LSE: Public lectures and events

By London School of Economics and Political Science

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

Episode Date
LSE IQ Episode 26 | Why do we need food banks? [Audio]
00:38:56
Speaker(s): Dr. Aaron Reeves, Laura Lane, Daphine Aikens | Welcome to LSE’s award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists and other experts to answer an intelligent question. In this episode, Joanna Bale asks ‘Why do we need food banks?’ She talks to LSE’s Aaron Reeves and Laura Lane, as well as Daphine Aikens, founder and CEO of Hammersmith and Fulham food bank, and some of her clients.
Aug 13, 2019
The Levelling: what's next after globalisation [Audio]
01:25:57
Speaker(s): Michael O'Sullivan | The liberal, globalised world order is withering according to Michael O'Sullivan in his new book The Levelling: What's Next After Globalization which he will talk about in this lecture. The levelling is the process of ironing out imbalances like indebtedness and inequality, and proposing new ideas and frameworks to kickstart the next world order. The Levelling will involve the levelling of political accountability and responsibility between political leaders and “the people”, the levelling of institutional power—away from central banks and defunct twentieth-century institutions such as the WTO and IMF and toward new treaties (on risk and monetary policy) and new institutions (for example, a truly effective and powerful climate body and an institution or agreement that oversees cybersecurity). It will also involve the levelling out of wealth between rich and poor countries and between the very rich and “the rest,” preferably with “the rest” enjoying both better organic growth and a greater share of this growth. Then the levelling out of power between nations and regions is what the concept of the multipolar world is about, and within it, different regions will have different reserves of power. Michael O’Sullivan, is the former chief investment officer at Credit Suisse. Michael joined Credit Suisse in July 2007 from State Street Global Markets. Prior to joining Credit Suisse, Michael spent over ten years as a global strategist at a number of sell-side institutions and has also taught finance at Princeton and Oxford Universities. He was educated at University College Cork in Ireland and Balliol College in Oxford, where he obtained M.Phil and D.Phil degrees as a Rhodes Scholar. He was an independent member of Ireland's National Economic Social Council from 2011 to 2016 Thomas Sampson is an Associate Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELevelling
Jun 27, 2019
Britain and Europe: how did we get here, and where do we go next? [Audio]
01:16:43
Speaker(s): David Miliband | This year’s Maurice Fraser annual lecture will take the form of a conversation between David Miliband and Professor Kevin Featherstone, followed by questions from the audience. The discussion will assess the state of play of the UK’s attempt to find a parliamentary majority for leaving the EU, and put into geopolitical context the choices and the stakes in the negotiations about our future relations with our European neighbours. David Miliband (@DMiliband) is the President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee and former British Foreign Secretary. He oversees the agency’s relief and development operations in over 30 countries, its refugee resettlement and assistance programs throughout the United States and the IRC’s advocacy efforts in Washington and other capitals on behalf of the world’s most vulnerable people. From 2007 to 2010, he served as the youngest Foreign Secretary in the United Kingdom, in three decades. In 2016 David was named one of the World’s Greatest Leaders by Fortune Magazine and in 2018 he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. David Miliband is also the author of the upcoming book, Rescue: Refugees and the Political Crisis of Our Time. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics. He is the Director of the Hellenic Observatory and Co-Chair of LSEE: Research on South-East Europe within the European Institute The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Jun 21, 2019
Global Health and Inequality [Audio]
01:30:09
Speaker(s): Professor Sudhir Anand, Professor Amartya Sen | To ensure that people live long and healthy lives it is important to know what kills different groups of people in different places. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) based on the Disability-Adjusted Life Year has been developed to do this. This lecture shows how this measure leads to various anomalies and biases, in particular it underestimates the health problems experienced by women and children. Sudhir Anand is Research Director of Global Equity Initiative at Harvard University and Centennial Professor at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Director of the International Inequalities Institute and Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Eva Colorni Memorial Trust was established by Amartya Sen to commemorate the life and work of Eva Colorni and to reflect and further her belief in the possibility of social justice. Eva was an excellent teacher and writer whose work and passion were concerned with analysing and redressing inequality. The main activities of the Trust are to award bursaries to undergraduate students of economics who are experiencing hardship at London Metropolitan University, where Eva taught for many years, and to hold lectures on the theme of social justice. The first five lectures were published in a book, called Living As Equals and includes an essay by Amartya Sen on "Social Commitment and Democracy”. There is more information about the Trust and past lectures on the Eva Colorni Memorial Trust website. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEvaColorni
Jun 18, 2019
Finding My Voice: my journey to the West Wing and the path forward [Audio]
00:57:17
Speaker(s): Valerie Jarrett | Join Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama in conversation with LSE's Peter Trubowitz about her new book. When Valerie Jarrett interviewed a promising young lawyer named Michelle Robinson in July 1991 for a job in Chicago city government, neither knew that it was the first step on a path that would end in the White House. Jarrett soon became Michelle and Barack Obama’s trusted personal adviser and family confidante; in the White House, she was known as the one who “got” him and helped him engage his public life. Jarrett joined the White House team on January 20, 2009 and departed with the First Family on January 20, 2017, and she was in the room–in the Oval Office, on Air Force One, and everywhere else–when it all happened. No one has as intimate a view of the Obama Years, nor one that reaches back as many decades, as Jarrett shares in Finding My Voice. Valerie Jarrett (@ValerieJarrett) was the Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama for his eight years in office. She now serves as a Senior Advisor to both the Obama Foundation and Attn:, Senior Distinguished Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and President of the Board of When We All Vote. Her book, Finding My Voice, debuted on the New York Times Bestsellers list this year. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEJarrett
Jun 18, 2019
The Problem of Modernity: reinterpreting decolonisation and the modern? [Audio]
01:24:51
Speaker(s): Amit Chaudhuri | How might the modern, rather than the human, be recovered as a way of looking at a common inheritance? And why is modernity resistant to being recovered? Amit Chaudhuri (@AmitChaudhuri) is an essayist, literary critic and the author of seven novels. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Jun 06, 2019
An Unexpected Convergence: informality, the gig-economy, and digital platforms [Audio]
01:30:32
Speaker(s): Professor Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg | The Annual Economica Coase lecture is jointly sponsored by the journal Economica and the Department of Economics. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg is Elihu Professor of Economics at Yale University and Chief Economist of the World Bank Group. She is former Vice-President of the American Economic Association and President elect of the Econometric Society (for 2021). She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of both Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and Sloan Research Fellowships, and recipient of the Bodossaki Prize in Social Sciences. She is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economics Research (NBER – currently on leave) and board member of the Bureau of Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD). From 2011-2017 she was Editor-in-Chief of the American Economic Review. She has published widely in the areas of applied microeconomics, international trade, development, and industrial organization. She holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and a Diplom from the University of Freiburg, Germany. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is a Professor of Economics, Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at the LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Economica (@EconomicaLSE) is an international peer-reviewed academic journal, covering research in all branches of economics. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECoase
Jun 04, 2019
Molyneux's Problem [Audio]
01:22:35
Speaker(s): Dr Marjolein Degenaar, Barry Ginley, Dr Brian Glenney | William Molyneux posed the following question: Consider a person who has been born blind and who has learnt to distinguish a globe and a cube by touch. If this person could suddenly see, would they be able to distinguish these objects by sight alone? This seventeenth-century thought experiment, known as ‘Molyneux’s problem’, received attention from some of philosophy’s greatest minds. We discuss how thinkers like Locke and Leibniz, as well as artists with visual impairments, responded to Molyneux’s challenge. Marjolein Degenaar is the author of Molyneux’s Problem: Three Centuries of Discussion on the Perception of Form. Barry Ginley is Equality and Access Adviser, Victoria & Albert Museum. Brian Glenney is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Norwich University. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow, Forum for Philosophy and a Teaching Fellow in Philosophy, UCD The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
Jun 03, 2019
Anti-System Politics in Europe: the crisis of market liberalism in rich democracies [Audio]
01:27:14
Speaker(s): Dr Jonathan Hopkin | At this year’s Annual Lecture, which marks the 10th anniversary of LEQS and follows just days after this year’s European parliamentary elections, Jonathan Hopkin will discuss the recent ruptures in the politics of the rich democracies, signalled by electoral instability across Europe, as well as dramatic events like the election of Donald Trump to the US Presidency and the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union. Dr Hopkin argues that these tumultuous political developments are a consequence of a longer-term crisis of market liberalism, resulting from the abandonment of the post-war model of egalitarian capitalism in the 1970s. This shift in politics entailed weakening the democratic process in favor of an opaque, technocratic form of governance that allows voters little opportunity to influence policy. With the financial crisis of the late 2000s, these arrangements became unsustainable, as incumbent politicians were unable to provide solutions to economic hardship. Electorates demanded change, and it had to come from outside the system. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Associate Professor of Comparative Politics in the Department of Government at LSE. Miriam Sorace (@MiriamSorace) is an LSE Fellow in EU Politics at LSE’s European Institute. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series (@leqsLSE) was established in May 2009 to publish high quality research on Europe and the European Union from scholars across LSE and beyond. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEurope
May 30, 2019
Replication Crisis? [Audio]
01:28:07
Speaker(s): Professor Alexander Bird, Dr Laura Fortunato, Professor Marcus Munafò | The hallmark of good science is often supposed to be experiments that produce the same results when repeated. But over the last number of years, scientists have replicated a number of established, high-profile experiments and produced different results. Does it point to serious flaws and biases in the sciences? Or is it evidence of the power of science to self-correct? And what can be done to make science more replicable? We explore whether the replication crisis undermines our trust in science. Alexander Bird is Peter Sowerby Professor of Philosophy and Medicine, KCL. Laura Fortunato is Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford. Marcus Munafò is Professor of Biological Psychology, University of Bristol. Jonathan Birch is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Associate Professor of Philosophy, LSE. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
May 28, 2019
State-like and State-dislike in the Anthropological Margins [Audio]
00:56:30
Speaker(s): Dr Judith Scheele | This lecture argues for a return to the study of political institutions in so-called “stateless societies”. Judith Scheele is Directrice d’études, École des hautes études en sciences sociales, France. Deborah James (@djameslse) is Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. This event is the Malinowski Memorial Lecture 2019. Anthropology (@LSEAnthropology) is the comparative study of culture and society. We ask big questions about what we have in common, and what makes us different. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMalinowski
May 23, 2019
Rethinking Human Rights: a southern response to western critics [Audio]
01:23:59
Speaker(s): Muthoni Wanyeki | In this lecture, Muthoni Wanyeki will draw on three decades of human rights activism with Kenyan, African and international organisations to push back against the western critique of human rights and to formulate her own assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the human rights movement in Africa and the global south. Muthoni Wanyeki is Regional Director of Open Society’s Africa Regional Office. Bronwen Manby (@BronwenManby) is a Visiting Fellow with LSE Human Rights and is an independent consultant in the field of human rights, democracy and good governance, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Bronwen is also a Principal Investigator at the LSE Middle East Centre. Based in the Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology), LSE Human Rights @LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHumanRights
May 22, 2019
Where Will Future Jobs and Growth Come From? Where Will Future Jobs and Growth Come From? [Audio]
01:30:33
Speaker(s): Professor John Van Reenen | John Van Reenen will discuss the impact of new technologies on jobs, wages and skills, and will assess how this impact will depend on the choices we make now as citizens, managers and voters. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Gordon Y. Billiard Professor of Management and Economics at MIT, and BP Professor of Economics at the LSE. Steve Pischke is Head of the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at the LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFutureJobs
May 22, 2019
Revolution Française: Emmanuel Macron and the quest to reinvent a nation [Audio]
01:24:52
Speaker(s): Sophie Pedder | Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist’s Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this updated edition, published with a new foreword, Pedder revisits her analysis of Macron’s troubles and triumphs in the light of the gilets jaunes protests. Sophie Pedder (@PedderSophie) is an award-winning journalist and the Paris Bureau Chief of The Economist since 2003. Iain Begg (@IainBeggLSE) is Professorial Research Fellow at the European Institute and Co-Director of the Dahrendorf Forum, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFrance
May 21, 2019
Internationale Blues: revolutionary pessimism and the politics of solidarity [Audio]
01:40:57
Speaker(s): Professor Robin D G Kelley | In the context of Afro-pessimism, this lecture will imagine "the Internationale," that great song of international solidarity and revolution transcending the nation, as a blues. Robin D G Kelley is Gary B Nash Endowed Chair in US History, University of California, Los Angeles. Ayça Çubukçu (@ayca_cu) is Associate Professor in Human Rights, Department of Sociology, LSE, and Co-Director of LSE Human Rights. This event is the annual lecture of the Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity (ICPS) research group at LSE. LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESolidarity
May 17, 2019
What Might the European Elections Mean for the Future of the EU? [Audio]
01:30:19
Speaker(s): Professor Matthew Goodwin, Dr Sara Hagemann, Professor Sara Hobolt | In this especially timely occasion, the panel will consider the impact of the upcoming European elections on the EU as a negotiating actor of Brexit and the future relationship with the UK. Will the balance of power change in the EU institutions? Is this the next stop for the populist wave, after Brexit? Matthew Goodwin (@GoodwinMJ) is Professor of Politics and International Relations, University of Kent. Sara Hagemann (@sarahagemann) is Associate Professor in European Politics, European Institute, LSE. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and Professor in the Department of Government, LSE. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the inaugural Dean of LSE's School of Public Policy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
May 16, 2019
On Strike On Strike [Audio]
01:31:23
Speaker(s): Dr Jo Grady, Dr Martin O'Neill, Dr Waseem Yaqoob | Workers of the world, unite! We discuss the history, politics, and ethics of strikes, and their place in the labour movement. Why do they happen and what makes for a successful strike? What justifies workers in withdrawing their labour to push bosses for improved pay and conditions? And will this event be cancelled due to strike action?! Jo Grady is a Senior Lecturer in Employment Relations, University of Sheffield. Martin O'Neill is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, University of York. Waseem Yaqoob is a Lecturer in the History of Modern Political Thought, University of Cambridge. Sarah Fine is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at KCL. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
May 14, 2019
Clear Bright Future: a radical defence of the human being [Audio]
01:27:19
Speaker(s): Paul Mason | We face a triple threat: authoritarian politicians, the possibility of intelligent machines and a secular fatalism and irrationality. But they can all be fought. Paul Mason explains how. Paul Mason (@paulmasonnews) is a British commentator, journalist and author. This event marks the publication of Paul's new book, Clear Bright Future: A Radical Defence of the Human Being. In the 1980s Paul worked as a special needs teacher, a theatre musical director and university lecturer before switching to journalism in the early 1990s. He was deputy editor of Computer Weekly during the dotcom boom and joined BBC Newsnight in 2001. ​He worked as economics editor on Newsnight, switching to Channel 4 News in 2013. During fifteen years as a public service broadcaster he covered stories as varied as Hurricane Katrina, the collapse of Lehman Brothers, Occupy and the Arab Spring. Plus the Greek crisis, the Taksim Square revolt and the 2014 Gaza war. He won the RTS Specialist Reporter Award in 2012 and was the inaugural winner of the Ellen Meiksins Wood prize in 2018. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
May 13, 2019
The Global Distribution of Income and the Politics of Globalisation - embedded liberal capitalism [Audio]
01:29:29
Speaker(s): Dr María Ana Lugo, Professor Branko Milanovic, Dr Paul Segal | The panel discuss the evolution of the global distribution of income and political implications, highlighting endogenous forces of rising inequality in liberal capitalism embedded in globalisation. The last quarter century of globalisation has witnessed the largest reshuffle of global incomes since the Industrial Revolution. The global Gini index declined by about 2 points over the twenty-five year period 1988-2013, while within the global distribution of income three changes stand out. First, China has graduated from the bottom ranks, creating an important global “middle” class that has transformed a twin-peaked 1988 global distribution into the single-peaked distribution we observe today. The main “winners” were country-deciles that in 1988 were around the median of the global income distribution, 90% of them representing people in Asia. Second, the “losers” were the country-deciles that in 1988 were around the 85th percentile of the global income distribution, almost 90% of them representing people in OECD economies. Third, the global top 1% was another “winner” whose incomes rose substantially. These three changes open up the following three political issues. In the developing world the big question is how to manage the rising expectations of meaningful political participation in emerging countries like China. In the rich countries, it is how to "placate" the relative losers of the last 30 years so that they do not turn away from globalisation and towards populist anti-immigrant policies. Cutting across all countries, and directly implicated in both of these questions, is how to constraint the rising economic and political power of the global elite. The increasing gap between the Western “top 1 percenters” and the middle classes that is at the origin of many of recent political developments may not be a temporary glitch, but may be driven by endogenous forces of rising inequality in systems of liberal capitalism embedded in globalisation. María Ana Lugo (@MariaAnaLugo) is a senior economist at the Poverty and Equity Global Practice at the World Bank and a council member of the Society for the Study of Economic Inequality (ECINEQ). Branko Milanovic (@BrankoMilan) is Visiting Presidential Professor and LIS Senior Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Paul Segal (@pdsegal) is Senior Lecturer in Economics, Department of International Development, Kings College London and Visiting Senior Fellow, International Inequalities Institute, LSE. David Soskice is School Professor of Political Science and Economics at the LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
May 10, 2019
From the 'End of History' to the Crisis of the Liberal Order: rethinking the end of the Cold War [Audio]
01:23:42
Speaker(s): Professor John Ikenberry, Professor Mary Kaldor, Professor Peter Trubowitz, Professor Vladislav Zubok | How and why has the liberal promise of the post-Cold War world not been realised? Where is the world now heading? Is the post-Cold War era over? In 1989 the Cold War ended. American pundit, Francis Fukuyama, confidently announced the end of history with the complete victory of liberalism word-wide. Globalisation and democracy represented the wave of the future. But thirty year later the tide of history appears to have turned. Fukuyama now talks bleakly of the crisis of democracy and the possible demise of the liberal order. Book after book proclaims the return of a 'new' Cold War between Russia, China and the West. And globalisation itself is in question. John Ikenberry is Albert G Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University. Mary Kaldor is Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit, Department of International Development, LSE. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Head of the Department of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at LSE. Vladislav Zubok is Professor of International History and author of The Idea of Russia: The Life and Work of Dmitry Likhachev. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.
May 08, 2019
The Meritocracy Trap [Audio]
01:31:17
Speaker(s): Professor Daniel Markovits | Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham. The meritocratic ideal—that social and economic rewards should track achievement rather than breeding—anchors the self-image of the age. Aristocracy has had its day, and meritocracy is now a basic tenet of civil religion in all advanced societies. Meritocracy promises to promote equality and opportunity by opening a previously hereditary elite to outsiders, armed with nothing save their own talents and ambitions. But today, middle-class children lose out to rich children at school, and middle-class adults lose out to elite graduates at work. At the same time, meritocracy entices an anxious and inauthentic elite into a pitiless, lifelong contest to secure income and status through its own excessive industry. In spite of its promises, meritocracy in fact installs a new form of aristocracy, purpose-built for a world in which the greatest source of income and wealth is not land but human capital and free labor. And merit is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an offensive distribution of advantage. Daniel Markovits is Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Private Law. Markovits works in the philosophical foundations of private law, moral and political philosophy, and behavioral economics. He publishes in a range of disciplines, including in Science, The American Economic Review, and The Yale Law Journal. Markovits’s latest book, The Meritocracy Trap, places meritocracy at the center of rising economic inequality and social and political dysfunction. The book takes up the law, economics, and politics of human capital to identify the mechanisms through which meritocracy breeds inequality and to expose the burdens that meritocratic inequality imposes on all who fall within meritocracy’s orbit. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. This event is the Morishima Lecture. This lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy.
May 08, 2019
Is the Presidency of Donald Trump a Political Aberration? [Audio]
01:27:58
Speaker(s): Professor Stephen Skowronek | The presidency of Donald Trump is so readily labeled "not normal" and "off-the charts" that it is hard to think of it any other way. Stephen Skowronek examines long-running patterns in the politics of presidential leadership to sort out what is new, and what is not, in the Trump phenomenon. In Skowronek hands presidential history is not a gauzy backdrop to something anomalous, but a critical source of insight into contemporary American politics. Stephen Skowronek is the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University. He has published extensively on the development of American national Institutions and on the American presidency. His books include The Politics Presidents Make, Presidential Leadership in Political Time, and most recently, with Karen Orren, The Policy State: An American Predicament. He is currently the Winant Visiting Professor of American Government at the Rothermere American Institute in Oxford. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.
May 02, 2019
The Politics of Equality, the 'Populist Moment' and the Power of New Technologies [Audio]
01:03:44
Speaker(s): Katrín Jakobsdóttir | Katrín Jakobsdóttir will discuss democratic challenges stemming from social inequalities, authoritarian politics and new technologies. Insecurities generated by globalisation, migration, and transformative technologies have created new societal divisions in liberal democracies and exacerbated the dislocation between personal identities and political loyalties. Since the Great Recession, the populist/authoritarian Right has profited from this trend, which has been accompanied by a critique of contemporary politics as being too technocratic and distant from the people. In her talk, Katrín Jakobsdóttir, the Prime Minister of Iceland, will argue that a renewed focus on the politics of equality is needed to respond to authoritarian tendencies and to the social challenges posed by the “fourth industrial revolution.“ Referring to her own political experience and to various forms of collective action – such as the #metoo movement – she makes the case for a democratic renewal based on social justice, gender equality and the green economy. Katrín Jakobsdóttir (@katrinjak) has been the Prime Minister of Iceland since November 2017 and the Leader of the Left-Green Movement since 2013. She is Iceland’s second female Prime Minister and served as Minister of Education, Science and Culture as well as Minister for Nordic Cooperation from 2009 to 2013. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Systemic Risk Centre (@LSE_SRC) was set up to study the risks that may trigger the next financial crisis and to develop tools to help policymakers and financial institutions become better prepared.
May 02, 2019
The Generation that Built and Cut Down Democracy [Audio]
01:26:31
Speaker(s): Zsuzsanna Szelényi | What is happening in Hungary? How has a party of dissident young democrats become a vehicle for illiberal and semi-authoritarian rule, and what does this mean for contemporary politics in Europe? Zsuzsanna Szelényi (@ZSzelenyi) is a Hungarian psychologist and politician. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHungary
Apr 30, 2019
Authentic Leadership: how successful leaders build gravitas [Audio]
00:44:01
Speaker(s): Shanelle Hall, Dr Rebecca Newton, Shaheen Sayed, Shaun Sinniah | Authentic leadership drives organisational success, yet is often misinterpreted in the workplace. In this book launch and panel session, Dr Rebecca Newton discusses what it really means to lead with authenticity, how to influence with integrity and drive positive change. Shanelle Hall (@shanellehall) was appointed by the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon as Deputy Executive Director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) on 6 June 2016. Shanelle served as Director of UNICEF's Supply Division (2007-2016), the organisation's procurement and logistics headquarters in Copenhagen, where she oversaw UNICEF's global supply activities and emergency supply response, with an annual expenditure exceeding USD 3.4 billion. She helped to expand the Supply function beyond service delivery to being a major strategic contributor to UNICEF results. Prior to that role, Shanelle served as Deputy Director of Supply Division and Chief of Immunization in Supply Division. Rebecca Newton is an organisational and social psychologist and Senior Visiting Fellow in the Department of Management. She has spent the past two decades researching and teaching on leadership, organisational culture, change, collaboration and management practice. Dr Newton has a PhD in Organisational Psychology from the LSE, was a Visiting Fellow at Harvard University, and has run executive education programmes on behalf of the LSE, Duke CE, University of Cambridge and Harvard Law School. She is a regular contributor to Harvard Business Review and Forbes, and serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Change Management. Dr Newton is the CEO of CoachAdviser and has worked with leaders and teams from a range of organisations, including Bank of America, Coca-Cola, Google, HSBC, Microsoft, Nike and more. Her latest book is Authentic Gravitas. Shaheen Sayed (@ShaheenSayed5) is the CEO of Accenture's Government Business in the UK & Ireland. She is a technologist by trade, who has most recently been at the forefront of delivering digital solutions to the Financial Services industry. Recognised as a senior advisor on talent and the workforce of the future, she was included in the Top 100 influential BAME global leaders by the Financial Times as well as Cranfield School of Management’s 100 Women to Watch in their 2018 list. Shaheen is also the Co-Founder Of 'Outsiders' a Not-For-Profit organisation focused on the intersection of youth education and digital technology. Shaun Sinniah works for Guy Carpenter & Company, the wholly owned reinsurance broking subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan, the world's leading professional service firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. At Guy Carpenter, Shaun is a Managing Director and looks after the Strategy & Sales functions across the International platform. Prior to joining Guy Carpenter, Shaun spent 9 years at Willis Towers Watson and its predecessor firms across group strategy, M&A and reinsurance, where at the age of 29 he became the youngest Managing Director in Willis' 180 year history. Shaun started his career at Goldman Sachs in London and Hong Kong and has a BEng (Hons), MSc and DIC in Engineering from Imperial College. Shaun is a trustee of his local Church and Compassion UK, which provides sponsorship, education and healthcare to over 100,000 children living in poverty around the world. Sandy Pepper joined the Department of Management in September 2008 as an ESRC/FME Fellow. He was appointed Senior Fellow in September 2011 and Professor of Management Practice in January 2013. He previously had a long career at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) where he held various senior management roles, including global leader of the Human Resource Services consulting practice from 2002-2006.
Apr 25, 2019
LSE IQ Episode 24 | How can we age better? [Audio]
00:41:45
Speaker(s): Professor Hiroko Akiyama, Kath Scanlon, Dr Thijs Van Den Broek, Professor Alan Walker | We hope you're enjoying this year's programme of public events and that you'll stay tuned for the exciting events we have lined up, for the summer term. In the meantime we have another podcast series we think you might enjoy. LSE IQ is an award-winning monthly podcast in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. Recent episodes have tackled questions such as 'Is the gentrification of our global cities inevitable?', 'Should we fear the rise of the far right?' and 'How does the modern world affect relationships?'. To give you a taste of LSEIQ the latest episode, which asks 'How can we age better?', is available for you here in our public events podcast feed. To listen to other episodes, search for LSE IQ in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq. We'd like to hear your opinion too so why not join the discussion on social media using the hashtag LSEIQ and please also consider leaving a review on iTunes as this makes the podcast easier for new listeners to discover.
Apr 16, 2019
In Conversation with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi [Audio]
01:17:10
Speaker(s): Nancy Pelosi | Join us for this conversation between Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and LSE's Peter Trubowitz, Director of the US Centre at the School. Nancy Pelosi (@SpeakerPelosi) is the 52nd Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, having made history in 2007 when she was elected the first woman to serve as Speaker of the House. Now in her third term as Speaker, Pelosi made history again in January 2019 when she regained her position second-in-line to the presidency, the first person to do so in more than 60 years. Speaker Pelosi is the highest ranking woman in American history and the most powerful Democrat in Washington. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPelosi Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at In Conversation with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.
Apr 15, 2019
Politics, Humanitarianism and Children's Rights [Audio]
01:32:21
Speaker(s): Sir Mike Aaronson, Maryam Ahmed, Mary Robinson, Rafia Zakaria | In 2019, Save the Children celebrates 100 years of working at the interface of politics, humanitarianism, and children’s rights. What does the future hold? Bringing together a panel of leading experts, the conversation will analyse how children's rights have transformed over the last 100 years. We will consider how the relationship between politics and humanitarianism is changing amidst transformations in the global ideological landscape, and where this leaves us for the future. Mike Aaronson (@MikeAaronson) was Director General of Save the Children UK 1995-2005. Maryam Ahmed graduated as a youth ambassador for Save the Children Nigeria in 2018. She has advocated for children's rights in Nigeria and in international forums. She particularly campaigns to end child marriage and sexual abuse, and to ensure girls have access to education and reproductive rights. Mary Robinson served as President of Ireland (1990-97) and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002). Rafia Zakaria (@rafiazakaria) is an author and attorney, she served on the Board of Amnesty International USA for two terms between 2009-2015 and was the first Pakistani-American woman to do so. Alcinda Honwana is an LSE Centennial Professor and Inter-Regional Adviser at UN DESA. Based at LSE in Pethick-Lawrence House, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate. Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSESave #SCconf100 Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Politics, Humanitarianism and Children's Rights.
Apr 08, 2019
Inequality, Brexit and the End of Empire [Audio]
01:27:42
Speaker(s): Professor Danny Dorling, Professor Sally Tomlinson, Professor Gurminder K Bhambra, Professor Will Hutton | In 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union – but has yet to leave its Empire past behind. What part did the long afterlife of the world’s largest-ever Empire play in Britain’s view of itself and world? And could a post-EU Britain, against all the odds, become less unequal? Join us as four eminent scholars turn their attention to often overlooked elements in the story – Britain’s past imperial might, jingoism, mythmaking and racism; deep-set anxieties about change and conflicting visions of the future – and the possibility of an unexpected outcome, namely that its shock to the national system may slow or even reverse the decades-long rise of inequality. In their new co-authored book Rule Britannia: Brexit and the End of Empire, Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson argue that while Brexit will almost certainly require the UK to confront its own “shocking, Dorian Gray-like deteriorated image”, “out of the ashes of Brexit could, should and perhaps will come a chastened, less small-minded, less greedy future. There are good reasons to be hopeful.” Danny Dorling (@dannydorling) is Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. He is author of books including Peak Inequality: Britain’s Ticking Time Bomb, The Equality Effect: Improving Life for Everyone and All That Is Solid: How the Great Housing Disaster Defines Our Times, and What We Can Do About It. Sally Tomlinson is Emeritus Professor at Goldsmiths University of London and Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. She is author of books including A Sociology of Special and Inclusive Education: Exploring the Manufacture of Inability and Education and Race from Empire to Brexit. Gurminder K Bhambra (@GKBhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies at the University of Sussex. She is author of books including Connected Sociologies: Theory for a Global Age. Will Hutton (@williamnhutton) is principal of Hertford College, Oxford, and Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester Business School. Bev Skeggs(@bevskeggs) is Professor of Sociology and Academic Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute. The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme is one of seven Atlantic Fellowships around the world, committed to building a global community of leaders working together to advance equity, justice and human dignity. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. This event is supported by the Progressive Economy Forum (@PEF_online). PEF brings together a Council of eminent economists and academics to develop and advocate progressive economic policy ideas, and to improve public understanding of key economic issues. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEInequality Update: due to unforeseen circumstances Professor John Weeks is no longer speaking at this event.
Mar 29, 2019
Brexit: what have we learnt? What can we expect? [Audio]
01:31:33
Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Sir Charles Bean, Jill Rutter | Editor's note: Unfortunately the last few minutes of the event are missing from the podcast. Our panel reviews what has been decided and resolved on Brexit, as well as the short- and long-term implications for Britain. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor in European Union Law and Employment Law at the University of Cambridge, and senior tutor and fellow of Trinity College. She specialises in EU law and employment law. She is author of EU Employment Law, The Substantive Law of the EU: The Four Freedoms, and (with Peers ed), European Union Law. Currently, Catherine is a Senior Fellow in the ESRC’s UK in a Changing Europe project which looks at all aspects of Brexit in its various manifestations. Charles Bean is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Jill Rutter (@jillongovt) is a programme director for Brexit at the Institute for Government and has co-authored a number of the Institute reports on the implications of Brexit for Whitehall and Westminster. She has also produced reports on better policy making, most recently on making tax policy better, arm’s length governance and on the centre. Before joining IFG, Jill was Director of Strategy and Sustainable Development at Defra. Prior to that she worked for BP for six years, following a career in the Treasury, and a two nd a half years secondment to the No.10 Policy Unit. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
Mar 28, 2019
Learning from Data: the art of statistics [Audio]
01:28:15
Speaker(s): Professor David Spiegelhalter | In his new book, The Art of Statistics, David Spiegelhalter guides us through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data, showing us why data can never speak for itself. He explains the basic concepts, from regression to P-values (without using mathematics), and introduces the intellectual ideas that underpin statistics. Drawing on numerous real world examples, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if the skeleton in the Leicester car park really was Richard III. Sir David Spiegelhalter is a British statistician and Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Spiegelhalter is one of the most cited and influential researchers in his field, and was elected as President of the Royal Statistical Society for 2017-18. Fiona Steele is a Professor of Statistics and Deputy Head of the Department of Statistics at LSE. Fiona first joined in LSE in 1996 as Lecturer in Statistics and Research Methodology. She then worked at the Institute of Education, University of London 2001-2005, followed by the University of Bristol 2005-2013 where she was Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Centre for Multilevel Modelling. She returned to LSE in 2013. The Department of Statistics (@StatsDeptLSE) offers a vibrant research environment and a comprehensive programme of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.
Mar 27, 2019
Marx at 201: the legacy of Karl Marx for the contemporary study of law, politics and society [Audio]
01:32:29
Speaker(s): Professor Bob Jessop, Professor Costas Lapavitsas, Professor Peter Ramsay, Professor Lea Ypi | Are we all Marxists now? Which of Marx’s ideas remain relevant, which redundant? Join leading scholars to address Marx’s legacy at 201. Are we all Marxists now? The question may sound strange but the virtues of the German philosopher are now extolled in the most unlikely of places. If this may be partly explained by the recent flurry of biographies and anniversaries – 2017 saw anniversaries of Das Kapital and the Russian Revolution, 2018 the bicentenary of his birth - the extraordinary growth of interest in Marx since the financial crisis seems undeniable. Socialism is even a talking point in the United States of America. and yet, the world looks as far removed from any communist utopia as could be imagined. Capitalism has accelerated; neoliberalism remains dominant, social democracy largely in retreat. If the political and ideological ascendency of capital has been fractured in the recent period, this seems predominantly to have benefitted the Right, leading to fears that a very different spectre from the one envisaged by Marx may now be haunting Europe, and the globe. Now therefore seems an opportune moment to reflect on the legacy of Karl Marx for the contemporary study of law, politics and society. Why is his influence so pervasive and resilient? Which ideas remain relevant, which redundant? The purpose of this event is to explore these questions with leading scholars from across different disciplines: economics, political theory, sociology and law. Bob Jessop is Professor of Sociology at the University of Lancaster. Costas Lapavitsas (@C_Lapavitsas) is Professor of Economics at SOAS. Peter Ramsay (@PeterRamsay2011) is Professor of Law at LSE. Lea Ypi (@lea_ypi) is Professor in Political Theory at LSE. Mike Wilkinson is Associate Professor of Law at LSE. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research.
Mar 27, 2019
Intergenerational Justice and Generational Sovereignty in Light of Brexit Vote and of Climate Change [Audio]
01:20:26
Speaker(s): Professor Axel Gosseries | Do the intergenerational issues raised by climate change differ from those raised by the Brexit vote? And what can we do to address these issues? Axel Gosseries is Professor of Economics and Social Ethics at Louvain University. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant.
Mar 26, 2019
Cryptocurrencies: the issue of scalability [Audio]
01:29:47
Speaker(s): Dr Andrew Lewis-Pye | Perhaps the most fundamental challenge for the future of cryptocurrencies is the issue of scalability: How can one dramatically increase transaction rates without sacrificing the security of the blockchain? In this talk Andrew Lewis-Pye will start by giving an overview of the fundamentals of cryptocurrencies (a digital currency in which encryption techniques are used to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds, operating independently of a central bank), with a focus on analysing protocols from a game theoretic perspective. Then he will go on to discuss possible solutions to the scalability issue. Andrew Lewis-Pye is Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics at LSE. Jan van den Heuvel (@JanvadeHe) is Professor of Mathematics at LSE. LSE's Department of Mathematics (@LSEMaths), located within a world-class social science institution, aims to be a leading centre for Mathematics in the Social Sciences. We have a stimulating and active research environment and offer a wide range of degree programmes and courses. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMaths
Mar 20, 2019
Occult Features of Anarchism: with attention to the conspiracy of kings and the conspiracy of the peoples [Audio]
01:30:42
Speaker(s): Dr Erica Lagalisse | Erica Lagalisse explores the relationship of 19th century anarchism with the clandestine fraternity, challenges leftist attachments to atheism, and intervenes in current debates concerning “conspiracy theory”. In the nineteenth century anarchists were accused of conspiracy by governments afraid of revolution, but in the current century various “conspiracy theories” suggest that anarchists are controlled by government itself. The Illuminati were a network of intellectuals who argued for self-government and against private property, yet the public is now often told that they were (and are) the very group that controls governments and defends private property around the world. Intervening in such misinformation, Lagalisse works with primary and secondary sources in multiple languages to set straight the history of the Left and will illustrate the actual relationship between revolutionism, pantheistic occult philosophy, and the clandestine fraternity. Exploring hidden correspondences between anarchism, Renaissance magic, and New Age movements, Erica Lagalisse also advances critical scholarship regarding leftist attachments to secular politics. Inspired by anthropological fieldwork within today’s anarchist movements, challenging anarchist atheism insofar as it poses practical challenges for coalition politics in today’s world. Studying anarchism as a historical object, Lagalisse will show how the development of leftist theory and practice within clandestine masculine public spheres continues to inform contemporary anarchist understandings of the “political,” in which men’s oppression by the state becomes the prototype for power in general, how gender and religion become privatized in radical counterculture, a historical process intimately linked to the privatization of gender and religion by the modern nation-state. Erica Lagalisse, author of Occult Features of Anarchism, is an anthropologist and Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Mathijs Pelkmans is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Mar 20, 2019
Silences of the Great War: all the things we cannot hear [Audio]
01:27:35
Speaker(s): Professor Jay Winter | Silence itself is a language of memory. Jay Winter explores the dialectic between silence and sound in the auditory history of the Great War. Jay Winter is Charles J Stille Professor of History Emeritus, Yale University. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Mar 18, 2019
How did we Reach the Present Crisis in Social Care and what are the Solutions? [Audio]
01:18:00
Speaker(s): Professor Pat Thane | The social and health needs of older people are not easily separable. But care has been institutionally separate since 1948. Did this help create the current crisis? Pat Thane is Research Professor in Contemporary History, King's College London. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESocialCare
Mar 14, 2019
Foundations of State Effectiveness [Audio]
01:26:13
Speaker(s): Professor Sir Tim Besley, Professor Amartya Sen | An effective state promotes freedom and the well-being of its citizens. This lecture will discuss the importance of norms, values and institutions in supporting state effectiveness drawing on recent developments in social science. As well as making connections to Amartya Sen's ideas, the lecture will reflect on some of the major policy challenges that the world faces in the turbulent times that we are living through. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission and was President of the Econometric Society in 2018. He has published widely on a wide variety of topics, mainly with a policy focus. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University. He is the recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economics and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to provide co-ordination and strategic leadership for critical and cutting edge research and inter-disciplinary analysis of inequalities.
Mar 13, 2019
China's Re-education Camps in Xinjiang [Audio]
01:28:58
Speaker(s): Dr Rachel Harris, Professor Jude Howell, Dr Rian Thum | Large numbers of Uyghurs have been detained by the Chinese government in re-education camps. What do we know about these camps? Rachel Harris specialises in Uyghur culture and religion and is based at SOAS. Jude Howell is an expert on authoritarianism and Professor of International Development at LSE. Rian Thum is a historian of Xinjiang based at the University of Nottingham. Hans Steinmuller is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. LSE Anthropology (@LSEAnthropology) is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEXinjiang
Mar 12, 2019
Liquidity and Leverage - The Two Faces of Liquidity [Audio]
01:29:13
Speaker(s): Professor Raghuram Rajan | Lionel Robbins was one of the outstanding men of his time; economist, public servant and supporter of the arts. The lectures, which were established in his name, take place each year and are a major event in the life of the School, featuring eminent economists from around the world. This year Raghuram Rajan, the Katherine Dusak Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth will deliver the Lionel Robbins Lectures. A bank's issuance of short-term demandable or overnight claims in order to finance illiquid loans leads to panics. Since the dawn of banking in Assyria and Sumeria, long before we had central banks, deposit insurance, or a tax advantage to debt, banks have had this structure, and critics have been troubled by it, as they are today. Professor Rajan will argue that this structure of banks - financing illiquid loans with short term or demandable debt - is not just a bug in the system, it is also a feature. This talk will focus on why anticipation of high liquidity can be detrimental for the financial system, increasing leverage, the system's dependence on the liquidity materializing, and lowering good governance practices. Raghuram Rajan was the 23rd Governor of the Reserve Bank of India between September 2013 and September 2016. Between 2003 and 2006, Dr. Rajan was the Chief Economist and Director of Research at the International Monetary Fund. The first of this years Lionel Robbins Lectures will take place on Monday 11 March. Established at LSE in 1990 CEP is one of Europe's leading economic research centres. It addresses three related questions: How to foster growth? How to share growth? How to make growth sustainable?
Mar 12, 2019
Liquidity and Leverage - Why Banks? [Audio]
01:25:12
Speaker(s): Professor Raghuram Rajan | Lionel Robbins was one of the outstanding men of his time; economist, public servant and supporter of the arts. The lectures, which were established in his name, take place each year and are a major event in the life of the School, featuring eminent economists from around the world. This year Raghuram Rajan, the Katherine Dusak Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth will deliver the Lionel Robbins Lectures. A bank's issuance of short-term demandable or overnight claims in order to finance illiquid loans leads to panics. Since the dawn of banking in Assyria and Sumeria, long before we had central banks, deposit insurance, or a tax advantage to debt, banks have had this structure, and critics have been troubled by it, as they are today. Professor Rajan will argue that this structure of banks - financing illiquid loans with short term or demandable debt - is not just a bug in the system, it is also a feature. This lecture will focus on why banks have the structure they have - long term illiquid assets financed by short term runnable liabilities. It will explain why the risk of runs is inherent in the business of banking and cannot be eliminated without impinging on that business. Raghuram Rajan was the 23rd Governor of the Reserve Bank of India between September 2013 and September 2016. Between 2003 and 2006, Dr. Rajan was the Chief Economist and Director of Research at the International Monetary Fund. The second of this years Lionel Robbins Lectures will take place on Tuesday 12 March. Established at LSE in 1990 CEP is one of Europe's leading economic research centres. It addresses three related questions: How to foster growth? How to share growth? How to make growth sustainable?
Mar 11, 2019
Women in the City [Audio]
01:39:00
Speaker(s): Pavita Cooper, Bronwyn Curtis, Elisabeth Stheeman | Three female leaders in business and finance share their experiences from their varied careers to mark International Women's Day. Pavita Cooper, Director of More Difference, will talk on women in finance, what has changed and what needs to change, talking in particular about the work of the 30 percent Club encouraging chairmen to appoint more women to their boards. Bronwyn Curtis, a member of the Office for Budget Responsibility, will speak on her career as a global financial economist who has served in senior executive positions in both the financial and media sectors. Elisabeth Stheeman, a member of the Bank of England's Financial Policy Committee and LSE Alum, will share her career journey and experience. She has worked in Financial Services and Real Estate for over 25years before moving to a "portfolio career" with a number of non-executive roles, both in the UK and in Continental Europe a few years ago. Grace Lordan is Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. On International Women's Day 2019, LSE Library launches its series of activities around Women at Work to commemorate 100 years since the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act. This Act removed the legal barriers of sex or marriage from official appointments and professional occupations, such as the legal profession. The Women's Library Collection in LSE Library is a rich source of information for and was formed out of the struggles encountered by women working in the professions after 1919. Our Women Work programme begins in Spring 2019 with a focus on areas of work that have only relatively recently appointed women to senior positions. The British Library of Political and Economic Science was founded in 1896, a year after the London School of Economics and Political Science. It has been based in the Lionel Robbins Building since 1978 and houses many world class collections, including The Women's Library.
Mar 08, 2019
Decolonising the Curricula: why necessary and why now [Audio]
01:34:09
Speaker(s): Dr Simukai Chigudu, Dr Laura Mann, Dr Lyn Ossome | From Cape Town to Oxford and beyond, student movements across the world calling for education to be decolonised have gained prominence over the past few years. In fact, academics have been raising concerns about the foundation of Africa scholarship as far back as 1969 at an African Studies Association in the United States. Simukai Chigudu (@SimuChigudu) is Associate Professor of African Politics at the University of Oxford. Laura Mann (@balootiful) is Assistant Professor in the Department of International Development at LSE. Lyn Ossome is Senior Research Fellow in the Makerere Institute of Social Research at Makerere University. Alcinda Honwana is Centennial Professor at LSE based in the Firoz Lalji centre for Africa and the Department of International Development. She is also a Visiting Professor of Anthropology and International Development at the Open University, where she held a Chair in International Development. Based at LSE in Pethick-Lawrence House, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECitingAfrica This event forms part of the "New World (Dis)Orders" series, linked to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them?
Mar 06, 2019
Women Who Change Lives: social entrepreneurs on the move [Audio]
01:26:51
Speaker(s): Elise Do, Grace Olugbodi, Ana Maria Torres | To mark International Women's Day, join us for a discussion on how female entrepreneurs are using social enterprise to change the world to provide opportunities for women and tackle inequalities. Inspiring female leaders speak frankly about their journey, motivations, purpose and business and share their golden nuggets for success. The last two years have seen women speak up around the world and support each other, resulting in a sense of solidarity that is stronger than ever today. Social enterprises are providing leadership opportunities for women in the UK, India, Pakistan, and the USA. But despite this, gender inequalities still remain among social entrepreneurs. HERA (Her Equality Rights and Autonomy) and LSE team up to present a panel of leaders, entrepreneurs and experts in business who will explore the world of social enterprise and the opportunities it can present. Elise Do is Chair of the Board of Trustees for HERA. Elise is an Associate Director of Merger and Acquisitions at Augusta and Co where she specialises in renewable energy investment banking. She spent 10 years at Rio Tinto as Chief of Staff to the Group CFO. Grace Olugbodi (@BeGenioCity) is founder of BeGenio and Easy Maths Skills, creator of the Race to Infinity Maths game and author of Make Maths Fun. Ana Maria Torres (@anamatorresmon) is co-founder of Hilo Sagrado and has more than 15 years' of experience in social impact working in more than 40 countries. She has been an advisor and consultant to governments, international organisations and NGOs. Nadia Millington is a Senior Lecturer in Practice and Deputy Director of LSE's MSc Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. She had over 10 years' experience as a strategy consultant in the UK and Caribbean. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management, ranked number 2 in the world for business and management studies. HERA (@HerEquality) provides entrepreneurship training, professional mentoring and grants to women survivors of human trafficking, violence and exploitation. Their programmes engage the business community to enable vulnerable women to achieve economic independence. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWomenIn
Mar 06, 2019
The Coming Asian Century: challenges for the West [Audio]
01:28:51
Speaker(s): Dr Yu Jie (Cherry), Dr Parag Khanna, Gideon Rachman | This event marks the launch Parag Khanna's book, The Future is Asian: Global Order in the 21st Century. In the 19th century, the world was Europeanized. In the 20th century, it was Americanized. Now, in the 21st century, the world is being irreversibly Asianized. The "Asian Century" is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning Saudi Arabia to Japan, and Russia to Australia-linking five billion people through trade, finance and infrastructure networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. China has taken a lead in building the new Silk Roads across Asia, but it will not lead it alone. Rather, Asia is returning to the stable multipolar order that existed long before European colonialism and American dominance, with India and Southeast Asia coming into their own as economic and strategic hubs. The world has gotten used to hearing "America First" — but is it ready for "Asia First"? Get ready to see the world, and the future, from the Asian point-of-view. Yu Jie (@Yu_JieC) is the China Research Fellow at Chatham House, focusing on the decision-making process of Chinese foreign policy as well as China's economic diplomacy. She speaks and writes frequently at major media outlets such as BBC and Financial Times and regularly briefs senior policy practitioners from the EU institutions, the UK Cabinet Office, and the Silk Road Fund in Beijing, as well as major corporates. Yu Jie has testified at the House of Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, and was also head of China Foresight at LSE IDEAS. Prior to LSE, she was a management consultant, specializing in Chinese state-owned enterprises investments in Europe and Chinese market entry strategies for European conglomerates at the London Office of Roland Berger Strategy Consultants. Dr Yu has been recognized as a 'Leading Woman' of the London School of Economics, and remains an associate of LSE IDEAS. Parag Khanna (@paragkhanna) is a global strategy advisor and author. He is Founder and Managing Partner of FutureMap, a data and scenario based strategic advisory firm. He is author of a trilogy of books on the future of world order beginning with The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (2008), followed by How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance (2011), and concluding with Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization (2016). He is also author of Technocracy in America: Rise of the Info-State (2017) and co-author of Hybrid Reality: Thriving in the Emerging Human-Technology Civilization (2012). In 2008, Parag was named one of Esquire’s "75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century," and featured in WIRED magazine's "Smart List." He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Bachelors and Masters degrees from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Gideon Rachman (@gideonrachman) is Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator at the Financial Times. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEAsia
Mar 05, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | New World Order 2035 [Audio]
01:30:49
Speaker(s): Dr Liam Kofi Bright, Dr Rebecca Elliott, Dr Barbara Fasolo, Dr Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Dr Ilka Gleibs and Dr George Lawson | What will the world look like in the not too distant future? By 2035 how could the way we live, work, interact with each other and understand ourselves have changed? Join a panel of LSE academics for some informed speculation. Liam Kofi Bright is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy, Logic, and Scientific Method at LSE. Rebecca Elliott is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Barbara Fasolo is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science in the Department of Management at LSE. Seeta Pena Gangadharan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Ilka Gleibs is Assistant Professor in Social and Organisational Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. George Lawson is Associate Professor in the Department of International Relations at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.
Mar 02, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Borders and Walls [Audio]
00:49:20
Speaker(s): Dr Elena Barabantseva, Professor Bill Callahan, Xiaolu Guo | A screening and discussion of two short films by Elena Barabantseva, University of Manchester and Bill Callahan, LSE. A discussion will follow with Xiaolu Guo, an award-winning writer and filmmaker. Border People (14 min, 2018) Elena Barabantseva, University of Manchester How does the border enter and shape a family life? What does it mean to the people who cross the border for marriage? This film juxtaposes a personal story of Meihua, a Vietnamese Yao woman who married a Yao man in China, with the stories and ritual practices that the Yao elders pass on to the young generation amidst the Chinese state’s ambitious border development plans and ethnic revival strategies. Great Walls: Journeys from ideology to experience (28 min, 2019) Bill Callahan, London School of Economics and Political Science As Trump’s Wall and the Berlin Wall show, border walls are key sites of ideology: both Cold War ideology, and anti-immigrant ideology. This film uses the Great Wall of China to consider walls as sites of experience in every life. It juxtaposes archive clips of political leaders (JFK, Trump, Merkel) and ethnographic film of ordinary people to show how even US presidents feel something when they go to the Berlin Wall or the Great Wall. The film returns to the Trump Wall and the Great Wall to probe how walls can be sites of spectacular wonder in paradoxical personal experience. Dr Elena Barabantseva is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Manchester. Bill Callahan is Professor of International Relations in the Department of International Relations, LSE. Xiaolu Guo is a novelist and film maker. Her most recent film “5 Men and a Caravaggio” premiered at the London Film Festival (2018). Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Mar 02, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Populism and Religion in the West [Audio]
01:14:51
Speaker(s): Tobias Cremer, Dr Zubaida Haque | In an apparently ever-less-religious West, how has Christian identity, however indirectly, been used as a focal point for populist discontent? Tobias Cremer (@cremer_tobias) is a PhD candidate at the Department of Politics and International Studies (POLIS) at Peterhouse, Cambridge. Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council his doctoral research focuses on the relationship between religion and the new wave of right-wing populism in Western Europe and North America. In particular, the project aims to understand the ways in which traditionally secularist right-wing populist parties are seeking to employ Christian symbols and language as cultural identity markers, and how believers and Church authorities are reacting to such co-optation attempts. Zubaida Haque (@Zubhaque) is the Deputy Director at The Runnymede Trust with a strong research and policy background in educational attainments, ethnic minorities and employment, equality within prisons, integration and extremism. She has worked for several government departments, think tanks and universities and has directly been involved in several national panels and commissions including two government-sponsored reviews of the ‘race riots’ in Britain. She has made regular appearances on Channel 4 News, Newsnight, BBC Breakfast, Sky News and Victoria Derbyshire as well as national and local radio stations. James Walters (@LSEChaplain) is the founding director of the LSE Faith Centre and leads its work in promoting religious literacy and interfaith leadership among the LSE’s global student body, in government and to the wider public. He is a Senior Lecturer in Practice at the LSE Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and an affiliated faculty member at the Department for International Development. He has recently published Loving Your Neighbour in an Age of Religious Conflict: A New Agenda for Interfaith Relations. LSE Religion and Global Society is a partnership between the LSE Faith Centre and LSE Institute of Global Affairs. Unfortunately due to unforeseen circumstances Anne Applebaum is no longer able to speak at this event. We apologize for any inconvenience caused. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Mar 02, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Conspiracy Theory as Truth [Audio]
01:14:56
Speaker(s): Dr Bradley Franks, Dr Erica Lagalisse, Dr Matijs Pelkmans | Psychologists and anthropologists explore how only some "conspiracy theories" fail tests of reason, and discuss the problems and potential of "conspiracy theory" for social movements. Erica Lagalisse is author of Occult Features of Anarchism - With Attention to the Conspiracy of Kings and the Conspiracy of the Peoples and Postdoctoral Fellow at the LSE International Inequalities Institute. Bradley Franks is Associate Professor in Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Matijs Pelkmans is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE and a specialist in the anthropology of the Caucasus and Central Asia. Martin Bauer is Director of MSc Social and Public Communication and Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Mar 02, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Protesting Inequalities [Audio]
00:55:42
Speaker(s): Bird la Bird, Dr Aviah Sarah Day, Dr Armine Ishkanian, Professor Tomila Lankina, Dr Olga Onuch | This event examines the changing dynamics of protests and protest movements, focusing on how activists in the UK and globally mobilize and fight against inequalities. Bird la Bird is a performance artist who straddles historiography, comedy, queer and politics. She has been described as a Queer Pearly Queen and a Haute Couture Fishwife. Bird la Bird has recently developed a series of performances interrogating the histories of Britain’s key cultural institutions, queering the chronicles and unpicking the layers of colonialism, class oppression, poverty and homophobia on which they were built. The resulting performances are highly accessible, inclusive, emotional and entertaining as Bird encourages the audience to shake the foundations of the museum by bringing hidden histories to the forefront. Aviah Sarah Day came to grassroots activism out of necessity. After a childhood in and out of the care system followed a period of homelessness with her mother and brother, Aviah became interested in anti-capitalism as resistance to her poverty. Over the last 10 years she has been involved in UK Uncut, Focus E15 and Sisters Uncut fighting racism, sexism and capitalism. Armine Ishkanian is Associate Professor and the Programme Director of the MSc in International Social and Public Policy (ISPP). Her research examines the relationship between civil society, democracy, development, and social transformation. She has examined how civil society organisations and social movements engage in policy processes and transformative politics in a number of countries including Armenia, Egypt, Greece, and the UK. Tomila Lankina is Professor of Politics and International Relations at the LSE’s International Relations Department. Her current research focuses on comparative democracy and authoritarianism, mass protests and historical patterns of human capital and democratic reproduction in Russia and other states. Dr Olga Onuch is Associate Professor in Politics at the University of Manchester. Onuch’s comparative study of protest (as well as elections, migration & identity) in Eastern Europe and Latin America has made her a leading expert in Ukrainian and Argentine politics specifically, but also in inter-regional comparative analysis. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.
Mar 02, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Art and Conflict [Audio]
01:16:40
Speaker(s): Dr Denisa Kostovicova, Dr Nela Milic, Tom Paskhalis, Dr Ivor Sokolić | The panellists will discuss the role of art and visual representation in response to conflict and dealing with its consequences. Text Illuminations is an art installation by artist Nela Milic of the University of the Arts London (UAL) produced through inter-disciplinary collaboration with political scientists Dr Denisa Kostovicova, Dr Ivor Sokolic and Tom Paskhalis of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). This artwork is an interactive representation of a search for the meaning of reconciliation after mass atrocity through debates including people from all ethnic groups involved in a decade of conflicts in the Balkans. The artist and the political scientists join together to discuss the process of interdisciplinary collaboration to convert quantitative text analysis into art. The exhibition is part of a major AHRC-funded project, ‘Art & Reconciliation: Conflict, Culture and Community’, led by King’s in collaboration with the University of the Arts London and the London School of Economics. The work will be contextualised in relation to the early findings of a DFID-funded project, the Conflict Research Programme, led by LSE, which explores conflict in relation to notions of identity, civicness and the political marketplace. Contemporary conflicts often combine attacks on civil society, culture and cultural heritage. The panel will also explore how, in responding to this civicness, art and the defence of cultural heritage can come together. Denisa Kostovicova is an Associate Professor in Global Politics at the European Institute and the Department of Government at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She studies post-conflict reconstruction and transitional justice with a particular interest in the bottom-up perspective on transitions from war to peace. Nela Milic is an artist and an academic working in media and arts, and is Senior Lecturer and Year 2 Contextual and Theoretical Studies Coordinator in the Design School at London College of Communication. Tom Paskhalis is a PhD candidate at the Department of Methodology, LSE. His research is focussed on comparative politics and the development and application of new approaches to quantitative text analysis. Dr Ivor Sokolić is a Research Officer at the European Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He works on the ERC funded project “Justice Interactions and Peacebuilding: From Static to Dynamic Discourses across National, Ethnic, Gender and Age Groups”. Denisa Kostovicova, Ivor Sokolic, Tom Paskhalis and Nela Milic discuss the process of interdisciplinary collaboration, which turned a political science method into an art installation in their blog piece Text Illuminations: From the Method to the Artefact. Henry Radice is a Reseach Fellow in the Department of International Development, LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Mar 02, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | What Does It Mean to Be British and Who Defines It? [Audio]
01:11:55
Speaker(s): Diane Abbott MP, Sunder Katwala, Professor Eric Kaufmann, Dr Alita Nandi | This interactive public event comprises a panel-based discussion, with representatives from different influential spheres in society who are shaping discourse on British identity, combined with direct audience engagement. Diane Abbott (@HackneyAbbott) is MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington and is the Shadow Home Secretary. Sunder Katwala (@sundersays) is the director of British Future. He has previously worked as a journalist. Eric Kaufmann (@epkaufm) is Professor of Politics at Birkbeck College, University of London. Dr Alita Nandi (@alitanandi ) is Research Fellow at the University of Essex, who carries out research on the formation and measurement of British, ethnic and other social identities and their consequences. Dr Ilka Gleibs (@Dr_Ilka_Gleibs) is Assistant Professor at the London School of Economics in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Mar 02, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Brave New World [Audio]
01:17:26
Speaker(s): Professor Richard Ashcroft, Professor David Healy, Professor Emily Jackson | In this age of utopian technologies, we can design mechanical limbs for amputees and chemically engineer happiness for depressives. But should we? From the fluoride in our water to genetically modified babies, scientific advances pose complex new ethical questions. We ask discuss the major bioethical issues of our time. Is philosophy braced for this brave new world? Are scientists and engineers morally obliged to design a utopia? Or are things best left to ‘nature’? Richard Ashcroft is Professor of Bioethics at Queen Mary University of London. David Healy (@DrDavidHealy) is Professor of Psychiatry, at Bangor University. Emily Jackson is Professor of Law at the London School of Economics. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is a Fellow of the Forum for Philosophy and Senior Lecturer in Romanticism at Queen Mary University of London. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Mar 02, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Putin's Russia and its Challenge to the Postwar Liberal Order [Audio]
01:06:20
Speaker(s): Bridget Kendall | Former BBC Correspondent, Bridget Kendall was appointed the first female Master of Peterhouse, the University of Cambridge's oldest College, in 2016. Educated at Oxford and Harvard, she joined the BBC World Service in 1983 and became the BBC's Moscow correspondent in 1989, covering the collapse of the Soviet Union as well as Boris Yeltsin's rise to power. She was then appointed Washington Correspondent before moving to the senior role of BBC Diplomatic Correspondent, reporting on major conflicts such as those in Kosovo, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, Syria and Ukraine. Her interviews with global leaders include Margaret Thatcher, Hillary Clinton, Mikhail Gorbachev and Vladimir Putin. Among her awards are the James Cameron Award for distinguished journalism and an MBE from Her Majesty the Queen in the 1994 New Year's Honours list. She is host of the BBC radio's weekly discussion programme, The Forum. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Mar 01, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Reliving the Origins of Totalitarianism [Audio]
00:56:21
Speaker(s): Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge | Hannah Arendt’s seminal study of the preconditions for, and rise of, Nazism and Stalinism in the first half of the 20th Century has some chilling resonances with the world we are living in today. How can her analysis help us understand the state of global politics today? Robert Eaglestone (@BobEaglestone) is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway, University of London. Lyndsey Stonebridge (@LyndseyStonebri) is Professor of Humanities and Human Rights at the Department of English Literature/IRiS, University of Birmingham. Sandra Jovchelovitch is Professor of Social Psychology at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.
Mar 01, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Developing Urban Futures [Audio]
01:06:03
Speaker(s): Professor Jo Beall, Professor Ricky Burdett, Professor Alcinda Honwana, Dr Philipp Rode | Following on from the Developing Urban Futures Urban Age Conference orgainised by LSE Cities in Addis Ababa in November 2018, this event will explore urban dynamics in rapidly changing Sub-Saharan African cities, and discuss how current models of planning and governance succeed or fail, addressing specific urban conditions on the ground. Continuing population growth and urbanisation will add 2.5 billion more people to the world's cities by 2050, with nearly 90 per cent of the increase concentrated in Asia and Africa. Today, around 40 per cent of Africans are urban dwellers, about 500 million people. In the next few decades this number will swell to over 1.4 billion. Ethiopia is moving at great pace from a predominantly rural economy to an urban one, with Addis Ababa growing at an annual rate of about 4 percent - twice the rate of Beijing or Jakarta. Estimates suggest that two-thirds of the investments in urban infrastructure to 2050 have yet to be made and decisions taken now will affect generations of city dwellers well into the 21st century. The event will draw on recent comparative research by the Urban Age Programme across Sub-Saharan African cities including Addis Ababa, Lagos, Kampala and LSE Cities' research on the governance of transport and sanitation infrastructure in the Ethiopian cities of Addis Ababa and Dire Dawa. Understanding the boundaries between infrastructure systems tends to be neglected in urban research. Yet it is here, at these infrastructure interfaces, where many critical questions for cities arise: who governs, who decides, who funds, who connects? Jo Beall (@JoBeall1) is Director Cultural Engagement at the British Council and a Professorial Research Fellow at the LSE. Professor Beall has conducted research in Africa and Asia on urban development and governance as well as cities in situations of conflict and state fragility. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and was recently awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the Open University. Ricky Burdett (@BURDETTR) is Professor of Urban Studies at LSE and Director of the Urban Age and LSE Cities. He sits on the Mayor of London's Cultural Leadership Board, and was a member of the UK Government Airport Commission (2012-2015); Chief Adviser on Architecture and Urbanism for the 2012 London Olympics; and Architecture and Urbanism Adviser to the Mayor of London (2001-2006). Alcinda Honwana is a Centennial Professor at LSE based in the Firoz Lalji centre for Africa and the Department of International Development. She is also a Visiting Professor of Anthropology and International Development at the Open University, where she held a Chair in International Development and has been an Inter-regional Adviser on social development policy at the United Nations. Philipp Rode (@PhilippRode) is Executive Director of LSE Cities and Co-Director of the Executive MSc in Cities at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has been directing interdisciplinary projects comprising urban governance, transport, city planning and urban design at the LSE since 2003 and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP). Susan Parnell co-founded the African Centre for Cities. She has been actively involved in local, national and global urban policy debates around the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal and is an active advocate for better science policy engagement on cities. Recent books include Building a Capable State: Post Apartheid Service Delivery (Zed, 2017) and The Urban Planet (Cambridge, 2017).
Feb 28, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | The Haunting of Neo-liberalism [Audio]
00:54:33
Speaker(s): Professor Robert Eaglestone, Professor Simon Glendinning, Professor Maja Zehfuss | Marx famously wrote of the spectre of communism haunting Europe in the nineteenth century, and the end of the Cold War might be considered to mark its exorcism. But has communism really been laid to rest? Despite the fall of the Berlin Wall, Derrida certainly thought not. He argued that in the ‘new world disorder’, ideologies like neo-liberalism were enmeshed with communism, haunted by the spectre of communisms yet to come. Is Derrida’s analysis still applicable to the post-9/11 world? And have new spectres appeared in our midst? Robert Eaglestone (@BobEaglestone) is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway, University of London. Simon Glendinning(@lonanglo) is Professor of European Philosophy, London School of Economics. Maja Zehfuss is Professor of International Politics, University of Manchester Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy & Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture, Royal Holloway, University of London. This event is co-organised by the European Institute and the Forum for Philiosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Forum for Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #New WorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. From time to time there are changes to event details so we strongly recommend that if you plan to attend this event you check back on this listing on the day of the event.
Feb 28, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | How to Remain Sane in the Age of Populism [Audio]
00:57:34
Speaker(s): Elif Shafak | Until not so long ago, some parts of the world—namely, the West— were thought to be solid, steady, stable. Other parts of the world—namely, the non-West— were thought to be liquid, not yet settled. Since 2016 it has become increasingly clear to citizens across the world that there are no solid and in fact, we are all living in liquid times. Fear, anger, anxiety, resentment… emotions guide and misguide politics. The more “informed” we are the less we know. The less we know the less we understand. And the less we understand the bigger our fears. How can we remain sane in the age of populism? Should we retreat into tribes of our own and try to feel more secure there; should we create new tribes, or should we, and can we, find a way beyond tribalism? Elif Shafak (@Elif_Safak) Elif Shafak is an award-winning British-Turkish novelist and the most widely read female author in Turkey. She writes in both Turkish and English, and has published seventeen books, eleven of which are novels. Her work has been translated into fifty languages. Shafak holds a PhD in political science and she has taught at various universities in Turkey, the US and the UK, including St Anne's College, Oxford University, where she is an honorary fellow. She is a member of Weforum Global Agenda Council on Creative Economy and a founding member of ECFR (European Council on Foreign Relations). An advocate for women's rights, LGBT rights and freedom of speech, Shafak is an inspiring public speaker and twice a TED Global speaker, each time receiving a standing ovation. Shafak contributes to major publications around the world and she has been awarded the title of Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres. In 2017 she was chosen by Politico as one of the twelve people who would make the world better. She has judged numerous literary prizes and is chairing the Wellcome Prize 2019. Jonathan White (@JonathanPJWhite) is Deputy Head of the European Institute and Professor in Politics at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 27, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | New Reconciliations: the two Koreas [Audio]
01:01:07
Speaker(s): Dr Jeong-Im Hyun, Dr Owen Miller, Professor Vladimir Tikhonov | Since early 2018, the two Koreas on the Korean Peninsula, known to be the last remaining divided countries since the end of the Second World War, have begun the road to reconciliation. A series of summit visits have taken place and are expected to continue, together with various events and projects that are expected to increase the level of interaction in terms of economy, politics, culture and infrastructure. What does this thawing relationship mean for the future of the Koreas and of the world? This roundtable discussion lasting 75 minutes, involve three experts who have carried out long-term research on Korean affairs, and are expected to provide an opportunity to re-think the Korean reconciliation from a wide range of perspectives, from post-imperialism and state formation to urban development and infrastructure. The event is to ask: to what extent does the reconciliation of the two Koreas allow us to re-think a better future and a new world order with less confrontation? The discussions will be related to the implication of the Korean reconciliation for the regional/global economic development for the re-ordering of the neo-imperialist geopolitics, and for the sustainable future of world development in the context of heightened global insecurity. Jeong-Im Hyun is a Lecturer of Korean Studies at the Department of School of languages and Global Studies in the University of Central Lancashire. Her main research interests are social movement, political communication analysis, and socio-cultural dimension of Korean popular culture diffusion in Europe. Owen Miller initially studied East Asian history at SOAS as an undergraduate and subsequently lived in South Korea, where he studied Korean language at Yonsei University. He returned to SOAS in 2001 to study for an MA and then a PhD in Korean history, focusing on merchant guilds in late nineteenth century Seoul. Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja) is a professor of Korean and East Asian studies at the Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, Oslo University. His research focuses on the history of modern ideas in Korea. Hyun Bang Shin is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies in the Department of Geography and Environment at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 27, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Beyond Journeys: a dialogue with migrants and refugees [Audio]
00:58:58
Speaker(s): Allaa Barri, Bashar Farahat, Mohammad Ghannam, Sema Nassar, Bashir Zalghaneh | Today’s growing sense of ‘disorder’ is shaped by the current refugee and migrant crisis. Conceived as an open dialogue between the audience and migrants and refugees, this panel provides the audience with an opportunity to explore the real-life consequences of current geopolitical tensions. Allaa Barri is a Syrian refugee and Research Development and Communications Manager at Chatham House. Bashar Farahat is a Syrian medical doctor living as a refugee in London, currently undertaking a conversion course so he can practise medicine in Britain. Mohammad Ghannam is a Palestinian-Syrian refugee in France, a journalist and Communications Officer for Médecins Sans Frontières. Sema Nassar is a Syrian refugee and prominent human rights activist, based in London. Bashir Zalghaneh is a Syrian refugee, former child refugee in Calais, now living in London and learning English. Sandra Jovchelovitch is Professor of Social Psychology at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, LSE. Curious to learn more, discuss, and get actively involved in the topic? Check out the variety of events during LSESU STAR Refugee Week on campus starting on the 4th of March. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 27, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Dangerous Scholarship: trolled and threatened for research and activism [Audio]
00:53:43
Speaker(s): Dr Bermal Aydin, Professor Sarah Banet-Weiser, Professor Meena Dhanda | The panel discusses how research about discrimination, misogyny, climate change or social inequity can call forth a violent ideological and physical backlash on and offline. Professor Sarah Banet-Weiser (@sbanetweiser) is Professor of Media and Communication and Head of the Department of Media and Communications. Professor Meena Dhanda is Professor of Philosophy and Cultural Politics at the University of Wolverhampton. Dr Bermal Aydin is a postdoctoral researcher in the Center for Study of Human Rights at LSE whose research interests include alternative media, precarity, authoritarianism, freedom of expression, populism, gender and film analysis. Dr Shakuntala Banaji is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies at the Department of Media and Communications. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 27, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Innovation: a disruptive force for good? [Audio]
00:55:05
Speaker(s): Dr Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe, Geoff Mulgan, Emma Smith, Kartik Varma | You see things; and you say "Why?" But I dream things that never were; and I say "Why not?" - George Bernard Shaw Join a panel of entrepreneurs and innovation experts to discuss how we can tackle the world's biggest problems in innovative ways to benefit society. We will consider questions including: What does innovation mean for social science? How we can innovate in socially responsible ways? Is innovation always to do with technology? How can we foster creativity and innovation? What does an innovative world look like? Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe is an Assistant Professor at the London School of Economics. Her research focuses on entrepreneurship, private equity and innovation. Her work has won several prizes including the Kauffman Dissertation Award (2012), the Coller Prize Award London (2013) and the Jaime Fernandez de Araoz Award (JFA, 2017). Emma Smith (@emmyagsmith) is the Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer at Eversend, a blockchain-based e-wallet for Africa and its diaspora that can facilitate money transfers both on and offline. To date, Eversend has facilitated over 5.5 million dollars worth of transactions. Before Eversend, Emma has worked on enterprising and innovative solutions to complex development problems. She's been on the founding team of five startups. Working with the public and private sector, she has led and participated in projects on diverse topics such as refugees and forced migration, global health, and financial inclusion. Geoff Mulgan (@geoffmulgan) has been Chief Executive of Nesta since 2011. Nesta is the UK's innovation foundation and runs a wide range of activities in investment, practical innovation and research. Between 1997 and 2004 Geoff had various roles in the UK government including director of the Government's Strategy Unit and head of policy in the Prime Minister's office. From 2004 to 2011 Geoff was the first Chief Executive of The Young Foundation. He was the first director of the think-tank Demos; Chief Adviser to Gordon Brown MP and reporter on BBC TV and radio. Kartik Varma (@CorpusKV) is an entrepreneur and an investor. He is the co-founder of PropTiger.com, India's largest digital real estate services firm, and iTrust Financial Advisors, a web-based open architecture platform providing financial products and advice to the mass affluent market in India. Previously, Kartik worked at The Childrens Investment Fund (London), Ziff Brothers Investments (New York and London) and James D Wolfensohn, Inc. (New York). Julia Black is Professor of Law in the Department of Law at LSE. She joined the Law Department in 1994. She completed her first degree in Jurisprudence and her DPhil at Oxford University. Her primary research interest is regulation. She has had a British Academy - Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship, and been a Visiting Fellow at the University of Sydney and at All Souls College, Oxford, and in 2014 was the Sir Frank Holmes Visiting Professor in Public Policy at the University of Victoria, Wellington. Due to unforeseen circumstances Hannah Leach is unfortunately no longer able to speak at this event. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 27, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Crisis of the Liberal World Order, or is the West in Decline - Again? [Audio]
01:03:20
Speaker(s): Professor G. John Ikenberry, Professor Mary Kaldor | The world famous theorist of international politics John Ikenberry of Princeton has for many years been insisting that the liberal world order created by the USA after WW2 has proved remarkably durable. Now, however, a series of major shifts in the world - the rise of China, the emergence of Russia as a spoiler power, the election of the very illiberal Donald Trump in the United States, and the more general populist backlash against globalisation- has placed the liberal order under immense strain. In this Roundtable Professor Ikenberry will be in conversation with leading LSE public intellectual Professor Mary Kaldor. Professor G. John Ikenberry is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University in the Department of Politics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is also Co-Director of Princeton’s Center for International Security Studies. Professor Mary Kaldor is Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit at the Department of International Development, LSE. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. The event is organised by LSE IDEAS. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 27, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | A Marketplace for World Order [Audio]
01:15:30
Speaker(s): Professor Danny Quah | For nearly a century, America has provided the world a simple narrative: "If you’re with us, you get international rule of law. If not, you have to deal with arbitrary exercise of power." Obviously, to most nations the latter proposition is untenable. Only under a multilateral rules-based system can lesser states stand toe to toe and resolve disputes on equal footing with great powers: In this view the right choice - an American-centered world order - is clear. But both America's own international conduct and academic scholarship suggest the increasing hollowness of this narrative. What forces will now shape the international system? Is disorder the only logical outcome with the breakdown of our current world order? This lecture suggests how an economic marketplace model for great power competition can help answer these questions, and guide thinking for constructing a world order that works for all the international community. Danny Quah (@DannyQuah ) is Li Ka Shing Professor in Economics and Dean at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. His research interests include income inequality, economic growth, and international economic relations. Quah's current research takes an economic approach to world order - with focus on global power shift and the rise of the east, and alternative models of global power relations. Quah is Commissioner on the Spence-Stiglitz Commission on Global Economic Transformation: Member, Executive Committee, International Economic Association: and Senior Fellow, Asian Bureau of Finance and Economics Research. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. In addition, he is currently working on a history of LSE. He helped establish the Cold War Studies Centre in 2004 and expand it into IDEAS, a foreign policy centre based at the LSE which aims to bring the academic and policy words together, in 2008. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 26, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Are We Heading Towards a Digital Dystopia? [Audio]
01:05:20
Speaker(s): Sam Byers, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Alison Powell | As technology and media continue to change our society at a rapid rate, what are the implications for our privacy, democracy and role as citizens? Sam Byers (@byers90) is the author of Idiopathy (2013) and Perfidious Albion (2018). His work has been translated into ten languages and his writing has appeared in Granta, The New York Times, The Spectator, and The Times Literary Supplement. Idiopathy was included on the Waterstones 11 list of debut novels to watch out for; shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Prize and the Desmond Elliot Prize; and won a Betty Trask Award. Dr Alison Powell (@a_b_powell) is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE, where she was inaugural programme director for the MSc Media and Communications (Data and Society). She researches how people’s values influence the way technology is built, and how technological systems in turn change the way we work and live together. Dr Orla Lynskey (@lynskeyo) is an Associate Professor and joined LSE Law in September 2012. She teaches and conducts research in the areas of data protection, technology regulation, digital rights and EU law. She holds an LLB (Law and French) from Trinity College Dublin, an LLM in EU Law from the College of Europe (Bruges) and a PhD from the University of Cambridge. Professor Charlie Beckett (@CharlieBeckett) is the founding director of Polis, the think-tank for research and debate around international journalism and society in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE Charlie is also director of the Media Policy Project and Lead Commissioner for the LSE Truth, Trust & Technology Commission (T3). This event is organsied by the Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE), a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. The LSE Truth, Trust and Technology (T3) Commission deals with the crisis in public information. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems. The full programme will be online in January 2019.
Feb 26, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | A Populist Wave? Unity and Division Among Europe's New Parties [Audio]
00:59:02
Speaker(s): Dr Alexandru Filip, Professor Sara Hobolt, Dr Benjamin Martill | The recent wave of populist parties and politicians throughout Europe and the world has been portrayed as a monolithic phenomenon that transcends national borders. On the right and on the left, populists have been portrayed as polarising forces that reinforce existing divisions in society and pull each side further from the centre. But is this the case? This event explores two counterintuitive arguments about Europe’s populist parties. First, that populist parties may find more in common with traditional parties in their home countries than with their counterparts in other European contexts; second, that populist parties on the left and the right have more in common with each other than with the traditional parties they separated from. Dr Alexandru Filip (@AlexFilip_87) is a Dahrendorf Forum Post-Doctoral Fellow based at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute at LSE. Dr Benjamin Martill is a Dahrendorf Forum Post-Doctoral Fellow based at the London School of Economics. Dr Rosa Balfour (@RosaBalfour) is a Senior Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund and Associate Fellow at LSE IDEAS. This event is co-organised by the Dahrendorf Forum at LSE IDEAS. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative between the LSE and the Hertie School of Governance, funded by the Mercator Stiftung. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 26, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | The Drugs Aren't Working! Confronting the Crisis of Superbugs [Audio]
00:56:57
Speaker(s): Michael Anderson, Dr Mathias Koenig-Archibugi, Ken Shadlen, Catherine Wilkosz | Growing resistance to antibiotics is one of the most significant current threats to global public health. Estimates suggest that in the European Union and the United States alone infections from multidrug resistant bacteria cause around 50,000 deaths a year, with substantial economic burdens associated with these infections. These figures will likely worsen, in the absence of new antibiotics to replace those with declining effectiveness. Existing systems of global health governance and drug development need to be reconfigured in order to respond to new threats. Coordinated international action is needed to address an impending global crisis – but how best to mobilise divergent private and public sector interests and forestall pending disorder? The interdisciplinary panel sitting across International Development, Health Policy, Government and International Relations will each address the challenge of growing resistance to antibiotics, providing a solution from their disciplinary viewpoint with questions and comments submitted in the days leading up to the event fed into the discussion. Michael Anderson is a Research Officer in Health Policy at the Department of Health Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Medical Doctor undertaking General Practice specialty training. Mathias Koenig-Archibugi is Associate Professor of Global Politics at the Department of Government. He joined the LSE in 2000 and is currently Senior Lecturer in Global Politics. After completing his secondary and undergraduate education in Rome, Italy, he received his PhD in Political Science from the University of Florence (2000). Ken Shadlen is Professor of Development Studies in the Department of International Development. Ken works on the comparative and international political economy of development, with a focus on understanding variation in national policy responses to changing global rules. Catherine Wilkosz is a nurse from Ann Arbor, Michigan who recieved her BSN from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. She worked primarily in intraoperative orthopaedic trauma surgery before pursuing her masters in Global Health Policy at LSE. Ernestina Coast (@LSE_ID ) is Professor of Health and International Development at the Department of International Development. Ernestina’s research is multidisciplinary and positioned at an intersection of social science approaches including health, gender and development. As a social scientist with training in demography and anthropology, her research uses mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative) to understand the inter-relationships between social context and health-related behaviours, with a focus on sexual and reproductive health. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 26, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Whatever Happened to the Revolution? LSE in the 60s [Audio]
01:10:30
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Cox | One British university above all others came to be associated with student rebellion in the 1960s - the LSE - later referred by one of the original rebels as that 'utopia at the end of the Kingsway rainbow - for a period'. But why the LSE? What did the students hope to achieve? And what legacy did they leave behind? Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. In addition, he is currently working on a history of LSE. He helped establish the Cold War Studies Centre in 2004 and expand it into IDEAS, a foreign policy centre based at the LSE which aims to bring the academic and policy words together, in 2008. Since joining the LSE he has also acted as Academic Director of both the LSE-PKU Summer School and of the Executive Summer School. Sue Donnelly joined LSE in 1989 and as LSE Archivist is responsible for the development of LSE’s institutional archive and raising awareness of the School’s unique and fascinating history. Her work has included creating content for the LSE History blog and developing a campus history tour to introduce staff and students to the history of LSE. The event is organised by LSE IDEAS. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 26, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | Pessimism and the State of the World [Audio]
01:20:39
Speaker(s): Minouche Shafik, Professor Andrés Velasco | Why are people in some of the richest countries in the world so miserable when so much of the economic and social data show massive material progress? Where did all that anger and anxiety come from that is manifested in populism, terrorism, and worsening well-being and mental health? Are we, despite the massive gains in material progress in recent decades, living in an age of insecurity? Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the inaugural Dean of the new School of Public Policy. He was the Minister of Finance in Chile between 2006 and 2010 and held professorial roles at the Harvard Kennedy School and Columbia University´s School of International and Public Affairs. He has advised governments around the world and formulated policy at the highest levels. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. Due to unforeseen circumstances, Stephanie Flanders is unfortunately no longer able to speak at this event. We apologies for any inconvenience cause. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 25, 2019
LSE Festival 2019 | A New International Order? Peacemaking after the First World War [Audio]
01:24:24
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Cox, Professor Annika Mombauer, Professor David Stevenson | A century after the Treaty of Versailles was signed in 1919, this session will reappraise the peace settlement that followed the First World War. On 28 June 1919 the Versailles peace treaty was signed between Germany and its First World War opponents, including Britain, America, France, Italy, and Japan. The treaty was intensely controversial, and has remained so. Disillusioned liberals such as John Maynard Keynes condemned it as unjust and unworkable, and much of German opinion agreed them. It has been blamed for inflaming German nationalism, enabling Hitler's rise, and causing the Second World War. Yet other commentators have seen the treaty as too weak, or as being neither consistently conciliatory nor consistently repressive, thus falling between two stools. This session will reappraise the 1919-20 peace conference, an exceptional moment when it briefly seemed possible to reshape the international order. It will include presentations on the 'war guilt' question and German attitudes; on Keynes, reparations, and the economic settlement; and on security, disarmament, and the League of Nations. Three contributions by experts on the settlement will be followed by a round-table discussion and by questions from the audience. Professor Michael Cox is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at the LSE. He has published extensively on international relations and international history, and is now researching on J. M. Keynes. Professor Annika Mombauer is Professor of Modern European History at the Open University. She has many publications on German history before and during the First World War. Professor David Stevenson is Stevenson Professor of International History at the LSE. He has published on the causes, course, and consequences of the First World War. Professor Matthew Jones is an expert on British and American foreign policy, and especially on the British nuclear deterrent. He is Head of the LSE International History Department. LSE's Department of International History (@lsehistory) teaches and conducts research on the international history of Britain, Europe and the world from the early modern era up to the present day. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 25, 2019
Quarantine [Audio]
01:18:52
Speaker(s): Catherine Arnold, Dr Stephen Roberts, Dr Seema Yasmin | One hundred years after the influenza pandemic, a novelist, a science writer and a population health specialist discuss the social impact of pandemics through time, and how virus, quarantine and contagion continue to inspire our dystopian literary imaginations. Catharine Arnold (@London_darkside) read English at Cambridge and holds a further degree in psychology. Catharine's latest book is Pandemic 1918: The Story of the Deadliest Influenza in History. Catharine's other titles include Necropolis London and its Dead and Underworld London, a history of capital punishment in London. Stephen Roberts is LSE Fellow in Global Health Policy. He is a module convenor on the MSc Global Health Policy and a member of the LSE Global Health Initiative. Dr Roberts is also an Associate Researcher at the Centre for Global Health Policy (CGHP) at the University of Sussex. Seema Yasmin (@DoctorYasmin) is an Emmy Award-winning journalist, author and medical doctor. Her first book charts the course of HIV/AIDS pandemic and the life of a scientist who fought to end the outbreak. She teaches science journalism and global health storytelling at Stanford University. Justin Parkhurst is an Associate Professor of Global Health Policy in the LSE Department of Health Policy. He is co-director of the MSc in Health Policy, Planning, and Financing programme, and the current serving Chair of the LSE Global Health Initiative. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFestival This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? The full LSE Festival programme is online.
Feb 23, 2019
Authority in the Era of Populism [Audio]
01:20:57
Speaker(s): Dame Louise Casey, Professor Mary Kaldor, Rupert Reid, Dame Heather Rabbatts, Jamie Bartlett | Public trust in the establishment is waning, but an age of disruption requires good leadership. So how can leaders lead in a post-deferential age? Jamie Bartlett (@JamieJBartlett) is writer and technology industry analyst at the think tank Demos. Mary Kaldor is Professor of Global Governance at LSE. Louise Casey is former head of the Respect Task Force, the UK’s first Victims’ Commissioner, director general of Troubled Families. Rupert Reid is Director of Research and Strategy at Policy Exchange. Previously based in Downing Street and Parliament as Special Adviser to the then Chief Whip, Rt Hon Gavin Williamson CBE MP. Heather Rabbatts is former chief executive of the London boroughs of Lambeth, Merton, and Hammersmith and Fulham. Anne McElvoy (@annemcelvoy) is Senior Editor at The Economist, a presenter of BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking and BBC Radio 4 Moral Maze, and a London Evening Standard columnist. This event will be recorded and broadcast BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking on Wednesday 27 February and will be available as an Arts & Ideas podcast from BBC Sounds.
Feb 19, 2019
Brexit: the Constitution and the future of the UK [Audio]
01:32:42
Speaker(s): Professor Vernon Bogdanor, Dr Catherine Haddon | Vernon Bogdanor discusses his forthcoming publication on the Constitution’s role within the future relationship between the UK and Europe. Vernon Bogdanor is Research Professor in the Centre for British Politics and Government at King’s College London. Catherine Haddon (@cath_haddon) is a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Government, which she joined in 2008 after a career in academia. She has led the Institute’s work on Whitehall reform, managing changes of government and general elections, evidence and policy making and now also runs their professional development and ministers programme. She advises and gives evidence to parliamentary select committees, has featured on radio and at party conferences, and is regularly cited in the press. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy and Professor in Practice in the Department of Government. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
Feb 19, 2019
The Role of Cities in a Global Economy [Audio]
00:57:17
Speaker(s): Rahm Emanuel | Rahm Emanuel will discuss the role of cities as world leaders in the 21st century. Cities have risen as global centers for innovation and energy across economics, entrepreneurship, culture and public policy. As the leader of the City of Chicago, Mayor Emanuel has been uniquely positioned to address the complex challenges and opportunities posed by education, health care, technology, immigration, infrastructure, climate change, and much more. Rahm Emanuel (@ChicagosMayor) was elected Mayor of Chicago in 2011 and re-elected in 2015. Mayor Emanuel has led major investments across education, youth programming, neighborhood development, transportation, infrastructure, public health, public safety, and the fight against climate change. Prior to this, Mayor Emanuel served as the White House Chief of Staff to President Barack Obama and served three terms in the U.S. House of Representatives representing Chicago’s 5th District. He previously served as a member of the Clinton administration from 1993 to 1998, rising to serve as Senior Advisor to the President for Policy and Strategy. Caroline Daniel (@carolinefdaniel) is a partner at Brunswick and former editor of FT Weekend, consulting editor of FT Live/FT Conferences, and FT assistant editor. LSE Cities (@LSECities) studies how people and cities interact in a rapidly urbanising world, focusing on how the design of cities impacts on society, culture and the environment. Through research, conferences, teaching and projects, the centre aims to shape new thinking and practice on how to make cities fairer and more sustainable for the next generation of urban dwellers, who will make up some 70 per cent of the global population by 2050. The Chicago Council on Global Affairs (@chicagocouncil) studies the influence of cities in solving global challenges and shaping world affairs. This event has been jointly organised by LSE Cities, the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and World Business Chicago.
Feb 19, 2019
Democracy on the Road: a 25 year journey through India [Audio]
01:32:46
Speaker(s): Ruchir Sharma | On the eve of India’s General elections in April and May, Ruchir Sharma will in this event, which marks the publication of his new book, offer a portrait of how India and its democracy work. Sharma has covered every election for the last two decades on the road talking to farmers, shopkeepers and CEOs from Rajasthan to Tamil Nadu, and interviewing leaders from Narendra Modi to Rahul Gandhi. Sharma will explain how the complex forces of family, caste and community, economics and development, money and corruption, Bollywood and Godmen, have conspired to elect and topple Indian leaders since Indira Gandhi. The message of his travels is that, while democracy is retreating in many parts of the world, it is thriving in India. Ruchir Sharma is author of the international bestsellers The Rise and Fall of Nations: Ten Rules of Change of in the Post-Crisis World. He is Head of Emerging Markets and Chief Global Strategist at Morgan Stanley, and a contributing opinion writer with The New York Times. His new book is Democracy on the Road. Mukulika Banerjee (@MukulikaB) is Director of the South Asia Centre at LSE. Mukulika’s current research interests are on the cultural meanings of democracy. Her most recent publication is Why India Votes? (2014) in which she explores the reasons behind India's rising trends of voter participation. She is currently completing a manuscript based on 15 years of engagement with a village in India to explain the sources of democratic thinking in Indian social life. Established in June 2015, the South Asia Centre (@SAsiaLSE) harnesses LSE's research & academic focus on South Asia, whose particularities constantly challenge conventional thinking in the social sciences.
Feb 18, 2019
Doping [Audio]
01:24:18
Speaker(s): Dr John William Devine, Dr Vanessa Heggie, Professor David Papineau | World-class athletes push themselves beyond normal limits and transform their bodies through training and diet. But in the wake of various scandals across the world of sport, we know pharmaceuticals can also play a role. Doping is considered a form of cheating, but should it be? And with the arrival of ‘smart drugs’, this is no longer only a worry for sports. Can we ensure a level playing field, in sports and beyond, or will the advances in drug development always outpace regulation? We explore the philosophy behind all things doping, competing, and cheating. John William Devine is Lecturer in Sports Ethics and Integrity at Swansea University. Vanessa Heggie is Lecturer in the History of Medicine at the University of Birmingham. David Papineau is Professor of Philosophy at KCL. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Feb 18, 2019
Netflix for Agriculture? Digital Technology for Development [Audio]
01:35:30
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Kremer | The rapid spread of mobile phones in developing countries, coupled with recent advances in our ability to analyze big data through tools such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, has generated considerable excitement about the potential of ICT for development. How does the reality of ICT use for development stack up to this excitement? And, which institutional arrangements best promote the use of ICT for development? Michael Kremer begins to answer these questions by examining the case of mobile-phone enabled agricultural extension for smallholder farmers. Recent changes in technology have made it possible to disseminate personalized agricultural information to smallholder farmers via their mobile-phones. In this lecture, Kremer explores the rapidly accumulating evidence on the impact of mobile-phone based agricultural extension. There appear to be at least some settings where farmers change their behavior and increase their yields in response to advice delivered via their mobile phones. Preliminary evidence suggests this may be highly-cost effective. However, due to market failures and asymmetric information private markets will typically undersupply this public good. Governments tend to fail as well due to design flaws that make their solutions difficult for farmers to understand. Kremer discusses potential hybrid solutions that incorporate elements of both private and public provision and argues that zero (or negative) pricing for such services is likely optimal. Finally, the lecture ends with a speculative vision of a “Netflix for Agriculture” in which farmers would provide information, knowing that this would allow the system to make better recommendations for them, and this would in turn improve the performance of the system in offering recommendations to other farmers. This event is a Kapuscinski Lecture (@kapulectures). Kapuscinski Development Lectures is a series organised by the European Commission, UNDP and partner universities. The series is funded by the European Commission. Michael Kremer is Gates Professor of Developing Societies, Harvard University. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and a Presidential Faculty Fellowship, and was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Kremer’s recent research examines education, health, water, and agriculture in developing countries. He has been named as one of Scientific American’s 50 researchers of the year, and has won awards for his work on health economics, agricultural economics, and on Latin America. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is Sir Anthony Atkinson Professor of Economics and Director of STICERD, LSE. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) is one of the leading economics departments in the world. It is a large department that ensures mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching.
Feb 14, 2019
Refugia: solving the problem of mass displacement [Audio]
01:24:25
Speaker(s): Professor Robin Cohen | Using fresh interpretations of utopian and archipelagic thinking, Robin Cohen will examine the limits and possibilities of creating an imaginative answer to mass displacement. The mass displacement of people through war, ethnic conflict, climate change and lack of opportunity is one of the pressing global issues of our time. The three traditional responses to this issue – local integration, resettlement and return – have proved to be inadequate, while politicians find it difficult to confront xenophobic and nationalist reactions to large-scale and culturally-diverse migration. Radical proposals to address the problem of mass displacement are now being given serious attention by academics and policy-makers alike. Drawing on joint work with Nicholas Van Hear, in this lecture Robin Cohen will subject these proposals to brief scrutiny, but also offer a major alternative vision, a new kind of transnational polity they have called ‘Refugia’. Robin Cohen is Professor Emeritus of Development Studies and Senior Research Fellow at Kellogg College, University of Oxford. Isabel Shutes is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Feb 14, 2019
A Short History of Europe [Audio]
01:24:13
Speaker(s): Sir Simon Jenkins | Simon Jenkins discusses his latest book, A Short History of Europe and the lessons to be learned from European history. Simon Jenkins is a Guardian columnist, author and BBC broadcaster. Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Head of the European Institute and Professor in European Philosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Feb 12, 2019
Engines of Privilege: Britain's private school problem [Audio]
01:32:49
Speaker(s): Professor Francis Green, Professor David Kynaston, Dr Luna Glucksberg | A rigorous, compelling and balanced examination of the British private school system and the lifetime of inequalities it entrenches. This event will see Francis Green and David Kynaston discuss their new book, Engines of Privilege: Britain's Private School Problem. Francis Green is Professor of Work and Education Economics at the UCL Institute of Education. David Kynaston is a historian and Visiting Professor at Kingston University. Luna Glucksberg (@luna_inequality) is a researcher at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Sam Friedman (@SamFriedmanSoc) is Associate Professor in Sociology, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Feb 11, 2019
Brexit: with a little help from our friends [Audio]
01:29:11
Speaker(s): George Brandis, Janice Charette, Foo Chi Hsia, Sir Jerry Mateparae | The panel considers the implications of Brexit on other countries, as well as how our friends overseas are fundamental to securing a smooth transition. George Brandis (@AusHCUK) is Australian High Commissioner to the UK. Janice Charette (@JaniceCharette) is Canadian High Commissioner to the UK Foo Chi Hsia has been Singapore’s High Commissioner to the United Kingdom since September 2014, and is concurrently accredited to Iceland and Ireland. Jerry Mateparae (@NZinUK) is New Zealand High Commissioner to the United Kingdom. Prior to his appointment, he served as New Zealand’s 20th Governor General. Previously, he has worked at senior levels in the New Zealand public service and military. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy and Professor in Practice, Department of Government, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
Feb 07, 2019
Racial Inequality in Britain: the Macpherson Report 20 years on [Audio]
01:30:18
Speaker(s): Professor Kalwant Bhopal, David Lammy MP, Dr Clive James Nwonka, Dr Faiza Shaheen | How have legislative issues been addressed to remedy racial inequalities and what has been the impact on law, policing, socioeconomic inequalities, media, politics and education? Kalwant Bhopal (@KalwantBhopal) is a Professor of Education and Social Justice at the University of Birmingham. David Lammy (@DavidLammy) is the Labour Party politician MP for Tottenham. Clive James Nwonka (@CJNwonka) is Fellow in Film Studies in the Department of Sociology, LSE. Faiza Shaheen (@faizashaheen) is Director of the Centre for Labour and Social Studies. Coretta Phillips is Associate Professor in LSE Department of Social Policy. Established in 1904, the Department of Sociology @LSEsociology at LSE is committed to empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated, and socially and politically relevant research and scholarship. Building upon the traditions of the discipline, we play a key role in the development of the social sciences into the new intellectual areas, social problems, and ethical dilemmas that face our society today.
Feb 07, 2019
Making a Difference in Greece [Audio]
01:29:16
Speaker(s): Kostis Hatzidakis | What are the key policies that will bring change in Greece? Kostis Hatzidakis addresses some critical factors that can lift the country’s growth and boost development. Kostis Hatzidakis (@K_Hatzidakis) is a member of the Greek Parliament and Vice President of the New Democracy Party. Spyros Economides is Associate Professor in International Relations and European Politics, European Institute, LSE; and Deputy Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) was established at the LSE in 1996. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships.
Feb 06, 2019
Welfare after Beveridge: state or civil society [Audio]
01:25:16
Speaker(s): Professor Richard Sennett, Professor Sir Julian Le Grand | Beveridge argued for the primacy of the state in providing welfare. His critics then and since have argued for more support from civil society, from communal associations, churches, voluntary organisations. This final lecture shows why obligations to others should be involuntary - and so why state support is fundamental. The challenge is to cut free of the bureaucratic tangles and institutional corruption which afflict the welfare state today. Richard Sennett (@richardsennett) is a sociologist and Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Sciences, and University Professor of the Humanities at New York University. His research interests include the relationship between urban design and urban society, urban family patterns, the urban welfare system, the history of cities and the changing nature of work. He has served as a consultant on urban policy to the Labour party and is a frequent commentator in the press. Julian Le Grand held the Richard Titmuss Chair of Social Policy in the Department of Social Policy and is now Professor in the Marshall Institute. From 2003 to 2005 he was seconded to No. 10 Downing Street as a Senior Policy Adviser to the Prime Minister. He is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books and has written more than one hundred articles and book chapters on economics, philosophy and public policy. He has chaired several government commissions and working groups, including most recently the Mutuals Task Force for the Cabinet Office, and the Panels reviewing Doncaster's and Birmingham's Children's Services for the Department for Education. He has acted as an adviser to the President of the European Commission, the World Bank, the World Health Organisation, and the OECD. In 2015 he was awarded a knighthood for services to social sciences and public service. Michael McQuarrie is Associate Professor in Sociology at LSE. This is 1 in a series of 4 public lectures that Richard Sennett will deliver on Welfare After Beveridge. The others take place on 16 January, 23 January and 30 January.
Feb 05, 2019
Psychiatry and Philosophy [Audio]
01:25:13
Speaker(s): Lisa Conlon, Dr Jean Khalfa, Professor Stella Sandford, Alistair Stewart | Mental disorders are widely held to have a chemical basis best treated with medication, and contemporary psychiatry is more closely allied with the neuro- and behavioural sciences than with philosophy. So what, if anything, does philosophy have to offer psychiatry today? Exploring both historical examples and contemporary psychiatric practice, we ask what the theoretical and therapeutic benefits of a philosophically informed psychiatry might be. Lisa Conlon is a Consultant Psychiatrist, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Jean Khalfa is Senior Lecturer in French Studies at Trinity College, Cambridge. Stella Sandford is Professor of Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University London. Alistair Stewart is Consultant Psychiatrist at Fairfield General Hospital, Bury. Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture at Royal Holloway, University of London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Feb 04, 2019
Work Smarter Not Harder: hacks to take you a long way at work [Audio]
01:14:00
Speaker(s): Saj Jetha | Understand how to ‘hack’ work and be the best you can with Saj Jetha, founder of the multi-award winning The Smarty Train and author of The Smarts: Big Little Hacks to Take You a Long Way at Work. Enjoy a jargon-free insight into 'hacks' which can boost your performance and that of those around. Discover how the award-winning techniques covered in The Smarts can make a real impact in your work life, whether you’re an intern, are moving to the next challenge in your career, or are the CEO. Saj will not only explain the power of these ‘hacks’, but will also immerse you in a series of tantalising experiments showing how small changes can make a big difference to your workplace performance. Saj Jetha (@thesmartytrain) is an economist and founder of The Smarty Train, a training and talent advisory described as ‘The Secret Cinema of Training’. He has worked with tens of thousands of people at major corporations worldwide like Accenture, BP, EY, HSBC and Deliveroo. Saj is also a trustee of The University of London Convocation and was recently awarded Freedom of the City. He is an alumnus of UCL and LSE. Alexander (Sandy) Pepper is Professor of Management Practice, Department of Management, LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies.
Feb 04, 2019
International Liberalism and its Discontents [Audio]
01:24:14
Speaker(s): Professor Stephan Haggard | Liberal internationalism is on the defensive across the West. Stephan Haggard examines the causes of this backlash and its global implications. Stephan Haggard is Distinguished Professor of Political Science, School of Global Policy and Strategy, University of California. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 91st year, making it one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. They are ranked 5th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2018 tables for Politics and International Studies.
Jan 31, 2019
What Now? The Political and Judicial Future of the Catalan Independentist Movement [Audio]
01:26:03
Speaker(s): Aamer Anwar, Alfred Bosch, Professor Clara Ponsati Obiols, Professor José Ignacio Torreblanca | More than a year after the celebration of the Self-determination Referendum, the Catalan independentist movement is at a crossroads. Nine political leaders are in jail and face charges of sedition and rebellion, while seven others face similar charges in other countries. The testimony of the ex-minister of Education, Clara Ponsatí, will provide the audience with a unique perspective of these circumstances. She will be joined by her lawyer, Aamer Anwar, who will focus on the judicial strategy against the accusations of the Judiciary of Spain. Aamer Anwar (@AamerAnwar) is Rector of the University of Glasgow and a criminal defence lawyer. Alfred Bosch (@AlfredBosch) is Minister of Foreign Action and Institutional Relations. Clara Ponsati Obiols (@ClaraPonsati) is former Minister of Education of Catalonia, and Professor of Economics, University of St Andrews. José Ignacio Torreblanca (@jitorreblanca) is Head of the Madrid office of the European Council on Foreign Relations. Professor Paul Preston is the Príncipe de Asturias Professor of Contemporary Spanish Studies and Director of the Cañada Blanch Centre for Contemporary Spanish Studies at the London School of Economics. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Catalan Observatory serves as a platform within Cañada Blanch Centre to promote research and debate about contemporary Catalan history and politics.
Jan 31, 2019
Looking Ahead: the 89ers and the future of the EU [Audio]
01:22:56
Speaker(s): Professor Timothy Garton Ash | On the occasion of the 1989 Generation Initiative’s third anniversary, Timothy Garton Ash will speak in broad terms about the future of the EU in the wake of Brexit, prospects for its reform, and how the next generation of European leaders must act to shape events. In an article at the height of the euro crisis, Timothy Garton Ash called on the young generation of Europeans to take ownership of the EU project. The response of students at the LSE European Institute in 2016, was to set up the 1989 Generation Initiative as a vehicle to do just that. Three years on, the Initiative is active in twelve countries and growing fast into a pan-European network of young people committed to reinventing Europe. In the meantime, the EU faces new crises. With the UK choosing to exit, paralysis over immigration, and the election of a populist government in a key member state, the future of the European Union is very much in doubt. How can it be reformed to make it function better? What role for the 89ers? Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies at the University of Oxford. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory. Michael Cottakis , President, 1989 Generation Initiative will provide a short welcome speech. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. 1989 Generation Initiative (@1989_Generation) is an open policy network mobilising a new generation of Europeans – the 89ers – to rebuild the European Project.
Jan 30, 2019
Welfare After Beveridge: sacrifices [Audio]
01:27:00
Speaker(s): Professor Richard Sennett, Dr Shani Orgad | The classic welfare state did not address itself to problems of consumption; there was not much to consume. Today, climate change entails profound changes in consumption; everyone will have to make sacrifices, consuming less. How should such necessary sacrifices change our thinking about the provision of welfare - whose classic moral logic was to give people more, to expand aspiration, rather than to shrink desire. Richard Sennett (@richardsennett) is a sociologist and Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Sciences, and University Professor of the Humanities at New York University. His research interests include the relationship between urban design and urban society, urban family patterns, the urban welfare system, the history of cities and the changing nature of work. He has served as a consultant on urban policy to the Labour party and is a frequent commentator in the press. Shani Orgad is Associate Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Dr Orgad gained a Bachelor's degree in Media and Communications with Sociology and Anthropology from The Hebrew University in Jerusalem, following which she obtained both a Master's and PhD in Media and Communications at LSE. Her research interests include gender and the media, media representations and contemporary culture, representations of suffering, new media, the Internet and computer-mediated communication, narrative and media, media and everyday life, media and globalisation, health and new media and methodological aspects of doing Internet research. Dr Robert Falkner is Research Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and Associate Professor of International Relations at LSE. This is 1 in a series of 4 public lectures that Richard Sennett will deliver on Welfare After Beveridge. The others take place on 16 January, 23 January and 5 February. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBeveridge LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, Single Homeless Project, one national, Mind, and one international, Teach A Man To Fish. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes.
Jan 30, 2019
The Politics of Memorials [Audio]
01:14:20
Speaker(s): Michelle Codrington-Rogers, Dr Margaret O’Callaghan, Dr Rahul Rau | Memorials have been fiercely debated in recent times. What roles do memorials play in a society and how do these acts of remembering contribute to a communities’ sense of identity? What gets remembered and what forgotten, and who decides? When, if ever, should memorials be removed? The panel will discuss past and present controversies around public memorializing, from Ground Zero to Confederate monuments, from Rhodes Must Fall to Trafalgar Square. Michelle Codrington-Rogers is an activist and Junior Vice-President of the NASUWT. Margaret O’Callaghan is Reader in History at Queen’s University Belfast. Rahul Rau is Senior Lecturer in Politics at SOAS. Sarah Fine (@DrSJFine) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at KCL. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Jan 29, 2019
The Class Ceiling: why it pays to be privileged [Audio]
01:28:37
Speaker(s): Dr Louise Ashley, Dr Sam Friedman, Dr Daniel Laurison, Dr Faiza Shaheen | How and why does class background still affect those in elite occupations? In this book launch the speakers look at barriers to upward mobility. Louise Ashley is a senior lecturer in organization studies at Royal Holloway, University of London. Sam Friedman (@SamFriedmanSoc) is Associate Professor in Sociology at LSE and co-author of The Class Ceiling. Daniel Laurison (@Daniel_Laurison) is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College and co-author of The Class Ceiling Faiza Shaheen (@faizashaheen) is Director of the Centre for Labour and Social Studies. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and Director of the International Inequalities Institute. Established in 1904, the Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) at LSE is committed to empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated, and socially and politically relevant research and scholarship. Building upon the traditions of the discipline, we play a key role in the development of the social sciences into the new intellectual areas, social problems, and ethical dilemmas that face our society today. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClassCeiling LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, Single Homeless Project, one national, Mind, and one international, Teach A Man To Fish. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes.
Jan 28, 2019
Paul Dolan: happy ever after [Audio]
01:23:15
Speaker(s): Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Tali Sharot | Paul Dolan launches his new book, Happy Ever After, exploring the narratives society installs in us, using good evidence to debunk bad stories. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the LSE where he currently serves as head of the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. Tali Sharot is a Professor Cognitive Neuroscientist at the Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London, where she is the director of the Affective Brain Lab. Julia Black is Professor of Law at the Department of Law, LSE. PBS@LSE (@PsychologyLSE @LSEBehavioural) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.
Jan 24, 2019
Europe's Response to the Challenge of Migration and Security [Audio]
01:04:34
Speaker(s): Dimitris Avramopoulos | Dimitris Avramopoulos will explore how Europe has reacted to the challenges brought about by migration in a globalised Europe. In 2015, Europe was confronted with an unprecedented migration and refugee crisis as well as rising security threats in the aftermath of several terrorist attacks. How did the European Union respond, politically but also operationally? What has changed since then? And is Europe today better prepared for the future? European Commissioner for Migration, Home Affairs and Citizenship, Dimitris Avramopoulos will share his experiences and insights from one of the hottest political seats in the EU’s policy and decision-making over the last three years, as well as his expectations for the future in this field. Dimitris Avramopoulos (@Avramopoulos) is European Commissioner for Migration, Home Affairs and Citizenship. Before becoming European Commissioner, Mr Avramopoulos was Minister of National Defence of Greece (two terms), Minister of Foreign Affairs, Minister of Tourism Development, Minister of Health and Social Solidarity and Mayor of Athens (two terms). Kevin Featherstone is Professor in European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative between the LSE and the Hertie School of Governance, funded by Mercator Stiftung.
Jan 23, 2019
Generations of Feminism? [Audio]
01:28:40
Speaker(s): Professor Avtar Brah, Professor Clare Hemmings, Niharika Pandit, Priya Raghavan | We often talk about different generations of feminism, but do these distinctions make sense? Our panel explains what differences and similarities there might be between generations of feminists. Avtar Brah is Professor Emerita at Birkbeck College, University of London. Clare Hemmings is Professor of Feminist Theory at LSE. Anne Phillips is Graham Wallas Professor of Political Science and Professor of Political and Gender Theory at LSE. Wednesday 23 January, 11:00am: Unfortunately due to unforeseen circumstances our third speaker Imaobong Umoren is unable to join the panel. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Jan 23, 2019
Welfare after Beveridge: bare life [Audio]
01:29:13
Speaker(s): Professor Richard Sennett, Professor Lord Skidelsky | Basic income can provide the bare essentials of life permanently, or alternatively, could provide bursts of help at strategic moments of need. An automated world disorients these concepts of basic income, because automation is radically altering the ways people can support themselves by work; new conditions of bare life are appearing in society. Richard Sennett (@richardsennett) is a sociologist and Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Sciences, and University Professor of the Humanities at New York University. His research interests include the relationship between urban design and urban society, urban family patterns, the urban welfare system, the history of cities and the changing nature of work. He has served as a consultant on urban policy to the Labour party and is a frequent commentator in the press. Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Warwick. His three volume biography of John Maynard Keynes (1983, 1992, 2000) received numerous prizes. He was made a life peer in 1991, and a Fellow of the British Academy in 1994. Robin Mansell is Professor of New Media and the Internet in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE.
Jan 23, 2019
Democracy and Prosperity: reinventing capitalism through a turbulent century [Audio]
01:27:58
Speaker(s): Professor Sara Hobolt, Professor Torben Iversen, Professor David Soskice | It is a widespread view that democracy and the advanced nation-state are in crisis, weakened by globalisation and undermined by global capitalism, in turn explaining rising inequality and mounting populism. At this event Torben Iversen and David Soskice will discuss their new book, Democracy and Prosperity: The Reinvention of Capitalism in a Turbulent Century, which argues this view is wrong: advanced democracies are resilient, and their enduring historical relationship with capitalism has been mutually beneficial. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute at LSE. Torben Iversen is Harold Hitchings Burbank Professor of Political Economy at Harvard University and BP Centennial Professor at LSE. David Soskice is School Professor of Political Science and Economics and Research Director of the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and Director of the International Inequalities Institute. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities)at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Jan 21, 2019
W E B Du Bois [Audio]
01:29:51
Speaker(s): Dr Liam Bright, Dr Brian Kelly, Dr Meera Sabaratnam | W. E. B. Du Bois is usually remembered as a sociologist and civil rights campaigner, and his analysis of race and racism continues to shape the way social scientists think about these issues today. But a genuine polymath, he was also a skilled philosopher and in this event we will consider Du Bois’s philosophical thought, from art, propaganda, and science, to the very purpose of philosophy itself. Liam Bright (@lastpositivist) is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at LSE. Brian Kelly is Reader in History at Queen’s University Belfast. Meera Sabaratnam is Senior Lecturer in International Relations at SOAS. Jonathan Birch is Associate Professor of Philosophy at LSE. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Jan 21, 2019
The Great Delusion: liberal dreams and international realities [Audio]
01:31:05
Speaker(s): Professor John Mearsheimer | In this lecture John Mearsheimer explains why US foreign policy so often backfires and what can be done to set it straight. John Mearsheimer is the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 91st year, making it one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. They are ranked 5th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2018 tables for Politics and International Studies. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreatDelusion
Jan 17, 2019
Welfare After Beveridge: dependence [Audio]
01:25:50
Speaker(s): Professor Richard Sennett, Professor Nicola Lacey | Economic inequality is increasing the dependence of ordinary people on institutions which do not have their welfare at heart. Yet children, the elderly, and the ill are necessarily dependent; mutual dependence is for everyone an ingredient of trust. We need a new logic of dependence. Richard Sennett (@richardsennett) is a sociologist and Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Sciences, and University Professor of the Humanities at New York University. His research interests include the relationship between urban design and urban society, urban family patterns, the urban welfare system, the history of cities and the changing nature of work. He has served as a consultant on urban policy to the Labour party and is a frequent commentator in the press. Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy. From 1998 to 2010 she held a Chair in Criminal Law and Legal Theory at LSE; she returned to LSE in 2013 after spending three years as Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, and Professor of Criminal Law and Legal Theory at the University of Oxford. She has held a number of visiting appointments, most recently at Harvard Law School. She is an Honorary Fellow of New College Oxford and of University College Oxford; a Fellow of the British Academy; and a member of the Board of Trustees of the British Museum. In 2011 she was awarded the Hans Sigrist Prize by the University of Bern for outstanding scholarship on the function of the rule of law in late modern societies and in 2017 she was awarded a CBE for services to Law, Justice and Gender Politics. Savvas Verdis is Deputy Director, Executive Masters in Cities, LSE Cities, LSE. This is the first in a series of 4 public lectures that Richard Sennett will deliver on Welfare After Beveridge. The others take place on 23 January, 30 January and 5 February.
Jan 16, 2019
War [Audio]
01:26:44
Speaker(s): Dr Susanne Burri, Professor Joseph Maiolo, Dr Michael Muthukrishna, Dr Michael Robillard | War scars human history, and it continues to mar lives across the globe. Is war part of human nature? Is it ever morally justified? And with the development of advanced weapon technologies, will future wars be more destructive than ever before? We bring together a philosopher, a historian and a cultural evolutionist to discuss the past, present and future of war and ask what, if anything, can be done to make war less likely. Susanne Burri is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at LSE. Joseph Maiolo is Professor of International History, Department of War Studies at KCL Michael Muthukrishna (@mmuthukrishna) is Assistant Professor of Economic Psychology at LSE. Michael Robillard is a Research Fellow at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics. Jonathan Birch is Associate Professor of Philosophy at LSE. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Jan 15, 2019
LSE IQ Ep 21 | Can we afford our consumer society? [Audio]
01:11:42
Speaker(s): Dr Rebecca Elliott, Professor Ian Gough, Dr Rodolfo Leyva | Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. For this LSE IQ we have something slightly different for you – an 'live' episode recorded in front of an audience at LSE at the beginning of November 2018. Economic growth has helped millions out of poverty. The jobs it creates mean rising incomes and consumers who buy more. This drives further growth and higher living standards, including better health and education. Yet WWF, the World Wildlife Fund, has recently warned that exploding human consumption is the driving force behind unprecedented planetary change, through increased demand for energy, land and water. Plastics and microplastics are filling our oceans and rivers and entering the food chain. The production of goods and services for household use is the most important cause of greenhouse gas emissions. The textile industry is responsible for depleting and polluting water resources and committing human rights abuses against its workers. It is also a major source of greenhouse gases, and three fifths of all clothing produced ends up in incinerators or landfills within a year of being made. For this episode of LSE IQ Jo Bale and Sue Windebank ask, 'Can we afford our consumer society?'. This episode features: Dr Rebecca Elliott, Assistant Professor, LSE’s Department of Sociology; Professor Ian Gough, Visiting Professor at LSE’s Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion and an Associate at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment; and Dr Rodolfo Leyva, LSE Fellow in LSE’s Department of Media Communications. For further information about the podcast visit lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSEIQ.
Dec 19, 2018
Women and Weapons [Audio]
01:33:51
Speaker(s): Ray Acheson, Dr Renata Dwan, Rebecca Johnson | Launching the Arts and Humanities Research Council research project, A Feminist International Law of Peace and Security, that asks how a feminist reading of International Law can further disarmament and promote sustainable peace, a panel of leading experts discuss the role of women and disarmament. For over a century women activists have played a leading role in seeking universal disarmament and arms control and in initiating peace projects – from the 1915 Women’s Peace Congress in The Hague through to the negotiations for the Nuclear Prohibition Treaty in 2017. The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) has continuously lobbied for ‘total and universal disarmament’ and for nineteen years women protested at Greenham Common against the placing of cruise missiles in the UK. Despite these and many other efforts it is argued that rather than promoting peace, contemporary international law sustains militarism and legitimates the use of force. And today we confront the threats of growing militarisation and military expenditure. The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute reported in May 2018 that ‘military spending in 2017 represented 2.2 per cent of global gross domestic product (GDP) or $230 per person.’ In addition new technologies are constantly used to increase the global weapons arsenal. These challenges urgently require responses to pressing questions. Ray Acheson (@achesonray) is the Director of Reaching Critical Will, a project of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). Renata Dwan (@RenataDwan) is Director, United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research. Rebecca Johnson (@GreenRebJohnson) is Executive Director, Acronym Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy. Anna Stavrianakis (@StavrianakisA) is Senior Lecturer in International Relations, University of Sussex. Christine Chinkin is Founding Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security and currently leading an AHRC project 'A Feminist International Law of Peace and Security'. The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation for women in conflict-affected situations around the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFILPS
Dec 13, 2018
Saving Democracy from Politicians. Do We Need Professional Representatives? [Audio]
01:26:24
Speaker(s): Professor Valentino Larcinese | Is populism a threat to democracy? And aren’t technocracy and elitism also threats to democracy? Is there a trade-off between the competence and representativeness of politicians? The lecture tries to address these questions of paramount importance for contemporary democratic systems by using the experience of the 5 Star Movement in the Italian parliament as a case study. It shows that the 5 Star parliamentary group is socio-economically much more similar to the Italian population than other political parties. It also shows that inclusiveness is not associated with below-average legislative performance.
Dec 06, 2018
The Chocolate Case [Audio]
00:57:52
Speaker(s): Arjen Boekhold, Dr Marjolein Busstra, Charlotte Williams | Is eating chocolate linked to child slavery? Watch this entertaining and shocking documentary film about the journalists investigating global chocolate production. To mark the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, LSE IDEAS, United Nations Cinema and the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands present a screening of The Chocolate Case, followed by a panel discussion on the links between responsible business, consumers, and modern day slavery. Arjen Boekhold (@ArjenBoekhold) is Cocoa Game Changer at Tony’s Chocolonely. Marjolein Busstra is a Legal Counsel at the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. She is a human rights lawyer, focusing on cyber, new technologies and business and human rights. Charlotte Williams is Head of Child’s Rights and Business at Unicef, UK. Mary Martin is Director of the UN Business and Human Security Initiative at LSE IDEAS. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. United Nations Cinema series (@CineONU) is organised by the UN Regional Information Centre. Now in its 10th year, the series has been screening documentary films on global issues with the aim of raising awareness of the work of the United Nations, and through awareness, inspiring people to make a difference. Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in London; the Netherlands is a great supporter of human rights and promotes sustainable and inclusive growth worldwide. In 2018 the Kingdom of the Netherlands is one of the 15 members of the UN Security Council, through which it contributes to international peace and security. Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSEChocolate, #NLUK, #Standup4HumanRights, #HumanRightsDay
Dec 06, 2018
How French minorities are reshaping the image of La Parisienne [Audio]
01:27:44
Speaker(s): Rokhaya Diallo | The idea of womanhood is often embodied by legendary blonde French icons. In 2018 Rokhaya Diallo challenges the stereotypical view of “La Parisienne” by bringing together diverse groups of people in the famous Parisian landscape. She seeks to deconstruct the norm and show that various skin tones and hair textures are valuable, despite the standard view of Parisian womanhood. She makes minorities visible as a way to give them room in the in the collective imagination of Paris. Rokhaya Diallo (@RokhayaDiallo) is a journalist, award-winning film-maker and activist. Sonya Onwu is the Director the undergraduate Legal Academic Writing Skills (LAWS) programme in the LSE Department of Law. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research.
Dec 04, 2018
Bad Language [Audio]
01:29:58
Speaker(s): Dr Emma Byrne, Dr John Gallagher, Dr Rebecca Roache | Language allows us to communicate. It also allows us to charm, shock, delight, and offend. It is political and we can use it to harm and manipulate. And some words are just not okay in polite company. Should there ever be restraints on what can be said? If so, what kind? In this Forum event, we navigate the deeper issues around swearing, slurring, and slander. Swear-jars at the ready! Emma Byrne (@SciWriBy) is author of Swearing is Good for You: the Amazing Science of Bad Language. John Gallagher (@earlymodernjohn) is Lecturer in Early Modern History, University of Leeds. Rebecca Roache (@rebecca_roache) is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, Royal Holloway, University of London. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is Fellow, The Forum and a doctoral researcher at King’s College London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
Dec 03, 2018
From Pillars to Practice: pushing the boundaries of ‘Women, Peace and Security' [Audio]
01:27:50
Speaker(s): Dr Toni Haastrup, Henri Myrttinen, Dr Aisling Swaine, Professor Jacqui True | At the UK launch of the Oxford Handbook of Women, Peace and Security, the authors will take stock of what has and hasn’t been achieved. Toni Haastrup (@ToniHaastrup) is Lecturer in International Security, School of Politics and International Relations, University of Kent. Henri Myrttinen is Head of Gender and Peacebuilding, International Alert. Aisling Swaine is Assistant Professor of Gender and Security at the Department of Gender Studies, LSE, where she teaches primarily on the MSc in Women, Peace and Security. Jacqui True (@JacquiTrue) is Professor of Politics and International Relations and Director of the Gender, Peace and Security Centre, Monash University. Bela Kapur is Visiting Senior Fellow in the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation for women in conflict-affected situations around the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWPS
Nov 29, 2018
Policy-Making in an Age of Populism [Audio]
01:33:56
Speaker(s): Professor Jason Furman, Professor Sara Hobolt, Yascha Mounk, Professor Andrés Velasco | Across the globe, liberal democracy is under threat from populism. Through Europe, the Americas and Asia demagogic figures of both the left and the right have come to power with simplistic solutions to entrenched policy dilemmas, bringing often authoritarian and sometimes brutal methods to achieve their political ends. The practice of good governance is being eroded, the international settlement up-ended, experts derided and societies polarised. The global effect is nothing less than an assault on liberalism and democratic institutions. In this landmark event, the Director of the LSE, Dame Minouche Shafik, and the Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy, Professor Andres Velasco, will be joined by an esteemed panel to understand the causes of this trend and how it can be reversed. Why have populists been able to gain public traction so easily? Where have establishment politicians and institutions gone wrong? Why have liberals’ responses to this challenge been so ineffective and at times so inaudible? What skills do policy-makers need to survive and thrive in this environment, and how can schools of public policy –perhaps the ultimate bastions of reasoned judgement in the pursuit of public service– contribute to the defence of liberal democratic values? Jason Furman (@jasonfurman) is Professor at the John Kennedy School of Government, Harvard, Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics and Former Head of the Council of Economic Advisers to President Obama. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute at LSE. Yascha Mounk (@Yascha_Mounk) is a Lecturer on Government at Harvard University, a Senior Fellow at New America, and a Columnist at Slate. He is the author of The People vs Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the inaugural Dean of the new School of Public Policy. Professor Velasco has an exceptional breadth of experience in a distinguished career spanning academia, policy and politics. He was the Minister of Finance in Chile between 2006 and 2010 and held professorial roles at the Harvard Kennedy School and Columbia University´s School of International and Public Affairs. He has advised governments around the world and formulated policy at the highest levels. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESPP Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Policy-Making in an Age of Populism. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.
Nov 29, 2018
Will You Feel Better after Hospital Treatment? [Audio]
01:36:22
Speaker(s): Professor Andrew Street | We have little idea about whether hospital treatment makes patients better. In his inaugural lecture Andrew Street explains why this matters and what can be done about it. Andrew Street (@andrewdstreet) is Professor of Health Economics in the Department of Health Policy at LSE. Previously he was at the University of York, which he joined in 1995, and where he was Director of the Health Policy team in the Centre for Health Economics and Director of the Economics of Social and Health Care Research Unit (ESHCRU). George Gaskell is Emeritus Professor of Social Psychology and Research Methodology. He was awarded the Gago medal in 2018 for lifetime contributions to science policy in Europe and is the lead researcher of multi-country studies on the social, ethical and legal impact of the life science in Europe and a European study on responsible research and innovation in neuro-enhancement. He is the Chair of LSE and Partners Behavioural Science Consortium, conducting studies in support of European Commission directives and policy discussions. The Department of Health Policy (@LSEHealthPolicy) is home to a diverse student body, determined to become future leaders in health policy and health economics, exploring policy-relevant interdisciplinary academic curriculum. Based in the heart of London, we are uniquely positioned to carry out impactful health and social care research, influencing and informing national and global policymaking and implementation. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHealth
Nov 29, 2018
Being Disabled [Audio]
01:26:36
Speaker(s): Dr Claire Jones, Dr Fiona Kumari Campbell, Dr Hannah Thompson | What is disability and how has it been understood through history and across different cultures? How is disability presented in the arts and in our changing idea of what it means to be human? Is the term ‘disability' useful for the development of disability rights or does it fail to capture the diversity of disabled experience? We will address these questions and consider the nature of disabled experience and the ways in which society is disabling. Claire Jones (@Claire_L_Jones) is Lecturer in the History of Medicine, University of Kent. Fiona Kumari Campbell (@f_k_campbell) is Senior Lecturer in Social Work, University of Dundee. Hannah Thompson (@BlindSpotHannah) is Reader in French, Royal Holloway, University of London. Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Fellow, The Forum and a Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Thought, Royal Holloway, University of London The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
Nov 28, 2018
How Far Has Brexit Reached? Taking Stock of Progress and Risks [Audio]
01:33:35
Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Sara Hobolt, Rain Newton-Smith, Stephen Wall | Our expert panel will reflect on the progress of the Brexit negotiations and their prospects, and the implications for the UK’s future relationship with the EU. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor in European Union Law and Employment Law at the University of Cambridge, and senior tutor and fellow of Trinity College. She specialises in EU law and employment law. She is author of EU Employment Law, The Substantive Law of the EU: The Four Freedoms, and (with Peers ed), European Union Law. Currently, Catherine is a Senior Fellow in the ESRC’s UK in a Changing Europe project which looks at all aspects of Brexit in its various manifestations. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is the Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and Professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute, LSE. Rain Newton-Smith (@RainNewtonSmith) is the Chief Economist at the Confederation of British Industry. Previously, Rain was head of Emerging Markets at Oxford Economics where she managed a large team of economists and was the lead expert on China. Prior to that, Rain worked on the international forecast for the Monetary Policy Committee at the Bank of England and also led a team with responsibility for developing a risk assessment framework for the UK financial system. Stephen Wall (@stephenwall34) is the former British Ambassador to Portugal and Permanent Representative to the European Union. The panel of experts will reflect on the progress of the ‘BREXIT’ negotiations and their prospects. It will also explore the implications for the UK’s future relationship with the EU. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Nov 28, 2018
Trump, America, and the World: two years on [Audio]
01:30:14
Speaker(s): Professor G. John Ikenberry, Dr Kori Schake, Professor Peter Trubowitz, Dr Leslie Vinjamuri | Two years ago Donald Trump's election shocked the world. At this event, foreign policy experts ask how much the Trump Presidency has changed America's global role. President Trump has challenged America's traditional allies and normal trade policies. Will this have a lasting effect on US international relations? This event is the launch of the 3rd edition of US Foreign Policy, co-edited by Professor Michael Cox and Doug Stokes. G. John Ikenberry is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University in the Department of Politics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is also Co-Director of Princeton’s Center for International Security Studies. Kori Schake (@KoriSchake) is Deputy Director-General, International Institute for Strategic Studies. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. Leslie Vinjamuri (@londonvinjamuri) is Head, US and the Americas Programme at Chatham House and Reader in International Relations, SOAS, University of London. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSETrump This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Nov 27, 2018
The Future of Money [Audio]
01:12:03
Speaker(s): Dr Jon Danielsson, Dr Eva Micheler, Nikola Tchouparov | This event will address the evolving role of money in society. Money used to be gold and is now fiat. Electronic transactions mean we have all but stopped carrying cash. The three speakers will discuss how new financial technology is set to change how money and payment systems are organised, if cryptocurrencies will displace fiat money and if banks will be replaced by technology providers? Jon Danielsson (@JonDanielsson) is Co-Director of the Systemic Risk Centre and Associate Professor of Finance, LSE. Eva Micheler is Co-investigator of the Systemic Risk Centre and Associate Professor in Law, LSE Law. Nikola Tchouparov is CEO of Moneyfold Ltd. Ross Cranston is Professor of Law, LSE. The Systemic Risk Centre (@LSE_SRC) was set up to study the risks that may trigger the next financial crisis and to develop tools to help policymakers and financial institutions become better prepared. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFutureOfMoney This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Nov 26, 2018
The Coddling of the American Mind [Audio]
01:24:55
Speaker(s): Professor Jonathan Haidt | A timely investigation into the new safety culture in universities and the dangers it poses to free speech, mental health, education, and ultimately democracy. This event marks the launch of Jonathan's new book, The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure. Jonathan Haidt (@JonHaidt) is a social and cultural psychologist and the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University's Stern School of Business. He is the author of The Righteous Mind and The Happiness Hypothesis. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is currently Professor of Behavioural Science at the LSE. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of LSE's Executive MSc Behavioural Science. LSE's Behavioural Science Hub (@LSEBehavioural) is a collaboration across the School in all things behavioural. Its two main goals are to provide a platform to highlight existing behavioural science related activities at LSE and further develop the capacity for top quality research into human behaviour. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHaidt Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at The Coddling of the American Mind. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.
Nov 23, 2018
Cost Benefit Analysis and the Environment: further developments and policy use [Audio]
01:25:34
Speaker(s): Nils-Axel Braathen, Ben Groom, Joseph Lowe, Susana Mourato, Tanja Wettingfeld | A number of OECD countries make extensive use of cost benefit analysis (CBA) to help inform environmental policy decisions. This discussion panel will reflect on this use and take stock of recent developments in environmental CBA and the challenges this presents to policy makers. The panel will be comprised of some of the LSE authors of a recent book published by OECD on environmental CBA as well as policy practitioners. The book is entitled Cost benefit analysis and the environment: further developments and policy use. Nils-Axel Braathen is a Principal Administrator in the Environmental Performance and Information Division of OECD’s Environment Directorate. Ben Groom (@ben_d_groom) is Professor of Environment and Development Economics, LSE. Joseph Lowe is Head of Economic Branch, HM Treasury. Susana Mourato (@smmour) is Professor of Environmental Economics, LSE. Tanja Wettingfeld (@tanjawett) is Economic Advisor on Smart Energy, Department of Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy. Giles Atkinson is Professor of Environmental Policy, LSE. Department of Geography and Enviroment (@LSEGeography): a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEnvironment
Nov 22, 2018
How Lives Change: Palanpur, India, and development economics [Audio]
01:29:40
Speaker(s): Professor Oriana Bandiera, Dr Himanshu, Peter Lanjouw, Professor Michael Lipton, Professor Lord Stern | The event marks the launch of a book that gives insights into the fundamental question of development economics, How Lives Change. This new book uses a unique data set consisting of seven full (100%) surveys of one Indian village, one for every decade since Independence. The panel, consists of some of the leading scholars and practitioners of economic development of our times. The book reflects on the past, present and future, both of India and of development economics, seen through the experience of Palanpur in the years since Independence. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is Sir Anthony Atkinson Professor of Economics and Director of STICERD, LSE. Himanshu is Associate Professor, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi and British Academy Visiting Fellow, LSE. Peter Lanjouw is Professor in Development Economics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Michael Lipton is Emeritus Professor of Economics, Sussex University. Nicholas Stern (@lordstern1) is IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, LSE and Director of the LSE India Observatory. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. The India Observatory (@LSE_IO), set up in 2006, is a Centre to develop and enhance research and programmes related to India's economy, politics and society. STICERD brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIndia
Nov 22, 2018
Fighting Misinformation: the launch of the LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission report [Audio]
01:26:23
Speaker(s): Polly Curtis, Professor Sonia Livingstone, Dr Damian Tambini, | The LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission has been working with experts, practitioners and the public to identify structural causes of media misinformation and set out a new framework for strategic policy. This event will launch the Commission's report, at which the report's key recommendations will be presented to the public. Polly Curtis (@pollycurtis) is the former Editor-in-Chief of HuffPost UK where she was responsible for all editorial output and standards on the award winning HuffPost UK website, overseeing a newsroom of 45 editors and reporters across the UK. Previously, the vast majority of her career was at The Guardian where she was a reporter, a correspondent working from the House of Commons, Deputy National Editor and then Digital Editor. Polly is also on the board of the Society of Editors and on the advisory panel of experts for the Cairncross Review. Sonia Livingstone (@Livingstone_S) is Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE and Chair of the LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission. She has published twenty books on media audiences, media literacy and media regulation, with a particular focus on the opportunities and risks of digital media use in the everyday lives of children and young people. Damian Tambini (@damiantambini) is Associate Professor in the LSE Department of Media and Communications, and the Special Advisor to the Truth, Trust and Technology Commission. He is an expert in media and communications regulation and policy and is frequently called to give evidence to parliamentary committees and provide formal and informal policy advice to government. Charlie Beckett (@CharlieBeckett) is the founding director of Polis, the think-tank for research and debate around international journalism and society in the Department of Media and Communications. Charlie is also director of the Media Policy Project and Lead Commissioner for the LSE Truth, Trust & Technology Commission (T3). The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in our field (2018 QS World University Rankings). Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEt3 This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Nov 20, 2018
Lessons learned from the Greek Crisis: reflections from George Papandreou [Audio]
01:31:25
Speaker(s): George Papandreou | George Papandreou will be in conversation with Kevin Featherstone. He will reflect on his expectations before coming to office at the start of the debt crisis and its impact on his government’s programme. George A. Papandreou (@GPapandreou) is a former Prime Minister of Greece, current President of Socialist International, a member of the Hellenic Parliament and former President of the Panhellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK). He served as the 11th Prime Minister of Greece from October 6, 2009 - November 11, 2011, after PASOK’s victory in the October 2009 national elections. He is an alumnus of LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) was established at the LSE in 1996. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships.
Nov 19, 2018
How to Succeed Outside Your Comfort Zone [Audio]
01:15:55
Speaker(s): Farrah Storr | Editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan, Farrah Storr, explains how we can harness constraint, failure and obstacles to unlock creative thinking and personal potential, using examples from her own career as a journalist and editor. Farrah Storr (@Farrah_Storr) is the award-winning editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan, where she has increased sales by an unprecedented 59% since she took over the helm of the brand, taking the magazine back to its number one position for the first time in 16 years. Prior to this she was the launch editor of Women's Health magazine, the most successful women's magazine launch of the millennium. In 2018 Farrah was named as one of the most powerful BAME leaders in the country by The Guardian. She is the author of The Discomfort Zone and is a regular spokesperson on women's issues, diversity and careers. Rebecca Campbell is an LSE Fellow in the Department of Management, LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWomenIn Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at How to Succeed Outside Your Comfort Zone. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.
Nov 12, 2018
The Global Gag Rule and Women's Reproductive Health: rhetoric versus reality [Audio]
01:21:34
Speaker(s): Professor Yana van der Meulen Rodgers | In 2017, three days after entering office, President Donald Trump not only reinstated the Global Gag Rule, he also expanded the order extensively. Trump halted US funding to family planning organisations providing abortion-related activities, but also extended this rule to any foreign nongovernmental organisation that receives funding from US Aid that does not certify that they do not use their own funding to provide abortions services. The estimated funding gap of $8.8 billion in US global health assistance will be hard to fill through philanthropy with consequences for the support of family planning, maternal and child health as well as the provision of health services not directly related to abortion such as HIV and Malaria treatment. On top of this, there is strong evidence to suggest that the Global Gag Rule leads to more rather than fewer abortions, projected to lead to 2.5 million unintended pregnancies and 870,000 unsafe abortions. Yana van der Meulen Rodgers (@YanaRodger) is a Professor at Rutgers University and Director of the Center for Women and Work. Naila Kabeer is Professor of Gender and Development at the Department of Gender Studies and Department of International Development. LSE’s Global Health Initiative is an interdepartmental research platform that applies LSE’s tradition of rigorous social science research to emerging global health challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGlobalHealth
Nov 12, 2018
Well-being and Work [Audio]
01:18:51
Speaker(s): Mike Coupe | With more people working more hours, many are finding themselves increasingly "time-poor". Sainsbury's CEO Mike Coupe argues that there is a need for big business to take an active leadership role on well being issues. Drawing on the Sainsbury's Living Well index he will answer questions put to him by Richard Layard on how we can lead happier, healthier lives. Mike Coupe is CEO of Sainsbury's. He has served as an Executive Director since 1 August 2007 and as Chief Executive Officer since 9 July 2014. Mike has also been a member of the Operating Board since October 2004. Mike has vast retail industry experience in trading, strategy, marketing, digital and online as well as multi-site store experience. He joined Sainsbury’s from Big Food Group where he was a board director of Big Food Group plc and Managing Director of Iceland Food Stores. He previously worked for both ASDA and Tesco, where he served in a variety of senior management roles. Mike is a Non-Executive Director of Greene King plc. Richard Layard is co-Director of the CEP's Wellbeing programme and co-founder and Chair of Action for Happiness. CEP (@CEP_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research centre at the LSE. Established by the ESRC in 1990, is now one of the leading economic research groups in Europe. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWorkplace
Nov 12, 2018
Human Rights and Climate Change [Audio]
01:17:52
Speaker(s): Kristin Casper, Roberto Eugenio T Cadiz, Dr Luke Harrington, Dr Annalisa Savaresi, Dr Joana Setzer | An expert panel will discuss the links between human rights and climate change, and whether rights-based climate change claims are one future path to spurring climate action. Kristin Casper is Litigation Counsel for Greenpeace's Global Climate Justice and Liability Project at Greenpeace Canada. Roberto Eugenio T Cadiz is a focal commissioner for Business and Human Rights, Environment and Sustainable Development Goals at the Commission on Human Rights of the Republic of the Philippines. Luke Harrington is a Researcher and College Lecturer at the University of Oxford. Annalisa Savaresi is a lecturer in Law at the University of Stirling. Joana Setzer (@JoanaSetzer) is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow, at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. Stephen Humphreys is an Associate Professor of International Law. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE)was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateChange This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Nov 08, 2018
Making sense of the US Midterms [Audio]
01:26:10
Speaker(s): Gideon Rachman, Dr David Smith, Dr Leslie Vinjamuri, Dr Linda Yueh | Join us for an evening of conversation as we discuss the midterm election results and what they mean for Donald Trump’s presidency and the US. Gideon Rachman (@gideonrachman) is Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator, Financial Times. David Smith (@dtsmith_sydney) is Senior Lecturer in American Politics and Foreign Policy, University of Sydney and a British Academy Visiting Fellow. Leslie Vinjamuri (@londonvinjamuri) is Head, US and the Americas Programme at Chatham House and Reader in International Relations, SOAS, University of London. Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is Visiting Senior Fellow, LSE IDEAS and member of the Policy Committee, Centre for Economic Performance. She is Fellow in Economics, St Edmund Hall, Oxford University and Adjunct Professor of Economics, London Business School. Her latest book is The Great Economists: How Their Ideas Can Help Us Today. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSMidterms
Nov 07, 2018
Just Giving: why philanthropy is failing democracy and how it can do better [Audio]
01:35:27
Speaker(s): Professor Rob Reich | Is philanthropy, by its very nature, a threat to today’s democracy? Though we may laud wealthy individuals who give away their money for society’s benefit, Robert Reich shows how such generosity not only isn’t the unassailable good we think it to be but might also undermine democratic values and set back aspirations of justice. Big philanthropy is often an exercise of power, the conversion of private assets into public influence. And it is a form of power that is largely unaccountable, often perpetual, and lavishly tax-advantaged. The affluent—and their foundations—reap vast benefits even as they influence policy without accountability. And small philanthropy, or ordinary charitable giving, can be problematic as well. Charity, it turns out, does surprisingly little to provide for those in need and sometimes worsens inequality. This event marks the launch of Rob's new book, Just Giving: Why Philanthropy Is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better. Rob Reich (@robreich) is professor of political science and faculty codirector for the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society at Stanford University. His recent books include Education, Justice, and Democracy. Stephan Chambers is the inaugural director of the Marshall Institute at LSE. He is also Professor in Practice at the Department of Management at LSE and Course Director for the new Executive Masters in Social Business and Entrepreneurship. The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEJustGiving
Nov 07, 2018
Future Politics: living together in a world transformed by tech [Audio]
01:29:33
Speaker(s): Jamie Susskind | Jamie Susskind will discuss the publication of his latest book, Future Politics: Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech. At this event, Jamie will discuss how digital technology, from AI to virtual reality, will transform politics and society. He will mention how digital technology will be used to exert control by the state and by big tech firms. This talk will challenge the audience to rethink the meaning of democracy and justice, freedom and equality, power, and property. The great political debate of the last century was about how much of our collective life should be determined by the state and what should be left to the market and civil society. In the future, the question will be how far our lives should be directed and controlled by powerful digital systems - and on what terms? Jamie Susskind (@jamiesusskind) is an author, speaker, and practising barrister. A past Fellow of Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, he studied history and politics at Magdalen College, Oxford, graduating first in his year before turning to the law. Tony Travers is the Associate Dean of LSE’s School of Public Policy and a Professor in the Department of Government. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSETech
Nov 06, 2018
Revolution and Freedom: Nightmarch among India's revolutionary guerrillas [Audio]
01:25:42
Speaker(s): Neel Mukherjee, Dr Alpa Shah | In her latest book, Nightmarch, which she will talk about at this event, Alpa Shah offers a profound understanding of why some of India’s poor have shunned the world’s largest democracy and taken up arms to fight for a fairer society in one of the most intractable and under-reported rebellions. Nightmarch refers to a seven-night trek that Shah happened to undertake with these communist guerrillas while living as an anthropologist in their tribal strongholds in eastern India for several years. In this event Shah discusses revolution and freedom with Neel Mukherjee, author of A State of Freedom and the Man Booker Prize shortlisted The Lives of Others. Neel Mukherjee is the critically acclaimed author of three novels: A State of Freedom (2017), The Lives of Others (2014), and A Life Apart (2010). Alpa Shah (@alpashah001) is Associate Professor (Reader) of Anthropology at London School of Economics and leads the Programme of Research on Inequality and Poverty. She is the author of the just published Nightmarch: Among India’s Revolutionary Guerrillas, author of In the Shadows of the State, co-author of Ground Down by Growth and presented India’s Red Belt for BBC Radio 4’s ‘Crossing Continents’. Beverley Skeggs (@bevskeggs) is a feminist sociologist and the Academic Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity based in the International Inequalities Institute. Anthropology ( @LSEAnthropology) is the comparative study of culture and society. We ask big questions about what we have in common, and what makes us different. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSENightmarch
Nov 01, 2018
Uncertain Futures: imaginaries, narratives, and calculation in the economy [Audio]
01:28:53
Speaker(s): Professor Jens Beckert, Richard Bronk, Dr Waltraud Schelkle, Dr Ekaterina Svetlova, Lord Turner | Our panel discusses the new book Uncertain Futures, exploring how economic actors visualise the future and decide how to act in conditions of radical uncertainty. Jens Beckert is Director, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies. Richard Bronk is Visiting Fellow, European Institute, LSE. Waltraud Schelkle is Associate Professor of Political Economy, LSE. Ekaterina Svetlova (@EkaterinaSvet19) is Senior Lecturer in Accounting and Finance, University of Leicester. Adair Turner (@AdairTurnerUK) is Chair, Institute of New Economic Thinking and the Energy Transitions Commission. George Gaskell is Professor of Social Psychology and Research Methodology, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, Cologne (@MPIfG_Cologne) conducts basic research on the governance of modern societies. It aims to develop an empirically based theory of the social and political foundations of modern economies by investigating the interrelation between economic, social and political action. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEconomics Podcast A podcast of this event is available to download from Uncertain Futures: imaginaries, narratives, and calculation in the economy. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.
Nov 01, 2018
Changing Cultures of Witnessing: paintings, selfies, hashtags [Audio]
01:26:49
Speaker(s): Professor Lilie Chouliaraki, Professor Robin Wagner-Pacifici, Professor Barbie Zelizer | What do #MeToo, refugee selfies and oil paintings have in common? They are all part of a mixed and changing culture of witnessing. This interdisciplinary panel explores the different media platforms and practices of spectatorship that today enable our moral and political engagement with human vulnerability. It asks not only how the digital has shifted the terms of our visual encounters with bodies-in-pain but also shows how our testimonial cultures remain the same. This is not only because contemporary witnessing mixes media, old and new, but crucially also because it is still traversed by historical power relations and social hierarchies. Lilie Chouliaraki (@chouliaraki_l) is a Professor of Media and Communications in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Robin Wagner-Pacifici is the University in Exile Professor of Sociology at the New School for Social Research. Barbie Zelizer (@bzelizer) is the Raymond Williams Professor of Communication and Director of the Scholars Program in Culture and Communication at the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communication. Sarah Banet-Weiser (@sbanetweiser) is Professor of Communication and Head of the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in our field (2018 QS World University Rankings). Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWitnessing
Oct 30, 2018
Communicating Climate Change - why so toxic? [Audio]
01:20:49
Speaker(s): Professor Chris Rapley | This visually engaging presentation by Chris Rapley will present the limitations of evidence in informing and motivating action on climate change. Before joining University College London as Professor of Climate Science in the Department of Earth Sciences, Chris Rapley (@ChrisRapley3131) was the Director of the British Antarctic Survey from 1998 to 2007. He was also appointed Director of the Science Museum between 2007, stepping down in 2010. In 2008 he was awarded the Edinburgh Science Medal – “For professional achievements judged to have made a significant contribution to the understanding and well-being of humanity” and, since 2014, has served as the Chair of European Space Agency (ESA), Director General's High Level Science Policy Advisory Committee. In 2014 Chris Rapley and Duncan Macmillan were commissioned by the Royal Court Theatre to write a play. The play was entitled '2071', is a dramatised lecture which aims to explain climate change and the controversies surrounding it. Tim Dyson is Professor of Population Studies in the Department of International Development at LSE. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE)was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) was established in 1990 as the Development Studies Institute (DESTIN) to promote interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change.
Oct 30, 2018
Pragmatism: doing what works [Audio]
01:30:32
Speaker(s): Professor Matthew Festenstein, Clara Fischer, Dr Paniel Reyes Cardenas | What if instead of worrying about truth as a fundamental, objective notion, we just focused on what works? What if we just believed in what is practical or beneficial to us to believe? Pragmatism is the great American contribution to philosophy, and it has serious implications for politics, philosophy, and science. Join us at the Forum to discuss the history of this idea, and what might be entailed by ‘doing what works’. Matthew Festenstein is Professor of Politics, University of York. Clara Fischer is an EU Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at the Centre for Gender, Feminisms, and Sexualities, and Co-director of the Dewey Studies Research Project, University College Dublin. Paniel Reyes Cardenas is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, People’s Autonomous University of Puebla State, Mexico. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is Fellow, The Forum and a doctoral researcher at King’s College London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Oct 29, 2018
From “having” to “being”: self worth and the current crisis of American society [Audio]
01:32:46
Speaker(s): Professor Michèle Lamont | This lecture will diagnose the challenges of neoliberal American society: the pitfalls of the American dream across classes, hardened group boundaries, and the need to invent new narratives of hope. Michèle Lamont (@mlamont6) is Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies, Harvard University. Rebecca Elliott is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, LSE. Established in 1904, the Department of Sociology @LSEsociology at LSE is committed to empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated, and socially and politically relevant research and scholarship. Building upon the traditions of the discipline, we play a key role in the development of the social sciences into the new intellectual areas, social problems, and ethical dilemmas that face our society today. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBJSAL This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Oct 25, 2018
Hard Truths: global leadership challenges [Audio]
01:19:21
Speaker(s): Ellen Barry, Khalid Janahi, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Professor Lord Stern, Professor Andres Velasco | Global challenges discussions around the Hard Truths exhibition (democracy, disinformation, migration, drug trafficking, climate change, global extremism). What global leadership and governance reforms are needed? Ellen Barry (@EllenBarryNYT) is a London-based international correspondent for The New York Times, covering immigration, security, demographics and culture across Europe. Khalid Janahi is the former Chair of Ihtmaar Bank, a Bahrain-based investment bank with a global portfolio. He was the co-founder of the Arab Business Forum at the World Economic Forum. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (@NOIweala) was Nigeria's Minister of Finance from 2003 to 2006 and from 2011 to 2015, and Foreign Minister in 2006. She was Managing Director of the World Bank from 2007 to 2011, overseeing South Asia, Europe, Central Asia, and Africa, and is currently Senior Adviser at Lazard and Board Chair of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. She is the author of Reforming the Unreformable: Lessons from Nigeria. Her lastest book is Fighting Corruption Is Dangerous: The Story Behind the Headlines. Nicholas Stern (@lordstern1) is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government and Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the inaugural Dean of the new School of Public Policy at LSE. He was the Minister of Finance in Chile between 2006 and 2010 and held professorial roles at the Harvard Kennedy School and Columbia University´s School of International and Public Affairs. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is the inaugural Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) on 1 February 2015 and Professor in Practice in the Department of Economics. This event is one of a series of public events linked to the Hard Truths exhibition which will be on display at LSE from 1-26 October. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges.
Oct 23, 2018
Modi's India, Erdogan's Turkey, and the Crisis of the Secular State in the Non-Western World [Audio]
01:34:21
Speaker(s): Professor Sumantra Bose | This lecture marks the publication of Sumantra Bose's new book, Secular States, Religious Politics: India, Turkey, and the Future of Secularism. Sumantra Bose is Professor of International and Comparative Politics at LSE. Chandran Kukathas is Chair in Political Theory and Head of LSE Department of Government. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESecularism This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Oct 23, 2018
Do the Migrations of the Past have Lessons for Today? [Audio]
01:28:23
Speaker(s): Professor Chris Minns | Migration has always been part of the human experience. But can the study of past population movements help us to understand present-day markets and societies? This lecture draws on a range of historical evidence to explore the possibilities. Chris Minns (@Chris__Minns) is Professor of Economic History at LSE. Joan Roses is Professor of Economic History at LSE. The Department of Economic History (@LSEEcHist) is home to a huge breadth and depth of knowledge and expertise ranging from the medieval period to the current century and covering every major world economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMigration
Oct 22, 2018
National Populism: the revolt against liberal democracy [Audio]
01:28:45
Speaker(s): Professor Matthew Goodwin | Matthew Goodwin will present his new guide to one of the most urgent political phenomena of our time: the rise of national populism. Matthew J Goodwin (@GoodwinMJ) is Professor of Politics, University of Kent and Senior Visiting Fellow, Chatham House. Francisco Panizza is Professor in Latin American and Comparative Politics in the LSE Department of Government. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is home to some of the most internationally respected experts in politics and government; producing influential research that has a global impact on policy, and delivering world-class teaching to our students. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEDemocracy This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Oct 22, 2018
Evidence-Based Everything (but let's do the basing properly) [Audio]
00:57:24
Speaker(s): Professor John Worrall | Statements can be significant despite being “statements of the bleedin’ obvious”. The philosopher David Hume’s remark that ‘The rational man adjusts his beliefs to the evidence’ falls exactly into this category. It is surely “bleedin’ obvious” that our views (and hence our policies) ought to be based on evidence, but Hume’s claim is important exactly because it is so often ignored in practice. In these Trumpish times of disinformation and fake news, people’s views seem more and more to be based on what they would like to be true rather than on any evidence that they are in fact true. But agreeing that our views should be evidence-based is only the first step. When it comes to the details of what is involved in basing views (and policies) on evidence, things are by no means as straightforward as might be thought. This lecture investigates some of the difficulties using Evidence-Based Medicine as a test-case (though the lessons generalise to other areas such as the social sciences). John Worrall is Professor of Philosophy, LSE. He specialises in the philosophical issues raised by major theory-change in science; and is especially known for his work on structural realism. J. McKenzie Alexander is Professor of Philosophy and Head of LSE's Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method. The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) at LSE was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant.
Oct 19, 2018
Hard Truths: Dictatorships [Audio]
01:26:23
Speaker(s): Alan Cowell, Professor Richard Evans, Bianca Jagger, Andres Velasco | Authoritarian leaders are taking control in more and more countries. What can we learn from the Venezuelan experience? After a long career as a foreign correspondent for The New York Times based in Africa, the Middle East and Europe, Alan Cowell (@cowellcnd) became a freelance contributor in 2015, based in London. Richard Evans is Provost of Gresham College in the City of London and Visiting Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London. He is the author of The Coming of the Third Reich, The Third Reich in Power, The Third Reich at War, The Third Reich in History and Memory, and, most recently, The Pursuit of Power: Europe 1815-1914. He is currently completing a biography of the historian Eric Hobsbawm, to be published next year. Bianca Jagger has dedicated her life to campaigning for human rights, civil liberties, peace, social justice and environmental protection throughout the world. She was born in Managua, Nicaragua. She left her native country to study political science in Paris with a scholarship from the French Government. In 2005 she founded the Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation (BJHRF). She is Council of Europe Goodwill Ambassador, a member of the Executive Director’s Leadership Council for Amnesty International USA and IUCN Bonn Challenge Ambassador. Bianca Jagger is the recipient of numerous prestigious awards. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the inaugural Dean of the new School of Public Policy at LSE. He was the Minister of Finance in Chile between 2006 and 2010 and held professorial roles at the Harvard Kennedy School and Columbia University´s School of International and Public Affairs. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is the Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA). He joined the School as a Professor in Practice in the Department of Economics. This event is one of a series of public events linked to the Hard Truths exhibition which will be on display at LSE from 1-26 October. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSENYT and #TimesEvents
Oct 18, 2018
History, Memory, Politics in Democratisation Research: a personal and professional journey [Audio]
01:25:28
Speaker(s): Professor Tomila Lankina | Three decades after the collapse of communism in Europe, a number of post-communist states experienced democratic back-sliding or embraced authoritarianism. In her inaugural lecture, Tomila Lankina discusses how her research into the durability of social structure of pre-communist Russia— elements of which she argues survived the revolutionary experiment to engineer a new society—helps explain democratic resilience and backsliding in Russia and other contexts. Tomila Lankina is Professor of Politics and International Relations at the LSE’s International Relations Department; her current research focuses on comparative democracy and authoritarianism, mass protests and historical patterns of human capital and democratic reproduction in Russia and other states. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 90th year, making it one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. They are ranked 5th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2018 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELankina
Oct 18, 2018
Ten Years after the Global Financial Crisis: what have we learned and what did we forget? [Audio]
01:25:36
Speaker(s): Professor Charles Bean, Lord O’Donnell, Professor Catherine Schenk, Minouche Shafik | This event explores the causes of the 2008 global financial crash and the responses of the major advanced economies, which drew on the lessons of the 1930s. A decade on from the crisis, the global financial system has yet to return to ‘normal’, with prolonged low interest rates posing a risk to its stability. It is time to reflect on previous financial crises and the policy lessons we have learned – and failed to learn – from them. Charles Bean is Professor of Economics, LSE and a former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Gus O’Donnell (@Gus_ODonnell) was Cabinet Secretary and Head of Civil Service 2005-11. Catherine Schenk is Professor of Economic and Social History, St Hilda’s College Oxford. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Nicholas Stern @lordstern1 is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and President of the Royal Economic Society. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. LSE's Department of International History (@lsehistory) teaches and conducts research on the international history of Britain, Europe and the world from the early modern era up to the present day. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEfinance This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Oct 18, 2018
Hard Truths: the art of peace-making in the 21st century conflict environment [Audio]
01:34:41
Speaker(s): Baroness Ashton, Razia Iqbal, Alissa Johannsen Rubin, Tim Phillips, Mark Muller | This event will look at peace-making in the 21st century and the lessons learnt from attempts to stabilise Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya. It will map out the new conflict environment and the rise of non-state actors and proxy forces through a prism of Syrian and Yemen conflicts including looking at the role of Iran. It will also consider the role played by the UN Security Council in preventing conflict. Catherine Ashton is former High Representative for Foreign Affairs & Security Policy for the EU. Razia Iqbal (@raziaiqbal) is a special correspondent for the BBC and main presenter on Newshour. Alissa Johannsen Rubin (@Alissanyt) is the Paris bureau chief for The New York Times. Tim Phillips is founder of Beyond Conflict. Mark Muller is Senior Mediation Advisor to the UN Department of Political Affairs and IGA Visiting Professor in Practice. This event is one of a series of public events linked to the Hard Truths exhibition which will be on display at LSE from 1-26 October. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSENYT and #TimesEvents
Oct 17, 2018
The Bullshitisation of the Economy Has Only Just Begun: pointless labour, digitisation, and the revolt of the caring classes [Audio]
01:12:01
Speaker(s): Professor David Graeber | The proliferation of useless forms of employment in the professional-managerial sector has placed enormous pressure on the caring professions, leading to a major social conflagration. David Graeber (@davidgraeber) is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE and author of Bullshit Jobs: a Theory. Deborah James is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE. LSE Anthropology @LSEAnthropology is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGraeber This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Oct 17, 2018
The End of Nuclear Weapons [Audio]
01:27:23
Speaker(s): Beatrice Fihn | Are we closer than ever to ending the nuclear weapon threat? In this tumultuous moment, Beatrice Fihn sets out plenty of reasons to hope. Beatrice Fihn (@BeaFihn) is Director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, which won the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Oct 17, 2018
Sleep [Audio]
01:26:09
Speaker(s): Marina Benjamin, Professor Russell Foster, Professor Simon Morgan Wortham | Philosophers have diligently examined consciousness, but what do they have to say about our nightly loss of consciousness? In an age of mindfulness, is there something to be said for sleepfulness too? And for those of us still rubbing our eyes at 4am, what is it that keeps us awake in the wee small hours? With apparently two-thirds of Britons suffering from sleep problems, this Forum event promises to be your wake-up call, exploring the science, philosophy and literature of sleep. Marina Benjamin (@marinab52) is an author and Senior Editor at Aeon. Russell Foster is Professor of Circadian Neuroscience, Director, Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology and Head of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute. Simon Morgan Wortham is Professor in Humanities, Kingston University London. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is a Fellow at The Forum and Senior Lecturer in Romanticism in the Department of English, Queen Mary, University of London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Oct 15, 2018
The Future of Capitalism [Audio]
01:18:56
Speaker(s): Professor Sir Paul Collier | Following the publication of his latest book, The Future of Capitalism, Paul Collier will discuss this book and his wider work. Paul Collier is Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government and a Professorial Fellow of St Antony’s College. From 1998–2003 he took a five-year Public Service leave during which he was Director of the Research Development Department of the World Bank. He is currently a Professeur invité at Sciences Po and a Director of the International Growth Centre. He has written for the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. His research covers the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural resources rich societies; urbanisation in low-income countries; private investment in African infrastructure and changing organisational cultures. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE.
Oct 12, 2018
Renewing Sociology in the Digital Age [Audio]
01:31:15
Speaker(s): Professor Susan Halford | It is now well-established that digital devices, techniques and new forms of data are deeply implicated in the re-working of social life, and this has only just begun. At the same time, these devices, techniques and data are shaping what we know about social life, fuelling stark questions about the value of the established academic disciplines. Most famously, it has been claimed that only mathematics and computer science will be necessary in this Brave New World. Such disciplinary troubles are not new. Tracing their roots undermines both the imperialist tendencies of data evangelists and any temptation to insist on stabilising the recognised academic disciplines of the pre-digital era. Instead, this talk argues that we must stay with the disciplinary troubles that have been provoked by the digital era. Moving beyond any simple call for interdisciplinary collaboration, the talk explores computational thinking to reveal surprising similarities as well as differences from sociological thinking. Taken together, both similarities and differences offer possibilities for making something new. This line of thinking not only explains the current positioning of sociologists as guardians of ‘ethical, legal and social implications’ in digital research and innovation but shows where this should be radically extended. Far from marginal, sociology is central if we are craft shared, meaningful and effective response-abilities in the digital era. Susan Halford (@susanjhalford) is President, British Sociological Association, and Professor of Sociology and Director, Web Science Institute, University of Southampton. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Professor of Sociology and Director of the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Established in 1904, the Department of Sociology @LSEsociology at LSE is committed to empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated, and socially and politically relevant research and scholarship. Building upon the traditions of the discipline, we play a key role in the development of the social sciences into the new intellectual areas, social problems, and ethical dilemmas that face our society today.
Oct 11, 2018
Hard Truths: global extremism [Audio]
01:42:49
Speaker(s): Dr Steffen Hertog, Dr Elisabeth Kendall, Azadeh Moaveni, Professor Peter Neumann | Exploring new data showing why someone joins ISIS. A discussion of the sources of extremism and how to make societies more resilient. Steffen Hertog is Associate Professor in Comparative Politics, LSE. His book about Saudi state-building, Princes, Brokers and Bureaucrats: Oil and State in Saudi Arabia was published in 2011. He is the co-author, with Diego Gambetta, of Engineers of Jihad: the Curious Connection between Violent Extremism and Education. Elisabeth Kendall (@Dr_E_Kendall) is Senior Research Fellow in Arabic & Islamic Studies, University of Oxford. She is the author or (co-) editor of several books, including ReClaiming Islamic Tradition, Twenty-First Century Jihad and Literature, Journalism and the Avant-Garde: Intersection in Egypt. She also conceived of and edits the Modern Middle Eastern Vocabularies series, which includes the titles Security Arabic, Intelligence Arabic and Media Arabic. Azadeh Moaveni(@AzadehMoaveni) is Senior Gender Analyst at the International Crisis Group. She is the author of Lipstick Jihad and other books, and has reported on women and ISIS for The New York Times. She was Middle East correspondent for a decade for Time magazine and the Los Angeles Times, and is lecturer in journalism at New York University, London. Her book-length work on gender and militancy, ISIS Brides, will be published next autumn. Peter Neumann (@PeterRNeumann) is Professor of Security Studies, War Studies Department and Director, International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation, King’s College London. Peter has authored or co-authored five books, including Old and New Terrorism, and The Strategy of Terrorism (with MLR Smith). He is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles, dealing with different aspects of terrorism and radicalization, especially ‘homegrown’ radicalization in Western countries. Shorter articles and opinion pieces have appeared in, among others, the New York Times, Der Spiegel, and the International Herald Tribune Jawad Iqbal is a Visiting Senior Fellow in the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE. He is a member of the Governing Council of Chatham House. Jawad has produced and edited a wide range of BBC News programmes. Since leaving the BBC, Jawad has become a contributor to The Times and Financial Times. This event is one of a series of public events linked to the Hard Truths exhibition which will be on display at LSE from 1-26 October.
Oct 10, 2018
Judging: a common or civil law legal system? [Audio]
01:24:21
Speaker(s): Vassilios Skouris | Based on his experience as Judge in the Court of the European Union, Vassilios Skouris will explore the differences between how judgements are made in the common law and civil law legal systems. The common law legal system allows judges to give personal opinion on a case. Alternatively, in civil law legal systems, such as those in continental Europe, judgments normally take the form of a “collective contribution”, meaning, a group of judges involved in the specific case make one judgement, based on their individual efforts. Interestingly, in the world of international courts, dissenting opinions (being an opinion written by a judge expressing disagreement with the majority opinion of the judges) are permitted to be made by judges in the European Court of Human Rights; but not in the Court of the European Union. With this in mind, Vassilios Skouris seeks to address to what extent is the individual contribution of a judge visible in their judgments in the civil law legal system? Vassilios Skouris is Chair of FIFA’s Ethics Committee and former President of the European Court of Justice. Neil Duxbury is Professor of English Law at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research.
Oct 10, 2018
Russia in the World [Audio]
02:06:17
Speaker(s): Professor Dominic Lieven, Professor Janet Hartley, Professor Alexander Semyonov | This event launches the Paulsen Programme at LSE International History Department, which has been set up to allow historians in Russia to realise their full potential in their research and to enable them to make a powerful impact within the worldwide community of historians. The core of the Programme are fellowships and grants to enable Russian historians to work in archives and attend conferences outside Russia. The Programme also includes two seminars, a final conference and publication aimed at bringing together outstanding historians of Imperial Russia, both Russian and foreign. The imperial period deserves a larger place in European, imperial and global history than it currently occupies. Nor is it possible to understand contemporary Russian politics and identity without some grasp of pre-1917 Russian history. The discussion during the launch will explain why this is the case. It will also provide insights into the history of Imperial Russia, how knowledge of this history can help Western policy-makers, and what is the current state of pre-revolutionary history in today's Russia. Dominic Lieven is Senior Research Fellow, Trinity College, Cambridge and Fellow of the British Academy and Chair of the Board of the Paulsen Programme. Janet Hartley is Professor of International History at LSE. She is a historian of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Russia with particular interests in Anglo-Russian relations, the social and administrative history of the Russian empire, and the relationship between warfare, state and society during Russia’s rise to great-power status. She is on the board of the Paulsen Programme. Alexander Semyonov is Director of the Center for Historical Research, National Research University-Higher School of Economics in St. Petersburg. He is a historian of modern Russian history, his research interests include political and intellectual history, history of empire and nationalism. Matthew Jones is Professor of International History at LSE and Head of Department. The Department of International History (@lsehistory) teaches and conducts research on the international history of Britain, Europe and the world from the early modern era up to the present day. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPaulsen
Oct 09, 2018
Women in Prison: more troubled than troublesome [Audio]
01:26:56
Speaker(s): Baroness Corston | The overwhelming majority of women in our prisons are serving very short sentences for non-violent offences frequently associated with mental ill health, abuse, addiction and poverty. Every year, about 17,000 children are affected by their mothers’ imprisonment, and, far too often, the family link is broken forever. Jean Corston will re-visit her groundbreaking 2007 report on vulnerable women in prison, and discuss subsequent developments. Baroness Corston is an LSE alumna, member of the House of Lords and former MP. LSE Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world's top law schools with an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and legal research. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEwomeninprison
Oct 09, 2018
Beyond Diversity: are inclusive organisations truly attainable? [Audio]
01:07:12
Speaker(s): Professor Quinetta Roberson | Scholars and practitioners have highlighted how diversity of identities, cultures and experiences within workforces can be of benefit to organisations. Yet, the meaning and design of inclusive organisations remains elusory. Drawing upon her research and experiences working with organisations, Quinetta Roberson will offer a new lens through which to view diversity. She will challenge us to define, ideate and create environments that value differences and offer open systems of opportunity and access to all workers. Quinetta Roberson (@QuinettaPhD) is the Fred J. Springer Endowed Chair in Business Leadership at Villanova University, prior to which she was an Associate Professor at Cornell University. Dr. Roberson’s research, teaching, and consulting work focuses on developing organisational capability and enhancing performance through the strategic management of people – particularly diverse work teams. Jacqueline Coyle-Shapiro is Professor of Organisational Behaviour at LSE’s Department of Management and the incoming President of the Academy of Management. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies.
Oct 09, 2018
Artificial Meat [Audio]
01:26:26
Speaker(s): Dr Anat Pick, Professor Mark Post, Dr Adam Shriver | Lab-grown meat promises burgers and foie gras without the side-order of animal suffering and environmental damage. Is fake meat a real solution to these problems? Anat Pick is Reader in Film Studies, Queen Mary, University of London. Mark Post is Professor of Vascular Physiology, Maastricht University. Adam Shriver is Research Fellow, Oxford Uehiro Centre for Applied Ethics and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities. Danielle Sands is Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture, Royal Holloway, University of London and Fellow, Forum for Philosophy The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
Oct 08, 2018
Is a Rules Based, Open, Globalisation Still Worth Fighting For? [Audio]
01:34:29
Speaker(s): Pascal Lamy | At a time when globalisation is under attack, Pascal Lamy exposes why Peter Sutherland was, and still is, right in promoting a rules based open international system. Pascal Lamy is former General Director of the World Trade Organization. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Peter Sutherland Memorial Lecture is hosted by the London School of Economics and Political Science and University College Dublin supported by LSE’s European Institute and the Institute of Global Affairs. Peter Sutherland was Chair of LSE Court and Council between 2008-2015. He was awarded an honorary doctorate at LSE in 2015 in recognition of his exceptional contribution to EU and world affairs. Peter left a permanent significant legacy to the School through his establishment of the Sutherland Chair in European institutions held in the European Institute. After he stepped down as Chair he also retained his connection with LSE by becoming Professor in Practice in the Institute of Global Affairs and became the leading figure in the Institute’s Global Migration Initiative. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESutherland
Oct 08, 2018
For the Love of Humanity: the world tribunal on Iraq [Audio]
01:10:55
Speaker(s): Dr Lori Allen, Dr Ayça Çubukçu, Professor David Graeber, Professor Kimberly Hutchings, Dr Tor Krever, Haifa Zangana | Comprised of experts in anthropology, international law, sociology, political science, and literature, this panel will discuss Ayça Çubukçu’s book, For the Love of Humanity: the World Tribunal on Iraq, addressing challenges of forging global solidarity through an anti-imperialist politics of human rights and international law. Lori Allen is Senior Lecturer in Anthropology at SOAS, University of London. Ayça Çubukçu (@ayca_cu) is Associate Professor in Human Rights at LSE. David Graeber (@davidgraeber) is Professor of Anthropology at LSE. Kimberly Hutchings is Professor of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary University. Tor Krever (@tor_krever) is Assistant Professor of International Law, University of Warwick. Haifa Zangana is an Iraqi novelist, author and political activist. Tarak Barkawi is Professor of International Relations at LSE. Established in 1904, the Department of Sociology @LSEsociology at LSE is committed to empirically rich, conceptually sophisticated, and socially and politically relevant research and scholarship. Building upon the traditions of the discipline, we play a key role in the development of the social sciences into the new intellectual areas, social problems, and ethical dilemmas that face our society today. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIraq This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Oct 04, 2018
What Next for International Climate Action? [Audio]
01:18:56
Speaker(s): Emma Howard Boyd, Professor Dame Judith Rees, Professor Lord Stern, Lord Turner | The panel will explore how climate action needs to develop in the next ten years to successfully deliver the Paris Agreement. Emma Howard Boyd is Chair of the Environment Agency. Judith Rees is Vice Chair of the Grantham Research Institute. Nicholas Stern @lordstern1 is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government and Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. Adair Turner (@AdairTurnerUK) is Chair of the Institute for New Economic Thinking. Sam Fankhauser is the Director of the Grantham Research Institute. This event marks the 10th Anniversary of the Grantham Research Institute. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE)was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #GranthamLSE10
Oct 04, 2018
The Inner Level: how more equal societies reduce stress, restore sanity and improve wellbeing [Audio]
01:24:24
Speaker(s): Professor Kate Pickett | The speakers will focus on the psychological effects of inequality, on how larger income differences increase feelings of dominance and subordination, and the consequences for mental illness. Kate Pickett @ProfKEPickett and Richard Wilkinson @ProfRGWilkinson are Professor and emeritus Professor of Social Epidemiology at the University of York where she is University Champion of Equality and Social Justice. Beverley Skeggs @bevskeggs is a feminist sociologist and the Academic Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity based in the International Inequalities Institute. The International Inequalities Institute @LSEInequalities at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEinnerlevel
Oct 03, 2018
Janesville: an American story [Audio]
01:30:45
Speaker(s): Amy Goldstein | What really happens to workers, families and a community when good jobs go away? Come hear the story of one small, proud city in the American heartland that lost the United States’ oldest operating General Motors assembly plant two days before Christmas in the midst of the Great Recession – and the lessons it offers about economic pain and resilience. Amy Goldstein (@goldsteinamy) has been a staff writer for thirty years at The Washington Post, where much of her work has focused on social policy. She currently is The Post’s national health-care policy writer. She has been a White House reporter and has covered many notable news events, from the Monica Lewinsky scandal to five of the past six Supreme Court nominations. Goldstein was part of a team of Washington Post reporters awarded the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting for the newspaper’s coverage of 9-11 and the government’s response to the attacks. She was a 2009 Pulitzer Prize finalist for national reporting for an investigative series she co-wrote on the medical treatment of immigrants detained by the U.S. government. She has been a fellow at Harvard University at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Janesville: An American Story is her first book. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEJanesville
Oct 02, 2018
Reforms to Strengthen the European Monetary Union [Audio]
01:30:11
Speaker(s): Vítor Constâncio | Vítor Constâncio, the former Vice President of the European Central Bank will explore the possible reforms proposed to strengthen the EMU and their predicted consequences. Vítor Constâncio (@VMRConstancio) is the former Vice President of the European Central Bank and Former Governor of the Bank of Portugal. Iain Begg (@IainBeggLSE) is a Professorial Research Fellow at the LSE's European Institute and Co-Director of the Dahrendorf Forum, a project of LSE Ideas. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative between the LSE and the Hertie School of Governance, funded by Mercator Stiftung. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEurope
Oct 02, 2018
Shaping Cities in an Urban Age [Audio]
01:23:34
Speaker(s): Eduarda La Rocque | Drawing on a range of contemporary urban experiences included in a new book, Shaping Cities in an Urban Age, the panel discussion will explore the dynamics and challenges of urban change. Three of the authors included in the new LSE Cities publication Shaping Cities in an Urban Age will draw on a range of contemporary urban experiences to explore the dynamics and challenges of urban change. Shaping Cities in an Urban Age, edited by Ricky Burdett and Philipp Rode, is the third book produced by the Urban Age project, a global investigation into the future of cities. Essays by leading experts in their fields, data highlighting dramatic instances of urban change and comparing cities today, and full-page colour photographs describe in detail the challenges and opportunities of contemporary city-making. Eduarda La Rocque is president of Pereira Passos Institute of the City Hall of the Rio de Janeiro (IPP). Saskia Sassen (@SaskiaSassen) is Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology at Columbia University and co-chairs its Committee on Global Thought. Nicholas Stern (@lordstern1) is the IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government and Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. Ricky Burdett (@burdettr) is Professor of Urban Studies at the London School of Economics (LSE), and director of LSE Cities and the Urban Age project. LSE Cities (@LSECities) is an international centre carrying out research, education and outreach in the urban field. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #ShapingCities A video of this event is available to view at Shaping Cities in an Urban Age. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel. This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019
Sep 26, 2018
Gandhi - the Years that Changed the World, 1914-1948 [Audio]
01:31:52
Speaker(s): Ramachandra Guha | At this event, Ramachandra Guha tells the epic story of Gandhi's life and how he changed the world armed only with his arguments and example. Gandhi lived one of the great 20th century lives. At this event, Ramachandra Guha tells the epic story of Gandhi's life from his departure from South Africa to his assassination in 1948. Guha allows us to see Gandhi as he was by his contemporaries and across India's diverse societies and understand how he changed the world, armed only with his arguments and example. Ramachandra Guha (@Ram_Guha) is a historian and biographer based in Bangalore. He has taught at the universities of Yale and Stanford, held the Arné Naess Chair at the University of Oslo, and been the Indo-American Community Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley. In the academic year 2011-2 he served as the Philippe Roman Professor of History and International Affairs at the London School of Economics and Political Science.
Sep 25, 2018
Money and Government: a challenge to mainstream economics [Audio]
00:52:37
Speaker(s): Professor Lord Skidelsky | Robert Skidelsky's new book, Money and Government: A Challenge to Mainstream Economics, which he will discuss in this lecture, is a major challenge to economic orthodoxy, contesting the dominant view that money and government should play only a minor role in economic life and emboldening the next generation to break free from their conceptual prisons. Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Warwick. His three volume biography of John Maynard Keynes (1983, 1992, 2000) received numerous prizes. He was made a life peer in 1991, and a Fellow of the British Academy in 1994. Camille Landais is Professor of Economics at LSE, Co-Editor, Journal of Public Economics and Director, CEPR Public Economics Program.
Sep 17, 2018
How Does The Euro Shield Europe From Future Crises? [Audio]
01:28:12
Speaker(s): Mário Centeno | In his lecture Eurogroup President Mário Centeno will speak about the push to reform the Euro and the politics behind it, and discuss how the single currency could shield the European economy from both internal and external shocks in the future. Mário Centeno (@mariofcenteno) was elected President of the Eurogroup on 4 December 2017 by the Euro area finance ministers. Since December 2017 he also serves as Chair of the Board of Governors of the European Stability Mechanism. He was sworn in as Finance Minister of Portugal in November 2015. Mr Centeno is an economist and University Professor who only began his political career in 2015. Before that he held several positions in Portugal’s Central Bank where he started as an economist in 2000. Mr Centeno has an academic background with two Masters – the first one in Applied Mathematics, by ISEG-UTL in 1993, the second one in Economics, by Harvard University, USA, in 1998 – and a PhD in Economics, by Harvard University, USA, concluded in 2000. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Sep 13, 2018
In Conversation with Rahul Gandhi [Audio]
01:17:01
Speaker(s): Rahul Gandhi | Rahul Gandhi (@RahulGandhi), President of the Indian National Congress and member of the Parliament of India will be in conversation with LSE’s Mukulika Banerjee (@MukulikaB), Director of the South Asia Centre, and Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. This event is in collaboration with the National Indian Students and Alumni Union (UK) and marks the launch of the NISAU India Perspective Townhall. Established in June 2015, the South Asia Centre (@SAsiaLSE) harnesses LSE's research & academic focus on South Asia, whose particularities constantly challenge conventional thinking in the social sciences.
Aug 24, 2018
Crashed: how a decade of financial crises changed the world [Audio]
01:25:01
Speaker(s): Professor Adam Tooze | In September 2008 the Great Financial Crisis, triggered by the collapse of Lehman brothers, shook the world. A decade later its spectre still haunts us. As the appalling scope and scale of the crash was revealed, the financial institutions that had symbolised the West's triumph since the end of the Cold War, seemed - through greed, malice and incompetence - to be about to bring the entire system to its knees. In this talk Adam Tooze will talk about his new book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World. Crashed is an analysis of what happened and how we were rescued from something even worse - but at a price which continues to undermine democracy across Europe and the United States. Gnawing away at our institutions are the many billions of dollars which were conjured up to prevent complete collapse. Over and over again, the end of the crisis has been announced, but it continues to hound us - whether in Greece or Ukraine, whether through Brexit or Trump. Adam Tooze (@adam_tooze) is the author of The Deluge and The Wages of Destruction.The Wages of Destruction won the Wolfson Prize for History and the Longman-History Today Book of the Year Prize. He has taught at Cambridge and Yale and is now Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of History at Columbia University. He is an alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Tim Frost is a Chair of credit asset manager Cairn Capital and a Trustee of Step Change the debt charity. He served in the British Army in Germany and the Falkland Islands and ran a hostel for homeless people before spending 15 years at JP Morgan, where he helped to establish the credit derivatives business. Tim is an Emeritus Governor and alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science, and was appointed a Director of the Bank of England in 2012.
Aug 23, 2018
LSE IQ Ep17 | Are we entering a new Cold War? [Audio]
00:47:15
Speaker(s): Professor Anne Applebaum, Dr Cristian Nitoiu, Peter Pomerantsev | We hope you’ve enjoyed listening to this year’s programme of public events and that you’ll stay tuned for the exciting programme of events we have lined up, for the new academic year. In the meantime we have another podcast series we think you might enjoy. LSE IQ is an award-winning monthly podcast in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. Recent episodes have tackled questions such as ‘Are cryptocurrencies the future of money?’, ‘How do you win an argument?’ and ‘Do we need to rethink foreign aid?’. To give you a taste of LSEIQ the latest episode, which asks ‘Are we entering a new Cold War?’, is available for you here in our public events podcast feed. To listen to other episodes, search for LSE IQ in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq. We’d like to hear your opinion too so please join the discussion on social media using the hashtag LSEIQ and please consider leaving a review on the Apple podcasts app as this makes the podcast easier to find.
Aug 15, 2018
Peak Inequality - Britain's Ticking Time Bomb [Audio]
01:28:17
Speaker(s): Professor Danny Dorling | When we think of economic inequality we tend to think of a trend that is ever rising and destined to continue rising; that is far from inevitable. There are many statistics today that point at Britain being at a peak of inequality. However, having allowed the gaps between us to grow so wide has had dire implications for our health, housing, education, demography, politics and future. Danny Dorling highlights these and discusses what it will take to begin to descend from the peak of inequality. Danny Dorling (@dannydorling) is a Professor of Human Geography at the University of Oxford. He has also worked in Sheffield, Newcastle, Bristol, Leeds and New Zealand, went to university in Newcastle upon Tyne, and grew up in Oxford. He has published over forty books including many atlases and All That is Solid in 2014; Injustice: Why social inequalities still persist in 2015; A Better Politics: How government can make us happier in 2016; The Equality Effect in 2017; and Do We Need Economic Inequality? – in 2018. His latest book is Peak Inequality - Britain’s Ticking Time Bomb. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Associate Professor of Comparative Politics, Department of Government, LSE.
Jul 17, 2018
Adam Smith: what he thought, and why it matters [Audio]
01:03:51
Speaker(s): Jesse Norman MP | At a time when economics and politics are both increasingly polarized between left and right, this book, Adam Smith: What He Thought, and Why it Matters, which Jesse Norman will discuss at this event, returns to intellectual first principles to recreate the lost centre of public debate. It offers a Smithian analysis of contemporary markets, predatory capitalism and the 2008 financial crash; it addresses crucial issues of inequality, human dignity and exploitation; and it provides a compelling explanation of why Smith is central to any attempt to defend and renew the market system. Jesse Norman MP (@Jesse_Norman) studied at Oxford, before completing a Masters and PhD in Philosophy at University College London. Before entering politics, he ran an educational project in Communist Eastern Europe and was a Director at Barclays. He has also been an Honorary Fellow at UCL, a Governor of the National Institute for Economic and Social Research, and a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. His previous books include a celebrated study of Edmund Burke. He currently serves as Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the Department for Transport. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.
Jul 09, 2018
Can Society Once Again Make Finance Servant, Not Master of the Economy? [Audio]
01:24:31
Speaker(s): Ann Pettifor | In February 2018, Jeremy Corbyn accused bankers of taking the economy hostage, and said in a speech that Britain's financial sector will be "the servant of industry not the masters of all" if the Labour Party wins the next election. How realistic is that promise? In this lecture Ann Pettifor will argue that given the dependency of the finance sector on the largesse of the state and its taxpayers, a Labour government could transform the relationship between finance and industry. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the author of The Production of Money, director of PRIME economics, and a member of Labour’s Economic Advisory Committee. She was one of a few to predict the Great Financial Crisis in her 2006 book The Coming First World Debt Crisis. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the author of The Production of Money, director of PRIME economics, and a member of Labour’s Economic Advisory Committee. She was one of a few to predict the Great Financial Crisis in her 2006 book The Coming First World Debt Crisis. Natacha Postel-Vinay is Assistant Professor, Economic History Department, LSE.
Jun 26, 2018
The Thatcher and Major Governments in Retrospect: reflections on 18 years in power [Audio]
01:23:15
Speaker(s): Kenneth Clarke, Professor Tony Travers | This event, in memory of Maurice Fraser, will see former Chancellor of the Exchequer Kenneth Clarke in conversation with LSE's Tony Travers and Kevin Featherstone. Kenneth Clarke, MP for Rushcliffe since 1970, held several Ministerial offices in the Governments of Margaret Thatcher and John Major - as Secretary of State for Health, Secretary of State for Education and Science, Home Secretary and Chancellor of the Exchequer. He also served as Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice and Minister without Portfolio within the Coalition Government. As the Member of the House of Commons with the longest continuous service he is currently the Father of the House. Tony Travers is Interim Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Head of the European Institute and Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics at the LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Jun 21, 2018
The Middle East after ISIS: what is at stake? [Audio]
01:37:21
Speaker(s): Professor Gilles Kepel | ISIS has been defeated militarily, but the fight for the Middle East is just beginning. At this event Gilles Kepel, author of The Rise of Jihad in the West, discusses the future of the region and how it will shape global politics in the decades ahead. Hear more about how sectarian conflict, bold new leaders, economic changes, and shifting geopolitics will be at the centre of the struggle for power and influence in the Middle East. Gilles Kepel is Chair of Middle East and Mediterranean Studies at École Normale Supérieure. Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.
Jun 18, 2018
Flying the Flag for Openness: why liberalism still matters [Audio]
01:38:32
Speaker(s): Sir Nick Clegg | Battered, bruised and blamed for so many of the world's problems, liberal values have found themselves under attack from left and right. But these values have multiple virtues and with many enduring strengths. In his inaugural lecture as a visiting professor in practice at LSE's School of Public Policy, Sir Nick Clegg will set out the case for liberal values at a time when stark social and generational divisions threaten to pull the country apart. If Open versus Closed is the pivotal divide in British politics today, then liberalism, a far richer philosophy than its critics allow, is best placed to bridge that divide. Sir Nick Clegg will explain why liberalism must be defended, must be cherished, but must also adapt to face the challenges of the future - and why there is nothing inconsistent with being both a liberal and a patriot. Nick Clegg (@nick_clegg) served as Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2010 to 2015 and as Leader of the Liberal Democrats from 2007 to 2015. He was the MP for Sheffield Hallam from 2005 to 2017 and was a Member of the European Parliament from 1999 to 2004. He now heads a think-tank, Open Reason. Tony Travers is Interim Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. In September 2018, LSE’s School of Public Policy fully replaces the existing Institute of Public Affairs. The School of Public Policy will be the home for LSE’s Master of Public Administration (MPA), Executive MPA and Executive MPP degrees. Update, Tuesday 12 June: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Anne McElvoy is no longer able to speak at this event.
Jun 12, 2018
Mastering the Multi-Generational Workplace [Audio]
01:25:46
Speaker(s): Lorraine Ansell, Saj Jetha, Dr Sunita Malhotra, Nina Mohanty, Professor Sandy Pepper | Organisations are increasingly leveraging diversity to drive success, with generational diversity beginning to take centre stage. How will the arrival of Generation Z impact today’s working culture and how do you combine the wisdom of age with the exuberance of youth? An inter-generational panel explores the impact of five generations working alongside each other for the first time. Presenting their own experiences of building successful careers, and drawing on workplace innovations, the panellists offer creative new ideas for individuals of any generation to capitalise on opportunities at work, overcome challenges, and boost their collegiality. This event marks 30 years since the foundation of the CEMS Global Alliance in Management Education. Lorraine Ansell (@LAvoiceart) is an award-nominated voiceover artist and studio engineer. She previously worked for L’Oréal, YSL and Amnesty International and is a LSE/ESADE CEMS alumna. Saj Jetha is founder of the multi award-winning talent consultancy, The Smarty Train with the mission is to Unlock Talent. He is an LSE alumnus and trustee of The University of London’s Convocation Trust. Sunita Malhotra is Professor at Université Catholiquede Louvain, lecturer on the CEMS Masters in International Management and Managing Director, People Insights. Nina Mohanty (@ninamohanty) is Business Development Manager at Bud. Sandy Pepper is Professor of Management in Practice at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Christine Cote is Senior Lecturer in Practice and Academic Director of the CEMS Masters in International Management programme and the MBA Exchange at the London School of Economics. Jane Shaw is Which MBA? editor, The Economist. Jane will moderate the panel Q&A. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world-leading centre for research and education in business and management. CEMS (@cems_alliance), the Global Alliance in Management Education is an alliance of 31 business schools, 73 corporate and seven social partners, delivering the CEMS Masters in International Management to 1200 students with a network of over 12,000 alumni across the globe.
Jun 11, 2018
Tracking the Rise in Global Economic Inequality: new evidence from the world inequality report 2018 [Audio]
01:34:25
Speaker(s): Lucas Chancel, Duncan Green, Rebecca Simson, Paul Segal | The first World Inequality Report (WIR2018), documents a sharp rise in global economic inequality since the 1980s despite strong growth in emerging economies. It also discusses country-to-country inequality trajectories (including UK's wealth inequality dynamics) and highlights the importance of policy-making in the diverging trends observed across countries and world regions. The report, first launched in December last year at the Paris School of Economics, was coordinated by Facundo Alvaredo, Lucas Chancel, Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman. It draws from new findings of the World Wealth and Income Database (a project which regroups more than 100 researchers all over the world) and provides the first systemic assessment of globalization in terms of income and wealth inequality since 1980. This discussion will examine the implications of the report findings.
Jun 07, 2018
Finance, Competition and Innovation-Based Growth [Audio]
01:28:13
Speaker(s): Professor Philippe Aghion | This event is the annual Economica Coase lecture. Philippe Aghion is a professor at the College de France and LSE, and a fellow of the Econometric Society and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is a Professor of Economics and the Director of the Suntory and Toyota Centre for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD) at the London School of Economics. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching.
Jun 05, 2018
The Challenge to Diversity and Democracy in India Today [Audio]
01:29:35
Speaker(s): Yogendra Yadav | What can we learn from the current challenge to the idea of a diverse and democratic India? Does this demand rethinking the idea of India as a “State-Nation”? Yogendra Yadav (@_YogendraYadav) is a nationally-renowned Indian psephologist, an expert on comparative democracy and National President of the newly-formed Swaraj India party. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Jun 05, 2018
Football [Audio]
01:26:07
Speaker(s): Professor Simon Critchley, Dr Gerald Moore, Dr Emily Ryall | ‘All that I know most surely about morality and obligations, I owe to football’, observed Albert Camus. And it is football, above all other sports, that so many philosophers revere. So there’s everything to play for in this panel discussion exploring the relationship between football and philosophy. We give it 110% in our exploration of what makes for a ‘good game’ and whether philosophical principles can be put into play on the pitch. Simon Critchley is Han Jonas Professor of Philosophy, New School for Social Research, NY. Gerald Moore is Associate Professor of French, University of Durham. Emily Ryall is a Reader in Applied Philosophy, University of Gloucestershire. Shahidha Bari is a Fellow, the Forum; Senior Lecturer in Romanticism, Queen Mary University of London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK
Jun 04, 2018
How to Lose a Referendum [Audio]
01:26:32
Speaker(s): Jason Farrell, Paul Goldsmith | In their book, How To Lose A Referendum, which they will talk about at this event, Sky News senior political correspondent Jason Farrell and political blogger and economics and politics teacher Paul Goldsmith identify eighteen key reasons why the UK made its choice, from Britain’s absence at the birth of the European project to the inflammatory rhetoric of one Nigel Farage, and everything in between. The book is the product of extensive and refreshingly frank interviews with the key players from both campaigns coupled with a wide-ranging exploration of the historical context around Britain’s departure. Why was a project designed for common peace and prosperity ultimately so hard to defend? Jason Farrell (@JasonFarrellSky) is a senior political correspondent for Sky News. Paul Goldsmith (@PaulGoldsmith73) is a politics and economics teacher at Latymer Upper School and author of the Goldblog. Tony Travers is Director of the Institute of Public Affairs, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public engagement initiatives.
Jun 04, 2018
The French Revolution: one year on [Audio]
01:32:50
Speaker(s): Professor Jean Pisani-Ferry, Christine Ockrent | The lecture takes stock of the transformation of French economic policy following the sweeping electoral success of Emmanuel Macron, and appraises its achievements. Jean Pisani-Ferry (@pisaniferry) is a professor at Sciences Po Paris and the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, and Mercator Senior Fellow at Bruegel. He was the Director for Programme and Ideas of Emmanuel Macron’s presidential campaign. Christine Ockrent (@Ockrent) is a journalist and broadcaster; former Chief Operating Officer of France 24 and RFI; Editor in Chief of the weekly news magazine L’Express. Iain Begg (@IainBeggLSE) is Professorial Research Fellow at the European Institute. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative between the LSE and the Hertie School of Governance, funded by Mercator Stiftung.
May 24, 2018
Fluctuating Formality: anthropology and the structure of difference [Audio]
01:04:18
Speaker(s): Dr Maxim Bolt | This lecture will reflect on an apparently dated concept: structure. Spanning institutions of state and market, it will focus on formality as a kind of structuring, and a lens for understanding the production of difference. This event is the annual Malinowski Memorial Lecture. Maxim Bolt is Reader in Anthropology and African Studies, University of Birmingham. Katy Gardner trained at Cambridge and the LSE. After spending much of her career at the University of Sussex she has returned to the LSE. Her work focuses on issues of globalisation, migration, & economic change in Bangladesh and its transnational communities in the UK. LSE's Anthropology Department (@LSEAnthropology), with a long and distinguished history, remains a leading centre for innovative research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMalinowski
May 17, 2018
School Autonomy, School Choice and the Quality of Education: evidence from England [Audio]
01:31:38
Speaker(s): Professor Olmo Silva, Amy Finch | Olmo Silva will discuss the conceptual framework and empirical evidence underpinning the idea that autonomy and choice can lead to improvements in education standards in England. Recent reforms in many countries around the world have injected ‘private sector’ elements in the provision of public education – in particular school autonomy and school choice – with the aim of improving education standards. But do these initiatives work? The answer to this question sparks lively debates among academics and policy makers alike – and resonates vividly among parents worried about taking the right decisions for their children’s learning and development. In England, ‘quasi markets’ have long been part of the education landscape. However, recent policy initiatives – in particular the mass academisation of secondary education – have brought these and related ideas centre stage. This dynamism makes the country an ideal “open-air laboratory” for studying these issues and provide a timely answer to some pressing questions. Olmo Silva is Professor of Real Estate Economics and Finance, LSE. Amy Finch (@amy_finch) is Head of Strategic Development, Ofsted. Julian Le Grand is a Professor of Social Policy at LSE. The LSE Department of Geography & Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change.
May 16, 2018
Fighting Corruption Is Dangerous: in conversation with Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala [Audio]
01:32:39
Speaker(s): Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala | Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala’s new book, Fighting Corruption Is Dangerous: The Story Behind the Headlines, draws on her years as Nigeria’s Finance Minister to provide practical lessons on the difficult, sometimes-dangerous, always-necessary work of fighting graft and corruption. Determined to root out the fraudulent claims and other schemes that drain the country of resources and ultimately deprive the poor of crucial services, the former Managing Director of the World Bank, Okonjo- Iweala found herself and her family targeted for reprisals designed to force her to drop her anti-corruption campaign. She refused to stop or to resign, even as her enemies kidnapped her mother. Admitting that it is risky to tell her story, Okonjo-Iweala, currently senior advisor at Lazard and board chair of Gavi, notes that it is also dangerous not to tell it. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (@NOIweala) was Nigeria's Minister of Finance from 2003 to 2006 and from 2011 to 2015, and Foreign Minister in 2006. She was Managing Director of the World Bank from 2007 to 2011, overseeing South Asia, Europe, Central Asia, and Africa, and is currently Senior Adviser at Lazard and Board Chair of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. She is the author of Reforming the Unreformable: Lessons from Nigeria. Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. During her 15 years at the World Bank, Minouche worked on its first ever World Development Report on the environment, designed reform programmes for transition countries in Eastern Europe, and developed proposals for economic integration in support of the Oslo peace process in the Middle East. She became the youngest vice-president in the history of the World Bank at the age of 36. Minouche returned to the UK in 2004 and rose to become the Permanent Secretary of the Department for International Development where she was responsible for the UK’s development assistance efforts around the world. The IGC (@The_IGC) aims to promote sustainable growth in developing countries by providing demand-led policy advice based on frontier research. We direct a global network of world-leading researchers and in-country teams in Africa and South Asia and work closely with partner governments. Based at LSE and in partnership with the University of Oxford, the IGC is funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID). Based at LSE, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate.
May 16, 2018
Texas, Trump and the Future of America [Audio]
01:22:17
Speaker(s): Lawrence Wright | Come learn about the most controversial state in America and what it tells us about Donald Trump and the future of the US. This event marks the publications of Lawrence's new book, God Save Texas: A Journey into the Future of America. Lawrence Wright (@lawrence_wright) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, screenwriter, playwright and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The United States Centre (@LSE_US) at LSE is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America.
May 15, 2018
Transparency: the most important pillar in a functional democracy [Audio]
00:56:26
Speaker(s): Juan Carlos Varela Rodríguez | President Juan Carlos Varela R. (@JC_Varela) studied primary and secondary in Javier College, under the direction of the Company of Jesus Order. He graduated as an Industrial Engineer from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), in the United States. He was elected Vice President of the Republic of Panamá in July 2009. In March 2013 he became the presidential candidate for the Panameñista Party and in August of that same year, he was proclaimed candidate of the Alliance "El Pueblo Primero", formed by the Panameñista Party and the Popular Party, with the support of the independent sectors of the country. Alvaro Mendez (@alvaroimendez) is the co-founder of the LSE Global South Unit. He is a Senior Research Fellow at the LSE. The LSE Global South Unit (@LSE_Globalsouth) is a decentralised ideas hub aimed at investigating the changing role of the South in shaping the global order. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.
May 15, 2018
Collusion: how central bankers rigged the world [Audio]
01:02:11
Speaker(s): Nomi Prins | In her new book, which she will talk about at this event, former Wall Street insider Nomi Prins shows how the 2007–2008 financial crisis turbo-boosted the influence of central bankers and triggered a massive shift in the world order. Central banks and international institutions like the IMF have overstepped their traditional mandates by directing the flow of epic sums of fabricated money without any checks or balances. Meanwhile, the open door between private and central banking has ensured endless opportunities for market manipulation and asset bubbles—with government support. Journalist and former global investment bank executive Nomi Prins (@nomiprins) is the author of six previous books. This event marks the publication of her latest book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World. Wouter den Haan is Co-director for the Centre for Macroeconomics and Professor of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.
May 14, 2018
Can Markets Pursue Social Values? [Audio]
01:22:51
Speaker(s): Professor Julia Black, Professor Simon Deakin, Sean Ennis | Theresa May's claim that free market capitalism constitutes "the greatest agent of collective human progress ever created" raises a complex question: can markets pursue social values? Julia Black is Pro Director for Research and Professor in the Department of Law, LSE. Simon Deakin is Professor of Law, University of Cambridge and Director of the Centre for Business Research. Sean Ennis is Senior Economist, Competition Division, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris. Niamh Dunne, Assistant Professor of Law, LSE. LSE Law (@lselaw) is an integral part of the School's mission, plays a major role in policy debates and in the education of lawyers and law teachers from around the world. This event is part of LSE Beveridge 2.0, a series of public engagement activities rethinking the welfare state for the 21st century and the global context. Update, Tuesday 8 May: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Martin Cave is no longer able to speak at this event. LSE apologies for any inconvenience this may cause.
May 09, 2018
Affirmative Action [Audio]
01:28:35
Speaker(s): Professor Elizabeth Anderson, Omar Khan | Women and minority groups are significantly under-represented in politics and various other walks of life. 'Affirmative action' is one response in tackling this enduring issue. But what is it? Who is it for? And why does it generate so much controversy? We discuss these questions and explore the relationship between affirmative action and social justice. Elizabeth Anderson is John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy, University of Michigan. Omar Khan (@omaromalleykhan) is Director, Runnymede; Governor, University of East London. Sarah Fine (@DrSJFine) is a Fellow, the Forum; Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, KCL. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
May 09, 2018
From People's Dissent to Royal Assent: Sylvia Pankhurst and the struggle for the vote [Audio]
01:19:31
Speaker(s): Rachel Holmes | On the centenary of the Representation of the People Act, Rachel Holmes remembers and reflects on the roles of revolutionary thinking and militancy in winning votes for women. The complacency of hindsight leads many in modern Britain to believe universal suffrage and votes for women to have been obvious and inevitable. The length and difficulty of the struggle and the vital roles of revolutionary thinking and militancy is almost airbrushed from our history. Rachel Holmes is Sylvia Pankhurst’s most recent biographer. Anne Phillips is the Graham Wallas Professor of Political Science in the Department of Government The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
May 08, 2018
The Catalan Crisis: populism and secessionism [Audio]
01:24:36
Speaker(s): Dr Pedro Sanchez | The leader of the opposition in Spain, Pedro Sánchez, will analyse the political, social and economic factors that have led to the growth of populism and secessionism in Catalonia and will propose possible solutions to the current political blockade in Spain. Dr Pedro Sanchez (@sanchezcastejon) is currently Secretary General of PSOE (Spanish Socialists and Workers' Party), leader of the opposition in Spain and vice president of the Socialist International. He was also Secretary-General of the PSOE, leader of the opposition and candidate to the Presidency of the Spanish Government in the period 2014-2016. Between 2009-2016 he was Member of the Spanish Parliament. He was also Senior Lecturer in Global Economics and Economic History at the Camilo José Cela University in Madrid (Spain) from 2008 to 2014. Previously, Dr Sanchez also served as Member of the Madrid City Council and as an adviser at different international institutions, including the European Parliament and the Office of the High Representative in Bosnia Herzegovina. He studied economics at the Complutense University of Madrid and holds a PhD in economics from the Camilo José Cela University as well as master's degrees from Ortega y Gasset Institute, and the Free University of Brussels. He is fluent in English, French and Spanish. Paul Preston is the Príncipe de Asturias Professor of Contemporary Spanish Studies and Director of the Cañada Blanch Centre for Contemporary Spanish Studies at the London School of Economics. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Cañada Blanch Centre for Contemporary Spanish Studies is a research centre at the London School of Economics with a focus on a flourishing interest in contemporary Spain in Britain. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative between the LSE and the Hertie School of Governance, funded by Mercator Stiftung. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.
May 08, 2018
Edge of Chaos: why democracy is failing to deliver economic growth and how to fix it [Audio]
01:29:51
Speaker(s): Dr. Dambisa Moyo | In Dr. Dambisa Moyo's new book, Edge of Chaos, which she will talk about at this event, she offers a radical menu of ten ways to improve democracy: making it better able to address the range of headwinds that the global economy faces (including technology and the prospects of a jobless underclass, demographic shifts, gapping income inequality, an unsustainable debt burden, natural resource scarcity and declining productivity) and deliver more economic growth and prosperity. Dr.Dambisa Moyo (@dambisamoyo) is an international economist who writes on the macroeconomy and global affairs. Professor Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) became the inaugural Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) on 1 February 2015. He joined the School as a Professor in Practice in the Department of Economics. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA), its Global Policy Lab and seven constituent centres bring together LSE faculty and students from across departments to design research-based and locally rooted solutions to global challenges. Based at LSE, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate.
May 03, 2018
Restoring Trust: how do we tackle the crisis in public information? [Audio]
01:29:04
Speaker(s): James Ball, Professor Charlie Beckett, Sophie Gaston | The LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission is working with experts, practitioners and the public to identify structural causes of media misinformation and set out a new framework for strategic policy. The four themes it is looking at are: journalism credibility, platform responsibility, political communications and media literacy and citizenship. At this event the audience is invited to put questions and views about misinformation direct to our expert panel. James Ball (@jamesrbuk) is a Commissioner of the LSE T3 project and the author of Post-Truth: How Bullshit Conquered the World. Charlie Beckett (@CharlieBeckett) is a Professor in LSE's Department of Media and Communications and Director of the Truth, Trust and Technology Commission. Damian Collins MP (@DamianCollins) is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Folkestone and Hythe, Chair of the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee and Commissioner on the Truth, Trust and Technology Commission. Sophie Gaston (@sophgaston) is Deputy Director and Head of International Research at Demos. Sonia Livingstone (@Livingstone_S) is Professor of Social Psychology in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE and Chair of the LSE Truth, Trust and Technology Commission. The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the United Kingdom and #3 globally in our field (2018 QS World University Rankings). Update, Monday 30 April: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Baroness Kidron is no longer able to speak at this event, but we are delighted to be joined by Sophie Gaston.
May 02, 2018
Europe in a Map: people and borders in times of change [Audio]
01:25:44
Speaker(s): Professor Simon Glendinning, Professor Elspeth Guild, Dr Natascha Zaun | What does a map tell us about Europe? What does it leave out? Prominent scholars in law, philosophy and political science reflect on how the age of cross-border flows from within and without Europe pose questions of how to map Europe and its peoples with renewed force. Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Professor of European Philosophy at LSE’s European Institute and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy. Elspeth Guild is Jean Monnet Professor ad personam at Queen Mary, University of London and Radboud University Nijmegen. Natascha Zaun is Assistant Professor in Migration Studies at LSE’s European Institute. Robert Basedow is Assistant Professor in International Political Economy at the LSE European Institute. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series (LEQS) was established in May 2009 to publish high quality research on Europe and the European Union from scholars across LSE and beyond.
May 02, 2018
How to Rig an Election [Audio]
01:28:04
Speaker(s): Professor Nic Cheeseman, Dr Brian Klaas | In this talk, Nic Cheeseman and Brian Klaas show how to rig an election - with the hopes that the lesson will help save democracy. The greatest political paradox of our time is this: there are more elections than ever before but the world is becoming less democratic. Elections are often the frontlines in a global battle for democracy. Dictators, despots, and counterfeit democrats hold elections to legitimize their regime, but then rig them to ensure that they maintain their iron grip on power. Vote buying. Violent repression. Assassinating rivals. Gerrymandering. Voter suppression. Ballot box stuffing. And the digital frontier of hacking and disinformation campaigns. Nic Cheeseman (@Fromagehomme) is Professor of Democracy at the University of Birmingham and was formerly the Director of the African Studies Centre at Oxford University. He is the recipient of the GIGA award for the best article in Comparative Area Studies (2013) and the Frank Cass Award for the best article in Democratization (2015). He is also the author of Democracy in Africa: Successes, failures and the struggle for political reform (Cambridge University Press, 2015), the founding editor of the Oxford Encyclopaedia of African Politics, a former editor of the journal African Affairs, and an advisor to, and writer for, Kofi Annan's African Progress Panel. Brian Klaas (@brianklaas) is a Fellow in Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics. Klaas is an expert on democracy, authoritarianism, American politics, and elections. He is the author of The Despot's Apprentice: Donald Trump's Attack on Democracy, The Despot's Accomplice: How the West is Aiding & Abetting the Decline of Democracy, and How to Rig an Election (co-authored with Professor Nic Cheeseman; Yale University Press 2018). Klaas is also a columnist for The Washington Post. Catherine Boone joined the LSE as Professor of Comparative Politics in 2013. She holds a BA from the University of California, and Ph.D from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) at LSE is one of the largest political science departments in the UK. Our activities cover a comprehensive range of approaches to the study of politics.
May 01, 2018
Shakespeare [Audio]
01:24:07
Speaker(s): Dr Jessica Chiba, John Crace, Tim Crouch | For Victor Hugo, ‘all forms of the multiple reality, actions and ideas, man and humanity’ can be found in Shakespeare. Perhaps this is the reason why, over 400 years after his death, we continue to study, perform, and re-read his plays in search of truths about ourselves and the world. Should we think of Shakespeare as a philosopher? Can reading him philosophically add to our understanding of his work, or is it simply another way of trying to contain this ‘myriad-minded’ (Coleridge) thinker? Jessica Chiba is a Teaching Fellow in English, Royal Holloway, University of London. John Crace (@JohnJCrace) is a journalist, critic, and author of the Penguin Incomplete Shakespeare series. Tim Crouch (@timcrouch1964) is a playwright and theatre maker. Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture at Royal Holloway, University of London and a Forum for European Philosophy Fellow. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Apr 30, 2018
Euroscepticism and the Future of European Integration [Audio]
01:27:34
Speaker(s): Tony Barber, Professor Catherine De Vries, Professor Simon Hix | The European Union is facing turbulent times. It is plagued by deep divisions over the future of European integration. This panel brings together experts who will discuss how Brexit and the rise of Euroscepticism on the continent may shape the contours of the European project in the coming years. Tony Barber (@TonyBarber8) is Europe Editor of the Financial Times. Catherine De Vries (@CatherineDVries) is Professor of Politics and Director of the Essex Centre of Experimental Social Science, Department of Government, University of Essex. Simon Hix (@simonjhix) is Harold Laski Professor of Political Science, Department of Government, LSE. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions at the European Institute and the Department of Government, London School of Economics. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Apr 26, 2018
Does the UK Need Its Own Infrastructure Bank? [Audio]
01:04:07
Speaker(s): Sir Danny Alexander, Robert Bartlett, Tamsyn Barton, Kwasi Kwarteng | This panel discussion will explore whether the UK should establish a new bank to support infrastructure investment. Danny Alexander (@dannyalexander) is Vice President at the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). Robert Bartlett is Head of Infrastructure at Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group. Tamsyn Barton (@TBartonBond) is Chief Executive of Bond. Kwasi Kwarteng (@KwasiKwarteng) is MP for Spelthorne and Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and is a member of the National Infrastructure Commission. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. This event is being held with the UK National Infrastructure Commission, which is considering this issue as part of its upcoming National Infrastructure Assessment. Twitter hashtag for this event: #LSEinfrastructure
Apr 24, 2018
The Struggle for the Arab World [Audio]
01:27:53
Speaker(s): Professor Fawaz Gerges | Fawaz Gerges tells us how the clash between pan-Arab nationalism and pan-Islamism has shaped the history of the region from the 1920s to the present. Fawaz Gerges (@FawazGerges) is Professor of International Relations at LSE and author of Making the Arab World: Nasser, Qutb, and the Clash That Shaped the Middle East. John Sidel is the Sir Patrick Gillam Professor of International and Comparative Politics at LSE. The Department of International Relations ( @LSEIRDept) is now in it's 90th year, making it one of the oldest and largest in the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEArabworld
Apr 24, 2018
From Transitional To Transformative: justice for conflict-related violence against women [Audio]
01:25:25
Speaker(s): Professor Christine Bell, Dr Aisling Swaine | ‘Conflict-related violence against women’ is often understood to mean sexual violence, specifically rape used as a weapon of war. But this is only one part of a broad continuum of gender violence which must be understood and addressed within and across conflict settings. In her new book, Conflict-Related Violence Against Women: Transforming Transition, Aisling Swaine examines the contexts of Liberia, Northern Ireland and Timor-Leste to identify a spectrum of forms of gender violence. She analyses their occurrence, and the relationship between them, within and across different points of pre-, mid- and post-conflict. Swaine proposes that a transformation rather than a transition is required in the aftermath of conflict, if justice is to play a role in preventing gender violence. Christine Bell (@christinebelled) is Principal Director of the Political Settlements Research Programme, Assistant Principal (Global Justice), Co-Director, Global Justice Academy, and Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Edinburgh. Aisling Swaine (@AislingSwaine) is Assistant Professor of Gender and Security at the Department of Gender Studies, LSE, where she teaches primarily on the MSc in Women, Peace and Security. Christine Chinkin is Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation for women in conflict-affected situations around the world.
Apr 23, 2018
The Value of Everything: making and taking in the global economy [Audio]
01:21:38
Speaker(s): Professor Mariana Mazzucato | In her new book, The Value of Everything, which she will discuss in this lecture, Mariana Mazzucato, argues that if we are to reform capitalism, we urgently need to rethink where wealth comes from. Which activities are creating it, which are extracting it, and which are destroying it? Answers to these questions are key if we want to replace the current parasitic system with a type of capitalism that is more sustainable, more symbiotic: that works for us all. Mariana Mazzucato (@MazzucatoM) is Professor in the Economics of Innovation and Public Value at University College London (UCL) where she is also Founder and Director of the Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose. She is author of the highly-acclaimed book The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths, and winner of the 2014 New Statesman SPERI Prize in Political Economy, the 2015 Hans-Matthöfer-Preis and the 2018 Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought. She advises policymakers around the world on how to deliver 'smart', inclusive and sustainable growth. She was named as one of the '3 most important thinkers about innovation' in the New Republic. Wouter den Haan is Co-director for the Centre for Macroeconomics and Professor of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.
Apr 23, 2018
Cultural Studies and the Challenge of Inequality Today [Audio]
01:34:42
Speaker(s): Professor Tony Bennett, Professor Angela McRobbie, Dr Clive James Nwonka, Professor Beverley Skeggs | This event will consider the prospects for contemporary thinking within the cultural studies tradition to engage with current inequalities. Mindful of the historical importance of this tradition, dating back to the 1960s and including work by Richard Hoggart, Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall, feminist cultural theory, and Bourdieu, the panel will both take stock of these older perspectives and offer their thoughts on contemporary prospects. Tony Bennett is Research Professor in Social and Cultural Theory in the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University. Angela McRobbie is Professor of Communications at Goldsmiths University of London. She has recently elected Fellow of the British Academy. Her early work was carried out at Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies and her most recent books include: The Aftermath of Feminism 2008, Be Creative 2015. She is currently completing Feminism, Neoliberalism and Popular Culture (Polity 2019). Clive James Nwonka (@CJNwonka) is Course Leader for the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity, LSE. His research is interested in how inequality is visualised and framed in cinema and cultural policy, through both film studies and cultural studies approaches. Beverley Skeggs (@bevskeggs) is Academic Director for the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity, LSE. Bev is one of the foremost feminist sociologists in the world, her work has been significant in drawing attention to the intersections between class and gender inequality. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and co-Director of LSE International Inequalities Institute. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Apr 18, 2018
Walk Together to Fight Inequality [Audio]
01:44:59
Speaker(s): Gro Harlem Brundtland, Hector Castañón, Aya Chebbi, Ban Ki-moon, Graça Machel, Njoki Njoroge Njehu, Dr Wanda Wyporska, Ernesto Zedillo | Join The Elders, the Fight Inequality Alliance, and Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity to honour grassroots efforts around the world to turn around the inequality crisis and learn how you can join the movement working to #WalkTogether to #FightInequality. Around the world, the gap between the richest and the rest of society has reached extremes not seen in a century. The global inequality crisis is undermining efforts to end poverty, racial and class-based discrimination, advance women’s rights, defend the environment, protect human rights and democracy, prevent conflict, and promote fair and dignified employment. We have an unacceptable concentration of wealth and power in the hands of elites, whilst hundreds of millions fight to survive. Together we will raise the voices of grassroots ‘Sparks of Hope’ who are fighting the root causes of inequality, and joining together in alliance to build more equal peaceful and just societies, and identify how we can each take steps towards freedom with equality. Gro Harlem Brundtland was the first female Prime Minister of Norway and is Deputy Chair of The Elders; a medical doctor who champions health as a human right; put sustainable development on the international agenda. Hector Castañón is a consultant for UN-HABITAT México; fellow of LEAD International for sustainable development; coach at Rhize.org for grassroots leadership training and cofounder of Tómala.Mx, a cross sectoral network of civil society organizations. He is a member of the Mexican Citizen Assembly to Address Sustainable Development Goals 1 and 10 related to poverty and inequality (AO1O), which is the Mexican chapter of the Fight Inequality Alliance. Aya Chebbi (@aya_chebbi) is an award winning pan-African feminist activist and blogger.
Apr 17, 2018
Factfulness: ten reasons we're wrong about the world and why things are better than you think [Audio]
01:28:07
Speaker(s): Anna Rosling Rönnlund, Ola Rosling | When asked simple questions about global trends – why the world's population is increasing; how many young women go to school; how many of us live in poverty – we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers according to the book's authors In their new book Factfulness, Professor of International Health Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators Anna Rosling Rönnlund and Ola Rosling, offer a radical new explanation of why this happens, and reveal the ten insticts that distort our perspective Ola Rosling (@OlaRosling) and Anna Rosling Rönnlund (@AnnaGapminder), Hans Rosling’s son and daughter-in-law, were co-founders of the Gapminder Foundation, and Ola its director from 2005 to 2007 and from 2010 to the present day. After Google acquired the bubble-chart tool called Trendalyzer, invented and designed by Anna and Ola, Ola became head of Google's Public Data Team and Anna the team's senior user experience (UX) designer. They have both received international awards for their work Tiziana Leone (@tizianaleone) is an Assistant Professor at the London School of Economics. Tiziana’s research agenda is focused around maternal and reproductive health, including a lifecourse approach to women’s health The Department of International Development (ID) was established in 1990 as the Development Studies Institute (DESTIN) to promote interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change The Global Health Initiative is a cross-departmental research platform set up to increase the coherence and visibility of Global Health research activity across the School, both internally and externally. It provides support for interdisciplinary engagement and showcases LSE’s ability to apply rigorous social science research to emerging global health challenges.
Apr 11, 2018
Fair Shot: rethinking inequality and how we earn [Audio]
01:29:44
Speaker(s): Chris Hughes, Professor Natalie Fenton, Kam Sandhu | Co-founder of Facebook Chris Hughes makes the case that one-percenters like him should pay their fortune forward in a radically simple way: a guaranteed income for working people Chris Hughes (@chrishughes) is co-founder of the Economic Security Project and co-founder of Facebook. His new book is Fair Shot: Rethinking Inequality and How We Earn Natalie Fenton (@NatalieFenton1) is Professor of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths and vice-chair of Hacked-Off, of the Media Reform Coalition and the Centre for the Study of Global Media and Democracy. She has published many books and articles, the most recent Digital Political Radical is published by Polity Kam Sandhu (@KamBass) is a journalist and editor of Real Media, a co-operative dedicated to public interest journalism. Her research areas include inequality, data and corporate accountability. Her work has featured in New Internationalist, InSurge Intelligence, DeSmog, The Real News Network and more Beverley Skeggs (@bevskeggs) is Academic Director, Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme, International Inequalities Institute The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Apr 10, 2018
The Great Economists: how their ideas can help us today [Audio]
01:24:50
Speaker(s): Dr Linda Yueh | Linda Yueh will discuss her new book that helps us to think about the biggest economic challenges of our time by drawing on the ideas of the great economists whose thinking has already changed the world Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is a Fellow in Economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University, Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School, and a Visiting Senior Fellow at LSE IDEAS Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is a Fellow in Economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University, Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School, and a Visiting Senior Fellow at LSE IDEAS Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.
Apr 09, 2018
Understanding Violence in the Middle East and Africa [Audio]
01:28:40
Speaker(s): Professor Toby Dodge, Dr Rachel Ibreck, Rim Turkmani, Lyse Doucet | This event will launch LSE’s new Conflict Research Programme funded by the UK’s Department for International Development. The CRP aims to understand why contemporary violence is so difficult to end and to analyse the underlying political economy of violence with a view to informing policy, with a special focus on Iraq, Syria, South Sudan, Somalia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Members of the research team will present their ideas and initial findings to Javier Solana, the former foreign policy chief of the European Union. Toby Dodge (@ProfTobyDodge) is Director of the LSE Middle East Centre, Kuwait Professor and Professor in the International Relations Department at LSE. He is also Senior Consulting Fellow for the Middle East at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, London. Rachel Ibreck's research centres on the politics of human rights, justice and civil society in the context of conflict and genocide, principally in Africa. Rim Turkmani (@Rim_Turkmani) is a Senior Research Fellow with the Conflict Research Programme on the Syrian war economy and the role of Syrian civil society in brokering peace and creating stability from the bottom up. Lyse Doucet (@bbclysedoucet) is chief international correspondent at the BBC. Lyse has been reporting for the BBC for nearly 30 years, with posts in Abidjan, Kabul, Islamabad, Tehran, Amman and Jerusalem. Javier Solana (@javiersolana) is President of the ESADE Center for Global Economy and Geopolitics and a former EU High Representative for Foreign and Security Policy. He is a Visiting Professor at LSE. Mary Kaldor is a Professor of Global Governance and Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit in the LSE Department of International Development. Professor Kaldor directs the unit’s largest research project, the Conflict Research Programme (CRP). The Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit is based within the International Development Department at LSE. The Unit focuses on understanding conflict and violence in Africa, Europe and the Middle East and bridging the gap between citizens and policy makers. Update, Monday 19 March: Due to unforeseen circumstances Rory Stewart will no longer be speaking at this event.
Mar 19, 2018
Trouble at the Top: is Britain's leadership still fit for purpose? [Audio]
01:30:47
Speaker(s): Professor Aeron Davis, Polly Toynbee, Joe Earle, Polly Toynbee, Joe Earle | Join Aeron Davis, Polly Toynbee, Joe Earle and Bev Skeggs for a discussion on Britain’s dysfunctional leadership. Aeron Davis will cast the evening off by arguing that the Brexit vote and 2017 election result are more than temporary setbacks for the Establishment. Instead, there is a deeper crisis of leadership that has been developing over decades. The great transformations of the 1980s onwards have not only upended societies, they have reshaped elite rule itself. The UK is producing a new generation of leaders who, although richer, have lost coherence, vision, influence and power. Their failings are not only damaging the wider public, economy and society, they are undermining the very foundations of the Establishment itself. Joining Aeron to offer their take on Britain’s top tier will be Polly Toynbee, the Guardian’s award-winning political affairs columnist, and Joe Earle, author and campaigner for economic reform. The event will be chaired by the LSE’s Bev Skeggs. The event will also launch Aeron Davis’s new book Reckless Opportunists: Elites at the End of the Establishment. The book, based on 350 interviews with elite figures across business, politics and finance, asks: how did we end up producing the leaders that got us here and what can we do about it?
Mar 19, 2018
The Arab/Persian Binary: histories of culture and conflict in the Persian Gulf [Audio]
01:21:23
Speaker(s): Professor Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet | Arabs and Persians have historically been placed in a binary and oppositional relationship. This bifurcated past has influenced the contemporary politics and historiography of the region, with far-reaching consequences for the stability and economic viability of different Middle Eastern communities. This clash of ethnicities becomes especially prominent in the Persian Gulf, where migrants, sailors, indigenous communities, and laborers have intermingled and forged a unique and multi-ethnic culture that defies facile categorization. Yet with the imposition of nationalism these multi-cultural communities have had to accept or adapt to the dominant state identity. This lecture will analyse the process of identity formation in the communities of the Persian Gulf by studying textual sources, as well as imperial and national objectives, that have determined these outcomes. Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet is Walter H Annenberg Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania. Roham Alvandi is is Associate Professor of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. This event is the Department of International History Annual Gulf History Lecture with generous support from LSE Kuwait Programme.
Mar 15, 2018
A Better World is Possible – the Gatsby Charitable Foundation and Social Progress [Audio]
01:22:18
Speaker(s): Lord Sainsbury | David Sainsbury will be talking about his lifetime of philanthropy. Lord Sainsbury is founder of the Gatsby Charitable Foundation. He donated £200 million of Sainsbury’s shares to the Foundation’s assets. Stephan Chambers is Marshall Institute Director. The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) aims to increase the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening.
Mar 13, 2018
Images that Resemble Us Too Much: natives, corporations, humans, and other personified creatures of international law [Audio]
01:19:58
Speaker(s): Dr Joseph Slaughter | Modern Euro-American law operates by fashioning legal persons as creatures endowed with rights and responsibilities. This figurative process of personification is a means of emancipation. Indeed, the fourteenth amendment to the U.S. Constitution laid the legal groundwork not only for recognition of the full legal personality of ex-slaves; it also “emancipated” the business corporation, which possesses legal rights and responsibilities by way of analogy to the human, figured as a metaphorical assemblage of human body parts. A perverse version of that analogical operation also sits at the bottom of international human rights law. Technically speaking, international law seems to protect the rights of the human, through the figure of the international legal person, by way of analogy to the human being itself. However, Joseph Slaughter argues that some of the qualities of international legal personhood that we now think of as properly belonging to human beings first appeared in the form of colonial charter companies. In this talk, Joseph Slaughter examines the rhetorical magic of modern law that populates the social world with personified legal fictions that may “resemble us too much” by reading international human rights law alongside and through early Nigerian novelist Amos Tutuola’s enchanting The Palm-wine Drinkard. Joseph Slaughter is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University in the City of New York. Gerry Simpson is a Professor of Public International Law at LSE. This event is the Annual London Review of International Law Lecture supported by the SOAS Centre for the study of Colonialism, Empire and International Law. LSE Law (@lselaw) is an integral part of the School's mission, plays a major role in policy debates & in the education of lawyers and law teachers from around the world.
Mar 13, 2018
Article 50: one year on [Audio]
01:27:58
Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Simon Hix, Jill Rutter, Professor Tony Travers | One year on from the triggering of Article 50, how far have the Brexit negotiations progressed? What lessons are there for the UK and the European Union? What are the implications for the future? Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union Law, University of Cambridge. Simon Hix (@simonjhix) is Harold Laski Professor of Political Science, Department of Government, LSE. Jill Rutter (@jillongovt) is a programme director for Brexit at the Institute for Government and has co-authored a number of the Institute reports on the implications of Brexit for Whitehall and Westminster. Tony Travers is Director, Institute of Public Affairs, LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Head of the European Institute, Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics. This lecture is part of the LSE Programme on Brexit. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public-engagement initiatives.
Mar 12, 2018
The Almighty Dollar [Audio]
01:01:20
Speaker(s): Dharshini David | The dollar is the lifeblood of globalisation: China holds billions in reserve for good reason. Greenbacks, singles, bucks or dead presidents, call them what you will, $1.2 trillion worth are floating around right now – and half the dollars in circulation are actually outside of the USA. But what is really happening as these billions of dollars go around the world every day? By following $1 from a shopping trip in suburban Texas, via China’s Central Bank, Nigerian railroads, the oil fields of Iraq and beyond, The Almighty Dollar answers questions such as: why is China the world’s biggest manufacturer – and the US its biggest customer? Is free trade really a good thing? Why would a nation build a bridge on the other side of the globe? Dharshini David (@DharshiniDavid) is an economist and broadcaster. From 2009 she fronted Sky News’ daily financial coverage and copresented Sky News Tonight. Keyu Jin (@KeyuJin) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics and a member of the Centre for Macroeconomics and Centre for Economic Performance. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.
Mar 08, 2018
Who Owns the Robots? Automation and Class Struggle in the 21st Century [Audio]
01:18:02
Speaker(s): Peter Frase | Robots and artificial intelligence promise to reshape the economy. But the political struggle between workers and owners will determine who really benefits from these changes. Peter Frase (@pefrase) is an editor at Jacobin Magazine and author of Four Futures. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Mar 07, 2018
Migration and the City [Audio]
01:11:26
Speaker(s): Professor Ash Amin, Dr Victoria Redclift | Migration is integral to the cultural and economic life of cities. Yet we live in a migration milieu in which migrants are rendered as illegal subjects, and where migration processes are reduced to crises at national border points. This event explores the relation between cities, migrants and migration systems. The event also launches The Sage Handbook of the 21st Century City edited by Suzanne Hall and Ricky Burdett. This edited collection engages with the volatile processes of urbanisation that reveal the turbulent nature of our early twenty-first century. Ash Amin is 1931 Professor of Geography, Head of Department of Geography and Fellow of Christ’s College, University of Cambridge. Victoria Redclift (@VRedclift) is Senior Lecturer in Sociology, University of Surrey. Ricky Burdett is Professor of Urban Studies at LSE and Director of the Urban Age and LSE Cities. LSE Cities (@LSECities) is an international centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science that carries out research, graduate and executive education and outreach activities in London and abroad. Its mission is to study how people and cities interact in a rapidly urbanising world, focussing on how the design of cities impacts on society, culture and the environment. The Department of Sociology at LSE (@LSEsociology) was established in 1904 and remains committed to top quality teaching and leading research and scholarship today.
Mar 06, 2018
The Brexit Negotiations: the view from Brussels [Audio]
01:22:19
Speaker(s): Stefaan de Rynck | Stefaan de Rynck, Senior Advisor to Michel Barnier, Chief EU Negotiator for Brexit, will provide a state of play on the Brexit negotiations. He will focus on the Withdrawal Treaty and the nature of the transition and will address the current progress and possible ways forward. Stefaan De Rynck (@StefaanDeRynck) is senior advisor of Michel Barnier, Chief EU Negotiator for Brexit, in charge of public engagement strategy and relations with think tanks. He is professor at the College of Europe since 2003, and also teaches on EU governance at the Collegio Carlo Alberto (University of Turin). Kevin Featherstone is Head of the European Institute, Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics. This lecture is part of the LSE Programme on Brexit. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public-engagement initiatives.
Mar 05, 2018
Brexit: what next? [Audio]
01:18:45
Speaker(s): Hilary Benn | Hilary Benn will speak about the Brexit negotiations and the future of the UK-EU relations. Hilary Benn (@hilarybennmp) is Labour MP for Leeds Central and Chair of the Select Committee on Exiting the European Union. Tony Travers is Director of the Institute of Public Affairs, LSE. This lecture is part of the LSE Programme on Brexit. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public-engagement initiatives.
Mar 01, 2018
Crime and Global Justice [Audio]
01:09:55
Speaker(s): Professor Daniele Archibugi, Alice Pease, Professor Christine Chinkin, Professor Richard Falk, Professor Mary Kaldor | Editor's note: We apologise for the poor audio quality of this podcast. In their new book, Crime and Global Justice: The Dynamics of International Punishment, which will be the subject of this discussion, Daniele Archibugi and Alice Pease offer an analysis of the successes and shortcomings of the global justice system from 1945 to the present day. Over the last quarter of a century a new stem of global criminal justice has emerged; national judges have become bolder in prosecuting crimes committed abroad, special tribunals have been able to target national leaders as well as their henchmen, and a permanent International Criminal Court has been established. But how successful have these ambitious transformations been? Have they ushered in a new era of cosmopolitan justice or are the old principles of victors’ justice still in play? Daniele Archibugi is a Research Director at the Italian National Research Council (CNR-IRPPS) in Rome, and Professor of Innovation, Governance and Public Policy at the University of London, Birkbeck College. Alice Pease is a freelance researcher currently working on a modern slavery campaign at the House of Lords. Christine Chinkin is Emerita Professor of International Law and Director of the Centre on Women, Peace and Security at the LSE. Richard Falk is Professor Emeritus of International Law at Princeton University and a Research Fellow in Global Studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Mary Kaldor is a Professor of Global Governance and Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit in the LSE Department of International Development. Gerry Simpson is a Professor and a Chair of Public International Law in the Department of Law, LSE.
Feb 28, 2018
Perspectives for the European Common Security and Defence Policy [Audio]
00:59:26
Speaker(s): Dr Ursula von der Leyen | Ursula von der Leyen is Germany's Minister of Defence, a position she has held since 2013. Since 2005, Ursula von der Leyen has been a member of the German Federal Cabinet. Before she was appointed Minister of Defence, she served as Federal Minister of Labor and Social Affairs since November 2009. From 2005 to 2009, she was Federal Minister for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth. Dr von der Leyen studied at Göttingen and Münster, Hanover Medical School and the London School of Economics and Political Science. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The German Society is a student union society at the London School of Economics and Political Science. This event forms part of their annual German Symposium which takes place from 28 February to 2 March.
Feb 28, 2018
The Vision of Empowerment: popular feminism and popular misogyny [Audio]
01:25:41
Speaker(s): Professor Sarah Banet-Weiser, Dr Shani Orgad | In 2018, we are living in a moment in North America and Europe where feminism has become, somewhat incredibly, popular. It seems as if everywhere you turn, there is an expression of feminism—on a t-shirt, in a movie, in the lyrics of a pop song, in an inspirational Instagram post. There are many different feminisms that currently circulate in popular culture across all media platforms, some connecting with synergy, others struggling for priority and visibility. But feminism isn’t the only popular phenomenon we need to contend with in the early 21st century. For every popular feminist practice or expression, there is always an accompanying hostile rejoinder or challenge, regardless of the mediated space in which it occurred— whether that was social media, or the legal realm, or corporate culture. In this talk, Sarah Banet-Weiser will discuss the ways in which contemporary popular feminism re-imagines and re-directs what “empowerment” means for girls and women, and how it is restructuring feminist politics within neoliberal culture. For many, a broader acceptance of feminism as an identity, concept, and practice is exhilarating; yet, for those who find feminism to be a threat, this acceptance also stimulates fear, trepidation, aggression, and violence. This talk is about the deeply entwined relationship between the creation and expression of popular feminism and what she calls popular misogyny. Sarah Banet-Weiser (@sbanetweiser) is Professor, Vice Dean and Director of the USC Annenberg School of Communication. In autumn 2018 she will join LSE as Head of the Department of Media and Communications. Shani Orgad is Associate Professor in the LSE Department of Media and Communications. Robin Mansell (@REMVAN) is Professor of New Media and the Internet and Head of the LSE Department of Media and Communications. The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in our field (2017 QS World University Rankings).
Feb 27, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | The Giants of 2020 [Audio]
01:09:35
Speaker(s): Dr Adura Banke-Thomas, Dr Tania Burchardt, Tammy Campbell, Kathleen Scanlon, Dr Jamie Woodcock | What are the key challenges of welfare states of the future? In a world of limited resources, what should our priority be? To close the LSE Festival, we will pit Beveridge's "five giants" (reimagined as the giant issues of housing and urbanisation, education and skills, health and social care, the future of work and the challenges of poverty), as well as sustainability, the missing sixth Giant voted for by you, against each other in a battle to decide which is the biggest issue now and in the near future. Adura Banke-Thomas is LSE fellow in Health Policy. He is also a research fellow at the Centre for Reproductive Health Research and Innovation, Lagos State University, Nigeria and a fellow at the McCain Institute for International Leadership, Washington DC, USA. Tania Burchardt is Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) and an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Tania’s research interests lie in theories of justice, including the capability approach, measurement of inequality and applied welfare policy analysis. Tammy Campbell (@_TammyCampbell) is based in the LSE’s Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, and is a (mainly) quantitative researcher. She completed her PhD at the UCL Institute of Education, focussing on structural and psychological factors creating difference among primary school pupils, and was previously a Government Social Researcher in the Department for Education. Rebecca Elliott (@RebsFE) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Her research interests span economic sociology, political sociology, environmental sociology, and knowledge production and science studies. She is particularly interested in how the environmental impacts of climate change are confronted as economic problems. Kathleen Scanlon (@KathJScanlon) is Assistant Professorial Research Fellow at LSE London. She has a wide range of research interests including comparative housing policy (across all tenures–social and private rented housing as well as owner-occupation), comparative mortgage finance, and migration. Jamie Woodcock (@jamie_woodcock) is a Fellow at LSE and author of Working The Phones, a study of a call centre in the UK inspired by the workers' inquiry. His current research involves developing this method in co-research projects with Deliveroo drivers and other digital workers in the so-called gig economy. Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.
Feb 24, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Tongue Lash: a night of challenging society with hiphop and spoken word [Audio]
00:38:56
Speaker(s): Poet Curious, Christian Gabriel, Caroline Teague, Desree, Thomas Owoo, Hannah Gordon | LSE LIFE invites you to take part in a night of spoken word performances, philosophical dialogue and hiphop vibes. Poetcurious hosts as hiphop poets from across London perform their spoken word art, offering lyrical rhymes that challenge our assumptions on urban spaces, masculinities, racism, and much more. These artists use beats to not just entertain, but educate us, transform us, and motivate us to reconsider our worlds. Between performances, Poetcurious, spoken word artist and co-convener of HipHopEd UK, will encourage dialogue between the audience and performers as we explore together the philosophy underpinning the poetry. Inspired by critical pedagogy, audience and performers ask each other questions, and learn from each other. Between performances and dialogues sets, a guest DJ will play beats as attendees are encouraged to continue dialogues while they get drinks and groove. There will also be an open mic at the end of the evening – so those of you who are budding freestyle artists, share your lyrical beats. The guiding values of the night will be based on the HipHopEd Manifesto, which states that “Collaboration is at the heart of HipHopEd” and “HipHop is dialogue”. So, come prepared to share, learn, talk, and enjoy a night of good vibes to close out this year’s LSE Festival. Poetcurious (@poetcurious) is a poet, artist and educator living and working in North West London. Co-convener of HipHopEd UK and host of “Rise Up”, “HeadSpin” and “Root Down”, Poetcurious can usually be found performing HipHop poetry on the spoken word scene; spitting freestyles over HipHop Beats or discussing critical pedagogy in a university lecture hall.
Feb 24, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Who Belongs? Can we Afford to be Different? [Audio]
01:27:53
Speaker(s): Brett Heasman, Celestin Okoroji, Professor Bev Skeggs, Dr Jana Uher | Editor's note: We apologise for the poor audio quality of this podcast. There have been significant advances in the rights, recognition and participation of diverse groups of people in the UK over the past 30 years. And yet, people’s backgrounds and characteristics – such as their age, gender, ethnicity, 'abilities' or 'disabilities', and sexual orientation – continue to strongly influence their life experiences, opportunities and prosperity. During an extended period of austerity, the current political climate is characterised by sharp divisions in attitudes to the long-term direction of the country, to the question of 'who belongs?' and to the sustainability of the UK's welfare system – giving rise to the question, ‘Can we afford to be different?’ LSE’s EDI (Equity, Diversity and Inclusion) team brings together a panel of experts on inequality for a discussion of the challenges of developing an inclusive and fair society in the 21st century. In honour of the 75th anniversary of the release of the Beveridge report, the speakers will draw on their research findings and disciplinary perspectives to consider how we should approach difference and supporting one another in society. When looking at life outcomes, what can we learn from examining the interplay of people’s characteristics and backgrounds? What does it mean to contribute to society, and who judges this? And what are the social costs of getting our approach to difference wrong? Brett Heasman is a PhD researcher in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. His research focuses on the public understanding of autism, for which he has won grant awards for collaboration and impact from the ESRC and LSE. Brett is the creator of the 'Open Minds' exhibition, which was set up to promote autistic voices. Celestin Okoroji is a PhD researcher in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. His research focuses on the ways in which ideas associated with stigmatised groups – such as unemployed people - become a part of stigmatised group members' self-concept. Celestin’s research was awarded the Popular Prize at the 2016 LSE Research Festival. Bev Skeggs is academic director of the Atlantic Fellows programme in the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. Jana Uher was a senior research fellow and Marie Curie fellow at LSE from 2015 to 2017. She is now a senior lecturer at the University of Greenwich. Sunil Kumar teaches on the MSc in Social Policy and Development and convenes the postgraduate elective ‘Urbanisation and Social Policy in the Global South’. As dean of graduate studies (2011–16) at LSE, he chaired the Equality and Diversity Forum, among other duties. His recent research is on the urbanisation-construction-migration nexus in south Asia.
Feb 24, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Civil Society and the Five Giants: a global perspective [Audio]
01:13:44
Speaker(s): Dr Duncan Green, Dr Armine Ishkanian, Dr Michael McQuarrie, Ludovica Rogers | The Beveridge Report's contemporary relevance can only be considered if we properly understand the ways in which civil society actors from across the globe are challenging unequal redistributive systems. The aim of this panel is to challenge the top-down approach of defining welfare needs and well-being and to critically examine how civil society actors, ranging from social movements, NGOs, to trade unions, have campaigned for the recognition of needs and for fairer redistribution. Duncan Green (@fp2p) is Senior Strategic Adviser at Oxfam GB, Professor in Practice in International Development at LSE, Honorary Professor of International Development at Cardiff University and a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Development Studies. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is an Associate Professor and the Programme Director of the MSc in Social Policy & Development (State and NGO Streams) in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Michael McQuarrie (@mgmcquarrie) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Ludovica Rogers (@ldvcrgrs) was an active participant in the Occupy movement and since then has been active in other groups that formed from or around it, such as the movement of the Commons, the #NoTTIP campaign and Debt Resistance UK. Hakan Seckinelgin is an Associate Professor (Reader) in the Department of Social Policy at LSE.
Feb 24, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Five LSE Giants' Perspectives on Poverty [Audio]
01:42:12
Speaker(s): Dr Tania Burchardt, Professor Sir John Hills, Professor Stephen P Jenkins, Professor Lucinda Platt | Taking five ‘Giants’ in the study of poverty over the last 100 years, themselves, like Beveridge, authors of influential reports, this event discusses how their thinking articulates with Beveridge’s vision and has advanced our understanding of poverty and how to tackle it. This event focuses on Beveridge’s Giant of ‘want’. It addresses the thinking on poverty of five ‘Giants’ in the study of poverty over the last 100 years, who have been closely associated with LSE and who are themselves authors or co-authors of influential reports: Beatrice Webb, Brian Abel-Smith, Peter Townsend, Amartya Sen and Anthony Atkinson. It explores how their thinking both articulates with the concepts and propositions of Beveridge in his report, and has transformed the ways in which we think about poverty and how to address it. The event draws on the insights of current LSE academics known for their work on poverty and inequality. Lucinda Platt will discuss Beatrice Webb’s ‘Minority Report on the Poor Laws’ of 1909, which was deemed to be highly influential on Beveridge’s thinking and the break with the Poor Laws expressed in his report. John Hills will shed light on the ‘rediscovery of poverty’ marked by the publication of Brian Abel-Smith and Peter Townsend’s 1966 work on ‘The Poor and The Poorest’, the corrective this provided to the somewhat over-optimistic interpretation of the achievements of the welfare state in eliminating poverty, and how it foregrounded Townsend’s subsequent development of the relational and ‘relative’ conception of poverty. Tania Burchardt will analyse the distinctive contribution of Amartya Sen to how we understand poverty across very different contexts, in her consideration of the 2009 Report by the Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress (coauthored with Joseph Stiglitz and Jean-Paul Fitoussi). Finally, Stephen Jenkins will evaluate the significance of the Atkinson Commission’s 2015 Report on Monitoring Global Poverty to how we conceptualize and address poverty in a global context. Tania Burchardt is Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) and an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. John Hills is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE, co-director of the LSE’s interdisciplinary International Inequalities Institute and is currently Chair of CASE. Stephen P Jenkins is Professor of Economic and Social Policy, in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Lucinda Platt is Professor of Social Policy and Sociology in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Lucinda’s research focuses on inequalities, with a particular focus on ethnicity and migration, as well as gender, disability, identity, and child poverty. Paul Gregg is a Professor of Economic and Social Policy, and Director of the Centre for Analysis and Social Policy at the University of Bath.
Feb 24, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | What's Love Got to Do with It? Loneliness, Relationships and Wellbeing [Audio]
01:00:53
Speaker(s): Professor Paul Dolan | Loneliness is one of the giant issues we are facing as a society today. Our relationships with other people are fundamental to our wellbeing, but what kinds of relationships make us happy or miserable? How should individuals decide when to ‘make or break’ a relationship? Why is the term love often misunderstood and misconstrued? How do social policies influence people’s relationships, such as by encouraging marriage and discouraging divorce – and how should they, if at all? Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at LSE, Director of Executive MSc Behavioural Science and Head of the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. There are two main themes to Paul’s work: Developing measures of happiness and subjective wellbeing that can be used in policy and by individuals looking to be happier; and considering ways in which the lessons from the behavioural sciences can be used to understand and change individual behaviour, and to add to the evidence base in this regard. He uses a range of data and methods to address these issues, and to better integrate them e.g. surveys, big data, lab studies, and field experiments. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book, Happiness by Design and the forthcoming The Narrative Trap, in which he talks about how the stories we tell about how we ought to live our lives harm us. Suzi Godson (@suzigodson) is a psychologist and journalist. She has been The Times sex and relationships columnist for fifteen years and is the author of several award winning books. She is currently conducting a longitudinal PhD study exploring the impact of midlife divorce on women with adult children. Last September she launched the multi award winning MeeTwo app, a safe, scalable, early intervention solution to the growing problem of adolescent anxiety. MeeTwo helps teenagers to talk about difficult things and encourages young people to help themselves, by helping each other. MeeTwo is free to use and is available on the App Store and Google Play
Feb 24, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Who Cares? [Audio]
01:09:45
Speaker(s): Kate Bell, Dr Derek King, Lisa McKenzie | The subject of care is now a central political concern. The consequences of longer lives and new expectations about universal participation in paid work have produced new questions about the ways in which care - for all ages and situations - can be provided and organised. We all know that at present the majority of people who provide care, both paid and unpaid, are women but we also know that the demands for care are increasing and increasingly difficult to fund. In the twenty first century assumptions about who cares - and for whom - demand that we think not just about the cost of care but also about the ways in which we recognise and validate care and caring as part of the lives of all citizens. Kate Bell (@kategobell) is Head of the Economic and Social Affairs Department (ESAD) at TUC, which leads the TUC's work in many key areas of economic and social policy, seeking to influence public and political debate through a comprehensive programme of research, analysis and events. Derek King is Assistant Professorial Research Fellow in the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at LSE. Lisa McKenzie (@redrumlisa) is Lecturer in Practical Sociology at Middlesex University and an Atlantic Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. She is a working class academic and undertakes research and actively campaigns on social and political issues relating to class inequality. Mary Evans is LSE Centennial Professor at the Department of Gender Studies. This event links with the exhibition Who Cares? Women, care and welfare on display in the Atrium Gallery from Monday 19 February - Friday 23 March 2018. Update, Friday 23 February: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Hilary Land is no longer able to speak at this event.
Feb 24, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | The Evolution of Altruism [Audio]
01:10:48
Speaker(s): Dr Jonathan Birch, Heikki Helanterä, Hannah Rubin | If evolution is a 'struggle for existence', why do we witness so much altruism in nature? From bacteria to baboons, the natural world is full of spectacular examples of organisms cooperating with one another. In the early 1960s, WD Hamilton changed the way we think about how such behaviour evolves, and his pioneering work kick-started a research programme now known as 'social evolution theory'. The Forum brings together a panel of biologists and philosophers of biology will discuss the legacy of Hamilton’s ideas, and the evolution of altruism in microbes, insects, humans, and the cells of our own bodies. Jonathan Birch is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at LSE and author of The Philosophy of Social Evolution. Heikki Helanterä is Group Leader in the Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions at the University of Helsinki. Hannah Rubin is Postdoctoral Researcher in Theoretical Philosophy at the University of Groningen. Bryan Roberts (@SoulPhysics) is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method at LSE.
Feb 24, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | The Future of Fashion: can the industry be in vogue and sustainable? [Audio]
01:15:47
Speaker(s): Deeti Vyas Béghin, Helen Newcombe, Olivia Pinnock, Roger Williams | As fashion production processes get faster and faster, this event will ask: how can fashion brands and producers adapt their business models, in the face of growing demands to reduce the environmental impacts from the production, consumption and disposal of clothing? Chaired by Dr Richard Perkins from the Department of Geography and Environment, a panel of speakers brought together by the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment will explore how fashion now demands faster and faster production and consumption of clothing; new approaches being pioneered by brands to become more sustainable; and the role consumers play in shaping demand for a new type of fashion future. Deeti Vyas Béghin is Chief of Business Longevity at Global Bright Futures. Deeti comes from a retail and commercial banking background and has spent over 7 years in the finance sector. In 2006, Deeti left the world of mainstream finance to pursue her interest in bridging the worlds of sustainability and business. More recently, she been involved in the sustainable fashion sector with organisations such as Made-By, WRAP, and CottonConnect, working on projects ranging from analysing the commercial viability of sustainable business models in fashion to farmer training programmes to improve the livelihoods to cotton farmers. Helen Newcombe (@davyjs) is the founder of Davy J, a British swimwear brand that creates beautiful active swimwear, all manufactured in the UK and made using ECONYL® yarn, a nylon yarn regenerated from 100% waste materials including fishing nets and other marine rubbish. Olivia Pinnock is a Freelance Fashion Writer and Lecturer. Roger Williams is an award winning Director/Producer and Director of Photography, who has worked with some of the world’s most respected broadcasters and entertainment companies.
Feb 24, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Getting Ahead of the Curve: addressing housing needs in rapidly growing cities [Audio]
01:02:12
Speaker(s): Professor Paul Collier, Rubbina Karruna, Paida Hlambelo | Across the developing world, the pace of urbanisation has outstripped the ability of governments to facilitate decent, affordable housing for citizens. With the price of private housing developments making them out of reach to middle income households, urban growth in these rapidly growing cities has largely occurred through unplanned, low density, and low-quality housing. As a result, citizens are unable to access basic services and amenities that affect their quality of life. At the same time, cities are missing a key ingredient for the effective clustering of individuals and firms that make cities engines for growth. In this context, many city governments are asking: how can policy help to address the growing gap between housing supply and rising demands? Can public housing schemes address the need of low income residents? How can policy be used to unleash private housing markets equipped for the demands of these cities? The International Growth Centre (IGC) and LSE Cities explore these questions in examining the future of housing policy in developing cities. Speakers will be presenting and defending their views on viable options for policy – the audience will have to decide who presents the most compelling case for reform. Paul Collier is Professor of Economics and Public Policy in the Blavatnik School of Government at the University of Oxford and Director of IGC. Rubbina Karruna is DFID Cities Adviser. Paida Hlambelo is an architect for Vavaki Architects. Priya Manwaring is Cities Economist for the International Growth Centre.
Feb 23, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Lessons from Grenfell Tower: inequality and housing need, the Giant that still divides us [Audio]
01:03:42
Speaker(s): Professor Danny Dorling, Lynsey Hanley, Professor Anne Power | The crucially important role of social housing has been recognised following the Grenfell Tower disaster, which also laid bare the disconnect between the ‘elites’ and the most disadvantaged in society.This event explores the link between inequality and housing, evidenced by the growing demand for low cost rented housing among those on the very lowest incomes. Unless the voices of communities and residents are heard and taken seriously, there is a risk that gaps in society will widen even further.Danny Dorling (@dannydorling) is a Professor of Human Geography at the University of Oxford. He has also worked in Sheffield, Newcastle, Bristol, Leeds and New Zealand, went to university in Newcastle upon Tyne, and grew up in Oxford. He has published over forty books including many atlases and All That is Solid in 2014; Injustice: Why social inequalities still persist in 2015; A Better Politics: How government can make us happier in 2016; The Equality Effect in 2017; and Do We Need Economic Inequality? – in 2018.Lynsey Hanley was born in Birmingham and lives in Liverpool. She is the author of Estates: An Intimate History, and Respectable: Crossing the Class Divide. She is a regular contributor to the Guardian.Anne Power has been involved in European and American housing and urban problems since 1965. She is Professor of Social Policy at LSE and Head of LSE Housing and Communities, a research group based within the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion. She is author of many books, reports and articles on housing, cities and low-income communities including most recently Cities for a Small Continent.John Hills is Chair of CASE, Co-Director LSE International Inequalities Institute and Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy, LSE.
Feb 23, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | A Beveridge Plan for an Unruly School? William Beveridge and LSE [Audio]
01:25:55
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Cox | There have been many famous Directors of LSE, from Halford Mackinder to Ralph Dahrendorf. But none can lay claim to such fame as LSE's fourth Director, William Beveridge - generally regarded as the main architect of the Welfare State and the energetic visionary who oversaw a major expansion of LSE from 1919-1937. But though his achievements at LSE were by any measure great, his relations with some of the School's leading academic figures were never easy, while his attempt to redefine the nature of the social sciences floundered. Why was rethinking the relationship between state and society an easier task for Beveridge than running an 'unruly School'? Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. He is author and editor of over twenty books, currently working on a 'new' history of LSE. Professor David Stevenson is the Stevenson Professor of International History, Department of International History, LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.
Feb 23, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | The Future of Ageing [Audio]
00:59:51
Speaker(s): Professor Rebeca Aldunate, Nicci Gerrard, Professor Michael Murphy, Jane Vass | With the average life expectancy increasing from 66.7 in 1942 to 81.25 in 2017, and set to continue, population ageing is poised to become one of the most significant social transformations of the 21st century. This panel discusses how ageing could come to dominate the giant issue of health and social care, and potentially all areas of the welfare state. Rebeca Aldunate is Director of the Biotechnology School, Faculty of Science at Universidad Santo Tomás, Chile. Nicci Gerrard (@FrenchNicci) is the co-author, with Sean French, of the bestselling Nicci French psychological thrillers and has written six novels under her own name, including The Winter House and Missing Persons. She was on the staff of The Observer for many years and still writes for that paper, in 2016 winning the Orwell Prize for 'Exposing Britain's Social Ills'. She is also a co-founder of John’s Campaign, that fights for more compassionate care in hospital for people with dementia, and a humanist celebrant. Michael Murphy is Professor of Demography in the Department of Social Policy at LSE, having joined the School in 1980. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the United Kingdom's national academy for the humanities and the social sciences. He has acted as an adviser to UK and US Governments, and international organisations, such as EU, UN and OECD. His current research areas include demographic modelling of ageing and mortality trends, social care and living arrangements and well-being of older people. Jane Vass is Director of Policy and Research at Age UK since April 2015. Prior to this Jane was Head of Public Policy at Age UK from 2012, having joined Age UK’s predecessor, Age Concern England as Financial Services Policy Adviser in 2006. Carrie Friese (@CarrieFriese) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Her research is in medical sociology and science and technology studies, with a focus on reproduction across humans and animals. Update, Wednesday 21 February: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Olivia Casanueva and Joanna Latimer are no longer able to speak at this event, but we are delighted to be joined by Rebeca Aldunate.
Feb 22, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | The Future of Work [Audio]
00:56:59
Speaker(s): Rebecca Campbell, Ruth Reaney, Dr Jamie Woodcock | If William Beveridge was to return to the East End, what would he make of it today? The welfare state has changed significantly in the 75 years since the publication of the Beveridge report, but so has the structure of the economy and the kinds of work that people do today. There is continuity with work, but there is also change: in some ways moving backwards, in other ways radically transforming. This panel session brings together academics from LSE’s Employment Relations and Human Resource Management Faculty Research Group to debate what Beveridge 2.0 would involve for work and how work could change in the future, to provoke a broader discussion on what is happening with work today. Rebecca Campbell is a teacher and graduate researcher in the Department of Management at LSE. Her research focuses on employment and pension decision-making. Ruth Reaney is an LSE Fellow in the Department of Management at LSE. She specialises in work and employment and her current research concerns trade union response to decreasing institutional security. Jamie Woodcock (@jamie_woodcock) is an LSE Fellow in the Department of Management. His current research focuses on the digital economy, the transformation of work, and eSports. Jamie completed his PhD in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London and has held positions at Goldsmiths, the University of Leeds, the University of Manchester, Queen Mary, NYU London, and Cass Business School. David Marsden is Professor of Industrial Relations in the Department of Management and an Associate in the Labour Markets Research Programme within the Centre for Economic Performance. The Employment Relations and Human Resource Management Faculty Group within LSE’s Department of Management conducts research and teaching in the institutional and strategic context of work and employment. LSE’s Department of Management informs and inspires better management in practice by challenging and extending the understanding of people, teams, organisations and markets, and the economic, psychological, social, political and technological contexts in which they operate worldwide.
Feb 22, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Blueprint for Welfare? The Beveridge Report and the Making of the Welfare State [Audio]
01:32:37
Speaker(s): Professor Derek Fraser | There was a marked difference between the enthusiastic popular response to the Report and what was perceived to be a lukewarm reception by Churchill and the wartime coalition. How far was the Report implemented in the creation of the Welfare State in 1948 and why 75 years later do many politicians wish to "Get back to Beveridge"? The lecture will review the content and context of the Beveridge Report and explain why it is of enduring importance. Derek Fraser is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Teesside, where he served as Vice-Chancellor for 11 years. He was previously Professor of Modern History at the University of Bradford and Professor of English History at UCLA. His expertise is in modern British social and urban history and the 5th Edition of his book, The Evolution of the British Welfare State, was published in September 2017. Mary Evans is LSE Centennial Professor in the Department of Gender Studies. A Time for Revolutions: making the Welfare State is exhibited at LSE Library Gallery Monday 8 January – Friday 13 April. This exhibition marks the 75th anniversary of the Beveridge report and looks at how welfare provision has been shaped and changed through the ages. This is one of a series of ongoing exhibitions and events hosted by LSE Library which utilise its world class special collections in order to provide food for thought for all.
Feb 22, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Universal Health Coverage in the Global South: what is needed to make it work? [Audio]
01:15:10
Speaker(s): Professor Kalipso Chalkidou, Professor Ken Shadlen, Dr Daniel Wang | Although Universal health coverage is a pillar of the modern welfare state, the successful design and implementation of arrangements to deliver on this promise faces enormous challenges. This panel, with perspectives from health policy, law, and political science, examines these challenges and reflects on national experiences in developing countries. Topics will include: the imperatives of determining which healthcare products and services are covered; national and regional strategies for securing stable supplies of quality healthcare services at affordable prices; the relationship between the spread of patents on pharmaceutical products, a new phenomenon, and governments’ commitments to provide essential medicines; and the tensions between health technology assessment systems designed to make judgements on cost-effectiveness and legal systems that offer opportunities for individuals and groups to secure expensive health products via litigation. Kalipso Chalkidou (@kchalkidou) is the Director of Global Health Policy and a Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Development, and a Professor of Practice in Global Health at Imperial College London. Ken Shadlen is Professor of Development Studies in the Department of International Development of LSE. He is currently Head of Department (September 2017-2020). Daniel Wang is a Lecturer in Health and Human Rights at Queen Mary University of London. Justin Parkhurst (@justinparkhurst) is Associate Professor in Global Health Policy in the Department of Health Policy at LSE and an honorary Senior Lecturer at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The panel is brought together by the Global Health Initiative (@LSEGlobalHealth), a newly established cross-departmental research platform set up to increase the coherence and visibility of Global Health research activity across the School, both internally and externally. It provides support for interdisciplinary engagement and showcases LSE’s ability to apply rigorous social science research to emerging global health challenges
Feb 22, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Is Higher Education Good for You? [Audio]
00:56:50
Speaker(s): Professor Paul Dolan, Lord Willetts | There is increasing evidence from the UK and the US to show that higher education is associated with less happiness and more inequality. In light of this, Professor of Behavioural Science at LSE Paul Dolan argues that the government should reduce funding to higher education and prioritise early years education instead. Former Minister for Universities David Willetts stands up for the value of a university degree. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at LSE, Director of Executive MSc Behavioural Science and Head of the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. There are two main themes to Paul’s work: Developing measures of happiness and subjective wellbeing that can be used in policy and by individuals looking to be happier; and considering ways in which the lessons from the behavioural sciences can be used to understand and change individual behaviour, and to add to the evidence base in this regard. He uses a range of data and methods to address these issues, and to better integrate them e.g. surveys, big data, lab studies, and field experiments. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book, Happiness by Design and the forthcoming The Narrative Trap, in which he talks about how the stories we tell about how we ought to live our lives harm us. David Willetts is the Executive Chair of the Resolution Foundation. He served as the Member of Parliament for Havant (1992-2015), as Minister for Universities and Science (2010-2014) and previously worked at HM Treasury and the No. 10 Policy Unit. Lord Willetts is a visiting Professor at King’s College London, a board member of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), a Board member of Surrey Satellites and of the Biotech Growth Trust, Chair of the British Science Association, a Governor of the Ditchley Foundation and a member of the Council of the Institute for Fiscal Studies. He is a member of the Board of the Crick Institute and a Trustee of the Science Museum. He is an Honorary Fellow of Nuffield College Oxford. Lord Willetts has written widely on economic and social policy. His book The Pinch about fairness between the generations was published in 2010. His latest book A University Education is published by Oxford University Press. Julia Black is Pro Director for Research at LSE.
Feb 21, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Writing Fiction to Dramatise Inequality [Audio]
00:55:20
Speaker(s): Louise Doughty, Winnie M Li, Professor Nicola Lacey | How can literature reach audiences in ways that social science research about inequality can’t? How can narratives about fictional characters dramatise lived experiences of social inequality – and what are the ethical implications of creating these narratives for a mass readership? This event brings together two award-winning authors (one established, one emerging) whose fiction explores various forms of social inequality. Louise Doughty, author of eight novels, is best known for her bestselling Apple Tree Yard, which was adapted into a BBC TV series. Winnie M Li is a PhD student at LSE, whose debut novel Dark Chapter, recently won The Guardian’s Not The Booker Prize and is inspired by her own lived experience of rape. They will be discussing these questions wtih Bingchun Meng, whose work focuses on the representation of gender in media narratives, and Nicola Lacey, whose work focuses on feminist analysis of law, law and literature and biography. Louise Doughty (@DoughtyLouise) is the author of eight novels, most recently Black Water, which was published in 2016 to critical acclaim in the UK and US where it was nominated as one of the New York Times Notable Books of the Year. Her previous book was the Top Ten bestseller Apple Tree Yard, adapted for BBC One as a four-part series starring Emily Watson. Her sixth novel, Whatever You Love, was shortlisted for the Costa Novel Award and longlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. She has also won awards for radio drama and short stories, along with publishing one work of non-fiction, A Novel in a Year, based on her popular newspaper column. She is a critic and cultural commentator for UK and international newspapers and broadcasts regularly for the BBC. Winnie M Li (@winniemli) is a PhD Researcher based in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Her research examines the uses of social media by rape survivors to narrate their experiences of sexual trauma – and how this online engagement can serve as a means of individual recovery and community-building. Before coming to LSE, Winnie worked for fifteen years in the creative industries in the US, the UK, Ireland, Qatar, and Singapore. Her debut novel Dark Chapter, inspired by her own experience of rape, was published worldwide in 2017. It was listed by Stylist Magazine as one of ‘10 Smashing Debut Novels of 2017’ and won The Guardian's Not The Booker Prize, decided in part by a public vote. It is currently nominated for the prestigious Edgar Awards in the US for Best First Novel. Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy at LSE and an Associate Member of the International Inequalities Institute. She is an Honorary Fellow of New College Oxford and of University College Oxford; a Fellow of the British Academy; and a member of the Board of Trustees of the British Museum. In 2011 she was awarded the Hans Sigrist Prize by the University of Bern for outstanding scholarship on the function of the rule of law in late modern societies and in 2017 she was awarded a CBE for services to Law, Justice and Gender Politics. Her publications include Women, Crime and Character: From Moll Flanders to Tess of the d’Urbervilles (OUP 2008) and In Search of Criminal Responsibility (OUP 2016). Bingchun Meng is an Associate Professor and Deputy Head of Department in the Department for Media and Communications at LSE. She is also LSE’s Advisor to Female Students. Her research interests include gender and the media, political economy of media industries, communication governance, and comparative media studies. Her book The Politics of Chinese Media: Consensus and Contestation was recently published by Palgrave.
Feb 21, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Beveridge in Context: reconstruction planning during the Second World War and after [Audio]
01:35:02
Speaker(s): Professor Matthew Jones, Dr David Motadel, Professor David Stevenson | Editor's note: We apologise for the poor audio quality of this podcast. Academics from the Department of International History at LSE will reassess the 1942 Beveridge Report in the light of German, American, and British planning for reconstruction after World War II. Matthew Jones is Professor of International History at LSE. He works on US foreign relations, British foreign policy, and nuclear history during the Cold War. David Motadel is Assistant Professor of International History at LSE. He works on the history of modern Europe and Europe's relations with the wider world. David Stevenson is Professor of International History at LSE. His research includes the continuities between the First World War and the Second. Megan Black is Assistant Professor of International History with research interests in the United States and the world, environmental history, and political economy. She completed doctoral work at George Washington University and a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard University. Her current manuscript, The Global Interior: Mineral Frontiers and American Power, is forthcoming with Harvard University Press.
Feb 21, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Education and the Giant of Ignorance [Audio]
01:00:44
Speaker(s): Professor Nicholas Barr, Professor Howard Glennerster, Professor Sandra McNally, Dr Kitty Stewart, Professor Anne West | Ignorance, though one of the Giants, was barely mentioned in the Beveridge Report, but addressed by the 1944 Education Act and 1963 Robbins Report. This panel identifies gaps that have emerged and ways to fill them, focussing particularly on equality of opportunity. Kitty Stewart will discuss the importance of early education to children’s life chances, and consider how far current early years and childcare policy is well-designed to promote children’s development and to narrow gaps between children from different backgrounds. Anne West will focus on school-based education. She will outline how the school system has changed since the 1944 Education Act, particularly since the academies programme was introduced. She will highlight some of the concerns that have been raised regarding the governance and financing of academies and outline proposals as to how these might be addressed. Sandra McNally will address the state of further and technical education in England. She will look at the extent to which there are good opportunities within this type of education in England – and whether there is inequality of opportunity in who is able to access the more successful routes. The post-war assumption was that education should be tax-financed. As higher education expanded both Howard Glennerster and Nicholas Barr advocated income-contingent graduate contributions. They discuss two contrasting futures: A return to old style, mainly tax-financed higher education, with a neglect of early education and vocational education, and resource constraints affecting the size and/or quality of higher education; or a forward-looking approach based on: a holistic view of tertiary education; a universal endowment at 18; a well-designed income-contingent loan; flexible pathways through tertiary education; and greater emphasis on education spending earlier in the system. Nicholas Barr is Professor of Public Economics at LSE and the author of numerous books and articles including The Economics of the Welfare State (OUP, 5th edn, 2012), Financing Higher Education: Answers from the UK (with Iain Crawford) (Routledge 2005), and Reforming Pensions: Principles and Policy Choices (with Peter Diamond) (OUP, 2008). Howard Glennerster joined the Higher Education Research Unit at LSE in 1964 after working in the Labour Party Research Department. Sandra McNally is Director of the Centre for Vocational Education Research and Director of the Education and Skills Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE. She is also a professor of economics at University of Surrey. Her interests are in the economics of education. She works on evaluation of government policies, particularly in schools and in post-16 education. Kitty Stewart is Associate Professor of Social Policy at LSE, and Associate Director of LSE’s Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion. Anne West is Professor of Education Policy in the Department of Social Policy at LSE.
Feb 21, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Combatting the Five Giants in 21st Century European Welfare States [Audio]
00:50:04
Speaker(s): Kathleen Henehan, Professor Nicola Lacey, Lord Wood | A distinguished panel discusses the most promising European welfare state reforms to combat Beveridge's social evils, presented in a video by European Institute students. Kathleen Henehan (@kathleenhenehan) joined the Resolution Foundation in 2017, working on post-16 skills and education, including apprenticeships, technical and higher education, and adult skills development. Prior to joining Resolution Foundation, Kathleen worked at Universities UK, where she focused on graduate employment outcomes and learning and teaching policy. She has a PhD in Political Science from LSE. Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy at LSE and an Associate Member of the International Inequalities Institute. She is an Honorary Fellow of New College Oxford and of University College Oxford; a Fellow of the British Academy; and a member of the Board of Trustees of the British Museum. In 2011 she was awarded the Hans Sigrist Prize by the University of Bern for outstanding scholarship on the function of the rule of law in late modern societies and in 2017 she was awarded a CBE for services to Law, Justice and Gender Politics. Her publications include Women, Crime and Character: From Moll Flanders to Tess of the d’Urbervilles(OUP 2008) and In Search of Criminal Responsibility (OUP 2016). Stewart Wood, Baron Wood of Anfield (@StewartWood) is a Labour life peer in the House of Lords since 2011. He studied Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Oxford University and completed his PhD in Government as a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard University. He has taught Politics at Oxford University since 1995. He served as advisor to Gordon Brown from 2001 to 2010, first at the Treasury and then at 10 Downing Street. At no.10 he was senior special adviser to the Prime Minister on foreign policy; Northern Ireland; and culture, media and sports policy. He also served as advisor to Ed Miliband, the Labour party's leader, from 2010 to 2015. His research and writing focuses on contemporary political economy in Europe, German politics, American politics, and public policy issues around industrial policy and the future of the welfare state. Nicholas Barr is Professor of Public Economics at the European Institute and the Department of Economics at LSE. He is the author of numerous books and articles including The Economics of the Welfare State (OUP, 5th edn, 2012), Financing Higher Education: Answers from the UK (with Iain Crawford) (Routledge 2005), and Reforming Pensions: Principles and Policy Choices (with Peter Diamond) (OUP, 2008). Alongside his academic work is wide-ranging involvement in policy, including spells at the World Bank and IMF. He has been active in policy debates, particularly on pension reform and higher education finance, advising governments in the post-communist countries, and in the UK, Australia, Chile, China, Hungary, New Zealand and South Africa.
Feb 21, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | The Challenge of Richness? Rethinking the Giant of Poverty [Audio]
00:55:49
Speaker(s): Dr Tania Burchardt, Amy Feneck, Dr Sam Friedman, Dr Luna Glucksberg | The economic and political power of the richest in our society has dramatically increased since 1942. 75 years on since his report, the panel will discuss whether Beveridge’s concern with poverty now needs to be extended to include a concern with richness. Tania Burchardt is Director of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) and an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Amy Feneck is an artist based in London. Her work spans photography, writing, moving image and participatory projects, including collaborating with artist Ruth Beale on The Alternative School of Economics – an artistic project investigating political, social and cultural issues. Sam Friedman (@SamFriedmanSoc) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. His research focuses on the cultural dimensions of contemporary class division. Luna Glucksberg (@luna_inequality) is an urban anthropologist based in LSE’s International Inequalities Institute, looking at socio-economic stratification in contemporary British society. Her current work focuses on the reproduction of wealth amongst elites in the UK, considering the roles of two key and so far under-researched actors: family offices and women. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is the Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and co-Director of the LSE’s International Inequalities Institute. His research focuses principally on social inequality, with a particular interest in social stratification and inequality. With an introduction from Katharina Hecht (@katharina_hecht), a PhD Researcher in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Her research focuses on perceptions of top incomes and wealth.
Feb 20, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Beveridge Rebooted: a basic income for every citizen? [Audio]
01:07:18
Speaker(s): Professor John Kay, Professor Philippe Van Parijs, Dr Malcolm Torry, Polly Toynbee | Discussion of a Basic Income – an unconditional, nonwithdrawable income for every individual (and sometimes called a Citizen’s Income, a Citizen’s Basic Income, or a Universal Basic Income) – is now a mainstream global social policy debate. This event will bring together key figures on different sides of that debate – Professor Philippe Van Parijs from the University of Louvain, and Professor John Kay of the University of Oxford – to debate the motion: ‘This house believes that if the Beveridge Report were being written today then it would have recommended a Basic Income’. Before they speak, Dr Malcolm Torry, a Visiting Senior Fellow at LSE, and Director of the Citizen’s Basic Income Trust, will briefly define a Basic Income; and at the end of the debate the Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee will offer her reflections on the event and on the wider debate about Basic Income. John Kay (@ProfJohnKay) is an economist whose career has spanned the academic world, business and finance, and public affairs. He has held chairs at the London Business School, the University of Oxford, and LSE, and is a Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford, where he began his academic career in 1970. Philippe Van Parijs (@pvpbrussels) is a special guest professor at the Universities of Louvain and Leuven, a Robert Schuman Fellow at the European University Institute and an associate member of Nuffield College, Oxford. Malcolm Torry (@Citizensincome) has been Director of the Citizen's Basic Income Trust since 2001 (and was Director before that between 1988 and 1992); he is a Visiting Senior Fellow in the Social Policy Department at LSE; and he is General Manager of BIEN, The Basic Income Earth Network. Polly Toynbee (@pollytoynbee) is a columnist for The Guardian. She was formerly BBC social affairs editor, columnist and associate editor of The Independent, co-editor of the Washington Monthly and a reporter and feature writer for The Observer. Enkeleida Tahiraj (@edatahiraj) is Senior Visiting Fellow at LSEE European Institute at LSE, researching rights based social policies and policy innovation. Her current research and teaching involves Universal Basic Income pilot projects. This event follows on from the Citizen's Basic Income Day at LSE, a day of discussions bringing together experts and speakers from pilot projects and experiements around the world.
Feb 20, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Beveridge's Sixth Giant [Audio]
01:02:51
Speaker(s): Professor Sam Fankhauser, Professor Fawaz Gerges, Professor Naila Kabeer, Professor Mary Kaldor, Professor Lord Layard | Beveridge's "Five Giants" remain central issues in discussions about the welfare state today, but there are also new challenges that have emerged since the 1940s. Which "Giant" issue would a modern day Beveridge prioritise? Having polled LSE students, staff and alumni for their suggestions as to Beveridge’s missing giants, the sixth giant will be selected from one of the following: Sustainability, Equity, Loneliness/Isolation, Security, Extremism. You decide. Vote on which of these giant issues should take its place alongside Beveridge’s giants. In this event, on the opening night of the LSE Festival, prominent LSE academics will put forward their pitch for the missing giants on the shortlist. Sam Fankhauser is Director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and Deputy Director of the ESRC-funded Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy, both at LSE. Fawaz A Gerges is Professor of International Relations at LSE, and holder of the Emirates Professorship in Contemporary Middle East Studies. Naila Kabeer is Professor of Gender and Development at the Department of Gender Studies and Department of International Development. Mary Kaldor is Professor of Global Governance and Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit in the LSE Department of International Development. Professor Kaldor also directs the unit’s largest research project, the Conflict Research Programme (CRP), an international DFID-funded partnership investigating public authority, through a theoretical lens of the political marketplace and the concept of civicness, across a range of countries in Africa and the Middle East. Richard Layard is Emeritus Professor of Economics and Director of the Wellbeing Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, and a member of the House of Lords. Jennifer Jackson-Preece is an Associate Professor of Nationalism, with a joint appointment in both the European Institute and the Department of International Relations, LSE. She is Deputy Head of the European Institute.
Feb 19, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Our Automated Future: utopia or dystopia? [Audio]
00:52:13
Speaker(s): Salonie Hiriyur, Laura-Jane Silverman, Dhruv Washishth | Editor's note: We apologise for the poor audio quality of this podcast. For the younger generations considering their future career options, are the technological advances transforming the way we work something to be afraid of or excited by? And are they being sufficiently prepared for the future of work? Salonie Hiriyur started work as a journalist in India, but wanting to develop a sound theoretical basis in development studies, she moved to London to complete a Master's from the Gender Institute at LSE. She graduated in 2016 and from there moved to work at the ILO (Geneva) in research. As a research assistant, she worked on reports on women's employment, the informal economy, social protection programmes for informal workers. She is now looking at starting a PhD in Social Policy, analysing the effects of the emergence of online platforms on the domestic work sector in India. Laura-Jane Silverman is a Careers Consultant and heads up the entrepreneurial work that LSE Careers offers to students and alumni. Having graduated from the University of Cambridge, Laura-Jane worked in various industries including Television and Film and Recruitment before starting up her own careers consulting and recruitment business. She has worked with universities and business schools across Europe and worked with students who are working out their future career strategies. In 2011 she joined LSE and now manages LSE Generate, the entrepreneurial skills development programme here at LSE and is also on the steering committee for the new Work It Out initiative that helps students think about their values and priorities as they explore future job opportunities. Dhruv Washishth is the Co-Founder and CEO of Paradigm Shift, a silicon valley startup that utilizes Virtual Reality for education. He is pursuing his MSc in Management of Information Systems, Digital Innovation & Philosophy at LSE. He has been a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, London and in 2014, he was selected by the Government of UK as a global young entrepreneur. In the past, he also launched Angelhack's operations in India and used to manage the startup accelerator at TiE Bangalore. Megan Beddoe @MeganBeddoe is Activities and Development Officer at the LSE Students' Union.
Feb 19, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | Identity and the Welfare State: evolving challenges for sustaining social solidarity [Audio]
00:57:26
Speaker(s): Professor Xenia Chryssochoou, Professor Peter Dwyer, David Goodhart, Celestin Okoroji | Editor's note: We apologise for the poor audio quality of this podcast. Central to the promise of the Beveridge Report is the assumption of social solidarity: we need a cohesive society to support social protection, and the resulting shared safety net should increase cohesion even further. Yet as the country and its welfare state evolved, so did the social bonds on which they depended. Given what we know about human behaviour and experience, what prospect is there for the level of solidarity needed to carry Beveridge’s vision into the twenty-first century? Bringing together policy and social psychology, this event will consider two challenges to welfare state solidarity. First, social policy expert Peter Dwyer and social psychologist Celestin Okoroji will present evidence from very different projects looking at the experiences of those receiving benefits in the context of greater demands for compliant behaviours and worsening stereotypes of the ‘welfare recipient’. Second, policy writer David Goodhart and social psychologist Xenia Chryssochoou will offer contrasting perspectives on whether greater diversity in the national population poses a challenge for the sense of collective solidarity needed to sustain the welfare state. This event will feature diverse research insights on thorny issues and will offer a chance for the audience to share their views on the debates at hand. Xenia Chryssochoou is Professor of Social and Political Psychology at Panteion University. Her research focuses on social psychological dimensions of identity in liberal societies, and in issues of multiculturalism and integration. Peter Dwyer (@ProfPeteDwyer) is Professor of Social Policy at the University of York. His research focuses on social citizenship, migration, and inclusion, and he directs the multi-site ESRC-funded project, Welfare Conditionality: Sanctions, Support and Behaviour Change. David Goodhart (@David_Goodhart) is Head of the Demography, Immigration and Integration Unit at the think tank Policy Exchange. He is the founder and former editor of Prospect magazine, and author of The British Dream: Successes and Failures of Post-War Immigration and The Road to Somewhere: The Populist Revolt and the Future of Politics, a Sunday Times bestseller. Celestin Okoroji is a PhD student at the LSE Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. His research focuses on the ways in which ideas associated with stigmatised groups become a part of stigmatised group member’s self-concept, with a focus on the unemployed in Britain. Jennifer Sheehy-Skeffington is Assistant Professor of Social Psychology at the LSE Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. Her research focuses on the psychology of poverty and intergroup relations in the context of widening economic inequality.
Feb 19, 2018
LSE Festival 2018 | The Five Giants and the Ministers who Made a Difference [Audio]
01:05:37
Speaker(s): Nicholas Timmins, Professor Sir Julian Le Grand, Minouche Shafik | Five tools and massive programmes were adopted to tackle Beveridge's "Five Giants": A policy of full employment; a National Health Service; a massively extended system of education; a new housing programme; and a much modernised system of social security. But in the 75 years since they took effect, who have been the "Five Giant" ministers in each of these areas? In this opening event of the LSE Festival: Beveridge 2.0, Nicholas Timmins and Professor Sir Julian Le Grand debate who, among the many hundreds of politicians who have held office, really made a difference between then and now. Nicholas Timmins is the author of The Five Giants: A Biography of the Welfare State which tells its tale from Beveridge to the modern day, with a fully up-dated version published by William Collins in November 2017. He is a senior fellow at the Institute for Government and at the King's Fund, and has been a Visiting Professor in the Department of Social Policy at LSE and a Visiting Fellow at King's College, London, in Public Management. Before that he was a journalist, working for Nature, the Press Association, The Times, The Independent (of which he was a founder member) and the Financial Times, where, between 1996 and 2012 he was Public Policy Editor and commentator. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and between 2008 and 2011 was President of the Social Policy Association. Julian Le Grand held the Richard Titmuss Chair of Social Policy in the Department of Social Policy and is now Professor in the Marshall Institute. From 2003 to 2005 he was seconded to No. 10 Downing Street as a Senior Policy Adviser to the Prime Minister. He is the author, co-author or editor of over twenty books and has written more than one hundred articles and book chapters on economics, philosophy and public policy. He has chaired several government commissions and working groups, including most recently the Mutuals Task Force for the Cabinet Office, and the Panels reviewing Doncaster's and Birmingham's Children's Services for the Department for Education. He has acted as an adviser to the President of the European Commission, the World Bank, the World Health Organisation, and the OECD. In 2015 he was awarded a knighthood for services to social sciences and public service. Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.
Feb 19, 2018
Can Literature Solve Poverty? [Audio]
01:30:36
Speaker(s): Kit de Waal, Paul McVeigh, Dr Aaron Reeves | In the run up to the LSE Festival: Beveridge 2.0, rethinking the welfare state for the 21st Century, we bring together a panel to discuss the relationship between literature and poverty. They reflect on questions such as: do you need money to access literature? If not, why are there comparatively few working-class writers? And can literature actively play a part in reducing financial hardship?
Feb 15, 2018
Post-Beveridge International Law [Audio]
01:29:39
Speaker(s): Dr Tatiana Borisova, Professor Matthew Craven | This event will consider the relationship between Cold War International Law and the Beveridge moment. In particular, did the ideals of the Beveridge Report get translated into global legal idealism, or were they neutralised or depoliticized by international legal projects around human rights or co-existence? And did the Beveridge Moment in international law actually take place at the height of the Cold War in Bandung in 1955 with the establishment of the non-aligned movement (or still later with the New International Economic Order in the 1970s?). The Cold War and the Beveridge Report occupy similar moments in time (Beveridge issues his report in 1942 a few month after the Anglo-Americans devise their report on the future of world organisation in the 1941 Atlantic Charter, the Attlee Government announces the implementation of the Report as the early Cold war divisions are beginning to appear at Nuremberg and San Francisco; and the NHS is created in 1948 while the Soviets are succeeding in getting their first production reactor operating). This event brings together three world experts on international law during this post-war period to explore these topics. Tatiana Borisova will bring her knowledge of Russia and Europe at the time of the Cold War to the table. She has co-edited the 2012 publication, The Legal Dimension in Cold War Interactions: Some Notes from the Field. Matthew Craven is a leader of the Cold War and International Law Project. His work asks the question: is contemporary international law a product of the Cold War? He has also contributed to a wider debate about the future of the international legal and diplomatic order, as global divisions emerge that echo the ideological enmity and paranoia that pervaded the Cold War period. If you want to learn how International Law has developed in the post-war period, and particularly through the time of Beveridge and the Cold War, you must attend this talk. Tatiana Borisova is Associate Professor, Department of History, Higher School of Economics, St Petersburg. Matthew Craven is Director of the Centre for the Study of Colonialism, Empire and International Law, SOAS. Gerry Simpson is Professor of Public International Law, LSE Law. LSE Law (@lselaw) is an integral part of the School's mission, plays a major role in policy debates & in the education of lawyers and law teachers from around the world.
Feb 14, 2018
At the Limits of Urban Theory: racial banishment in the contemporary city [Audio]
01:31:15
Speaker(s): Professor Ananya Roy | In cities around the world, especially in the United States, processes of socio-spatial restructuring continue to unfold. Often understood as neoliberal urbanism and often identified through concepts such as gentrification, these processes entail the displacement of subaltern classes to the far edges of urban life. In this talk, Ananya Roy argues that it is necessary to analyse such transformations through a theorisation of racial capitalism. In particular, she draws on research conducted by scholars and social movements in Los Angeles to delineate processes of racial banishment. In doing so, Roy argues that the standard conceptual repertoire of urban studies is ill-equipped to study such processes. In particular, influential explanations that invoke neoliberalisation often miss the long histories of dispossession and disposability that are being remade in the contemporary city. Put another way, she makes the case for how urban studies must contend with legacies of white liberalism and the elision of the race question. Relying on both postcolonial theory and the black radical tradition, Roy demonstrates that what is at stake is not only a more robust analysis of urbanism but also attention to the various forms of movement and mobilisation that are challenging racial banishment. Ananya Roy (@ananyaUCLA) is Professor of Urban Planning, Social Welfare and Geography and inaugural Director of the Institute on Inequality and Democracy at UCLA Luskin. She holds The Meyer and Renee Luskin Chair in Inequality and Democracy. Ricky Burdett (@BURDETTR) is Professor of Urban Studies at the LSE and Director of LSE Cities and the Urban Age Programme. He was curator of the Conflicts of an Urban Age exhibition at the 2016 International Architecture Biennale in Venice and contributed to the United Nations Habitat III conference on sustainable urbanisation in Quito. LSE Cities (@LSECities) is an international centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science that carries out research, graduate and executive education and outreach activities in London and abroad. Its mission is to study how people and cities interact in a rapidly urbanising world, focussing on how the design of cities impacts on society, culture and the environment.
Feb 13, 2018
Is God Really Dead? Why Belief Matters [Audio]
01:24:16
Speaker(s): Professor Eileen Barker, Professor Conor Gearty | Thirty years after founding INFORM, the information network on religious movements, Eileen Barker argues that the sociology of religion still has an important role in “knowing the causes of things”. Abraham Lincoln is reputed to have remarked, “I don’t like that man; I must get to know him better”. Today the world is populated by religions that most of us do not like. Throughout most of the 20th century, there was a rumour that secularisation was a worldwide phenomenon; by the 21st century, however, diversification was emerging as a more prominent theme. But by then, many of the social sciences had abandoned the study of religion, being either blind to, or uninterested in, the ways in which religious, spiritual and fundamentally atheistic beliefs were affecting not only lives at the individual level, but also the political, economic and cultural institutions of society. This talk will argue, with a variety of illustrations, that the sociological study of religions is essential for a comprehensive understanding of our contemporary global society. It will maintain that we must get to know them better. In 1988, with the support of the Home Office and the mainstream Churches, Eileen Barker set up INFORM, an NGO affiliated to the Sociology Department at LSE which supplies information about alternative religions that is as objective and up-to-date as possible. A former governor of INFORM, Conor Gearty is a current member of INFORM's advisory panel. This event will celebrate Eileen's work over the past 30 years. As such, a celebratory drinks reception will follow the lecture. Eileen Barker is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at LSE with Special Reference to the Study of Religion. Conor Gearty @conorgearty is Professor of Human Rights Law at LSE. Nigel Dodd (@nigelbdodd) is Professor of Sociology, LSE. The Department of Sociology at LSE (@LSEsociology) was established in 1904 and remains committed to top quality teaching and leading research and scholarship today.
Feb 12, 2018
Academic Freedom and the New Populism [Audio]
01:29:48
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Ignatieff | A new ‘populism’ is evident in a variety of countries. Experts and expertise are attacked as standing in the way of the popular will. Universities are under new pressures from populist politicians. How should these pressures be resisted? Born in Canada, educated at the University of Toronto and Harvard, Michael Ignatieff (@M_Ignatieff) is a university professor, writer and former politician. His major publications are The Needs of Strangers (1984), Scar Tissue (1992), Isaiah Berlin (1998), The Rights Revolution (2000), Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry (2001), The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror (2004), Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics (2013) and The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World (2017). Between 2006 and 2011, he served as an MP in the Parliament of Canada and then as Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and Leader of the Official Opposition. He is a member of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and holds eleven honorary degrees. Between 2012 and 2015 he served as Centennial Chair at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs in New York. Between 2014 and 2016 he was Edward R. Murrow Professor of the Practice of the Press, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. He is currently the Rector and President of Central European University in Budapest. Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Professor of European Philosophy at the European Institute and the Director of the Forum for European Philosophy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Feb 08, 2018
Truth and Lies about Poverty [Audio]
01:06:09
Speaker(s): Stephen Armstrong, Alex Wheatle, Ros Taylor, Ros Wynne-Jones | In this event, aimed at school children aged 13-18, a panel of speakers discuss how we tell the truth about the people struggling to get by in modern Britain. Stephen Armstrong (@SArmstrong1984) is a journalist and author of The New Poverty. He writes extensively for the Sunday Times, the Daily Telegraph and the Guardian. He also appears occasionally on BBC Radio 4 and Radio 2. His other books include War PLC, The Super-Rich Shall Inherit the Earth and The Road to Wigan Pier Revisited. Born in 1963 to Jamaican parents living in Brixton, Alex Wheatle (@brixtonbard) spent most of his childhood in a Surrey children's home. He spent a short stint in prison following the Brixton uprising of 1981. Following his release from, he continued to write poems and lyrics and became known as the Brixton Bard. Alex's first novel, Brixton Rock, was published to critical acclaim in 1999; his books now feature widely on school reading lists. Alex is representing English PEN, and tours the country with his one-man show, Uprising. He was awarded an MBE in for services to literature in 2008. His first YA novels include Liccle Bit; Crongton Knights, which won the Guardian Children’s Fiction Award 2016; and most recently Straight Outta Crongton. Ros Taylor (@rosamundmtaylor) is Research Manager at the Truth, Trust & Technology Commission in the Department of Media & Communications at LSE and Managing Editor of LSE Brexit. Ros Wynne-Jones (@roswynnejones) is a journalist and author. She writes the Real Britain column every Friday in the Daily Mirror campaigning against government cuts and standing up for ordinary people. She is author of the novel Something is Going to Fall Like Rain. She has spent the last year retracing George Orwell’s steps on the Road to Wigan Pier 80 Years On stopping in the places he did and talking to ordinary people about their lives as part of the Daily Mirror's Wigan Pier Project. The Orwell Youth Prize (@OrwellYouthPriz) is a registered charity which aims to inspire and support the next generation of politically engaged young writers. The OYP run workshops in schools, regional workshops, a writing prize and an annual Celebration Day. The writing prize for young people aged 13 – 18, is open now open for entries! Supported by LSE Library, which holds unique material relating to social, economic and political history and ideas. We welcome school visits and can tailor sessions for schools in areas of key stage 3 & 4 history and citizenship, areas of A level history and A level government & politics and sociology as well as supporting Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). More information and free online resources.
Feb 08, 2018
100 Years of Votes for Women: an LSE Law celebration [Audio]
01:21:54
Speaker(s): Baroness Chakrabarti, Baroness Hale, Professor Nicola Lacey | On February 6th 1918, with the coming into force of the Representation of the People Act, women were by law first given the vote in this country. Even though this foundational right only applied to a restricted category of women initially, the dam had been breached and the universal franchise would soon follow. 100 years on, to the very day, LSE Law will be marking this constitutional watershed with speeches from Brenda Hale, Shami Chakrabarti, and Nicola Lacey. There will also be an opportunity to view key historic documents from the women’s library held by the LSE, followed by a drinks reception. This public lecture is the first in a series of LSE Law events taking place over 2018 and 2019 to mark the Centenary of the founding of the LSE Law department. Shami Chakrabarti was formerly director of the human rights group Liberty, and is now the Shadow Attorney General for England and Wales. She is a Visiting Professor at LSE Law. Brenda Hale is an English judge and is the current President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. She is the first woman to serve in the role, and she is one of only two women to have ever been appointed to the Supreme Court (alongside Lady Black). Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy at LSE. Jeremy Horder is Head of the Law Department and Professor of Criminal Law at LSE. LSE Law (@lselaw) is an integral part of the School's mission, plays a major role in policy debates & in the education of lawyers and law teachers from around the world.
Feb 06, 2018
Universal Declaration of Human Rights at 70: rejuvenate or retire? [Audio]
01:32:01
Speaker(s): Professor Francesca Klug | At the beginning of the year in which the UDHR’s 70 birthday will be commemorated around the globe, Francesca Klug asks: is the Declaration no longer relevant for our modern world or has its time finally come? Francesca Klug is a Visiting Professor at LSE Human Rights and former Director of the Human Rights Futures Project from 2001-2015 at the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights. Francesca was formerly a Senior Research Fellow at King's College Law School where she assisted the government in devising the model for incorporating the European Convention on Human Rights into UK law reflected in the Human Rights Act. Conor Gearty (@conorgearty) is Professor of Human Rights Law at LSE. LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights.
Feb 05, 2018
How do People Really Think about Climate Change? [Audio]
01:22:49
Speaker(s): Professor Cass Sunstein | How does new information about climate change impact our existing beliefs? Cass Sunstein identifies some surprising biases and findings. Cass Sunstein (@CassSunstein) is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard Law School. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Nicholas Stern (@lordstern1) is IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government at the LSE and has been Chair of the Grantham Research Institute since it was founded in 2008. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE ) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy.
Feb 01, 2018
Crisis Politics and the Challenge of Intersectional Solidarity [Audio]
01:26:39
Speaker(s): Professor Akwugo Emejulu | How might we transform the ways in which we think about ‘crisis’, ‘activism’ and 'solidarity'? Drawing on her new co-authored book, Minority Women and Austerity: Survival and Resistance in France and Britain, Akwugo Emejulu's talk will explore the asymmetrical impacts of austerity measures on women of colour and their strategies for resistance in Scotland, England and France. Akwugo Emejulu is Professor of Sociology, University of Warwick. Aisling Swaine is Assistant Professor of Gender and Security in LSE's Department for Gender Studies LSE’s Department of Gender Studies (@LSEGenderTweet) is the largest gender studies centre in Europe. With a global perspective, LSE Gender’s research and teaching intersects with other categories of analysis such as race, ethnicity, class and sexuality; because gender relations work in all spheres of life, interdisciplinarity is key to LSE Gender’s approach. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Jan 31, 2018
The Politics of Marriage [Audio]
01:24:47
Speaker(s): Dr Clare Chambers, Sir Paul Coleridge, Peter Tatchell | Marriage is an odd mix of sex, religion, and politics. Our speakers ask what marriage is and whether there is there any distinctive moral value in it. Should the state promote it? Is it possible to have an ‘equal’ marriage, or is marriage fundamentally an oppressive institution? Should marriage be rejected in favour of civil partnerships, or something else, or perhaps nothing else? Clare Chambers is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Cambridge. Paul Coleridge is a former high court judge and Chairman, The Marriage Foundation. Peter Tatchell (@PeterTatchell) is an activist and Director of the Peter Tatchell Foundation. Sarah Fine (@DrSJFine) is Fellow, The Forum and Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, King’s College London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Jan 31, 2018
What do the Italian Elections Mean for Europe? [Audio]
01:23:07
Speaker(s): Professor Francesco Caselli, Lorenzo Codogno, Miriam Sorace | Italy will hold its next general election no later than spring 2018. What are the potential outcomes and likely implications for Italy and Europe? Francesco Caselli is Norman Sosnow Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, LSE. Lorenzo Codogno is Visiting Professor in Practice, European Institute, LSE. Miriam Sorace (@MiriamSorace) is LSE Fellow in EU Politics, European Institute, LSE. Sara Hagemann (@sarahagemann) is Associate Professor in European Politics at the LSE European Institue. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Jan 31, 2018
A World of Food in Change [Audio]
01:22:34
Speaker(s): Michael La Cour | Michael La Cour will in this lecture discuss the role and responsibility of corporations in addressing the challenges of the food system, and how sustainability and health drives innovation. Michael La Cour (@MichaelIKEAFood) is Managing Director of IKEA Food Services AB. Richard Perkins is Associate Professor of Environmental Geography at LSE. The LSE Department of Geography & Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change.
Jan 30, 2018
Development Collective Know-how and Us [Audio]
01:32:03
Speaker(s): Professor Ricardo Hausmann | The difference between rich and poor countries is mostly explained by differences in “technology”. But what is technology and why does it not diffuse more quickly? This lecture will clarify the importance of collective know-how in technology diffusion and the importance of a sense of us in creating the needed cooperation to support the implementation of technology. Ricardo Hausmann (@ricardo_hausman) is Director of Harvard's Center for International Development and Professor of the Practice of Economic Development at the Kennedy School of Government. Previously, he served as the first Chief Economist of the Inter-American Development Bank (1994-2000), where he created the Research Department. He has served as Minister of Planning of Venezuela (1992-1993) and as a member of the Board of the Central Bank of Venezuela. He also served as Chair of the IMF-World Bank Development Committee. He was Professor of Economics at the Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Administracion (IESA) (1985-1991) in Caracas, where he founded the Center for Public Policy. His research interests include issues of growth, macroeconomic stability, international finance, and the social dimensions of development. He holds a PhD in economics from Cornell University. Riccardo Crescenzi (@crescenzi_r ) is a Professor of Economic Geography at LSE. The LSE Department of Geography & Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change.
Jan 29, 2018
Ground Down by Growth: tribe, caste, class and inequality in 21st century India [Audio]
01:29:50
Speaker(s): Professor Philippe Bourgois, Dr Jens Lerche, Dr Alpa Shah | Our panel examines how economic growth in India entrenches social difference of tribe, caste and class and has transformed identity-based discrimination into new forms of exploitation and oppression. Philippe Bourgois is Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles. Jens Lerche (@JensLerche) is Reader in Labour and Agrarian Studies, SOAS. Alpa Shah (@alpashah001) is Associate Professor (Reader), Department of Anthropology, LSE. Katy Gardner is Head of Department of Anthropology, LSE. LSE Anthropology (@LSEAnthropology) is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Jan 25, 2018
Megatrends: predicting the future to reinvent today [Audio]
01:23:37
Speaker(s): Shane Wall | Our planet’s pace of change is at lightning speed. How do we stay ahead of the curve to innovate, adapt, reinvent and engineer experiences for a future that promises to look vastly different from today? Join Shane Wall for a conversation about megatrends – major socio-economic, demographic and technological shifts occurring across the globe that will have a sustained, transformative impact on the world and humanity in the decades ahead. Shane Wall (@ShaneWallCTO) is HP Inc.’s Chief Technology Officer and Global Head of HP Labs. In this role, Shane drives the company’s technology vision and strategy, leads new business incubation and oversees the overall technical and innovation community. Before HP, Shane spent ten years at Intel. Based in Vancouver, Washington, Shane is a graduate of the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University and has a B.S., Computer Engineering from Oregon State University. He holds multiple patents in the image and compute area. Carsten Sørensen (@verbalpiercing) is Associate Professor (Reader) of Digital Innovation at LSE’s Department of Management. He studies the complex impact of digital platforms and infrastructures on organisational design, innovation processes, and work. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world-leading centre for research and education in business and management.
Jan 25, 2018
Being Alone [Audio]
01:23:27
Speaker(s): Professor John Burnside,Professor Barbara Taylor,Professor James Warren | ‘Hell is other people’, noted Jean Paul Sartre—rather rudely, it might seem to an outside observer. But is the pursuit of philosophical understanding an inherently solitary pursuit by its nature? From Augustine to Kant, philosophy has cherished the image of the deep thinker immersed in solitudinous reflection. But how does solitude differ from loneliness? And in an age of increasing social atomization, can we think about our lonely condition in ways that might allow us to overcome it? We explore the idea of loneliness as an aesthetic and socio-political phenomena, as well as an existential question. John Burnside is Professor in Creative Writing, St Andrews University and a poet and novelist, winner of both the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize and the Whitbread Poetry Award. Barbara Taylor is Professor of Humanities, Queen Mary, University of London. James Warren (@JIWarren) is Professor of Ancient Philosophy, University of Cambridge. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari ) is a Fellow at The Forum and Lecturer in Romanticism in the Department of English, Queen Mary, University of London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Jan 24, 2018
The Despot's Apprentice: Donald Trump's attack on democracy [Audio]
01:26:54
Speaker(s): Dr Brian Klaas | Donald Trump isn't a despot. But he is increasingly acting like a despot's apprentice. An expert on authoritarianism, Brian Klaas is well placed to recognise the warning signs of tyranny. He argues forcefully that with every autocratic tactic or tweet, Trump further erodes democratic norms in the world's most powerful democracy. Brian Klaas (@brianklaas) is Fellow in Comparative Politics, Department of Government, LSE and author of The Despot's Apprentice: Donald Trump's Attack on Democracy. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Associate Professor of Comparative Politics, Department of Government, LSE and author of Party Formation and Democratic Transition in Spain as well as numerous journal articles on democratic institutions and political economy in Europe. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) at LSE is one of the largest political science departments in the UK. Our activities cover a comprehensive range of approaches to the study of politics.
Jan 24, 2018
The Origins of Happiness: Andrew Marr in conversation with Richard Layard [Audio]
01:11:15
Speaker(s): Professor Lord Layard | To mark the publication of The Origins of Happiness Andrew Marr and Richard Layard discuss some of its key focal points: What makes people happy? Why should governments care about people's wellbeing? How would policy change if wellbeing was the main objective? Richard Layard is Director of the Wellbeing program at the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE. Andrew Marr (@AndrewMarr9) is the host of The Andrew Marr Show on BBC One and also hosts BBC Radio 4's Start the Week every Monday. He began his career in journalism on The Scotsman newspaper in 1981, later moving to London to become its political correspondent. He was part of the team which launched The Independent in 1986 and returned as its editor, after a stint at The Economist magazine. He was then a columnist for The Express and The Observer before making the move into television, as the BBC's Political Editor, in May 2000. The Centre for Economic Performance (@CEP_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research centre at the LSE Research Laboratory. It was established by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) in 1990 and is now one of the leading economic research groups in Europe.
Jan 22, 2018
Toxic Inequality in the United States: economic inequality and racial injustice driving ugly politics [Audio]
01:29:08
Speaker(s): Professor Thomas Shapiro, Zamila Bunglawala | In his latest book, Toxic Inequality, which he will discuss in this lecture, Thomas Shapiro examines a powerful and unprecedented convergence in the United States: historic and rising levels of wealth and income inequality in an era of stalled mobility, intersecting with a widening racial wealth gap, all against the backdrop of changing racial and ethnic demographics. Thomas Shapiro (@tmshapiro) is Director, Institute on Assets and Social Policy and Pokross Professor of Law and Social Policy, Brandeis University. Zamila Bunglawala is Deputy Director of Strategy and Insight, Race Disparity Unit, Cabinet Office. Lucinda Platt is Professor of Social Policy and Sociology in the LSE Department of Social Policy. This lecture is funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. Read about the International Inequalities Institute’s partnership with JRF here. The Internatio.nal Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Jan 18, 2018
Turbulent Climate Change: why we need to address injustice [Audio]
01:18:15
Speaker(s): Mary Robinson | Events such as hurricanes affecting Texas, Florida and Caribbean Islands, wild-fires raging in California and Portugal, and severe monsoon rains in South Asia, bring home the urgency of a people centered, climate justice approach. Mary Robinson is President of the Mary Robinson Foundation – Climate Justice and Chair of the Board of Trustees. She is a former President of Ireland (1990-1997) and a former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002). Between March 2013 and August 2014 Mary Robinson was the UN Secretary-General Special Envoy to the Great Lakes Region of Africa. From August 2014 – December 2015 she was the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy on Climate Change. In May 2016 the UN Secretary-General appointed Mary Robinson as a Special Envoy on El Niño and Climate. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Jan 18, 2018
Clean Brexit: why leaving the EU still makes sense [Audio]
01:31:33
Speaker(s): Liam Halligan, Dr Gerard Lyons | In their latest book Clean Brexit, which they will discuss at this event, Liam Halligan and Gerard Lyons offer a vision of how Britain, and the world, can make a great success of Brexit. If the negotiations go well, the UK could become an inspiration for voters elsewhere in Europe who have long demanded EU reform. Unashamedly optimistic about Britain’s future, they argue that leaving the EU provides an opportunity for the UK to re-invent its economy, while reclaiming our place as a premier global trading nation. Liam Halligan (@LiamHalligan) is a British economist, journalist and broadcaster. Gerard Lyons (@DrGerardLyons) is a leading UK and international economist and writer. Tony Travers is Director of the Institute of Public Affairs. This lecture is part of the LSE Programme on Brexit. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public-engagement initiatives.
Jan 17, 2018
Culture under Fire [Audio]
01:29:24
Speaker(s): Professor Helen Frowe, Issam Kourbaj, Vernon Rapley, Professor Eleanor Robson | From the recent destruction of Palmyra and the looting of the National Museum of Iraq, cultural artefacts are one of the many casualties of armed conflict. What exactly is cultural property and whose property is it? How should we weigh its value against other priorities during times of conflict? What risks should be taken to protect it, and who is responsible for rebuilding and restoring when the conflict is over? Our speakers discuss the political and ethical issues around culture in war zones. Helen Frowe is Professor of Practical Philosophy and Director of the Stockholm Centre for the Ethics of War and Peace, Stockholm University. Issam Kourbaj is Lector in Art, University of Cambridge and a Syrian artist. Vernon Rapley is Director of Cultural Heritage Protection and Security, Victoria & Albert Museum and Special Advisor for Cultural Protection Fund, The British Council. Eleanor Robson is Professor of Ancient Middle Eastern History and Director of the Nahrein Network, UCL. Sarah Fine is Fellow, The Forum and Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, King’s College London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Jan 17, 2018
Role of Trade and Investment in Driving Sustainable and Inclusive Growth [Audio]
01:16:48
Speaker(s): Shri Suresh Prabhu, Y K Sinha | Editor's note: We regret to inform you that owing to a technical problem the last few minutes of the lecture are missing from the podcast Shri Suresh Prabhu, Minister for Commerce and Industry, Government of India will in this lecture discuss the importance of trade and investment in driving sustainable growth and inclusion. He will also reflect on the future of India-UK collaborations in a changing world. Prior to his current role Dr Prabhu (@sureshpprabhu) was Minister for Railways during November 2014 – September 2017. He is a Chartered Accountant and a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India; has a Law degree; and is pursuing two PhD programs in climate change and economics, in Germany and in Mumbai. Minister Prabhu is visiting London for a meeting of the India-UK Joint Economic and Trade Committee. He has been strategically leading the agenda for the future of multilateral trade at the recent WTO talks in Buenos Aires and beyond. Y K Sinha is the High Commissioner of India to the UK. Nicholas Stern (@lordstern1) is IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government and Director of LSE India Observatory. The India Observatory (@LSE_IO), set up in 2006, is a Centre to develop and enhance research and programmes related to India's economy, politics and society. It is involved in public policy engagement in, and with, India and also works in collaboration with international partners for the generation and exchange of knowledge on India and its position in the world.
Jan 12, 2018
Challenges for the Eurozone [Audio]
01:23:00
Speaker(s): Jeroen Dijsselbloem | In his lecture Eurogroup President Jeroen Dijsselbloem will speak about the lessons learnt from the economic and financial crises, where we are now and about the challenges for the Eurozone in the future. Jeroen Dijsselbloem (@J_Dijsselbloem) is President of the Eurogroup and former Minister of Finance for the Netherlands. Kevin Featherstone is Head of the European Institute, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Jan 11, 2018
Moonshot Thinking to Unleash Innovation [Audio]
01:24:34
Speaker(s): Dr Pablo Rodriguez | Innovation in most large companies these days is fairly incremental. There is nothing inherently wrong in this, as much of our progress as a society has resulted from such innovation. Over recent years, however, we are seeing a radical departure from incremental innovation. Instead, we look at organisations who intentionally set extremely ambitious innovation objectives, where incremental innovation cannot get the job done. The focus of this talk is to discuss the ways in which organisations mobilise resources to go after bold objectives which can move the needle: Moonshots. These are not incremental innovation activities, but instead multi-year missions that mobilise extensive scientific and technological resources to expand the horizons for both organizations and societies, and transform both in the process. From the original Apollo mission, the original IBM 360 mainframe computer, NASA, DARPA, Google X, or Telefonica´s new spinoff company — Alpha, more and more organizations are trying to inductively develop a coherent approach to creating and executing organisational moonshots. A major driving force to tackle Moonshots is the incredible advances in Data Science and Artificial Intelligence. It is widely believed that global human progress depends on the collection and analysis of data to fuel our increasingly digital world. There is tangible benefit including economic opportunity to be gained. But arguably most important, is data as a force for global and impactful social good and, here, the possibilities are endless. Pablo Rodriguez (@pabloryr) is the CEO of Alpha. Prior to Alpha, Pablo led Telefonica´s corporate research lab and incubator. He has worked in several Silicon Valley startups and corporations including Inktomi, Microsoft Research and Bell-Labs. His current interests are privacy and personal data, re-thinking the Internet ecosystem and network economics. He has co-founded the Data Transparency Lab, an NGO to drive data privacy and transparency. He is on the advisory board of Akamai, EPFL, and IMDEA Networks. He has worked with chef Ferran Adria (El Bulli) on computational gastronomy and with F.C. Barcelona applying data science to soccer. He received his Ph.D. from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He is an IEEE Fellow and an ACM Fellow. Milan Vojnovic is Professor of Data Science with the Department of Statistics and the MSc in Data Science Programme Director. SEDS (@SEDS_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research unit established to foster the study of data science and new forms of data with a focus on its social, economic, and political aspects. SEDS aims to host, facilitate, and promote research in social and economic data science. SEDS is a collaboration between the Departments of Statistics, Methodology and Mathematics.
Jan 10, 2018
Streaming Consciousness [Audio]
01:24:49
Speaker(s): Eimear McBride, Dr Kaye Mitchell | Is it possible to express the richness, variety, and depth of our inner experience, our thoughts and feelings? If so, what is the best way to do it? Should we turn to literature or to philosophy? And what can they teach each other about understanding, expressing, and performing the self? In this event, award-winning novelist Eimear McBride will discuss these questions with writer and academic Kaye Mitchell. Eimear McBride is an award-winning novelist, author of A Girl is a Half-formed Thing and The Lesser Bohemians. Kaye Mitchell is Senior Lecturer in the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, University of Manchester. Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture at Royal Holloway, University of London and a Forum for European Philosophy Fellow. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Jan 09, 2018
The Cold War: a world history [Audio]
01:21:49
Speaker(s): Professor Arne Westad | Arne Westad and Michael Cox discuss the truly global nature of the Cold War, with East and West demanding absolute allegiance around the world. For over forty years the demands of the Cold War shaped the lives of millions of people worldwide, with countries as remote from each other as Korea, Angola, and Cuba defined by the conflict. For many nations, the war was not 'cold' at all and the second half of the 20th century offered no reprieve from horrors of world war. This conversation is based on Professor Westad's new book, The Cold War: A World History. Arne Westad (@OAWestad) is the S.T. Lee Professor of US-Asia Relations at Harvard University. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.
Jan 09, 2018
LSE IQ Episode 9 | Why is social mobility declining? [Audio]
00:38:25
Speaker(s): Professor Mike Savage, Dr Abigail McKnight, Dr Sam Friedman | We hope you’ve enjoyed listening to the autumn 2017 programme of LSE public events and that you’ll stay tuned for the exciting programme of events we have lined up for the new year. In the meantime we have a new podcast series that we think you might enjoy. LSE IQ is a monthly, thirty minute podcast, where we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. Recent episodes have tackled questions such as 'What's the secret to happiness?', 'Could social entrepreneurship be the answer to world poverty?' and, 'Is our prison system broken?'. To give you a taste of LSEIQ the latest episode, which asks 'Why is social mobility declining?', is available for you here in our public events podcast feed. To listen to other episodes and to subscribe, search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq . We’d like to hear your opinion too so why not join the discussion on social media using the hashtag #LSEIQ and please also consider leaving a review on iTunes or the Apple podcast app.
Dec 11, 2017
Exploitation and the Gig Economy [Audio]
01:20:44
Speaker(s): Brhmie Balaram, Jason Moyer-Lee | The gig economy is on the rise and with it worries about exploitation. Leading experts will analyse how to deal with the challenges and opportunities of new ways of working. Brhmie Balaram (@Brhmie) is a Senior Researcher in the RSA’s Economy, Enterprise and Manufacturing team. She leads the RSA’s research on the sharing economy. She was previously a researcher for the Independent Review of the Police Federation and for the influential RSA City Growth Commission. She has experience exploring issues of institutional reform, economic inequality and labour market disadvantage. Brhmie joined the RSA from the Institute of Public Policy Research and was formerly at The Work Foundation. Jason Moyer-Lee (@MoyerLee) is General Secretary, Independent Workers of Great Britain union. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Dec 07, 2017
Welfare: from Beveridge to the fourth industrial revolution [Audio]
00:46:22
Speaker(s): David Gauke | Beveridge offered a radical response to the social and economic circumstances of his time in a country emerging from global depression and conflict. Yet today’s world would be unrecognisable to Beveridge: the past 75 years have seen significant social and economic changes that the welfare system has needed to accommodate. We now face further significant changes as we enter the fourth industrial revolution. Our welfare system will need to change to adapt to future circumstances. David Gauke (@DavidGauke) was appointed Secretary of State for Work and Pensions in June 2017. He was elected the Conservative MP for Hertfordshire South West in May 2005. David was a member of the Treasury Select Committee from February 2006 until he was appointed as a Shadow Minister for the Treasury in June 2007. He was appointed Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury in May 2010, and promoted to Financial Secretary to the Treasury in July 2014 where he served until July 2016. He served as Chief Secretary to the Treasury from July 2016 to June 2017. After qualifying as a solicitor in 1997, David worked for a leading City firm before entering Parliament in 2005. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.
Dec 07, 2017
A Room with a View: managing from the top [Audio]
01:25:40
Speaker(s): Yasmin Diamond | Yasmin Diamond reflects on her extensive career in corporate, government and public sector communications to discuss effective female leadership, what makes a good communicator and overcoming cultural differences in the workplace. Join her in conversation with Dr Hyun-Jung Lee. Yasmin Diamond is Executive Vice President of Global Corporate Affairs of InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG). Before joining IHG, Yasmin was Director of Communications at the Home Office. She has held numerous government positions including Director of Communications at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; Head of Communications for Welfare to Work and New Deal and Head of Marketing at the Department for Education and Skills. Prior to government communications, Yasmin was Publicity Commissioner for the BBC. Hyun-Jung Lee is Assistant Professor of Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour in LSE's Department of Management. Dr Lee’s research is focused on cross-cultural management, multicultural identity and HR issues in multinationals. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world-leading centre for research and education in business and management.
Dec 06, 2017
The Human Cost of Conflict: the search for dignity and rights of Palestine refugees [Audio]
01:21:19
Speaker(s): Pierre Krähenbühl | Appointed by the UN Secretary-General in November 2013, Pierre Krähenbühl (@PKraehenbuehl) became UNRWA Commissioner-General on 30 March 2014. As Commissioner-General, he serves at the level of Under-Secretary-General. A Swiss national born in 1966, Mr. Krähenbühl has 25 years of experience in humanitarian, human rights and development work. Prior to joining UNRWA, he served as Director of Operations at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) from July 2002 to January 2014, responsible for the conduct, management and supervision of 12,000 ICRC staff working in 80 countries. In this position, Mr. Krähenbühl directly oversaw the ICRC response to conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Colombia and Libya among others. He led senior-level negotiations with a range of governments, armed forces and other groups to secure access to conflict-affected populations. Chetan Bhatt (@ChetanBhatt1962) is Professor of Sociology and Director of LSE Human Rights. This event is LSE Human Rights' International Human Rights Day Lecture. LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights.
Dec 04, 2017
Game Theory Through the Computational Lens [Audio]
01:29:33
Speaker(s): Professor Tim Roughgarden | The fields of computer science and game theory both trace their roots to the first half of the 20th century, with the work of Turing, von Neumann, Nash, and others. Fast forwarding to the present, there are now many fruitful points of contact between these two fields. Game theory plays an important role in 21st-century computer science applications, ranging from social networks to routing in the Internet. The flow of ideas also travels in the other direction, with computer science offering a number of tools to reason about economic problems in novel ways. For example, computational complexity theory sheds new light on the “bounded rationality” of decision-makers. Approximation guarantees, originally developed to analyse fast heuristic algorithms, can be usefully applied to Nash equilibria. Computationally efficient algorithms are an essential ingredient to modern, large-scale auction designs. In this lecture, Tim Roughgarden will survey the key ideas behind these connections and their implications. Tim Roughgarden is a Professor in the Computer Science and (by courtesy) Management Science and Engineering Departments, Stanford University, as well as a Visiting Professor in the Department of Mathematics at LSE. Martin Anthony (@MartinHGAnthony) is Professor of Mathematics and Head of Department of Mathematics at LSE. The Department of Mathematics (@LSEMaths) is internationally recognised for its teaching and research in the fields of discrete mathematics, game theory, financial mathematics and operations research.
Nov 30, 2017
Measuring Progress on Women's Inclusion, Justice and Security [Audio]
01:31:15
Speaker(s): Dr Gary L Darmstadt, Dr Jeni Klugman, Dr Anita Raj,Dr Frances Stewart | The Women, Peace and Security Index is the first global index bridging both women’s inclusion and access to justice, as well as security. Developed by the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace, and Security and the Peace Research Institute of Oslo, the Index ranks 153 countries covering over 98 percent of the world’s population. Global indices such as this are a way to assess and compare progress against goals, by distilling an array of complex information into a single number and ranking. What is the potential in this new WPS index? Does it provide more than an opportunity to spotlight achievement and failure? Could it help identify routes to transformative change around a shared agenda for women’s inclusion, justice, and security? Gary L Darmstadt (@gdarmsta) is Associate Dean for Maternal and Child Health, and Professor of Neonatal and Developmental Pediatrics in the Department of Pediatrics at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Jeni Klugman is managing director at the Georgetown Institute for Women Peace and Security, and a fellow at the Kennedy School of Government’s Women and Public Policy Program at Harvard University. Anita Raj (@AnitaRajUCSD) is a Tata Chancellor Professor of Medicine and the Director of UC San Diego's Center on Gender Equity and Health in the Department of Medicine. She is also a Professor of Education Studies in the Division of Social Sciences. Frances Stewart (@Some0172) was Director of Oxford Department of International Development from 1993-2003 and Director of the Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity at the department between 2003 and 2010. Paul Kirby is Assistant Professorial Research Fellow in the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation for women in conflict-affected situations around the world.
Nov 30, 2017
Beveridge 2.0 - Rethinking the Welfare State for the 21st Century [Audio]
01:39:16
Speaker(s): Minouche Shafik, Professor Sir John Hills, Dr Waltraud Schelkle, Professor Richard Sennett, Professor Alex Voorhoeve | In November 1942, former LSE Director William Beveridge published a report that was to lay the foundation for Britain’s welfare state, caring for its citizens ‘from cradle to grave’. 75 years on, you are invited to join new LSE Director Dame Minouche Shafik, as she considers the future of social safety nets in a very different world economy. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. John Hills is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and co-director of the LSE’s interdisciplinary International Inequalities Institute. He was director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion from 1997 to 2016 and is currently Chair of CASE. His work has focused on inequality, the welfare state, and the role of social policy over the life course. Waltraud Schelkle is an Associate Professor of Political Economy at the European Institute and has been at LSE since autumn 2001, teaching courses on the political economy of European integration at MSc and PhD level. She is an Adjunct Professor of economics at the Economics Department of the Free University of Berlin. Dr Schelkle is also a (non-resident) Senior Fellow at the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies (AICGS), Johns Hopkins University, Washington D.C. and Chair of the Advisory Board of the Centre for Social Policy Research (Zentrum für Sozialpolitik) in Bremen. Richard Sennett (@richardsennett) writes about cities, labor, and culture. He teaches sociology at New York University and at the London School of Economics. Alex Voorhoeve is Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method at the LSE and part-time Visiting Professor of Ethics and Economics at Erasmus University Rotterdam. Shirley Pearce is currently Chair of Court and Council at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Beveridge 2.0 - Rethinking the Welfare State for the 21st Century The core theme of Beveridge 2.0 is to run throughout this academic year, informing how LSE shares its research and its societal impact. Engagement activities such as the LSE’s acclaimed public events programme, schools outreach work and LSE Festival will shine a light on the ‘Five Giants’ identified in the Beveridge report, re-cast for the 21st century and for the global context. Originally described as Want, Disease, Ignorance, Squalor and Idleness, today’s giants are framed as the challenges of poverty; health and social care; education and skills; housing and urbanisation; and the future of work. LSE’s community is coming together for the LSE Festival (19 – 24 February 2018) to explore these themes as deeply as possible, and to consider the interconnectedness of the themes. Cross-cutting questions, such as the issues of rights and expectations of citizens with respect to welfare provision; questions of who decides, who provides and who pays for welfare provision; and sustainability – financial, environmental and social will be addressed, along with the identification of ‘missing Giants’ that a modern day Beveridge would prioritise instead.
Nov 29, 2017
Sovereignty [Audio]
01:25:55
Speaker(s): Dr Serena Ferente, Dr Carmen Pavel, Professor David Runciman | The Brexit debate saw a revival in talk of ‘sovereignty’. But what exactly is it, and why is it so highly prized? What are its essential features and what are its limits? In a globalized world, is sovereignty something modern states can achieve? We will explore this elusive concept, and ask whether it is still a useful concept in the twenty-first century. Serena Ferente is Senior Lecturer in Medieval European History, KCL. Carmen Pavel is Lecturer in International Politics, King’s College London. David Runciman is Professor of Politics, University of Cambridge. Sarah Fine (@DrSJFine) is a Fellow in The Forum and a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, King’s College London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Nov 29, 2017
Cash: the future of money in the Bitcoin age [Audio]
01:27:37
Speaker(s): Dr Tatiana Cutts, Professor Nigel Dodd, Dr Eva Micheler, Dr Philipp Paech | The socio-economic debate surrounding money has advanced since the early metallist days of John Locke. Money is no longer viewed as an homogenous, neutral thing; rather, theorists are wont to emphasise its pivotal role in shaping networks of social relations. Yet, in many respects, the legal analysis of money is playing catch-up, and the advent of distributed online ecosystems such as Bitcoin and Ethereum has pushed to the fore some difficult questions concerning the appropriate legal lens through which to view money, and monetary assets. If we are to produce robust answers, these questions must be explored with the benefit of interdisciplinary insight. In this conversation, law meets sociology in an attempt to lay the foundation for confronting some of these challenges. Tatiana Cutts (@TatianaCutts) is Assistant Professor of Law, LSE Law. Nigel Dodd (@nigelbdodd) is Professor of Sociology, LSE. Eva Micheler is Associate Professor in Law, LSE Law. Philipp Paech is Assistant Professor of Law, LSE Law. Jo Braithwaite is Associate Professor of Law at LSE Law. LSE Law (@lselaw) is an integral part of the School's mission, plays a major role in policy debates & in the education of lawyers and law teachers from around the world.
Nov 28, 2017
The Brexit Alternatives and their Implications [Audio]
01:24:22
Speaker(s): Professor Joachim Blatter, Professor Erik O Eriksen, Professor Sieglinde Gstöhl | As the UK and the EU look ahead to their long-term relationship post-Brexit, what might the UK learn from the experiences of other European states that are outside the EU but have endeavoured to maintain close economic ties to it? What does life outside the EU offer? Is there a trade-off between market access and sovereignty? What are the implications for domestic politics and economics? This expert panel will probe beyond the rhetoric to outline the key issues. This lecture is part of the LSE Programme on Brexit and the Dahrendorf Forum a project of LSE IDEAS. Joachim Blatter is Professor of Political Science at the University of Lucerne. Erik O Eriksen is the Director of ARENA and Professor of Political Science, University of Oslo. Sieglinde Gstöhl is Director of the Department of EU International Relations and Diplomacy Studies, College of Europe (Belgium). Kevin Featherstone is Head of the European Institute, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public-engagement initiatives.
Nov 27, 2017
The Great Leveler: violence and the history of inequality from the Stone Age to the twenty-first century [Audio]
01:28:26
Speaker(s): Professor Walter Scheidel | Throughout history only violent shocks have significantly reduced economic inequality: war, revolution, plagues. Walter Scheidel considers the prospects of levelling in today’s more stable world. Walter Scheidel (@WalterScheidel) is Dickason Professor in the Humanities, Professor of Classics and History, and Kennedy-Grossman Fellow in Human Biology, Stanford University. Aaron Reeves is Associate Professorial Research Fellow in Poverty and Inequality, International Inequalities Institute, LSE. This lecture is funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. Read about the International Inequalities Institute’s partnership with JRF here. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Nov 27, 2017
Doughnut Economics: seven ways to think like a 21st century economist [Audio]
01:29:30
Speaker(s): Kate Raworth, Professor Oriana Bandiera | Economics matters. Its theories are the mother tongue of public policy, the rationale for multi-billion-dollar investments, and the tools we use to tackle global poverty and manage our planetary home. Pity then – or more like disaster – that its fundamental ideas are centuries out of date, but still dominate decision-making for the future. Instead of criticising the past, this book takes the long view forwards, identifying seven insights to help the twenty-first-century economist bring humanity into the global sweet spot (shaped like a doughnut) that combines human prosperity with ecological sustainability. The Department of International Development is proud to be hosting Kate Raworth (@KateRaworth), Senior Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute and Senior Associate of the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership, as well as the author of Doughnut Economics, Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st Century Economist. Kate will present her book that dares to take on the mainstream economics establishment with a radical rewrite of 200 years of theory. Using humour and metaphor, but always deeply grounded in the theory itself she offers a new model for a green, fair and thriving global economy. It promises that the economic future will be fascinating, but wildly unlike the past, if we equip ourselves with the mindset needed to take it on. Oriana Bandiera is Professor of Economics, LSE. Duncan Green (@fp2p) is Senior Strategic Advisor at Oxfam UK and Professor in Practice at LSE. He is the author of the From Poverty to Power blog and How Change Happens. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) promotes interdisciplinary post-graduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change.
Nov 23, 2017
Partition, 70 years on: what have we learnt from the division of India? [Audio]
01:27:29
Speaker(s): Lady Kishwar Desai | The 70th year of Indian independence inevitably recalls Partition and the violent division that followed it. In a lecture that considers the lessons for other countries facing similar divisions, Kishwar Desai talks about establishing the Partition Museum in Amritsar, and considers whether partition and division are ever reparable. Lady Kishwar Desai (@kishwardesai) is an author and columnist and chair of the Arts and Cultural Heritage Trust, which is responsible for creating the Partition Museum, dedicated to the memory of the Partition of the Indian sub-continent in 1947. Susheila Nasta MBE is currently Professor of Modern and Contemporary Literature at Queen Mary College, University of London and Emeritus Professor at the Open University. The Migration Museum Project (@MigrationUK) is working to establish the UK’s first national migration museum, telling the long story of migration into and out of this country and providing a forum in which to discuss the impact of migration on our national identity.
Nov 22, 2017
The Myth of Millionaire Tax Flight: how place still matters for the rich [Audio]
01:25:50
Speaker(s): Dr Cristobal Young, Ed Miliband MP, Dr Andrew Summers | If taxes rise, will they leave? In his new book, Cristobal Young publishes the findings from the first-ever large-scale study of migration of the world's richest individuals, drawing on special access to over 45mil US tax returns, together with Forbes rich lists. He shows that contrary to popular opinion, although the rich have the resources and capacity to flee high-tax places, their actual migration is surprisingly limited. Place still matters, even in today’s globalised world. Cristobal Young (@cristobalyoung5) is Assistant Professor of Sociology, Stanford University. Ed Miliband (@Ed_Miliband) is the Member of Parliament for Doncaster North and was leader of the Labour Party from 2010-2015. Andrew Summers (@summers_ad) is Assistant Professor of Law, LSE. His teaching and research specialises in the taxation of wealth. Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. LSE Law (@lselaw) is an integral part of the School's mission, plays a major role in policy debates & in the education of lawyers and law teachers from around the world.
Nov 20, 2017
How Entrepreneurial Management Transforms Culture and Drives Growth [Audio]
01:39:39
Speaker(s): Eric Ries | Discover how to kick-start innovation and deliver sustained growth, even in highly uncertain environments. Join entrepreneur Eric Ries in conversation with Dr Lourdes Sosa as he discusses his new book The Startup Way. Drawing on his experiences of working with iconic organisations following the release of his international bestseller The Lean Start Up, Ries offers a new framework for entrepreneurial management, showing how the startup ethos can breathe new life into companies of all sizes. Eric Ries (@ericries) is an entrepreneur and author of the international bestseller The Lean Startup. He has founded a number of startups including IMVU, where he served as CTO, and is the founder and current CEO of the Long-Term Stock Exchange. Ries has also advised on business and product strategy for startups, venture capital firms, and large companies, including General Electric, where he partnered to create the FastWorks programme. He has served as Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Harvard Business School, IDEO, and Pivotal. Lourdes Sosa is Associate Professor in LSE’s Department of Management. She researches technological discontinuities, a pervasive phenomenon in which a radical change in technologies disrupts a market. Prior to academia, Dr Sosa worked in R&D management at General Electric and General Motors. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a globally diverse academic community at the heart of the LSE, taking a unique interdisciplinary, academically in-depth approach to the study of management and organisations.
Nov 16, 2017
Partners or Adversaries? Managing US-China Relations in the Era of Trump [Audio]
01:26:34
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Mastanduno, Minouche Shafik | The post-Cold War US-China “grand bargain” in economics and security is now unravelling, and faces new uncertainty in the era of Trump. Michael Mastanduno is Nelson A Rockefeller Professor of Government, Dartmouth College and the inaugural Susan Strange Professor of International Relations at LSE. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Head of Department and Director of the US Centre at LSE. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 90th year, making it one of the oldest and largest in the world.
Nov 16, 2017
The Multinational World: how cities and regions win or lose in the global innovation contest [Audio]
01:24:38
Speaker(s): Professor Riccardo Crescenzi, Martin Sandbu | The process of technological development constantly opens windows of opportunity for new innovation centres to emerge around the world. What makes it possible for some cities and regions to join the exclusive ‘world innovation club’? Why are other places persistently excluded or lose their membership? Scholarly and policy debates attempt to identify factors at the national, regional or city level to ‘ignite’ innovation and boost productivity and employment in stagnating areas of the world. Our understanding is more limited of the transformative power of the flows of capital, skills and knowledge bundled into increasingly complex value chains, often controlled by multinational firms. This inaugural lecture by Riccardo Crescenzi will discuss the conceptual foundations and new empirical evidence from across the globe on the link between internationalisation, multinational firms’ strategies and local innovation and prosperity. The lecture will first discuss how multinationals decide where to locate different types of foreign activities along the value chain and how this process leads to ‘matching’ between firms and host regions. The second part will look at the consequences of these decisions and strategies for world cities and regions, drawing upon examples from Europe, the United States, China, India, Russia and Latin America. The final part will address the role of public policies and discuss how mayors, regional governors and national governments can effectively leverage global investment flows and value chains for innovation and recovery after the Great Recession. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union Horizon 2020 Programme H2020/2014-2020) (Grant Agreement n 639633-MASSIVE-ERC-2014-STG). Riccardo Crescenzi (@crescenzi_r ) is a Professor of Economic Geography at LSE. Martin Sandbu (@MESandbu) is an economics commentator at the Financial Times. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose (@rodriguez_pose) is a Professor of Economic Geography at LSE. The LSE Department of Geography & Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change.
Nov 15, 2017
How Many People Can Earth Support in Comfort? [Audio]
01:21:35
Speaker(s): Professor Partha Dasgupta | Contemporary economics is mostly unconcerned with distortions to individual incentives that lead to population and consumption overshoots. Currently the overshoot would appear to be in consumption in the rich world and fertility in the poor world. In this lecture Professor Dasgupta will trace those distortions to an absence of adequate property rights to the biosphere and to the fact that human preferences are socially embedded. Those distortions also encourage technological advancements to be rapacious in the use of Nature’s resources, thus exacerbating the problems. Using global assessments of the biosphere’s capacity to provide humanity with the demands we make of it, he will provide crude estimates of the size of the global population that Earth can support in comfort under foreseeable technologies and institutions. Partha Dasgupta, was born in Dhaka (at that time in India) and educated in Varanasi (Matriculation 1958 from Rajghat Besant School), Delhi (B.Sc. Hons, in Physics, 1962, University of Delhi), and Cambridge (B.A. Hons. in Mathematics, 1965, and Ph.D. in Economics, 1968). He is Frank Ramsey Emeritus Professor of Economics at the University of Cambridge, Fellow of St John’s College, Cambridge, and Professorial Research Fellow at the Sustainable Consumption Institute, University of Manchester. He taught at the London School of Economics during 1971-1984 and moved to the University of Cambridge in 1985 as Professor of Economics, where he served as Chairman of the Faculty of Economics in 1997-2001. Sam Fankhauser is Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at the London School of Economics and Deputy Director of the ESRC Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment(@GRI_LSE ) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy.
Nov 14, 2017
A World of Three Zeroes: the new economics of zero poverty, zero unemployment, and zero carbon emissions [Audio]
01:19:48
Speaker(s): Dr Muhammad Yunus | The capitalist system, in its current form, is broken. In this lecture, Nobel Peace Prize-winning economist Dr Muhammad Yunus outlines his radical economic vision for fixing it, as explored in his new book A World of Three Zeroes. Muhammad Yunus (@Yunus_Centre) is the economist who invented microcredit, founded Grameen Bank, and earned a Nobel Peace Prize for his work towards alleviating poverty. He was awarded an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science (Economics) by LSE in November 2011. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.
Nov 11, 2017
Lakatos Award Lectures [Audio]
01:36:33
Speaker(s): Dr Brian Epstein, Dr Thomas Pradeu | The Lakatos Award is given for an outstanding contribution to the philosophy of science, widely interpreted, in the form of a book published in English during the previous five years. The 2015 award winner Dr Pradeu will speak on Why Philosophy in Science? Re-Visiting Immunology and Biological Individuality and the 2016 award winner Dr Epstein on Rebuilding the Foundations of the Social Sciences. Brian Epstein is an associate professor of Philosophy at Tufts University. Thomas Pradeu is Research Director in Philosophy of Science, CNRS Immunology Unit and University of Bordeaux.
Nov 09, 2017
The Politics of Mental Health [Audio]
01:28:47
Speaker(s): Victoria Dutchman-Smith, Emmy Eklundh, Professor Matthew Ratcliffe | At the intersection of the personal and the political, we explore the relationship between mental health and economics, politics, and society at large. Is it even possible to distinguish between mental illness that derives from an individual’s physiology or childhood experience and that which has broader social or political causes? Why do particular mental illnesses appear to characterize certain eras? Could social change limit the spread of mental illness in contemporary society? Victoria Dutchman-Smith (@glosswitch) is a journalist and commentator. Emmy Eklundh is a Teaching Fellow in Spanish and International Politics, King’s College London. Matthew Ratcliffe is Professor for Theoretical Philosophy, University of Vienna. Danielle Sands (@DanielleCSands) is a Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture at Royal Holloway, University of London and a Forum for European Philosophy Fellow. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Nov 08, 2017
Gender Equality: how can the UN lead? [Audio]
01:22:20
Speaker(s): Jane Connors, Professor Aoife O’Donoghue, Rosalyn Park, Navanethem Pillay | The United Nations has developed a strong focus on gender balance and gender sensitivity throughout all of its work. Yet the UN itself has significant problems in relation to gender within its Secretariat, Funds, Programmes and Agencies. Despite the UN Charter arguably setting out legal obligations to ensure gender parity within the UN and initiatives aimed at addressing the lack of gender parity, there have been few concrete changes to the lack of gender parity at senior levels. That impacts on the UN’s work, and on its legitimacy and credibility. This panel discussion will focus on why the UN remains deeply unequal in relation to gender, and suggest methods for addressing this issue. The event is part of the AHRC-funded UN Gender Network, which brings together academics, civil society, member states and UN staff to achieve a deep understanding of the causes and impact of gender inequality within the UN and the impact this has on its global leadership and work. Jane Connors is the inaugural Victims’ Rights Advocate for the United Nations and Assistant Secretary-General and Visiting Professor in Practice at the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. Prior to that she was the International Advocacy Director (Law and Policy) of Amnesty International, based in Geneva. Aoife O’Donoghue is a professor at Durham Law School. Rosalyn Park is Director, Women's Human Rights Program, The Advocates for Human Rights. Navanethem Pillay served as the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights from 2008 to 2014. Christine Chinkin is Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation for women in conflict-affected situations around the world.
Nov 07, 2017
Militarisation and the 'War on Crime' [Audio]
01:36:08
Speaker(s): Dr John Collins, Misha Glenny, Dr Sasha Jesperson, Tuesday Reitano, Dr Anja Shortland | From the 70 year old "War on Drugs", to the more recent "War on Human Smuggling", politicians use militarised responses to look decisive on crime. The deployment of armies, navies, military assets and militarised approaches can send a powerful message, but have produced mixed results. This debate, co hosted between the LSE US Centre and the Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime will discuss four different areas of criminality – wildlife crime, piracy, human smuggling and drug trafficking – to see how effective a militarised response can really be, and what might be lost as collateral damage. The International Drug Policy Unit (IDPU) is a cross-regional and multidisciplinary project, designed to establish a global centre for excellence in the study of international drug policy. John Collins (@JCollinsIDPU) is Executive Director of the International Drug Policy Unit and Fellow of the LSE US Centre. Misha Glenny (@MishaGlenny) is an investigative journalist and author of McMafia. Sasha Jesperson (@SashaJesperson) is Director, Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery, St Mary's University Twickenham. Tuesday Reitano (@Tuesdayjaded) is Deputy Director, Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime. Anja Shortland is Reader in Political Economy, King's College London. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE.
Nov 07, 2017
WTF: what the f--- happened and what happens next? [Audio]
01:28:02
Speaker(s): Robert Peston | To celebrate the release of his new book WTF: What the F--- Happened and What Happens Next? Robert Peston will be helping us make sense of the significant events which are changing our lives. It has never been a scarier time and never has there been more uncertainty in every arena of public life. Peston will go through it all, answering the questions everyone is asking around their breakfast tables. He will explain what happened, how it happened and where we might be going. Peston will be in conversation with LSE Director Minouche Shafik. Robert Peston (@Peston) is ITV's political editor, presenter of the politics show Peston on Sunday and founder of the education charity, Speakers for Schools. He has written three books, How Do We Fix This Mess?, Who Runs Britain?, and Brown's Britain. For a decade until the end of 2015, he was at the BBC, as economics editor and business editor. Previously he was City editor at the Sunday Telegraph, political editor and financial editor at the FT, a columnist for the New Statesman, and at the Independent in various roles. Peston has won more than 30 awards for his journalism, including Journalist of the Year from the Royal Television Society. His blog is itv.com/robertpeston. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public-engagement initiatives.
Nov 06, 2017
The Brexit Negotiations: make or break? [Audio]
01:25:26
Speaker(s): Professor Sara Hobolt, Philippe Legrain, John Rentoul | What will a Brexit deal look like? How does the British public view controversies over budget, jurisdiction and immigration? What are the risks of a breakdown of the Brexit negotiations? To address these questions, our panel of leading experts will look at the negotiation stance of the British government and the EU, and present new evidence on British public attitudes towards Brexit. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions at the European Institute, LSE. Philippe Legrain (@plegrain) is former advisor to the European Commission President and Visiting Senior Fellow at the LSE European Institute. John Rentoul (@JohnRentoul) is Chief Political Commentator for The Independent and visiting professor at King's College London. James Tilley is Professor of Politics and Fellow of Jesus College at the University of Oxford. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
Nov 02, 2017
Investing in Equality: the role of capital and justice in addressing inequality [Audio]
01:33:05
Speaker(s): Darren Walker | Philanthropic organisations play a key role in challenging the causes, effects, and consequences of inequality, funding projects that aim to directly and indirectly reduce the inequality gap. However questions have been raised about the approach, direction and priorities of such wealthy organisations when funding projects to tackle inequality, and the effect of these projects on the beneficiaries and the economy as a whole. The Ford Foundation has identified inequality as the central issue of our time. Darren Walker, President of Ford Foundation, will discuss the work and focus of the Ford Foundation, and the greater role of Philanthropy in reducing inequality. Darren Walker (@darrenwalker) is President of the Ford Foundation, the US’s second largest philanthropy. Prior to joining Ford, he was Vice President at the Rockefeller Foundation. Julia Black is Pro Director for Research at LSE. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
Nov 01, 2017
The Art of the Good Life: clear thinking for business and a better life [Audio]
01:22:42
Speaker(s): Rolf Dobelli | Editor's note: At time code 11:00 please note ‘about 1400 years old’ should state ‘about 2400 years old’ and research discussed between time codes 34:16 - 37:30 should be attributed to Matthew Syed. Rolf Dobelli, the bestselling author of The Art of Thinking Clearly returns to the UK to discuss his new book The Art of the Good Life. Join us for a talk in which Rolf will provide some surprising and indispensable mental shortcuts for better decision-making in life, work and business. Rolf Dobelli (@dobelli) is a Swiss writer, novelist and entrepreneur. He has an MBA and a PhD in economic philosophy from the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland, and is a co-founder of getAbstract, the world's leading provider of book summaries. Helena Vieira (@helenavieira1) is LSE Business Review’s managing editor. LSE Business Review (@LSEforBusiness) is a blog that promotes the dialogue between researchers and society on topics related to business and economics.
Nov 01, 2017