Sasquatch Tracks

By Micah Hanks, Dakota Waddell and Jeff Smith

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Description

Sasquatch Tracks takes a scientific look at whether there are large animal species that remain undiscovered. With special emphasis on the Sasquatch in North America, the show looks at claims of apelike “relict hominoids” and other animals purported to exist in various parts of the world.

Episode Date
Jeff Meldrum: The Science of Sasquatch, Part Two | ST 004
01:41:13

On this episode of Sasquatch Tracks, we continue our discussion with Idaho State University professor of Anatomy and Anthropology Jeff Meldrum, Ph.D., as he answers more of our questions about the scientific study of Sasquatch. 

Picking up where we left off with Dr. Meldrum on the last installment of the podcast, we get his ideas and opinions on the anatomy of Sasquatch, and what the creature would subsist on in remote areas like the Pacific Northwest. We also look at why the creatures are purported to be so large, and what unusual characteristics they might possess that make them both similar to, and in many ways different from humans.

Then after concluding our discussion with Dr. Meldrum, the Sasquatch Tracks team goes over some of our big takeaways from this discussion, along with additional commentary on how science can be applied to the study of America's Great Ape. 

Stories and other slinks discussed in this episode: 

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Got a news tip or story to share? Send us an Email.

Have you seen an animal you can't identify? Submit a report here.

Jul 03, 2020
Jeff Meldrum: The Science of Sasquatch, Part One | ST 003
01:19:58

On this edition of Sasquatch Tracks, we are joined by Idaho State University professor Dr. Jeff Meldrum for the first in a two-part series that will examine how science can be applied to the study of Sasquatch. 

Meldrum holds a doctorate in anatomical sciences with an emphasis in physical anthropology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1989). He is currently a Full Professor of Anatomy & Anthropology in the Departments of Biological Sciences and Anthropology. In this first installment of the two-part series, we take a look back at Meldrum's professional interest in ichnotaxonomy - the branch of taxonomy that attempts to classify an animal based on its footprints - and how he has applied this to the study of Sasquatch. In 2007, Meldrum proposed Anthropoidipes ameriborealis as the formal ichnotaxon for the Sasquatch, based on footprints h has studied throughout the course of his career. We discuss the most compelling footprint data he has viewed, as well as Dr. Meldrum's thoughts on the famous Patterson/Gimlin Film made in Bluff Creek, California in 1967, and much more. 

Stories and other slinks discussed in this episode: 

Follow Sasquatch Tracks on Twitter.

Got a news tip or story to share? Send us an Email.

Have you seen an animal you can't identify? Submit a report here.

Jun 17, 2020
Peter Byrne: Still On the Track | ST 002
01:25:10

On this episode of Sasquatch Tracks, after a discussion of animal tracking where Jeff fills us in about his recent experience making paster castings of a set of well-preserved black bear tracks, we are joined by the legendary big-game tracker, conservationist and Sasquatch seeker Peter Byrne. 

At age 94, Byrne may be the world's most accomplished professional Bigfoot tracker alive today, having devoted decades of time and funding to the search for America's most elusive animal. Byrne began his search for relict hominoids in Nepal with the famous Yeti, before arriving in America at the invitation of Texas philanthropist Tom Slick to go in search of Bigfoot in the California wilderness.

Byrne was even on the scene at the legendary film site near Bluff Creek, California, shortly after Roger Patterson and Bob Gimlin made what is arguably one of the most controversial and widely-discussed pieces of film footage of all time. We talk with Peter about his fieldwork over the last several decades, as we hear stories about the life and times of a legend who searched for Sasquatch. 

Stories and other slinks discussed in this episode: 

Follow Sasquatch Tracks on Twitter.

Got a news tip or story to share? Send us an Email.

Have you seen an animal you can't identify? Submit a report here.

Jun 17, 2020
Sasquatch and Citizen Science | ST 001
01:20:12

On this inaugural edition of Sasquatch Tracks, we introduce the team (you can read more about us here) as we sit down to talk about who we are, what we aim to do with Sasquatch Tracks, and the role of "citizen scientists" in the study of nature and unidentified species. We are then joined by phone for an interview with naturalist David George Gordon, author of The Sasquatch Seeker's Field Manual, to talk about applying science and field research methods to the search for America's favorite relict hominoid.

Gordon is the award-winning author of The Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, The Sasquatch Seeker’s Field Manual, and 18 other titles. He is also The Bug Chef, having brought his exotic cuisine before groups that include the Explorers Club, The Smithsonian, Microsoft, and Ripley’s Believe It or Not! museums in Hollywood and Times Square and appeared on Conan O’Brien, James Corden and The View. Gordon lives in Seattle.

Stories and other slinks discussed in this episode: 

Follow Sasquatch Tracks on Twitter.

Got a news tip or story to share? Send us an Email.

Have you seen an animal you can't identify? Submit a report here.

Jun 16, 2020