The Current

By CBC Radio

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James Dyer
 Jan 26, 2019
Anna Maria Tremonti is the best interviewer I've heard. Please, never retire

Description

CBC Radio's The Current is a meeting place of perspectives with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today.

Episode Date
Marking 25 years since the Hong Kong handover
00:23:37
Britain officially handed authority over Hong Kong to China 25 years ago this week. We discuss what that historic event has meant for the region — and its future — with former journalist Emily Lau, who became the first woman elected to the Legislative Council of Hong Kong; and journalist and author Louisa Lim.
Jun 30, 2022
The fight over established fundamental rights in the U.S.
00:18:31
The overturning of Roe v. Wade in the United States has many wondering what rights might also come under fire, including same-sex marriage and contraception. Guest host Nahlah Ayed discusses established rights and how they might be stripped away, with writer and activist Chrissy Stroop, and author and academic Carol Anderson.
Jun 30, 2022
Author Gordon Korman on how 'the power of humour' can help tell serious stories
00:23:13
Canadian-born author Gordon Korman is celebrating publishing his 100th book, The Fort. He talks to us about staying in touch with your inner child, and how 'the power of humour' can help tell serious stories.
Jun 29, 2022
Eyewitness account of Russian attack on crowded Ukrainian shopping mall
00:17:53
A Russian missile destroyed a crowded shopping mall in Ukraine's central city of Kremenchuk Monday, leaving at least 18 dead, dozens injured and more still missing. Guest host Nahlah Ayed talks to Oksana Guida, a local political activist who was at the shopping centre that day; and Inna Sovsun, a member of the Ukrainian parliament.
Jun 29, 2022
The crisis in Canada's emergency rooms
00:43:47
There's a crisis in Canada's emergency rooms: long wait times, overworked staff, and patients afraid to even go to the hospital. We hear from some of those patients, and Nahlah Ayed talks to some of the doctors and nurses trying to find solutions.
Jun 28, 2022
U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v Wade — what does it mean for Canada?
00:30:36
On Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, opening the door for individual states to ban abortion. Guest host Nahlah Ayed speaks with Anna Visser, communications and education director for Right to Life Michigan; Robin Marty, operations director for the West Alabama Women's Center; and law professor Carolyn Shapiro, founder and co-director of Chicago-Kent's Institute on the Supreme Court of the United States. We also talk with Carolyn Egan, a spokesperson with the Ontario Coalition for Abortion Clinics, about concerns over access in this country.
Jun 27, 2022
Invasive jellyfish making a new home in B.C.
00:11:01
An invasive species of jellyfish believed to be native to southeast China, Craspedacusta sowerbii, is making a new home for itself in B.C.'s freshwaters. Zoologist Florian Lüskow tells us more about them.
Jun 27, 2022
Helping those hit hardest by Afghanistan’s deadly earthquake
00:10:37
As Afghanistan digs out from one of its deadliest earthquakes in decades, we talk to Islamic Relief aid workers Ajmal Majboor and Mohammed Golam Sorwar about efforts to help those in hard-hit, remote areas.
Jun 24, 2022
Chris Hall on interviewing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
00:12:57
The CBC’s Chris Hall gives us a sneak peek of his upcoming interview with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
Jun 24, 2022
The importance of small-town Pride parades
00:19:41
Some small towns across Canada are celebrating their first ever Pride parades. Guest host Duncan McCue discusses the importance of LGBT representation in smaller towns and rural areas, with Greg Klassen in Altona, Man., Trevor Taylor on Fogo Island in Newfoundland, and Kjerstina Larsen in Vanderhoof, B.C.
Jun 24, 2022
Writer Lyndsie Bourgon on the surprising roots of tree poaching
00:23:55
In her new book Tree Thieves: Crime and Survival in North America's Woods, Lyndsie Bourgon explores the environmental impact of tree poaching, and the social and economic factors driving it.
Jun 24, 2022
Concerns that Quebec’s new language law, Bill 96, will hurt province’s tech sector
00:10:48
Quebec’s new language law, Bill 96, aims to preserve French — but some business leaders worry it could trigger a quiet exodus of jobs and investment in the tech sector. We talk to Lloyd Segal, president and CEO of Repare Therapeutics, a Montreal-based biotechnology company that develops cancer drugs.
Jun 23, 2022
One Toronto man’s 15-year fight to remove suspected illegal billboards
00:15:08
Dave Meslin has spent 15 years fighting to have massive, “ugly” billboards removed in Toronto, saying many don’t even have legal permits. Meslin shares his story, and we hear from Montreal City Councillor Alex Norris about similar efforts in his borough.
Jun 23, 2022
MPs issued personal panic buttons amid rising anger, vitriol in public life
00:15:09
Canadian MPs are being issued personal panic buttons. We discuss the levels of anger and abuse in public life, and the impact it’s having on politics, with Liberal MP Pam Damoff, Conservative MP Ziad Aboultaif, and NDP MP Charlie Angus.
Jun 23, 2022
A Manitoba teen died by suicide after being sexually extorted online. His parents want other families to know the risks
00:27:10
Daniel Lints was a 17-year-old Manitoba boy who was blackmailed after being coerced into sharing an explicit image of himself with someone online. Not long after, Daniel died by suicide. Guest host Duncan McCue talks to Daniel’s parents about what they want other families to know; and discusses the risk of online sextortion with Signy Arnason, associate executive director of the Canadian Centre for Child Protection.
Jun 23, 2022
Russia’s invasion of Ukraine reaches four-month mark, with no end in sight
00:23:56
Russia’s invasion of Ukraine started four months ago, but there is still no end in sight. We talk to Oleksandra Matviichuk, who has been documenting evidence of war crimes; and discuss what might come next with Serhii Plokhy, a professor of Ukrainian history at Harvard University; and David Marples, a distinguished university professor of Russian and East European history at the University of Alberta.
Jun 22, 2022
An engineer claimed a Google chat bot is sentient. Experts say the story prompts wider questions about AI
00:20:08
A Google engineer recently claimed an artificial intelligence he was working on had become sentient. Many scientists have disagreed with his assessment, but say the story raises other concerns about AI. Guest host Duncan McCue talks to Christof Koch, chief scientist of the MindScope Program at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle; Marisa Tschopp, a human-AI interaction researcher; and Susan Schneider, a philosopher and the founder of the Center for the Future Mind at the Florida Atlantic University.
Jun 22, 2022
How Switzerland used prescription heroin to fight an opioid crisis — and the lessons for Canada
00:13:08
We talk to Dr. Thilo Beck about how Switzerland has used prescription heroin to fight an opioid crisis — and what Canada could learn from the effort.
Jun 22, 2022
Beach Smart warning system hopes to track rip tides and save lives
00:09:17
University of Windsor professor Chris Houser tells us about Smart Beach, his real-time, data-driven warning system for rip currents.
Jun 22, 2022
The Current Introduces: Buffy
00:35:36
Buffy Sainte-Marie is one of the most prolific singer-songwriters of the past century. For 60 years her music has quietly reverberated throughout pop culture, and provided a touchstone for Indigenous resistance. In this five-part series, Mohawk and Tuscarora writer Falen Johnson explores how Buffy’s life and legacy is essential to understanding Indigenous resilience. More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/buffy
Jun 21, 2022
Athletes say efforts to stop abuse in sport must be independent from sporting organizations
00:26:41
Last week, the federal government announced measures to hold sports organizations accountable when athletes report mistreatment or abuse. We talk to former athletes Kim Shore, Neville Wright and Jennifer Heil; and ask Sarah-Ève Pelletier, Canada's sport integrity commissioner, how the plans will be implemented.
Jun 21, 2022
What Colombia's first leftist president will mean for global politics
00:21:58
Former rebel Gustavo Petro has narrowly beaten a millionaire opponent to become Colombia's first leftist president. We discuss what this election could mean for Latin American politics and the rest of the world, with Juanita León, founder of news website La Silla Vacía; and Michael Shifter, former president of Inter-American Dialogue, a think tank focused on Latin America’s governance and prosperity.
Jun 21, 2022
Canadians taking second jobs, skipping meals to cope with inflation
00:19:59
Canadians are struggling with the highest inflation in a generation. Guest host Duncan McCue talks to two Canadians who are taking second jobs or skipping meals to make ends meet; and asks economist Sébastien Mc Mahon where the solutions lie.
Jun 20, 2022
Curbing misinformation and hate speech online
00:10:19
How can misinformation and hate speech be curbed on social media platforms, while freedom of speech is preserved? We talk to Taylor Owen, co-chair of the Canadian Commission on Democratic Expression, which has just submitted its recommendations for regulating online spaces to the federal government.
Jun 20, 2022
The fight to eradicate polio in Pakistan
00:22:16
Polio has been eradicated in nearly every country in the world, but Pakistan and Afghanistan are facing a surge in infections. We discuss what’s driving the outbreak — and how to fight it — with Dr. Shahzad Baig, who leads Pakistan's Polio Eradication Programme; and Aidan O'Leary, director for the Global Polio Eradication Initiative at the World Health Organization.
Jun 20, 2022
U.S. approves COVID-19 vaccines for kids under 5
00:12:58
U.S. health officials have cleared the way for COVID vaccines to be administered to children under five. We talk to pediatrician and infectious disease expert Dr. Cora Constantinescu about what Canadian parents need to know about protecting their kids.
Jun 20, 2022
How peanuts were a driving force behind colonial expansion and slavery
00:16:31
Jori Lewis tells us about her new book, Slaves For Peanuts: A Story of Conquest, Liberation, and A Crop That Changed History, which looks at how an appetite for peanuts was a driving force behind colonial expansion and slavery in Africa.
Jun 17, 2022
Curbing money laundering in Canada
00:08:07
James Cohen, an anti-corruption expert at Transparency International Canada, discusses why Canada has become a haven for money laundering — and what to do about it.
Jun 17, 2022
Dr. João Goulão on what Canada can learn from how Portugal tamed its drug crisis
00:23:20
We talk to Dr. João Goulão — the man often credited with taming Portugal’s drug crisis — about how Canada could save lives during the opioid crisis.
Jun 17, 2022
Workplace standoffs as reluctant employees are ordered back to the office
00:19:54
Many offices across Canada are at a stalemate: businesses want workers back at their desks, but employees want to continue working remotely. As part of our series Work in Progress, Matt Galloway talks to two employees about why they want to work from home; and asks Mark Rose, chairman and CEO of Avison Young, what employers should consider.
Jun 17, 2022
What a human rights complaint by Alberta's only female cardiovascular surgeon says about sexism in surgery
00:42:22
Alberta's only female cardiac surgeon, Dr. Teresa Kieser, has filed a human rights case alleging systemic gender-based discrimination over her 34-year career. Matt Galloway talks to Kieser about why she’s trying to bring “the light of day” to her experiences; and Canadian surgeons Dr. Nancy Baxter and Dr. Marisa Louridas about what needs to change.
Jun 16, 2022
Activists call for culture change over racism in policing
00:27:20
Toronto’s interim police chief apologized after a report detailed disproportionate police action taken against racialized people — but activists say an apology isn’t enough. We talk to Neil Price, executive director of non-profit consultancy group LogicalOutcomes; El Jones, a poet, activist, and professor of political and Canadian studies at Mount Saint Vincent University; and Akwasi Owusu-Bempah, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Toronto, who researches police and racism in Canada.
Jun 16, 2022
Indigenous sisters hope for exoneration three decades after murder conviction
00:19:36
Sisters Odelia and Nerissa Quewezance were convicted of second-degree murder almost 30 years ago, for a crime they say they didn’t commit. Now, federal Justice Minister David Lametti has ordered a review of the convictions to determine if the Indigenous women suffered a miscarriage of justice. Matt Galloway talks to Odelia about her hopes for exoneration; and their lawyer James Lockyer, a director with Innocence Canada.
Jun 15, 2022
Former NATO Supreme Allied Commander James Stavridis on what makes a great leader
00:24:57
We talk to former NATO Supreme Allied Commander James Stavridis about what makes a great leader, what it will take to end the war in Ukraine, and his new book To Risk it All: Nine Conflicts and the Crucible of Decision.
Jun 15, 2022
How to tackle growing belief in conspiracy theories
00:23:28
A new poll from Abacus Data suggests a significant number of Canadians believe in conspiracy theories. We talk to Bruce Anderson, chairman of Abacus Data; Aengus Bridgman, director of the Media Ecosystem Observatory, based out of McGill University and the University of Toronto; and Carmen Celestini, an instructor at the University of Waterloo, who studies conspiracy theories and extremist movements.
Jun 15, 2022
Hearings underway into Jan. 6 riot at U.S. Capitol
00:23:44
Hearings into the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol are exploring the role of the Republican Party and former president Donald Trump. We talk to Washington Post reporter Amber Phillips; John Fund, a columnist for the National Review; and Molly Jong-Fast, a contributor to The Atlantic.
Jun 14, 2022
Kimberly Murray on helping Indigenous communities heal
00:13:00
Kimberly Murray was recently appointed as special interlocutor to co-ordinate the government's response to unmarked graves at residential schools. She explains how she hopes to help Indigenous communities in their healing process.
Jun 14, 2022
Journalist, Indigenous expert missing in the Amazon rainforest
00:13:09
Indigenous expert Bruno Pereira and journalist Dom Phillips have disappeared in the Amazon rainforest. We discuss their work and Brazil’s broken relationship with Indigenous communities, with Ana Alfinito of the NGO Amazon Watch; and Leonardo Barros Soares, a political science professor at the Federal University of Viçosa in Brazil.
Jun 14, 2022
How classes in agriculture and baseball aim to rejuvenate two rural schools in Alberta
00:16:59
A school principal is trying to attract new families to small-town Alberta by setting up schools of excellence, focused on agriculture and baseball. The CBC’s Bryan Labby tells host Matt Galloway more.
Jun 14, 2022
Two climbers are spreading the joy of the outdoors by summitting Mount Everest
00:23:09
Lhakpa Sherpa is the first woman to climb Mount Everest’s summit 10 times, and James Kagambi is the first Kenyan to summit the mountain. They talk about their accomplishments and how they’re trying to spread the joy of the outdoors to as many people as possible.
Jun 13, 2022
How the Rosebud Sioux Tribe brought the remains of its lost children home
00:20:10
Once unmarked burial sites are found at residential school sites, Indigenous communities will work to bring home the remains of the lost children. It’s a long, difficult process — but it’s underway in some parts of the United States. The CBC’s Wawmeesh Hamilton visited one reservation that has brought some remains home: the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota. He tells host Matt Galloway more.
Jun 13, 2022
Saving lives in dire times — and the ethics of working with aggressors
00:23:28
As the former head of humanitarian relief for the United Nations, Mark Lowcock has seen the best and worst of humanity. It was his job to coordinate aid and rally international support for people caught in the world's most desperate crises. Now that he's left that post, he's reflecting on what he's learned in a new book called Relief Chief: A Manifesto for Saving Lives in Dire Times.
Jun 13, 2022
Shedding light on domestic violence in rural communities
00:19:28
An Ontario coroner's inquest is shining a light on the issue of domestic violence in rural communities — and the changes advocates and victims' loved ones hope will result from it. Host Matt Galloway discusses these potential changes with JoAnne Brooks, co-ordinator of End Violence Against Women Renfrew County, and Deborah Sinclair, a clinical social worker and founding member of Ontario’s Domestic Violence Staff Review Committee.
Jun 10, 2022
How a journalist helped an Afghan national escape the Taliban-controlled country
00:21:25
The Globe and Mail journalist Mark MacKinnon has won an award for excellence in journalism for the story of Sharif Sharaf’s escape from Taliban-controlled Afghanistan. He talks to us about Sharaf’s escape to Canada — and Canada’s slow movement in bringing Afghan refugees here.
Jun 10, 2022
Muslim representation in new TV series Ms. Marvel
00:08:33
Canadian Iman Vellani stars in Disney+’s new TV series Ms. Marvel. Arab Canadian filmmaker Maissa Houri discusses Ms. Marvel’s place as a role model for young Muslim women
Jun 10, 2022
Drummer Gene Champagne on recovering from COVID-19
00:15:59
A year after fighting for his life during the third wave of COVID-19, drummer Gene Champagne is getting ready to get back behind the drums. He discusses how the music community helped him through his recovery.
Jun 10, 2022
Why some audiophiles are recording cultural sounds in Cairo
00:27:26
Youssef Sherif and Nehal Ezz tell us why they are gathering cultural sounds from Cairo; and Stuart Fowkes, the founder of Cities and Memory, explains why preserving what our world sounds like is as important as protecting what it looks like.
Jun 09, 2022
How the N.S. RCMP failed to adequately warn the public about a gunman
00:20:06
The RCMP in Nova Scotia has been criticized for the way communications were handled during the mass shootings of April 2020. This week, the Mass Casualty Commission looks at how the RCMP failed to adequately warn the public about a loose gunman. CBC reporter Elizabeth McMillan tells host Matt Galloway more; and emergency alert expert Michael Hallowes explains how a better emergency alert system could have saved lives during the shooting.
Jun 09, 2022
The Ukraine-Russia war’s effect on a potential global food crisis
00:23:26
Ukraine is one of the world's top suppliers of wheat, sunflower and corn oil. But those goods are now stranded by war — and there’s a risk of a global food crisis. CBC reporter Margaret Evans explains what Ukrainian farmers are feeling; and Hassan Khannenje, the director of Kenyan think-tank HORN International Institute for Strategic Studies, tells us more about how these shortages affect Africa. We also hear from Harry Nedclu, the policy director of Rasmussen Global and the head of its Free Ukraine Task Force.
Jun 09, 2022
New B.C. Coroners Service report highlights how unprepared province was to deal with extreme heat
00:19:12
A new B.C. Coroners Service report examining last year's heat dome details just how unprepared the province was to deal with extreme heat. Guest host Nahlah Ayed discusses the lessons learned and the need for more actionable steps with Robyn Chan, the Chair of the Vancouver City Planning Commission; and Blair Feltmate, the head of the Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation at the University of Waterloo.
Jun 08, 2022
Advocates are concerned Canada’s blanket forced labour law isn't being enforced
00:23:13
The treatment of the Uyghur ethnic minority in China’s Xinjiang province has spurred the United States to ban the import of goods made with cotton picked using forced labour. Canada has a blanket forced labour ban, but advocates are concerned it’s not being enforced. We speak with Bob Kirke, the executive director of the Canadian Apparel Federation; William Pellerin, a lawyer in Ottawa who focuses on Canadian laws surrounding forced labour imports; and Canada's Minister of Labour Seamus O'Regan.
Jun 08, 2022
Tunisian president seeks to consolidate power a decade after Arab Spring
00:24:10
During the Arab Spring, Tunisians were excited about the apparent dawn of democracy in their country. But a decade later, that hope is being dashed as the president seeks to consolidate power. We learn more from Ghaya ben Mbarek, a journalist for the independent news site Meshkal; Aya Riahi, an anti-corruption activist with the youth-driven NGO, I-Watch; and Sami Hamdi, the managing director of the global risk and intelligence company International Interest.
Jun 08, 2022
The Current Introduces: The Village Season Three - The Montreal Murders
00:45:41
In the early 1990s, as AIDS tightens its grip on major cities around the world, the relative safety of Montreal’s nightlife becomes a magnet for gay men. But when they start turning up dead in hotel rooms, beaten lifeless in city parks, and violently murdered in their own homes, the queer community has more to fear than the disease. While the city’s police force dithers over the presence of a serial killer, a group of queer activists starts making connections, and rises up to start a movement that would end up changing thousands of lives. Hosted by Francis Plourde. More episodes are available at smarturl.it/thevillagecbc
Jun 07, 2022
Plans to ban some single-use plastics is a ‘tepid’ step forward, says advocate
00:19:40
The federal government will ban some single-use plastics, including straws, takeout containers and grocery bags, over the next 18 months. Guest host Duncan McCue discusses what the plan involves — and what’s missing — with Karen Wirsig, from Canadian environmental advocacy organization Environmental Defence; and Angela Riley, founder of Scotian Shores, an organization dedicated to cleaning Nova Scotia’s shorelines.
Jun 07, 2022
Why Turkey is objecting to Sweden and Finland joining NATO
00:15:47
Turkey is objecting to Sweden and Finland’s bid to join NATO. We talk to Steven Erlanger, the chief diplomatic correspondent in Europe for the New York Times; and Aslı Aydıntaşbaş, a senior fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations.
Jun 07, 2022
Canada’s military can’t fix sexual misconduct problem ‘all by themselves,’ says Louise Arbour
00:18:50
The Canadian military must accept outside help to solve systemic issues around sexual misconduct, says former Supreme Court justice Louise Arbour. She talks to Matt Galloway about her investigation into what’s needed to change that culture.
Jun 07, 2022
Pay disputes, pay equity and Canada’s national soccer teams
00:20:48
Canada's men's soccer team is embroiled in controversy. They were forced to cancel a game with Iran after protests; and the players refused to play against Panama on Sunday due to a dispute over pay and benefits. We talk to soccer reporter John Molinaro, and former Canadian players Craig Forrest and Amy Walsh.
Jun 07, 2022
Despite surviving a confidence vote, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s future is still in doubt
00:11:03
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson survived a confidence vote on Monday, but how secure is his political future? We ask Alan Rusbridger, former editor of the Guardian and current editor of Prospect Magazine.
Jun 07, 2022
Fighting Islamophobia in Canada, one year after the attack on a Muslim family in London, Ont.
00:19:54
People in London, Ont., gathered this past weekend to remember the Afzaals, the local Muslim family targeted a year ago in a fatal attack. Matt Galloway talks to London resident Ingy Akkary about the conversations she’s had with her children over this past year; and discusses what Canada needs to do to stamp out Islamophobia with Nusaiba Al-Azem, the second vice-chair of the London Muslim Mosque, and Noor Al-Henedy, communications director for the Al Rashid Mosque in Edmonton.
Jun 06, 2022
Adrian Forte on being a role model for young Black chefs
00:23:57
Chef Adrian Forte discusses his new cookbook, Yawd: Modern Afro-Caribbean Recipes — and being a role model for young Black chefs.
Jun 06, 2022
The push towards de-paving our urban spaces
00:23:47
Some communities are smashing up their pavements to create greener, more environmentally-friendly neighbourhoods. We hear about how these projects — and what the pavement gets replaced with — can make cities more climate resilient.
Jun 06, 2022
Bonus | Gov. Gen. Mary Simon on the true meaning of reconciliation, and how to achieve it
00:35:23
In a special podcast edition of Matt Galloway’s conversation with Gov. Gen. Mary Simon, she discusses her love of Canada’s North, reconciliation and the value of an apology, and how she sees her role as a unifier in a time of national division.
Jun 04, 2022
Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservatives win another majority government in Ontario
00:19:54
Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservatives have won another majority government in Ontario. Matt Galloway dissects the results with Karl Baldauf, the vice president at public affairs firm McMillan Vantage, and former chief of staff to Ontario's finance minister; Marieke Walsh, a political reporter at the Globe and Mail; and Vassy Kapelos, the host of CBC’s Power & Politics.
Jun 03, 2022
Kyiv museum displays the boots and bombs that Russia left behind
00:23:55
Russian troops left some things behind — including boots and military equipment — when they withdrew from the areas around Kyiv. Now, a museum in Kyiv has created an exhibition from those items. We discuss preserving history as it unfolds, with Dmytro Hainetdinov, head of the education department at the National Museum of the History of Ukraine in the Second World War; and field archeologist Damian Koropeckyj.
Jun 03, 2022
Rick Steves on the euphoria of returning to travel
00:23:42
Guidebook author Rick Steves tells us about the joy of returning to travel after the pandemic grounded him — and his tour company — for almost two years.
Jun 03, 2022
What will Biden’s pledge of advanced weapons mean for Russia-Ukraine war?
00:19:39
As Russia’s invasion enters its fourth month, U.S. President Joe Biden has pledged to send advanced rocket systems to Ukraine. Matt Galloway discusses Biden’s plans and their potential impact on the war, with political science professor and Ukraine expert Lucan Way; and security expert and retired U.S. Marine colonel Mark Cancian.
Jun 02, 2022
Tajja Isen on how we talk about race, lip service and the gap between intention and action
00:20:36
Corporations throw words like "diversity," "inclusion" and "anti-racist" around a lot these days, but Canadian writer Tajja Isen says they often amount to little more than lip service. She tells us about her new book, Some of My Best Friends: Essays on Lip Service, and why she believes the gap between intention and action has never been wider.
Jun 02, 2022
Alain Babineau on quitting anti-racism role with Montreal police, and police union’s resistance to change
00:11:01
Alain Babineau was hired last year to tackle racial profiling in the Montreal police force. Now he’s quit, saying the policing culture is resistant to change — and the police union isn’t helping.
Jun 02, 2022
How the Savannah Bananas are fixing the boring parts of baseball
00:13:49
On a Georgia baseball diamond, the Savannah Bananas are livening up what they call the more boring parts of baseball — with things like pitchers on stilts, on-field dance routines, and a dad bod cheerleading squad. Team owner Jesse Cole and player Bill Leroy tell us more.
Jun 02, 2022
Newfoundland churches sold off to pay compensation to survivors of Mount Cashel abuse
00:20:04
Survivors of sexual abuse at Mount Cashel Orphanage are set to finally receive compensation from the Catholic Church. But to pay, the Archdiocese of St. John’s is selling off land and churches — and angering local parishioners who thought they owned those places of worship. Mary-Catherine McIntosh went to Newfoundland to hear more.
Jun 01, 2022
Decriminalization plan won’t save lives without safe supply, says B.C.’s chief coroner
00:23:29
The federal government will allow British Columbia to decriminalize possession of small amounts of drugs like heroin for personal use, in an effort to curb toxic drug-related deaths. But B.C.’s Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe says the move could have a limited impact, and more people will die before it’s enacted.
Jun 01, 2022
High school newspaper cries censorship in fight with Vancouver School Board
00:16:24
Student journalists at a Vancouver high school are crying censorship in a fight over articles that hold school officials to account. We hear more from Spencer Izen, editor-in-chief of the Griffins' Nest school paper in Vancouver; and James Turk, director for the Centre for Free Expression at Toronto Metropolitan University.
Jun 01, 2022
After two months, Shanghai residents finally out of strict COVID-19 lockdown
00:10:20
After a months-long COVID-19 lockdown, we ask a Shanghai resident what it feels like to get out of his tiny apartment.
Jun 01, 2022
Survivors want action, not words, after report into sexual misconduct in military
00:20:07
Former Supreme Court justice Louise Arbour released her final report on sexual misconduct in the military on Monday. Matt Galloway discusses its recommendations with Donna Riguidel and Dawn McIlmoyle, two former armed services members and survivors of sexual assault.
May 31, 2022
East Africa drought is everyone’s problem, says scientist
00:21:53
A persistent drought in East Africa is fuelling the threat of famine, amid fears that climate change will only make the situation worse in years to come. We hear from Aliow Mohamed, the Somalia country director for the humanitarian NGO Islamic Relief; and Barron Joseph Orr, the lead scientist at the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification.
May 31, 2022
Confronting community trauma
00:10:04
A week after a mass shooting at a school in Texas, trauma counsellor Deb Del Vecchio-Scully discusses the work she did to help the community affected by the 2012 Sandy Hook shooting — and what can help a community find resiliency after a mass tragedy.
May 31, 2022
Imelda Marcos and the missing Picasso
00:16:19
A missing Picasso — recently spotted in the home of Imelda Marcos, the former First Lady of the Philippines — has the art world and former Philippine investigators chattering. We talk to Ruben Carranza, who worked on the investigations into the Marcos’ wealth; and art journalist Georgina Adam.
May 31, 2022
Reconciliation needs to happen ‘every day — it's a journey, it's the way we live,’ says Gov. Gen. Mary Simon
00:34:19
As the first Indigenous person appointed Canada's Governor General, Mary Simon says part of her role is bringing people together in conversations about reconciliation.
May 30, 2022
Trying to get Iceland’s cats under control
00:08:27
Cats loom large in Iceland’s folklore and culture, but some towns and cities are now trying to get the feline population under control. We hear more from Egill Bjarnason, a writer and journalist in Reykjavík.
May 30, 2022
A community grapples with grief after school shooting in Uvalde, Texas
00:24:33
The Current’s Joana Draghici travelled to Uvalde, Texas, where a mass shooting took place at an elementary school last week. She brings us the voices from that community, as they grapple with their grief and call for change.
May 30, 2022
Historic floods prompt calls for better protections for Peguis First Nation
00:19:51
Peguis First Nation has suffered historic flooding, prompting calls for better protection. Matt Galloway talks to resident Cheryl Thomson; Peguis First Nation Chief Glenn Hudson; and Niigaan Sinclair, a member of the Peguis First Nation and acting head of the department of Indigenous studies at the University of Manitoba.
May 27, 2022
The meme-ification of the Amber Heard-Johnny Depp trial — and its impact on understanding intimate partner violence
00:14:10
Some observers say the online discussion and meme-ification of the Amber Heard-Johnny Depp trial could have a damaging effect on public understanding of intimate partner violence. We talk to gender justice advocate Farrah Khan; and Mandi Gray, a postdoctoral associate at the University of Calgary who studies defamation lawsuits and disclosures of sexual violence.
May 27, 2022
How to tackle North Korea’s COVID-19 outbreak
00:09:02
A COVID-19 outbreak in North Korea has infected millions of people. We discuss how to get it under control with Dr. Kee B. Park, a surgeon and lecturer on global health and social medicine at Harvard Medical School.
May 27, 2022
Microfinance was meant to help the world’s poorest, but critics say it leaves many drowning in debt
00:24:18
Microfinance is a loan system that offers small business loans to people who can’t secure them elsewhere. It was conceived as a liberating financial tool for the world's poor — but some say it can be a source of abuse. We talk to Naly Pilorge, deputy director of the Cambodian League for the Promotion and Defense of Human Rights; Sohini Kar, an associate professor of international development at the London School of Economics; and Timothy Ogden, managing director of the Financial Access Initiative at New York University.
May 27, 2022
What you need to know about monkeypox, as more cases detected in Canada
00:19:41
Health officials in Canada are investigating around two dozen cases of monkeypox, a relative of the smallpox virus not normally seen outside of Africa. Matt Galloway speaks with infectious diseases specialists Dr. Isaac Bogoch, and Dr. Dimie Ogoina, who was on the frontline of a 2017 monkeypox outbreak in Nigeria.
May 26, 2022
What the Texas school shooting might mean for U.S. gun control
00:23:58
Gun control activists are hoping for change following Tuesday’s school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. We talk to Michele Gay, the executive director and co-founder of Safe and Sound Schools, whose daughter was killed in the Sandy Hook shooting in 2012. We also hear from Arelis Hernandez, the Texas correspondent for the Washington Post; and gun control advocate Matt Bennett.
May 26, 2022
How three B.C. communities are preparing for potential floods and wildfires this summer
00:18:06
After successive wildfires, floods and storms last summer, the CBC’s Sarah Penton visited communities in British Columbia to find out how they’re preparing for potential climate-related disasters in the months ahead.
May 26, 2022
How this year’s baseballs are affecting pitching and hitting in the MLB
00:08:46
Are softer baseballs affecting play in the MLB this year? Robert Arthur, a data scientist and freelance journalist, explains why pitchers and hitters are grumbling about the new type of balls they're playing with.
May 26, 2022
Mass shooting at Texas elementary school prompts anguished calls for gun control
00:20:00
Nineteen children and two teachers have been killed in a shooting at a Texas elementary school, prompting anguished calls for action on gun control. Guest host Nahlah Ayed speaks with Matt Houston, a reporter at KENS 5 in San Antonio; and Taylor Pettaway, a reporter at the San Antonio Express-News.
May 25, 2022
Upgrading Canada’s infrastructure to cope with extreme weather events
00:20:37
A powerful storm wreaked havoc across Quebec and Ontario last weekend. We speak with Mario Zanth, mayor of Clarence-Rockland, Ont., about how his community is coping; and ask Joanna Eyquem of the University of Waterloo’s Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation how Canada’s infrastructure can be upgraded to cope with extreme weather events.
May 25, 2022
How a video game with artificial intelligence could help diagnose depression
00:24:08
Could a video game equipped with artificial intelligence help diagnose mental health issues like depression? Neuroscientist and CEO Emilia Molimpakis tells us about the diagnostic tools that her company, Thymia, is working on; and psychiatrist Dr. David Gratzer and clinical psychologist Dr. Sean Kidd discuss the promise and pitfalls of deploying technology and AI in mental health care.
May 25, 2022
The Current Introduces: Someone Knows Something: The Abortion Wars
00:33:13
Host David Ridgen joins victims' family members as they investigate cold cases, tracking down leads, speaking to suspects and searching for answers. In Season 7 of Someone Knows Something, Ridgen and investigative journalist Amanda Robb dig into the 1998 murder of her uncle, a New York doctor killed for performing abortions. They uncover a network of anti-abortion movements linked to violence in North America and Europe. Twenty years later, with debates about reproductive rights heating up in the U.S., could more violence be on the horizon? More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/sks
May 24, 2022
What will it take to end Russia’s aggression in Ukraine?
00:19:42
Russia says it has captured the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol after a bloody and protracted siege. Matt Galloway discusses the devastation and what it might take to end this war, with Ukrainian journalist Andriy Kulykov; and Maia Otarashvili, deputy director of the Eurasia Program at the Foreign Policy Research Institute.
May 24, 2022
How a Canadian chef is helping migrant women integrate into life in Italy
00:21:36
Megan Williams travels to Modena, Italy, to hear how award-winning Canadian chef Jessica Rosval is using food to help migrant women integrate into life in Italy.
May 24, 2022
New season of Someone Knows Something explores shootings of abortion providers
00:15:08
CBC Podcasts host David Ridgen and investigative journalist Amanda Robb discuss the new season of Someone Knows Something: The Abortion Wars.
May 24, 2022
Understanding the oceans’ role in storing carbon
00:08:18
Anya Waite, an oceanography professor at Dalhousie University, explains the important role of the oceans in storing carbon — and why we need to better understand it.
May 24, 2022
Author Mary Roach examines the world of animal crime
00:23:43
In her new book Fuzz: When Nature Breaks The Law, Mary Roach explores the world of animal crime. She says although we're trying all sorts of things to deal with human-wildlife conflict, we're mostly failing because it's human behaviour that needs to change.
May 23, 2022
Allergy season is getting longer and experts say climate change is to blam
00:18:51
Studies have found allergy season is getting longer and more intense, and experts are blaming climate change. To learn more about the amped up allergy season, Matt Galloway speaks with Cecilia Sierra Heredia, lecturer at the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University, and Anne Ellis, a professor of medicine and chair of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Queen's University.
May 23, 2022
Where did it go wrong for Alberta Premier Jason Kenney?
00:19:53
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney narrowly won a vote on his leadership of the United Conservative Party this week, but announced he would step down anyway. Matt Galloway talks to Rob Smith, president of the UCP Constituency Association for Olds-Didsbury-Three Hills; Tyler Dawson, Alberta correspondent for the National Post; and Zain Velji, a political strategist with the Calgary firm Northweather.
May 20, 2022
Canada’s airports face short-staffing and long delays
00:23:14
Many Canadian airports are facing short staffing, long line-ups, delays and missed flights. We talk to fiddler Korona Brophy, who faced numerous delays trying to reach Newfoundland to perform for Prince Charles this week. We also discuss the problems and possible solutions with Duncan Dee, former chief operating officer at Air Canada; and infectious disease physician Dr. Zain Chagla.
May 20, 2022
Connie Walker’s podcast explores her father’s experience at residential school
00:09:21
Journalist Connie Walker’s new podcast, Stolen: Surviving St. Michael's, tells the story of what her father and his siblings experienced at St. Michael's Indian Residential School in Duck Lake, Sask. She tells us what she learned about herself while working on the podcast.
May 20, 2022
Sri Lanka’s dire financial crisis sparks widespread protest
00:16:03
Sri Lanka is experiencing a financial crisis and widespread protests — but demonstrators say this might be a turning point in a long fight against corruption. We talk to protester Nuzly Hameem and political scientist Paikiasothy Saravanamuttu.
May 20, 2022
In Buffalo, N.Y., a community is coming together in the wake of a mass shooting
00:18:27
A mass shooting claimed 10 lives in Buffalo, N.Y. last weekend. The Current's John Chipman went there and found a community coming together to heal; he tells Matt Galloway what he saw.
May 19, 2022
Supreme Court rules extreme intoxication can be used as a defence in violent crimes
00:19:13
The Supreme Court of Canada ruled last week that defendants accused of violent crimes can use self-induced extreme intoxication as a defence. We discuss the implications with Danielle Robitaille, a defence lawyer who represented Thomas Chan, who fatally injured his father while highly intoxicated; and Elizabeth Sheehy, a professor emerita at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law.
May 19, 2022
What an equal pay agreement for U.S. women's soccer means for Canadian players
00:07:24
Women soccer players in the U.S. have won equal pay with their male counterparts after a years-long fight. Retired Canadian soccer star Diana Matheson addresses what this means for Canada’s women’s team and their fight for pay equality.
May 19, 2022
International co-operation needed to address world crises, says risk expert
00:23:16
The world faces many crises — and risk expert Ian Bremmer believes international co-operation is our best shot at addressing them. He explains what our collective future holds if we don't work together, and tells us about his new book, The Power of Crisis: How Three Threats – and Our Response – Will Change the World.
May 19, 2022
Quebec’s language bill aims to protect French, but critics argue it could have harmful consequences
00:20:26
Quebec’s Bill 96 is meant to protect the French language, but critics warn it could harm small businesses, Indigenous people and even access to health care. Matt Galloway talks to Robert Leckey, dean of McGill University’s Faculty of Law; and Christopher Skeete, Parliamentary Assistant to the Premier for Relations with English-Speaking Quebecers.
May 18, 2022
Soccer match with Iran is ‘sports-washing,’ says man who lost wife and daughter on Flight PS752
00:09:40
Families who lost loved ones in the destruction of Flight PS752 are angry at Canada Soccer’s plan to host Iran for an upcoming friendly in Vancouver. Hamed Esmaeilion, spokesperson for the association representing the families, tells us why they want the match cancelled.
May 18, 2022
Plants grown in soil from the moon for the first time ever
00:14:13
Scientists have grown the first-ever plants in soil from the moon. We discuss what this might mean for interplanetary exploration, with University of Florida professor Robert Ferl, a co-researcher on the project; and University of Guelph professor Thomas Graham.
May 18, 2022
How descendants of the HMS Bounty mutineers ended up in a ‘trailer park at the end of the world’
00:24:05
After the famous mutiny on the HMS Bounty in 1789, the mutineers fled and eventually settled on the remote Pitcairn Islands in the Pacific. Travel writer Brandon Presser tells us about his journey to meet their descendants in what he calls a “trailer park at the end of the world” — and why he wanted to tell a different side of their story in his book, The Far Land: 200 Years of Murder, Mania, and Mutiny in the South Pacific.
May 18, 2022
The Current Introduces: Kuper Island
00:32:36
Kuper Island is an 8-part series that tells the stories of four students: three who survived and one who didn’t. They attended one of Canada’s most notorious residential schools – where unsolved deaths, abuse, and lies haunt the community and the survivors to this day. Hosted by Duncan McCue.More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/kuperisland
May 17, 2022
Advocates call for ‘decarceration,’ other measures to end overrepresentation of Indigenous women in Canada’s jails
00:19:56
Indigenous women are overrepresented in Canada’s prisons, and critics blame systemic factors. Now, a report co-authored by Canadian senators looks at the cases of 12 Indigenous women and calls for their exoneration. Matt Galloway talks to Senator Kim Pate, who co-authored the report; Lynne Groulx, CEO of the Native Women's Association of Canada; and Corey Shefman, a lawyer for Indigenous peoples and organizations at Olthuis Kleer Townshend.
May 17, 2022
Duncan McCue shares stories of residential school survivors in new CBC podcast, Kuper Island
00:23:48
CBC journalist Duncan McCue discusses his new CBC podcast, Kuper Island, which tells the stories of four children who were forced to attend one of Canada's most notorious residential schools.
May 17, 2022
Calls to end school dress codes — and the tactics used to enforce them
00:07:27
Students at an Ottawa high school recently protested over a school dress code enforcement blitz that they said unfairly targeted girls. We talk to Ottawa City Councillor Catherine Kitts about calls for an end to school dress codes — and the tactics used to enforce them.
May 17, 2022
El Salvador bet big on Bitcoin, and now faces heavy losses
00:17:03
El Salvador bet big on Bitcoin, but was reported to have suffered heavy losses when cryptocurrency markets recently slumped. We talk to Isabella Cota, the Latin America economic correspondent for El Pais; and David Gerard, author of Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain.
May 17, 2022
Parents alarmed at baby formula shortage
00:08:24
A baby formula shortage has prompted concerns among parents in the U.S. and some parts of Canada. We talk to Michelle Pensa Branco, a lactation consultant and co-founder of SafelyFed Canada, about what’s driving the shortage.
May 16, 2022
Pro-democracy activists arrested in Hong Kong
00:23:31
Pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong say the recent change in leadership and latest round of arrests are a blow to their movement — can it survive? We talk to Kelly Ho, a reporter for the Hong Kong Free Press; journalist Matthew Brooker, who is leaving Hong Kong after 30 years there; and former Hong Kong lawmaker Dennis Kwok.
May 16, 2022
Finland moves to join NATO
00:15:55
Finland's Minister of the Interior Krista Mikkonen discusses why her country wants to join NATO; and Bessma Momani, political science professor at the University of Waterloo, discusses how Russia might respond.
May 16, 2022
‘Racially motivated’ mass shooting leaves 10 dead in Buffalo, N.Y.
00:20:13
Ten people were killed in a mass shooting in a predominantly Black neighbourhood in Buffalo, N.Y., on Saturday, in what authorities described as a "racially motivated” attack. Matt Galloway talks to local organizer Tyrell Ford about how his community is remembering the dead; and asks Ricky L. Jones, a Pan-African studies professor, what the violence says about racism in the U.S.
May 16, 2022
Helping Ukrainian refugees start a new life in Newfoundland
00:19:05
Ukrainian refugees arrived in Newfoundland this week, but what supports will they need if local officials want to help them build a life there? Matt Galloway talks to new arrival Lesya Dunaevskaya, local volunteer Brandon Ramey, and Tony Fang, a professor of economics at Memorial University of Newfoundland.
May 13, 2022
Nigeria makes it illegal to pay a kidnapper’s ransom, but critics say the move hurts victims
00:18:46
Nigeria’s government has made it illegal to pay a ransom to kidnappers. But critics say the law won’t solve the problem, and it will actually hurt victims and their families. We talk to Paul Mshelia, who paid a ransom when his adult son was kidnapped last year; and security expert Ebenezer Oyetakin, the executive secretary at the Anti-Corruption Network.
May 13, 2022
Scientists unveil first picture of supermassive black hole in our galaxy
00:08:34
Scientists have unveiled the first picture of a supermassive black hole lurking in the heart of our galaxy. Avery Broderick, an associate professor at Waterloo University and one of the scientists involved in the discovery, explains what it might teach us about the universe.
May 13, 2022
The race to stop a catastrophic oil spill in Yemen
00:16:20
The FSO Safer tanker in Yemen is carrying more than a million barrels of oil — and it's damaged beyond repair. We hear about the risk of a disaster and the plans to avert it, with Ala Mustafa, the global ambassador for Youth4Nature; and David Gressly, the UN resident and humanitarian co-ordinator for Yemen.
May 13, 2022
Palestinian journalist Shireen Abu Akleh killed in the occupied West Bank
00:19:22
Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh was shot and killed in the occupied West Bank town of Jenin Wednesday. She was wearing a helmet and a flak jacket that clearly marked her as a journalist. Her broadcaster and a reporter who was wounded in the incident blamed Israeli forces. The Israel army initially suggested Abu Akleh might have been killed by stray Palestinian fire, but later walked back that suggestion, which was also discounted by Al Jazeera and an Israeli human rights group. Matt Galloway talks to Tamara Alrifai, a senior spokesperson for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency; and Steve Hendrix, the Jerusalem bureau chief for The Washington Post.
May 12, 2022
Ugandan fashion designer selling donated clothes back to the West
00:15:09
Clothes donated in the West often end up in developing countries, where local designers producing new garments must compete with the low prices. Designer Bobby Kolade is taking those cast-offs, refashioning them and selling them back to the West — to fight that imbalance and raise awareness about fast fashion.
May 12, 2022
The legacy of the iPod
00:08:13
Apple is discontinuing the iPod after two decades. Tech journalist Chris Stokel-Walker tells us how the little machine revolutionized not just tech, but the music industry.
May 12, 2022
Canadians swapping ambition for job satisfaction
00:24:22
What is it that actually makes a job satisfying and fulfilling — and has the pandemic changed those priorities? As part of Work in Progress, we talk to Canadians who used this moment to exchange ambition for job satisfaction.
May 12, 2022
Thousands of Canadians still waiting for surgeries
00:20:22
As soon as the pandemic hit, the world of medicine shifted its focus. That meant surgeries that weren’t deemed life-threatening were put on hold. Today, thousands of Canadians are still waiting for their turn to come. Matt Galloway speaks with Amber Nurse and Linda Kroeker, who are both waiting for knee surgery; and Dr. David Urbach, the head of the department of surgery at Women's College Hospital.
May 11, 2022
How desalination could solve the growing water crisis
00:19:01
The southwestern United States is in the grips of a historic drought — and now, one of the country’s biggest reservoirs, Lake Mead, has seen its water levels plummet. It’s the result of a two-decades-long dry spell fuelled by climate change. John Fleck, a professor of water policy and governance at the University of New Mexico, talks about the importance of Lake Mead; and Peter Fiske, director of the National Alliance for Water Innovation and the Water-Energy Resilience Institute, explains why desalination could solve the growing water crisis.
May 11, 2022
Architecture critic Alex Bozikovic on Canada’s lost buildings and the memories within them
00:24:42
In his new book, 305 Lost Buildings of Canada, architecture critic Alex Bozikovic explores some of Canada’s greatest lost buildings — and the memories and stories that lived within them.
May 11, 2022
How the lessons of COVID-19 might apply to containing avian influenza
00:24:51
Avian influenza is spreading quickly across Canada, resulting in poultry flocks being culled and farmers seeing their livelihoods threatened. Chicken farmers Ray Nickel and Peggy Ife explain how their farms have been affected by the virus. We also speak with Dr. Shayan Sharif, a professor of poultry immunology at the University of Guelph’s veterinary school.
May 10, 2022
Rising energy prices are hitting Canadians, farmers hard
00:20:07
In some Canadian provinces, gas has gone up by 50 or 60 per cent compared to this time last year. Host Matt Galloway speaks with family support worker Jennifer Spence and farmer Benoit Michaud, two Canadians who have been hit hard by high energy prices; and Kent Fellows, an energy economist and assistant professor at the University of Calgary's School of Public Policy.
May 10, 2022
Changing the stigma around autism diagnosis for adults
00:23:28
For young people, being diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum often comes with support from parents, teachers and government funding. But an official diagnosis as an adult can be difficult to get — and expensive. For more on the push to change that, we speak with Megan Pilatzke, who was recently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder; Lara Newell-Barrette, who is looking to get formally diagnosed; and Kevin Stoddart, the director of the Redpath Centre in Toronto.
May 10, 2022
Julie Ireton's investigative documentary into alleged serial sexual abuse
00:20:19
CBC reporter Julie Ireton presents her investigative documentary, Under His Control. It covers a dark history of alleged serial sexual abuse that took place in Toronto-area music programs. Warning: this documentary deals with descriptions of sexual assault.
May 09, 2022
Mélanie Joly on Canada’s support of Ukraine and what victory in the war looks like
00:23:37
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland and Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly made a surprise trip to Ukraine this weekend. They spoke with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, and reopened the Canadian embassy in Kyiv. Matt Galloway speaks with Joly about the visit and Canada’s support of Ukraine. He also talked to Maxym Oliferovsky, who runs the New Hope Center in Zaporizhzhia; and Alexander Lanoszka, an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Waterloo.
May 09, 2022
Novelist Shyam Selvadurai reimagines ancient India through the wife of the man who became the Buddha
00:26:07
In his new book, Sri Lankan-Canadian novelist Shyam Selvadurai reimagines ancient India through the life of Yasodhara, the wife of the man who became the Buddha. He talks about the book and the role of Buddhism in his own life.
May 09, 2022
Why Indigenous women account for half of all female inmates and what to do about it
00:20:04
Just 1 in 20 women in Canada are Indigenous, but for the first time in federal prisons, Indigenous women now account for half of all female inmates. Canada's prison ombudsman, Ivan Zinger, has called the overrepresentation both "appalling and shameful." Donna Gamble shares her experience of more than twenty years in the corrections system. And Eleanore Sunchild says Donna’s story is a common one. She is an Indigenous lawyer with Sunchild Law.
May 06, 2022
A look at the fertilizer shortage in Canada and its impact on food supply
00:22:08
As farmers across Canada prepare for the growing season, they are running short of a key supply; fertilizer. It's becoming harder to find, and expensive. Part of the problem is that Russia is the world's biggest fertilizer exporter. Matt Galloway speaks with Robert Misko, a farmer of 35 years and chair of the Manitoba Crop Alliance. And Evan Fraser, director of the Arrell Food Institute discusses how the fertilizer shortage could ripple through the Canadian and global food supply.
May 06, 2022
Temperatures reach record highs in India and Pakistan
00:24:39
In some regions of India and Pakistan, it was the hottest April in 122 years. Rolling blackouts and power cuts have left millions sweating all day and all night. Temperatures have been above 40 degrees Celsius for days on end. Matt Galloway discussed the high temperatures and what can be done with Chandni Singh, Senior Researcher at the Indian Institute for Human Settlements, and Fahad Saeed, a climate scientist with the think tank Climate Analytics.
May 06, 2022
Journalists have had to flee Russia for reporting on the war in Ukraine
00:19:00
The Kremlin has been cracking down on independent media since the invasion of Ukraine, and stations like TV Rain became criminalized for how they covered the war. That has meant some news organizations have had to shut down, and some journalists have had to flee the country. Ekaterina Kotrikadze was the host of a weekly foreign affairs show on TV Rain and headed its global news coverage. And Alexey Kovalev is the investigations editor for the independent Russian news site Meduza. Both have fled Russia, and don’t know when they’ll be able to return.
May 05, 2022
Filmmaker Barri Cohen examines Ontario’s infamous Huronia Regional Centre
00:23:34
The Huronia Regional Centre in Ontario was sold to families as a safe home for children with disabilities, but in reality, it was the site of appalling abuse and neglect. Filmmaker Barri Cohen set out to learn about the siblings she didn't know she had, and a dark history she tells of institutionalization in Canada. Her film Unloved: Huronia's Forgotten Children is being shown at the Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival. We also hear from Brian Logie, a survivor of the Huronia Regional Centre.
May 05, 2022
A look at abortion access in Canada
00:12:09
Then, abortion has been legal in Canada for over thirty years, and as the issue once again rises to the surface in the U.S., plenty of Canadian politicians have promised that right will never be taken away from women. But according to Karen Segal with the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund, there is a difference between having the legal right to an abortion and being able to access one.
May 05, 2022
How the son of a former Philippines dictator could become the country’s president
00:10:06
The son of former Philippines dictator Ferdinand Marcos could become the next president of his country, almost 40 years after his father’s rule. During Marcos’ rule, there were two decades of martial law, rampant corruption, and human rights abuses, before rebel soldiers revolted and overthrew Marcos. Now, Ferdinand Marcos Jr. is leading in the polls there. Washington Post correspondent Regine Cabato has been covering the campaign and she discusses it with Matt Galloway.
May 05, 2022
Examining the implications of a draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade
00:19:51
Since 1973, the Roe v. Wade decision has protected the right to an abortion in the U.S., but that may be coming to an end. The U.S. Supreme Court confirmed yesterday that the draft opinion revealing the intentions of the Supreme Court to strike down Roe v. Wade that was leaked is real, although not final. The case involves the Jackson Women's Health Organization, also known as the Pink House. Clinic owner Diane Derzis discusses the impacts of the draft opinion and Michele Bratcher, Chancellor's Professor of Law at UC Irvine School of Law, talks about the legal implications.
May 04, 2022
1 of 5 species of reptiles are at risk of extinction
00:23:42
The future of reptiles is at risk. More than 1 in 5 species of reptiles worldwide, including the fierce king cobra, are threatened with extinction, according to an assessment of thousands of species published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Matt Galloway speaks with Bruce Young, co-author of that study. Scott Gillingwater, lead biologist for Southern Ontario At Risk Reptiles, talks about reptiles in Canada, and we also hear from Mary O'Connor, a professor of zoology at the University of British Columbia.
May 04, 2022
Why the grand-niece of Walt Disney is taking a look at her company’s labour practices
00:25:12
The grand-niece of Walt Disney is trying to shine a light on the company that made her family rich. Abigail Disney has made a documentary about the company’s labour practices and income inequality called The American Dream and Other Fairy Tales. She discusses the film with Matt Galloway, which is being shown at the Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival.
May 04, 2022
Our national affairs panel examines the federal Conservative leadership race
00:20:20
The race is officially on for the next leader of the federal Conservative party. Six candidates have paid the $300,000 registration fee and submitted 500 signatures of support from party members. The party’s options include Patrick Brown, Jean Charest, Leslyn Lewis, Pierre Poilievre, Roman Baber, and Scott Aitchison. Our national affairs panel discusses the race with Matt Galloway. Yudhvir Jaswal is Group Editor and CEO of Y Media, Catherine Levesque is a parliamentary reporter for the National Post in Ottawa, and Jason Markusoff is the opinion and analysis editor at CBC Calgary.
May 03, 2022
Fashion content creator says fast fashion is symptomatic of a trend-obsessed culture
00:19:16
The brand Shein has become a behemoth of ultra-fast fashion. It has now surpassed Amazon as the world's most downloaded shopping app and is worth more than competitors H&M and Zara, combined. It’s all online and it sells its clothes cheap. Timothy Chernyaev is a fashion editor and content creator on TikTok. He says the rise of ultra-fast fashion retailers is a symptom of a bigger problem because of the need on social media to keep up with trends. And Lucy Siegle, an environmental journalist in the U.K., says the trend is waste.
May 03, 2022
How José Andrés went from famous restaurants to helping in disaster zones
00:25:54
José Andrés made his name as a food innovator in famous restaurants in Spain and the United States, but these days you’re more likely to find him in a disaster zone trying to get food to people who need it. There is a new documentary about him and his organization, World Central Kitchen, being shown at Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival in Toronto. Andrés spoke to Matt Galloway about the film We Feed People.
May 03, 2022
How the Nova Scotia mass shooter acquired guns in Maine
00:19:09
The inquiry into the deadliest mass shooting in Canada's history continues this week. Two years ago, a gunman dressed as an RCMP officer burned down houses and killed 22 people in Nova Scotia. CBC reporter Elizabeth McMillan explains how tracing the story of how the Portapique gunman got his weapons brought her to Houlton, Maine. And retired U.S. federal prosecutor Margaret Groban talks about how Maine is considered a source state for guns.
May 02, 2022
A new wave of book bans sweeps the United States
00:23:41
There is a new wave of book bannings across the United States. Parent groups and local politicians have succeeded in having a number of books removed from school curriculums and libraries. We hear from Angela Wynn, a mother in Sarasota, Florida, who is fighting against book bans. We also hear from Jonathan Zimmerman, a professor of the History of Education at the University of Pennsylvania, and Michelle Arbuckle, co-chair of the Freedom of Expression Committee and Director of Member Engagement & Education at the Ontario Library Association.
May 02, 2022
How intergenerational trauma affects the children of Holocaust survivors
00:25:52
Marsha Lederman says the trauma caused by the Holocaust doesn’t just affect those who survived it. In her new memoir, Kiss the Red Stairs: The Holocaust, Once Removed, she explains how intergenerational trauma torments the children of Holocaust survivors, including herself, and how she is triggered by reports of anti-semitic incidences and war.
May 02, 2022
Finding ways to keep older workers in the workforce
00:20:12
New census data shows a record one in five working adults is getting close to retirement age. That means businesses and workplaces could soon be struggling to fill positions — but some say it doesn’t need to be this way. Matt Galloway speaks with Helen Hirsh Spence, founder and CEO of Top Sixty Over Sixty; and Donna Wilson, a professor and gerontology researcher at the University of Alberta.
Apr 29, 2022
New documentary looks at Russian opposition figure Alexei Navalny post-assassination attempt
00:23:22
An award-winning documentary by a Toronto filmmaker highlights the life — and attempted assassination — of Russian opposition figure Alexei Navalny. Daniel Roher talks about his documentary, Navalny, and the extraordinary access he got to Navalny.
Apr 29, 2022
The case for digital public infrastructure
00:13:52
When Elon Musk forks over about 44 billion dollars to buy Twitter, he’ll get to make the rules about how hundreds of millions of users interact. Ethan Zuckerman, an associate professor of public policy, communication and information at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, tells us why people should be concerned about allowing private corporations and billionaires to control our public communication infrastructure.
Apr 29, 2022
How turning plastic waste into recycled materials can help refugees
00:09:09
As part of our ongoing coverage of the global refugee crisis, we’re looking at a system turning plastic waste into recycled materials — and making refugees money in the process. Joseph Klatt, the managing director of Precious Plastics, tells us more.
Apr 29, 2022
What to do about Canada’s family doctor shortage
00:20:21
From British Columbia to rural Nova Scotia, Canadians across the country are struggling to find family doctors. Matt Galloway speaks with Camille Currie, who recently lost her family physician, about how she’s dealing with the shortage. We also speak with family physician Dr. Greg Stewart and Dr. Brady Bouchard, president of the College of Family Physicians of Canada, about why there’s a shortage, and what to do about it.
Apr 28, 2022
South Africa’s devastating floods — and the role of climate change and social inequality
00:19:19
Floods in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal have killed more than 400 people and displaced 40,000 others. We hear more from Phindiwe Mashiloane, whose house was flooded; and Tafadzwa Mabhaudhi, a professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal who specializes in climate change adaptation.
Apr 28, 2022
A new documentary explores one man’s landmark settlement against an agrochemical company
00:25:40
In 2014, Dewayne “Lee” Johnson was diagnosed with terminal cancer. He worked as a groundskeeper and doctors suspected the disease came from the weed killers he used every day. Johnson sued the manufacturer, Monsanto, and won a landmark settlement. His ordeal is told in a powerful new documentary, Into The Weeds, directed by Canadian filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal.
Apr 28, 2022
Long COVID sufferer says she's struggling to find the medical help she needs
00:19:57
For Canadians still suffering from long COVID, getting specialized medical help can be a frustrating journey. Matt Galloway talks to Elise Cote, who hopes a new clinic in Victoria, B.C., could help her; and long COVID researcher Dr. Angela Cheung.
Apr 27, 2022
Could Denmark offer the solutions to Canada’s elder care crisis?
00:23:59
CBC investigative journalist Erica Johnson travelled to Denmark to see how the country provides elder care — and find out what solutions could be applied in Canada.
Apr 27, 2022
Former ambassador Kerry Buck on Russia's threats around nuclear warfare
00:09:34
As the war in Ukraine drags on, Russia's threats about this conflict escalating into a nuclear war grow louder. Former Canadian Ambassador to NATO Kerry Buck discusses how seriously we should take those threats.
Apr 27, 2022
What does Indigenous ownership of Hudson's Bay Winnipeg building mean for reconciliation?
00:16:51
The Hudson's Bay building in downtown Winnipeg is passing into Indigenous hands. We discuss what that means for reconciliation with Niigaan Sinclair, a professor in the Department of Native Studies at the University of Manitoba; and Riley Yesno, an Anishinaabe writer and Fellow at the Yellowhead Institute at Toronto Metropolitan University.
Apr 27, 2022
Can small modular nuclear reactors help in the climate change fight?
00:20:09
As part of action on climate change, the recent budget pledged $120 million to develop a new type of nuclear technology: small modular reactors. Matt Galloway talks about cost and safety concerns, and what the technology will bring to the climate change fight, with John Gorman, president of the Canadian Nuclear Association; and Susan O'Donnell, adjunct research professor for the environment and society program at St. Thomas University.
Apr 26, 2022
Dr. Brian Goldman on The Power of Teamwork
00:23:35
Dr. Brian Goldman discusses his new book The Power of Teamwork, why the medical world in particular has been slow to catch on to teamwork’s benefits, and how improv comedy and the pandemic are changing that.
Apr 26, 2022
New film Batata follows decade-long plight of stranded Syrian migrant workers
00:24:45
Canadian filmmaker Noura Kevorkian was making a documentary about Syrian migrant workers in Lebanon — but the eruption of the civil war led her on a 10-year odyssey. She tells us about moving into a refugee camp to tell the stories in her film, Batata.
Apr 26, 2022
High school students stage walkouts over sexual violence and consent education
00:19:49
High school students have staged walkouts around the country to push for change around consent education and sexual violence. Matt Galloway talks to Grade 12 student Fechi Onyegbule; Teralyn Phipps, a co-ordinating principal at the Peel District School Board in Ontario; and Farrah Khan, manager of Consent Comes First at Ryerson University in Toronto.
Apr 25, 2022
Why some businesses choose to pass ownership to employees
00:23:58
What if employees owned the companies they worked for? Our series Work in Progress looks at employee ownership trusts and worker-owned co-operatives, with experts Jon Shell, managing director of Social Capital Partners; and Marcelo Vieta, an associate professor at the University of Toronto. Philip Diceanu, co-owner of food manufacturing company Henry's Tempeh; and Heather Payne, CEO of Juno College of Technology, also tell us why they want to hand ownership to their staff.
Apr 25, 2022
Concerns over U.K. deal to deport migrants to Rwanda
00:25:16
Some migrants who reach the United Kingdom without authorization will be deported to Rwanda under a deal penned by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government. We hear about concerns from people in both countries: Hassan Akkad, a Syrian refugee and activist in the U.K.; Alf Dubs, a member of the House of Lords, the second chamber of U.K. parliament; and Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza, leader of Development And Liberty For All, a political party in Rwanda.
Apr 25, 2022
What Elon Musk’s bid for Twitter could mean for big tech and democracy
00:23:09
Elon Musk’s bid to buy Twitter has sparked heated discussion, and concerns over what that might mean for the power held by big tech companies, and their impact on democracy. We talk to William D. Cohan, bestselling author of a number of books on high finance intrigue; and Shoshana Zuboff, a retired Harvard Business School professor.
Apr 22, 2022
Russia refocuses invasion on Eastern Ukraine
00:19:48
Russia is refocusing its military efforts on the Donbas region in Eastern Ukraine. Matt Galloway talks to Kharkiv restaurant owner Michael Chernomorets and his friend Vlad Glabacheck, who are heading east to fight; and discusses the Donbas region’s strategic significance with Marta Dyczok, an associate professor of history and political science at Western University.
Apr 22, 2022
Russian athletes banned from Wimbledon
00:18:41
Wimbledon has barred Russian and Belarusian players from participating in this year’s tournament. We discuss the move with Alexandr Dolgopolov, a former professional tennis player who is helping with the war effort in Kyiv; and Jon Wertheim, a writer with Sports Illustrated.
Apr 22, 2022
Fresh from Afghanistan, Graeme Smith describes a fall in violence but rising poverty
00:19:39
Former foreign correspondent Graeme Smith has just returned from Afghanistan, where he was working as a senior consultant on Afghanistan for the International Crisis Group. He tells Matt Galloway what he saw and why Canada shouldn’t turn its back on the people there.
Apr 21, 2022
Meet Oleksandr Kamyshin, the man keeping the trains running in Ukraine
00:10:20
Trains in Ukraine have been a lifeline for people fleeing the war, and for keeping goods and military supplies moving through the country. We talk to Oleksandr Kamyshin, the CEO of Ukrainian Railways.
Apr 21, 2022
Endometriosis, and the problem of women’s pain being overlooked or misdiagnosed
00:23:52
Endometriosis can cause chronic and debilitating pain for women — but it can take years to diagnose and is often missed by doctors. We talk to Meghan Thomas, who suffered for more than a decade before her diagnosis; and discuss why women’s pain is often overlooked or misdiagnosed, with obstetrician-gynecologist Dr. Alice Pham and family doctor Dr. Sheila Wijayasinghe.
Apr 21, 2022
Tyrone ‘Muggsy’ Bogues on his 14-year NBA career
00:15:29
Standing tall at five feet three inches, Tyrone ‘Muggsy’ Bogues played 14 years in the NBA. He tells us about his career, and his new book Muggsy: My Life from a Kid in the Projects to the Godfather of Small Ball.
Apr 21, 2022
Jonah Keri’s conviction offers hope for other survivors of intimate partner violence, says his ex-wife Amy Kaufman
00:19:23
Canadian sportscaster Jonah Keri was sentenced to 21 months in March, for repeated assaults against his ex-wife Amy Kaufman. Anna Maria Tremonti spoke with Kaufman about the judge's ruling and why Kaufman says it offers hope for other survivors.
Apr 20, 2022
The complexities and expectations refugees face in their new countries
00:23:46
After the initial trauma of fleeing home and arriving in a new country, refugees face years of complexities. Matt Galloway discusses ideas about home, community, gratitude and identity with two people whose families came to Canada as refugees: Carmen Aguirre, a theatre artist and activist; and Anh Ngo, an assistant professor at Wilfrid Laurier University.
Apr 20, 2022
Growing concerns over whether Ukrainian refugees will receive the support they need in Canada
00:22:16
As Ukrainians continue to arrive in Canada, there are concerns about whether they'll be able to access the support they need. We talk to Dr. Christine Gibson, a trauma therapist and family physician at Calgary’s Mosaic Refugee Clinic, who is preparing to welcome Ukrainians into her home; and Aleks Dughman-Manzur, president of the Canadian Council for Refugees.
Apr 20, 2022
Confronting the slowly changing stigma around schizophrenia
00:25:48
To overcome stigma, some groups supporting people with schizophrenia are taking the name of the illness out of their organization’s name. We talk to advocates and people living with schizophrenia about how that stigma is changing — and yet not changing quickly enough.
Apr 19, 2022
Can carbon capture and storage help Canada reach net-zero emissions?
00:20:25
Some experts say we can't get to net-zero without carbon capture, but does the technology live up to the promise? Matt Galloway talks to Rick Chalaturnyk, a professor of geotechnical engineering at the University of Alberta; and Emily Eaton, a professor of geography and environmental studies at the University of Regina.
Apr 19, 2022
Cal Newport on how ‘slow productivity’ could reduce burnout in our working lives
00:23:36
As part of our Work in Progress series, author and professor Cal Newport discusses how to slow down the pace of work and reduce burnout, through his ideas around “slow productivity” and “deep work.”
Apr 19, 2022
Edmonton’s Amber Bracken wins World Press Photo of the Year
00:19:49
A photo taken by Edmonton’s Amber Bracken — of multiple unmarked graves near the site of the former Kamloops Residential School — has been named World Press Photo of the Year. Bracken talks to Matt Galloway about the photo and the rights of photojournalists.
Apr 18, 2022
Meg Lowman spent her career climbing trees — and found an ‘eighth continent’ of life high above us
00:23:26
Biologist and ecologist Meg Lowman has spent her life climbing trees. Now, she’s sharing her tall tales in her book, The Arbornaut: A Life Discovering the Eighth Continent in the Trees Above Us. We revisit our conversation with her from last year, about why it’s important for the next generation of tree climbers to discover — and save — the treetops.
Apr 18, 2022
Bonus | The global refugee crisis, and what can be done to help
00:34:50
In a special podcast edition of this week's radio show on the refugee crisis, displaced journalist Tolossa Asrat takes us inside the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya; Alaa Alakel talks about the pain of bein separated from her family in Syria; and UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi discusses what can be done to help refugees worldwide.
Apr 16, 2022
What losing her father and finding love taught Kathryn Schulz about the 'bargain of our existence'
00:22:30
Earlier this year, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and New Yorker writer Kathryn Schulz told us why she wrote about the loss of her father in her new book, Lost & Found.
Apr 15, 2022
A Ukrainian chef and a Russian chef team up to highlight Ukrainian food
00:23:42
Olia Hercules is Ukrainian, and Alissa Timoshkina is Russian. Together, the two friends and chefs have started the campaign Cook for Ukraine to highlight Ukrainian cuisine. They talk to Matt Galloway about the personal connections they have with Ukrainian food.
Apr 15, 2022
Rabbi Tina Grimberg on why she went to help displaced Ukrainians
00:23:21
Toronto Rabbi Tina Grimberg left Kyiv in 1979, but the war in Ukraine has drawn her back to help. She tells us about her recent trip to Poland to help displaced Ukrainians with transport, shelter and gifts.
Apr 14, 2022
Canadians face roadblocks to adopting electric vehicles
00:19:19
The federal government is trying to help Canadians adopt electric vehicles, but what are the roadblocks to consumers making a successful switch? Matt Galloway talks to Connie Blixhavn, who owns an electric vehicle in Killarney-Turtle Mountain, Man.; Joanna Kyriazis, program manager for clean transportation at Clean Energy Canada; and Brian Kingston, president and CEO of the Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association.
Apr 14, 2022
Frustrated Shanghai residents locked in their homes amid COVID-19 outbreak
00:23:43
As China tackles another COVID-19 wave, frustrated Shanghai residents are sharing stories online of a strict lockdown. We talk to one resident about his experience, as well as sinologist Manya Koetse and Yanzhong Huang, director of the Center for Global Health Studies at Seton Hall University.
Apr 14, 2022
The global refugee crisis, and what can be done to help
01:14:41
We bring you the stories of the people caught up in the global refugee crisis. Displaced journalist Tolossa Asrat takes us inside the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya. The camp was established in 1992 and is now home to more than 160,000 people — but it’s slated to close in June. While conditions at the camp are harsh, refugees who live there say they have nowhere else to go. Then, we hear from refugees here in Canada. Some have been forced to leave loved ones behind — and they want the Canadian government to do more to help reunite them. And we speak with UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi about what can be done to help refugees worldwide, and his fears that the crisis in Ukraine could draw resources further away from where they’re needed.
Apr 13, 2022
Ukraine crisis could overshadow plight of refugees worldwide, says UN refugees chief
00:25:20
We speak with UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi about what can be done to help refugees worldwide, and his fears that the crisis in Ukraine could draw resources further away from where they’re needed.
Apr 13, 2022
Ukrainians returning home to help despite threat of war
00:19:50
In the midst of war, some Ukrainians are returning to Kyiv and other areas to try to get their country moving again. Matt Galloway talks to four people who are trying to help, from reopening businesses to co-ordinating aid and supplies.
Apr 12, 2022
The role of Paxlovid in tackling COVID-19’s sixth wave
00:11:12
Amid a sixth wave of COVID-19 in Canada, could increased access to the antiviral pill Paxlovid help patients? We talk to family physician Dr. Tara Kiran about the pill.
Apr 12, 2022
Record lobster prices prompting fishers to brave rough seas
00:10:04
Buyers are paying record prices for lobster, prompting fishers to brave rough seas to cash in. We talk to Gail Atkinson, the captain of the Nellie Row.
Apr 12, 2022
Bill Browder on facing ‘Putin’s wrath’ for exposing corruption in Russia
00:23:52
Long before Russia faced sanctions for the war in Ukraine, financier Bill Browder found himself in the Kremlin’s crosshairs for his work tracking corruption in the country. He tells us more about the danger he faced, and his new book Freezing Order: A True Story of Money Laundering, Murder, and Surviving Vladimir Putin's Wrath.
Apr 12, 2022
Searching for accountability in Russia’s invasion of Ukraine
00:19:06
Russian attacks on eastern Ukraine have forced thousands to flee the area in search of safety. Matt Galloway hears the latest from Ukraine with Oleksiy Sorokin, the political editor for the Kyiv Independent; and discusses calls to hold Russian President Vladimir Putin accountable for alleged war crimes with Carla Del Ponte, who served as chief prosecutor on International Criminal Tribunals for both the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda.
Apr 11, 2022
What the Bay du Nord oil project means for climate activism
00:24:07
The federal government gave the green light to a new deepwater oil development, the Bay du Nord oil project, off the coast of Newfoundland. We discuss the approval and what it means for meeting Canada’s climate targets with Newfoundland and Labrador's Energy Minister Andrew Parsons; pipefitter Steve White; and Angela Carter, a member of the Newfoundland and Labrador government’s Net-Zero Advisory Council.
Apr 11, 2022
How a new poetry collection illustrates varied experiences of the pandemic
00:22:26
Co-editors David Hassler and Naomi Shihab Nye discuss a new poetry collection about the pandemic, Dear Vaccine: Global Voices Speak to the Pandemic.
Apr 11, 2022
Kamal Al-Solaylee on the idea of home and the desire to return
00:22:59
Where do you want to be buried? That's the question author Kamal Al-Solaylee wrestled with in his book, Return: Why We Go Back to Where We Come From. Last year, Al-Solaylee discussed his own feelings around the idea of home, and the desire of different communities to return to their homelands.
Apr 08, 2022
National affairs panel weighs up the federal budget
00:20:38
Our national affairs panel tackles the federal budget, an affordability crisis, and a new offshore oil development in the middle of the climate emergency. Matt Galloway talks to three political veterans: former Conservative MP Lisa Raitt; former NDP MP Libby Davies; and former Liberal MP Wayne Easter.
Apr 08, 2022
Could cryptocurrency go mainstream in Canada?
00:23:25
Thursday’s budget promised a legislative review of the "digitalization of money and maintaining financial sector stability and security." We discuss the appeal of cryptocurrency in Canada with former Bank of Canada governor Stephen Poloz; Jelena Djuric, a co-founder of the Canadian Web 3 Council, a cryptocurrency advocacy group; and Jacob Goldstein author of Money: The True Story of a Made-Up Thing.
Apr 08, 2022
Budget day: The sky-rocketing cost of living in Canada, and what needs to be done about it
01:12:28
On budget day, we look at how life in Canada has gotten more expensive, from finding a place to live, to getting around, to what we eat. Inflation is putting seniors under extra pressure as the price of daily necessities skyrockets. We talk to Terri Gilpin, a senior in Ottawa, and Karen McDonald, executive director of Sage Seniors Association. Then, we look at how ever-increasing rents, a hot market and being priced out of a place you can call home. In Nova Scotia, Dayle Crouse is converting a school bus to live in; while Kevin Simonar and Tina Gentile had to move their young family across the country to find a place they could afford. Brian Doucet, an associate professor in the School of Planning at the University of Waterloo, discusses how governments could help make housing more affordable. Plus, former Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz looks ahead to today's budget, why it needs to address a new economic reality, and an economic situation that is only going to get more volatile. And the great Canadian composer Boris Brott was killed this week in a hit-and-run in Hamilton, Ont. We hear from those who remember him both for his accomplishments, and how he made them feel.
Apr 07, 2022
Remembering the great Canadian composer Boris Brott
00:04:21
The great Canadian composer Boris Brott was killed this week in a hit-and-run in Hamilton, Ont. We hear from those who remember him both for his accomplishments, and how he made them feel.
Apr 07, 2022
Bill Hayes on the history of exercise
00:23:52
Author Bill Hayes tells us about his new book Sweat: A History of Exercise, whether gyms are indeed the fast food of exercise, and what he learned about the joy of swimming from his late partner, Oliver Sacks.
Apr 06, 2022
Catherine McKenna on UN’s ‘now or never’ warning on climate change
00:09:37
The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says the world is headed for catastrophe if we do not drastically cut emissions. We talk to former federal environment minister Catherine McKenna about how to get Canada on track.
Apr 06, 2022
Humanitarian work and the question of neutrality
00:17:34
The International Committee of the Red Cross has faced criticism for recent meetings with Russian officials. We discuss humanitarian work and the question of neutrality with Robert Mardini, director-general of the International Committee of the Red Cross; and Patricia McIlreavy, president and CEO of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy.
Apr 06, 2022
Calls to improve conditions for temporary foreign workers
00:19:26
The federal government is expanding Canada's temporary foreign workers program, but critics say conditions for low-wage workers need to improve. Matt Galloway talks to Marie-France MacKinnon, vice-president of public affairs and communications at the Canadian Meat Council; Syed Hussan, executive director of Migrant Workers Alliance for Change; and federal Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Carla Qualtrough.
Apr 06, 2022
Canadian workplaces see increased productivity in four-day work week
00:20:41
Our Work In Progress series takes a look at workplaces experimenting with a four-day work week — and in some cases seeing an increase in productivity and revenue. We visit a Toronto workplace that made the switch; and hear from Clémentine Van Effenterre, a labour economist and assistant professor at the University of Toronto.
Apr 05, 2022
Any decision for the North should be made by the North, says Nunavut Premier P.J. Akeeagok
00:21:10
Canada’s three Northern premiers met with the prime minister Monday to discuss Arctic security amid Russian aggression in Europe, and northern infrastructure investment. We talk to the Premier of Nunavut P.J. Akeeagok; and Will Greaves, an assistant professor of international relations at the University of Victoria.
Apr 05, 2022
Accusations that rape is being used as tool of war in Ukraine
00:19:49
Russia faces accusations of war crimes in Ukraine, including allegations that rape is being used as a weapon of war. Matt Galloway talks to Alona Shkrum, a Ukrainian member of parliament; and Christina Lamb, chief foreign correspondent for The Sunday Times and the author of Our Bodies, Their Battleground: What War Does To Women.
Apr 05, 2022
Allegations of war crimes committed by Russian forces in Ukraine
00:07:27
Amid growing reports of war crimes committed by Russian forces in Ukraine, Human Rights Watch has released a report documenting allegations of rape, murder and other violent acts against civilians. Matt Galloway talks to Hugh Williamson, Europe and Central Asia director at Human Rights Watch.
Apr 05, 2022
Eric Reguly on the life and legacy of his father, famed journalist Robert Reguly
00:20:23
The Globe and Mail correspondent Eric Reguly has written a book exploring the incredible life and legacy of his father, the journalist Robert Reguly. He tells us how he learned more about his father by retracing Robert's footsteps all the way into the battlegrounds of the Vietnam War
Apr 04, 2022
How a radio station in Ukraine is helping the war effort
00:12:15
Bogdan Bolkhovetsky, the CEO of Kraina FM, tells us he’s keeping his radio station running from a makeshift studio in order to help the war effort.
Apr 04, 2022
How Canadians can assess the ongoing risk of COVID-19
00:23:17
Public health officials in Peterborough, Ont., have created a tool to help people assess the specific COVID-19 risk in that region and protect themselves against the virus. Dr. Thomas Piggott, the medical officer of health for Peterborough Public Health, explains how the tool works. We also discuss what Canadians should consider as cases rise, with infectious disease specialist Dr. Lisa Barrett, and neuroscientist and science communicator Samantha Yammine.
Apr 04, 2022
Prompted by The Cello’s Tale, a listener shares his story of the Bosnian war
00:06:13
David Packer, a listener in Halifax, shares a letter he wrote to The Current about the time he spent as a humanitarian health-care worker during the Bosnian war. His letter was prompted by the recent broadcast of Paolo Pietropaolo’s The Cello’s Tale.
Apr 04, 2022
Allegations of price fixing among Canada's largest meat-packing companies
00:19:14
A class-action lawsuit in Quebec accuses Canada's largest beef packers of collusion and price-fixing. Matt Galloway discusses the allegations with Sylvain Charlebois, a professor in food distribution and policy at Dalhousie University; and Ambarish Chandra, an associate professor of economics at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.
Apr 01, 2022
Pope Francis apologizes for ‘deplorable’ abuses at residential schools
00:20:00
Pope Francis has apologized to Indigenous delegates in Rome, for “deplorable” abuses at residential schools. We discuss what the apology means with Phil Fontaine, former Chief of the Assembly of First Nations; and look at the impact of previous papal apologies with Colm O’Gorman, executive director of Amnesty International in Ireland.
Apr 01, 2022
Canadians need to get better at talking about death, says pioneer in medically assisted dying
00:22:26
Dr. Stefanie Green was one of the first doctors to offer medical assistance in dying (MAID) after it was legalized in 2016. She explores the last six years in her new book This is Assisted Dying: A Doctor's Story of Empowering Patients at the End of Life.
Apr 01, 2022