Gadget Lab: Weekly Tech News

By WIRED

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 Jun 17, 2019

Description

Inside the hottest personal tech stories of the week; mobile apps, gear, social networking, and entertainment.

Episode Date
Twitter’s Redesign Is Impressive. Is It Enough?
3099
On Monday, Twitter began rolling out its first desktop redesign in seven years. It was a mostly aesthetic makeover, with changes like a new layout, dark mode, and a more prominent search bar. As with anything Twitter, the reaction has been polarizing, with many users criticizing the platform for not doing enough to address its major problems. Today on the Gadget Lab podcast, Arielle, Mike, and Lauren discuss the changes Twitter has made, and how the company continues to grapple with its ongoing existential crisis.<br>Also in the news: The latest eruption of FaceApp paranoia and the nuances of Amazon’s Prime Day. Oh, and Elon Musk wants to drill a computer into your brain.<br><strong>Show Notes:</strong> <br>Read Arielle’s story about the Twitter redesign <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/twitter-website-redesign/">here</a>. Read Brian Barrett’s story about FaceApp <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/faceapp-privacy-backlash-facebook/?itm_campaign=TechinTwo&amp;verso=true">here</a>. Read Adam Rogers’s story about Elon’s latest sc-fi machinations <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/heres-how-elon-musk-plans-to-stitch-a-computer-into-your-brain/?verso=true">here</a>. Read about Amazon’s labor woes <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/robots-alone-cant-solve-amazons-labor-woes/?verso=true">here</a>, or follow WIRED’s coverage of Amazon <a href="https://www.wired.com/search/?page=3&amp;q=amazon&amp;size=10&amp;sort=publishDate_tdt%20desc&amp;types%5B0%5D=article&amp;types%5B0%5D=article">here</a>.<br><strong>Recommendations:</strong> <br>Arielle recommends staying on top of the latest online hullabaloo by going to Reddit’s <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/OutOfTheLoop/">r/outoftheloop</a> subreddit. Mike recommends the show <a href="https://www.netflix.com/title/80175348"><em>Kantaro: The Sweet Tooth Salaryman</em></a> on Netflix. Lauren recommends the book <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Year-Rest-Relaxation-Ottessa-Moshfegh/dp/0525522115"><em>My Year of Rest and Relaxation</em></a> by Ottessa Moshfegh.
Jul 19, 2019
Facebook's Libra and the Future of Money
2238
Last month, Facebook announced its plans to get into the cryptocurrency race with Libra. A blend of blockchain and partnership with 28 companies, Libra has been pitched as a money transfer service and a unique currency rolled into one. But just by virtue of being a Facebook venture, Libra immediately garnered controversy. Some people think it could help bring the entire cryptocurrency industry into the mainstream, while others think giving Facebook access to their financial information sounds like a dystopian nightmare. On this episode of Gadget Lab, WIRED writer Gregory Barber explains the intricacies of Facebook’s ambitious plan and how Libra is poised to rattle the future of crypto.<br><br><strong>Show Notes:</strong> This episode was recorded just two hour before President Trump tweeted about the perceived dangers of Libra. Our guest Gregory Barber wrote <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/president-trump-latest-critic-facebooks-libra/">a news story</a> about that development. You can also read Greg’s previous stories about Libra <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/facebooks-cryptocurrency-might-work-like-loyalty-points/">here</a> and <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/fed-chair-facebooks-libra-raises-serious-concerns/">here</a>. Also read the <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/guide-blockchain/">WIRED guide to the blockchain</a>.<br><br><strong>Recommendations:</strong> Greg recommends getting back into <a href="https://www.duolingo.com/">Duolingo</a> (and maybe learning Arabic). Arielle recommends the book <a href="https://brianchristian.org/the-most-human-human/"><em>The Most Human Human</em></a> by Brian Christian.<br>Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Gregory Barber is <a href="https://twitter.com/gregoryjbarber">@GregoryJBarber</a>. Boone Ashworth, who edited the show, can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/BooneAshworth">booneashworth</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.
Jul 13, 2019
Rebalancing Our Relationship With Tech
3855
This week, a conversation with Aza Raskin, cofounder of the Center for Humane Technology at Stanford University, about the “asymmetric power relationships” between the people who use tech and the companies who control it. In the news, Jony Ive, the famed designer of the iPod, iMac, and iPhone, is leaving Apple. Also, Twitter announced plans to start cracking down on politicians who violate their rules on the platform, and Amazon launches a program that will let you pick up packages from Rite Aid.<br><br><strong>Show Notes:</strong> Here’s Louise Matsakis’s story about Jony Ive’s <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/jony-ive-leaves-apple/">departure from Apple.</a> And Paris Martineau wrote about how Twitter will <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/twitter-quarantine-politicians-tweets-violate-rules/">now quarantine politicians’ tweets if they violate the rules</a>. You can read Wired editor-in-chief Nicholas Thompson’s story about the latest campaign from the Center for Human Technology <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/tristan-harris-tech-is-downgrading-humans-time-to-fight-back/">here</a>. <br><br><strong>Recommendations:</strong> Arielle recommends the book <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Na%C3%AFve-Super-Erlend-Loe/dp/1841956724"><em>Naïve. Super</em></a> by Erlend Loe. Michael recommends that you sign up for a free trial of Amazon Prime so that you can take advantage of <a href="https://www.amazon.com/l/13887280011?pf_rd_p=5494a76b-b2c7-48ab-bcd6-ea276e65bd79&amp;pf_rd_s=nav-sitewide-msg&amp;pf_rd_t=4201&amp;pf_rd_i=navbar-4201&amp;pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;pf_rd_r=31W6DGHBA3EGWW8HNY2J&amp;pf_rd_r=31W6DGHBA3EGWW8HNY2J&amp;pf_rd_p=5494a76b-b2c7-48ab-bcd6-ea276e65bd79">Prime Day </a>sales next month (then unsubscribe from the service afterwards, if you want). Lauren recommends <a href="https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/why-liberals-conservatives-create-such-different-media/id1081584611?i=1000442136474">this episode of the Ezra Klein podcast</a>, on why liberals and conservatives create such different media. <br><br>Our guest Aza Raskin is on Twitter at @<a href="https://twitter.com/aza">aza</a>. Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Boone Ashworth, who edited the show, can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/BooneAshworth">booneashworth</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.
Jun 28, 2019
A Genius Move
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If you thought an internet giant stole your hard work and claimed it as their own, how would you ever prove it? Well, what if you could booby trap the information first? On this spine-tingling episode of the Gadget Lab podcast, Mike, Arielle, and Lauren talk with WIRED’s Emily Dreyfuss about how the tension between Google and song lyric service Genius could become much more than just a copyright dispute. Also in the news, Apple takes a hit with a recall of the MacBook Pro and GE catches some delayed internet ridicule over a video about light bulbs. Also, the gang consider becoming an ASMR podcast.<br><strong>Show Notes:</strong> <br>Read more from Emily about the Google-Genius dispute <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/what-the-google-genius-copyright-dispute-is-really-about/">here</a>. Soothe your senses with Arielle’s <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/commercialization-of-asmr/">story about ASMR</a>. Read Lauren’s analysis of the latest woes of the <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/apple-macbook-pro-recall/">MacBook Pro</a>. And you can follow along with the video for <a href="https://youtu.be/1BB6wj6RyKo">how to reset C by GE light bulbs</a> and paint yourself into a tingly slumber with Behr Paint’s <a href="https://youtu.be/Y261TMAbtTU">ASMR ad</a>. (Psst … we also got more <a href="https://people.com/movies/keanu-reeves-no-idea-internet-obsession-toy-story-4-premiere/">Keanu</a>.)<br><strong>Recommendations:</strong> <br>Arielle recommends the podcast <a href="http://www.top40philosophy.com/">Top 40 Philosophy</a>. Mike recommends <a href="https://www.nintendo.com/games/detail/katamari-damacy-reroll-switch/"><em>Katamari Damacy Reroll</em></a> on the Nintendo Switch. Lauren recommends diving into the Genius page for <a href="https://genius.com/Skee-lo-i-wish-lyrics">Skee-Lo’s “I Wish”</a> and season three of <a href="https://www.hulu.com/series/the-handmaids-tale-565d8976-9d26-4e63-866c-40f8a137ce5f"><em>The Handmaid's Tale</em></a> on Hulu. Emily recommends that you delete your Twitter app (no link here, pal).<br>Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Emily Dreyfuss is @<a href="https://twitter.com/EmilyDreyfuss">EmilyDreyfuss</a>. Boone Ashworth, who edited the show, can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/BooneAshworth">booneashworth</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.
Jun 21, 2019
The Biggest News From E3
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This week was E3, the trade show where the biggest names in gaming debut their latest shiny products and software. On this week’s Gadget Lab podcast, WIRED’s Peter Rubin joins Mike, Arielle, and Lauren to discuss the latest developments in cloud computing, live-streaming services, and <em>Fortnite</em> as a social platform. And of course, it wouldn’t be 2019 without a Keanu Reeves cameo.<br><strong>Show Notes:</strong> Check out the <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/final-fantasy-vii-remake/">E3 coverage you may have missed</a>, and take advantage of <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/best-e3-game-sales/">E3 sales</a> before they’re gone. You can read more about Google’s upcoming Stadia cloud computing service from Peter Rubin <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/google-stadia-release/">here</a>.<br><strong>Recommendations:</strong> Peter recommends the show <a href="https://abc.go.com/shows/bless-this-mess"><em>Bless this Mess</em></a> on ABC. Mike recommends following @<a href="https://www.instagram.com/powazek/?hl=en">powazek from Milk Barn Farm</a> on Instagram for all your baby goat needs. Arielle recommends Clio Chang's <a href="https://theslot.jezebel.com/pete-buttigieg-in-60-seconds-hes-somehow-still-polling-1835388899">60-second presidential explainers</a> on <em>Jezebel</em>. Lauren recommends two movies: <a href="https://www.netflix.com/title/80202874"><em>Always Be My Maybe</em></a>, written by and starring Ali Wong; and <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1489887/"><em>Booksmart</em></a>, directed by Olivia Wilde and written by four women scriptwriters. Also, <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/keanu-reeves-e3-cyberpunk-2077/">Keanu</a>. <br>Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Peter Rubin is @<a href="https://twitter.com/provenself">provenself</a>. Boone Ashworth, who edited the show, can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/BooneAshworth">booneashworth</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.<br><br>
Jun 14, 2019
Everything From Apple’s WWDC
3336
The iPhone is still undoubtedly Apple’s most important product. So why were some of the biggest announcements this week at the company’s annual developers conference around the iPad and the Mac? On this week’s Gadget Lab podcast, Mike, Arielle, and Lauren talk about Dark Mode for iOS; why Apple is still trying to make Memoji <em>happen</em>; Apple sign-on and what it means for privacy; why “iPadOS” is more than just a name; and yes, that multi-thousand dollar Mac Pro and 6K display setup. <br><br><strong>Show Notes:</strong> You can read Paris Martineau’s story about YouTube’s new community guidelines <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/how-effective-youtube-latest-ban-extremism/">here</a>. Peter Rubin’s story on Google Stadia is <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/google-stadia-release/">here</a>. And good luck getting an <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2019/06/06/uber-helicopter-nyc/">Uber Copter</a> if you don’t have Diamond or Platinum status. <br><br><strong>Recommendations:</strong> Mike recommends the <a href="https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/gettin-better-with-ron-funches/id1432301616"><em>Gettin’ Better!</em></a> podcast With Ron Funches. Arielle recommends the <a href="https://mubert.com/">Mubert</a> generative music app. Lauren recommends <a href="https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/john_wick_chapter_3_parabellum"><em>John Wick 3</em></a>––really, all of the John Wick triology. <br>Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Boone Ashworth can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/BooneAshworth">booneashworth</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.<br><br><br><br>
Jun 07, 2019
Making Surfing More Sustainable
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The great irony in the sport of surfing is that the process of making a surfboard puts a great deal of strain on the environment. The various chemicals and materials used to assemble boards, leashes, and wetsuits end up polluting the waterways, and defiling the very beaches that surfers rely on. A number of organizations and companies are dedicated to reversing this trend through something called the Ecoboard project. The certification program establishes manufacturing and sourcing guidelines that let people create boards that are gentler on the oceans and perform as well as traditional surfboards.<br><br>One such company is Firewire Surfboards. We’re joined on today’s show by Firewire CEO Mark Price to talk about ecoboards, sustainability, and surfing in general. Also on the show, the hosts cover the latest news about products from Amazon and Google, and also give a preview of what to expect from Apple’s WWDC developer conference that takes place next week.<br><br><strong>Show Notes:</strong> Find Firewire’s website <a href="https://firewiresurfboards.com/">here</a>. Also check out the <a href="https://sustainablesurf.org/">Sustainable Surf</a> project. Read Lauren on <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/amazon-echo-show-5-and-alexa-privacy-hub/">Amazon’s new privacy initiative</a> and <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/apple-wwdc-2019-what-to-expect/">what to expect from WWDC</a>. Also read Lily Hay Newman on <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/google-chrome-extensions-security-changes/">Google’s Project Strobe</a>.<br><br><strong>Recommendations:</strong> Mike tells us about <a href="https://www.sho.com/wu-tang-clan-of-mics-and-men"><em>Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics and Men</em></a> on Showtime. Arielle recommends <a href="https://turo.com/">Turo</a>, and Lauren wants you to watch season two of <a href="https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07QGKM68X/"><em>Fleabag</em></a> on Amazon Prime Video.<br>Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Jun 02, 2019
Samsung’s Innovation Dilemma
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What’s a giant consumer electronics maker to do when it notices that younger customers are more interested in paying for experiences, rather than <em>things</em>? That’s what WIRED senior associate editor Arielle Pardes had the chance to ask Samsung’s David Eun this week at the Collision conference in Toronto. Eun says he envisions a consumer market in the not-so-distant future where all of the physical goods we now purchase outright are rented, and he talked about how Samsung Next, the company’s innovation arm, is investing and acquiring to make sure Samsung doesn’t miss the (rented?) boat. <br><br><strong>Show Notes: </strong>Here’s WIRED’s story on <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/how-huawei-might-handle-latest-us-sanctions/">how Huawei might handle the latest U.S. sanctions</a>. And you can read about the <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/apple-macbook-pro-2019-speed-bump/">new MacBook Pros here</a> and the <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/apple-macbook-keyboard-ifixit/">keyboard fix here</a>. <br><br><strong>Recommendations:</strong>Mike recommends the <em>Popcast!</em> Podcast; this week it’s <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/20/arts/music/popcast-apple-airpods.html">all about AirPods.</a> Arielle recommends earplugs. Just wear earplugs. Lauren recommends this Ezra Klein podcast episode about <a href="https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-ezra-klein-show/e/60197403?autoplay=true">work as identity and burnout as a lifestyle</a>. <br><br>Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.<br><br><strong>How to Listen</strong>You can always listen to this week's podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here's how:<br><br>If you're on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-gadget-lab-podcast/id266391367?mt=2">tap this link</a>. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by<a href="https://play.google.com/music/m/Iec5bnjozxz7wpye5n4m32mgsuu?t=The_Gadget_Lab_Podcast"> tapping here</a>. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, <a href="https://www.wired.com/feed/podcast/gadget-lab">here's the RSS feed</a>.<br><br>We're also <a href="https://soundcloud.com/wired">on Soundcloud</a>, and every episode gets <a href="https://www.wired.com/tag/gadget-lab-podcasts">posted to wired.com</a> as soon as it's released. If you still can't figure it out, or there's another platform you use that we're not on, <a href="mailto:radio@wired.com">let us know</a>.<br><br><br>
May 24, 2019
YouTube’s Latest Beauty Scandal
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Beauty product reviews on YouTube aren’t just about beauty products and internet capitalism. They’re a conduit for drama, loyalty politics, and “cancel” culture, as WIRED’s Emma Grey Ellis has learned throughout her reporting on some of YouTube’s biggest names. This week’s drama is centered around James Charles, a hugely popular 19-year-old beauty influencer and Tati Westbrook, an OG YouTube beauty guru and a mentor of James Charles. Coachella and hair vitamins were involved. Charles was cancelled (again). <br><br>But as Ellis writes, “The real victims of cancel culture might be the rest of us, perpetually required to join the angry mob lest ye be taken for a collaborator.” We talk about this and more on this week’s Gadget Lab podcast. <br><br><strong>Show Notes: </strong>Read Emma’s story <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/james-charles-tati-westbrook-youtube-loyalty/">here</a>. Read all about the WhatsApp vulnerability <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/whatsapp-hack-phone-call-voip-buffer-overflow/">here</a>. Read Casey Newton’s newsletter <a href="https://www.theverge.com/interface/2019/5/16/18627096/trump-social-media-bias-reporting-scam-christchurch-call">here</a> on the White House’s call for supposedly politically biased social media content. <br><br><strong>Recommendations:</strong>Emma recommends the Canadian television series <a href="https://www.netflix.com/title/80036165"><em>Schitt’s Creek</em></a>, which is available on Netflix. Arielle recommends a Tamagotchi. Yes, <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/tamagotchi-on-price-release-date/">that Tamagotchi</a>. Lauren recommends <a href="https://www.netflix.com/title/81080637"><em>Knock Down the House</em>,</a> also streaming on Netflix. Mike recommends this <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/14/style/lemonheads-evan-dando.html"><em>New York Times</em>&nbsp;profile of Evan Dando</a>, and has the audacity to recommend you listen to The Lemonheads.&nbsp;<br><br><br><br><br><br>
May 17, 2019
If You Build It, They Will I/O
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Developer conferences aren’t just a chance for tech companies to incentivize app makers and show off the latest tricks and tools in software. The events also present an opportunity for companies like Facebook, Microsoft, and Google to assure the public that they are <em>on it</em> when it comes to issues like privacy, openness, and also, privacy. And companies often use the giant keynote stage to show off futuristic demos involving augmented reality, artificial intelligence, and assistive technologies. How much of this is reality–not the virtual kind–and how much is simply lip service? The Gadget Lab team discusses on this week’s podcast. <br><br><strong>Recommendations:</strong> Arielle recommends checking out <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BTS_(band)">BTS</a>, if you haven’t already. Lauren recommends Emily Dreyfuss’s <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/melinda-gates-tech-women-empowerment/">compelling interview with Melinda Gates</a>. Peter recommends this <a href="https://www.theragun.com/?lang=en_US">percussive therapy instrument</a>, no really. <br>Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Peter Rubin is @<a href="https://twitter.com/provenself">provenself</a>. Michael Calore is on vacation this week, but can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com/">Solar Keys</a>.<br><br><br><br>
May 10, 2019
The Making of Adam Savage
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You might know Adam Savage as the co-host of the television show <em>MythBusters</em>, as the editor of Tested.com, or as the host of countless web videos that show him building machines, sewing costumes for Comic-Con, and occasionally blowing something up in his San Francisco workshop. Now Savage is the host of a new television show, <em>Savage Builds</em>, coming to the Science and Discovery channels on June 12. Savage has also written a memoir about his life as a maker called <em>Every Tool’s a Hammer</em>. We bring Adam on the show to talk about his new book, his new show, why he hates homework, how the gig economy exposes the motives of late-stage capitalist entities, and so much more.<br><strong>Show notes</strong>: Find Adam Savage <a href="http://simonandschusterpublishing.com/adam-savage-sweeps/">on book tour</a>. See his new show starting June 12. Find Tested on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDJtJKMICpb9B1qf7qjEOA">YouTube</a> and at <a href="https://www.tested.com/">Tested.com</a>.<br><strong>Recommendations:</strong> Arielle recommends <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Machines-Like-Me-Ian-McEwan/dp/0385545118"><em>Machines Like Me</em></a> by Ian McEwan. Mike recommends Stephen King’s memoir, <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Writing-Memoir-Craft-Stephen-King/dp/1439193630/"><em>On Writing</em></a>. Lauren recommends Arielle’s story on the <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/helvetica-now/">Helvetica Now typeface</a>. Adam recommends <a href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312427565/"><em>The Right Stuff</em></a> by Tom Wolfe.<br>Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Our guest Adam Savage is @<a href="https://twitter.com/donttrythis">donttrythis</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.<br><br><br>
May 03, 2019
Preserving Your Right to Repair Your Gadgets
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What happens when your drop your phone and shatter the screen? Or when its battery starts to grow noticeably weaker? These common technological woes are things that you should be able to remedy yourself—just buy some parts, get some tools, and fix your device. But it’s not that simple. Gadget manufacturers have been increasingly restricting access to the parts, tools, and knowledge required for regular consumers to fix their broken tech. Instead, consumers have to turn to authorized repair technicians, and often pay a lot more, to get something fixed.<br>Our guest this week, Nathan Proctor, is the national director of the Right to Repair Campaign for US PIRG. Proctor and his team advocate for state and federal legislation that secures consumer access to hardware repairs and software updates so they can handle these repairs themselves.<br>Also this week, Peter Rubin tells us about what to expect from the new PlayStation console Sony plans to release next year, and we discuss the problems with early review units of the Samsung Galaxy Fold smartphone.<br><strong>Show notes</strong>: Read Peter Rubin on <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/exclusive-sony-next-gen-console/">the next PlayStation</a>. Aarian Marshall outlines the <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/injuries-force-lyft-hit-brakes-e-bikes-ambitions/">problems with Lyft’s e-bikes</a>. Nathan Proctor recently wrote about the <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/right-to-repair-elizabeth-warren-farmers/">Right to Repair</a> movement in WIRED. <br>Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Our guests: Nathan Proctor is @<a href="https://twitter.com/nProctor">nProctor</a> and Peter Rubin is @<a href="https://twitter.com/provenself">provenself</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.<br><br><br><br>
Apr 19, 2019
What Happens to Uber After Its IPO?
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Uber filed to go public this week. No big surprise there; everyone in the industry has been waiting months for the ride-hailing giant to hit the accelerator on its IPO. What did raise an eyebrow were the details the company divulged in its filing—from how it views the future of its business to what it considers its primary challenges in the marketplace.<br>This week, we invite WIRED transportation reporter Aarian Marshall back onto the show to break down all of the revelations in Uber’s S1 filing. You can read her news story about the upcoming Uber IPO <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/ubers-losing-less-moneybut-growing-less-too/">right here on WIRED</a>.<br>Also on this week’s pod, Mike, Lauren, and Arielle discuss the first photo of a black hole, the latest privacy concerns around Alexa devices, and some upcoming changes to Facebook’s News Feed. <br><strong>Show notes</strong>: <br>Read <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/ubers-losing-less-moneybut-growing-less-too/">Aarian on Uber</a>. Read <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/alexa-google-assistant-echo-smart-speaker-privacy-controls/">Lily Hay Newman on Alexa</a>, <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/scientists-reveal-the-first-picture-of-a-black-hole/">Sophia Chen on the black hole pic</a>, and <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/facebook-click-gap-news-feed-changes/">Emily Dreyfuss and Issie Lapowsky on Facebook</a>. Recommendations this week are <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/jumbo-privacy-assistant/id1454039975?mt=8">Jumbo Privacy Assistant</a>, <a href="https://www.instagram.com/1bike1world/?hl=en">1bike1world</a>, and the <a href="https://www.criterionchannel.com/">Criterion Channel</a>. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>. Our guest Aarian Marshall is @<a href="https://twitter.com/AarianMarshall">aarianmarshall</a>. Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com">Solar Keys</a>.
Apr 12, 2019
Introducing Citadel Dropouts: A Game of Thrones Podcast
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We’re confused about what exactly this hoped-for Targaryen Restoration is about, politically. And is Game of Thrones, like, good anymore? Laura Hudson and Spencer Ackerman preview the political and social themes fueling the forthcoming final season of Game of Thrones.
Apr 12, 2019
Reporting From Syria
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This week, we’re joined by a special guest: freelance war correspondent Kenneth R. Rosen. Ken is working on a series of stories for WIRED about the reconstruction efforts in Syria. The first of Ken’s stories, “The Body Pullers of Syria,” published earlier this week. We talk to Ken about how he does his job, the tools he uses to report the stories of the men and women rebuilding the war-torn cities, and the methods he uses to stay safe in the field.
Apr 05, 2019
The Case for Male Birth Control
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Hormonal male contraception is not a new idea––in fact, researchers have been working on solutions for men the pill was invented for women. But early tests around male contraceptives were inconclusive, and as birth control pills exploded, interest in a male version of this waned.&nbsp;<br>A new male contraceptive gel, one that reduces sperm count, could change that. It’s been in the works for more than a decade, WIRED’s Arielle Pardes reports this week, and it looks promising. Even if the gel eventually make its way to pharmacies, though, there may still be societal hurdles to overcome. And survey results are mixed, Arielle tells us on this week’s Gadget Lab podcast: Some men indicate they would be reluctant to use birth control, while others are for it.&nbsp;<br>Also on this week’s pod, Mike, Lauren, and Arielle discuss all of the news announced at Apple’s services-focused event on Monday. You could say it was an unusual presentation, as far as Apple events go. But on the upside: Oprah was there.&nbsp;<br><strong>Show notes</strong>:&nbsp;You can read Arielle’s story about the clinical trials of the latest male contraceptive gel, called NES/T, <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/how-we-reproduce-male-contraceptive/">here</a>. Here’s <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/everything-apple-announced-march-25-apple-event-news-tv-card/">everything that was announced</a> during Monday’s Apple event. Lauren Goode and Peter Rubin also wrote a story about <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/apple-subscriptions-apple-news-plus-apple-card-apple-arcade/">the real choice you make when you’re using Apple’s services</a>.&nbsp;<br><strong>Recommendations</strong>:&nbsp;Arielle recommends the <a href="https://dayoneapp.com/">Day One journaling app</a>. Lauren recommends <a href="https://cash.app/">Square’s Cash app</a> for peer-to-peer payments. Mike recommends season 2 of the <a href="https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/pushkin-industries/broken-record"><em>Broken Record</em></a> podcast, particularly the episode with Questlove.&nbsp;<br>Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/pardesoteric">pardesoteric</a>. Lauren Goode is @<a href="https://twitter.com/LaurenGoode">laurengoode</a>. Michael Calore can be found at @<a href="https://twitter.com/snackfight">snackfight</a>.&nbsp;<br>Bling the main hotline at @<a href="https://twitter.com/gadgetlab">GadgetLab</a>. Our theme song is by <a href="https://solarkeys.bandcamp.com/">Solar Keys</a>.<br><br>
Mar 29, 2019
Game On at Google
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Google’s Project Stream, first unveiled last October, gave gamers a taste of what it would be like to stream heavy games directly from the cloud – from a Chrome browser, even. That effort has now evolved into something much, much more ambitious. At the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco this week, Google formally announced Stadia. Stadia is Google’s bet on next-generation gaming: It exists entirely in the cloud, with a physical, WiFi-enabled controller that connects to whatever computer you’re playing on. <br><em>WIRED</em>’s Peter Rubin was at GDC this week for Google’s big reveal, and he joins the latest Gadget Lab episode to talk about how Stadia is supposed to work when it launches later this year. The Gadget Lab team also discuss how Google is taking aim at Microsoft’s and Amazon’s cloud gaming services, and tries to answer the most important question of all: Is streaming and capturing 4K games totally going to destroy our Google Drive subscriptions? <br><strong>Show notes</strong>: You can read Peter Rubin’s story on Stadia <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/google-stadia-cloud-gaming/">here</a>. Lily Hay Newman’s story on Facebook’s latest security mess is <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/facebook-passwords-plaintext-change-yours/">here.</a> <br><strong>Recommendations</strong>: Peter recommends Whole Foods 365 granola bars. Arielle recommends the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/03/20/magazine/train-across-america-amtrak.html">latest Voyages issue</a> of <em>The New York Times Magazine</em>. Lauren recommends reading <em>WIRED</em>’s stories this week about Apple’s hardware updates, specifically the <a href="https://www.wired.com/review/review-ipad-mini-2019/">iPad Mini review</a> if you’re in the market for a tiny iPad. Mike recommends this recent <em>New Yorker</em> article about <a href="https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/stepping-into-the-uncanny-unsettling-world-of-shen-yun">Shen Yun</a>.&nbsp;
Mar 22, 2019
Flickr Cofounder Questions Big Tech
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“Should this exist?” is not typically a question that technologists ask themselves, Caterina Fake says. The Flickr cofounder-turned-investor says that most entrepreneurs and engineers will ask themselves, “Can this exist, could this exist, how can we gain the funding to make this exist? Those are the conversations we’ve been having for the past 15 to 20 years about technology.”<br>But that narrative in tech is evolving, Fake tells WIRED on this week’s Gadget Lab podcast, from one of ideation, optimism, and changing the world, to a stark reality in which technology can do as much harm as good. The cracks are showing, and suddenly, Fake says, “People are asking, ‘Whoa, what have we done? Is this what we really wanted to build?’” That line of questioning was the genesis for her own podcast, <a href="https://shouldthisexist.com">“<em>Should This Exist?</em>”</a>, a WaitWhat original series made in partnership with <em>Quartz</em>.&nbsp;<br><br><strong>Show notes</strong>: On this week’s show we also talked about the <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/boeing-737-max-8-ethiopia-crash-faa-software-fix-lion-air/">tragic Ethiopian Airlines crash</a>, Elizabeth Warren’s <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/elizabeth-warren-break-up-amazon-facebook-google/">call to break up Big Tech</a>, and Apple’s <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/apple-event-march-2019-all-about-services/">upcoming media-related event</a>.&nbsp;<br><strong>Additional note</strong>: WIRED’s Gadget Lab team taped this podcast before news broke about a mass shooting in Christchurch, New Zealand, that was live-streamed on the internet. At the time of publication, <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/new-zealand-shooting-video-social-media/">at least 49 people were reported to have been killed</a>. WIRED will continue to follow this story.&nbsp;<br><br><strong>Recommendations</strong>: Caterina recommends <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Lost-Time-Lectures-Proust-Classics/dp/1681372584"><em>Lost Time: Lectures on Proust in a Soviet Prison Camp</em></a>. Arielle recommends the <a href="https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/death-clock/nddjbfjdamhcmdcghehomomgppbigjam?hl=en">Death Clock extension for Chrome</a>, which constantly reminds you of your mortality. Mike recommends Esther Perel’s podcast <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/where-should-we-begin-with-esther-perel/id1237931798?mt=2"><em>Where Should We Begin?</em></a> Lauren recommends the new HBO documentary <a href="https://www.hbo.com/documentaries/the-inventor-out-for-blood-in-silicon-valley"><em>The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley</em></a>.&nbsp;<br>
Mar 15, 2019
How to Quit Your Tech Job
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Jessica Powell was the top communications executive at Google when she found herself Googling, in no uncertain search terms, how to quit her job at Google. She tried approximately 837 different tactics before she ended up taking the leap, and now she’s a startup founder, a contributor to Medium and The New York Times, and the author of The Big Disruption, a novel about a giant Silicon Valley tech company. The eventual burnout and dissatisfaction Powell experienced is not unique in Silicon Valley, she tells us on this week’s Gadget Lab podcast. But it can be difficult to acknowledge when you’re working in an industry filled with mission-driven companies and leaders who want to “change the world” (and in some cases–––they do). Powell also talks about the commercialization of International Women’s Day, and speaks candidly about Facebook’s latest manifesto around privacy. “Facebook is in such a bad place that I feel like if they cough, people say, ‘That cough is just a way to get more data!’” Powell tells the Gadget Lab hosts. “There are so many conspiracy theories, and sometimes you just have to realize a cough is just a cough. But, I also don’t think that’s the case with this announcement.” Show notes: You can read WIRED editor-in-chief Nick Thompson’s interview with Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg here, as well as a follow up story from Thompson and Issie Lapowsky. Read Klint Finley&#8217;s story about a possible return to Obama-era net neutrality rules here. For some of Powell’s recent writing, check out her Medium page. Recommendations: Jessica Powell recommends putting vegetable puree into buttermilk-free biscuits to trick your kids into eating their greens. She also recommends the book The Radiance of the King, by Camara Laye. Arielle recommends this WIRED guide to TikTok, and also, TikTok. Mike recommends the Beastie Boys Book audiobook, which is narrated by an all-star cast of characters. Lauren recommends Workin&#8217; Moms, the CBC show that&#8217;s now on Netflix. If you have feedback for us, please, leave us a review! Or you can send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just
Mar 08, 2019
Alex Kipman’s Holographic Tendencies
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Microsoft just unveiled a brand new product, but it really doesn’t want to hype it. That’s according to Alex Kipman, technical fellow at Microsoft who is credited with inventing Kinect and HoloLens. Kipman joins the Gadget Lab podcast this week to talk about HoloLens 2, the next-generation mixed reality headset. HoloLens 2 has some significant upgrades: It’s lighter, more comfortable, and “smarter” than the previous version. Due to a new, patented optics module, its field-of-view is larger. But if you’re an officer dweller or average tech consumer, you likely won’t be buying one, both because of its price ($3500) and because of who it’s built for. Microsoft is focused entirely on commercial clients; think frontline employees, field workers, and maintenance professionals. “The majority of the world does not sit in front of desks all day, and a lot of these jobs are being digitally transformed,” Kipman told WIRED in an earlier interview. “Things are getting more complex. There’s much more need to travel around the world. Mixed reality, in those cases, can transform things.” Also on this week’s show: What does the viral Momo hoax say about our internet tendencies? Is Facebook getting into crypto? And, Amazon’s Project Zero will shift responsibility for flagging counterfeits into the hands of the brands being copied. Show notes: You can read all about the new HoloLens here. Also, here’s how to avoid falling for internet hoaxes. Recommendations: Arielle recommends Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials by Malcolm Harris. Mike recommends Barbarian Days, a Pulitzer Prize-winning memoir about surfing, by William Finnegan. Lauren recommends Russian Doll on Netflix, and does a terrible Natasha Lyonne impression while she’s at it. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. We&#8217;re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it&#8217;s release
Mar 01, 2019
You’ve Got to Know When to Fold ‘Em
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At its flagship phone event this week in San Francisco, Samsung announced not one but four different versions of the new Galaxy S10: A phone with a 6.1-inch display, a plus-sized model, a “less expensive” version of the phone, and a handset that will support 5G networks when it ships. But the most interesting part of the launch was undeniably Samsung’s reveal of its new foldable phone, the Galaxy Fold. It wasn’t the very first time this phone was shown off, but this time around Samsung showed a demo, shared a ship date, and announced that it would cost a whopping $1980. How will a foldable phone fit into our lives? How does any super-expensive smartphone fit into our lives (and our budgets) these days? These are a couple of the questions we had for Axios chief tech correspondent Ina Fried, who has tracked the mobile industry for more than a decade and who joined us on this week’s Gadget Lab podcast. Ina brought nearly half a dozen phone models with her to compare to the new Samsung wares, and, even though it was visual demonstration on an audio podcast, you’re not going to want to miss this. Show notes: You can read all about Samsung&#8217;s new phones here, along with all of the other hardware Samsung announced this week. Here&#8217;s Brian Barrett&#8217;s story on the folding phone. If you&#8217;ve already made up your mind to order one of the new Galaxy S10 phones, here&#8217;s how to do it. Recommendations: Ina recommends seeing The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part, as well as the third and final installment in the How to Train Your Dragon trilogy. Arielle recommends the astrology app Co-Star, especially if you&#8217;ve deleted Facebook and are having trouble keeping track of birthdays. Lauren recommends Purple Carrot, a vegan-friendly meal-kit service. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. We&#8217;re also
Feb 23, 2019
The Treacherous Allure of OG Usernames
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Product designer and internet native Chris Messina was lucky enough to snag the username @chris on Instagram back when Instagram was known as Burbn, and, like all of his early usernames, it became a part of his digital identity. But having an OG username has exposed him to hacks, scams, and generally shady online exchanges. It has also lead him down the path of more existential questions about life online––like, is the internet still fun? On this week’s Gadget Lab podcast we talk to Chris about the biggest offer he’s ever been made for his name, ephemerality in apps, and what the future of social media looks like once the concept of “following” goes away. Also covered in this episode of the Gadget Lab podcast, which was taped on Valentine’s Day: Amazon’s big break up with New York City. After a months-long search for “HQ2” that ended in an eventual commitment to build out corporate offices in Long Island City, Queens, Amazon has now backed out of the deal. While not everyone is happy about Amazon’s retreat, there were also plenty of good reasons for the resistance to the deal. Show notes: You can read WIRED’s story about Amazon backing out of New York City here. Say goodbye to NASA’s Mars Opportunity rover here. And if you want to see what Chris has been up to, follow the hashtag #Noyoucanthavemyusername on Twitter. Recommendations: Chris Messina recommends Otter.ai. Arielle Pardes recommends the Tokimeki unfollow tool. Lauren Goode recommends Becoming, by Michelle Obama. Mike Calore recommends Nanban, by Tim Anderson. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. We&#8217;re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it&#8217;s released. If you still can&#8217;t figur
Feb 15, 2019
The App Smackdown
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Move fast and break app store rules: That very well may have been Facebook’s motto for awhile now, only, we’re just learning about it this week. After TechCrunch reported that Facebook was sidestepping Apple’s rules for enterprise apps and distributing a market research app to iOS users as young as 13 years old, Apple temporarily removed Facebook’s internal apps from its enterprise app program. Facebook wasn’t the only guilty party: Google also had its wrist slapped by Apple this week, for a sneaky app of its own. The big question is what happens next, and whether this will only escalate growing tensions between Apple and Facebook, two massive tech companies that monetize their user bases in fundamentally different ways. Also on this week’s Gadget Lab podcast: WIRED’s transportation editor Alex Davies joins us to talk about Tesla earnings and its preparation for the production of the Model Y. Show notes: You can read WIRED’s coverage of the app smackdown here and here. And here’s Alex Davies’ story on the Tesla Model Y. Recommendations: Arielle recommends these funky new Casper smart lights for your bedside. Lauren pre-recommends Maid, a book by Stephanie Land (pre-recommends because she hasn’t finished the book yet.) Mike recommends the TV series Lodge 49, a comedic drama that will shatter any illusions you still had about a decent, post-recession, middle-class existence. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. We&#8217;re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it&#8217;s released. If you still can&#8217;t figure it out, or there&#8217;s another platform you use that we&#8217;re not on, let us know.
Feb 01, 2019
Amazon Delivery Bots Are Here
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Kids are particularly terrible for robots. At least, that’s what researchers in Japan discovered when they let a robot roam around a shopping center in Osaka in 2015. A group of kids antagonized the robot, forcing the researchers to program an algorithm that would give the bot the agency to evade abuse. That’s just one example of challenging social interactions between humans and robots, and one that technologists have almost certainly considered when building and designing delivery bots. Including the folks at Amazon: This week, the e-commerce behemoth dropped a web page for Scout, its new delivery robot. For now, Scout’s impact is small. The six-wheeled delivery bot is only piloting in Snohomish County, Washington, and only with Prime customers who request short-term delivery. But anything Amazon does has the potential to fundamentally disrupt shipping (not to mention a whole slew of eager startups that have been building their own automated delivery solutions). On this week’s Gadget Lab podcast, WIRED’s Arielle Pardes and Matt Simon deconstruct Scout and talk about the inevitable challenges that arise when you let a robot roam the sidewalks alongside humans and animals. Show notes: You can read Arielle and Matt’s excellent story here. Also: Smartphones are getting weird in 2019. Real weird. Recommendations: Three out of four dentists (or Gadget Lab podcasters) recommend reading books this week. Matt Simon recommends Darkness: A Cultural History. Arielle recommends Valley of Genius. Mike recommends Recomendo, which is quite fitting. Lauren is slacking off from reading this week and recommends using the Google Home Hub as part of your nighttime routine. Don’t worry, it doesn’t have a camera. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. We&#8217;re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wir
Jan 25, 2019
Nike’s Truly Smart Sneakers
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Self-lacing sneakers have been the dream since Marty McFly first rocked Nike MAGs in 1989, but most attempts at turning shoe leather into smart sneakers have been expensive, produced in small batches, and frankly, a little gimmicky. Until now: Earlier this week, Nike revealed Adapt BB, the company&#8217;s latest self-lacing basketball shoe. And these actually seem &#8230; smart. WIRED&#8217;s Peter Rubin joins the Gadget Lab podcast this week to talk about what it&#8217;s like to wear the new kicks, and describes all of the tech that goes into them. At $350, the Adapt BB&#8217;s are a little more accessible than previous iterations, though as Peter points out, they&#8217;re likely to be worn by professional athletes and Nike-backed college teams to start. Also on this week&#8217;s podcast: WIRED&#8217;s Nitasha Tiku talks about a group of Googlers who have launched a public awareness campaign about mandatory arbitration agreements, arguing that employers use them to suppress workers facing harassment and discrimination. Show notes: Peter&#8217;s story on Nike&#8217;s Adapt BB is here. Read all about mandatory arbitration at tech companies here. Worried about the latest data breach? Check and see if you&#8217;ve been hacked. Wish Google would make a legitimately sporty smartwatch to compete with Apple Watch? You might be in luck. Recommendations: Peter recommends watching Detroiters, on Comedy Central. Lauren recommends Fyre Fraud, on Hulu. Mike recommends watching the 1995 film Before Sunrise. Clearly, &#8220;watching gluttonous amounts of streaming media&#8221; is on our collective list of 2019 resolutions. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. We&#8217;re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.c
Jan 19, 2019
The Best of CES
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We came. We saw. We touched a lot of gadgets. This week was the annual CES, one of the world’s largest consumer electronics show, and WIRED’s team was on the ground covering all of the top tech trends to emerge from the show. In this week’s episode of the Gadget Lab podcast, Mike, Arielle, and Lauren talk about CES’s big security #fail, what all of these connected gadgets mean for the future of healthcare, and robots. Lots of robots. Later in the episode, Arielle talks to Jen Wong, the chief operating officer of Reddit, about the company’s “growing up” moment and how it plans to monetize its users. Show notes: Check out our best of CES list when you’ve finished listening to the pod. Our CES reporting goes beyond gadgets, as well: We have stories on how insidious logging your child’s data has become, why you should ignore the 5G hype (for now), and how women’s sexuality is apparently still taboo at CES. Recommendations this week: Arielle recommends getting a Yubikey for all your 2FA needs; Mike recommends the Mui wooden smart home panel (when it ships); Lauren recommends checking out Google Assistant on Sonos, and, if you happen to be a hotel concierge, looking into Google’s new Interpreter Mode. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. We&#8217;re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets posted to wired.com as soon as it&#8217;s released. If you still can&#8217;t figure it out, or there&#8217;s another platform you use that we&#8217;re not on, let us know.
Jan 12, 2019
The Year in Tech, in One Word
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If you had to sum up the year in tech in one word, what word would you choose? That’s what we at the Gadget Lab asked ourselves as we looked to somehow recap a year’s worth of tech-related drama in approximately 45 minutes. 2018 was the year that we learned about Cambridge Analytica; that social media’s role in the 2016 U.S. election came into sharper focus; that top tech executives were put in the Congressional hot seat; and that tech workers spoke out about everything from brutal work environments to how their firms’ technologies were being used by government agencies. At the same time, 2018 was also a year of remarkable advancements in artificial intelligence, space exploration, and even the future of transport. And at the very least, our increasing awareness of some of the tech industry’s practices could lead us to a place in the new year where we&#8217;re making better decisions about what’s good and what’s not-so-good for us tech-consuming mortals. That’s what we’re telling ourselves, anyway. Also on this week’s podcast, Lauren talks to Brynn Putnam, the founder and CEO of Mirror, a new digital health-and-fitness company that live streams workout classes through a mirror in your living room. The future of fitness has arrived, and we are never leaving our homes. Show notes: For a rundown of just some of the Facebook scandals that have happened this year, check out Issie Lapowsky’s story. And here’s Lauren’s story about new interactive fitness systems, including Mirror. Recommendations this week: Arielle recommends reading Charles Duhigg’s story about anger in the latest issue of The Atlantic. Mike recommends a podcast from Malcolm Gladwell called &#8220;Broken Record.&#8221; Lauren recommends taking advantage of the “screen time” dashboards on your smartphone, getting a sense of how much time you’re spending on non-essential tasks, and then really, truly, seriously guys, putting down your phone more in the new year. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. If you use Android, you can find us in the Google Play Music app just by tapping here. You can also download an app like Pocket Casts or Radio Public, and search for Gadget Lab. And in case you really need it, here&#8217;s the RSS feed. We&#8217;re also on Soundcloud, and every episode gets
Dec 21, 2018
Apocalypse Now
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Most people, at this point, believe that climate change is a real thing that will harm future generations of humans. And yet, a cognitive dissonance exists around that knowledge and our sense of responsibility: A much smaller percentage of people believe that climate change is impacting them personally, according to Yale’s climate survey program. It is indeed impacting humans right now, with clear and compelling evidence that the global average temperature is much higher than anything modern society has experienced. And that has lead us to a whole host of issues, some of which WIRED writer Adam Rogers discusses with the Gadget Lab team on this week’s podcast. So what can we humans do to fix things – and how much of it can actually be fixed by personal actions, versus widespread policy? How much does our own consumption of tech add to the problem? We ask Adam these questions and more. Show notes: You can find some of Adam’s recent work here and here. Issie Lapowsky covered Google CEO Sundar Pichai’s trip to Washington this week. Brian Barrett has the scoop on Intel’s new chip packaging technology. And what would we do without Elon Musk? Recommendations this week: Adam recommends &#8220;Typeset in the Future&#8221; by Dave Addey, about the typefaces and UIUX in classic science fiction movies. It’s all about the Eurostile Bold Extended. Mike recommends a game called Goat Simulator. Really, you should try it. Arielle recommends Moleskin&#8217;s extremely satisfying to-do app on iOS, called Actions, as well as Adam&#8217;s book &#8220;Proof: The Science of Booze.&#8221; Lauren recommends &#8220;Swell,&#8221; a book by Liz Clark about her post-college voyage sailing through and around Southern California, Central America, and the Pacific Islands, on a forty-foot sailboat named Swell. Send the Gadget Lab hosts feedback on their personal Twitter feeds. Arielle Pardes can be found at @pardesoteric. Lauren Goode is @laurengoode. Michael Calore can be found at @snackfight. Bling the main hotline at @GadgetLab. Our theme song is by Solar Keys. How to Listen You can always listen to this week&#8217;s podcast through the audio player on this page, but if you want to subscribe for free to get every episode, here&#8217;s how: If you&#8217;re on an iPhone or iPad, open the app called Podcasts, or just tap this link. You can also download an app like Overcast or Pocket Casts, and search
Dec 14, 2018