest in Taiwanese film and television
  • How Cinema Escapist is often the first or only publication that covers Taiwanese film or television shows
  • Publications about Taiwan recommended by Anthony
  • Anthony’s approach to writing about film
  • When and why Anthony started Cinema Escapist
  • How Cinema Escapist has changed over time
  • What’s behind the name “Cinema Escapist”
  • The challenges of running Cinema Escapist which has a completely volunteer staff
  • The interesting experiences and people that Anthony has met through Cinema Escapist
  • Cinema Escapist’s plans to go into podcasting

 

Related Links:

 

Cinema Escapist: https://www.cinemaescapist.com/

 

Cinema Escapist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cinemaescapist

 

Cinema Escapist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cinemaescapist

 

Goodbye Lenin (film): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0301357/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Bye,_Lenin!

 

Yi Yi (film): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yi_Yi

 

New Bloom Magazine: https://newbloommag.net/


CommonWealth Magazine: https://english.cw.com.tw/

 

The News Lens: https://international.thenewslens.com/

 

Talking Taiwan Episode 91 about the Austin Asian American Film Festival: Prismatic Taiwan: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/austin-film-festival-prismatic-taiwan-a-series-celebrating-queer-taiwanese-cinema-ep-91/

 

Film Director Jean Luc Godard: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Luc_Godard

https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000419/

 

Cinema Escapist articles on The News Lens: https://international.thenewslens.com/author/Cinema%2520Escapist

 

The Great Buddha+ (film): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Buddha%2B

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7010412/

 

The 10 Best Taiwanese Movies of 2019: https://www.cinemaescapist.com/2019/12/best-taiwanese-movies-2019/

Feb 15, 2021
Ep 115 | A Discussion with Jason Wang on Covid and STC NextHealth's Antimicrobial Mask Combo
10:18

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This week’s guest is Jason Wang who we’ve had on Talking Taiwan previously. In Episode 102 Jason spoke with me about how his advisory firm Cypress Rivers started producing PPE to support health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, through an effort called Face Shields for the First Line. At the time he mentioned that Face Shields for the First Line would be transitioning into the making of face masks. So we’re welcoming Jason back to tell us what’s happened since we last spoke.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The continuing spread of COVID-19 and new variants which necessitates continuing to practice safe hygiene measures such as social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks
  • The double mask that STC Next Health is producing which consists of an outer shell and inner filter
  • The masks are antimicrobial due to the use of nano-coated silver
  • Other products that STC Next Health produces like antimicrobial zinc oxide tape for use on common high touch/high traffic areas such as door handles or hand railings
  • Talking Taiwan listeners can use the code: talkingtaiwan at checkout to get a 10% discount off their purchase of items from STC Next Health

 

Related Links:

 

STC Next Health: https://stcnext.health/

 

STC Next Health’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/stcnexthealth/

 

STC Next Health’s Instagram page: https://www.instagram.com/stcnext_health/

 

Talking Taiwan Episode 102 featuring Jason Wang: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/jason-wang-how-his-advisory-firm-makes-coronavirus-face-shields-for-the-front-line/

Feb 08, 2021
Ep 114 | An Interview with Charles Yu, Winner of the 2020 National Book Award for Fiction
38:56
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Charles Yu is a Taiwanese American writer, author of the novel Interior Chinatown, and winner of the 2020 National Book Award for fiction. He spoke candidly with me about how he and his family are dealing with the pandemic, his writing process, what it was like appearing on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and how he transitioned from a career as a lawyer to television writing.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

·      How Charles and his family are doing during the pandemic

·      The piece that Charles wrote for The Atlantic about life during the pandemic

·      How Charles first started writing poetry as a child

·      How Charles’ Taiwanese parents’ reactions to his interest in writing have changed over time

·      How Charles recently found some of the poetry that he wrote when at Berkeley

·      Charles’ connection to Taiwan

·      How Charles started writing Interior Chinatown in 2013 and the concept changed over time

·      How/why Interior Chinatown is written in a screenplay-type format

·      Charles’ approach to writing

·      His appearance on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

·      Charles’ writing for TV

·      How Charles was previously a lawyer and quit to work in TV in 2014

·      The difference between writing books and for TV

·      Charles’ interest in writing his own TV series

·      How Charles feels about being compared to Franz Kafka, Kurt Vonnegut and Douglas Adams

·      Why/What motivates Charles to write

·      What themes inspire Charles to write

·      Advice Charles has for some struggling to write their first book

·      Why it took Charles seven years to write Interior Chinatown

 

 

Related Links:

 

Charles Yu’s website: https://www.charlesyuauthor.com/

 

 

Charles Yu’s Atlantic article “ The Pre-pandemic Universe Was the Fiction”: https://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2020/04/charles-yu-science-fiction-reality-life-pandemic/609985/

 

 

Order a copy of Interior Chinatown here: https://www.amazon.com/Interior-Chinatown-Novel-Charles-Yu/dp/0307907198/

 

 

TAF (Taiwanese American Foundation): https://www.tafworld.org/

 

 

TACL (Taiwanese American Citizens League): https://tacl.org/

 

 

Charles’ interview on TaiwaneseAmerican.org: http://www.taiwaneseamerican.org/?s=charles+yu

 

 

How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe | Charles Yu | Talks at Google: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckmJt3AsU4c

 

 

Charles’ appearance on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0afVYOb4kA

 

 

Charles on Twitter: https://twitter.com/charles_yu

Feb 01, 2021
Ep 113 | Tony Coolidge Talks About his Work with Indigenous Bridges
43:42

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This is part two of my interview with Tony Coolidge. Tony is the Founder of the Atayal organization, which is named after his mother’s indigenous tribe. In this interview Tony talks about his work with Indigenous Bridges through his nonprofit, the Atayal organization, and shares his perspectives on some of indigenous people he’s interacted with from around the world.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • The work of Indigenous Bridges
  • Why Tony moved back to Taiwan in 2009
  • How Indigenous Bridges serves to connect indigenous people from all over the world
  • How the mission of the Atayal organization shifted from sharing the culture of indigenous people to connecting indigenous people with each other
  • How Indigenous Bridges is about building trusted relationships based on shared cultures and cultural exchange
  • The sister city relationship between Orlando, Florida and Tainan, Taiwan
  • Sister tribe programs that are being developed
  • The indigenous youth ambassador program of Indigenous Bridges
  • Virtual cultural exchanges and conferences that are now being developed due to the onset of COVID-19
  • The common experiences and challenges of indigenous people
  • Possible solutions to the economic hardship that is often experienced by indigenous people around the world
  • How the rights of indigenous people in the U.S. compares to Taiwan and other parts of the world
  • The connection between the Maori indigenous people of New Zealand and the indigenous people of Taiwan
  • The migration of Austronesian people and how they originated from Taiwan
  • What Tony learned from the Maori indigenous people of New Zealand
  • How the Maori are a source of pride for New Zealand
  • The government’s role in preserving indigenous culture
  • How indigenous rights are protected by the United Nations and indigenous people can create treaties with each other
  • The struggles in trying to return property to the indigenous people of Taiwan
  • How the recognition of tribes gives them access to resources
  • The fight over resources between the different indigenous people of Taiwan
  • How Tony hopes that his work reveals that Taiwan is a far more diverse and interesting place than people have originally thought
  • How former President Lee Teng-hui’s role in changing the perception of indigenous people in Taiwan
  • Tony’s experience representing indigenous people at the UN headquarters in New York

 

 

Related Links:

 

Indigenous Bridges programs of the Atayal organization: https://www.indigenousbridges.org/

 

Voices in the Clouds, the documentary based on Tony’s 2004 trip to Taiwan: https://www.cultureunplugged.com/documentary/watch-online/play/5485/Voices-in-the-Clouds?fbclid=IwAR1qjJPdz9cglu_NIK3X399mbSiZiAsTT4hztaHXbRDbYX1nZBo_vbqbk2A

 

A link to the “Village in the Clouds” article about Tony’s trip to Taiwan in 1996 that led him to discover his indigenous roots: https://indigenousbridges.blogspot.com/2021/01/village-in-the-clouds.html

 

Video footage from indigenous language competitions: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpdlwzeeA3YU19JZsJMbYqA/videos

 

General information about Taiwan’s indigenous people: https://oftaiwan.org/taiwan-101/taiwan-indigenous-people/

 

A video produced about Tony's work creating the Taproot Cultural Exchange program with New Zealand Maori: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cV64quV53m0
 
 
A blog page about the Taproot Cultural Exchange program with New Zealand Maori: http://aceca-taiwan.blogspot.com/
Jan 25, 2021
Ep 112 | Tony Coolidge: Finding his Indigenous Roots in Taiwan
58:35

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Did you know that there are 16 indigenous tribes officially recognized in Taiwan and up to 29 self-identified tribes?  Also, Taiwan’s current President Tsai Ing-wen’s paternal grandmother was from the Paiwan tribe. 

 

My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is Tony Coolidge. Tony is the Founder of the Atayal organization, which is named after his mother’s indigenous tribe. In this interview Tony talks about finding his indigenous roots and the indigenous people of Taiwan. This is part one of a two part interview.

 

In part two of our interview, Tony will talk about his work with Indigenous Bridges through his nonprofit, the Atayal organization.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • How Tony discovered his indigenous roots
  • Tony memories of his mother and the lessons she taught him
  • Tony’s mother’s connection to Taiwan and her indigenous roots
  • The first time that Tony visited Taiwan and met his mother’s family
  • Tony’s mother’s village Wulai
  • The documentary film that was made about Tony’s month-long trip to Taiwan with his brother during which time he met with several indigenous peoples and learned more about the culture
  • Tony’s mother’s struggles as an indigenous person and why she may have hidden her indigenous background from him
  • The pressure that Tony’s grandfather (his mother’s father, who was the chief/mayor of Wulai) had to show allegiance to the Chinese under the Kuomintang regime
  • How the indigenous peoples’ identity was suppressed under the Kuomintang regime and led to discrimination and abuse of indigenous people
  • The discrimination that indigenous people faced under the rule of the Kuomintang and Japanese
  • How the discrimination and abuse of indigenous people has changed over time
  • Tony’s desire to preserve indigenous culture
  • How policies of former President of Taiwan, Chen Shui-bian and the changing attitudes of the media contributed to changing people views of the indigenous peoples of Taiwan
  • Some key facts about the Atayal tribe (that Tony’s mother belonged to)
  • The mountainous and lowland indigenous tribes of Taiwan
  • How many indigenous tribes are presently recognized in Taiwan
  • The story of how the Atayal tribe’s custom of headhunting was ended
  • How Tony’s sons are learning the Atayal language
  • Tony started his nonprofit organization in 2001
  • In 2004 Tony’s nonprofit had its first indigenous cultural festival in Orlando, Florida
  • Alice the teacher of indigenous cultures that Tony met in 2004 and how she was instrumental in arranging the trip during which much of the documentary about Tony’s life was filmed
  • Tony’s trip to Taiwan in December 2004- January 2005 with his brother and the documentary film crew
  • How the trip to Taiwan affected Tony’s brother
  • How the death of Tony’s father-in-law happened in the middle of the trip and film
  • The challenges that Tony and his brother faced during the trip
  • The similarities and differences amongst Taiwan’s indigenous tribes
  • How the lives of indigenous peoples changed overnight when the Japanese removed them from their villages in the mountains
  • How have the indigenous peoples of Taiwan have adjusted over time
  • Social issues facing young indigenous peoples
  • The story of an indigenous policeman, Sakino who created a hunting, survival club through with he passed down indigenous knowledge
  • The most memorable moments of Tony’s 2004 trip to Taiwan
  • The abandoned village in the mountains (in Pintung) that Tony visited in the documentary film
  • How the 16 tribes now recognized in Taiwan were mostly originally mountainous tribes because the lowland tribes have been assimilated so long ago
  • Research has shown that more than 70% of Taiwanese have some indigenous DNA

 

 

Related Links:

 

A link to the “Village in the Clouds” article about Tony’s trip to Taiwan in 1996 that led him to discover his indigenous roots: https://indigenousbridges.blogspot.com/2021/01/village-in-the-clouds.html

 

Film Director Wei Te-sheng: 

 

Voices in the Clouds, the documentary based on Tony’s 2004 trip to Taiwan: https://www.cultureunplugged.com/documentary/watch-online/play/5485/Voices-in-the-Clouds?fbclid=IwAR1qjJPdz9cglu_NIK3X399mbSiZiAsTT4hztaHXbRDbYX1nZBo_vbqbk2A

 

Indigenous Bridges programs of the Atayal organization: https://www.indigenousbridges.org/

 

Video footage from indigenous language competitions: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpdlwzeeA3YU19JZsJMbYqA/videos

 

General information about Taiwan’s indigenous people: https://oftaiwan.org/taiwan-101/taiwan-indigenous-people/

Jan 18, 2021
Ep 111 | Elena Liao of Te Company: Running a Tea Room in the West Village
26:37

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

When I first interviewed Elena in 2013, she had just won the Entrepreneur Challenge and Competition. She was launching her Taiwanese tea business Té online.  Since then, I’ve wondered how she was doing and a couple of years later, I learned that Elena had opened a tearoom in the West Village.

 

I’ve visited the tearoom and it is a place of pure zen where tea drinking becomes a ritual. A true ambassador of tea, Elena sees the tearoom as a way to connect with others, to experience tea, and to demonstrate how it is brewed. Many of her customers are dedicated tea drinkers who first cultivate their tea drinking habits there. In this space, tea drinking is an activity of tranquil introspection.

 

In October of 2017 I invited Elena back on to Talking Taiwan for an update.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in the podcast:

 

  • What’s happened since the last time Elena was interviewed on Talking Taiwan in 2013
  • What it was like opening and running the tea shop
  • The tea education and tea tastings that Té offers
  • How Elena was able to get press for Té
  • Advice for people who want to open a brick and mortar store like Té
  • What’s next, her future plans for Té

 

 

 

Related Links:

 

Té Company: https://www.te-nyc.com/

 

Té Company on Instagram: www.instagram.com/tecompany/

 

Té Company on Facebook page: www.facebook.com/tecompany

 

Té Company on Twitter: www.twitter.com/tecompany

 

Elena’s 2013 interview on Talking Taiwan: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/tt027-elena-liao/

Jan 11, 2021
Ep 110 | Supei Liu: Her Experiences with Nomi Network and Entrepreneurship
01:02:34

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

The last time I had my guest Supei Liu on was six years ago to talk about her work with Nomi Network. Supei is the VP of Global Initiatives and Co-founder of Nomi Network.  Nomi Network combats human trafficking by creating pathways to safe employment, empowering women and girls to break cycles of slavery in their families and communities.

 

After spending seven years based in Cambodia and India, she’s relocated to the U.S. Last week we got caught up and talked about what’s she’s learned from her experience working with Nomi Network, and how she’s come to see herself as an entrepreneur. She also shared some thoughts on how to navigate parent-child relationships.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Nomi Network has grew and developed up to 2014
  • What learnings there have been for Nomi Network since 2014
  • How Nomi Network focused on providing job skills training
  • How Nomi Network faced a bottle neck after 2016 and switched from trying to create employment opportunities to partnering with businesses or organizations that have employment opportunities
  • How world view and the definition of success varies depending on cultural context
  • What Supei has learned about happiness, fulfilment and success (from working and living in Asia for seven years)
  • Supei’s return and relocation from Asia to the U.S.
  • Personal stories of how women have grown and been helped by Nomi Network’s training
  • How Nomi Network started doing virtual training through Zoom
  • How the Coronavirus pandemic affected Nomi Network
  • How Nomi Network selected 240 graduates of their training programs to become community outreach workers; these community outreach workers were trained to become contact tracers, and they would educate and inform the community about the best health and safety practices related to COVID-19
  • Since May of 2019 Nomi Network has been able to reach 160,000 people through its 240 community outreach workers and staff
  • Supei’s upbringing and background
  • How Supei was able to work through parent-child issues with her mother when she lived with Supei in Cambodia for three years
  • Supei’s transition from the corporate to nonprofit world in 2008
  • When Supei realized that she’s an entrepreneur
  • Entrepreneurship as the pursuit of solving problems
  • How Supei worked with a distillery to create liquor from a cashew apple fruit
  • Supei’s proudest accomplishments
  • How Supei’s work is going to change now that she’s relocated to the U.S.
  • Why Supei has decided to return to the U.S.
  • What Supei is working on beyond and outside of Nomi Network
  • How courage is not the absence of fear

 

 

Related Links:

 

Nomi Network: https://nominetwork.org/

 

Nomi Network products: https://www.buyherbagnotherbody.com/

 

Nomi Network on Facebook: www.facebook.com/nominetwork

 

Nomi Network on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nominetwork/

 

Nomi Network on Twitter: https://twitter.com/nominetwork

 

Nomi Network on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7UaUlyqMy2B1KL1S2_l5HQ

 

Supei’s previous interview on Talking Taiwan: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/nomi-network-cofounder-supei-liu-discusses-human-trafficking-ep-104/

Jan 04, 2021
Ep 109 | Talking Taiwan Top 5 of 2020 End of Year Review
17:06

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

Since March of this year, we’ve been publishing new episodes of Talking Taiwan on a weekly basis, so for our last episode of 2020, we thought it would be fun to look back and see which were the top five episodes of the year. It comes as no surprise that 2 of the episodes are related to the Coronavirus pandemic.

Through it all, it’s been amazing to see our listenership grow. In fact, I’ve really enjoyed hearing from listeners who’ve reached out to tell me how much they’ve enjoyed listening to Talking Taiwan. Thanks for all of the positive feedback. We look forward to continuing to deliver new episodes about interesting people and stories connected to Taiwan.

Which episode was your favorite of 2020? Let us know by leaving a comment below.

Don’t forget to check out our new feature starting in the new year called “Talking Taiwan Shorts.” We will be creating 100 short one-minute videos for our YouTube channel highlighting a GREAT segment from one of our podcast episodes. Be sure to check out Talking Taiwan’s YouTube channel, or go to our website here for “Talking Taiwan Shorts.”

Below are links to the top five Talking Taiwan episodes of 2020. Wishing you a wonderful rest of 2020, and a Happy New Year!

 

CORRECTION: At the 15:32-minute in the interview, Dr. Keating remarks, “We are 75 years at the end of World War I.” What he meant to say is that, "We are 75 years at the end of World War II."

 

Related Links:

 

Number 5 Talking Taiwan Episode of 2020

 

Number 4 Talking Taiwan Episode of 2020

 

Number 3 Talking Taiwan Episode of 2020

 

Number 2 Talking Taiwan Episode of 2020

 

Number 1 Talking Taiwan Episode of 2020

Dec 28, 2020
Ep 108 | Constance Parng: Super Auntie to Native Nations of the Auntie Sewing Squad
01:14:24

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Constance Parng, an actress, writer and healer who’s earned the title of Super Auntie to Native Nations of the Auntie Sewing Squad. Constance spoke with me about her work to support the highly vulnerable Native American communities and her connection to Taiwan. Through this conversation she reveals that the lack of access to basic things like running water and proper health care on reservations have deeply rooted origins. COVID-19 has exposed this reality that existed pre-pandemic. She hopes that bringing awareness to systemic injustices like this can lead to more people taking action to rectify the situation.

 

As Constance put it “by doing acts of compassion we are not only helping and saving others but also helping and saving ourselves."

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Constance’s connection to Taiwan
  • How Constance got involved with the Auntie Sewing Squad
  • Why Constance prefers to use the term Native Nations instead of First Nations, Native American, Tribal Nations, Indigenous Nations, Native Communities
  • The living conditions of the Navajo Nation reservation
  • How 35-40% of the Navajo Nation reservation does not have running water
  • Families need to travel a distance to get water which they must then ration for cooking, drinking or washing their hands
  • How violations of treat rights and Systemic racism have contributed to the current living conditions on reservations
  • Why the Lakota Well Being Project is fundraising for an additional ambulance
  • How reservations are like third world nations within the United States
  • How people can donate to the Lakota Well Being Project
  • Medshare providing medical supplies to Standing Rock
  • Constance estimates that she’s been responsible for getting 60,000 masks too indigenous communities
  • Winter coat drive for Standing Rock
  • The conditions at Standing Rock
  • The discrimination that exists in the border towns outside of reservations
  • Constance’s call out to people who have supported the Dakota Access Pipeline Protests to support Standing Rock now in their time of need during COVID
  • South Dakota has one of the lowest life expectancy rates in the U.S.
  • The Dakota Access Pipeline Protests
  • The lack of adequate health care and the long term effects on the native peoples who live on the on a reservation
  • The April 20th conversation Constance had a with Bettina who was connected to a group of seamstresses who sew for Navajo Nations
  • The uranium mining that has happened on native reservations and its hazardous health effects
  • How people can help by donating to the ambulance fund, the Auntie Sewing Squad, art supplies for kids, winter coats
  • How Constance has been connected to many amazing people from all walks of life through this work she’s been doing for the Native Nations
  • The difference between the Navajo Nation and Hopi Nation
  • How deliveries of supplies and essentials are coordinated
  • The “fortress of gratitude” where donations can be dropped off
  • How acts of compassion not only help others but actually can serve to help ourselves
  • How the mother of one of Constance’s contacts at Navajo Nation has COVID-19
  • The impact of curfews that have been imposed on reservations
  • The CARES Act
  • Mutual aid and nonprofit groups that Constance has worked with have told her that the Auntie Sewing Squad and Lakota Well Being Project have done more for them than their own tribal government or the federal government

 

Related Links:

 

Ways to donate to Lakota Well Being Project and Standing Rock:

 

Lakota Well-Being Project (Thanks to a generous matching gift, every dollar you give will be matched up to $10,000): https://bit.ly/3mBMYHn

 

Donate to Standing Rock via Donorbox: https://donorbox.org/standingrockrelief

 

The Lakota Well Being Project on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lakotawellbeing

 

 

Dakota Access Pipeline Protests: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dakota_Access_Pipeline_protests

 

 

 

The Fortress of Gratitude where items to be donated to the Navajo and Hopi Nations via the Auntie Sewing Squad are dropped off

 

Portable handwashing stations being delivered to Navajo Nations by the Auntie Sewing Squad

 

Ways to donate to the Auntie Sewing Squad:

Tax-deductible donation link thanks to Art2Action who has waived the fiscal sponsor fees:  https://donorbox.org/auntie-sewing-squad

 

Kristina Wong PayPal General Donations using (Friends & Family):  k@kristinasherylwong.com

 

Kristina Wong Venmo General Donations HERE: “GiveKristinaWongMoney”

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s website: http://auntiesewingsquad.com/

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s Core Values: http://auntiesewingsquad.com/about/#ourcorevalues

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad on Instagram: www.Instagram.com/AuntieSewing

 

Auntie Sewing Squad Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2764362993676831/

 

Auntie Sewing Squad Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/auntiesewing

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQrlwkZu_l6F1d9D_M5ZnGQ

 

The Tom’s model: https://bit.ly/3oPzNUJ

 

World Harvest Food Bank (LA)

 

Siwa Murti Healing Institute: www.siwamurtihealing.com

 

Dec 21, 2020
Ep 107 | Auntie Sewing Squad 2: Supporting Communities on the Fringe Through Caring
53:10

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Kristina Wong and Valerie Soe are back to talk about the Auntie Sewing Squad. When they were last here (on episode 75) the Auntie Sewing Squad was about two months old with over 600 members. A lot has happened with the Auntie Sewing Squad since then.

As you listen to the episode, you might be wondering why is there a dog crying in the background as Kristina talks to us? And what major announcement is Valerie going to make about yet another off-shoot project? You might want to go back and listen to episode 75 first or at least read this description of the Auntie Sewing Squad from their website:

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad was founded on March 24, 2020 by performance artist and comedian Kristina Wong as a casual effort to connect with other friends sewing homemade masks for essential workers due to the Federal Government’s failure to prepare them with proper personal protective equipment.

 

Auntie Sewing Squad has been featured on CNN, NBC, KCRW, Washington Post, Good Morning America and many more. We Go Down Sewing, a cross between an anthology, memoir, and a visual record of the work of the Auntie Sewing Squad will be published in Fall 2021 by University of California Press. The Aunties also collaborated with the Kronos Quartet on the film “Radical Care: The Auntie Sewing Squad” which uses music by Kronos and testimony and footage provided by the Aunties. We are a college course at San Francisco State University. We also have hosted two rounds of an online summer mask sewing camp for kids. Our relationship with various First Nations has extended to include fundraising and sending them sewing and relief supplies. We have sent several vans filled with sewing and hygiene supplies to the Seamstresses United Navajo & Hopi Nation for distribution throughout both reservations.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How the Auntie Sewing Squad has developed and changed since we last spoke
  • How Kristina’s role has changed
  • How masks, mask wearing and mask making have become a political statement
  • How the Auntie Sewing Squad’s work is about supporting communities forgotten by the federal government such as first nations, incarcerated communities, poor communities of color, migrants at the border
  • How sewing masks is a political statement for many of the aunties
  • The Auntie Sewing Squad’s Core Values
  • The Auntie Sewing Squad’s fiscal sponsor Art2Action which allows donations received by the Auntie Sewing Squad to be tax deductible
  • Historian Shakedown Auntie Rebecca Solnit
  • The Karl Marx quote that applies to the Auntie Sewing Squad
  • How Auntie Care started with an offering of hand salve
  • The Auntie Sewing Squad’s collaboration with the Kronos Quartet on the eight-minute short film, “Radical Care: The Auntie Sewing Squad”
  • The press that the Auntie Sewing Squad has received
  • Kristina’s Good Morning America appearance
  • The coat and clothing drives that the Auntie Sewing Squad has organized for Lakota Nation and the Navajo Nation
  • The book about the Auntie Sewing Squad, We Go Down Sewing
  • The full-length documentary film about the Auntie Sewing Squad that’s in the works
  • The crazy requests for masks that the Auntie Sewing Squad still receives
  • Monk robe fabric that was donated to make masks
  • How the Auntie Sewing Squad has become a sort of national network that supports various communities in need- from people affected by California wildfires to migrants in need of masks in Tijuana
  • How Kristina’s show and live tour “Kristina Wong for Public Office” became a Zoom and an online experience
  • The Auntie Sewing Squad’s Kid Sewing Summer Camp

 

Related Links:

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s website: http://auntiesewingsquad.com/

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s Core Values: http://auntiesewingsquad.com/about/#ourcorevalues

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad on Instagram: www.Instagram.com/AuntieSewing

 

Auntie Sewing Squad Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2764362993676831/

 

Auntie Sewing Squad Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/auntiesewing

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQrlwkZu_l6F1d9D_M5ZnGQ

 

 

Ways to donate to the Auntie Sewing Squad:

Tax-deductible donation link thanks to Art2Action who has waived the fiscal sponsor fees:  https://donorbox.org/auntie-sewing-squad

 

Kristina Wong PayPal General Donations using (Friends & Family):  k@kristinasherylwong.com

 

Kristina Wong Venmo General Donations HERE: “GiveKristinaWongMoney”

 

 

Kristina Wong with set pieces from her show “Kristina Wong for Public Office”

Kristina Wong’s website: http://kristinawong.com/

 

Kristina Wong’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ilovekristinawong/

 

Kristina Wong’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYVB9LCGQewhp4LxlachKPQ

 

Kristina and Valerie’s previous Talking Taiwan interview about the Auntie Sewing Squad: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/auntie-sewing-squad-combats-covid-19-one-mask-at-a-time-ep-75/

 

 

Valerie with a screen shot of “Radical Care: The Auntie Sewing Squad”

 

Valerie Soe’s blog: https://beyondasiaphilia.com/

 

Valerie’s previous Talking Taiwan interview about her documentary film, Love Boat Taiwan: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/love-boat-taiwan-interview-asian-american-studies-professor-film-maker-valerie-soe-ep-66/

 

 

We Go Down Sewing, a cross between an anthology, memoir, and a visual record of the work of the Auntie Sewing Squad will be published in Fall 2021 by University of California Press

 

The Tom’s model: https://bit.ly/3oPzNUJ

 

Art2Action’s website: http://www.art2action.org/

 

Art2Action’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/art2action/

 

 

 

Kronos Quartet musician wearing a mask made by the Auntie Sewing Squad

 

Kronos Quartet musicians wearing masks made by the Auntie Sewing Squad

 

The Kronos Quartet: https://kronosquartet.org/

 

 

Historian Shakedown Auntie Rebecca Solnit’s article for The Guardian, “The way we get through this is together: the rise of mutual aid under coronavirus,” which features a mention of the Auntie Sewing Squad: https://bit.ly/2LDuK8d

Dec 14, 2020
Ep 106 | CoFounders Gary Reloj and Bonnie Chan Raise $30,000 for PPE Relief Initiative and What's Next
01:00:05

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guests on this episode of Talking Taiwan are Gary Reloj and Bonnie Chan, co-founders of the PPE Relief Initiative (PRI). I had Gary on as a guest previously in episode 79, only a couple of months into the COVID-19 pandemic. He talked about his own personal battle with COVID and the PPE Relief Initiative’s crowdfunding campaign. Since then, the PPE Relief Initiative has surpassed its goal of raising $30,000, and has also been selected by GoFundMe to be a featured campaign on their COVID page.

 

When asked about the mistakes they’ve made and lessons they learned, Gary responded that he’s not afraid of failure and embraces it as long as there’s something that can be learned from it.  Gary and Bonnie talked how they’ve tweaked things since phase one of the crowdfunding campaign and shared some of the work productivity tools that PRI uses. Bonnie offered some general advice for people interested in doing crowdfunding for a cause. The two also shared a lot of exciting updates.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What’s happened with the PPE Relief Initiative (PRI) since we first interviewed Gary about it
  • Bonnie’s role in creating a strong brand identity for the PPE Relief Initiative
  • How the PPE Relief Initiative got selected by GoFundMe to be a featured campaign and what it means for the campaign
  • The PPE Relief Initiative’s next fundraising goal is $15,000 to support an additional 1,000 healthcare workers
  • How the PPE Relief Initiative has grown and recruited new volunteers
  • How the support that the PPE Relief Initiative is not only supplying healthcare workers with PPE but giving them emotional and moral support
  • Some of the biggest challenges they faced in trying to reach their initial fundraising goal of $30,000
  • The failures and lessons learned during phase one of the PPE Relief Initiative’s crowdfunding campaign
  • How some of the healthcare workers that PPE Relief Initiative has worked with who have had to resort to wearing garbage bags, bed covers, and men’s old clothing as PPE
  • How important it is to have the right team of people working together to achieve goals together
  • What they did when contributions to the GoFundMe Campaign plateaued and stalled
  • How they tell and capture the stories of healthcare workers through their “Stories from the Frontlines” videos
  • The note that went viral - written by KP Mendoza, a healthcare worker featured in one of PRI's "Stories from the Frontlines" videos
  • The shift from first focusing more on individual donors, to phase two in which they are planning to focus more on partnerships with e.g. community organizations, businesses, and student groups
  • Why Gary embraces failure
  • How PPE Relief Initiative learned from the mistakes it made during its first phase and has improved its processes
  • The work productivity tools that PPE Relief Initiative uses
  • The importance of organization and setting up an infrastructure
  • The goals of the second phase of PPE Relief Initiative’s Go Fund Me campaign
  • The difference between GoFundMe and GoFundMe Charity
  • The Promise Society, fiscal sponsor of the PPE Relief Initiative
  • General advice for anyone interested in running a crowdfunding campaign
  • The importance of email campaigns and data to PRI’s fundraising campaign
  • PPE Relief Initiative’s plans to partner with a local politician to hold a virtual roundtable with healthcare workers giving testimony on their experiences
  • PRI’s plans to make an impact on policy regarding healthcare worker protection

 

Related Links:

 

PPE Relief Initiative’s (PRI) website: https://pperelief.org/

 

PRI’s social media accounts:

PRI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ppe.relief/

 

PRI’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ppe.relief.initiative/

 

PRI’s LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ppe-relief-initiative/

 

PPE Relief Initiative’s Go Fund Me crowdfunding campaign: https://charity.gofundme.com/o/en/campaign/every-superhero-needs-armor-ppe-relief-for-healthcare-workers-fighting-covid-19

 

PPE Relief Initiative’s volunteer page: https://pperelief.org/join-our-team/

 

Healthcare workers (in New York and New Jersey) who’d like to apply for PPE can STILL do so here: https://pperelief.org/apply

 

Belinda and Mary (Mother & Daughter share their stories) with PRI: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNlmUL6iAMo

 

The note from healthcare worker KP Mendoza that went viral: https://helphopehonor.org/thank-you-to-our-heroes/kp-mendoza---do-not-call-me-a-hero-listen-to-an-icu-nurses-plea-for-fighting-the-coronavirus.html

 

PPE Relief Initiative’s YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/channel/UC_ncFI3RKutGY1D6QQL8cow

 

 

Recommended websites to recruit volunteers from:

 

Idealist: https://www.idealist.org/en/

 

Volunteer Match: https://www.volunteermatch.org/

 

 

Productivity tools that PPE Relief Initiative uses:

 

Workplace: https://www.workplace.com/

 

Asana: https://asana.com/

 

Google Drive:  https://www.google.com/intl/en_in/drive/

 

The Promise Society:  http://www.thepromisesociety.org/

Dec 08, 2020
Ep 105 | Jason Chew Talks About Being a Filmmaker
55:28

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

On this episode of Talking Taiwan I speak with Jason Chew about being a filmmaker. We talked about how he veered away from his traditional Taiwanese upbringing and parents’ expectations that he become a lawyer.

As a filmmaker, he’s worked with several different clients in both Taiwan (a funeral home and cosmetics company) and the U.S. He shared how one project with the NYPD required him to wear a bulletproof vest while cruising around with the NYPD to the scene of a crime.

When asked I him what inspires his creativity, Jason responded by asking “where don’t you find inspiration… everything could be inspiration.”

Check out the show notes on the Talking Taiwan website for some of the great film directors that have inspired Jason and a few of the classic films about Taiwan that he recommends.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Jason’s connection to musician Treya, who we interviewed in episode 55
  • Jason’s “traditional Taiwanese upbringing” and what a “traditional Taiwanese upbringing” means to him
  • How he went from being on the path to attend law school to applying for film school
  • What it was like attending NYU Film School in Singapore
  • What Jason’s film career has been like so far
  • The difference between film editing, shooting, and directing
  • What sets someone apart as a director
  • What is cinematography
  • Jason’s short films
  • The music video he worked on for Treya’s song Magic
  • The work that Jason did on the NYPD’s Domain Awareness System (DAS) which is a sort of monitoring service
  • How Jason and his colleagues rode around in an NYPD police car to crime scenes in response to alerts from the Shot Spotter, which is a series of microphones that listen for shots fired
  • Jason’s thoughts on Black Lives Matter
  • Jason’s work with Taiwanese companies
  • Jason’s parents’ reaction to his choice to pursue a career as a filmmaker instead of law
  • What inspires him as a cinematographer
  • The crowdfunding campaigns on student films that he’s worked on
  • Jason’s favorite films about Taiwan
  • Films that he recommends for people who would like to know more about Taiwan
  • Jason’s work on the short film A Father’s Son – A 90s Chinatown Noir Thriller, which is based on the characters from Henry Chang’s NYPD Detective Jack Yu crime series novels
  • What Jason enjoys the most about filmmaking
  • How the pandemic has affected Jason
  • What Jason is currently working on
  • Jason’s advice for people interested in pursuing filmmaking
  • Jason’s advice on how to push through tough challenging times

 

Related Links:

 

Jason Chew’s website: https://www.jasonchew.com

 

Jason Chew on Instagram: @chewchomp

 

Roaming Dogs of Taiwan (short film): https://www.jasonchew.com/#/roaming-dogs/

 

The music video for Treya’s song Magic: https://www.jasonchew.com/#/treya-lam-magic/

 

Treya’s Talking Taiwan interview (episode 55): https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/treya-lam-talking-taiwan-ep-55/

 

Apartment Therapy: https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/

 

Film Director Tsai Ming-liang https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsai_Ming-liang

 

Film Shop: https://www.thefilmshop.org/

 

Ava Duvernay (Film Director): http://www.avaduvernay.com/

 

The short film project: A Father’s Son - A 90s Chinatown Noir Thriller, which is based on the characters from Henry Chang’s NYPD Detective Jack Yu crime series novels: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/chenxihao/a-fathers-son-a-90s-chinatown-noir-thriller

 

Stanley Kubrick (Film Director):  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Kubrick

 

Akira Kurosawa (Film Director): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akira_Kurosawa

 

Cohen Brothers (Film Directors): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coen_brothers

 

Bong Joon-ho (Film Director): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bong_Joon-ho

 

 

Classic Films about Taiwan that Jason recommends:

 

Eat Drink Man Woman (Ang Lee film): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0111797/

 

Yi Yi (Edward Yang film): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0244316/

Nov 30, 2020
Ep 104 | Nomi Network CoFounder Supei Liu Discusses Human Trafficking
37:39

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In the spirit of giving, with Thanksgiving approaching and the holiday season soon upon us, I thought I’d share this interview from 2014 with Supei Liu one of the co-founders of Nomi Network. Hear Supei tell the story of how the desire to create more awareness about human trafficking led to the creation of Nomi Network, an organization which gives economic opportunities to empower women and to protect them from human trafficking. Last year, the organization celebrated its tenth year.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The work that Nomi Network does
  • The story of the Cambodian girl who inspired Diana Mao, Supei Liu and Alissa Moore-Williams to found Nomi Network
  • How their desire to raise awareness of human trafficking grew into creating an organization
  • How Diana, Supei and Alissa all had full-time jobs when they started Nomi Network
  • How Supei became the first full-time employee of Nomi Network
  • Supei’s background in corporate America
  • What Supei does for Nomi Network
  • How Nomi Network is about creating economic opportunities for women and children at risk of being trafficked
  • Prevention as one of the keys to dealing with human trafficking
  • How Supei works directly with the women that Nomi helps
  • How Nomi Network started a program in India in 2012
  • The social issues that the women Nomi Network helps have to deal with
  • The challenges that the Nomi Network has faced
  • Nomi’s “Buy Her Bag Not Her Body” campaign
  • Products made by survivors and women at risk
  • Nomi’s key accomplishments
  • How Nomi was awarded one of the top nonprofits in 2014
  • Supei’s connection to Taiwan
  • Sex trafficking in other parts of the world including Taiwan
  • How her early experiences have shaped her
  • Supei’s advice for those wanting to create an organization or to work for a specific cause

 

Related Links: 

 

Nomi Network: https://nominetwork.org/

 

 

Nomi Network products: https://www.buyherbagnotherbody.com/

 

Nomi Network on Facebook: www.facebook.com/nominetwork

 

Nomi Network on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nominetwork/

 

Nomi Network on Twitter: https://twitter.com/nominetwork

 

Nomi Network on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7UaUlyqMy2B1KL1S2_l5HQ

Nov 23, 2020
Ep 103 | Andrew Yang Venture for America U.S. Presidential Candidate Talks Entrepreneurship
22:31

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In 2013 I spoke with Andrew Yang who was the CEO of Venture for America at the time. He was at his office and multi-tasking during our interview, so when you listen to the interview, you’ll hear some background noise and typing. At the time he talked about being invited to the White House amongst several things.

 

Who would have predicted that a few years later that he would be running as a Democrat for the 2020 U.S. President election?

 

Many now know him as the Presidential candidate who proposed something called the “Freedom Dividend.” With the 2020 U.S. Presidential election results unfolding, and Joe Biden recently declared President-elect, some say that there may place for Andrew in the Biden administration. I thought it would be a good time to share this interview that I did with Andrew.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Andrew’s involvement with the Entrepreneur Challenge and Competition and connection with the Taiwanese American Professionals
  • What is Venture for America?
  • What it was like for Andrew to be invited to the White House and speak to President Barack Obama about Venture for America?
  • How Venture for America was modeled after Teach for America
  • What cities Venture for America was in (at the time of the interview) and where they were planning to expand to
  • What types of startups Venture for America works with
  • How long is the bootcamp that Venture for America fellows are required to go through and what are they taught
  • How many fellows there were in Venture for America (at the time of the interview)
  • What are some of the things that the fellows have done/accomplished
  • How Jeff Weiner the CEO of LinkedIn has agreed to join Venture for America’s investment council
  • The highlights of being involved with Venture for America for Andrew
  • What’s the most challenging thing about running an organization like Venture for America
  • What motivates Andrew with Venture for America
  • Who are some of Andrew’s role models in the nonprofit space
  • What’s the difference between a struggling and successful entrepreneur
  • What advice Andrew has for someone wanting to start a community-based organization
  • What Andrew’s future plans are for Venture for America
  • Andrew’s book Smart People Should Build Things
  • Andrew’s thoughts on Taiwan and the entrepreneurship of the Taiwanese people

 

Related Links:

 

Venture for America: www.ventureforamerica.org

 

Teach for America: https://www.teachforamerica.org/

 

Charity Water: https://www.charitywater.org/

 

Donors Choose: https://www.donorschoose.org/

 

Angela Lee Duckworkth’s TED talk about Grit: https://www.ted.com/talks/angela_lee_duckworth_grit_the_power_of_passion_and_perseverance?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare

 

 

Smart People Should Build Things by Andrew Yang: https://read.amazon.com/kp/embed?asin=B00DB3D7EY&preview=newtab&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_BVrSFb10ZBV39

 

Andrew Yang’s campaign website for the 2020 U.S. Presidential election: https://www.yang2020.com/

 

Taiwanese American Professionals- New York (TAP-NY): https://tap-ny.org/

Nov 16, 2020
Ep 102 | Jason Wang: How his Advisory Firm Makes Coronavirus Face Shields for the Front Line
41:51

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Jason Wang, the Founder of Cypress River Advisors spoke with me about how his advisory firm which is normally not in the business of producing PPE, was able to start the production of face shields at scale in four weeks in Taiwan during the COVID-19 pandemic. The effort which is called Face Shields for the First Line, donates face shields to health care and essential workers.

 

We also talked about how they cut down on the shipping costs and minimized waste by using polypropylene a material lighter in weight than acrylic and flat packaging due to the origami design of the face shield.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What’s it been like being in Taiwan during the Coronavirus pandemic
  • Jason’s, upbringing and career path before he relocated to Taiwan and founded Cypress River Advisors
  • What brought Jason back to Taiwan
  • What Cypress River Advisors does
  • How Cypress River Advisors has been impacted by COVID-19
  • How this advisory firm had no prior experience producing PPE but its Face Shield for the First Line effort was able to produce and ship their first face shields in four weeks
  • Why Jason decided to start Face Shields for the First Line
  • How Face Shields for the First Line began with producing intubation shields and then face shields
  • The origami design of the face shields and light-weight materials used to cut down on shipping costs
  • What bra elastic has to do with Face Shields for the First Line
  • What’s been most challenging with Face Shields for the First Line
  • What’s been most rewarding about Face Shields for the First Line
  • How Jason manages the business of Cypress River Advisors and Face Shields for the First Line
  • How fatherhood has changed his outlook on life
  • The future direction of Face Shields for the First Line

 

Related Links:

 

Face Shields for the First Line Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/faceshieldsforthefirst

 

 

Face Shields for the First Line donated to Elmhurst Hospital in Queens, NY

 

Face Shields for the First Line on Spotfund:

https://spot.fund/faceshieldsforthefirst

 

Cypress River Advisors:

https://www.cypressriveradvisors.com/

 

A conversation between Taiwan’s Vice President Chen Chien-jen and Ellen J. MacKenzie (Dean, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health) on Friday, April 24, about Taiwan’s early and effective response to the coronavirus. Chen Chien-jen received a Doctor of Science degree in epidemiology and human genetics from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 1982. Chen and MacKenzie discussed the specific measures Taiwan took to control the spread of the virus and how Vice President Chen’s public health training played a role.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ReI6ROZNbkk&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR27S_KP92dg_hotNY0SD89V76gbPQKw-_9U76MfuXzUVo-HizO6dpslOMs

 

TECRO: www.taiwanembassy.org/us_en/index.html

 

The open source intubation shield box (aka "Aerosol Box") designed by Taiwanese doctor, Lai Hsien-yung: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1vWPikcRHVE8YUmZlvgHyb2Nj6hvtxof8

 

Cypress River Associates COVID-19 Tracker Dashboard: https://cypressriveradvisors.shinyapps.io/covid-19/

 

 

Quick video of how to put together the Face Shields for the Front Lines origami face shield: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=207286267217061

Nov 09, 2020
EP 101 | Dr. Peter Tsai N95 Mask Inventor Helps to Fight Covid-19
42:22

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In part two of my interview part two with Dr. Peter Tsai, he talks about how he was called out of retirement to help address the shortage and demand for N95 masks with the onset of the Coronavirus pandemic. Dr. Tsai is the Taiwanese American inventor of the N95 mask technology who has come out of retirement to figure out how to sterilize N95s for reuse, and to help scale up production of the masks.

 

Special Thanks to HoChie Tsai of TaiwneseAmercan.org for making this interview possible. 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Dr. Tsai was contacted and came out of retirement because of the demand and shortage of N95 masks
  • How he tested whether or not N95 masks could be sterilized
  • The shelf life of N95 masks
  • The experiments that Dr. Tsai conducted to determine how to sterilize N95 masks so that they could be reused
  • COVID-19 can survive for 28 days on smooth surfaces
  • If N95 masks get wet, submerged in water, or come into high humidity it won’t have charge decay, however if washed with soap and water N-95 masks will lose their effectiveness
  • The stories of how people found Dr. Tsai
  • How Dr. Tsai has worked harder than he did before retiring
  • Dr. Tsai’s relationship with Oak Ridge Labs, and how he was able to help them scale up their production of N95 masks
  • Why there’s been a shortage of N95 masks
  • How he’s been nicknamed the “screwdriver professor”
  • Research-oriented vs. industry-oriented science
  • Why Dr. Tsai decided to come out of retirement to work on N95 technology and what’s next

 

 

Related Links:

 

TaiwaneseAmerican.org article about Dr. Peter Tsai, “Our Dad Invented the N95 Mask: Our Taiwanese American Story”:

http://www.taiwaneseamerican.org/2020/09/peter-tsai-n95-inventor/

 

Washington Post article about Dr. Peter Tsai, “The retired inventor of N95 masks is back at work, mostly for free, to fight covid-19”: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2020/07/07/peter-tsai-n95-mask-covid/

 

NBC News article about Dr. Peter Tsai, “Taiwanese immigrant who invented N95 mask on working amid COVID-19 racism”: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/taiwanese-immigrant-who-invented-n95-mask-working-amid-covid-19-n1233777

 

CNN News Article: https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/15/health/n95-mask-inventor-coronavirus-sanjay-wellness-trnd/index.html

Nov 02, 2020
Ep 100 | Dr Peter Tsai N95 Mask Inventor: The Man Who Created the Technology
47:15
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Dr. Peter Tsai is the Taiwanese American inventor of the technology behind the N95 mask, the piece of personal protective equipment that has become such a part of our everyday vernacular since the onset of the global Coronavirus pandemic. With the shortage of N95 respirators at the beginning of the pandemic, Dr. Tsai was called out of retirement to figure out how to sterilize N95s for reuse, and to help scale up production of the masks. In part one of my interview with him he talks about his roots and early career. Dr. Tsai also explains how the technology behind the material of N95s works, offers some suggestions on how to make more protective D.I.Y. masks, and why everyone should wear masks.

 

Next week we’ll be sharing part two of my interview with Dr. Tsai next week, in which he talks about how he was called out of retirement and what has happened since.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What it was like growing up as one of 10 children
  • One of his early childhood inventions
  • Why he decided to pursue further studies in the United States
  • What it was like when he first arrived in the U.S. and what his expectations were
  • The biggest challenge Dr. Tsai faced when first arriving in the U.S.
  • The tough decision that Dr. Tsai had to make about his two daughters while he was still working on obtaining his PhD degree
  • When and how Dr. Tsai started working on the material that is now used for the N95 mask
  • How adding an electrostatic charge to fibers improves their filtration efficiency
  • How the “corona charge” (yes, the same word “corona” but different in meaning from the Coronavirus “corona”) when added to microfibers improves filtration efficiency by 10 times
  • The first use of this charged fabric technology was for air filtration in 1992
  • In 1995 the U.S. was set to issue new standards for respirators, which is now called the N95
  • The 95 of “N95” mask refers to the fact that it needs to filter out 95% of submicron particles
  • How the science behind charging fibers works
  • The misconception that the size of a fabric’s pores need to be smaller than particles to block them
  • Electrostatic charged media is good material for respirators
  • The comparison between cloth masks (which are made of woven material) and N95 masks (which are made of nonwoven material)
  • Cloth masks with higher filtration efficiency must be compactly woven, thicker or higher weight
  • How cloth masks are good shields to contain the virus inside a mask avoid infecting others
  • Cloth masks are not ideal but they can contain the spread of the virus to others
  • Dr. Tsai’s recommendations regarding wearing cloth masks
  • The most commonly found types of nonwoven materials that can be used as a filter for a D.I.Y. mask
  • How to test if a fabric is hydrophobic
  • How a MERV 14 home use filter (typically used for air filters) is electrostatically charged and hydrophobic and good to use as a filter for a D.I.Y. mask
  • Dr. Tsai explains why he thinks everyone needs to wear a mask (whether its cloth or N95)
  • How Dr. Tsai is working on making high filtration efficiency materials more breathable
  • Research on the material used for the N95 mask began in 1987, then in 1992 the technology used for the N95 mask was first developed
  • The material has been improved from 1992-2018
  • How Dr. Tsai is motivated to innovate by the changing needs of the industry

 

Related Links:

 

TaiwaneseAmerican.org article about Dr. Peter Tsai, “Our Dad Invented the N95 Mask: Our Taiwanese American Story”:

http://www.taiwaneseamerican.org/2020/09/peter-tsai-n95-inventor/

 

Washington Post article about Dr. Peter Tsai, “The retired inventor of N95 masks is back at work, mostly for free, to fight covid-19”: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2020/07/07/peter-tsai-n95-mask-covid/

 

NBC News article about Dr. Peter Tsai, “Taiwanese immigrant who invented N95 mask on working amid COVID-19 racism”: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/taiwanese-immigrant-who-invented-n95-mask-working-amid-covid-19-n1233777

Oct 27, 2020
Ep 99 | Professor Scott Simon: Taiwan's Indigenous Peoples and Their Connection to Ecology
24:19

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Earlier this year, I spoke with Professor Scott Simon about his research on Taiwan’s indigenous peoples. He is a Professor in the School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies and Co-holder of the Research Chair in Taiwan Studies at the University of Ottawa. He’s done research in Taiwan since 1996, spent an accumulated 10 years of residence in the country, and published 3 books about Taiwan. We talked about Taiwan as the cradle of Austronesian peoples and culture, and what the designation of a group of people as “indigenous” means from an international law perspective. What’s interesting to me is how Professor Simon’s work invites us to think of Taiwan as a Pacific island nation rather than a renegade province of China.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Professor Simon got interested in the indigenous peoples of Taiwan
  • How there were a lot of changes pertaining to the indigenous peoples of Taiwan around 1996
  • The indigenous people that Professor Simon met while in Taiwan
  • What brought Professor Simon to Taiwan initially in 1996
  • How Professor Simon had initially planned to obtain his PhD in China but ended up doing it in Taiwan
  • How Professor Simon's research on Taiwan’s indigenous peoples and economic development led him to study the ecology and environment, and the study of Austronesian peoples
  • The connection between the Bhatani Islands of the Philippines and Taiwan
  • The similarity between the CHamoru language (of the people of Guam) with the Truku language of the Taiwanese indigenous people and Tao language spoken in Taiwan’s Orchid Island
  • Looking at Taiwan as a Pacific island nation and not just as connected to China
  • Taiwan’s connection to Guam, Marieta Islands, Carolina Islands, Maori of New Zealand and Easter Island
  • Book recommendations for people wanting to learn more about Taiwan’s indigenous peoples
  • The difference between categorizing a group of people as indigenous vs. an ethnic minority
  • The three nations in Asia that recognize indigenous peoples
  • The political implications that come with a group of people being declared indigenous

 

 

Related Links:

 

Professor Scott Simon’s author page on The Center for International  Policy Studies of the University of Ottawa website: https://www.cips-cepi.ca/author/scott-simon/

 

Undoing Fieldwork in a Time of Epidemic by Scott Simon: https://cascacultureblog.wordpress.com/2020/04/20/undoing-fieldwork-in-a-time-of-epidemic/

 

Professor Scott Simon’s books:

 

Tanners of Taiwan: Life Strategies and National Culture: https://books.google.com/books/about/Tanners_of_Taiwan.html?id=ostwAAAAMAAJ

 

Sweet and Sour: Life-Worlds of Taipei Women Entrepreneurs: https://books.google.com/books/about/Sweet_and_Sour.html?id=gFyqAuPTAgkC

Oct 19, 2020
Ep 98 | Dr. Jerome Keating's Books: Mapping, Paradigm Shifts, and his Favorite Quotes
41:58

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In part two of my conversation with Dr. Keating, we spoke about his other books on mapping and paradigm shifts.  Dr. Keating also shared some of his favorite quotes including the one that encapsulates why he writes about Taiwan. And he talked about meeting with Trigg Brown and Josh Ku the owners of the popular Taiwanese American restaurant Win Son, who I interviewed in episode 60.

Since his book, Taiwan The Struggle Gains Focus features some great photos of him with several influential Taiwanese celebrities, politicians and individuals, I asked him to reflect on some of the most memorable individuals he’s met.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Keating’s books about Taiwan, that were written before Taiwan The Struggle Gains Focus
  • How Taiwan The Struggle Gains Focus will probably be the last book Dr. Keating will write about Taiwan
  • Keating’s book about the mapping of Taiwan
  • What maps can tell us about the mapmaker, trade, and economies
  • The role that the Spice Islands played in bringing the West to Asia
  • Dutch settlement of Anping, Taiwan
  • Spanish occupation of Taiwan
  • How the Portuguese named Taiwan “Ilha Formosa”
  • Keating’s book about paradigms, The Paradigmsthat Guide Our Lives and Drive Our Souls
  • The three realms of paradigms: science, metaphysics/teleology, phenomenology
  • Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
  • Examples of paradigm shifts that have happened in the world of physics (science)
  • What Dr. Keating plans to write about next
  • Coronavirus and the paradigm shift that it has caused
  • Keating’s writing process and why he writes
  • Keating’s favorite quotes
  • How the owners of the Taiwanese American restaurant Win Son (featured in episode 60), Trigg Brown and Josh Ku sought out Dr. Keating for his perspective on Taiwan’s history
  • Keating’s thoughts on the late president Lee Teng-hui and on some of well-known politicians and personalities from Taiwan that he’s met
  • An African quote that sums up why Jerome writes about Taiwan
  • Where you can buy Dr. Keating’s books and learn more about him

 

 

Dr. Jerome Keating’s website: http://www.jeromekeating.com/

 

Related Links:

 

Dr. Keating’s book, The Mapping of Taiwan, Desired Economies, Coveted Geographies

 

Anping, Taiwan: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anping_District

 

 

Dr. Keating’s book, The Paradigms that Guide Our Lives and Drive Our Souls:

 

Thomas Kuhn (The American physicist and philosopher who introduced the term paradigm shift): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Kuhn

 

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Thomas-S-Kuhn

 

Jonathan Edwards (Puritan Theologian): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Edwards_(theologian)

 

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Jonathan-Edwards

 

Ralph Waldo Emerson (Transcendentalist Essayist, Philosopher and Poet): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Waldo_Emerson

 

https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/emerson/

 

https://www.biography.com/writer/ralph-waldo-emerson

 

Alfred North Whitehead (Mathematician Philosopher, and notable figure in process philosophy):https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/whitehead/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_North_Whitehead

 

 

The True Believer by Eric Hoffer: https://www.amazon.com/True-Believer-Thoughts-Movements-Perennial/dp/0060505915

 

 

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: https://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maslow%27s_hierarchy_of_needs

 

 

Henry David Thoreau (Essayist, Philosopher and Poet):

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_David_Thoreau

 

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Henry-David-Thoreau

 

 

Episode 60 of Talking Taiwan featuring Trigg Brown and Josh Ku of the Taiwanese American restaurant Win Son: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/trigg-brown-josh-ku-win-son-taiwanese-restaurant-nyc/

 

 

Dr. Keating’s piece written in memoriam, Lee Teng-Hui: https://taiwaninsight.org/2020/08/08/in-memoriam-lee-teng-hui/?fbclid=IwAR03XDnv4-SMpaWQMuLDlDGUCsmcQohq6aK8R0DWS1Cll8OvSnr1ZuX8gYc

 

Lee Teng-hui: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Teng-hui

 

Su Beng: http://aboutsubeng.com/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Su_Beng

 

Peng Ming-min: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peng_Ming-min

 

Taiwan Foreign Correspondents Club: https://taiwanfcc.org/

 

 

 

Taiwan The Struggle Gains Focus: http://www.smcbook.com.tw/smc/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=61651&search=Taiwan+The+Struggle+Gains+Focus

 

 

Taiwan, the Search for Identity

 

 

Taiwan, the Struggles of a Democracy  

 

 

Island in the Stream http://www.smcbook.com.tw/smc/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=55&search=island+in+the+stream

Oct 12, 2020
Ep 97 | Understanding the History of Taiwan through Dr. Jerome Keating
37:14

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Few contemporaries are more qualified than Dr. Jerome Keating on understanding the history of Taiwan. He has been living in Taiwan for over 30 years. Initially he came over to Taiwan to work on the MRT. He has written several books about Taiwan. We invited him on to the podcast to talk about this latest book, Taiwan The Struggle Gains Focus.

Dr. Keating also reflected on how Taiwan has changed in the past 30 years, and we discussed things past and present including Taiwan’s complicated international status, amendment of the constitution, changing the official name of Taiwan (which is the Republic of China) and redesigning the passport and flag of Taiwan.

 

In part two of our interview, Dr. Keating will talk about his other writings, what he plans to write next, and how the owners of a popular New York-based Taiwanese American restaurant sought his advice before opening their restaurant.

 

CORRECTION: At the 14:40-minute in the interview, Dr. Keating remarks, “We are 75 years at the end of World War I.” What he meant to say is that, "We are 75 years at the end of World War II."

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What motivated Dr. Keating to write his latest book, Taiwan The Struggle Gains Focus
  • Who the book was intended for and who Dr. Keating writes for
  • How Taiwan has changed in the last 30 years
  • The semi-martial-like atmosphere of Taiwan when Dr. Keating arrived in 1988
  • Keating’s first book Island in the Stream and what motivated him to write it
  • What intrigues Dr. Keating about Taiwan as a subject matter
  • How the San Francisco Peace Treaty (signed in 1951) left Taiwan in a limbo status
  • How the US position on Taiwan 75 years after World War II is still undecided
  • The circumstances surrounding “Taiwan” aka the Republic of China losing its seat in the United Nations in 1971, which included a proposal to have 2 Chinas in the United Nations
  • The Republic of China and People’s Republic of China’s claims on China
  • How Taiwan has never had a seat in the United Nations
  • The Republic of China framework and constitution that Chiang Kai-shek and the Kuomintang brought to Taiwan
  • Keating’s thoughts on amending Taiwan’s constitution
  • Changing the official name and flag that represent Taiwan
  • Submissions for the new Taiwan passport cover design
  • The Taiwan Civil Government wanting to make Taiwan the 51st state of the United States
  • How Dr. Keating sees Taiwan’s future

 

 

Related Links:

 

Dr. Jerome Keating’s website: http://jeromekeating.com

 

 

Dr. Jerome Keating’s books:

 

 

 

Taiwan The Struggle Gains Focus: http://www.smcbook.com.tw/smc/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=61651&search=Taiwan+The+Struggle+Gains+Focus

 

 

 

 

Island in the Stream: http://www.smcbook.com.tw/smc/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=55&search=island+in+the+stream

 

 

 

Taiwan, the Struggles of a Democracy

 

 

 

Taiwan, the Search for Identity

 

 

 

The Mapping of Taiwan, Desired Economies, Coveted Geographies

 

 

 

The Paradigms that Guide Our Lives and Drive Our Souls

 

 

Ma Ying-jeou (former President of Taiwan): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ma_Ying-jeou

 

The Sunflower Movement: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunflower_Student_Movement

 

Submissions for the new Taiwan passport cover design: https://taiwanpassport.tw/publish_page/international_standard/page=1

 

The winning design for Taiwan’s new passport cover: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/sep/03/taiwan-demotes-republic-of-china-reference-on-new-passports?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other&fbclid=IwAR1Kr3MQb9g2-xXto_udk7Sbez0v5gSTFvxqeT0eZOscdvfxywHhukTmAxE

 

San Francisco Peace Treaty: http://www.taiwandocuments.org/sanfrancisco01.htm

 

About the Taiwan Civil Government: https://international.thenewslens.com/article/85225

Oct 05, 2020
Ep 96 | Professor Andrew Morris: The Relationship Between Taiwan Baseball and its History
01:03:36

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

With major league baseball playoffs soon upon us, we thought that this episode might appeal to our baseball fans. It seems like a distant memory now, when about a month into the Coronavirus pandemic, Taiwan was the only place on the planet where live professional baseball was being played. My guest on this episode is Professor Andrew Morris whose research on baseball in Taiwan presents a fascinating new angle and way of seeing Taiwan’s history. I came across his writings and research when I when I was doing some research for my interview (episode 77) with Richard Wang the English-speaking broadcaster of CPBL games in Taiwan.

 

How important is baseball to Taiwan? Did you know that there’s a baseball related image featured on Taiwan’s currency or that Taiwan’s little league baseball team won 17 times from 1979 to1996?

 

Interestingly, Professor Morris began our interview by sharing his own mistaken assumption of baseball as a symbol of American culture in Taiwan. He went on to explain that baseball was introduced to Taiwan by Japan, while it was a colony of Japan from 1895-1945. We covered a broad range of topics including how baseball survived the arrival of the Kuomintang in Taiwan, the rise of Taiwan’s little league team, the establishment of a professional baseball league in Taiwan (CPBL) which has had its ups and downs, and the short-lived Taiwan Major League.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Professor Morris got interested in the topic of baseball and the history of Taiwan
  • How baseball in Taiwan is not as it seems on the surface, a symbol of American culture in Taiwan
  • What were some of the most surprising and interesting things that Professor Morris has learned about baseball in Taiwan over the course of his research
  • The role of Taiwan’s Indigenous people in the game of baseball in Taiwan
  • What baseball tells us about Taiwan’s Japanese colonial era
  • How Chiayi (嘉義) is known as the spiritual home of baseball and how that was captured in the film Kano
  • How “Kano,” is the nickname of the old Chiayi Agricultural and Forestry Vocational High School, which comes from the two Japanese words “Ka-gi No-rin”
  • The Kano baseball team became the best team in Taiwan and is remembered by the Japanese
  • How Kano is remembered as an example of the success of Japan’s colonialism in Taiwan
  • Baseball as a pathway for Indigenous peoples during Taiwan’s Japanese colonial period
  • Professor Morris’ thoughts about the film Kano and its historical accuracy
  • The Japanese influence that we still see in Taiwanese baseball today
  • How after the Kuomintang arrived in Taiwan, around 1946, they tried to remove and erase Japanese culture, but baseball was allowed to remain
  • What happened to baseball after the Kuomintang arrived in Taiwan
  • How baseball games were played in the aftermath of the 228 massacre and a famous baseball coach was killed in the 228 massacre
  • Taiwan’s little league baseball team and how it served to bolster Republic of China (ROC) nationalism
  • The 1968 legend of what led Taiwan creating a little league team and participating in the little league world series
  • How in 1969, the Taiwanese little league team played in the Little League World Series in South Williamsport, PA for the first time and won
  • Between 1969-1996 the Taiwanese little league team won the Little League World Series 17 times and became a source of pride for the Taiwanese who watched the games late at night
  • The story (from the 70s) of how a coach of a little league team comprised mostly of Black players sensed the anti-Chinese and anti-Taiwanese sentiment against the Taiwanese little league team
  • How the Taiwanese little league team became a source of Taiwanese pride (different from ROC pride)
  • How the KMT hired Chinatown thugs to beat up the pro-Taiwanese little league fans and fights would break out between them after little league games
  • What happened to Taiwan’s little league team
  • The legacy of Taiwan’s little league team
  • How the American little league teams that were able to beat Taiwan’s little league team were celebrated an ESPN made a 30 for 30 film about this
  • The story behind the image of the youth baseball team that appears on Taiwan’s 500 dollar bill
  • The establishment of the CPBL and its game throwing and gambling scandals
  • The short-lived Taiwan Major League (TML) and how it differed from the CPBL
  • How baseball has been tied to Taiwan’s national identity in the past but that has changed as Taiwan has become more democratic
  • The research that Professor Morris is working on now
  • Professor Morris’ recommendations of other books on the subject of baseball in Taiwan

 

Related Links:

 

Professor Andrew Morris’ Cal Poly webpage:
https://history.calpoly.edu/faculty/andrew-morris

Professor Andrew Morris’ Digital Commons page (which has full text of some of his articles):
http://bit.ly/ADMorrisDC

 

Colonial Project, National Game: A History of Baseball in Taiwan (Asia Pacific Modern Book 6) by Andrew D. Morris: https://amzn.to/3cALcmf

 

 

Kano vocational school of forestry and agriculture: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Chiayi_University

 

 

Kano (film): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2247566/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kano_(film)

 

 

ESPN Films 30 for 30: Little Big Men

(A film about the Kirkland National Little League of Kirkland, Washington, which defeated the Puzih little league of Chiayi County, Taiwan. The Kirkland, Washington team, was the first American little league team to win the Little League World Series in over a decade): https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1717745/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1982_Little_League_World_Series

 

 

Book recommendations about baseball in Taiwan:

 

Playing in Isolation: A History of Baseball in Taiwan by Junwei Yu: https://www.amazon.com/Playing-Isolation-History-Baseball-Taiwan/dp/0803211406

 

Empire of Infields: Baseball in Taiwan and Cultural Identity, 1895-1968 by John J. Harney: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=John+J.+Harney%2C+Empire+of+Infields%3A+Baseball+in+Taiwan+and+Cultural+Identity&ref=nb_sb_noss

 

Taking in a Game: A History of Baseball in Asia by Joseph Reaves: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Joseph+Reaves%2C+Taking+in+a+Game%3A+A+History+of+Baseball+in+Asia&ref=nb_sb_noss_2

 

 

Taiwan’s professional baseball league the CPBL’s English website: http://www.cpbl.com.tw/eng/history/

 

Watch Taiwan’s professional baseball league CPBL teams Rakuten Monkeys and Uni Lions on the Eleven Sports Taiwan Twitter account:

https://twitter.com/ElevenSportsTW

Sep 28, 2020
Ep 95 | Raising Blasian Kids Part 2: A Conversation with Rolla Chng and Eileen Lin-Goutier
01:12:33
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

This week’s episode of Talking Taiwan features part two of my conversation with Eileen Lin-Goutier and Rolla Chng about raising Blasian kids. This was definitely the longest interview that I’ve done for Talking Taiwan to date, which is why we split it up into two parts. In this episode, Eileen talks about the Facebook group for Taiwanese Moms with Blasian kids, and Rolla talks about her son and daughter’s cross-country road trip and the different concerns that she, their father Frantz and their uncle Tim had.

 

While much of conversation focused on parenting, we also got into a discussion about racism, the understanding of the Black experience amongst Taiwanese and Taiwanese Americans, and human rights.

 

About Eileen Lin-Goutier:

 

Eileen was born and raised in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and moved to U.S. when she was in high school. While at the University of Virginia she founded the Taiwanese Language Club and served as the president of Taiwanese Student Association. She later kicked off her nonprofit career by working at the Formosan Association of Public Affairs (FAPA) for three years (2010-2013) managing FAPA’s Young Professionals Group (FAPA-YPG). Eileen has also served on the board of Taiwanese American Association of America’s (TAA) Greater Washington Chapter for several years by helping to plan local cultural events and Taiwanese American Heritage Week. Her nonprofit career was been guided by her belief in fighting for social justice, equity and human rights. Eileen met her Haitian American husband, Edwin through a love for food, family and passion for social and environmental causes. She currently lives in Washington D.C. with her family.

 

About Rolla Chng:

 

Rolla Chng was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio. While at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, she established the Taiwanese American Students Club (TASC) and helped to found the Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association (ITASA). Rolla has been involved with the Taiwanese American Conference- East Coast (TAC/EC) in the 90s and early 2000s. She organized the second generation program for TAC/EC in 1998 and 2003, and has been a strong supporter of TAC/EC’s new iteration, Taiwanese American Next Generation (TANG). She raised her Haitian-Taiwanese American daughter and son in Baltimore City with their father, Master Frantz Cadet, owner of Cadet Martial Arts and Fitness. She began teaching math in Baltimore City Public Schools and community college when her children reached school age. After her children graduated from high school, she returned to her pre-family career of civil engineering.

 

About Rolla's children:

 

Her daughter, Uiseng Francois, is on pandemic hiatus from her New York City gig playing a Jet in the Broadway revival of West Side Story. She is a second year BFA student in dance at Peabody Institute, and is currently continuing her studies, virtually, as she travels cross country. Rolla's son Evains traveled with Uiseng during the first week of her cross-country trip, before entering his second year of a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The Facebook group for Taiwanese Moms with Blasian kids that Eileen is a member of and what she’s learned from it
  • Topics commonly discussed in the Facebook group for Taiwanese Moms with Blasian kids
  • Skin colorism
  • How Eileen and Rolla balance educating their kids about both of their cultural backgrounds
  • How Rolla wanted to make sure that her kids were exposed to the Taiwanese language at an early age and that they visited Taiwan
  • How Eileen plans to teach her kids Taiwanese with the help of her parents and by planning to take them to Taiwanese school
  • The importance of language in understanding and connecting to one’s culture
  • Thoughts on the term “color blind” and raising kids to be “color blind”
  • People’s different reactions to using the term “Black”
  • Incidents that Rolla’s kids have had with the police or authorities
  • How Rolla’s kids feel about the police
  • The advice that Frantz would give his and Rolla’s kids and how it is different from Rolla
  • The concerns that Tim, Rolla’s brother and Frantz her partner have about Uiseng and Evains’ cross-country trip
  • How Rolla and Frantz co-parent
  • The importance of teaching your kids negotiation skills
  • Asian Black relations
  • The racism that Asians have toward Blacks
  • The understanding of the Black experience amongst Taiwanese and Taiwanese Americans
  • Minority relations
  • How doing the right things and having an education does not exempt you from experiencing racism
  • Advice for parents of Blasian kids
  • Rolla’s advice for parents and her parenting philosophy
  • What the job of a parent is in raising their kids

 

Related Links:

 

Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association (ITASA): https://itasa.org/

 

Taiwanese American summer camps and conferences:

 

Taiwanese American Next Generation (TANG): http://tangeneration.org/

 

Taiwanese American Foundation (TAF): https://www.tafworld.org/

 

Formosan Association of Public Affairs (FAPA): https://fapa.org/

 

Formosan Association of Public Affairs- Young Professionals Group (FAPA- YPG) on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/fapaypg

 

FAPA- YPG LA/OC Chapter Facebook Group: https://facebook.com/groups/54085939954

 

FAPA- YPG NY/NJ Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/nynjypg

 

FAPA- YPG San Francisco/Bay Area Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/fapaypgsf

 

Taiwanese Association of America (TAA): https://www.taa-usa.org/


Taiwanese American Conference- East Coast (TAC/EC): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwanese_American_Conference

Sep 23, 2020
Ep 94 | Raising Blasian Kids Part 1: A Conversation with Rolla Chng and Eileen Lin-Goutier
01:04:30
A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

My guests on this episode of Talking Taiwan are Eileen Lin-Goutier and Rolla Chng. Both are Taiwanese American women with Black partners and are parents of Blasian kids. Eileen is a relatively new parent with a two-year-old daughter and Rolla has two grown children who are 19 and 20 years old. I thought it would be a good idea to bring together these two women at very different stages of the parenting journey to have a conversation about their perspectives on raising Blasian children. 

 

There was so much to discuss that we’ve decided to split up the conversation into two parts. Join us next week for the second part of the conversation when Eileen will talk about the Facebook group for Taiwanese Moms with Blasian kids that she’s a part of, and what she’s learned from being a part of that group. Rolla will talk about her son and daughter’s cross-country road trip and the discussions that she, their father Frantz had their uncle Tim had with them about it, beforehand.

 

About Eileen Lin-Goutier:

 

Eileen was born and raised in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, and moved to U.S. when she was in high school. While at the University of Virginia she founded the Taiwanese Language Club and served as the president of Taiwanese Student Association. She later kicked off her nonprofit career by working at the Formosan Association of Public Affairs (FAPA) for three years (2010-2013) managing FAPA’s Young Professionals Group (FAPA-YPG). Eileen has also served on the board of Taiwanese American Association of America’s (TAA) Greater Washington Chapter for several years by helping to plan local cultural events and Taiwanese American Heritage Week. Her nonprofit career was been guided by her belief in fighting for social justice, equity and human rights. Eileen met her Haitian American husband, Edwin through a love for food, family and passion for social and environmental causes. She currently lives in Washington D.C. with her family.

 

About Rolla Chng:

 

Rolla Chng was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio. While at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, she established the Taiwanese American Students Club (TASC) and helped to found the Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association (ITASA). Rolla has been involved with the Taiwanese American Conference- East Coast (TAC/EC) in the 90s and early 2000s. She organized the second generation program for TAC/EC in 1998 and 2003, and has been a strong supporter of TAC/EC’s new iteration, Taiwanese American Next Generation (TANG). She raised her Haitian-Taiwanese American daughter and son in Baltimore City with their father, Master Frantz Cadet, owner of Cadet Martial Arts and Fitness. She began teaching math in Baltimore City Public Schools and community college when her children reached school age. After her children graduated from high school, she returned to her pre-family career of civil engineering.

 

About Rolla's children:

 

Her daughter, Uiseng Francois, is on pandemic hiatus from her New York City gig playing a Jet in the Broadway revival of West Side Story. She is a second year BFA student in dance at Peabody Institute, and is currently continuing her studies, virtually, as she travels cross country. Rolla's son Evains traveled with Uiseng during the first week of her cross-country trip, before entering his second year of a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How their parents/families first react to learning that their partner was Black
  • When their parents’ perceptions changed
  • How to deal with people’s reactions to them and their Blasian kids
  • Dealing with people’s perceptions of their kids as primarily Black
  • Acknowledging that as a parent you may unintentionally do things that hurt your kids
  • How they co-parent with their partners
  • Learning about the Black experience through their partner’s personal experiences
  • The Taiwanese experience and the role social justice in Eileen and Rolla’s lives
  • The importance of acknowledging the privilege that you have compared to other groups of people
  • Preparing their kids for encounters with the police or authority figures
  • The importance of instilling confidence in your kids to be comfortable with who they are
  • How to prepare your kids for any racism or bias they may encounter and make sure that they are safe
  • “The talk” that Black parents have with their kids
  • How Asian identity is perceived in the U.S.
  • The acceptance of Blasian people’s Asian identity
  • The participation of Rolla’s kids in Taiwanese American conferences and summer camps
  • Dealing with microaggressions that they have experienced
  • Eileen’s parenting questions for Rolla and Rolla’s advice

 

Related Links:

 

The Watts Riots (aka Watts Riots): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watts_riots

http://history.com/topics/1960s/watts-riots

 

Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Students Association (ITASA): https://itasa.org/

 

Taiwanese American summer camps and conferences:

 

Taiwanese American Next Generation (TANG): http://tangeneration.org/

 

Taiwanese American Foundation (TAF): https://www.tafworld.org/

 

Formosan Association of Public Affairs (FAPA): https://fapa.org/

 

Formosan Association of Public Affairs- Young Professionals Group (FAPA- YPG) on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/fapaypg

 

FAPA- YPG LA/OC Chapter Facebook Group: https://facebook.com/groups/54085939954

 

FAPA- YPG NY/NJ Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/nynjypg

 

FAPA- YPG San Francisco/Bay Area Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/fapaypgsf

 

Taiwanese Association of America (TAA): https://www.taa-usa.org/

 

Taiwanese American Conference- East Coast (TAC/EC): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwanese_American_Conference 

Sep 15, 2020
Ep 93 | A Discussion with Dr. Eunice Yuen About Asian American Mental Health
36:56

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

September is National Suicide Prevention Month. Unfortunately, suicide is a very real issue for the Asian American community. According to the Office of Minority Health, in 2017 the leading cause of death in young Asian Americans in the US was suicide. My guest on this episode of Talking Taiwan is passionate about promoting emotional wellness and a prevention model for mental health.

 

Dr. Eunice Yuen is, a child and adult psychiatrist who specializes in Asian American mental health. She sat down to speak to me about the stigma of mental health and the reluctance of Asian Americans to seek help. Dr. Yuen noted that prevention through mindfulness of emotional wellness are especially important for teenagers and young adults, which is the age at which mental illness often first manifests.

 

Dr. Yuen is working on an innovative tool called CHATogether that helps to resolve conflicts between Asian American parents and children. More than ever, tools like CHATogether are useful to address heightened child-parent conflicts during COVID-19, and discussions about racism. Please note that any of the advice or content shared in the episode is not meant to be taken as medical advice or psychiatric treatment. 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Why Dr. Yuen decided to enter the field of child and adult psychiatry and where her special interest in promoting emotional wellness in the Asian American community comes from
  • The difference between emotional wellbeing and a mental health issue
  • How building emotional resilience is important to help deal with everyday stress
  • How daily routines and structure is important for emotional wellbeing especially during the Coronavirus pandemic
  • How to identify when someone is dealing with a mental health issue and needs to seek help
  • Some individuals may display physical symptoms e.g. a stomachache, diarrhea, headache, while being able to function
  • What should you do if you think that someone you know (e.g. a friend or family member) is in need of help with a mental health issue
  • What the project Dr. Yuen CHATogether is about
  • How CHATogether is based on a paper published by Brazilian theater director, Augusto Boal in the 1980s called “Theater of the Oppressed”
  • What ages CHAT has been developed for
  • The concept of mentalization
  • The CHATogether community
  • What type of feedback CHATogether has gotten from its’ participants
  • How Chatogether has addressed child-parent conflict during COVID-19, talking about Black Lives Matter and racism
  • The concept of regulating emotions
  • The 3 R’s: Recognize your emotions, Realize where the emotions are coming from, Regulate your emotions
  • The importance of labeling your emotions and talking about your feelings
  • How to overcome the stigma of mental health within the Asian American community

Related Links:

 

Dr. Eunice Yuan’s bio: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/eunice_yuen/

 

CHATogether website: https://yale.edu/chatogether/ 

 

CHATogether Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CHATogetherWithUs/

 

CHATogether Youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRX2Nzv65ekzHikAaiyG6YQ

 

QR Code to connect to Cchatogether on social media:

 

A bio of Augusto Boal, the Brazilian dramatist who created the Theatre of the Oppressed:

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Augusto-Boal 

 

An article about Theater of Oppressed in medical education:

http://www.ijme.in/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/1909-5.pdf

 

Yale School of Medicine Magazine article about CHATogether: https://medicine.yale.edu/news/yale-medicine-magazine/chating-about-problems-before-they-turn-toxic/

 

Woodblock press article about CHATogether: https://www.woodblock-press.com/asianvoices/chatting-through-vignettes-with-dr-eunice-yuen

Sep 07, 2020
Ep 92 | Small Talk at LGBTQ Film Festival: An Interview with Director Huang Hui-chen
01:01:40

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

A relationship between mother and daughter that was so stonewalled that it took 20 years and a camcorder to make a breakthrough- this was the subject of Huang Hui-chen’s first feature documentary film, Small Talk. Small Talk is one of two documentary films being screened at the Austin Asian American Film Festival’s Prismatic Taiwan (September 4-13), a virtual, six-film series celebrating the past and present of queer Taiwanese cinema. Hui-chen spoke candidly about this deeply personal film that she described as a letter to her mother. She also revealed what’s happened in the aftermath of the film. Her film and personal story give hope to others dealing difficult parent-child relationships. Special thanks to the Austin Asian American Film Festival and Stacey Pai for providing translation.

 

To purchase tickets to watch Small Talk and learn about the other films featured in Prismatic Taiwan visit: www.aaafilmfest.org/ Talking Taiwan listeners will get $2 off when they use the code TALKING. The Prismatic Taiwan Queer Film Series, features six LGBTQ Taiwan films spanning from 1970 to 2016. You can watch all six films for under $15. To learn more Prismatic Taiwan check out last week’s episode, episode t.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Hui-chen’s work as an activist
  • When she got interested in documentary filmmaking
  • How it took her so long (20 years) to make Small Talk into a movie that her mother and relatives didn’t think she’d actually be able to do it
  • The footage of her nieces discussing whether their grandma (Hu-Chen’s mother) is a boy or a girl
  • How she got her mother to finally talk
  • How she got other family members and her mother’s girlfriends to talk in the film
  • The one person who she would have like to interview for the movie, but did not
  • How the film, Small Talk is like a letter to her mother
  • Why Hui-chen’s husband doesn’t appear in the film
  • While Hui-chen’s now ex-husband doesn’t appear in Small Talk he will be in her next film which will be about the relationship between love and social activism
  • Hui-chen’s mother’s reaction to the film after watching it
  • How Hui-chen’s mother’s reacted when Small Talk was screen at Taiwan’s Golden Horse Awards
  • How the film Small Talk has affected her and mother’s relationship with their relatives
  • What was Hui-chen’s sister’s reaction to Small Talk
  • How the film Small Talk has affected Hui-chen’s relationship with her mother
  • How Hui-chen’s relatives reacted to and dealt with to her mother’s lesbianism
  • How Hou Hsiao-hsien took a leap of faith when he got involved and became the executive producer of Small Talk
  • What filmmaking advice Hou Hsiao-hsien gave her
  • How Hui-chen feels about Small Talk having been selected as the Taiwanese entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards
  • Hui-chen’s book about her mother that reveals more that the film did not

 

Related Links:

 

PURCHASE tickets to watch Small Talk

LEARN More About Prismatic Taiwan and the September 5th live, virtual roundtable discussion event with Asian Cinevision and director Zero Chou, entitled “Creating Transnational Queer Asian Spaces”: https://www.aaafilmfest.org/prismatic-taiwan

Huang Hui-chen’s book, about her mother, 我和我的T媽媽 (available in Chinese):

https://readmoo.com/book/210085132000101

https://www.books.com.tw/products/E050053049

Austin Asian American Film Festival: https://www.aaafilmfest.org/

 

Austin Asian American Film Festival Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/AAAFF/

 

Austin Asian American Film Festival on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aaafilmfest/

 

Austin Asian American Film Festival on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AAAFF

Aug 31, 2020
Ep 91 | Austin Asian American Film Festival: Prismatic Taiwan, A Series Celebrating Queer Taiwanese Cinema
31:01

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Prismatic Taiwan, is a virtual, six-film series celebrating the past and present of queer Taiwanese cinema, co-presented by the Austin Asian American Film Festival (AAAFF). I recently spoke with Hanna Huang, the Executive Director of the Austin Asian American Film Festival and Josh Martin of the special programs team about the lineup of films that span 1970-2016. As you’ll hear in the interview, a lot of research and thought went into the film selections. The films offer a different perspective on Taiwan’s history and insight into Taiwan’s LGBTQ history. You can watch all six films for under $15 and Talking Taiwan listeners can also get an additional $2 off when they use the code: TALKING.

 

Next week’s episode will feature my interview with one of the film directors, Huang Hui-chen about her film, Small Talk, a deeply personal documentary that was 20 years in the making.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How the Austin Asian American Film Festival has screened many Taiwanese films throughout the years
  • The retrospective of six Hou Hsiao-hsien films at the Austin Asian American Film Festival in September 2018
  • How a Taiwan Queer Film Retrospective has actually been in the works since 2018
  • The Austin Asian American film festival started in 2004, but was known as the Austin Asian film festival until 2007 when an Asian American organizer, Masashi Niwano stepped in
  • The mission of the Austin Asian American Film Festival, which is to bring to light Asian and Asian American stories through cinema
  • Their programming is year round
  • The main film festival is usually held in June, but this year they had a short film online festival featuring 36 short films
  • Prismatic Taiwan, a six film retrospective of queer films spanning 1970-2016
  • A retrospective of Asian American films is being planned for the late fall (November)
  • The meaning behind the name Prismatic Taiwan
  • How they translated the word prismatic with the Chinese word for kaleidoscope, therefore Prismatic Taiwan A Queer Film Series has been translated into Chinese as: 萬花同志電
  • How the first film of Prismatic Taiwan, The End of the Track from 1970 was thought lost but has been recovered and is being reintroduced to audiences
  • How they narrowed down the film selection from over 20 films to 6
  • The one film that they couldn’t include in Prismatic Taiwan when the Austin Asian American Film Festival went online, Ang Lee’s The Wedding Banquet
  • The second film in the series, Outcasts (aka The Outsiders) as made in 1986 right before martial law in Taiwan was lifted
  • How they selected films that were not that easy to find
  • The River, was set in 1997 around the emergence of the gay club scene in Taipei
  • Not Simply a Wedding Banquet, set in 1997 is a documentary
  • Spider Lilies (2007) and Small Talk(2016) feature female gay characters whereas The River and Not Simply a Wedding Banquet feature male gay characters
  • September 5th live event, a Transnational Queer Activism Panel featuring Film Director Zero Chou in collaboration with Asian Cinevision along with others from the U.K. and Taiwan
  • Small Talk (2016) is a documentary film that was 20 years in the making and was executive produced by Hou Hsiao-hsien and Taiwan’s submission to the Academy Awards
  • These films tell the story of Taiwan’s history and queer history
  • How Director Tsai Ming-Liang, made the film I Don’t Want To Sleep Alone in Malaysia but it was banned there
  • Previously Tsai Ming-Liang had said that he wasn’t comfortable having his films in a queer film festival but that has changed since the legalization of gay marriage in Taiwan
  • How there were film distributors or filmmakers who didn’t want their film to be a part of the queer series
  • The background of Mou Tun-Fei the director of The End of The Track
  • How the design of the poster for Prismatic Taiwan was inspired by Kaohsiung’s Love River
  • Prismatic Taiwan is offering a SPECIAL DISCOUNT to listeners of Talking Taiwan, just use the code: TALKING to get $2 off when you purchase your tickets from August 38-September 13

 

Related Links:

 

Austin Asian American Film Festival: https://www.aaafilmfest.org/

 

 

Purchase tickets to Prismatic Taiwan and for more info on the September 5th live event, virtual roundtable discussion event with Asian Cinevision and director

Zero Chou, entitled “Creating Transnational Queer Asian Spaces”: https://www.aaafilmfest.org/prismatic-taiwan

 

 

Austin Asian American Film Festival Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/AAAFF/

 

Austin Asian American Film Festival on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aaafilmfest/

 

Austin Asian American Film Festival on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AAAFF

Aug 24, 2020
Ep 90 | Jaleea Price Talks About Living in Taiwan
43:11

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Jaleea Price, spoke with me about a broad range of topics beginning with her arrival and time in Taiwan. While in Taiwan she worked on the ICRT morning news show, co-founded D.A.P. (Descendants of African Peoples) with Elissa Russell (who was a guest on episode 88), and had two daughters. Now an arts educator based in Thailand, Jaleea she had recently gone through quarantine in Thailand and the U.K. when we spoke. She also spoke to me about TCKs, the racism that she’s experienced in the U.S. and Taiwan as a biracial woman and her thoughts on the Black Lives Matter movement.  

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Jaleea talks briefly about quarantining in Thailand and the U.K.
  • What brought her to Taiwan
  • Her connection to the Cloud Gate Dance Theater of Taiwan
  • Arriving in Taiwan alone without a cell phone and going to Internet cafes to communicate with her friends and family
  • What it was like working on the ICRT morning show
  • What it was like having young children in Taiwan
  • People’s reactions when they asked where she was from and she said that she was American
  • Her involvement with D.A.P. The Descendants of African Peoples group
  • The different ways that Black people from other parts of the world (e.g. Canada, France) identify themselves vs. American
  • The racism and discrimination that she’s experienced in the U.S. and Taiwan
  • Her thoughts on the murder of George Floyd and Black Lives Matter
  • Her experience of the Black Lives Matter movement in the U.K. and Thailand
  • Her privilege as a light-skinned woman of color
  • K-pop group BTS’s support of Black Lives Matter and takeover of #whitelivesmatter
  • What a TCK is
  • The Eastern and Western cultural differences in the birthing process
  • What she misses most about Taiwan

 

 

Related Links:

 

Jaleea on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaleea-price

 

Jaleea on Instagram: instagram.com/jaluthegreat

 

Jaleea on Facebook: www.facebook.com/jaleeajoie

 

Taipei Times article about D.A.P. (Descendants of African Peoples): https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2004/07/12/2003178672

 

BBC New article about the K-pop group BTS that donated $1m to the Black Lives Matter movement and took over the hashtag #whitelivesmatter: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-52960617

Aug 17, 2020
Ep 89 | Quarantine in Taiwan: An Interview with Diana Lee
48:01

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In this episode of Talking Taiwan, we’ll be sharing two different perspectives on the Taiwan quarantine experience in this time of the Coronavirus pandemic. I spoke with Diana Lee, the co-founder and president of Asian in New York and one of the founders and organizers of Hello Taiwan. She recently traveled back to Taiwan with her two young children and was quarantined with them in Kaohsiung at her parents’ home. We’ll also hear from JD Chang who went back to Taiwan earlier this year. JD was a guest on Episode 80 of Talking Taiwan. He had a very different experience since he traveled and quarantined alone. He spoke with us about his quarantine experience back in May.

Special thanks to Jane Wang for providing the recording of JD. 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Hello Taiwan and what it does
  • How Diana prepared for her trip back to Taiwan with 2 young kids (the travel and quarantine preparations)
  • Permits required for entry into Taiwan at the time
  • The Facebook group Diana consulted for advice on how to prepare for her trip back to Taiwan
  • The PPE Diana prepared for her and her kids to wear during their travel back to Taiwan
  • JD’s travel preparations and quarantine experience as a solo traveler
  • The different types of quarantine accommodations that people can opt for
  • The most important tip for anyone traveling back to Taiwan and undergoing quarantine, which Diana mentioned and that ended up delaying JD for an extra hour at the airport
  • The procedure upon arrival at the airport and before getting transported in a quarantine taxi or bus to your final destination
  • What happens once you’re in quarantine
  • How Diana kept her kids occupied during quarantine
  • How JD kept himself occupied during quarantine
  • The US $33,000 fine for breaking quarantine

 

Related Links:

Asian In New York: http://www.asianinny.com/

 

Asian In New York Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/AsianInNYFans

 

Hello Taiwan: http://www.hellotaiwan.us/

 

Hello Taiwan Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/HelloTaiwanWorld/

 

Taiwanese COVID-19 Traveling Back to Taiwan Facebook Group (台灣海外Covid-19自救會): https://www.facebook.com/groups/889736338130271/?ref=share

 

Episode 80 with JD  Chang Founder of Crushing The Myth: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/jd-chang-founder-of-crushing-the-myth-ep-80/

Aug 10, 2020
Ep 88 | Being Black in Taiwan and Racism in the United States: Elissa Russell and Elizabeth Williams
55:56

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Elissa Russell and Elizabeth Williams are my guests on this episode of Talking Taiwan. We spoke about their experiences of living in Taiwan, the racism that they’ve experienced in Taiwan vs. the U.S. and Black Lives Matter. One thing that’s abundantly clear is that Taiwan has a very special place in their hearts. Liz and Elissa spoke candidly on the topic of Black Lives Matter and the state of race relations in the United States. Thank you Liz and Elissa for your open-heartedness and for inviting my audience to continue the conversation with you. Contact info for Elissa and Liz is listed below in the Related Links section.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What brought Elissa and Liz to Taiwan
  • Elissa and Liz talk about their experiences living in Taiwan
  • The racism that Liz and Elissa have experienced in Taiwan vs. the United States, and how they have handled it
  • Elissa and Liz share their perspectives on the segregation in Atlanta, Chicago and Los Angeles
  • Liz and Elissa offer their perspectives on Black Lives Matter
  • Elissa and Liz discuss how the killing of Ahmaud Arbery felt especially personal
  • The anti-racism initiative that Liz is working on
  • Being an ally vs. an accomplice
  • What actions people can take to support the Black Lives Matter and too educate themselves
  • How to have conversations with others about the Black Lives Matter movement

 

Related Links:

 

Elissa Russell's contact info:

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/janquilrussell/

 

https://www.instagram.com/im_readi/

 

https://www.facebook.com/elissa.j.russell

 

 

Elissa Russell's business info:

 

www.consultreadi.com

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/consultreadi/

 

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/readi-consulting-llc

 

 

Elizabeth Williams' contact info:

 

Personal website: https://www.theycallmeliz.com/

 

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elizabeth-williams-370510/

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lizzyworld/

 

 

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/liz.williams.52090 An article about the arrest and jailing of Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr.: https://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/21/us/21gates.html

 

An Open Letter for Black Lives Matter (which has been translated into over 30 different languages): https://lettersforblacklives.com/

 

An article about the arrest and jailing of Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr.: https://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/21/us/21gates.html

 

Liz’s appearance on the Taiwan TV show Super Idol: https://youtu.be/vzQpANhYAeI

 

Liz singing a bit of Peking Opera during her appearance on the Taiwan TV show Super Idol [Start watching at 4:09]: https://youtu.be/cFEz19varyo

 

Aug 03, 2020
Ep 87 | This is My Brain in Love: A Conversation with Author I.W. Gregorio
55:13

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

July is Black, Indigenous, People of Color Mental Health Awareness Month, so I thought this would be good time to invite Dr. Ilene Wong, who writes as I.W. Gregorio on to Talking Taiwan to talk about her latest novel, This is My Brain in Love. Dr. Wong has described the novel as a happy book about mental illness across cultures. We spoke about how she balances her medical and writing careers and her first book, None of the Above.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Why she writes under the pen name “I.W. Gregorio”
  • How she went from being a doctor to a YA author and which came first
  • How she balances her career in medicine with her writing
  • How her medical career informs her writing
  • How much of her novel draws from her personal life
  • Her thoughts on the model minority myth and stereotypes
  • What she thinks of the media’s focus on suicide as the endpoint of depression
  • YA books and movies that romanticized death by suicide
  • The difference between being down in the dumps and clinically depressed
  • How difficult was it for Ilene to come out about her mental health issues
  • Why she felt compelled to write this book now
  • How her family dealt with her depression
  • The paradoxical views that some doctors have about medicating for mental health issues
  • How we might de-stigmatize mental health
  • The difference between passive and active suicide ideation
  • Her writing process and the importance of having critique partners
  • The feedback that she’s received on the book
  • Her first book None of the Above
  • What the term “intersex” means
  • Why she writes for YA audiences
  • Her advice for aspiring authors
  • Ilene’s connection to Taiwan

 

Related Links:

 

Ilene’s website: www.iwgregorio.com

 

I.W. Gregorio on social media:

 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/IWGregorio

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iwgregorio/

 

Tumblr: https://iwgregorio.tumblr.com/

 

Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) Mental Health Awareness Month: https://www.mhanational.org/BIPOC-mental-health-month

 

Suicide hotlines:

 

Crisis Text Line (Text HOME to741741 from anywhere in the USA, at any time)

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255)

 

The Trevor Project (1-866-488-7386)

 

For suicide hotlines by country: International Association for Suicide Prevention https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/

 

 

Mental Health Resources:

 

Mental Health America https://screening.mhanational.org/screening-tools

 

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (1-800-662-4358 https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/)

 

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America https://adaa.org/

Jul 27, 2020
Ep 86 | The Coming Collapse of China: Gordon Chang Discusses his Books
25:08

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In 2015, I spoke with Gordon Chang, author and political commentator about his views on China and his books, The Coming Collapse of China, and Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes On the World. I recently invited him back on Talking Taiwan, to listen to that episode, check out episode 85.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Gordon went from practicing law to writing The Coming Collapse of Chinaand becoming a political commentator who focuses on news about China
  • How Gordon’s views of China changed after he worked and lived there from 1996-2001
  • How the Chinese Communist Party is going in the wrong direction
  • What kind of reactions Gordon’s book, The Coming Collapse of Chinareceived
  • What’s going to happen if China does collapse?
  • China’s predatory trade policies
  • How China’s ban of certain websites and social media platforms delegitimizes the Chinese Communist Party
  • Gordon’s impressions of Taiwan
  • How Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement was inspired by Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement
  • Dissent in Hong Kong, Tibet and the Uighurs in Xinjiang
  • Gordon’s book Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes On the World
  • How Gordon believes that the U.S. should be calling out China on North Korea
  • Gordon’s thoughts on the premise of the film The Interviewand the cyber hacks on Sony
  • If Gordon has another book in the works

 

 

Related Links:

 

Gordon Chang on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gordongchang

 

Gordon Chang’s website: www.gordonchang.com

 

Gordon’s book Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes On the World: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1400062942/qid=1134270260/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/002-9747648-7111228?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

 

Gordon’s book, The Coming Collapse of Chinahttps://www.amazon.com/gp/product/037550477X/qid=1134270217/sr=8-2/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i2_xgl14/002-9747648-7111228?n=507846&s=books&v=glance

 

Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement: https://qz.com/1714897/what-was-hong-kongs-umbrella-movement-about/

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umbrella_Movement

 

Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-asian-studies/article/inside-taiwans-sunflower-movement-twentyfour-days-in-a-studentoccupied-parliament-and-the-future-of-the-region/DB4A7B57538A6F06DC6C8CF0058C8040

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunflower_Student_Movement

 

The Interviewhttps://www.netflix.com/title/70305895

 

https://www.cnn.com/2014/12/27/world/asia/north-korea-the-interview-reaction/index.html

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/08/-sp-north-koreans-review-the-interview

Jul 20, 2020
Ep 85 | Hong Kong Security Law: An Interview with Political Commentator Gordon Chang
20:14

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Gordon Chang is an author and political commentator. I first learned of him when I heard about his book The Coming Collapse of China. Then in 2015, I met and interviewed him for the Talking Taiwan podcast. We will re-share that episode at a later time. Recently, I invited Gordon back on to share his thoughts on the Hong Kong Security Law, India’s ban of TikTok, Zoom’s ties with China and the confirmed case of bubonic plague in China’s Inner Mongolia. Will the U.S. ban Tiktok? At the time this interview was recorded that question was unanswered.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What is the Hong Kong Security Law?
  • What does the Hong Kong Security Law mean for Hong Kong and its democracy movement?
  • What has happened since the law was enacted?
  • What has been the reaction to the law by people in Hong Kong and around the world?
  • China’s violation of the Sino-British Joint Declaration signed on December 19, 1984 
  • How can the international community hold China accountable for what’s happening to Hong Kong?
  • British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s offer to give British citizenship to up 3 million people from Hong Kong
  • Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen’s offer to provide refuge to the people of Hong Kong
  • What the Hong Kong Security Law means for Taiwan
  • How willing and able is China to take Taiwan by force?
  • India’s ban of 59 different Chinese apps including Tiktok and WeChat
  • Why the concern over Chinese apps?
  • The Chinese Communist Party’s 2017 National Intelligence Law
  • How Tiktok is owned by ByteDance, a Chinese company which is subject to the National Intelligence Law
  • How Zoom has sent information back to China, and canceled the accounts of activists who used Zoom to commemorate the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square
  • The confirmed case of bubonic plague in China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region and the G4 Swine Flu
  • China’s handling of COVID-19

 

Related Links:

 

Gordon Chang on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gordongchang

 

Gordon Chang’s website: www.gordonchang.com

 

The Hong Kong Security Law: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/30/world/asia/hong-kong-security-law-explain.html

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-52765838

 

Articles about concerns that the Chinese Communist Party could be mining the data of Tiktok users: https://qz.com/1613020/tiktok-might-be-a-chinese-cambridge-analytica-scale-privacy-threat/

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/zakdoffman/2020/06/26/warning-apple-suddenly-catches-tiktok-secretly-spying-on-millions-of-iphone-users/#69134f8934ef

 

https://theprint.in/tech/tiktok-caught-spying-on-iphone-users-in-india-and-around-the-world/450339/

 

Zoom’s data has gotten routed through China: https://www.businessinsider.com/china-zoom-data-2020-4

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2020/04/03/warning-zoom-sends-encryption-keys-to-china-sometimes/#4a901a0d3fd9

 

Why Zoom closed an account of a group that held a Zoom event commemorating the 31st anniversary of the June 4 Tiananmen Square Massacre: https://www.axios.com/zoom-closes-chinese-user-account-tiananmen-square-f218fed1-69af-4bdd-aac4-7eaf67f34084.html?fbclid=IwAR2-8R2Jz9bb_iskXAJcO4mmBXrAeltYKs7CfZNna4h0Ko7TakrLB1sgH7k

 

 

U.S. Secretary of State Mike’s appearance on Laura Ingram’s Fox News Show stating that the US is considering banning Tiktok: https://www.cnn.com/videos/business/2020/07/07/tiktok-app-china-us-pompeo.cnnbusiness/video/playlists/business-news/

 

https://www.foxnews.com/media/mike-pompeo-tik-tok-china-communist-social-media-spying-fox-ingraham

Jul 13, 2020
Ep 84 | Black Lives Solidarity Global Initiative: Founders Stefanie Davis and Patrick Springer
01:11:06

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Stefanie Davis and Patrick Springer are the founders of the Black Lives Solidarity Global Initiative, which organized a rally in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement on June 13th in Taipei’s 228 Peace Park. I spoke to Stefanie and Patrick about their experiences living as people of color in Taiwan and the U.S., the activities planned for the rally and their personal views of Black Lives Matter.

 

Here’s a description of the Black Lives Solidarity Global Initiative rally from their Facebook event page:

 

We cannot sit around as the stories of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Iyanna Dior, Sandra Bland, Philando Castile, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown Jr., Pamela Turner, Atatiana Jefferson, and countless others become common occurrences- background noise to the daily news, their lives summarized as sound bites between the weather and sports updates.

 

We cannot sit idly by and watch as police brutality against innocent black and brown bodies continues to go unchecked around the world.

 

It is time for us to take a stand and make our voices known that we demand action against racism both abroad and at home. That injustice against one of us, is an injustice to all.

 

Join us in a legal and peaceful rally Saturday, June 13th, at 228 Peace Memorial Park in Taipei as we come together to lend our support and our voices to those around the world fighting for equality and for others right to simply breathe.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What brought Stefanie and Patrick to Taiwan and how long they have been here
  • The racism that they have experienced in Taiwan and how it compares to what they’ve experienced in the U.S.
  • How they talk to their students about race and nationality
  • Patrick’s bar Arts & Crafts (in Taichung)
  • How the Black Lives Solidarity Global Initiative (BLSGI) came about
  • The events and activities planned at the June 13 BLSGI rally
  • The Taipei Is Listening Forum
  • How the BLSGI rally has put Taiwan on the map as one of the countries that has had a rally about the injustices happening to Black people in the U.S.
  • The feedback they’ve received about the rally
  • What Stefanie and Patrick hope that people take away from the experience of being at the rally or what they learned at the rally
  • Common stereotypes that people have about Black people
  • Facts and statistics that demonstrate some of the discrimination that Blacks in the U.S. experience
  • The shooting of Atatiana Jefferson and arrest of Sandra Bland
  • Where the funds raised at the rally went
  • Patrick and Stefanie’s personal experiences with Black Lives Matter
  • What advice Stefanie or Patrick have for non-Black people who want to understand the Black experience or who want to be allies
  • What Black Lives Matter means to Stefanie and Patrick
  • Facts and statistics based on US data and research that were shared at the BLSGI rally:

 

  • More than 1/2 of young Black Americans know someone, including themselves, who has been harassed by the police.
  • Black students are 3 times more likely to be suspended than white students for similar infractions.
  • Black drivers are 30% more likely than white drivers to be pulled over by the police.
  • For every $100 earned by white
  • families -> Black families earn $57.30.
  • Blacks Americans make up 13% of the nation's population.
  • Blacks Americans make 40% of prison populations.

 

 

Related Links:

 

 

 

Black Lives Solidarity Global Initiative Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/BLSGlobal/

 

Brothas & Sistas of Taiwan Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1728788584038273/

 

Taipei Is Listening Forum: https://www.facebook.com/events/2570056726428424/

 

An article about the Taipei Is Listening Forum: https://ketagalanmedia.com/2020/06/11/is-taipei-listening-black-lives-matter-taiwan-gears-up-for-weekend-rally/

 

 

Patrick’s bar Arts & Crafts’ Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ArtsAndCraftsBar/

 

 

To follow Patrick's bartending recipes, videos, photos and his Virtual Happy Hour booking information visit: https://www.inhousebartender.com/

Jul 06, 2020
Ep 83 | What Led to Taiwan's Same Sex Marriage?
24:00

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

In 2017 I interviewed Professor Wen Liu about the historic news of May 24, 2017, that Taiwan’s Constitutional Court had ruled that marriage is not strictly defined as being between a man and a woman. This paved the way for same sex marriage to be legalized in Taiwan in 2019. Since the Stonewall uprising, which began on June 28, 1969, led to the international gay rights movement, June has become recognized as worldwide Pride month. In recognition of Pride month, I’d like to re-share my interview with gender studies Professor Wen Liu.

 

Here's a link to the original post of this interview: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/gender-studies-professor-wen-liu-talking-taiwan-ep-58/

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The May 24th ruling by the Constitutional Court in Taiwan that same-sex marriage could be legalized
  • Mr. Chi Chia-wei who’s lawsuit led to the May 24th ruling
  • The history of the same-sex marriage battle and family law in Taiwan
  • Major turning points in Taiwan’s LGBTQ movement
  • The history behind Taiwan’s gay pride parade
  • How Taiwan compares to other Asian countries on LGBTQ issues
  • The next steps after the May 24th ruling
  • The marriage equality bill, civil partnership bill, multiple family bill
  • Other work that needs to be done in Taiwan for the LGBTQ community

 

Related Links:

Wen Liu’s writings on New Bloom Magazine: http://newbloommag.net/author/wen-liu/

An article about the LGBTQ movement in Taiwan: https://outreachfortaiwan.org/taiwan-101/social-movements/lgbtq-movement-in-taiwan/

Jun 29, 2020
Ep 82 | Taiwan Pride Parade for the World: Speaking with Organizer Darien Chen
29:17

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

On June 28, 2020, Taiwan Pride Parade for the World will be held in Taipei at 3pm to celebrate Pride Month and the anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall riots. While in-person Pride events have been canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it will likely be one of the few if only in-person Pride events to be held in the world during Pride Month. I spoke with the organizer of Taiwan Pride Parade for the World, Darien Chen about what motivated him to organize the event.

 

Darien also told me about how he participated in Mr. Gay World as Mr. Gay Taiwan and how he hopes that the parade will give people around the world hope and keep the torch and spirit of Pride alive.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Darien competed as the first Mr. Gay Taiwan at Mr. Gay World
  • His involvement in the first Gay Pride Parade in Taiwan
  • His involvement with the NTU (National Taiwan University) gay student club GayChat
  • What motivated Darien to organize Taiwan Pride Parade for the World
  • The challenges and obstacles he faced in trying to organize the event
  • How Taiwan will be the only place in the world that will be able to host a live in-person Gay Pride Parade in June (worldwide Pride Month), on the anniversary of the June 28, 1969 Stonewall riots
  • That there are several Pride parades/events organized at the local level in Taiwan’s various counties
  • Activities planned on the day of the event
  • If there will be a live stream of the event
  • Darien’s co-organizer Mamasan drag queen Magnolia La Manga
  • How this rally will compare to the annual Gay Pride Parade that takes place in Taiwan in October
  • What the annual Gay Pride Parade that takes place in Taiwan in October is like and how it compares to the Gay Pride March in New York and other major cities

 

 

Related Links:

 

Taiwan Pride Parade for the World Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/277051990005355/

 

A Live stream of the event (Taiwan Pride Parade for the World) will be available on the Taiwan Pride Parade for the World Facebook event page or on Cookie the Drag Queen’s YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2Vr2VW6

 

Here’s where you can watch Global Pride 2020: https://www.globalpride2020.org/watch/

 

GLOBAL PRIDE 2020: COVID-19 relief PERFORMANCES WITH TODRICK HALL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HhzcnTFfjE

 

Mr. Gay World: https://mrgayworld.com/

 

Anastasia Lin, Miss World Canada 2016: http://www.anastasialin.com/bio

 

A Taipei Times article about NTU’s (National Taiwan University) student club GayChat: https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2015/09/27/2003628678

Jun 28, 2020
Ep 81 | Black Lives Matter: A Conversation with Jalesa Tucker
26:28

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

After the murder of George Floyd sparked protests in Minneapolis, here in New York, across the country, and around the world, I wanted to have a conversation on Talking Taiwan about what precipitated all of this social unrest, the Black Lives Matter movement and what we, especially non-Black people can do at this time.

 

This led me to invite Jalesa Tucker to be a guest on Talking Taiwan. I met Jalesa when I did some work for a nonprofit that educates young people about healthy relationships.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • Who was George Floyd and why his death has led to massive protests across the U.S. and globally
  • Recent incidents in the U.S. that led up to the protests over the murder of George Floyd (May 25 in Minneapolis, Minnesota): the killing of Ahmaud Arbery (February 23 in Brunswick, Georgia), Breonna Taylor (March 13 in Louisville, Kentucky), a dispute between Chris Cooper and Amy Cooper in New York City’s Central Park (May 25)
  • The death of Trayvon Martin (February 26, 2012 in Sanford, Florida) that led to the Black Lives Matter movement
  • The start of the hashtag Black Lives Matter
  • What is taught about Black history or the lack thereof in U.S. high schools
  • The Black Lives Matter movement’s call to defund the police and what that means
  • Resources to learn more about racial inequality in the U.S.
  • Why Black Lives Matter is about humanity and how we treat each other

 

Related and Recommended Links:

 

Netflix documentary film, directed by Ava DuVernay 13th: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krfcq5pF8u8&t=210s

 

 

Malcom X: https://www.malcolmx.com/biography/

 

 

James Baldwin: https://www.biography.com/writer/james-baldwin

 

 

My Grandmother’s Hands by Resmaa Menakem: https://www.resmaa.com/books

 

 

Emmanuel Acho’s YouTube channel video series, Uncomfortable Conversations With A Black Man: https://www.youtube.com/user/Eacho18/videos

Jun 22, 2020
Ep 80 | JD Chang: Founder of Crushing the Myth
36:55

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Crushing The Myth (CTM) is an Asian American speaker series that shares Asian American stories and perspectives with a global audience. Established in January of 2019, CTM aims to connect Asian Americans and allies to each other.

 

I spoke with the Founder of Crushing The Myth, JD Chang about why he created CTM, and its mission.

 

Crushing The Myth is about showing that Asian America today is more than just the “Model Minority” label and telling Asian American stories that make people LISTEN, LEARN, and INSPIRED.

 

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • JD’s experience of the model minority myth
  • What Crushing The Myth is about and what it represents
  • What is the mission of Crushing The Myth (CTM)
  • How JD started his career as a film line producer
  • What JD thinks about TED Talks
  • South by Southwest (SXSW) Conference
  • What Crushing the Myth offers to its participants (prospective speakers)
  • What’s the biggest challenge JD has experienced with Crushing The Myth
  • The highlights of working on Crushing The Myth
  • How people can sign up to do a Crushing The Myth talk
  • The training that Crushing The Myth provides to its speakers
  • JD’s tips for public speaking
  • JD’s tips for looking good on video
  • Where you can watch the CTM talks

 

 

 

Related Links:

 

Crushing The Myth’s website: https://www.crushingthemyth.com/

 

Crushing The Myth on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/crushingthemyth/

 

Crushing The Myth YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKLyCJ6sOp72YB2iXJhd9DA

 

 

 

JD Chang on social media:

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jdchang360/

 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jdchang360

 

 

 

APEX for Youth: https://www.apexforyouth.org/

 

Asia Society: https://asiasociety.org/new-york

 

South by Southwest (SXSW) Conference: https://www.sxsw.com/

 

TED Talks: https://www.ted.com/talks

Jun 15, 2020
Ep 79 | Gary Reloj Coronavirus Survivor Delivers PPE
57:18

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Gary Reloj is Co-founder of the PPE Relief Initiative, an entrepreneur in the tech startup and restaurant industry, a founding board member of The Promise Society, and a COVID-19 survivor. 

 

In late March, Gary shared a public Facebook post, that was a very well-documented account of COVID-19 symptoms he’d experienced, the toll it took on his body, and specific things that he did to cope with the physical discomfort, and anxiety that it brought on. He had come down with symptoms early on, even before New York City went on lockdown and when testing was still not widely available. It was clear that he had written his post as a way to help others who had also contracted COVID-19 or were worried about possibly contracting it. In the early days of the Coronavirus pandemic, every little cough, sniffle or bit of malaise sent a lot of us into a panic. 

 

Around that time, I also learned that Gary was spearheading an effort to get PPE (personal protective equipment) to health care workers. That effort became the PPE Relief Initiative (PRI) with a crowdfunding campaign on GoFundMe to raise $30,000 to give PPE kits to 400 healthcare workers. 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Gary dealt with and recovered from having COVID-19
  • The Facebook post that Gary wrote and publicly shared detailing his COVID-19 symptoms and the regime he followed in dealing with his symptoms
  • What motivated Gary to start looking for a way to deliver PPE to healthcare workers
  • Gary’s PPE Relief Initiative Co-founder Dr. Joanne Kwan
  • How they determined what to include in the PPE Relief Initiative supply kit that they were going to give health care workers
  • The challenges they encountered in obtaining high quality PPE
  • The PRI team
  • Why the PRI supply kits are delivered directly to health care workers rather than to hospitals
  • The GoFundMe crowdfunding campaign for PRI to raise $30,000 to support 400 healthcare workers
  • There is still room for around 200 for healthcare workers that live or work in the New Jersey/New York metropolitan area and are dealing with COVID-19 patients to apply for the PRI supply kits
  • How they prioritize which healthcare workers will receive the PRI supply kits first
  • The partnership with The Promise Society on the PRI’s GoFundMe crowdfunding campaign
  • PRI’s support for Black Lives Matter protesters and tips for how protestors should protect themselves and be safe while protesting during this pandemic
  • Being prepared for a possible second wave of COVID-19 cases
  • What’s next for PRI after the GoFundMe campaign
  • How having COVID-19 has affected Gary’s outlook on life

 

Related Links:

PPE Relief Initiative’s GoFundMe crowdfunding campaign: http://pperelief.org/donate or https://bit.ly/2Y7JguX

 

Eligible healthcare workers can apply for the PRI supply kits here: www.pperelief.org/apply

 

PPE Relief Initiative’s website: https://pperelief.org/

 

PRI’s social media accounts:

 

PRI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ppe.relief/

 

PRI’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ppe.relief.initiative/

 

Cuomo's words really resonated with me and I used the phrase “New York Tough” to help get my mind right and out of the negative mental trench I was in. If you have Covid-19 or someone you know has it, and you’re looking for someone to talk to about the experience, please don’t hesitate to reach out. When I was at my worst, I was partly in a bad place mentally because I felt so helpless and clueless as to how long my symptoms were going to last. I seriously wish I had someone I could talk to at a human level that could relate to what I was experiencing so if I could do that for you, please let me know.

That said, here is the full list of symptoms I experienced...
-Fever (ranged between 100 and 102). My fever lasted for four days.
-Chronic dry coughing. It came from deep within my chest and at times, would have bad coughing fits. One coughing session was so bad, my core stomach muscles cramped up and I started to gag because I just couldn’t breathe…. That really sucked!
-Difficulty breathing. This was the big one. Any form of simple physical activity would make it hard to breathe; you almost feel like you’re drowning it’s like an asthma attack. If I got out of bed to go to the bathroom, or if I would try to eat food, I would be gasping for air with short, shallow, quick breaths. It was extremely difficult to take deep breaths (still is to an extent). The only way I’d be able to breath normally would be to lay down in bed on my side.
-Dehydration. This was especially bad when I was on my 2nd day of my fever and was coughing up a storm.
-Chills. This also occurred on the 2nd and 3rd day of my fever.
-Loss of appetite. Not only was I not hungry, but when I did eat, it was actually hard to breathe while eating, so that contributed to my loss of appetite.
-Confusion. This again was on the 2nd day, early in the morning. I just woke up and I felt like I was still in dream mode, and I kept trying to tell my body move, but it felt like I was stuck and was confused to where I was.
-Diarrhea.
-Fatigue
-Loss of smell. My taste was also a bit dulled, especially with sweets.
-Body aches. This was actually my first symptom. It first started with body aches like sciatica. I then had back pains, lower and upper back.
-Anxiety. There were moments where my mind was in a very bad place, especially when it was very hard to breathe. I started to get anxiety thinking about every breathe and as a result, it would disrupt my breathing cycle. When I would have major anxiety, I would try to calm myself by playing meditation music and do my best to have my mind escape reality for a minute to help regulate my breathing again. Eventually, as a way to combat future anxiety, I would create structure around me to keep me busy and help me cope. For example, I documented all my symptoms under a certain timeline, I documented my medication and tried to create a set schedule, and I made sure to reach out to friends for support.

Here’s the lineup of meds I took and how often:
-Tylenol Extra Strength, 3000mg daily, or 2 pills 3x a day. This was probably the most important thing I was taking.
-Mucinex DM, 1 tablet every 12 hours. This helped act as a cough suppressant.
-Cepacol Extra Strength. Take as needed. This helped numb my throat. While I know my coughing originated more from my chest and not my throat, it gave me peace of mind to take Cepacol before I slept.
-Pedialyte. Unfortunately I didn’t have any, but my friend who also had Covid-19 was using it to help with dehydration and if I could do it all over again, I would have included it in my rotation.
-Ton of water. I can’t stress how important it is to have available water by your side. I would have a big pitcher of water by my bed at all times and when I could manage to get out of bed, I always made sure to re-fill my pitcher even if it’s 70% full.

Here’s the timeline of everything (this was the diary I kept).

03/11: Suspected date of exposure
03/14: Noticed body aches, like sciatica.
03/15: Back aches, lower and upper back. Mild diarrhea.
03/16: Experience slight fatigue. Back pain and sciatica pain increases. Start to have mild cough.
03/18: Lose sense of smell. Fatigue increases big time. Cough starts to become more frequent. Start to feel warm under eyelids at night. Mild diarrhea continues. Appetite still normal.
03/19: Cough and fatigue becomes worse. Headaches occur.
03/20: Chronic coughing begins. Fever occurs 101 degrees. Loss of appetite begins.
03/21: Very bad coughing fits, difficulty breathing. Fever still at 101 degrees. Extremely fatigued. Experienced cold chills as well. Further loss of appetite. Difficulty sleeping.
03/22: Coughing is still terrible, at times difficult to breathe. Energy and appetite was okay in the morning, decreased as day progressed. Difficulty sleeping. Breathing is still bad.
03/23: Becoming more thirsty. Woke up and fever wasn’t so bad. Early evening suffered worst coughing fit. Night fever is back, 101. Worst night of sleep. Breathing is still bad.
03/24: Lower back really hurts, but could be due to uncomfortable bed. Felt better for most of the day, around 3:30pm start to feel worse. Managed to get myself under control after taking Tylenol and shower around 3:40pm. Improved appetite and energy. No fever. Breathing ability hasn’t improved.
03/25: Breathing is still effected. The simplest form of physical activity creates shallow breathing, elevated breathing rates.
03/26: Energy and appetite continues to improve. Coughing slightly improved; starting to produce some phlegm. Breathing is still the same. 3rd day of no fever. Spoke with Doctor, said plateau of symptoms is a good sign, as Covid-19 is progressive in nature. Still have diarrhea.
03/27: Feel exponentially better. Breathing is much improved, although still can’t take deep breaths without coughing. Coughing overall is down. Again, no fever. Energy is up, able to sit up without trouble, was able to walk and spend time outside.
03/28: Diarrhea seems improved. Still coughing a little. Breathing still improved. Still no fever.

Anyway, I hope this helps! AND STAY HOME!!

 

Gary Reloj’s social media accounts:

 

Gary on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/garyreloj

 

Gary on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/garyreloj/

 

Gary on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GaryReloj



The Promise Society’s website: http://www.thepromisesociety.org/

Jun 08, 2020
Ep 78 | Sunflower Movement: Reflecting Back from the Civil Unrest of 2020
17:30

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin: 

As protests and civil unrest arise across the U.S., and tension has mounted, Talking Taiwan's host Felicia Lin was reminded of a time in which she found herself in the midst of intense protests in 2014,  in Taipei, Taiwan, after the occupation of the Legislative Yuan in what has become known as the Sunflower Movement.

Jun 01, 2020
Ep 77 | Richard Wang Announcer of Taiwan Baseball Games: First Pro Sports Since Covid-19
48:03

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

The exceptional way in which Taiwan has handled and contained the Coronavirus has thrust it into the international spotlight once again, but for a different reason. On April 11th, Taiwan’s professional baseball league (CPBL) became the world’s first professional sports league to open in 2020. And then it became the first to have spectators at their games on May 8th.

 

When I realized that Taiwan had became the only place on the planet where professional baseball was being played, and I knew there was a story there. I learned that Richard Wang had become the English broadcaster for CPBL games, so I reached out to him hoping that he’d agree to an interview for Talking Taiwan.


Richard kindly agreed to do the interview, and you’ll see how just how kind, gracious and patient he was when our interview got off to a bit of a rocky start. Just watch the blooper video of our Zoom call, which shows that strange things happen when using a virtual background. Look for that video below in the related links section.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • What happened when Taiwan’s baseball league (CPBL) realized that they were going to be the first sports league in the world to open in 2020
  • The Eleven Sports Network’s role in bringing English commentary to Taiwan’s baseball league
  • Richard’s baseball broadcasting partner Wayne McNeil 
  • What it was like having live baseball games with no spectators
  • What it was like when fans were allowed to attend baseball games
  • The comparison between baseball games played in the U.S. and Taiwan
  • How Richard became a Red Sox fan
  • How Richard got the nickname Boston
  • How Richard got interested in baseball
  • How Richard became a baseball announcer in Taiwan
  • How aspects of Taiwanese culture and traditions are introduced during the broadcasting of games
  • A viral video of a home run call from 2013, when Manny Ramirez hit another home run for the EDA Rhinos in Taiwan
  • How baseball was introduced to Taiwan
  • The history of baseball in Taiwan
  • Taiwan’s Little League and its participation in the Little League World Series
  • How baseball has boosted Taiwan’s international image
  • Why Taiwan’s baseball league is called the Chinese Professional Baseball League
  • The Taiwan Major League (TML)
  • Parallels between the Spanish Flu of 1918 and the Coronavirus in 2020
  • The precautions taken at the baseball stadiums in Taiwan
  • Will there be a major league baseball season in the U.S.
  • Where you can watch the CPBL games
  • What baseball has to do with the New Taiwan Dollar 500 dollar bill

 

 

Richard Wang and Wayne McNeil (Photo courtesy of Richard Wang)

 

 

Richard Wang and Wayne McNeil (Photo courtesy of Richard Wang)

 

Related Links:

 

Blooper video of Richard Wang’s interview with Felicia Lin:

 

CPBL English Website: http://www.cpbl.com.tw/eng/history/

 

For CPBL stats and stories visit: http://cpblstats.com/

 

 [Can you embed this link to a video clip on Twitter]

Here’s a video clip from a CPBL game that shows the robot drummers:

https://twitter.com/ElevenSportsTW/status/1251201807981768709

 

Watch CPBL games by going to Twitter.com and searching for one of the following four teams: Rakuten Monkeys, Uni Lions, Chinatrust Brothers and Fubon Guardians

 

Watch Rakuten Monkeys, Uni Lions on the Eleven Sports Taiwan Twitter account:

https://twitter.com/ElevenSportsTW

Richard Wang on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RWang_WBSC

Jun 01, 2020
Ep 76 | Grace Lee: Documentary Filmmaker on A-Doc
26:43

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

A-Doc, the Asian American Documentary Network was established in 2016 by one of the Co-founders, Grace Lee (known for the award-winning The Grace Lee Project and other documentary films) and is a resource and network for nonfiction filmmakers at all different stages of their career.

I spoke with Grace about the organization, and its “Stories of the Coronavirus” microdoc series, with microdocs being released throughout the month of May and beyond.

Grace also told me about two of her most recent documentary film projects, the PBS five-part documentary “Asian Americans,” which will air May 11 and May 12, and the

“And She Could Be Next” docuseries for POV on PBS that will be released in June.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Grace got involved with the Auntie Sewing Squad
  • A-Doc (Asian American Documentary Network) and its mission
  • The A-Doc “Stories of the Coronavirus” microdoc series
  • How Valerie’s microdoc “Sewing in the Time of Coronavirus” became A-Doc’s proof of concept for the “Stories of the Coronavirus” microdoc series
  • The events, work and initiatives of A-Doc
  • Resources that Grace recommends for documentary filmmakers to deal with the COVI-19 pandemic
  • A-Doc’s partnership with the Center for Asian American Media (in San Francisco) on a mentorship/fellowship program
  • A-Doc’s work on creating a database of documentary films made by Asian American filmmakers
  • The networking opportunities for filmmakers facilitated by A-Doc
  • What’s in the future for A-Doc
  • How has the landscape of Asian American documentary films and filmmakers changed since Grace started her career
  • The PBS five-part documentary “Asian Americans,” that Grace worked on
  • “And She Could Be Next” series for POV (television’s longest-running showcase for independent non-fiction films on PBS) that Grace has worked on
  • Grace’s advice for aspiring documentary filmmakers

 

Related Links:

To view all related links for this article, click link below:

https://talkingtaiwan.com/grace-lee-documentary-filmmaker-on-a-doc/

May 25, 2020
Ep 75 | Auntie Sewing Squad Combats Covid-19 One Mask at a Time
54:21

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

What a fun, spirited conversation I had with my guests Valerie Soe and Kristina Wong! We could certainly use more conversations like this in this post-COVID-19 world. We talked about the Auntie Sewing Squad, a sewing circle formed during the global Coronavirus pandemic, that has taken on making masks first for frontline medical and essential workers, and now for vulnerable marginalized communities, who have no financial means to purchase masks.

 

My guests are Valerie Soe, an Asian American Studies Professor and Film maker, and Kristina Wong, a performance artist. comedian, writer and elected representative.

 

Valerie has been on Talking Taiwan previously to talk about her documentary film Love Boat: Taiwan and she recently made a microdocumentary, “Sewing in the Time of Coronavirus,” which incidentally, is how I learned about the Auntie Sewing Squad.

 

Kristina, is the force behind the Auntie Sewing Squad. She recently streamed a live performance, “Kristina Wong Sweatshop Overlord” over Zoom and YouTube. It’s her latest work born out of the current COVID-19 lockdown, about how she went from volunteer sewist to a “swearshop” overlord in ten days. 

 

Listen in and enjoy our conversation!

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The mission/purpose of the Auntie Sewing Squad
  • Why Kristina was initially reluctant to wear a mask herself when the pandemic first hit Los Angeles
  • How the Auntie Sewing Squad grew from a dozen members to over 600
  • Writing Auntie Rebecca Solnit’s piece for The Guardian which mentions the Auntie Sewing Squad
  • “Aunties” located in states other than California
  • What funds donated to the Auntie Sewing Squad (via Kristina) used for
  • The unfortunate acronym that represents to the Auntie Sewing Squad
  • What “Auntie Care” is
  • Does Kristina plan on making the Auntie Sewing Squad into a non-profit organization
  • The microdocumentary film that Valerie made for A-Doc (Asian American Documentary Network)
  • How Kristina helped an LA hospital fix broken N95 masks that were given to them by the Federal government
  • Stories about the amazing dedication of the sewing aunties
  • How you can support the Auntie Sewing Squad even if you don’t sew
  • How much longer the Auntie Sewing Squad will continue sewing masks
  • Kristina’s connection to the “Love Boat program”
  • Kristina and Valerie’s advice for how to deal with lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic

 

Related Links:

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad on Instagram: www.Instagram.com/AuntieSewing

 

The Auntie Sewing Squad Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2764362993676831/

 

Ways to donate to the Auntie Sewing Squad:

 

Tax-deductible donation link thanks to Art2Action who has waived the fiscal sponsor fees:  https://donorbox.org/auntie-sewing-squad

 

Kristina Wong PayPal General Donations using (Friends & Family):  k@kristinasherylwong.com

 

Kristina Wong Venmo General Donations HERE: “GiveKristinaWongMoney”

 

 

"Kristina Wong, Sweatshop Overlord" (May 6, 2020 performance). This performance is a preview of Kristina’s new work born out of the current lockdown and about how she went from volunteer sewist to overlord of a volunteer sewing factory in ten days: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmSWdH1BnjE

 

Kristina Wong’s website: http://kristinawong.com/

 

Kristina Wong’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ilovekristinawong/

 

Kristina Wong’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYVB9LCGQewhp4LxlachKPQ

 

Valerie Soe’s blog post about the Auntie Sewing Squad and microdocumentary “Sewing in the Time of Coronavirus”: https://beyondasiaphilia.com/2020/05/07/fire-in-the-rain-sewing-in-the-time-of-coronavirus/

 

Valerie Soe’s microdocumentary, “Sewing in the Time of Coronavirus”: https://youtu.be/1H7jrmD3JC4

 

Writing Auntie Rebecca Solnit’s article for The Guardian, “The way we get through this is together: the rise of mutual aid under coronavirus,” which features a mention of the Auntie Sewing Squad: https://bit.ly/2LDuK8d

 

Valerie’s previous Talking Taiwan interview about her documentary film, Love Boat Taiwan: https://www.talkingtaiwan.com/love-boat-taiwan-interview-asian-american-studies-professor-film-maker-valerie-soe-ep-66/

May 18, 2020
Ep 74 | Surviving the Coronavirus Crash as a Musician: A Discussion with Peter Lin
39:07

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Since I’ve stepped into the role of Producer of this podcast, in addition to being the host, we’ve been working on consistently delivering quality content, and on releasing previously unreleased episodes. In doing so, it’s allowed me to revisit some of our previous guests like Peter Lin who is a jazz musician and trombone player who I interviewed in 2018. 

 

Recently I caught up with Peter, two years after our first interview. Artists and musicians have been amongst the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic and I wanted to know how Peter was dealing with it.

 

I learned that Peter released a second album in 2019 and has started a new company, Yardbird Entertainment. He had lots of great advice and tips for musicians who are trying to get through these tough times.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The difference between performing live vs. doing remote, online performances
  • How the Internet can offer new opportunities for musicians to reach the larger global community
  • How some musicians have earned money by performing on a live stream with a link to Venmo or PayPal to donate
  • What relief funds and government assistance there is for musicians
  • The different ways that musicians have been trying to earn money
  • The Facebook group, the COVID-19 musicians support group- a resource to apply for unemployment, and find out about grants
  • Resources where musicians can apply for relief
  • The importance of staying at home and protecting those who are most vulnerable and realizing who has been hardest hit
  • What Peter has been working on since the last time he was on Talking Taiwan on 2018
  • The release of Peter’s second album New Age Old Ways in 2019 and the comic book that accompanies it
  • Peter’s YouTube series Jazz Biz 101 by Yardbird Entertainment
  • Peter’s remote video production company, Yardbird Entertainment
  • Creating mobile live stream
  • How clubs can widen their reach by broadcasting on the Internet
  • How people can support artists and musicians in this time of the COVID-19 pandemic

 

Related Links:

 

The Lintet’s website and social media

 

Peter Lin's Website : www.lintet.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/thelintet

Instagram: www.instagram.com/the_lintet

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCR9oIrd0KQlvLqov1ivTkSA

 

Yardbird Entertainment’s website and social media

 

Yardbird Entertainment Website : www.yardbirdent.com

Y.E.'s Facebook: www.facebook.com/yardbirdentertainment

Y.E.'s Instagram: www.instagram.com/yardbirdentertainment

Y.E.'s YouTube (Jazz Biz 101 + Y.E. Remote Music Video Productions): www.youtube.com/c/yardbirdentertainment

 

Jazz Exchange Relief Fund: https://www.gofundme.com/f/dz5cng-the-jazz-exchange-relief-fund

 

Louis Armstrong Foundation Musicians Emergency Fund: https://louisarmstrongfoundation.org/emergency-fund-for-jazz-musicians-form/

 

Peter Lin's Digital Album + Comic Book "New Age Old Ways" + First Album "With Respect": https://peterlin.bandcamp.com/

 

Places to stream Peter Lin's Music:

 

Spotify : https://open.spotify.com/artist/2zQlHyPGf6ydi4CBrLXP4r

Apple Music: https://music.apple.com/us/artist/peter-lin/1402841452

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Respect-Peter-Lin/dp/B07F1TPSQC

Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/music/album/Peter_Lin_New_Age_Old_Ways?id=Bhdnqosid74unyfczxi5grktxoq&PCamRefID=LFV_857c0eb8a48e4637a911c4fb39769d32

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/thelintet

 

Kelly Lin's Etsy:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/SketchBites

 

Peter Lin's Remote Rendition of Taiwanese Classic "Wife":

https://youtu.be/Brja_6rq1T4

https://www.facebook.com/peterlinmusic/videos/10157450798753335/

 

NYC's Covid-19 Musician Resource Group:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/nycmusicianscovid19/

 

Chris Do's "The Futur" YouTube Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/TheSkoolRocks

 

Pat Flynn’s website Smart Passive Income: https://www.smartpassiveincome.com/

May 11, 2020
Ep 73 | Jazz Trombone Player Peter Lin: A Mix of East and West
46:37

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Peter Lin, is a trombone player, leader of the jazz band, The Lintet, and music teacher. He is a man who wears a lot of different hats! In March of 2018, Peter spoke with me about his career as a professional musician, the difference between being a bandleader versus a sideman, and how he met jazz legend Slide Hampton. We also talked about the Lintet’s first upcoming album, and the connection between Jeremy Lin, Linsanity, and The Lintet- all of which incidentally are not related to me.

 

Peter shared why he describes jazz as democratic, and a barometer of the United States’ social climate. In his first album, The Lintet introduces Taiwanese music to jazz listeners and jazz music to the Taiwanese.

 

Two years later, we’ve invited Peter back on to Talking Taiwan to let us know what he’s been up to, how he’s been dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, and to share some advice for how musicians can get through these tough times. Our follow up interview is coming up on the next episode of Talking Taiwan.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • How Peter got started playing the trombone
  • How he decided to become a professional musician
  • Where the band’s name The Lintet came from
  • What Peter does as a bandleader
  • How jazz has historically reflected the social climate and race relations in the U.S.
  • How The Lintet incorporates Taiwanese and Chinese songs done in jazz style at his performances and on their first album
  • The twofold purpose The Lintet’s album to introduce Taiwanese to jazz music and to introduce jazz listeners to Taiwanese and Chinese music
  • Peter’s observation that more Taiwanese people are becoming interested in jazz

 

 

Here’s the sound clip from one of the Lintet’s 2018 Lunar New Year performances. It’s a rendition of a classic Teresa Teng song:

 

 

Related Links:

 

Peter Lin’s Facebook profile: https://www.facebook.com/peterlinmusic

 

The Lintet’s first album, With Respect: https://peterlin.bandcamp.com/album/with-respect

 

The Lintet’s website: www.lintet.com

May 04, 2020
Ep 72 | China’s Coronavirus Pandemic Lack of Transparency: An Interview with Scott Simon
24:46

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Scott Simon, Professor in the School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies and Co-holder of the Research Chair in Taiwan Studies at the University of Ottawa spoke with us about an article he wrote for the Macdonald-Laurier Institute which served to sound a warning to the global community about China’s lack of transparency. In the case of the COVID-19 pandemic, several media sources have reported that Chinese authorities alerted the WHO on December 31, 2019, about several cases of pneumonia of unknown cause. China then announced its first death from the Coronavirus on January 11, 2020.

 

In our conversation, Scott also offered an anthropological perspective on the Coronavirus pandemic by discussing the term anthropocene, which is defined as the period of time during which human activities have had an environmental impact on the Earth regarded as constituting a distinct geological age. He also offered thoughts on what should be taken into consideration as the world begins to look at when to end lockdowns.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

 

  • The March 16thincident in which China flew one of their military jets very close to Taiwan’s airspace at night
  • Chinese aggressive behavior since the COVID-19 outbreak towards Taiwan’s outer islands, Taiwan’s main island, Japan and Guam
  • Chinese military’s operations during the global COVID-19 pandemic
  • How do we really know about what’s going on in China and the PLA
  • Does China have its COVID-19 outbreak currently under control
  • China’s lack of transparency
  • How China has tried to rewrite history and dispute that COVID-19 originated from China
  • How China has blocked Taiwan’s WHO membership
  • How Taiwan and the WHO have differed in their early responses to COVID-19
  • The Free and Open Indo-Pacific foreign policy spearheaded by Japan
  • Coronavirus cases on the USS Theodore Roosevelt
  • Scott’s perspective as an anthropologist on the COVID-19 pandemic and what considerations should be made as lockdowns are lifted
  • How the Western world failed to see the possible impact of the Coronavirus

 

 

Related Links:

 

Professor Scott Simon’s author page on The Center for International  Policy Studies of the University of Ottawa website: https://www.cips-cepi.ca/author/scott-simon/

 

We Must Be on Guard as China Seeks Strategic Advantage: Scott Simon for Inside Policy: https://www.macdonaldlaurier.ca/china-seeks-strategic-advantage-covid-19/?fbclid=IwAR0eRpwScoHNeHSIbMp-r3YjRK9cQpBT_C5LXuI4YJMh4Isw8bZGfg_t9W8

 

Macdonald-Laurier Institute (Canada's only truly national public policy think tank based in Ottawa): https://www.macdonaldlaurier.ca/

 

The Free and Open Indo-Pacific foreign policy: https://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/page25e_000278.html

The Pandemic Is Turning the Natural World Upside Down: https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2020/04/coronavirus-pandemic-earth-pollution-noise/609316/

Apr 27, 2020
Ep 71 | How I Homeschool During the Coronavirus: An Interview with Emily Chen
33:49

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

I invited Emily Chen on to Talking Taiwan as a guest to talk about how she manages to homeschool during the coronavirus when having her kids home full-time during this pandemic. The idea for this episode came from a Google doc that was created and shared by Emily on Facebook. The link to it is listed below in the related links section of this post. You’ll see that it has over 100 weblinks to resources for parents and kids to try out during the Coronavirus pandemic. What a treasure trove of information it is!

**SPOILER ALERT** Be sure to listen to the end of my interview with Emily for a special offering that she has for parents and kids to get through the quarantine of the COVID-19 pandemic.

With so many parents and families struggling with managing their kids at home due to the COVID-19 outbreak, I realized that many people could benefit from this amazing list of resources that Emily has compiled. I also knew that because Emily has been homeschooling her kids, she could definitely provide some perspective with parents suddenly faced with this unfamiliar situation.

 

Our conversation touched upon what homeschooling is and the different approaches that people take to homeschooling. Imagine a teaching approach completely centered on a particular child’s interests and a more holistic approach to teaching. In essence every moment of teaching could be turned into a well-rounded lesson by looking at a particular subject matter from different angles by discussing the math, geography, history, or writing etc. involved.

 

It is a creative approach to teaching what a child is already interested and it makes what the child has learned seem much more meaningful and tangible. This conversation gave me a fuller understanding of how homeschooling works and how Emily is applying it to her kids.  In full disclosure, Emily is not only my Facebook friend, but also my cousin. Strange that we never got into such an in-depth conversation about this before.

 

Emily also shared her thoughts on how to manage working at home while having kids at home and how to parents your kids when you are at home full-time with your kids.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this podcast episode:

  • How long Emily has been homeschooling her kids
  • Why Emily decided to homeschool her kids
  • What is homeschooling, and what approaches to people take to homeschooling their kids
  • What is unschooling and different unschooling approaches
  • Homeschooling vs. public schooling
  • How she and her kids are dealing with social distancing and how that has impacted their homeschooling
  • The challenges for parents having to be home full-time with their kids due to lockdown recommendations
  • What’s on the Google doc list of resources that Emily put together for parents with kids at home
  • How parents can deal with having kids of different ages and personalities at home at the same time
  • How to manage working at home with having kids at home
  • Talking to your kids about the Coronavirus
  • How to parent your kids when you are at home full-time with your kids

 

Related Links:

The Google doc that Emily has compiled with resources for homeschoolers and parents looking for things to do with their kids at home: https://bit.ly/2VuOOOR

Emily’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/mchendraws/

Other resources for parents dealing with talking to kids about COVID-19:

Coronavirus: Keeping Our Children And Ourselves Safe, With Pamela Cantor, M.D. (180 Podcast): https://www.turnaroundusa.org/the-180-podcast-coronavirus/

Turnaround For Children, an organization created by Dr. Pamela Cantor in the wake of 9/11, after co-authoring a study on the impact of the 9/11 attacks on NYC schoolchildren: https://www.turnaroundusa.org/

The Daily podcast episode, in which Carl Zimmer, science reporter and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times answers kids questions about COVID-19: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/a-kids-guide-to-coronavirus/id1200361736?i=1000469699785

TED Talk 10 Tips for Cultivating Creativity in Your Kids: http://ideas.ted.com/10-tips-for-cultivating-creativity-in-your-kids/

Apr 20, 2020
Ep 70 | Taiwan’s Response to the Coronavirus: An Interview with Dr. Brian Chang
27:44

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

Since Taiwan has received a great deal of recognition globally for its successful containment of COVID-19, I've been looking to interview a medical professional about Taiwan's response and handling of the Coronavirus. Special thanks to Dr. Han Mingrong (韓明榮) for his help in connecting me with Dr. Brian Chang who is located in Taipei, Taiwan. 

 

I spoke with Dr. Chang about the early steps that Taiwan took to contain the Coronavirus outbreak, and how having dealt with SARS in 2003, the government and the general public in particular was prepared to deal with COVID-19. 

 

Note to listeners: my interview with Dr. Chang was pre-recorded. I spoke to him on April 2nd, 2020, which was around the time of the ching ming  jie or tomb sweeping weekend in Taiwan. I really appreciate the fact that Dr. Chang took the time out of his busy schedule to speak with me. Right after we spoke, he had planned to travel down to southern Taiwan to observe the tomb sweeping weekend.

 

Dr. Chang is the acting Secretary General of the Taiwan Medical Association and the Honorary Secretary of the World Organization of Family Doctors of the Asia Pacific Region. He is a specialist in family medicine and community medicine. Dr. Chang has been a Director in a public health center for 11 years.

 

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this episode:

 

  • How Taiwan is currently dealing with the Coronavirus
  • How Taiwan’s experience with SARS prepared it and its people to deal with COVID-19
  • What were the earliest steps that Taiwan took to contain the spread of COVID-19
  • How the government of Taiwan clearly communicated and educated its public about that precautions they needed to take regarding COVID-19 
  • How the public in Taiwan initially reacted when the Coronavirus hit 
  • How Taiwan’s government instilled confidence in the people of Taiwan
  • How Taiwan’s government handled the spread of false news and rumors
  • Dr. Chang’s recommendations of when to wear masks
  • How the government created educational videos (public service announcements) to inform the public
  • The biggest challenges for Taiwan currently in containing the spread of COVID-19
  • Fines enacted by the government of Taiwan for the violation of self-isolation rules
  • What the U.S. can learn from Taiwan’s handling of COVID-19
  • What kind of aid Taiwan is currently offering to help other nations dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic
  • What is our best hope to develop a vaccine or to find a cure?
  • What medical advice Dr. Chang has for people who are currently under lockdown and trying to stay healthy

 

 

Related Links:

 

Dr. Brian Chang’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/brianclinic/  

 

An article on how Taiwan has been so successful in managing the Coronavirus written by Brian Bih-Jeng Chang and Tai-Yuan Chiu, Ready for a long fight against the COVID-19 outbreak: an innovative model of tiered primary health care in Taiwan: https://bjgpopen.org/content/early/2020/04/07/bjgpopen20X101068

 

Taiwan’s CDC website (in Chinese characters): https://www.cdc.gov.tw

 

An example educational video (aka public service announcements) that the government created to inform the public about COVID-19: 

https://youtu.be/gHc9WcEKWX4

Apr 13, 2020
Ep 69 | Coronavirus Pandemic in New York: An Interview with Dr. Wilson Wang
01:03:55

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

I’m pleased to welcome Dr. Wilson Wang back on to Talking Taiwan after five years for what turned out to be a very in-depth conversation, about the Coronavirus crisis in New York. Dr. Wang spoke with me about the COVID-19 pandemic from both a science-based and human perspective. This interview with Dr. Wang was recorded last week on March 30th, 2020.

 

Dr. Wilson Wang is the Founder and CEO of a health software company called Walking Doctors, a pediatric emergency room physician and hospitalist at NYU and NYC Public Hospital system, and adjunct faculty of Global Public Health at NYU.

 

Here’s a little preview of what we talked about in this episode:

 

  • How Dr. Wang and his family are dealing with COVID-19
  • How Dr. Wang’s experience with Ebola led to establishing Walking Doctors
  • The importance of standardizing diagnosis and treatment of disease
  • Comparing the Ebola outbreak with COVID-19
  • Epidemics vs. pandemics
  • The SARS 2003 epidemic
  • The strategies that Taiwan used to contain the spread of COVID-19
  • Development of a test for COVID-19
  • Is the Coronavirus airborne and how long does it survive in the air?
  • How long does the Coronavirus survive on surfaces?
  • Comparing measles with the Coronavirus
  • Dr. Wang’s recommendations on whether or not to wear a mask
  • Why it’s important to adhere to social distancing and self-isolation
  • Possible treatments for COVID-19
  • The ventilator shortage
  • Which is our best hope a vaccine or cure?
  • General advice to people trying to stay healthy and deal with social distancing and self-isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic

 

Related Links:

 

Dr. Wang’s blog: http://wilson-wang.squarespace.com/

 

JAMA Article:

Response to COVID-19 in Taiwan

Big Data Analytics, New Technology, and Proactive Testing: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2762689

 

Dr. Wang on social media:

 

LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/wilson-wang-9289554

 

Twitter: @walkingdoctors

 

Walking Doctors: https://walkingdocs.com/

 

Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Map: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html

Apr 06, 2020
Ep 68 | Ebola Outbreak: An Interview with Dr. Wilson Wang
46:58

A note from Talking Taiwan host Felicia Lin:

 

What does a robot, Jedi and Wi-Fi have to do with the Ebola crisis? In 2015 I spoke with Wilson Wang a medical doctor by training, who was a Senior Clinical director at the International Rescue Committee (IRC) at the time. We spoke about his work with IRC on the 2014 Ebola outbreak and his career in medicine and p