Marketplace

By Marketplace

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Wonderful journalism. I can't recommend it enough.

Description

Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, our flagship program is all about providing context on the economic news of the day. Through stories, conversations and newsworthy numbers, we help listeners understand the economic world around them.

Episode Date
How much can one school provide?
00:25:19

For years, Oyler School has been trying to provide for students’ basic needs in one of Cincinnati’s poorest neighborhoods. Now, leaders are looking outside the school and trying to improve the local job market. Plus: The International Monetary Fund projects an economy without the U.S.-China trade war, and Walmart’s new direct-to-fridge delivery service.

Oct 15, 2019
How much can a school remake the neighborhood it’s in?
00:25:27

Cincinnati’s Oyler School serves one of the city’s poorest neighborhoods. Community leaders have used public and private money to add a food pantry, health clinics and more so students could focus on learning. Graduation rates have been steadily ticking up, but in recent years, the school’s been trying to help more homeless students find a place to stay. Administrators are realizing that transforming a school may not be enough to spark the transformation of the surrounding neighborhood. Plus: China’s latest import and export numbers, and why some key players are pulling out of Facebook’s cryptocurrency efforts.

Oct 14, 2019
The nest is full
00:26:12

According to Census Bureau data, about 37% of Californians age 18 to 34 still live with a parent. In more expensive parts of the state, that number is much higher. Today, we look at the factors making living at home the new normal for some young adults. Plus: new consumer sentiment numbers and the first state law cracking down on forced arbitration.

Oct 11, 2019
What it’s like to be a foster parent during the opioid crisis
00:25:40

We talked a bit yesterday about West Virginia, which has the highest rate of children in foster care in the nation, thanks largely to the opioid crisis. Today, we’re continuing that story by looking at some of the challenges facing foster parents there. Plus: The impact California’s power outages are having on low-income households, and why negotiating a salary is so hard.

Oct 11, 2019
In West Virginia, the opioid crisis is straining the foster care system
00:27:00

As many American parents struggle with opioid addiction, the number of children put into foster care in the U.S. is steadily increasing. West Virginia has been hit particularly hard: 70% more children entered foster care there in six years, and most of them have a parent struggling with substance use. Today, we’ll take you inside a system that’s straining to care for them all. But first: The latest from the Fed, and the controversy in the NBA over Chinese protestors.

Oct 09, 2019
What’s your data worth?
00:26:00

If a service is free, the saying goes, then you’re the product. Most of us have come to accept that when you’re using social media or a free email client, you’re giving up some data in exchange. But what if you got paid for giving up some of that information? Today, we talk with a startup that’s working on it. Plus: Target is joining forces with a resurrected Toys R Us, and California is fighting wildfires by turning the lights off.

Oct 08, 2019
Remember pensions?
00:26:01

General Electric will freeze pensions for 20,000 workers and offer pension buyouts to another 100,000 former employees. Today, we trace the decline of the once-common benefit. But first: We check in on the state of the trade war and the autoworkers’ strike. Plus, a conversation with the CEO of Dick’s Sporting Goods.

Oct 07, 2019
There’s no such thing as a free oyster
00:26:14

… usually they’re a dollar, but you get the idea. Today: the economics of happy hour, particularly discounted seafood. But first, let’s take apart that new jobs report.

Oct 04, 2019
What we talk about when we talk about jobs
00:25:32

We talk about the federal government’s jobs report every month. But determining how many Americans are unemployed, how many jobs the economy created and in which sectors is a tricky business. Ahead of tomorrow’s new numbers, we’ll dig into how it all works. Plus: A story from communist China, which turns 70 this week. And who pays to fix federal monuments?

Oct 03, 2019
Maybe it’s not a recession after all
00:26:10

Economists and market watchers have spent the past few months trying to figure out if we’re headed toward, or maybe already in, a recession. But there’s a growing chorus wondering if the U.S. economy is just headed toward a period of slow growth. Today, we dig into what that means. Plus: How Amazon handles counterfeit goods and how couples handle money.

Oct 02, 2019
October will have you seeing pink
00:27:00

Oct. 1 is the start of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and that means you’ll be seeing pink all over: at NFL games, at charity walks and on virtually any consumer good you could buy. Today, we dig into the economics of awareness. Plus: What’s behind this disappointing year for IPOs and the national debt, explained.

Oct 02, 2019
The stock market is not the economy … so what is it?
00:27:07

It’s an interesting time in the American capital markets. Specifically, for stocks. The major indexes have been at or near record highs after trending up for more than a decade. But as we’ve said before, and we’ll surely say again: The stock market is not the economy. For today’s installment of “Kai Explains,” we’ll dig into what it is and isn’t. Plus: Why the Trump administration would want to curb American investment in Chinese firms, and how Amazon’s HQ2 could reshape Arlington, Virginia’s economy.

Sep 30, 2019
You should be watching the bond market
00:26:15

We say it over and over: Keep an eye on the bond market. But it can be hard to know what the “10-year T-note” even is, much less what it tells us about the economy. So in today’s installment of our new series “Kai Explains,” we’re going to dig into bonds. Plus: Saudi Arabia opens up to tourists, and a conversation with Rakim.

Sep 27, 2019
Inequality is at a 50-year high
00:25:30

New data from the U.S. Census Bureau says inequality is the highest it’s been since the measure began in the 1960s. Today, we dig into why. Plus: Health care spending is breaking records, too, and consumer confidence, explained.

Sep 26, 2019
How IPOs work
00:25:09

Home fitness company Peloton is expected to go public tomorrow. It’ll be the latest in a series of high-profile tech IPOs, some of which haven’t gone so smoothly. Today, we’ll look at how companies are valued, how that process has changed and why markets haven’t quiet caught up. Plus: What a no-deal Brexit would do to Europe and what’s next for embattled e-cigarette maker Juul.

Sep 25, 2019
What debt does to the economy
00:26:00

Americans owe $13.86 trillion in household debt. That’s slightly higher than the total amount right before the 2008 financial crisis, and it’s rising. Today, we’re gonna dig into debt a bit: Who owes whom, what it does to the economy and what we can do about it. Plus: What you need to know about new overtime rules, and, inspired by Greta Thunberg, what we talk about when we talk about “economic growth.”

Sep 24, 2019
The art of the organic tortilla
00:28:03

Some might think that the best part of a taco is what’s inside. But Rick Ortega and Omar Ahmed, founders of Kernel of Truth Organics, disagree. They’re champions of soft corn tortillas and pride themselves on being the only known tortilleria in Los Angeles using certified organic corn. Plus: Americans are saving more money, and farmers aren’t keen on being bailed out.

Sep 23, 2019
The GM strike marches on
00:27:11

General Motors workers have been striking since midnight on Sunday after contract negotiations broke down. The company’s use of temp workers is one of the main reasons for the strike. Temps make less money, don’t get benefits and can take very limited time off, unpaid. We hear from one GM worker who was a temp for four years before being hired full time. Plus: Why grad students might lose their ability to unionize, and what items will be exempt from tariffs.

Sep 20, 2019
How an oil company pivots to video games
00:25:48

Sometimes businesses make hard left turns. YouTube was a dating site. Shopify sold snowboard equipment. Then there’s Black Ridge: It recently got out of oil and gas and into the fast-growing world of competitive gaming. How’s a company go from fracking to “Fortnite”? Today, we look at the art of the pivot. Plus: Why central banks are predicting an economic slowdown and what Silicon Valley is (and isn’t) doing to combat climate change.

Sep 19, 2019
When regulations meet market forces
00:26:40

President Donald Trump plans to revoke California’s ability to set its own fuel efficiency standards. But what happens when many consumers want lower emissions? Plus: What you need to know about the rate cut and an update on the GM strike.

Sep 18, 2019
What is the DEAL with all these old episodes of “Seinfeld”?
00:25:41

As the war of streaming TV services heats up, tech and media giants like Comcast, WarnerMedia and Disney are racing to build their libraries. That means dropping hundreds of millions of dollars for the rights to old shows like “Seinfeld” and “The Big Bang Theory.” Plus: We’ll walk you through the Federal Reserve’s toolkit and take a look at the way oil prices affect the larger economy.

Sep 17, 2019
Juul needs research on vaping, but scientists aren’t sure
00:25:51

With new reports of people getting sick and politicians vowing to crack down on electronic cigarettes, the industry leader, Juul, is looking for new research on the health effects of its products. But the vaping giant has had difficulty finding scientists to take on that research, and the few who have accepted Juul’s overtures face blowback. Plus: Nearly 50,000 members of the United Auto Workers went on strike against General Motors today, and oil prices jumped following an attack on Saudi oil facilities.

Sep 16, 2019
Meet me at the mall, it’s goin’ down
00:26:00

Forever 21 is expected to close 100 stores as part of a bankruptcy filing. Big anchor stores like Sears have been struggling for a long time, so what’s left? The American mall looks pretty different these days. Plus: The federal deficit has passed $1 trillion for the first time since 2012, and the latest in our “Adventures in Housing” series.

Sep 13, 2019
Negative interest rates, explained
00:26:06

The European Central Bank cut interest rates to -0.5 percent. President Trump praised the decision, as he’s been pushing the Federal Reserve to do the same. Today, we compare the economic situation in the U.S. and abroad and explore how negative rates would work. Plus: California’s attempt to curb soaring rents and a new DIY clothing start-up.

Sep 12, 2019
Reclassifying employees won’t just affect Uber
00:25:38

A California bill that would reclassify many independent contract workers as employees is on track to becoming law. It would affect hundreds of thousands of people in the gig economy — not just those who deliver food and give rides, but also nail salon workers, truck drivers and more. Today, we talk with some of those independent contractors about how their lives would change and look at the broader economic implications. Plus: An update on the blocked offshore wind project.

Sep 11, 2019
Who makes money off your political donations?
00:25:54

There’s another Democratic presidential debate on Thursday, and hopefuls that reach the stage will have done so by meeting polling and donation requirements. It’s just one reason why candidates spend a lot of time and energy hitting you up for cash, and there are a lot of businesses facilitating that effort. Today, we follow the money. Plus: Why Moody’s says Ford is “junk,” and looking ahead to the holiday hiring season.

Sep 10, 2019
You shouldn’t make trades based on Trump’s tweets
00:25:57

… But those tweets do affect markets, and JPMorgan is launching a new index to track the impact of a presidential tweet. Plus: dispatches from the supposed “worst place to live in America,” and is bigger still better for American companies?

Sep 09, 2019
Embrace your inner child
00:26:28

A growing number of adults are willing to pay to do kid stuff: smashing their faces into cake, watching Saturday morning cartoons, doing scavenger hunts. Today, we dive into the big money of feeling little again. Plus, we recap the jobs report and examine the declining entrepreneurship rate.

Sep 06, 2019
How much do WeWork, really?
00:26:09

The unemployment rate has been historically low for months now. But even in a tight labor market, not everyone who needs a job has one. Today we’ll meet some job hunters and run through some of the fundamentals of this economy. Plus: Why the company behind WeWork is still going public after slashing its valuation.

Sep 05, 2019
A different kind of Brexit deal
00:26:42

As uncertainty looms about how Britain will leave the European Union, a trade deal with the United States would help make up for any loss of business with the EU and show the country isn’t cutting itself off completely. Today, we look at how a trans-Atlantic trade deal could happen and the sticking points that remain. But first: YouTube’s record fine to settle claims it violated children’s privacy, and the Trump administration’s plan to turn Fannie and Freddie private again.

Sep 04, 2019