The Current

By CBC Radio

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James Dyer
 Jan 26, 2019
Anna Maria Tremonti is the best interviewer I've heard. Please, never retire

Description

CBC Radio's The Current is a meeting place of perspectives with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today.

Episode Date
Anderson Cooper on the distance he kept from his family, the ultra-rich Vanderbilts
00:23:48
In his new book Vanderbilt: The Rise and Fall of An American Dynasty, CNN anchor Anderson Cooper digs into the tale of his own family, the ultra-rich Vanderbilts, and why for most of his life he did everything possible to distance himself from their prestige and money.
Sep 24, 2021
Angela Merkel’s legacy after 16 years as Germany’s chancellor
00:19:38
Elections in Germany this weekend bring an end to Angela Merkel’s 16-year tenure as the country’s chancellor. What will her legacy be? Matt Galloway talks to Anne Applebaum, staff writer with The Atlantic and author of Twilight of Democracy; and Oliver Schmidtke, professor and director at the Centre for Global Studies at the University of Victoria.
Sep 24, 2021
The impact of Instagram on teenager’s mental health and self image
00:25:09
A recent Wall Street Journal investigation revealed that Facebook has known for years that Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, damages teens' mental health. We talk to Wall Street Journal technology reporter Jeff Horwitz about what he found, and discuss what safeguards are needed with Dr. Patricia Conrod, a neurodevelopmental researcher at Sainte-Justine children's hospital, and a professor of psychiatry at the University of Montreal.
Sep 24, 2021
Haitians deported as Biden uses Trump-era policy to deny them chance to claim asylum
00:17:32
Haitian migrants trying to cross the Rio Grande river were chased by U.S. border agents on horseback this past week. Some will be deported back to Haiti, a country many say they haven’t been to in years, because President Joe Biden has kept a Trump-era policy that allows them to be deported without the chance to seek asylum. Matt Galloway speaks with Arelis Hernandez, Texas correspondent for the Washington Post, who has been covering the situation from the Mexico-Texas border; and Lee Gelernt, a lawyer and deputy director of the Immigrants' Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union.
Sep 23, 2021
Tensions rise as vaccination rate remains low in Winkler, Man.
00:12:14
The city of Winkler, Man., has low vaccination rates, and heightened tensions over COVID-19 restrictions. The situation has become so acrimonious that the city’s police chief has called for civility on Facebook. We talk to Winkler’s mayor, Martin Harder, about the divisions.
Sep 23, 2021
Talking about climate change requires honesty and connection — not just arguing, says scientist Katharine Hayhoe
00:22:55
Debates about climate change can often become heated, but Katharine Hayhoe says that most people who are labelled as climate change deniers aren't actually deniers at all — they just have questions. Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist, and professor in the department of political science at Texas Tech University. She wants people to change the conversation and focus on connection, rather than division.
Sep 23, 2021
Taliban delays leaves millions of Afghan girls shut out of education
00:11:13
Millions of girls in Afghanistan have not been allowed to return to school, though the boys have. We discuss the delay, and whether the Taliban’s earlier promises were all talk, with Pashtana Durrani, a teacher and the founder and executive director of LEARN Afghanistan, a charity focused on education.
Sep 23, 2021
Merlin Bird ID, the app that can identify a bird from its song
00:07:23
Have you ever heard a bird in the wild, and wished you knew what it was? There’s an app for that! We talk to Jessie Barry, one of the founders of Merlin Bird ID, an app developed by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology that can identify birds using a sound recording.
Sep 22, 2021
As COVID-19 vaccines for kids get closer, experts weigh up how to combat hesitancy and misinformation
00:19:49
Pfizer-BioNTech says a clinical trial of its COVID-19 vaccine recorded a robust immune response in five- to 11-year-olds, and the company plans to seek regulatory approval as soon as possible. Some experts say that approval process must move quickly to protect children against the virus, but also with the necessary transparency and efforts to reassure the hesitant, and combat misinformation. Matt Galloway talks to Halifax parent Fallon Jones, who is keen to have her eldest vaccinated, but sees hesitation among other parents; Dr. Cora Constantinescu, a pediatrician and infectious disease doctor at Alberta Children's Hospital, who also works at the Vaccine Hesitancy Clinic; and Dr. Kashif Pirzada, an emergency physician in Toronto, and a co-founder of Masks4Canada, a group that advocates for masking, vaccines, rapid tests, and improved ventilation.
Sep 22, 2021
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney faces an uncertain political future, say pundits
00:16:57
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney all but declared the pandemic over a few months ago. Then he saw his health-care system buckle under a fourth wave, reversed course on a vaccine passport, and became a factor in the federal election. Now he’s facing calls for his resignation. We talk to Stephen Carter, president of Decide Campaigns, who served as chief of staff to former Alberta premier Alison Redford; and Dave Cournoyer, host of Daveberta, a political podcast.
Sep 22, 2021
‘If you think I'm a troublemaker, just wait’: Jesse Wente on family, truth, and Indigenous resistance
00:23:13
Politicians have been talking about reconciliation between Canada and Indigenous peoples for years — and for two decades, Jesse Wente has been talking about how difficult that will be. The Anishinaabe broadcaster and arts leader talks about the multi-generational impact of residential schools on his own family, the resistance and activism he sees in today’s Indigenous youth, and his new memoir Unreconciled: Family, Truth, and Indigenous Resistance.
Sep 22, 2021
Political veterans weigh up what the results mean for the parties, and for you
00:20:31
It’s the morning after the federal election, how are the results shaping up? Matt Galloway talks to three political veterans — former Conservative MP Lisa Raitt; former NDP MP Libby Davies; and former Liberal MP Catherine McKenna — about what the results mean for the various parties, and for you.
Sep 21, 2021
Political scientists discuss what this election means for Canada’s political landscape
00:24:26
What does this election tell us about the political landscape in Canada, and where the country goes from here? We talk to Tamara Small, professor of political science at the University of Guelph, Ont., Daniel Béland, director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada in Montreal; and Lisa Young, political scientist at the University of Calgary School of Public Policy.
Sep 21, 2021
Newly elected MPs discuss the work ahead, and working together
00:24:10
We hear from voters across the country, and some of the people they voted for: Mark Holland was re-elected for the Liberals in Ajax; Conservative candidate Stephanie Kusie was re-elected in the riding of Calgary-Midnapore; Heather McPherson was re-elected for the NDP in Edmonton-Strathcona; and Mike Morrice is newly elected for the Green Party in Kitchener Centre.
Sep 21, 2021
Back to the Land: How a first-generation farmer hopes to make rural agriculture more diverse
00:23:50
When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, Aminah Haghighi faced what she calls her quarter-life crisis and began gardening at her Toronto home. Today, she runs a farm in Prince Edward County, Ont., that sells everything from tomatoes to seedlings at the local farmer’s market. But in her journey to launch Raining Gold Farms, Haghighi says she’s faced racism from those living in the rural community. Jacqueline Scott, a University of Toronto Ph.D candidate who studies race and the outdoors, says that’s not surprising given that nature is often coded as a “white space” — and farmers are often considered to be white men. Back to the Land is a four-part series about people who are (re)connecting with nature and the outdoors.
Sep 20, 2021
Pakistan’s complicated relationship with the Taliban
00:19:42
CBC senior correspondent Susan Ormiston was recently in Pakistan, she joins Matt Galloway to discuss the country’s complicated relationship with the Taliban, and what the future may hold for the region. Obaidullah Kabeer, a lecturer at the American University in Afghanistan in Kabul, discusses what the first month under Taliban rule has been like.
Sep 20, 2021
How scorching temperatures and water shortages are affecting the Okanagan Valley
00:24:34
Summer in B.C. brought scorching heat, drought, and even cooked some fruit still on the trees. Matt Galloway recently visited the Okanagan Valley to find out how people are coping. We hear from Sukhpal Bal, a cherry grower in Kelowna and president of the B.C. Cherry Association; and Corinne Jackson, with the Okanagan Basin Water Board.
Sep 20, 2021
How Skeetchestn First Nation uses traditional knowledge to keep wildfires at bay
00:20:36
In one of the worst fire seasons on record for B.C., one First Nation managed to save their buildings, but not their land. Matt Galloway talks to members and firekeepers of Skeetchestn First Nation, to hear what they know of the land and fire, and why they want more support to use that knowledge to keep communities safe.
Sep 17, 2021
Director Liz Garbus dives into the life and work of Jacques Cousteau
00:22:50
Director Liz Garbus dives into the life and work of Jacques Cousteau. Her new film, Becoming Cousteau, explores whether his early career in some ways exploited the ocean, and how he came to sound a warning about the climate crisis — a message that rings true today.
Sep 17, 2021
Calls for change after multiple sexual assault allegations at Western University
00:23:53
The return to campus at Western University in Ontario has coincided with allegations of multiple sexual assaults. We talk to Carina Gabriele, a former student union executive at Western who has spent years working for better measures to address sexual assault on campus; Alan Shepard, the president and vice-chancellor of Western University; and Farrah Khan the co-director of the gender-based violence prevention project called Courage to Act.
Sep 17, 2021
A special broadcast from Musquodoboit Harbour, N.S., about access to health care and mental health resources, including in smaller, more rural communities.
01:14:39
In a special broadcast from Musquodoboit Harbour, N.S., Matt Galloway hosts a forum about access to health care and mental health resources, including in smaller, more rural communities. More than 75,000 Nova Scotians are seeking a family doctor, with emergency rooms struggling to pick up the slack, even as they face temporary closures over staffing shortages. We talk to patients, front-line health workers and advocates as they discuss their experiences, and how they feel the health-care system needs to change.
Sep 16, 2021
Night Raiders: telling the story of residential schools through a dystopian future
00:23:01
Director Danis Goulet says that even though her film Night Raiders is fictional, it’s based on events that are very real; residential schools in Canada. Night Raiders is set after a war across North America, where the government is taking children from their families and putting them in forced-education camps. Night Raiders is screening as part of the Toronto International Film Festival.
Sep 15, 2021
Dr. Robert Strang on why Nova Scotia is putting its reopening plan on hold
00:19:18
Life for Nova Scotians looks almost back to normal, even while other regions look at reviving restrictions to combat the delta variant of the coronavirus. But the province’s chief medical officer of health isn’t ready to fully reopen just yet. Dr. Robert Strang talks about how the province has managed.
Sep 15, 2021
Rising COVID-19 cases in Alberta and Saskatchewan is putting health systems in crises
00:19:56
Alberta and Saskatchewan have the lowest vaccination rates in Canada, and the highest rates of COVID-19 per capita right now — with packed ICUs leading to cancelled surgeries. Matt Galloway discusses the pressure on their health-care systems with Dr. Shazma Mithani, an emergency room doctor in Edmonton, and Dr. Lookman Abdul, an ICU doctor at Battlefords Union Hospital in North Battleford, Sask. And infectious disease specialist Dr. Alexander Wong talks about why the pandemic is the worst in the prairies and what needs to be done to get COVID-19 under control.
Sep 15, 2021
Canada Votes 2021: homelessness, affordability and housing
00:20:14
In Hamilton, Ont., problems around homelessness, housing and affordability reflect a national election issue. Matt Galloway talks to Vic Wojciechowska, with the Hamilton Encampment Support Network; and Laura Kennedy and Mike Rigitano, who have just bought their first home after an emotional and frustrating year-and-a-half of multiple offers, and almost giving up all together.
Sep 14, 2021
Kamal Al-Solaylee on the idea of home, and the desire to return
00:23:11
Where do you want to be buried? Kamal Al-Solaylee wrestles with that question in his new book, Return: Why We Go Back to Where We Come From. He discusses his own feelings around the idea of home, and the desire of different communities to return to their homelands.
Sep 14, 2021
Director Eva Orner on the Australia fires and her new film Burning
00:24:14
When director Eva Orner saw the 2019-2020 Australia fires, she wanted to address both the devastation and lack of political will to address the root causes. Her new film Burning, part of this year's TIFF lineup, does just that.
Sep 14, 2021
Afghanistan, in the Shadow of the Taliban: new book explores inside story of the war
00:18:19
Washington Post investigative reporter Craig Whitlock says the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan was cloaked in lies, to cover up the fact the US and its allies were losing. As part of our series, Afghanistan, in the Shadow of the Taliban, he tells us about his new book The Afghanistan Papers: A Secret History Of The War.
Sep 13, 2021
The impact of wildfires on B.C.’s tourism industry
00:08:27
We hear how climate change and the wildfires in B.C. are affecting the tourism sector there, and whether summer could become a no-go time for the province.
Sep 13, 2021
Indigenous communities weigh up promises from federal party leaders
00:19:42
Federal party leaders have made several promises on Indigenous issues during this election campaign, but some Indigenous voters see a poor track record, and have heard enough. Matt Galloway weighs up the promises and the parties behind them with Niigaan Sinclair, an Anishnaabe writer and professor, and columnist for the Winnipeg Free Press; and Willow Fiddler, who is Oji-Cree Anishinabe from Sandy Lake First Nation and a national reporter for The Globe and Mail.
Sep 13, 2021
Back to the Land: Preserving Indigenous languages could be good for the planet, say researchers
00:23:40
It’s expected that 50 to 90 per cent of the world’s 7,000 languages will be lost by the end of the century, with research suggesting a loss of languages is linked to a loss of biodiversity. Plant medicine educator Joe Pitawanakwat has made teaching about medicine plants — and preserving their Anishinaabemowin names — his life work. He talks to Duncan McCue, who explores what Pitawanakwat’s work could mean for the planet. Back to the Land is a four-part series about people who are (re)connecting with nature and the outdoors.
Sep 13, 2021
Afghanistan, in the Shadow of the Taliban: Divided families, and concerns over human rights
00:50:06
Then, we continue our series of special interviews — Afghanistan: In the Shadow of the Taliban. Fawzia Koofi was Afghanistan's first female deputy speaker of parliament, an advocate for women’s rights, and part of the government's negotiation team that engaged in peace talks with the Taliban. The Taliban has tried twice to kill her, and she escaped Afghanistan last week after being put under house arrest. She wants the world to exert pressure on the new regime, to protect the lives and freedoms of those living under it. We’ll also speak to an Afghan family separated by the Taliban takeover, and desperate to reunite. Anna lives here in Canada; her sister Mariam is still in Afghanistan. Their father is also there, in hiding because years ago he helped imprison Taliban members who have now been released and are looking for him. The Current is not revealing their real names out of fears for their safety. And Najla Ayoubi is a lawyer and former Afghan judge, who served as legal advisor for the country’s state ministry of parliamentary affairs. She talks about decades of change in Afghanistan, and why the Taliban may find a country very different from their last regime.
Sep 10, 2021
Political veterans dissect the federal election debate
00:20:26
How did the federal party leaders fare in Thursday night’s election debate? Matt Galloway puts that question to three political veterans: former Conservative MP Lisa Raitt; former NDP MP Libby Davies; and former Liberal MP Catherine McKenna.
Sep 10, 2021
Who gets a vaccine exemption, and what are the ethical considerations?
00:19:38
Under what circumstances — perhaps medical, or religious — can you get an exemption from getting a COVID-19 vaccine? And what are the ethical considerations around exemptions, and mandates? Matt Galloway talks to Cheryl Pauls, president of the Canadian Mennonite University in Winnipeg; Dr. Mariam Hanna, the Ontario Medical Association’s Chair for Allergy and Clinical Immunology; and Maxwell Smith, a bioethicist and assistant professor at Western University.
Sep 09, 2021
Remembering the kindness of Gander, N.L., 20 years after 9/11
00:13:08
In the hours after the 9/11 attack, many flights were diverted to Gander, N.L.. Twenty years later, the kindness displayed by people there remains a moment of brightness in a time of horror. Anthony Germain brings us back to that time, with the voices of some of the people who lived through it.
Sep 09, 2021
How did federal party leaders fare in French-language debate?
00:11:37
We look to Wednesday night's French-language debate, and ahead to Thursday’s English debate, with Michel C. Auger, a political columnist with La Presse and Radio-Canada; and Emilie Nicolas, a political columnist with Le Devoir and the Montreal Gazette.
Sep 09, 2021
Fixing long-term care after the devastation of the pandemic
00:24:07
Where do the federal parties stand on fixing long-term care, after the devastation of the pandemic? To weigh up what’s being promised, and what’s missing from the conversation, we talk to Laura Tamblyn Watts, CEO of CanAge, a national seniors' advocacy organization; Dr. Quoc Dinh Nguyen, a geriatrician and researcher at the University of Montreal Hospital Centre; and Dr. Bob Bell, former deputy minister of health and long-term care in Ontario and a former hospital CEO.
Sep 09, 2021
Introducing: The Flamethrowers
00:43:27
The Flamethrowers captures the punch-you-in-the-mouth energy and sound of right-wing talk radio. Host Justin Ling takes us from the fringe preachers and conspiracy peddlers of the 1920s to the political firestorm that rages today. With humour and candour, Ling examines the appeal of broadcasters like Rush Limbaugh, who found a sleeping audience, radicalized it, and became an accidental kingmaker — culminating in the election of Donald Trump. More episodes are available at smarturl.it/theflamethrowers
Sep 09, 2021
National affairs panel on vaccine passport protests across provinces
00:20:03
Protests are flaring up across the country as vaccine passports are rolled out. How are premiers handling it? Matt Galloway discusses the politics of the fourth wave with our national affairs panel: Kelly Cryderman, a reporter and columnist for the Globe and Mail in Alberta; Rob Benzie, the Queen's Park bureau chief for the Toronto Star; and Tanya Fletcher, the CBC's provincial affairs reporter for B.C.
Sep 08, 2021
A new Texas abortion law is creating devastating situations for young people
00:20:46
A new law in Texas prohibits abortion after six weeks — before some women even know they're pregnant. We hear about the particular impact on young people, from Rosann Mariappuram, executive director of Jane's Due Process, a nonprofit that ensures legal representation for pregnant minors in Texas. And a discussion on how the new law works, and how it might be challenged, with Professor Priscilla Smith, a senior fellow at the program for the study of reproductive justice at Yale Law School.
Sep 08, 2021
Afghanistan, in the Shadow of the Taliban: Graeme Smith on the end of a ‘meat grinder’ of a war
00:23:43
The first in a series of special interviews — Afghanistan: In the Shadow of the Taliban. Former Canadian correspondent for the Globe and Mail Graeme Smith discusses his time in the country and what he calls a ‘meat grinder’ of a war. He discusses what he thinks the future might hold for his friends now living under the Taliban and his new TVO Original documentary, Ghosts of Afghanistan. CBC Radio's Ideas will be airing a radio adaptation of the TVO documentary.
Sep 08, 2021
Survivors in Lytton, B.C., talk resilience and rebuilding after devastating fire
00:21:55
A brutal fire season levelled the town of Lytton, B.C. this summer, after days of record-breaking temperatures. Matt Galloway went there to talk to residents about what they’ve been through, and their perspectives on rebuilding, resilience and climate change.
Sep 07, 2021
Andrea Constand on her new book The Moment: Standing Up to Bill Cosby and Speaking up for Women
00:23:47
Canadian Andrea Constand was one of the women who accused U.S. entertainer Bill Cosby of sexual assault, leading to his conviction in 2018 (before that conviction was overturned this summer.) She tells Matt Galloway about her new book The Moment: Standing Up to Bill Cosby and Speaking up for Women.
Sep 07, 2021
How to help students get back on track as pandemic disruptions continue
00:22:18
As another school year starts amid pandemic disruption, what can be done to help students get back on track — academically, socially, and emotionally? We talk to Graeme Hopkins, a Grade 12 student in Saskatoon who wants schools to return to regular semesters; Tracy Vaillancourt, Canada Research Chair in school-based mental health and violence prevention at the University of Ottawa, who helped author a recent policy briefing on children and schools during COVID-19; and Dr. Yusra Ahmad, a psychiatrist and clinical lecturer in the department of psychiatry at the University of Toronto.
Sep 07, 2021
Athletes reflect on the unique challenges, achievements and exhilaration of this Paralympic Games
00:17:12
Team Canada won 21 medals at the Paralympic Games, after the pandemic made it a Games like no other. We hear about the experience with Tristen Chernove, a four-time medallist in paracycling, who won silver in Tokyo; and first-time Paralympian Sarah Mickey, who finished 6th in the discus.
Sep 06, 2021
Back to the Land: How a prescription for nature could make us healthier
00:23:24
Jon Cadang has struggled with his mental health since childhood, but he says spending time in nature proved to be a powerful treatment against his depression. He’s not alone, says Vancouver-based physician Dr. Melissa Lem, the director of PaRx, an evidence-based nature prescription program. She says there’s a body of research that indicates spending time in the natural world can benefit our mental and physical well-being. They talk to Back to the Land host Duncan McCue about getting outside, and why it’s so good for us. Back to the Land is a four-part series about people who are (re)connecting with nature and the outdoors.
Sep 06, 2021
Experts answer your questions and concerns about the return to school
00:20:37
It’s the start of a new school year, the third disrupted by the pandemic. What are the risks related to the delta variant, and what needs to be done to keep kids and educators healthy? Matt Galloway puts listener questions to Edmonton pediatrician Dr. Tehseen Ladha, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Alberta; and Dr. Lisa Barrett, a clinician scientist and infectious diseases expert at Dalhousie University in Halifax.
Sep 06, 2021
A message in a bottle puts a Welsh woman on the hunt for a Canadian fisherman
00:06:02
Amanda Tidmarsh found a message in a bottle on the beach in Wales. Now she’s looking for the sender: a Canadian fisherman named John Graham. [Correction: Since this segment aired, The Current has seen a photo of the letter, which refers to the fisherman as Craig Drover, not John Graham.]
Sep 03, 2021
André Picard on on vaccine passports and rising COVID-19 numbers
00:10:33
The Globe and Mail’s Health Columnist André Picard weighs in on vaccine passports, rising COVID-19 numbers in Canada, and why Ivermectin use is up, even though it doesn't work.
Sep 03, 2021
Turbulent return to school in Florida as COVID cases rise and children fall ill
00:19:40
There are currently more than 20,000 new daily cases of COVID-19 in Florida, and the return to school last month has seen children hospitalized with the virus. But the state has no public health restrictions in place, and funding has been withheld from schools that require masks in class. Guest host Anthony Germain talks to Chrissy Krampert, who has three daughters under the age of 12 in a school where masks are not required. We also hear from Vickie Cartwright, the interim superintendent of Broward County Public Schools, which has had funding withheld by the state; and discuss the risks to kids’ health with Dr. Mobeen Rathore, chief of the pediatric infectious diseases and immunology unit at Wolfson Children's Hospital in Jacksonville.
Sep 03, 2021
Why ‘adopting an elder’ was life-changing for this Canadian household
00:16:52
When Marike Finlay and her partner Karin Cope decided to up sticks and move from Quebec to the Maritimes 20 years ago, they had a question for their older friend, Elisabeth Bigras: "Why don't you come?" In a documentary first aired in April, the three women tell us how that question changed their lives, and give their take on this alternative form of long-term care: adopting an elder.
Sep 02, 2021
Rural Canadians still struggle with poor internet connectivity, despite promises to fix it
00:19:49
Rural Canadians still struggle with poor internet connectivity, despite repeated political promises to fix the problem. Guest host Anthony Germain talks to CBC journalist Lindsay Bird about the problems faced by people living in Newfoundland; and Barb Carra, CEO of Cybera, an Alberta not-for-profit organization responsible for driving economic growth through the use of digital technology.
Sep 02, 2021
Vaccine Hunters founder says they’ll be back — if needed
00:06:56
The online group Vaccine Hunters has helped countless Canadians get a COVID-19 shot, but this week wound up its social media updates. Founder and director Andrew Young says that doesn’t mean their work to vaccinate Canadians is finished, he tells us what lies ahead.
Sep 02, 2021
The threat of terrorism after the Taliban’s takeover of Afghanistan
00:20:01
After the deadly bombing at the Kabul airport, national security and terrorism experts are warning of further ISIS-K attacks. Guest host Anthony Germain weighs up the threat of terrorism in Afghanistan with Jessica Davis, a former senior intelligence analyst at CSIS; Ben Rowswell, president of the Canadian International Council and former deputy ambassador to Afghanistan; and Javed Ali, a former senior director for counter terrorism at the U.S. national security council.
Sep 01, 2021
Communities of colour hit hardest by disasters like Hurricane Ida
00:19:38
In the wake of Hurricane Ida local business owner Alonzo Knox has been volunteering at a foodbank in the Algiers neighbourhood of New Orleans. He says his community is helping each other as best it can, even as people face long line-ups for food and fuel, and widespread power outages in the oppressive summer heat. And Robert Bullard, a professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University, says it's no coincidence that these disasters hit communities of colour the hardest.
Sep 01, 2021
Family thankful to be out of Afghanistan as resettlement continues
00:19:40
Canada made its last government flight out of Kabul last week, and Mohammed Ehsan Saadat and his family are happy to be out. Officials said on Friday that Canada has evacuated approximately 3,700 people, including 2,000 Afghans. Guest host Anthony Germain spoke with Mohammed Ehsan Saadat. He and his family finished a two-week quarantine in Toronto last week after leaving Afghanistan. He's a policy researcher and worked with Canadian-funded NGOs in Kabul.
Aug 31, 2021
Former residential school now a place to teach and celebrate Siksika culture
00:19:35
When the Old Sun Indian Residential School closed in 1969, the Siksika First Nation repurposed the building as Old Sun Community College, a place to teach and celebrate their culture and traditional knowledge. We speak to Vivian Ayoungman, who was forced to attend the residential school in the 1950s, but now teaches in the same building.
Aug 31, 2021
What parties are promising on affordable housing ahead of election day
00:20:19
Political parties are making big promises about affordable housing ahead of voting day in Canada, but is it enough? Guest host Anthony Germain spoke with two non-partisan experts about what parties are planning. Leilani Farha is the former UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Housing and is the global director of an organization focused on the right to housing. Murtaza Haider is a professor of Data Science and Real Estate Management at Ryerson University.
Aug 30, 2021
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on what she’s learned about grief
00:23:44
Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie lost her father last year. Then, a few months later, her mother also died suddenly. In a replay from June, she tells Matt Galloway about processing that loss by putting words to paper — and her new book, Notes on Grief, one she never wanted to write.
Aug 30, 2021
Canadians turn to canning to save fruits of summer pandemic gardens
00:10:36
You were locked down, so you planted a garden. Now, what are you supposed to do with all those cucumbers and tomatoes? Well, it's canning season — and if it's your first attempt, Ana Stoica-Constantin and Johwanna Alleyne are here with some tips.
Aug 27, 2021
Mellissa Fung on trying to get women out of Afghanistan
00:12:37
For weeks, Mellissa Fung has been trying to help vulnerable people escape Afghanistan. She was in the country last month making a documentary investigating the killings of Afghan women and girls for the news outlet Aljazeera. Fung was taken hostage and held captive for 28 days in Afghanistan in 2008. Now she's trying to help people who have helped her.
Aug 27, 2021
Changing mask mandates and the weight of pandemic fatigue
00:19:33
After a rise in cases, British Columbia and Manitoba have brought back masking rules in public places. And Dr. Anna Wolak told guest host Anthony Germain that it was a welcome surprise. She is a family physician and part of the grassroots group Masks4Canada. And psychology professor Igor Grossmann says changing mandates and pandemic fatigue is weighing on people after some thought we might be at the end of the pandemic.
Aug 27, 2021
Fraggle Rock makes a comeback
00:12:56
Jim Henson's Fraggle Rock was a huge kids TV hit when it aired on CBC in the 1980s. Now it's getting a reboot, with new episodes being made in Canada. We take a trip through TV history, down in Fraggle Rock.
Aug 26, 2021
Women in Afghanistan are worried for their safety and human rights
00:19:46
As Taliban control continues to grip Afghanistan, women and girls there are worried most for their safety and basic human rights. Guest host Anthony Germain spoke with Zahra, who CBC has given a fake name to protect her identity. And Martine Van Biljert, co-founder of Afghanistan Analysts Network, says the country is in a state of flux and it may be too early to tell how the Taliban will rule.
Aug 26, 2021
How a N.S. court decision will be used to recognize systemic racism when sentencing
00:10:06
A decision by Nova Scotia's highest court on the sentencing of a Black man convicted of weapons offences is being called historic. Robert Wright explains how Impact of Race and Culture Assessments will be used in Nova Scotia and later across the country to help recognize systemic racism when sentencing Black offenders.
Aug 26, 2021
Tim Caulfield on overcoming the anxiety of everyday life
00:13:43
Modern life's everyday choices can come with a lot of anxiety: why are you on your phone before you get out of bed? Should you really drink that third cup of coffee? Have you had enough water today? Why aren't you exercising more? Tim Caulfield has some advice in the face of all those decisions, summed up in the title of his new book, Relax, Dammit!
Aug 25, 2021
A potential serious refugee crisis out of Afghanistan
00:09:38
In Afghanistan, the race to escape Taliban control grows more desperate. Elizabeth Ferris, Vice President of Research at the World Refugee and Migration Council, says the scenes from the Kabul airport could be just the beginning of a serious refugee crisis.
Aug 25, 2021
Concerns about vaccine mandates or lack-there-of at universities
00:19:31
Post-secondary students will soon be back on campuses across the county. Law Professor Debra Parks tells The Current's guest host Anthony Germain why she's concerned that there are no vaccine mandates for all students at the University of British Columbia. And Darshan Daryanani, president of The Students' Society of McGill University talks about why inclusion and equity need to be considered in vaccine mandates for post-secondary students.
Aug 25, 2021
Political scientist Aengus Bridgman on manipulated media and misinformation
00:10:46
One political post has already been flagged by Twitter during the Canadian election. Liberal candidate Chrystia Freeland tweeted an edited video of Conservative leader Erin O'Toole, talking about healthcare. It's the kind of post Aengus Bridgman is watching out for. He is a political scientist with McGill University's Media Ecosystem Observatory, and a lead researcher with the Canadian Election Misinformation Project.
Aug 24, 2021
Volunteer pushes for Canada to do more as Afghans struggle to get out of Kabul
00:19:22
Thousands of Afghans are hoping to get out of the country, and journalist Kevin Newman says Canada needs to do more to help people. He is a journalist who has reported from Afghanistan, and volunteers with a group helping Afghan interpreters escaping the Taliban. Guest host Anthony Germain spoke with Kevin Newman, and a man named Bashir who is hoping Canada will help him out of the country. He worked for a Canadian-funded program training Afghan women police.
Aug 24, 2021
The humble beginnings and lasting appeal of Dr. Martens
00:12:04
Do you remember your first pair of Docs? We go back to February, when Dr. Martens hit the London Stock Exchange. In a conversation with Matt Galloway, we hear about the brand's humble beginnings, and lasting appeal, from Elizabeth Semmelhack, creative director and senior curator at the Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto, and Andrew Groves, professor of fashion design at University of Westminster in London.
Aug 24, 2021
Where major parties stand on climate change
00:20:06
Climate change is set to be a hot topic in the federal election this fall. Guest host Anthony Germain talks to Christopher Ragan, an economist and director of the Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University and former chair of the EcoFiscal Commission, and Kathryn Harrison, a political science professor at the University of British Columbia who specializes in climate policy. They discuss what parties are proposing, and what their plans might mean for Canadians.
Aug 23, 2021
Vicki Laveau-Harvie on her memoir The Erratics
00:22:54
Vicki Laveau-Harvie became a literary star in her 70s with her incredible story of growing up in rural Alberta in a family with an ailing father and a narcissistic mother. In a conversation with Matt Galloway in November, she discusses why her memoir, The Erratics, seems to connect so much with readers — and why writing it wasn't the catharsis people assume.
Aug 23, 2021
Clarissa Ward on the mental health impact of reporting from the front lines
00:26:48
In a discussion about her book On All Fronts: The Education of a Journalist, CNN chief international correspondent Clarissa Ward remembers her first brush with death in a conflict zone. Speaking to Matt Galloway last October, she explains how it taught her to weigh those risks, and why she was taking them more carefully.
Aug 20, 2021
They had a fleeting romance — and a son he didn't know about. 50 years later, they're back together
00:21:31
Robin Pitt Taylor had a brief romance with Karen Paul decades ago, before she disappeared from his life without a word. We hear the story of how they reconnected in our documentary The Robin I Knew, first aired in June.
Aug 20, 2021
Aid is not reaching the stricken Haitians who need it most
00:20:38
Almost a week after the earthquake, aid is not getting where it’s needed in Haiti. Guest host Nora Young talks to the CBC's Peter Armstrong about what he’s seeing in the hardest-hit parts of the island; and Margarett Lubin, Haiti's country director for the organization Community Organized Relief Effort, discusses how to get help to the people that need it.
Aug 20, 2021
Set fees, or tax credits? Candidates debate which child-care plan would be best fit for Canadians
00:20:40
Where do the Conservatives, Liberals and NDP stand on the key election issue of child care? Guest host Nora Young talks to Ontario candidates Eric Duncan, Conservative candidate for Stormont–Dundas–South Glengarrym; Chrystia Freeland, Liberal candidate for University-Rosedale; and Lindsay Mathyssen, NDP candidate for London-Fanshawe.
Aug 19, 2021
What to expect from the Taliban’s new regime, and how neighbouring powers might react
00:21:21
What kind of regime will the Taliban establish in Afghanistan, and how will neighbouring powers react, and interact? We discuss the geopolitical fallout of the Taliban’s resurgence with Obaidullah Baheer, a lecturer at the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul; Madiha Afzal, the David M. Rubenstein fellow for foreign policy at the Brookings Institute in Washington, D.C.; and Bessma Momani, a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation in Waterloo, Ont.
Aug 19, 2021
Food writer Mark Bittman on building a more sustainable food system
00:23:48
Food writer Mark Bittman says our modern food system has evolved into something that's feeding us unhealthy foods, wrecking the environment, and reinforcing inequality. In a conversation with Matt Galloway from May, he explains why changing that model is urgent, and talks about his book, Animal, Vegetable, Junk: A History of Food, from Sustainable to Suicidal.
Aug 19, 2021
Armchair Expert’s Dax Shepard on humility, sobriety and the messiness of human life
00:26:50
With his podcast Armchair Expert, actor, director, and writer Dax Shepard has won a huge following for revealing and intimate conversations with everyone from Justin Timberlake to Hillary Clinton. In a conversation with Matt Galloway from February, he talks about sobriety, humility, the messiness of human life, and how the podcast was born in what he thought was his "greatest failure.
Aug 18, 2021
Climate change activists say there are mental health benefits to taking action on climate change
00:21:42
Climate change is doing more than just physical damage around the world — people are also suffering from eco-anxiety. Neuroscientist Emma Lawrance describes eco-anxiety as the chronic fear of environmental doom, and says decision makers need to take into account the impact climate change is having on people’s mental health. And activist Abbie Richards understands those worries, and says it’s time to change the conversation of doom and gloom, to one of hope and action.
Aug 18, 2021
Window to help Afghans trying to flee Taliban ‘closing rather rapidly,’ warns veteran
00:19:45
Canadians with relatives and friends in Afghanistan are desperate to help them flee the country now that it's under Taliban control, but some say they are getting no clear answers about how that will happen. Guest host Nora Young talks to retired Major-General Denis Thompson, a 39-year veteran of the Canadian Armed Forces who is working to get people out of Kabul right now; Ottawa-based Ali Mizard, who has relatives in Afghanistan and fears his people, the Hazara ethnic minority, is being forgotten; and Canada's Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Marco Mendicino, who says Canada is working to stop a humanitarian crisis that could unfold as the U.S. and its allies leave Afghanistan at the end of the month.
Aug 18, 2021
Malcolm Gladwell on the firebombing of Tokyo and his book, The Bomber Mafia
00:25:32
The firebombing of Tokyo was one of the single most destructive nights of the Second World War. But before that mission, Malcolm Gladwell says there were efforts to fight less deadly wars, and to end them faster with precision bombing. In a conversation with Matt Galloway from April, Gladwell explores those efforts and discusses his book, The Bomber Mafia: A Dream, a Temptation, and the Longest Night of the Second World War.
Aug 17, 2021
Haitians working to build resilience after successive crises
00:18:43
Haiti is struggling to cope as crisis follows crisis: a president assassinated, a 7.2-magnitude earthquake, and now a tropical storm, all amid the COVID-19 pandemic. We talk to aid worker Muhamed Bizimana, assistant country director for CARE in Haiti; and Rose-May Guignard, an urban planner and resilience expert.
Aug 17, 2021
Afghan educator says now is the time to speak up for women’s rights
00:19:47
With the Taliban now in control of most of Afghanistan, educators and activists are worried that hard-won women's rights will vanish. Guest host Nora Young talks to freelance journalist Ali Latifi about the situation in Kabul; and Pashtana Durrani, a teacher and founder and executive director of LEARN Afghanistan, a charity focused on education. 
Aug 17, 2021
Salman Rushdie on the pandemic and why we return to stories to make sense of the world
00:23:35
In a conversation with Matt Galloway in May, author Salman Rushdie reflects on his bout with COVID-19, his despair over the crisis in India, and his great friendship with the late actress Carrie Fisher.
Aug 16, 2021
Political veterans weigh up what to expect from the federal election
00:20:12
What can Canadians expect on the campaign trail, as the parties vie for your votes before the federal election on Sept. 20? Guest host Nora Young talks to three political veterans: former Conservative MP Lisa Raitt; former NDP MP Libby Davies; and former Liberal MP Catherine McKenna, about the promises, key issues and inevitable gaffes that lie ahead.
Aug 16, 2021
Provinces sign daycare funding deals with Ottawa, as federal election looms
00:19:21
Several provinces have signed daycare funding deals with Ottawa, including Quebec, B.C. and Manitoba. But as a federal election looms, parents in places like Ontario and Alberta are still waiting to see if their provincial governments will do the same. We talk to Brampton, Ont., mother Diana Ratos, who is saving for her two-year-old daughter’s daycare next year; Colleen Lussier, director of Building Blocks on Balmoral, a YWCA-run daycare centre in Winnipeg; and Susan Prentice, a professor of sociology at the University of Manitoba, where she studies childcare policy.
Aug 13, 2021
Book celebrates women on front lines of fighting climate crisis
00:24:11
The women at the forefront of the climate crisis have stories to tell — so Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Katharine Wilkinson have collected them in a new book of essays, stories and poems: All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis. They discuss what's already been lost to climate change, and what can still be saved in an interview with Matt Galloway from October.
Aug 13, 2021
André Picard on what a fourth wave of COVID-19 might look like
00:10:54
Health experts say Canada has entered the fourth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Globe and Mail health columnist André Picard discusses what to expect, variants of concern, and whether restrictions should be rolling back right now.
Aug 13, 2021
Skateboarders riding a new wave of popularity after sport's Olympic debut
00:11:43
The Olympic debut of skateboarding is making teenage girls into international superstars — and that popularity has made its way to Canada. Stephanie Battieste, founder of Toronto-based women’s skate collective Babes Brigade, says seeing young skaters dominate in Tokyo will inspire more girls to excel in the sport.
Aug 13, 2021
Jonathan Meiburg on the caracara, a most remarkable bird
00:25:08
Charles Darwin described caracaras as "false eagles," but Jonathan Meiburg thinks the bird of prey has been unfairly maligned for centuries. In a conversation with Matt Galloway in June, he discusses what he's learned from studying the birds in Central and South America, and his new book, A Most Remarkable Creature: The Hidden Life and Epic Journey of The World's Smartest Birds of Prey.
Aug 12, 2021
Canadian Kevin Garratt on his detention in China, and what it tells us about what Michael Spavor might be going through
00:20:13
Michael Spavor has been sentenced to 11 years in prison in China, on charges of espionage that Canadian officials have called baseless, and retaliation for the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou in 2018. Kevin Garratt knows that situation all too well, after he was detained in China for more than two years, much of it in the very same facility as Spavor. He tells guest host Laura Lynch what Spavor might be going through, and we discuss the politics at play with Lynette Ong, an expert on Chinese politics and associate professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.
Aug 12, 2021
Canada’s Paralympians gearing up for an unusual Games in Tokyo
00:21:50
The Paralympics are two weeks away. Canada’s athletes have faced unprecedented challenges in training — and now have to contend with COVID-19 surging in Tokyo. We talk to Jessica Frotten, who will compete in wheelchair racing; para rower Jeremy Hall; and Canada's Chef de Mission Stephanie Dixon.
Aug 12, 2021
Climate change is fueling bigger, stronger, wildfires around the world
00:21:31
Climate change is contributing to bigger, stronger, more common wildfires around the world. We talk to Panos Agiannitis, a tourism operator on the Greek island of Evia, about the devastation he’s seeing there. And weather expert Claire Martin tells us about efforts to stay safe in wildfire season, where she lives in Vernon, B.C.
Aug 11, 2021
Concern over Alberta's plan to stop testing for COVID-19
00:19:30
Testing has been the cornerstone of the fight against the spread of COVID-19, but Alberta will soon offer it only to those with a doctor’s referral, or those with symptoms severe enough to require hospitalization. Guest host Laura Lynch discusses the implications with Colin Furness, an epidemiologist at the University of Toronto, and Krista Li, a parent of two school-aged children in Calgary.
Aug 11, 2021
U.S.-Canada border reopens, but only in one direction
00:22:58
Vaccinated Americans are now welcome back to Canada, no quarantine necessary, but Canadians hoping to enter the U.S. by land are still in limbo. We talk to two families living in border cities about what the changes mean to them. And we discuss when the road south might reopen with Kathryn Bryk Friedman, a Canada-U.S specialist at the University of Buffalo.
Aug 10, 2021
Stark warning on climate change must prompt action, not despair, say scientists
00:20:05
A UN report has brought the climate crisis into sharp focus, but some scientists say while the warning is stark, the focus must be on action, not despair. Guest host Laura Lynch is joined by Simon Lewis, a professor of global change science at University College London; and Katharine Hayhoe, an atmospheric scientist and professor in the department of political science at Texas Tech University.
Aug 10, 2021
How a N.S. carpenter learned to live life for others — and kept his neighbour from losing her home
00:14:51
In December we talked to Nova Scotia carpenter Kelly McCann, who was building a house for his Nova Scotia neighbour Jane McClair — for free. We check back in as McCann is putting the finishing touches to the house, and McClair is starting to move in.
Aug 09, 2021
The legacy of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics
00:07:37
The Tokyo 2020 Olympics are over, after a tournament of sporting excellence, glory and memories made, but plenty of controversy. Tokyo bureau chief for the New York Times Motoko Rich discusses the legacy of the pandemic Games.
Aug 09, 2021
Five years after the killing of Colten Boushie, his mother is still waiting for an apology
00:16:40
Monday marks five years since the killing of Colten Boushie. Guest host Laura Lynch talks to his mother Debbie Baptiste about what her family has been through; and the family’s lawyer Eleanore Sunchild, about a renewed push for a national inquiry into RCMP actions during the case.
Aug 09, 2021
Canada's women's soccer team win Olympic gold
00:08:42
Canada's women's soccer team won gold against Sweden in Tokyo Friday morning. Andrea Neil played hundreds of games for Canada’s national team, she tells us what the team might have been feeling, and what the win might mean for the future of the sport in Canada.
Aug 06, 2021
Tackling coronavirus variants around the world
00:20:07
How are countries around the world coping with coronavirus variants? Guest host Rosemary Barton talks to Canadian teacher Mark Henshaw in Wuhan, China, where 10 million people are being tested after a handful of cases, including the delta variant, were discovered. And in Lima, Peru, professor of microbiology Dr. Pablo Tsukayama explains his work identifying the lambda variant, first detected in December.
Aug 06, 2021
Chris Nikic on being first person with Down syndrome to complete Ironman triathlon
00:16:00
Chris Nikic smashed a record, and stigma, as the first person with Down syndrome to complete an Ironman competition last November. He and his father, Nik, talk about his journey so far, and his dreams for the future.
Aug 06, 2021
Should Canadians be offered booster shots, when poorer countries struggle to access vaccines?
00:20:30
Should richer countries be offering citizens third, booster shots of COVID-19 vaccines (in some cases to allow international travel), or should those shots be shared globally, with countries where access to vaccines is low? Guest host Rosemary Barton speaks to Benoit Barbeau, a virologist at the University of Quebec; and Madhukar Pai, Canada Research Chair in epidemiology and global health at McGill University.
Aug 05, 2021
Investigative reporter Julie K. Brown on getting the story that brought down Jeffrey Epstein
00:21:49
Miami Herald investigative reporter Julie K. Brown shares how she got the story that led to federal sex-trafficking charges against wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein, and tells us about her new book Perversion of Justice: The Jeffrey Epstein Story.
Aug 05, 2021
Provinces lifting mask mandates
00:19:51
Some provinces are lifting mask mandates, but with COVID-19 variants still posing a threat, is it too soon? Guest host Rosemary Barton talks to Rod Russell, vice-president of the Canadian Society for Virology; and Alexander Wong, an infectious disease physician and associate professor at the University of Saskatchewan. We also hear from Crystal Dougan, owner of the Little Hobo Soup and Sandwich Shop in Kelowna, B.C., where a mask mandate was recently reintroduced after a spike in cases.
Aug 04, 2021
Athen appoints first chief officer of heat to keep things cool — and save lives
00:12:24
Athens has appointed its first Chief Officer of Heat, Eleni Myrivili. She tells us about the task of keeping people cool, and saving lives, in the face of climate change and rising temperatures.
Aug 04, 2021
Crackdown on dissent in Belarus
00:10:42
Belarusian sprinter Krystsina Tsimanouskaya was granted a humanitarian visa from Poland Monday, after she publicly criticized officials in her Olympic team. Tsimanouskaya said she was forcibly brought to the airport after the disagreement, and feared “punishment” if she was returned to Belarus. We discuss the country’s crackdown on dissent with Franak Viačorka, a former journalist and now senior advisor to an exiled politician, Svetlana Tikhanovskaya.
Aug 04, 2021
Rebecca Giggs on why whales loom large in our collective imagination
00:23:36
In a conversation with Matt Galloway from December, science writer Rebecca Giggs discusses her book Fathoms: The World in the Whale. She talks about why whales loom large in our collective imagination, and their role in everything from our ventures in space, to protecting us from climate change.
Aug 03, 2021
‘We are on survival mode’: Financial crisis limiting basic supplies in Lebanon, says doctor
00:19:53
One year after the enormous explosion that rocked Beirut, Lebanon faces a financial crisis that affects every aspect of daily life, including access to basic medicine. Guest host Rosemary Barton talks to Dr. Sarah Haddad, a neurologist in training at St. George’s Hospital in Beirut; and Habib Battah, a Lebanese investigative journalist.
Aug 03, 2021
Sexism in the Olympics
00:20:06
The International Olympic Committee has been trying to push gender equality in the 2020 Olympics, but some say we still have a long way to go. Sports writer Kavitha A. Davidson speaks to guest host Rosemary Barton about how tough conversations will help make sports better, and Michele K. Donnelly, an assistant professor of sports management at Brock University, talks about what the numbers tell us and don't tell us about the representation of women athletes at the Olympics.
Aug 02, 2021
The power of fake words
00:23:04
We revisit a conversation Matt Galloway had with British writer and language expert Eley Williams earlier this year. The conversation focused on Williams's new novel, The Liar's Dictionary, which explores fake words that are deliberately inserted in written works. Williams spoke to us about the power of defining words, from the perspective of a character who slips made-up words into dictionaries.
Aug 02, 2021
Crocs are back. But why?
00:07:42
Crocs are back. Not the reptiles, the shoes. Those foamy, floatable, squeaky and comfy clogs from the early 2000s have made a comeback during the pandemic, to the horror of some fashion-minded commentators. We speak to Carolyn Mair, author of The Psychology of Fashion, to better understand the resurgence of the shoes' resurgence.
Jul 30, 2021
Concern over Alberta lifting COVID-19 restrictions
00:19:29
Alberta's chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw announced Wednesday that the province will lift nearly all restrictions related to COVID-19 in the coming weeks. We speak with infectious diseases expert Ilan Schwartz, who says it's far too early to lift the restrictions; and political science professor Lori Williams, who says Premier Jason Kenney is "gambling" with his political base with the decision.
Jul 30, 2021
'The kids aren't yours': Barwin sperm mix-up sheds light on 'broken' fertility industry
00:18:38
We revisit Alison Motluk's documentary, And That's Why Everything is Difference, which tells the story of a family who discovered their daughter was the biological child of their now-disgraced fertility doctor Norman Barwin.
Jul 30, 2021
Devastating floods in China, and what climate change has to do with it
00:23:04
China's Henan province saw a year's worth of rain in just three days last week. At least 99 people have died, and hundreds of thousands more have been displaced. What's happening on the ground now, and how is China preparing itself to deal with future flooding linked to climate change? We speak to Keith Bradsher, Shanghai bureau chief for the New York Times; environmental scientist Faith Chan; and climate scientist Roxy Mathew Koll.
Jul 30, 2021
Author Andrea Pitzer on her book Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World
00:25:04
Journalist and author Andrea Pitzer's book Icebound: Shipwrecked at the Edge of the World tells the story of death and survival in the North more than four centuries ago.
Jul 29, 2021
How to repair friendships strained by different perspectives on the pandemic
00:23:35
The pandemic has tested some friendships, leaving many people wondering if they want to reconnect now that restrictions are easing. Clinical psychologist Miriam Kirmayer says for those who do want to repair strained relationships, listening is the key.
Jul 29, 2021
First Nations leaders urge Ont. government to declare state of emergency over wildfires
00:19:47
First Nations leaders in Northern Ontario are calling for the Ontario government to declare a state of emergency to save their communities from unprecedented wildfires that have so far forced 3,000 people from their homes. Guest host Robyn Bresnahan speaks to Mathew Hoppe, CEO of the Independent First Nations Alliance, and Sol Mamakwa, the NDP MPP for Kiiwetinoong.
Jul 29, 2021
Roman Mars about the hidden wonders of a city
00:27:02
With his podcast 99% Invisible, Roman Mars tells the fascinating backstories of everyday things that we may not give a second thought, from barbed wire to a plaque on a bench. He joins us to discuss his new book The 99% Invisible City: A Field Guide to the Hidden World of Everyday Design, and the benefit of slowing down and looking around.
Jul 28, 2021
COVID-19 vaccine passports prompt privacy, public health debate
00:19:50
Provinces and businesses are split on requiring people to show proof of immunization, ramping up a debate on privacy versus public health. Guest host Robyn Bresnahan speaks to Regina business owner Colin Hall, who implemented proof of vaccination; Cara Zwibel of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association; Dr. Peter Jüni, scientific director of Ontario's COVID-19 science advisory table; and Dr. Jia Hu, a physician and former medical officer of health with Alberta Health Services.
Jul 28, 2021
TJ Newsman, flight attendant-turned-author, on Falling
00:23:24
TJ Newman, a former flight attendant turned author, on her debut thriller Falling that recently made the bestseller list.
Jul 28, 2021
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on artificial intelligence and facing a new age
00:23:38
In his latest book Klara and the Sun, Nobel Prize-winning author Kazuo Ishiguro explores the themes of artificial intelligence and what it means to be human.
Jul 27, 2021
Delta variant surges in U.S. amid lagging vaccination rates
00:19:14
COVID-19 is ravaging parts of the U.S., fuelled by the highly contagious delta variant and lagging vaccination rates. Now Republican politicians are speaking out to encourage those who are hesitant to get the shot, after some spent months stoking fears and downplaying the virus. Guest host Robyn Bresnahan speaks to Katie Towns, director of the Springfield-Greene County Health Department in Missouri; University of Arkansas Medical Sciences Medical Center CEO Stephen Mette; and conservative commentator David Frum.
Jul 27, 2021
Why Canadian nurses are leaving the profession
00:19:46
The pandemic has taken its toll on nurses. Some are leaving the profession, while others are burned out, working long hours and trying to provide sufficient care amid staffing shortages. To discuss how we can alleviate the pressures on nurses, as well as how we can attract more Canadians to the profession, guest host Robyn Bresnahan talks to two nurses about their experiences. We also speak to Kim McMillan, assistant professor of nursing and health sciences at University of Ottawa.
Jul 26, 2021
"It's just the icing on the cake now," Canadian baseball legend Fergie Jenkins
00:24:09
We revisit Matt Galloway's interview with Canadian baseball legend Fergie Jenkins following the announcement that the Chicago Cubs will erect a statue of him outside Wrigley Field. He tells us about a career that took him from Chatham, Ont., to Chicago and his time playing for the Harlem Globetrotters.
Jul 26, 2021
How Indigenous fire practices could help to combat future wild fires
00:19:34
With the recent heat waves and subsequent wildfires in B.C., experts are calling for Indigenous fire management practices to be implemented across North America so that fire services can better prepare for the future. To discuss how cultural burns could have a positive impact going forward, guest host Robyn Bresnahan talks to fire research scientist Amy Christianson, as well as Don Hankins, professor of geography and planning at California State University, Chico.
Jul 23, 2021
Why Canada needs a reckoning on Islamophobia
00:23:21
Plus, following yesterday's national summit on Islamophobia, we discuss the severity of Islamophobia in Canada with Aymen Derbali, a survivor of 2017's Quebec City mosque shooting that left six dead; lawyer Nusaiba Al-Azem from London, Ont.; and Noor Al-Henedy, a member of the Canadian Islamic Centre in Edmonton.
Jul 23, 2021
South Africa suffers worst unrest in decades
00:23:17
Hundreds of people have been killed in South Africa’s worst unrest in decades, after protests triggered by the jailing of ex-president Jacob Zuma widened into rioting over inequality. We discuss the root causes of the unrest, and possible paths forward, with Xolani Dube, a political analyst at the Xubera Institute for Research and Development in Durban; and Kwandiwe Kondlo, a professor of political economy at the University of Johannesburg.
Jul 22, 2021
Extreme heat battering Canada’s farmers and food supply
00:19:43
Recent extreme heat ‘cooked’ fruit still on the tree in B.C., as well as forcing farmers in Manitoba to sell their cattle at emergency auctions, due to failed crops and a lack of available feed. To discuss climate change and the impact on Canada’s farmers and food supply, guest host Robyn Bresnahan talks to Kirk Kiesman, a farmer and general manager of the Ashern Auction Mart in Ashern, Man.; Lenore Newman, the Canada Research Chair in food security and environment at the University of the Fraser Valley; and Ian McCreary, a grain and livestock farmer who's active in a group called Farmers for Climate Solutions.
Jul 22, 2021
The Tasmanian devil’s return to Australian mainland
00:07:49
Last year the Tasmanian devil was reintroduced to the Australian mainland for the first time in 3,000 years. In a conversation from October, we discuss the project with Menna Jones, an ecologist at the University of Tasmania who has studied the animals for 30 years.
Jul 21, 2021
Health concerns for communities shrouded in smoke from hundreds of wildfires
00:19:57
Smoke from hundreds of wildfires is wreaking havoc on communities and businesses across Canada. Guest host Robyn Bresnahan discusses the impact on air quality and people’s health with Anne Hicks, assistant professor of pediatric respiratory medicine at the University of Alberta; and Michael Mehta, professor of geography and environmental studies at Thompson Rivers University, in Kamloops, B.C.
Jul 21, 2021
Mark Carney on how Canada can come out of the pandemic in better shape
00:19:50
Former Bank of Canada and Bank of England Governor Mark Carney has ruled himself out of running in a potential fall election, due to a commitment to help organize the private financial sector in the run-up to the United Nations climate conference. We revisit his conversation with Matt Galloway from March, about his book Value(s): Building a Better World For All, and ideas about how Canada can come out of the COVID-19 crisis in better shape.
Jul 21, 2021
Pandemic prompting wave of resignations as Canadians take stock and rethink their careers
00:23:24
The upheaval of the pandemic convinced some Canadians that their next career move was clear: tendering their resignation. We talk to Matt McGuire, who used reclaimed commuting time to upskill and upgrade to a new job; former corporate lawyer Samanthea Samuels, who is now pursuing her passion of advocating on diversity and inclusion issues; and Debby Carreau, founder and CEO of Inspired HR and Inspired Workplace.
Jul 20, 2021
Pegasus spyware used to target politicians, activists and journalists around the world, investigation alleges
00:19:51
An investigation by a global media consortium has alleged that a spyware called Pegasus was used to target hundreds of politicians, activists and journalists in countries all over the world. Guest host Robyn Bresnahan talks to Agnès Callamard, secretary general of Amnesty International, which took part in the investigation; Ron Deibert, director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto; and one of the people believed to be targeted by the spyware, Carine Kanimba, daughter of Rwandan activist Paul Rusesabagina.
Jul 20, 2021
Calls to ease restrictions on hospital visits as vaccinations rise and COVID-19 cases fall
00:19:19
People have been kept away from their loved ones in hospital through the pandemic. But as more Canadians are vaccinated and COVID case counts drop, there are calls to ease restrictions on visits. Guest host Robyn Bresnahan talks to Ottawa resident Kim Gogo, who waited for hours in a hospital car park as her son had major heart surgery last month; Dr. Fahad Razak, an internist and epidemiologist in Toronto; and Dr. Alex Wong, an infectious disease physician in Regina.
Jul 19, 2021
Margaret Atwood on her late partner Graeme Gibson, and their shared love of birds
00:23:52
Canadian author Margaret Atwood shared much with her late partner, the novelist Graeme Gibson, including a love of birds. In a conversation from March, she talks to Matt Galloway about the spring migration, the new edition of Gibson's Bedside Book of Birds and what nature can bring us, especially amid the pandemic.
Jul 19, 2021
Indigenous leaders discuss accountability and healing amid discoveries of unmarked graves at former residential schools
00:19:47
The Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation released a report identifying 200 potential burial sites near the former Kamloops Indian Residential School Thursday. Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc Kukpi7 (Chief) Rosanne Casimir and Cowessess First Nation Chief Cadmus Delorme join guest host Mark Kelley to discuss how their communities are coping, the painful recovery work that lies ahead, and the need for accountability.
Jul 16, 2021
Protest and the podium at Tokyo 2020
00:22:59
The International Olympic Committee has updated a long-standing rule banning gestures of protest. Olympians now have some leeway, but not at the podium. We discuss athleticism and activism with Waneek Horn-Miller, a water polo player who competed for the Canadian women's team at the 2000 Sydney Games; Angela Whyte, a Canadian hurdler who has competed at three summer Olympics; and Mark Tewksbury, a Canadian swimmer who won multiple medals and is now vice-president of the Canadian Olympic Committee's board of directors.
Jul 16, 2021
Rachel Johnson on the personal and political dynamics of Brexit
00:22:14
Rachel Johnson, the sister of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, campaigned against Brexit, while her brother hung his political hat on the phrase "Get Brexit Done." She joins us to talk about political and personal crises, the family dynamics of being a staunch Remainer, and her new book, Rake's Progress: The Madcap True Tale of My Political Midlife Crisis.
Jul 15, 2021
The tricky monkeys that steal to barter for food
00:08:38
Macaque monkeys are notorious for stealing from humans, but did you know they can also barter for food and negotiate to return the things they've stolen? University of Lethbridge associate professor Jean-Baptiste Leca has studied these creatures, and tells us what he's learned.
Jul 15, 2021
Canada working to bring Afghan interpreters to safety 'as quickly as possible': minister
00:19:25
As the U.S. withdraws from Afghanistan, interpreters who worked for the Canadian Armed Forces now face renewed threats to their lives from the Taliban. Guest host Mark Kelley talks to retired major-general David Fraser, one of three former Canadian generals urging the government to speed up the process of bringing Afghan interpreters to this country; and asks Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Marco Mendicino what the federal government is doing to help those at risk.
Jul 15, 2021
Why space junk could have damaging consequences
00:19:24
Since humans started venturing into outer space, they've been leaving a lot of junk behind — with no plans to clean it up. Moriba Jah, an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin's aerospace engineering and engineering mechanics department, says we need to flatten the space junk curve, or the consequences could be disastrous.
Jul 14, 2021
U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan emboldens resurgent Taliban
00:18:52
The U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan has already emboldened a resurgent Taliban. Guest host Mark Kelley talks to Jim Davis about his son, Cpl. Paul Davis, who died serving as part of Canada's mission in the country. And Muska Dastageer, a lecturer at the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul, discusses life in Kabul right now, and what's at risk as the Taliban reclaims more territory.
Jul 14, 2021
Ban on swim cap for natural Black hair is ‘so disheartening,’ says coach
00:06:08
The Soul Cap is a swim cap designed to be worn with natural Black hair, but was recently banned by the International Swimming Federation, which means it can't be worn by Black female swimmers at the upcoming Olympics. We discuss that decision, and the history of racism and discrimination in swimming, with Chantique Carey-Payne, head coach of the University of Guelph swim team.
Jul 14, 2021
The long history of cheating in baseball
00:14:56
Journalist Andy Martino joins us to discuss the long history of cheating in baseball, and his new book, Cheated: The Inside Story of the Astros Scandal and a Colourful History of Sign Stealing.
Jul 13, 2021
Dispelling myths about fertility and COVID-19 vaccines
00:08:45
Do you have questions about COVID-19 vaccines and fertility? Dr. Tali Bogler has answers, and joins us to separate fact from fiction.
Jul 13, 2021
Cubans take to the streets over food shortages and high prices
00:19:43
Cubans are protesting in the streets over food shortages, high prices and the handling of the coronavirus crisis. Guest host Mark Kelley talks to Tania Bruguera, an artist and dissident in Havana; Karen Dubinsky, a professor in the global development and history departments at Queen's University in Kingston, Ont.; and Mark Entwistle, Canada's former ambassador to Cuba.
Jul 13, 2021
How sober curious people are questioning their relationship with alcohol
00:20:57
Are you sober curious? We hear about how mindful drinking is catching on and changing how, and what, we imbibe. We talk to Laura Willoughby, co-founder of Club Soda, a mindful drinking organization; Kerry Benson, a registered dietitian and co-author of Mocktail Party; and alcohol-free gin maker Bob Huitema.
Jul 12, 2021
Mitigating the spread of COVID-19 at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics
00:20:07
The Olympics are less than two weeks away, but concerns persist about mitigating the spread of COVID-19. Guest host Mark Kelley talks to Dr. Annie Sparrow, a public health specialist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York; Dr. Jeremy Faust, a physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston; and Dr. Mike Wilkinson, chief medical officer for the Canadian Olympic Committee.
Jul 12, 2021
Weaning kids away from screens
00:23:17
Have your kids become even more glued to the screen with the pandemic shift to online learning? Could summer break be a chance to wean them off? Dr. Shimi Kang, clinical associate professor at the University of British Columbia, discusses the ground rules for a healthy digital diet.
Jul 09, 2021
Efforts to reach unvaccinated communities ramping up
00:20:20
The rate of COVID-19 vaccinations is tapering off in Canada, prompting efforts to reach communities where uptake is low. Guest host Mark Kelley talks to Mayor Brandon Burley about the vaccination campaign in Morden, Man. And we discuss vaccination strategies with Jason Kindrachuk, a virologist and assistant professor in emerging viruses at the University of Manitoba, and Sabina Vohra-Miller, a pharmacologist, science communicator, and co-founder of the South Asian Health Network.
Jul 09, 2021
Nalo Hopkinson on the 'joyful' responsibility of being a leading Black voice in sci-fi writing
00:25:45
Late last year, science fiction writer Nalo Hopkinson became the first Black woman to win a prestigious lifetime achievement award from Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America. She hopes the honour will encourage more marginalized voices in the science fiction and fantasy communities to pursue their writing, and win the respect they deserve in the field.
Jul 09, 2021
Bringing Harry Hibbs’s accordion home to Newfoundland
00:14:28
Harry Hibbs was a legendary Newfoundland musician who helped bring the island's traditional music to the rest of Canada, selling millions of albums in the process. More than 30 years after his death, we hear about plans to bring his accordion home to Bell Island, N.L.
Jul 08, 2021
Mysterious firing at high-security lab points to larger issues, say former colleagues
00:19:52
Two scientists were fired from Canada's only Level 4 virology lab in January, leading to speculation about espionage and national security. Now, two of their former colleagues are speaking out. We talk to the CBC's national reporter, Karen Pauls, who has been investigating the story; and security expert Christian Leuprecht, a professor at the Royal Military College of Canada and Queen's University in Kingston, Ont.
Jul 08, 2021
Fully vaccinated Canadians embrace the chance to hug again
00:23:40
With more Canadians becoming fully vaccinated every day, hugs are making a comeback. We hear from some people about what it was like to get up close and personal again; explore the benefits of an embrace with Suzanne Degges-White, chair and professor of counselling and counsellor education at Northern Illinois University; and hear about work to create a futuristic hugging robot with Alexis Block, a PhD student at the haptic intelligence department at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Germany.
Jul 08, 2021
Assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse
00:11:33
University of Miami Prof. Louis Herns Marcelin joins us to discuss the assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moïse, as well as the political instability that preceded the killing and what might happen next.
Jul 08, 2021
Mary Simon named Canada's first Indigenous governor general
00:14:56
Longtime Inuk leader and former ambassador to Denmark Mary Simon will be the first Indigenous person to serve as Canada's governor general. We discuss what that means for reconciliation with Niigaan Sinclair, an Anishinaabe writer and professor, and columnist for the Winnipeg Free Press; and Rebecca Kudloo, president of Pauktuutit Inuit Women of Canada, the national representative organization for Inuit women.
Jul 07, 2021
Former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard on how to tackle gender bias and sexism in leadership
00:25:36
In a conversation first aired in March, we talk to former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard about ways to tackle gender bias and sexism in leadership. Gillard spoke with eight current and former leaders for her book Women and Leadership: Real Lives, Real Lessons, co-authored with Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the former Nigerian finance minister who is now head of the World Trade Organization.
Jul 07, 2021
How to prevent deaths in future heat waves
00:08:53
B.C.'s coroner reported that the province's recent heat wave likely contributed to 719 sudden deaths, prompting urgent questions about how to prevent it from happening during the next inevitable hot spell. We speak with B.C.'s seniors advocate, Isobel Mackenzie, about how to protect the most vulnerable.
Jul 07, 2021
Concern as some provinces start to relax mask mandates
00:19:53
Masks are no longer mandatory in some Canadian provinces, but some fear it's too soon to relax rules, with vaccination campaigns ongoing and concerns about the spread of variants. We talk to Edmonton business owner Katy Ingraham, who says she'll still ask customers to mask up; Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng, an intensive and palliative care physician at the Montfort and Ottawa hospitals; and Dr. Stephanie Smith, an infectious disease physician at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton.
Jul 07, 2021
Perry Bellegarde on his time as national chief of the Assembly of First Nations
00:19:53
Perry Bellegarde has been a leader in Indigenous politics for decades, and national chief of the Assembly of First Nations for almost seven years. As his term comes to an end, he reflects on his time in office, Canada's reckoning with residential schools, and what lies ahead.
Jul 06, 2021
Global Vaccine Poem asks people to write stanzas to their COVID-19 shot
00:23:19
You might have taken a selfie when you got your COVID-19 vaccine, but would you write a poem to mark the occasion? David Hassler is co-leader of the Global Vaccine Poem, which asks people to reflect on the pandemic and receiving their shot, and put those feelings into a few lines of verse. We also hear from Laura Wood in Owen Sound, Ont., who is among more than 1,400 people who have contributed to the global poetry initiative.
Jul 06, 2021
Advocates say marijuana shouldn’t be on banned list at Olympics
00:23:03
U.S. sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson will miss the women's 100-metre race at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, after accepting a suspension for testing positive for THC, the psychoactive chemical found in marijuana. We talk to Ross Rebagliati, a Canadian Olympian whose gold medal almost went up in smoke after he tested positive for the drug in 1998; and Paul Melia, CEO of the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport.
Jul 06, 2021
Grappling with post-pandemic anxiety
00:19:54
After more than a year of masking, physical distancing and lockdowns, provinces are finally easing COVID-19 restrictions. But for some Canadians, the return to normal is causing more stress than celebration. Guest host Mark Kelley speaks with Steven Taylor, a clinical psychologist and professor at the University of British Columbia, about post-pandemic anxiety, and the lessons we can take from our time in lockdown.
Jul 05, 2021
Habs fans remain hopeful as Montreal Canadiens head to Game 4 of Stanley Cup finals
00:08:56
The Montreal Canadiens are heading to Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals against the Tampa Bay Lightning on Monday night — a game that could end their playoff run if they don't secure a victory. We check in with longtime Habs fans Lynne Schlala and Stuart Ashton as excitement, and some concern, builds over the team's fate.
Jul 05, 2021
Preparing for the consequences of a warming climate
00:14:28
Extreme temperatures and wildfires have devastated parts of British Columbia in recent days. As the climate continues to warm, are humans ready for the consequences? Mark Maslin, a climate change professor at University College London in the U.K., tells us we need to rethink the way we design our world to handle hotter temperatures.
Jul 05, 2021
U.S. civil rights activist Opal Lee on Juneteenth, and addressing racism
00:20:36
For decades, 94-year-old civil rights activist Opal Lee pushed for Juneteenth to be declared a national U.S. holiday celebrating the end of slavery. This year, President Joe Biden made it official. Matt Galloway speaks with Lee about success, her life story, and what she says needs to be done to address systemic racism.
Jul 02, 2021
How flowers brought an Ontario community together
00:17:19
When the pandemic's one-year anniversary approached earlier this year, Melanie Harrington and her staff at the Dahlia May Flower Farm in Trenton, Ont., knew they wanted to honour isolated long-term care residents. So they opened a program to deliver fresh flowers to seniors — free of charge. We bring you the story of how their efforts brought a community together.
Jul 02, 2021
B.C. residents forced to flee from wildfires
00:23:46
B.C.'s interior weathered deadly, record-breaking temperatures this week and is now fighting several devastating wildfires. We speak with people forced from their homes, and examine what these events tell us about adapting to dangerous changes in our climate.
Jul 02, 2021
Grappling with how to mark this Canada Day
00:45:05
On this July 1, while the country is mourning over the findings at residential schools, people are asking what our national day should look like. On a special edition of The Current, we speak with several prominent people from around the country about how they're grappling with that question, and whether celebration should be part of Canada Day this year.
Jul 01, 2021
Vinyl Cafe: A Trip to the Cottage
00:26:51
We dip into the archives of Stuart McLean's Vinyl Cafe to bring you a tale about Dave and Morley's trip to the cottage.
Jul 01, 2021
Mark Sakamoto on his family’s experience in Japanese internment camps
00:09:18
We continue our reflection on Canada Day with writer Mark Sakamoto, discussing the conflict he feels in being Canadian, given his family's experience in Japanese internment camps.
Jun 30, 2021
Marnie McBean on the role of politics, protest, and activism at the Olympics
00:16:18
Marnie McBean is a three-time Olympic gold medallist, about to head to the Summer Games in Tokyo as Canada's chef de mission. She joins us to discuss the recent news of unmarked graves at former residential schools, how that complicates taking pride in Canada, and the place of protest at the Olympics.
Jun 30, 2021
8-year-old's passion for ants is 'inspiring,' says biologist and ant-ficionado
00:22:25
We talk to eight-year-old insect hunter Benjamin Arana-Stirling, who catches and cares for queen ants — then sells them for $30 a pop. McGill University biologist and ant researcher Ehab Abouheif tells us more about the world of ants, and why he loves them.
Jun 30, 2021
How Canada’s history is told, and how that shapes who we think we are
00:19:41
Many are treating Canada Day this year as a moment of reflection, rather than celebration, and asking: What does it mean to be Canadian? We discuss the way Canada's history is taught and told — and how that shapes who we think we are — with Falen Johnson, co-host of the CBC podcast The Secret Life of Canada; and Anthony Wilson-Smith, CEO of Historica Canada, the makers of the Heritage Minutes.
Jun 30, 2021
Former residential school now a place to teach and celebrate Siksika culture
00:19:40
When the Old Sun Indian Residential School closed in 1969, the Siksika First Nation repurposed the building as Old Sun Community College, a place to teach and celebrate their culture and traditional knowledge. We speak to Vivian Ayoungman, who was forced to attend the residential school in the 1950s, but now teaches in the same building.
Jun 29, 2021
Designing homes equipped to beat the heat
00:12:20
Western Canada is in the grip of a record-breaking heat wave, with people being told to take refuge indoors. But what if your home isn't equipped to beat the heat? We speak with Hannah Teicher, researcher-in-residence at the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions in B.C., about concerns around buildings that aren't designed to deal with high temperatures.
Jun 29, 2021
Sous Sous, the 10-year-old drag queen
00:13:52
Like many people, 10-year-old Ozzy Horvath developed a passion project in the pandemic: his drag alter ego Sous Sous. He tells us about creating Sous Sous, and how she's been a part of what he's learned about himself.
Jun 29, 2021
Vaccine inequity around the world
00:23:24
Vaccines are flowing in Canada, but that's not the case in many countries, where issues around supply and access are having serious consequences. We talk to Dr. Vishi Beharry, a family physician and president of the Trinidad and Tobago Medical Association; Dr. Brenda Okware, a public health specialist in Uganda, and the scientific co-ordinator of the COVID-19 Clinical Research Coalition; and Itai Rusike, a public health activist in Zimbabwe.
Jun 29, 2021
Excitement builds for Montreal Canadiens in Stanley Cup final
00:07:33
The Montreal Canadiens take on the Tampa Bay Lightning in Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Finals Monday night — the first time a Canadian team has made the finals in a decade. We chat with New Yorker writer and Habs superfan Adam Gopnik about the excitement ahead of the game.
Jun 28, 2021
Former track star speaks of years of grooming by coach
00:33:10
Mary Jane Richards was an exceptional athlete, with a bright future ahead of her. But she gave up running due to what she says were years of grooming by her running coach — which included inappropriate massages, explicit emails and sexual intercourse. CBC senior reporter Julie Ireton talks to Richards in her documentary Heavy Medals; and we discuss what needs to change to protect young athletes with Gretchen Kerr, a professor in the faculty of kinesiology and physical education at University of Toronto; and Lorraine Lafrenière, CEO of the Coaching Association of Canada.
Jun 28, 2021