Marketplace All-in-One

By Marketplace

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Reviews: 3

Magnificent Steve
 Nov 24, 2019

Paul
 Apr 27, 2019
Marketplace is an excellent source of information about the national and global economy, and why you should care. Well produced and timely, but it does not require an economics degree top understand.

A Podcast Republic user
 Jul 27, 2018

Description

Marketplace® is the leading business news program in the nation. We bring you clear explorations of how economic news affects you, through stories, conversations, newsworthy numbers and more. The Marketplace All-in-One podcast provides each episode of the public radio broadcast programs Marketplace, Marketplace Morning Report®and Marketplace Tech® along with our podcasts Make Me Smart, Corner Office and The Uncertain Hour. Visit marketplace.org for more. From American Public Media. Twitter: @Marketplace

Episode Date
Whiplash in the bar and restaurant industries
00:07:18

Many bar and restaurant employees went back to work in June. New COVID-19 spikes and shutdowns might be sending them back home. Plus, potential furloughs for United Airlines. And, how Americans are spending pandemic unemployment insurance.

Jul 09, 2020
Singapore is next in line for elections during COVID-19
00:07:48

From the BBC World Service: The wealthy city-state of Singapore heads to the polls amid rising concerns about socioeconomic inequality. Australia ignites more fury from China, its biggest trading partner. As disease ravages global pork stocks, could fake meat be the answer?

Jul 09, 2020
How is bias built into algorithms? Garbage in, garbage out.
00:06:38

In facial recognition and AI development, computers are trained on massive sets of data, millions of pictures gathered from all over the web. There are only a few publicly available datasets, and a lot of organizations use them. And they are problematic. Molly speaks with Vinay Prabhu, chief scientist at UnifyID. He and Abeba Birhane at University College Dublin recently studied these academic datasets. Most of the pictures are gathered without consent, people can be identified in them and there are racist and pornographic images and text. Ultimately, the researchers said, maybe it’s not the data that’s the problem. Maybe it’s the whole field.

Jul 09, 2020
How college got so unaffordable
00:22:00

On our recent episode on higher education, Scott Galloway discussed the “Rolexification” of public education. For today’s Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday, we’ll dig a bit into how we got here. Plus, a listener’s heartbreaking housing dilemma, why Molly is canceling “cable” again and a “Hamilton” close read.

As always, you can find slinks to everything we talked about today at makemesmart.org.

Jul 08, 2020
Baltimore’s deadly vacant housing problem
00:27:00

There are millions of vacant and abandoned houses around the country. But in some parts of Baltimore, vacant buildings have become an intractable, even deadly, problem. Today, we take a deep dive into why. Plus: How some states are starting to close the racial pay gap, what bankrupted Brooks Brothers and why Disney World is reopening as COVID-19 cases spike.

Jul 08, 2020
What are we going to do with schools this fall?
00:09:09

President Trump pushes for schools to reopen this fall. Looking forward to Thursday’s forthcoming jobless claims numbers, as we wait to see if people are getting back to work amid COVID-19 spikes. And, how summer camp closures are hitting parents.

Jul 08, 2020
An investigation into unpaid labor at rehab centers
00:07:35

An investigation by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting shows that workers in rehab programs often don’t get paid, and are sometimes put in dangerous situations. Plus, global joblessness is rising 10 times faster than during the Great Recession. And, how employee pay cuts have helped save jobs.

Jul 08, 2020
Could the UK have an answer for young workers hit by COVID-19?
00:06:55

From the BBC World Service: The U.K. government will announce a $2.5 billion “kick-start scheme” to create more jobs for young people after the pandemic. The latest on how the coronavirus is squeezing jobs in China. The CEO of Loon on how the company is providing internet to rural Kenya using balloons.

Jul 08, 2020
What is venture capital doing to change its mostly white culture?
00:06:42

For years, the venture capital industry has been pressured to be more diverse and inclusive — invest in and hire more women and people of color. In the past month, Molly Wood has talked with Black startup founders and investors about what it takes to drive real change in tech, and they say it’ll take work from big Silicon Valley firms and the big institutions that invest in those firms. She asked Ilya Fushman, a partner at Kleiner Perkins, what Kleiner is doing to improve representation at Silicon Valley.

Jul 08, 2020
We can’t reopen the economy without solving child care
00:33:17

It’s kind of a circular problem: If we’re ever going to get people back to work, they need child care. But those child care workers are out of work, too. As Congress weighs new coronavirus relief programs, both parties are making a point to devote billions to child care. But America’s child care system has been in crisis long before this pandemic. Today, Washington Post reporter Valerie Strauss walks us through it. Plus, we’ll hear from a Vermont sheep farmer with a new side hustle, and Kai Ryssdal answers the Make Me Smart question again.

As always, you can find a list of everything we talked about today at makemesmart.org.

Jul 08, 2020
Who got all that PPP money, and how’d they spend it?
00:27:08

The federal government has released the names of companies that received loans of $150,000 or more through the Paycheck Protection Program. There are some surprisingly big names in there. Today, we’ll look at how one business spent its  $90,000. Plus: Why test shortages persist, what fall holds for foreign students and the problem with the Beige Book.

Jul 07, 2020
Americans are moving because of the pandemic
00:07:08

How COVID-19 is changing where people live. Plus, will we see a rebound in the demand for labor after severe declines in the spring? Job openings numbers for May are out today. And, how the U.K. has kept its unemployment rate from skyrocketing.

Jul 07, 2020
The data on PPP loans is out. Many large businesses took advantage of them.
00:07:31

The Paycheck Protection Program data raises questions, again, about whether aid helped well-off businesses rather than those most in need. Extended federal unemployment benefits are coming to an end. And, why it matters that carbon dioxide is currently in short supply.

Jul 07, 2020
TikTok will leave Hong Kong over new security law
00:06:23

From the BBC World Service: TikTok has said it will withdraw from Hong Kong after China imposed a new security law on the city. A company spokesman told the BBC, “In light of recent events, we’ve decided to stop operations of the TikTok app in Hong Kong.” Also, whether the U.K. furlough scheme for workers has saved millions of jobs or just delayed the inevitable.

Jul 07, 2020
The days of unlimited pandemic internet are over
00:07:43

Marketplace has been looking at how, in the middle of this pandemic, the internet is everything. Access and cost are problems for many, but what about data? Many broadband providers limit how much data subscribers can use each month; go over, and there are extra fees. Some lifted these caps at the start of the pandemic, but now those are coming back. Molly Wood spoke with Tom Merritt, host of the “Daily Tech News Show” podcast.

Jul 07, 2020
Is it too early in the week for a rage supernova?
00:13:57

If you’re flying on a plane, you should wear a mask. But as far as the federal government is concerned, of all the things you have to do to get on a plane, wearing a mask isn’t one of them. Make it make sense!!!!!! We’ll also talk about the inequality of COVID-19 and the foreign students falling through the cracks at Harvard and other all-remote schools this fall. It’s grim. Maybe some Quibi gossip will cheer us up.

As always, you can find slinks to everything we talked about today on our episode page at makemesmart.org.

Jul 06, 2020
The complicated history of McDonald’s and Black America
00:26:32

All the way back to the civil rights era, McDonald’s has had a strange relationship with unrest and Black Americans. Today, we’ll explore what the Golden Arches has and hasn’t done for Black business owners. Plus: Corporate debt, home equity and other things that will help businesses and families survive this crisis.

Jul 06, 2020
Uber’s food-delivery market move to buy Postmates
00:07:26

Uber is buying food-delivery service Postmates. Business for apps like Postmates has been up during COVID-19. Plus, an early look at why market futures were up all morning. And, how does the cancellation of minor league baseball this year affect the towns where teams play?

Jul 06, 2020
Warren Buffett’s big energy play
00:07:09

Berkshire Hathaway Energy has announced it will acquire Dominion Energy’s natural gas transmission and storage business. The Louvre Museum in Paris is reopening. And, is a tax on the meat industry and its carbon emissions coming soon?

Jul 06, 2020
Mona Lisa back on display as Paris’ Louvre reopens
00:06:30

From the BBC World Service: Visitors have been welcomed back to Paris’ Louvre Museum for the first time since March, but the museum’s boss says they still desperately need foreign tourists back as soon as possible. Plus, the biggest shake-up in U.K. accounting in decades. And, two years since the U.S.-China trade war began, where things stand now.

 

Jul 06, 2020
Tech companies should make it someone’s job to think about ethics
00:05:09

From hate speech to privacy, to labor and biased algorithms, society is reckoning with the power of technology and how it affects our lives. Molly Wood speaks with Emanuel Moss, a researcher at the nonprofit Data & Society and author of an upcoming report called “Ethics Owners.” It argues that data-driven tech companies should be creating specific positions for people whose entire job is to think about policies and product development with ethics in mind. Basically, a person who is hired to imagine the worst possible usage of a product.

Jul 06, 2020
COVID-19 is bringing back the road trip
00:27:00

Cheap gas coupled with uncertainty about traveling by air or rail during COVID-19 has vacationers turning to their cars. But summer travel decisions continue to be complicated during the pandemic. New York, New Jersey and Connecticut just issued a two week quarantine on any out-of-state visitors. Plus: the story of Janet’s List and the continuously rising cost of cord-cutting.

Jul 03, 2020
Forced arbitration looms over workers of color
00:07:41

Change is in the air for Native American representation in both the arts as well as the football field. Also, we examine how something called forced arbitration can have a negative impact on Black and brown workers.

Jul 03, 2020
How misery and the economy share the same company
00:07:12

The U.K. relaxes some of its COVID-19 travel restrictions. Also, minimum wage increases have already started in some places despite the pandemic. We also talk to psychotherapist and author Megan Devine about the ties that bind grief to the economy.

Jul 03, 2020
How English pubs are prepping to re-open
00:08:17

From the BBC World Service: Pubs in England open on Saturday in an easing of lockdown rules. Édouard Philippe, the French Prime Minister, has resigned.

Jul 03, 2020
The technology behind the discovery of a new blue hue
00:04:00

Throughout human history, the color blue has been a conundrum. Now, an Oregon State University lab is pushing color science forward. Researcher Mas Subramanian discovered YInMn blue, the first new blue pigment discovered since Thomas Jefferson was president and one of the most vivid blue colors ever created. Oregon Public Broadcasting’s Jes Burns reports.

Jul 03, 2020
How are you doing?
00:18:17

We’re about 113 days into this pandemic, heading into a holiday weekend unlike any other in recent memory. We’re still learning about the best way to treat COVID-19, and some states are coming around on mask mandates. It’s not necessarily getting any easier. So how are you doing?

Thanks to everyone who joined us for the livestream. It was our best yet. Links to subscribe to our YouTube channel, plus everything we talked about today, are at our episode page at makemesmart.org

Jul 02, 2020
What does it take to get a break on rent?
00:26:51

Nearly four months into this pandemic, and we’re starting to see evidence that the rental market is softening, if only in the highest-price cities. Today, we’ll do the numbers on New York real estate and what might happen to the rest of the country. Plus: The ongoing ad boycott at Facebook, arts organizations’ turn to streaming and the June jobs report.

Jul 02, 2020
The fight for fair pay in Big Tech
00:22:53

One woman’s fight against Silicon Valley’s racial pay gap. Plus, why it’s so hard for Black workers in tech to get ahead

 

 

Jul 02, 2020
The job market got better in June, but the numbers are from before renewed shutdowns
00:08:23

Nearly 5 million people found work in June, and the unemployment rate dropped to about 11%. But, there’s already concern about a July setback. Plus, reimagining the economy with Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation.

Jul 02, 2020
Remember war bonds? What about “social bonds”?
00:08:14

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association strongly suggests we are undercounting the number of COVID-19 deaths. It could change how policy planners and hospitals operate. And, the philanthropic Ford Foundation is borrowing money during the pandemic, so it can give more away.

Jul 02, 2020
Worries that China-India tensions could spread to supply chains
00:07:28

From the BBC World Service: FedEx and DHL have reportedly suspended Chinese import shipments to India. Food delivery workers in Brazil protest over pressure from delivery apps. Ukraine’s central bank governor resigns blaming “systemic political pressure.”

Jul 02, 2020
Content creators look for more fan support as brands pull back ad spending
00:05:27

You aren’t seeing ads from hundreds of brands on Facebook and Instagram right now because companies froze their advertising over how Facebook handles hate speech. That’s on top of a drop in advertising due to the pandemic. For online creators, the drop in advertising is even more of a push to diversify their revenue sources and support themselves without relying on sponsorship or ads. 

Jul 02, 2020
Will coronavirus make it easier to buy a home?
00:15:30

We’ve gotten a lot of questions about the housing market during the COVID-19 recession. For today’s Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday, we’re going to dive into that, plus scary tech, reserve currency and a little “M*A*S*H” trivia.

You can find a list of everything we talked about today on our episode page at makemesmart.org, along with a slink to subscribe to our YouTube page, where we’ll be live Thursday!

Jul 01, 2020
How the BLS does the numbers
00:28:19

We’re getting the June jobs report Thursday, a little early because of the holiday. The unemployment rate is expected to drop for the second month in a row, but the picture might not be as accurate as we’d like. That’s partly because since the start of the pandemic, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has said it might be  undercounting furloughed workers. Today, we’ll dig into the BLS survey and what you should make of it. Plus: How enforceable are interstate travel restrictions?

Jul 01, 2020
The strongest quarter for stocks in 20 years
00:10:20

The second quarter was a blockbuster for stocks, and it looks like investors are separating businesses into the old economy and the new economy. Americans remain banned from traveling to Europe. Can you care for your children while working from home? And, Florida citrus sales are up during the pandemic.

Jul 01, 2020
PPP loans frozen by the calendar
00:08:02

The deadline has passed for small businesses to submit applications to the Paycheck Protection Program, but an extension is already in the works. Melbourne suburbs go back into lockdown in Australia today. How climate change threatens Canada’s maple syrup.

Jul 01, 2020
Ethical hackers are busy stamping out bugs during the pandemic
00:08:16

There are a lot of juicy targets for hackers these days, with millions of people working from home and companies working on valuable COVID-19 drugs. One of the ways companies fight attacks is to try to fix bugs in their software before they can be exploited. They do it by hiring ethical hackers. Molly Wood speaks with Jesse Kinser who works as the chief information security officer for the precision health care company LifeOmic. She also moonlights as a hacker, finding jobs using the crowdsourced hack platform Synack.

Jul 01, 2020
A higher ed crisis is a terrible thing to waste
00:34:42

The rock walls, sushi bars and student center bowling alleys at colleges around the country will likely sit empty this fall. The spring semester has shown that online learning has significant limitations, said NYU marketing professor Scott Galloway, and welcoming back students and faculty is going to be like “Contagion 2.” But there’s also an opportunity here, he says, to increase budgets, cut costs and leverage technology to make higher education as accessible as it used to be.

Jul 01, 2020
What happens when the coronavirus relief runs out?
00:27:00

The $600 a week in extra benefits provided to every jobless worker who’s on unemployment insurance right now — about 29 million Americans — is set to expire by July 31. And if Congress doesn’t do something before then, things could get ugly in this economy. Plus: Why black-owned banks are undercapitalized and a conversation with Visa CEO Al Kelly.

Jun 30, 2020
“The bounce is losing its bounce”: Still a lot of work ahead for the U.S. economy
00:08:14

“The bounce is losing its bounce.” A partial economic recovery with reopenings, but a lot of work to be done. Plus, America’s top two economic policymakers on the past and future of special pandemic payments. Also, pressure to create a national policy for wearing masks. And, China’s national security law for Hong Kong.

Jun 30, 2020
Rents due tomorrow, tax returns due in two weeks
00:07:59

Housing groups say they are bracing for a wave of eviction notices. And the deadline to file your tax return this year is July 15, despite calls for another extension. Plus, what it’s like to work as a contact tracer.

Jun 30, 2020
China passes controversial Hong Kong security law
00:07:40

From the BBC World Service: China has passed a security law giving it new powers over Hong Kong. Delhi becomes India’s biggest COVID-19 hot spot. Shell warns that it’ll take a charge of up to $22 billion this quarter.

Jun 30, 2020
When immigrants come to the U.S., investments often follow
00:11:49

The Trump administration put a temporary freeze on new foreign workers that come here through the H-1B visa program. The administration argues that if the U.S. stops the flow of immigrants, there will be more jobs left for Americans in this recession. But researchers say the policy may backfire, because when immigrants go to a new country, they frequently bring new ideas, start companies and attract new investment money. Molly Wood speaks with Zeke Hernandez, a professor of global strategy at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

Jun 30, 2020
Even the pandemic is bigger in Texas
00:16:18

Marketplace reporter Andy Uhler is in for Kai today, bringing us his on-the-ground reporting from Austin, Texas, where Gov. Greg Abbott is rolling back reopening plans. But Abbott’s mostly left the rule-making to local governments and, well, no one knows what’s happening. For the rest of the California-based Make Me Smart crew, that confusing relationship between local and state government sounds familiar. Might be the same way in your state, too. Plus: Talking about sports, and talking around the COVID-19 sadness, not at the same time.

As always, you can find slinks to everything we talked about on makemesmart.org

Jun 29, 2020
As COVID cases spike, let’s look at the PPE supply chain
00:28:19

Coronavirus cases are surging in Arizona, Florida, Texas and California, and hospitals are becoming overwhelmed with patients. Other parts of the country have been there — and we all saw what happened. Today, we spend some time checking in on N95 masks, gowns and other protective gear. Plus: The latest Paycheck Protection Program loan deadline and what it’s like reopening a museum right now.

Jun 29, 2020
New pressure for social media moderation
00:08:13

Unemployment numbers for June come on Thursday — not Friday. The consensus forecast is around 3.5 million jobs added. But the potential for surprise is still there. Plus, the social media advertising boycott goes global. The Boeing 737 Max begins test flights. And, migrant workers’ remittances are expected to drop 20% this year.

Jun 29, 2020
The “new NAFTA” arrives this week
00:07:36

Global trade may be down, but trade agreements forge ahead. This week, the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement goes into effect. NBC plans to take over broadcasting the U.S. Open golf championship. And, the future of education and online learning.

Jun 29, 2020
Pakistan stock exchange targeted in deadly attack
00:07:10

From the BBC World Service: There have been fatalities following an attack by gunmen on the Pakistan Stock Exchange building in Karachi. Amazon workers in Germany strike over COVID-19 safety fears. Fears of food insecurity in East Africa grow amid a new wave of desert locusts.

Jun 29, 2020
Why the racism in facial recognition software probably can’t be fixed
00:07:09

It’s been proven that facial recognition software isn’t good at accurately identifying people of color. It’s also known that police departments around the country use facial recognition tools to identify suspects and make arrests. And now we know about what is possibly the first confirmed wrongful arrest made as a result of mistaken identification by software. The New York Times reported last week that Robert Williams, a Black man, was wrongfully arrested in Detroit in January. Molly Wood speaks with Joy Buolamwini, who has been researching this topic for years as a computer scientist based at the MIT Media Lab and head of the nonprofit Algorithmic Justice League. She said that, like racism, algorithmic bias is systemic.

Jun 29, 2020
That was fast: Facebook’s ad moderation flip-flop
00:15:59

It was just days ago that Facebook declared it would “not make policy changes tied to revenue pressure” after advertisers announced a boycott over the platform’s moderation efforts — or lack thereof. Today, Facebook announced it would, in fact, respond to that boycott by tamping down misinformation and discriminatory ads on its platform. So, that worked. Plus: Why oh why oh why aren’t more Americans wearing masks???? We need a drink.

As always you can find slinks to everything we talked about on our episode page at makemesmart.org.

Jun 26, 2020
Black Americans are far more likely to be denied a mortgage
00:27:08

As we continue exploring structural economic racism, today we’re looking at a huge source of the wealth gap between Black and white Americans: homeownership. Plus: Facebook’s about-face on ads and Texas’ influx of Californians.

Jun 26, 2020
Personal incomes are down … but consumer spending is up?
00:07:41

Consumers spending jumped a record 8.2% in May, but “we’re not even close” to back to normal. Airlines executives are going to the White House today to talk COVID-19 concerns. And, Ibiza’s clubs are shut down for the foreseeable future.

Jun 26, 2020
Trump administration asks SCOTUS to throw out the entire ACA
00:07:46

Half a million Americans have turned to Obamacare during COVID-19. So why does the Trump Administration want the Supreme Court to strike it down? Texas governor pauses reopening the state. And, people are ditching big weddings in favor of elopements.

Jun 26, 2020
Fresh COVID-19 outbreaks force governments to backtrack on reopening
00:06:43

From the BBC World Service: Almost 2,000 people are under quarantine in Germany after a coronavirus outbreak at a meat factory. Meanwhile, France’s coastal towns are relying on domestic visitors as EU countries discuss reopening borders.

Jun 26, 2020
If the internet was a utility, could more cities provide it?
00:09:25

In this country, internet access comes from companies. And in many states, those companies have lobbied for laws that prevent cities from building their own infrastructure to provide access. But some cities have. A decade ago, Chattanooga, Tennessee, laid fiber to every business and home in the city to prevent power outages and offer internet access to everyone. Molly Wood speaks with Katie Espeseth, vice president of new products at the city’s electricity and internet utility. 

Jun 26, 2020
Verizon boycotts Facebook (for a month)
00:14:36

Joining the likes of REI, Patagonia and others, Verizon is the biggest company by far to pull advertising from Facebook to protest the social media company’s moderation policies and overall corporate approach to combating misinformation. Can a boycott that’s just a month long lead to lasting change? We’ll talk about it. Plus: The country’s mayors speak out about racism in criminal justice.

As always, you can find a list of everything we talked about today at makemesmart.org.

Jun 25, 2020
Why isn’t racism in Economics 101?
00:25:53

Systemic economic racism is fundamental to understanding this moment, so why not teach it that way? Today, we talk with Gary Hoover, chair of the economics department at the University of Oklahoma, about why he folds race into his intro courses. Plus: Virginia is set to become the first state mandating COVID-19 workplace safety measures, and bars are adapting to takeout cocktails.

Jun 25, 2020
Bayer’s $10 billion settlement over Roundup
00:08:18

One of the largest product-liability settlements ever is taking shape. Will the U.S. be able to sustain an improvement in reducing unemployment? The strength of the Nike brand in its support of Black Live Matters. How the pandemic is testing the foster care system.

Jun 25, 2020
A financial portfolio … for everyone
00:07:10

As we reimagine an economy of the future, economist and “Angrynomics” author Mark Blyth shares ideas for a “citizens’ wealth fund.” And, with COVID-19 cases spiking, reopenings are being reconsidered, including at Disney theme parks.

Jun 25, 2020
Nigeria’s $6 billion solution to the oil price plunge
00:06:37

From the BBC World Service: Billions are needed to boost the economy of Africa’s largest crude oil producer. Qantas cuts 20% of its workforce. Travel companies struggle as Saudi Arabia bans international pilgrims travelling for hajj.

 

Jun 25, 2020
Want affordable, abundant internet access? Competition’s the key.
00:10:59

All this week, we’ve been looking at internet access, cost, infrastructure, and today, competition. Actually, the almost complete lack of competition. More than 129 million people in the U.S. only have one option for broadband. Is that a government problem or a free market problem? Molly Wood speaks to Susan Crawford, a law professor at Harvard and the author of the book “Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution — and Why America Might Miss It.”

Jun 25, 2020
Who gets to be an “investor”?
00:16:47

There’s an accreditation process… and there’s an app. For this week’s Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday, we’ll talk about both. Plus: If you’re not attending college in person this fall, should you get a discount?

As always, you can find a list of some of the stuff we talked about today at makemesmart.org.

Jun 24, 2020
As COVID-19 cases surge, reopenings could become reclosings
00:26:32

Arizona, Florida, California, Texas and other states are seeing sharp increases in coronavirus cases as they reopen restaurants and other businesses. So what happens when those places have to shut their doors all over again? Today we look at it. Plus: The IMF’s grim forecast, unemployment data as sound and “The Great Indoors.”

Jun 24, 2020
A clearer picture on who got PPP loans
00:06:55

Federal officials have agreed to release information about who got Paycheck Protection loans, but new research suggests those who got the most may have needed aid the least. Plus, a cautious mood among stock investors with COVID-19 spikes. And, the child care industry’s dire need for financial help.

Jun 24, 2020
An obscure indicator can tell us a lot about global commerce
00:06:57

Economists track what’s called the Baltic Dry Index as a snapshot of what’s coursing through the arteries of the global economy. That number, about ship cargo, is at a seven-month high. Plus, 13 more J.C. Penney stores will close for good. And, surveying millennials about transformational change.

Jun 24, 2020
Pandemic pressure on child labor in Latin America
00:07:19

From the BBC World Service: Some families facing financial hardship in Latin America are sending children to work. Germany imposes fresh regional lockdowns after a spike in COVID-19 cases. A spotlight on Spain’s migrant fruit pickers.

Jun 24, 2020
Gaps in internet access: Low-income, communities of color most left out
00:11:45

All this week, Marketplace Tech is doing a new series called “The Internet Is Everything,” where we look at access, infrastructure and cost. That question of cost comes down to competition, infrastructure and whether telecom companies have invested in bringing service to where you live. Molly Wood speaks with Mignon Clyburn, a former member of the Federal Communications Commission. She says we have to acknowledge that race and poverty play a role in where companies decide to offer access.

Jun 24, 2020
Stock up on masks and wipes, the country’s reopening
00:33:04

Loren Wold came on the show to talk about testing and vaccines back in late April, which feels like eons ago in this pandemic. Wold’s a professor and assistant dean for biological health research at Ohio State University. His lab is one of many working on a coronavirus vaccine. Today he’s back to talk masks, vaccines and whether he’d get on a plane again anytime soon.

Jun 23, 2020
Visa restrictions could lead to more offshoring
00:25:39

We’ve said it before: Immigration is a labor force story. So today we’re going to look at the ways the White House’s new restrictions on H-1B visas could ripple through this economy: offshoring jobs, worker shortages and so on. Plus, a look at the history of discriminatory and family-based immigration policies in the 20th century.

Jun 23, 2020
U.S.-China trade deal confusion
00:06:58

Confusion after White House trade adviser Peter Navarro seemed to say the U.S.-China “Phase 1” trade deal was “over.” Trump says it’s “fully intact.” How long will the grocery surge last? How COVID-19 is hitting densely populated Chelsea, Massachusetts.

Jun 23, 2020
New U.S. visa rules lock out foreign workers
00:07:21

From the BBC World Service: Around 70% of America’s H-1B visas, now temporarily suspended, go to workers from India. Renault and Nissan face a U.K. lawsuit over emissions cheating claims. South Africa announces its first COVID-19 vaccine trial.

Jun 23, 2020
Trump restricts work-based immigration
00:06:55

Following a White House order, the U.S. will stop issuing new visas for people who want to travel to the country for work. Rethinking police dramas on TV. China launches its final satellite in a system to rival GPS.

Jun 23, 2020
Mapping internet access: no clear data on haves and have-nots
00:09:44

This fall, the FCC is planning to award up to $16 billion to increase broadband availability across the country. But the data the FCC is using to decide where broadband is most needed is wildly inaccurate, even by the agency’s own admission. Host Molly Wood speaks with Nicol Turner Lee, who researches technology access as a fellow in the Center for Technology Innovation at the Brookings Institution. She said the pandemic has made the mapping problem even more obvious.

Jun 23, 2020
Let’s rename the places and stuff named after racists
00:15:21

Sen. John C. Stennis was a segregationist who opposed civil rights bills during his 41-year tenure. So why is there still an aircraft carrier named after him? That’s just one example we’ll pick apart today. Plus, President Trump’s suspension of H1-B visas and, of course, “Hamilton.”

As always, for a list of stuff we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org.

Jun 22, 2020
Forget the rally — TikTok and K-pop fans will cost Trump money
00:25:43

Those big online groups are giving themselves some credit for spamming ticket reservations and driving down attendance at President Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, this weekend. It’s not clear how much that (and COVID-19 fears) depressed turnout, but they definitely did give the Trump campaign a whole lot of bad data. Today we look at how expensive that data is to clean up. Plus: drive-ins across the pond, racist film classics and “Diversity, Inc.”

Jun 22, 2020
Borrowing from yourself during the pandemic
00:07:40

The IRS is making more families eligible to borrow from their retirement accounts without penalty. American Airlines has been forced to raise another $3.5 billion. Why the U.S. government would sell bonds that don’t need to be paid back.

Jun 22, 2020
Housing under pressure during COVID-19
00:07:38

Nearly 4.5 million homeowners were late on mortgage payments in May. Plus, potential home sellers have been cautious about getting into the market. As businesses reopen, some add a COVID-19 surcharge. And, Wirecard says the missing $2 billion never existed.

Jun 22, 2020
Where is Wirecard’s missing $2 billion?
00:07:20

From the BBC World Service: The German payments processor Wirecard says money missing from its accounts may not exist. Britain tightens foreign takeover rules for future pandemics. How furloughed airline staff are helping health care workers.

Jun 22, 2020
The pandemic has shown us that the internet is everything
00:03:51

Internet access is the ultimate essential service. But, like so many things in this country, access is not equal. This week, host Molly Wood starts a new series called “The internet is everything,” starting with listeners’ personal stories.

Jun 22, 2020
Friday the Juneteenth
00:19:46

It’s Juneteenth, the day in 1865 when the Emancipation Proclamation finally reached slaves in Galveston, Texas. To celebrate, Kimberly is lining up joyful movies about Black characters to watch this weekend. We’re also going to spend some time today reflecting on the decline of Black-owned businesses during this pandemic and a shameful history that’s not that far in our past. But first, Kai gives an update on the USS Theodore Roosevelt.

As always, you can find a list of everything we talked about today at makemesmart.org.

Jun 20, 2020
What happens when COVID-19 aid runs out?
00:26:21

The fiscal relief for the coronavirus pandemic is set to run out at the end of July, but many Americans are still out of work. Today, we’ll look at what could happen to this economy if Congress allows that aid to expire. Plus: How companies decide which holidays, like Juneteenth, to take off and Tulsa’s eviction problem.

Jun 19, 2020
How companies are observing Juneteenth
00:08:27

Given the intense focus on racial injustice, corporations are doing more to mark Juneteenth this year. Plus, how much money did households save by cooking their own meals during lockdowns? And, 40 years of CNN.

Jun 19, 2020
On U.S.-China trade tensions
00:07:02

Conflicting signs today on whether or not the U.S. and China are reconciling trade differences. Also, a breakdown in Canada-China relations. And, a DACA recipient on what Thursday’s Supreme Court ruling means for him.

Jun 19, 2020
“Europe’s moment” for COVID-19 recovery plans
00:06:34

From the BBC World Service: It’s been dubbed “Next Generation Europe,” but can the EU find unity on a COVID-19 recovery fund? Australia says it’s been the victim of cyberattacks by a state actor. Why remittances are so vital for millions of families.

Jun 19, 2020
What happened to coronavirus contact tracing on our phones?
00:07:50

Earlier in this pandemic, Apple and Google joined forces to help create a shared underlying technology for digital contact tracing apps. But at least in the United States, they haven’t caught on. Apple and Google’s tech only work with apps developed by government health authorities. And almost no states have developed those apps. Marketplace’s Jack Stewart speaks with Ina Fried, chief technology correspondent for Axios.

Jun 19, 2020
We have an empathy gap in this country
00:14:44

Kai has said it over and over again: We’ve given up on this pandemic. But people are still dying by the thousands from coronavirus infections. And, according to an interview Kimberly talks about today, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says we’re still in the first wave. All that, some cookies, plus: Kai sings!

Jun 19, 2020
Immigration is a labor force story
00:27:22

The U.S. Supreme Court blocked the White House’s effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants today. We’re going to look at the role those Dreamers play in this economy. Plus: Checking in on the financial health of historically black colleges and universities, and we talk with Howard University professor William Spriggs about his open letter to economists about systemic racism in their field.

Jun 18, 2020
How to pay for college
00:29:15

Years ago, one woman had put college on hold because she couldn’t afford it. Now she faces a hard choice to keep history from repeating itself. Plus: What will college even look like this fall?

Jun 18, 2020
A powerful but not omnipotent central bank
00:07:52

The Federal Reserve is trying to be as nurturing as it can to the economy in the pandemic, making credit easier to get, interest rates low, markets smooth. Plus, 1.5 million more people applied for unemployment benefits. And, the last installment of “A History of Now,” the current season of Marketplace’s documentary podcast “The Uncertain Hour.”

Jun 18, 2020
A connection between racism and the economy
00:07:55

The President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Robert Kaplan, on how stamping out racism would contribute to everyone’s success. Plus, the economic fallout of a surge in COVID-19 cases in parts of Arizona, Florida, Texas, California and more.

Jun 18, 2020
British corporate giants apologize for slave-trade slinks
00:06:34

From the BBC World Service: Two of Britain’s biggest companies apologize for their ties to the slave trade and make charitable donations. An English soccer star heads up a successful campaign to ensure the nation’s most vulnerable children don’t go hungry during the coronavirus crisis.

Jun 18, 2020
Can working from home help employees speak out against racism?
00:07:03

There’s a national conversation going on about race and inequality, and that includes at work. A lot of companies are holding internal listening sessions to start to address systemic racism. And because of the pandemic, many of those tough conversations are happening via videoconference. For some, it may be easier to have tough conversations from the comfort of their own home. Marketplace’s Jack Stewart speaks with Kira Banks, a professor of psychology at Saint Louis University, where she runs the Race and Intergroup Dynamics Laboratory.

Jun 18, 2020
What do you do when a business is spreading COVID?
00:17:55

On this week’s Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday, Kai and Kimberly tackle a listener’s ethical dilemma: Should you blow the whistle on a company that’s knowingly accelerating the spread of coronavirus? Plus, voting machines, stress tests and Champagne problems.

As always, you can find slinks to everything we talked about today at makemesmart.org.

Jun 18, 2020
Hollywood is back to work, but TV and movies won’t look the same
00:26:48

The CBS soap “The Bold and the Beautiful” was one of the first scripted series to turn cameras back on after officials allowed filming to resume in Los Angeles with restrictions to slow the spread of COVID-19. But movies and TV produced during a pandemic will look a little different. Plus: Racism in tech, unemployment in the U.K. and the difference between the debt and the deficit.

Jun 17, 2020
Answering your “History of Now” questions
00:29:06

We’ve spent the past five weeks trying to make sense of this moment, where the inequalities of our society have been suddenly set in high relief. In that time, you all have written in with a bunch of questions big and small. Today, we’re going to cap off this pop-up season by answering a few of them. Questions like: What would chicken cost if plant workers got better wages and benefits? And how did health insurance get tied to our jobs anyway? We’ll also look back at two very clear moments, both after pandemics, when economic inequality started to fall dramatically.

Thanks so much to everyone who listened and sent in questions. We’ll be back later this year with new episodes. Until, then, there’s always our first three seasons.

Jun 17, 2020
Facebook’s new plan for political ads
00:07:06

Facebook says it’s going to let people turn off all political ads. This, as several civil rights groups are calling for major advertisers to boycott the platform. Signs of life in the housing market. And, can work-sharing programs prevent layoffs?

Jun 17, 2020
Disbanding a police force
00:07:04

In 2013, the city of Camden, New Jersey, disbanded and replaced its police force. What lessons can we learn? Plus, Fed Chair Jerome Powell will be talking “pandemic economy” to Congress again today. He said there are some signs of stabilization.

Jun 17, 2020
The implications of China’s deadly border clash with India
00:06:32

From the BBC World Service: At least 20 Indian soldiers have been killed on the disputed border between India and China. Trade tensions have already been bubbling between the two nations. So how worried should we be? Also, as the world’s most popular soccer league – the English Premier League – kicks off again after a three-month hiatus, we ask if the women’s game is being left behind.

Jun 17, 2020
In automated warehouses, robots’ reach exceeds their grasp
00:07:45

Amazon, along with other online retailers, has seen a massive increase in demand in the past few months. The company has also faced accusations about its working conditions being unsafe, especially during this pandemic. The coronavirus has accelerated the push to automate warehouses, but the technology isn’t quite there yet to improve conditions for human workers. Marketplace’s Jack Stewart speaks with Ken Goldberg, a professor of industrial engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. 

Jun 17, 2020
BLM and pride take it to the streets
00:36:48

Pride month and Juneteenth are upon us, and protests against police brutality are entering their third week. Across the country, we’re seeing two civil rights movements gaining momentum together. Here to talk with us about intersectionality at this moment and how the coalition could come together is Keith Boykin. He’s a lawyer, journalist and commentator on CNN. He worked in the Clinton administration and wrote the book “One More River to Cross: Black & Gay in America.” His new book, out next year, is called “Race Against Time: Politics of a Darkening America.” Plus, with “Marketplace’s” Kimberly Adams in for Molly Wood on this episode, we’ll talk about Infrastructure Week — are we in it now? Did it ever end? — and President Donald Trump’s new executive order on policing.

As always, you can find a list of everything we talked about today at makemesmart.org.

Jun 16, 2020
The view from a COVID hot spot
00:27:00

Just down the road from the Smithfield pork-processing plant where hundreds of employees are off the job after a coronavirus outbreak is Grand Prairie Foods. They make eggs and breakfast sandwiches for hotel chains and convenience stores. Today, we’ll talk with the CEO about how they’re managing, along with a Black business owner in Utah who’s seeing a boom. Plus: Chinese unemployment and why the Fed started buying corporate bonds.

Jun 16, 2020
A proposal to eliminate unemployment
00:07:49

Retail sales jumped by nearly 18% in May, more than double the forecasts. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell starts two days of congressional testimony today. And, in our Reimagining the Economy project, the case for a job guarantee.

Jun 16, 2020
The Supreme Court ruling on protections for LGBTQ workers
00:07:07

Human resources experts say companies should update employee handbooks to make clear that discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender will not be tolerated. Also, activists are still pushing for Congress to pass a law on equality that would make some related forms of discrimination illegal. And, a pioneer of the shale oil and gas revolution in the U.S. is reportedly readying its bankruptcy filing.

Jun 16, 2020
Shipping faces a “humanitarian time bomb”
00:07:14

From the BBC World Service: Crew changeover delays at major shipping hubs have led some seafarers to threaten to put down their tools. China faces fresh economic pressure from a new COVID-19 outbreak. A slump in oil demand is expected through 2021.

Jun 16, 2020
How to prepare our communications for the next natural disaster
00:08:14

Our computers and cellphones are an increasingly huge part of how we work, socialize and even organize protests. In a natural disaster, those communication tools become even more important but often less reliable. That’s particularly an issue for first responders, who are soon going to have to start dealing with this year’s inevitable hurricanes and wildfires. Marketplace’s Jack Stewart speaks with Craig Fugate, a former FEMA administrator who now consults for goTenna, one of the companies working on “mesh network” technology.

Jun 16, 2020
Imagine the economic upside of dismantling systemic racism
00:14:41

Kicking off the week with guest co-host Kimberly Adams, we pick up the conversation within the context of Kai’s interview with Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic. Plus, what today’s big Supreme Court ruling protecting gay and transgender employees says about “constitutional textualism,” and how the lockdown is changing American fashion. False eyelashes. Crocs. And more.

As always, you can find a list of everything we talked about today on our episode page at makemesmart.org.

Jun 16, 2020
Discrimination has steep economic costs
00:27:22

Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic wrote recently that “systemic racism is a yoke that drags on the American economy.” We’ll spend much of today’s show talking with Bostic about that essay and what’s next for the economy in a turbulent year. Plus, today’s big Supreme Court ruling on LGBTQ workplace discrimination, online internships and the transparency (or lack thereof) around who gets half a trillion in Paycheck Protection Program money.

Jun 15, 2020
COVID-19’s effect on Native American economies and well-being
00:08:47

The pandemic has closed casinos, a major economic engine for Native American tribes. Money out of the stock market following news of a COVID-19 outbreak in Beijing and infection increases in U.S. states. Bankrupt Hertz is flooding the used-car market.

Jun 15, 2020
The latest on extra unemployment benefits
00:07:29

The White House is worried that the extra $600 a week in unemployment benefits makes not working too attractive. Democrats want to keep providing that money until January. The new head of the U.S. Postal Service. And, how COVID-19 is reshaping the response to domestic violence.

Jun 15, 2020
English consumers urged to “shop with confidence”
00:09:08

From the BBC World Service: As non-essential stores in England open for the first time in three months, the boss of bookseller Barnes & Noble and Waterstones explains how quarantining books works. Investors worry about a potential second wave of COVID-19 infections.

Jun 15, 2020
This just in: a rollback of protections for trans Americans
00:16:39

A Friday-afternoon story we couldn’t ignore: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced new rules Friday afternoon that would effectively exclude trans people from protection against health care discrimination. The news  comes amid the pandemic, during LGBT Pride Month and at a time when America is in a fury over systemic oppression of a different sort… We discuss. But it’s not all dark on this Friday show. We’ll also journey back into the thicket of HBO’s sophisticated/weird branding.

As always, you can find slinks to everything we talked about today at makemesmart.org

Jun 13, 2020
Why diversity and inclusion programs often fall short
00:26:53

The national outcry over systemic racism has pushed employers big and small to examine their own failings in diversity and inclusion. Today, we’ll look at why so many companies’ efforts haven’t worked — some have even made things worse — and whether this time could be any different. Plus: Some people are getting lax on masks even as COVID-19 cases rise, and we’re short on contact tracers.

Jun 12, 2020
Hacktivism on the rise in wake of national protests
00:07:33

Hacktivism, or computer hacking as activism, is in the news again with the group Anonymous claiming responsibility for a cyberattack on the Minneapolis Police Department this month. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood interviews M.R. Sauter, assistant professor at the University of Maryland and author of “The Coming Swarm: DDoS Actions, Hacktivism, and Civil Disobedience on the Internet,” for a dive into the history and tactics of so-called hacktivists.

Jun 12, 2020
The corporate money going into social justice groups
00:07:40

Employees are crowdsourcing donations to social justice groups, which their employers matching. Plus, a roller-coaster week on Wall Street, a new number on consumer sentiment and spikes in new COVID-19 cases. And, household debt increased in the first quarter.

Jun 12, 2020
Stock market turbulence returns
00:06:58

The stock market had its biggest drop since March. A big part of the Republican National Convention is moving from Charlotte, North Carolina, to Jacksonville, Florida. Calls to change the measure that lets police departments get surplus military hardware and supplies.

Jun 12, 2020
UK economy shrinks at record level
00:06:21

From the BBC World Service: The U.K.’s economy shrank by 20.4% in April, the sharpest contraction since records began. Asian and European stocks follow Wall Street down on fears of a second wave of the coronavirus. And, Sony has revealed its new Playstation 5.

Jun 12, 2020
Tech companies scrap facial recognition products
00:06:10

After largely ignoring demands from civil rights groups, tech giants IBM, Amazon and Microsoft have put moratoriums on sales of facial recognition technology to law enforcement agencies as protests against police brutality continue.

Jun 12, 2020
Who got half a trillion in COVID loans? The Trump administration won’t say
00:14:12

The Small Business Administration was supposed to release detailed information about who got hundreds of millions of dollars of taxpayer-backed PPP loans. But at a hearing yesterday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said it’s “confidential information.” We’re going to talk a lot about the shredding of norms on today’s show … if Kai’s recording setup can make it through the end of the taping.

As always, you can find a list of everything we talked about today (including Kai’s “room rating”) on our episode page at makemesmart.org

Jun 12, 2020
Small businesses struggle with protests and reopening
00:27:00

It’s not just big corporations feeling the pressure to respond to the protests against police violence around the country — small businesses are trying to figure out what to do, too. And, oh yeah, there’s still a pandemic going on. Today we’ll follow two different businesses to see how they’re managing. Plus: cops on TV, Zoom in China and annualized GDP, explained.

Jun 11, 2020
Companies back away from facial recognition technology
00:09:14

After IBM said it will no longer sell or research facial recognition software, Amazon announces amoratorium on police use of its technology. Grubhub’s acquisition by Just Eat Takeaway. The stock market tumbles again, given a reality check by Federal Reserve policymakers.

Jun 11, 2020
Fed reacts to inequality, high unemployment
00:07:24

America’s top economic policymakers at the Federal Reserve think the COVID-19 economy will linger on. How the U.S. shelters homeless people during a pandemic. And, how Starbucks has been hit the decline in commuting.

Jun 11, 2020
Just Eat Takeaway gobbles up Grubhub
00:06:49

From the BBC World Service: Why Europe’s Just Eat Takeaway acquired Grubhub and what it means for Uber Eats, who’d previously been trying to secure a deal. Trade tensions rise between China and Australia. Spain’s top soccer league La Liga returns tonight, providing a financial sigh of relief for its clubs.

Jun 11, 2020
Lots of industries are bad at diversity. But tech stands out.
00:06:59

Big tech companies and investors have a bad track record when it comes to hiring, investing in and retaining people of color. Especially Black employees. Host Molly Wood speaks with Tiffani Ashley Bell, an alum of the Y Combinator startup accelerator and founding director of the water nonprofit the Human Utility. She wrote the Medium post “It’s Time We Dealt With White Supremacy in Tech” and originated the phrase “Make the hire. Send the wire.”

Jun 11, 2020
Without a home in a pandemic
00:43:01

On any given night last year, half a million people in the United States were experiencing homelessness, and more than 60% of them were staying in emergency shelters or transitional housing programs. Now, those same facilities are hot spots for COVID-19. It’s hard to social distance when you’re cramped, sharing bedrooms and sharing locker-room style communal showers. Today, we’ll look back at the history of how America has sheltered unhoused people, and how those approaches can make it hard for them to get back on their feet even when there’s not a pandemic going on.

Jun 11, 2020
Do investors care about fighting systemic racism?
00:18:11

IBM’s stock price slumped this week after the company announced it would get out of the facial recognition business for fear that it could lead to racist, abusive surveillance. So what do we make of that? We’ll talk about this disconnect between our national moment and Wall Street on today’s Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday.

Jun 10, 2020
Can researchers work on anything besides COVID-19?
00:26:55

When the coronavirus pandemic hit, all other research froze. Some scientists packed it in, others pivoted to searching for a vaccine. Now, along with the rest of the economy, labs across the country are looking to reopen. Today, we’ll look at what that means. Plus: Hollywood inequality past and present, and a recap of Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s press conference.

Jun 10, 2020
Extra unemployment money is set to run out
00:08:30

Congress and the president are deciding whether to extend the extra $600 a week in unemployment benefits. Should government support for the economy continue? The number of deferred credit card payments appears to be dropping. How community participation can guide law enforcement.

Jun 10, 2020
How COVID-19 affects opportunities for young people
00:07:11

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development predicts a deep recession around the world. But for how long? Adidas pledges to hire more Black employees. And, how COVID-19 might lead to more “youth disconnection” in the U.S.

Jun 10, 2020
NATO welcomes UK review of Huawei
00:06:18

From the BBC World Service: NATO’s Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg has told the BBC he welcomes a U.K. review of the Chinese tech firm Huawei. Also, how reformed community policing could look around the world, and how to fund it, and HBO Max pulls “Gone with the Wind” from its platform.

Jun 10, 2020
Can 15,000 moderate the content of 2 billion?
00:05:44

Pressure is growing on social media platforms to intervene more against misinformation, hate speech and other content. A new report says a big barrier, especially at Facebook, is that content moderators are mostly outside contractors and there aren’t nearly enough of them. Host Molly Wood speaks with Paul Barrett, deputy director of the NYU Stern Center for Business and Human Rights, who wrote the report. 

Jun 10, 2020
Defund police? Then what?
00:37:43

Following two weeks of sustained protest over the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police, the City Council there voted to explore dismantling its Police Department. Minneapolis is among the few cities now seriously considering the work of activists and academics who’ve tracked the failure of police-reform efforts. It is looking at alternate systems, pledging to build new options for public safety.

As always, you can find slinks to everything we talked about today on our episode page at makemesmart.org

Jun 10, 2020
The legacy of slavery in this economy
00:27:00

In order to understand the structural economic racism that lead to this moment, you need to know your history. So today we head to Thomas Jefferson’s plantation to look at business strategies of slaveholders, and the legacy of those strategies today. Plus: How the National Bureau of Economic Research makes a call on what’s a recession, and the racial wage gaps at Bon Appetit and beyond.

Jun 09, 2020
It’s official: We’re in a recession
00:07:33

How we feel is now certified by the experts — the National Bureau of Economic Research says the U.S. in a recession. But smaller businesses are more optimistic than they were a month ago.  And, how the NFL is responding to protests for justice around the country.

Jun 09, 2020
Discrimination allegations at Bon Appétit, Refinery29
00:07:08

The editor-in-chief of Bon Appétit magazine, Adam Rapoport, has resigned after a photograph of him in brownface resurfaced. And, a small liberal arts college in Wisconsin is overhauling its academic calendar to prepare for a return to campus amid COVID-19.

Jun 09, 2020
France’s aerospace “state of emergency”
00:06:33

From the BBC World Service: The French government releases more aid with fears a slump in demand for airplanes could turn Toulouse into the “new Detroit.” What are the longer-term implications of a drop in electricity demand during COVID-19 restrictions?

Jun 09, 2020
Climate change isn’t going anywhere, and investment could soon rise
00:06:15

While people around the country deal with the COVID-19 pandemic and protest for police reform and racial justice, the climate is continuing to change. The U.S. just experienced the warmest May on record. A U.N. report last week warned that mass extinctions are happening far faster than expected. While climate change solutions are on the back burner for now, they’re as urgent as ever. Host Molly Wood speaks with Seth Bannon, a founding partner at the venture firm Fifty Years.

Jun 09, 2020
We’re officially in a recession
00:16:12

After a 128-month expansion, the U.S. economy entered a recession in February. Today, we’ll talk about what that means and where we go from here. Plus: Guest co-host Kimberly Adams talks about a #MeToo-style movement for Black journalists and why it really feels like this time racist media bosses are on notice.

As always, you can find slinks to everything we talked about on the episode page at makemesmart.org

Jun 09, 2020
What it means to defund police
00:28:03

Almost two weeks after George Floyd was killed in police custody, a veto-proof majority of the Minneapolis City Council has come out in favor of dismantling the city’s police department. Today, we look at how reallocating cities’ large police budgets could work. Plus: Why the jobs report needed a correction, how aggregated economic data contributes to racial inequality and the problem of child care during a pandemic.

Jun 08, 2020
Is the worst behind us?
00:09:27

Surprise job growth. State reopenings. Market optimism. And positive economic growth projections for the third quarter. Plus, of a potential mega-merger in the pharmaceutical industry. And, the significance of a Russian tanker’s voyage through the Arctic.

Jun 08, 2020
The U.S. COVID-19 epicenter is starting to reopen
00:07:22

New York City, where more than 21,000 people have died from COVID-19, enters phase one of its reopening. OPEC extends record cuts in oil production. We check back in with one of many Black-owned businesses left out of the first round of the PPP.

Jun 08, 2020
Could UK quarantine fury end up in court?
00:06:26

From the BBC World Service: European airlines criticize U.K. government rules for arriving international passengers. Could a social enterprise model work for a COVID-19 vaccine? The pandemic could wipe half a trillion dollars from Asian economies.

Jun 08, 2020
From BlackPlanet to Black Twitter, the evolution of Black voices on social media
00:05:48

As protests over police brutality and systemic racism continue, social media is a tool for organizing, amplifying and arguing. Yes, it can often be a racist dumpster fire. But, experts say that a big, messy public square might actually be the best place to create political change. Host Molly Wood speaks with Omar Wasow, who is a founder of the social media site BlackPlanet, an early place for online Black expression. He’s now a professor at Princeton studying race and protest.

 

Jun 08, 2020
Yes, you can trust the jobs report
00:17:55

We were all surprised by this morning’s May jobs numbers, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t trust them. That’s a dangerous road to go down. On today’s show, we’ll pick apart how the Bureau of Labor Statistics does the numbers and the wonkiness behind the (forgive us) wonky numbers. Plus: revolt over comments from public officials at The New York Times and Facebook.

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org.

Jun 06, 2020
It’s expensive to get arrested
00:27:16

A teenager protesting police brutality lands in jail, and we try to understand the tricky business of bail.

Jun 05, 2020
Where’d those 2.5 million jobs come from?
00:26:30

If there’s one lesson to take from today’s show, it’s that economists are just as confused as you are. We’ll talk with experts and analysts about what to make of the May jobs report, how much of it has to do with PPP loans and what it says about the changing state of the economy. Plus: The New York Times’ Wesley Morris calls in to talk about why the protests against the police killing of George Floyd feel different.

Jun 05, 2020
Surprise drop in unemployment
00:07:55

The U.S. unemployment rate unexpectedly dropped from nearly 15% in April to 13.3% in May. Economic divides by race are apparent in the numbers, though: the rate for Black people ticked slightly higher. And, where are sports leagues on plans for reopening?

Jun 05, 2020
Where job losses are most concentrated
00:07:14

This week, the Labor Department listed the cities that have been hardest hit by layoffs. The president has a new executive order, allowing federal agencies to bypass some environmental laws. What drives theft and vandalism during protests?

Jun 05, 2020
Potential COVID-19 vaccine production begins
00:07:46

From the BBC World Service: British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca begins production of a potential COVID-19 vaccine with some help from Bill Gates. New U.S. trade restrictions on 33 Chinese firms adds to concerns about a technology cold war between the world’s two largest economies. British pubs are turning to takeout services to survive the coronavirus lockdown.

Jun 05, 2020
You may have heard this before: Venture capital investing is not very diverse
00:08:21

The past few days have seen a few commitments from established venture funds to support founders of color. SoftBank launched a $100 million fund; Andreessen Horowitz launched a $2.2 million fund to support founders from “underserved” communities, with a plan to expand it to $15 million over time. But honestly, that’s not that much. Host Molly Wood speaks with Sarah Kunst, the managing director of Cleo Capital.

Jun 05, 2020
K-Pop stans vs. racism
00:15:30

If you find yourself rage-clicking on trending topics that appear to be racist this week, you’ll likely be greeted by gifs and videos of BTS or another massively popular Korean pop group. Their famously dedicated fan armies have joined the fight against racism online, flooding anti-Black hashtags. Also on the docket today: What would it take for you to sit in the middle seat on an airplane again?

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org.

Jun 05, 2020
Big companies say they’re anti-racist, but what are they actually doing?
00:27:00

After more than a week of protests following the death of George Floyd in police custody, businesses small, large and super-massive are declaring solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. But words are one thing, action is another. Today, we’ll take you beyond the PR of it all. Plus: America’s overnight food deserts, who’s paying overdraft fees and COVID-driven state budget cuts.

Jun 04, 2020
LA’s pledge to move money out of policing
00:10:31

Rehiring has been happening, but slowly. And another 1.9 million people filed jobless claims last week. LA will move money out of policing. A new set of rules from Congress for PPP loans. A look at how housing came to be so precarious for many.

Jun 04, 2020
Addressing economic disparities by race
00:08:00

Reimagining a new economy post-COVID-19 requires eliminating racial inequities, says Andre M. Perry. And, a new report shows that many people working for public schools are losing their jobs.

Jun 04, 2020
When can U.S. airlines land in China?
00:06:36

From the BBC World Service: President Trump threatened to ban Chinese airlines from landing in the U.S., if Beijing refused to allow U.S. flights to China resume. LVMH’s bid to buy Tiffany & Co is under review. Europe’s central bank plans more stimulus.

Jun 04, 2020
Social media unites and divides us. How should we respond?
00:07:36

As people all over the country protest the police killing of George Floyd, social media has become the medium for amplifying marginalized voices, organizing and reporting events. It’s also where President Trump and other politicians are responding. Bots and bad actors are swarming social media with misinformation, yet these platforms often spark awareness of injustice in the first place. Host Molly Wood speaks with Nicol Turner Lee, a fellow at the Brookings Institution.

Jun 04, 2020
Yes, Quibi still exists
00:15:36

For Whaddya Wanna Know Wednesday, we dipped into the mailbag and pulled out a mix of your questions from the past week, including: What’s happening with Quibi, the very-well-funded mobile-only streaming service that landed with a thud in the middle of a pandemic? Plus, we look at consumerism post-COVID-19 and the ripple effects of Silicon Valley workers permanently working from home anywhere in the world.

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org.

Jun 04, 2020
How communities rebuild after protests
00:27:00

From coast to coast, communities are coming together to clean up after protests over the death of George Floyd in police custody. But some neighborhoods are better equipped to recover than others. Today, we take you inside one rebuilding effort in the Bronx. Plus, why black women entrepreneurs are missing out on startup funding and a conversation with the director of “Do Not Resist.”

Jun 03, 2020
There are cracks in the foundation of our housing system
00:33:20

The COVID-19 pandemic arrived at a moment when the gap between rich and poor in this country had hit a record high. One place that inequality is most visible is in the neighborhoods where we live. Generations of discriminatory housing policy, and lending practices that favored white borrowers, have entrenched segregation in American cities. This week, we’ll examine the housing policies that emerged from past economic crises, policies that excluded black people and other people of color, preventing them from building the wealth that middle class white families built.

Jun 03, 2020
It’s also hurricane season
00:08:04

Investment in firearm companies is up, as are background checks. Early numbers for May job losses appear to be down significantly compared to expectations. State budgets are already strained because of COVID-19. Now hurricane season is here.

Jun 03, 2020
Curfews and COVID-19 weigh on essential workers
00:07:39

Essential workers have to worry about curfews on top of the coronavirus. Google faces a proposed class-action lawsuit over alleged privacy violations. And, some health plans are requiring patients to chip in for COVID-19 testing — which was supposed to be free.

Jun 03, 2020
Italy needs vacation visitors this summer
00:06:30

From the BBC World Service: As Italy reopens its borders to Europe, what’s the economic cost of COVID-19 quarantine measures? Sweden’s pandemic policy expert says there is “potential for improvement” in the country’s no-lockdown strategy.

Jun 03, 2020
Black founders want tech companies to do more than donate
00:08:12

The protests happening around the country over the police killing of George Floyd are emblematic of longstanding racial divisions. That certainly includes the tech industry, which is notorious for its lack of diversity in hiring and investing. Host Molly Wood speaks with tech startup CEO Jim Gibbs about one suggested solution: Hire people of color or wire them investments.

Jun 03, 2020
Will the George Floyd protests finally catalyze real change?
00:34:10

Protests against the killing of George Floyd in police custody have flared in some 140 cities. Once again Americans are confronted with a reminder of the ways people of color, particularly black people, bear a disproportionate burden in this economy in the areas of health care, resources like loans and pandemic relief, food security and more. Today, we talk with D’Artagnan Scorza, founder and executive director of the Social Justice Learning Institute, about the language we use to talk about protest and policing, and where the fight for equality and justice goes after a crisis.

Jun 03, 2020
Structural economic racism
00:26:47

George Floyd’s death in police custody sparked nationwide protests, but the kindling has been building for decades. Today we’re going to take some time to talk about the deep racial economic divide in this country. Plus: we do the numbers on states of emergency, what brands are and aren’t saying around Black Lives Matter and the disconnect between Wall Street and Main Street right now.

Jun 02, 2020
Will action follow words from corporate leaders?
00:07:24

The CEOs of companies from big brands on down have been crafting statements condemning racism and police brutality. The CBO’s grim projections for COVID-19 economic recovery. An update on the 2020 U.S. census.

Jun 02, 2020
How implicit bias training falls short
00:07:24

Researchers say police departments aren’t looking at how implicit bias training affects officer behavior. Facebook employees stage a virtual walkout. China gets into the GPS satellite game with implications for phone users everywhere.

Jun 02, 2020
Leadership lessons from France’s yellow vest protests
00:06:53

From the BBC World Service: We explore the role of leadership in achieving lasting change. Yemen needs billions in a fundraising drive to stop the world’s biggest aid operation from going broke. Argentina faces another sovereign debt deadline.

Jun 02, 2020
Police can track protesters even after the demonstrations end
00:05:34

Police departments have a lot of surveillance tools to identify protesters and looters, from camera technology to drones, license plate readers to the facial recognition tool known as Clearview AI. In some cases, these technologies can help keep the peace, but they can also be used to find organizers and even arrest protesters after the fact. There aren’t a lot of rules. Host Molly Wood speaks with Saira Hussain, a lawyer with the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Jun 02, 2020
Facebook, protests and a whole lot more
00:14:27

Many Facebook employees took a virtual hike to protest the company’s policies around presidential messaging. And there’s a lot to process on this Monday. We do bring you a couple of things to make you smile, though.

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org.

Jun 02, 2020
How bail activism works
00:26:00

As protesters across the U.S. call for justice in the death of George Floyd, people are showing support by donating to bail funds, known as bail activism. The Minnesota Freedom Fund has received $20 million in donations and is focusing on the hundreds of activists being arrested nationwide. The argument is that the bail system disproportionately affects low-income people and people of color. Bail activism is just one component of the current protests against police brutality. Plus: Activists call for cuts to police budgets, the U.S.-China trade war has continued during the pandemic and the long recovery communities face after protests.

Jun 01, 2020
Very incomplete data on police use of force nationwide
00:07:47

Fewer than half of the law enforcement officers in the U.S. are participating in the FBI’s use-of-force database. How insurance companies can be a driver of better policing. Chinese officials accuse the Trump administration of hypocrisy when it comes to protests.

Jun 01, 2020
The costs of policing, and of police brutality
00:07:42

Amid protests across the country over the killing of George Floyd, a call to make payouts to victims of police misconduct much more transparent to the public. And, some company leaders are acknowledging the injustice driving the reaction to the events in Minnesota.

Jun 01, 2020
Brazil protests as health care turns political
00:06:21

From the BBC World Service: Hospitals in Brazil struggle to source supplies of personal protective equipment. Mexico’s economy could shrink 9% this year. As protests ripple across America, what’s the economic impact of social upheaval?

Jun 01, 2020
How can we respond to mass protests if we can’t agree on what’s happening?
00:05:47

Protesters demonstrated in dozens of cities across the country over the weekend, sparked by the alleged murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer last week. But depending on what people saw on social media about the protests, they may have completely different ideas about what happened. Host Molly Wood speaks with Zeynep Tufekci, author of “Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest.”

Jun 01, 2020
These are broken times
00:16:13

It’s been a long week, so we went live on YouTube Friday to talk about what’s happening in Minneapolis, our hobbled economy, and President Trump’s leadership over a drink. In lighter news, we’ll also discuss how to leave your dog at home after the pandemic and “Haircut Night in America.”

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org.

May 30, 2020
Some of those temporary layoffs might become permanent
00:26:58

More than 40 million Americans have filed for unemployment insurance since mid-March. Many of them told the Labor Department that they considered their layoffs “temporary,” that they’d been furloughed and would be back at work at some point. But “some point” seems to be dragging on, and coming back from layoffs might not happen at all for some. Today, we do the numbers. Plus: tourism, bar reopenings and problems in the supply chain.

May 29, 2020
Renewables edge out coal … for the first time in 135 years
00:08:58

In 2019, Americans used more renewable energy than coal. The White House’s executive order on social media platforms. Tenants owe rent, and landlords owe mortgages. And, why leaders look to infrastructure spending in recessions.

May 29, 2020
How capitalism needs to change, according to Ray Dalio
00:07:09

The founder of the biggest hedge fund has plans for how capitalism must be restructured in order to better serve more people. And, the White House is out with an executive order to try to remove some legal protections for social media companies.

May 29, 2020
India’s migrant workers want to return home
00:07:48

From the BBC World Service: Unemployment in India has risen to 24% with migrant workers facing an uncertain future. Imaging the future of retail, restaurants in Lithuania use vacant seating to make a catwalk of a different kind for local clothing stores.

 

 

May 29, 2020
The regulation that helped build the internet may be in trouble
00:07:03

The debate over how social media platforms deal with content hit a new peak this week after Twitter fact-checked several of President Donald Trump’s tweets. That prompted Trump to sign an executive order trying to limit platforms’ legal protections. Currently, under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, internet platforms aren’t legally responsible for most content posted by users. Host Molly Wood speaks with Jeff Kosseff, author of “The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet,” a book on Section 230.

May 29, 2020
What does Hong Kong bring to China’s economy?
00:15:09

As China cracks down on Hong Kong’s autonomy, we take a minute to examine the territory’s place in the world’s second-largest economy. Plus: the Boston Marathon, the Wall Street Journal and a couple of Uncles David.

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org.

May 29, 2020
Why so many women are losing their jobs
00:27:00

Another 2.1 million Americans filed for unemployment insurance this week. About  55% of the people who lost their jobs last month are women, which is a contrast from the last financial crisis. Today, we’ll look at the dynamics playing out now and why benefits have been historically hard for people to get. Plus: life on the farm and on the reservation.

May 28, 2020
Barred from benefits (from The Uncertain Hour)
00:36:37

Millions of Americans who are out of work don’t receive unemployment benefits. That’s by design. An episode from “The Uncertain Hour’s” pop-up season “A History of Now.”

If you liked this epsiode, you can hear more at uncertainhour.org.

May 28, 2020
Job losses hit households with children especially hard
00:07:30

Some people are starting to get rehired as states reopen, but, overall, we’re not hiring enough to offset the extraordinary magnitude of job losses. The history of the U.S. unemployment benefits system. And, Disney World’s plan to reopen this summer.

May 28, 2020
The argument for a federal jobs program
00:07:14

Since the lockdowns began, more than 30 million Americans have gotten approval to receive unemployment benefits, but many more are still trying to get filed and approved. Plus, reimagining the economy after COVID-19 with a federal jobs program.

May 28, 2020
No more free gas in Venezuela
00:06:40

From the BBC World Service: People in Venezuela will have to pay to refuel as vital oil supplies arrive from Iran. Hong Kong residents worry as China passes a controversial security law. Nissan will stop making cars in Barcelona.

May 28, 2020
Demand for mental health apps is spiking
00:05:12

COVID-19 has opened up a conversation about remote therapy, but online mental health care goes way beyond talking to a therapist over video chat. App analytics companies say downloads of mental health and wellness apps are up almost 30% since the pandemic began. These include therapy services, but also meditation apps like Calm and Headspace. Do they work, and how is your data handled? American Public Media’s mental health reporter, Alisa Roth, takes a look. 

May 28, 2020
What’s HBO Max?
00:15:14

Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday isn’t just about answering your questions.  Sometimes our hosts have questions too. Today, Kai is trying to figure out the latest entrant in the streaming wars. Plus: how oil prices bounced back and the future of higher ed.

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org.

May 28, 2020
How to reopen colleges
00:27:00

Most colleges in the U.S. have been shut down for months in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. But NYU’s campus in Shanghai could provide an example of how to reopen mid-pandemic. Today, we take you there. Plus: the PPP extension, a literal economic slowdown and how breweries are adapting to social distancing.

May 27, 2020
Unemployment benefits are hard to get. That’s on purpose.
00:36:18
Millions of Americans who are out of work don’t receive unemployment benefits. That’s by design. Today, we’ll look at the history of the United States’ unemployment insurance system, how this country defines “unemployment,”and why the program was never intended to cover everyone who’s not working.
May 27, 2020
Consumer sentiment vs. stock market behavior
00:09:28

Consumer sentiment plunged 19% in April, according to the University of Michigan’s index. Yet the stock market is up. What do these contrasting trends mean? The launch of HBO Max. The future of manufacturing. And, in buildings closed by COVID-19, stagnant water can become dangerous.

May 27, 2020
Trump’s former economic adviser on the way forward
00:07:47

Gary Cohn is frustrated with partisanship surrounding what the federal government should do next over the economy during COVID-19. Plus, fast food employees in Chicago have filed a lawsuit against McDonald’s, asking for stricter health standards.

May 27, 2020
Biking to work aids social distancing
00:07:12

From the BBC World Service: Governments hope biking commuters will ease pressure on public transport and lower pollution. The European Commission unveils a fresh COVID-19 rescue plan. Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi collaborate to cut costs.

May 27, 2020
Public health officials stuck using faxes to track the coronavirus
00:08:35

Tech has helped in the fight against the coronavirus, but there’s a bottleneck when it comes to contact tracing: public health departments. These government agencies are chronically underfunded, and some don’t have the right tech to get medical data quickly. Host Molly Wood speaks with Dan Gorenstein, co-host of the health-care podcast “Tradeoffs,” about trying to track the spread of the virus  with fax machines. 

 

 

May 27, 2020
Back to the mall … but is anyone buying?
00:31:47

After years of sagging sales and changing customer habits, the coronavirus pandemic has retail fighting for its life. As more states move to partially reopen nonessential businesses, it’s still not clear who’s going to make it out of this crisis. For our 200th (!) episode, Marketplace retail reporter Marielle Segarra walks us through the winners and losers, what this crisis says about the way Americans shop and what’s coming next. Get ready for a mall-walking comeback.

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org. And a big thanks to everyone who’s helped us get to 200 episodes! Here’s to 200 more.

May 27, 2020
Can we have a 4-day workweek every week?
00:27:22

Some companies have been experimenting with the four-day workweek to improve productivity and morale. Will the coronavirus pandemic finally push more workplaces to make the switch? Plus: what it’s like to quarantine in an RV, and will Q3 be the “fastest-growing quarter in U.S. history”?

May 26, 2020
Markets up on hopes the worst of lockdowns is behind us
00:08:22

More on the new safety rules at the New York Stock Exchange. The S&P hits 3,000 for the first time since early March. Home prices see their biggest jump in a year. The German government has agreed to pay $10 billion to keep the country’s flagship airline from collapsing.

May 26, 2020
Back to work at the NYSE
00:08:03

About 25% of traders are returning to the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. First-quarter results for Costco are in this week. How does the warehouse-style retailer see the road ahead? And, two years of Europe’s online privacy law, the GDPR. What’s changed?

May 26, 2020
Africa’s largest tobacco producer feels COVID-19 pain
00:07:05

From the BBC World Service: Europe and China aren’t buying as much tobacco from Zimbabwe. Australia’s economic recovery could take five years. Spain is set to approve legislation for a guaranteed basic income to support the financially needy.

May 26, 2020
Europe’s data-privacy law turns 2. Has it actually made our information safer?
00:07:14

This week marks two years since Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation went into effect. Companies spent millions of dollars on GDPR compliance, and people expected fines so big they’d put Big Tech out of business. That didn’t exactly happen, but what has the GDPR meant for consumer privacy? Host Molly Wood speaks with Jessica Lee, a partner with the law firm Loeb & Loeb who specializes in privacy.

May 26, 2020
As states reopen, which rules apply to which businesses?
00:25:49

States — and counties within those states — are reopening at different stages with different rules and guidelines. Business owners are navigating the uncertainty around those rules as they try to determine which apply to their businesses. A bar owner in Boise, Idaho, thought she might be able to reopen, but realized her bar doesn’t serve enough food to meet the state requirement. Plus: a program in California focused on housing the homeless during the pandemic, high school seniors are facing a difficult decision and the life-saving properties of soap.

May 25, 2020
Name game has become a name odyssey for new companies
00:08:04

The oil market is starting to show the effects of pandemic lockdowns lifting across the country. Teenage unemployment has soared to its highest rate in decades because the pandemic has vaporized some of the summer job market. Starting a business is hard enough during a pandemic, and one of the most significant hurdles is finding a name no one’s taken yet.

May 25, 2020
Consumer confidence could show signs of rising in the face of COVID-19
00:08:01

The U.S. is now suspending some travel from Brazil, now the second-largest COVID-19 hotspot. The Conference Board’s measure of consumer confidence comes out Tuesday, with some economists hoping for an uptick from April’s results. We then talk with Chris Farrell about the effect the pandemic has had on the nation’s elder care system.

May 25, 2020
Fancy some sun on a Greek island?
00:06:49

From the BBC World Service: Domestic tourism could be key to this summer’s vacation season. Greece’s island beaches will welcome mainland visitors. In the Czech Republic, people can drink a cold beer inside a bar. Dubai’s malls await shoppers.

May 25, 2020
Some people are making bread in quarantine. Others are making TikToks
00:04:33

TikTok has been in the news for its new CEO, who was poached from Disney, and for the record labels who think the service should pay more to publishers and artists for song rights. And there have been calls to ban it in the U.S. over its Chinese ownership and security fears. But its popularity keeps growing.

May 25, 2020
Happy Friday: Your SAT scores really don’t matter anymore
00:15:01

Not in California, anyway. The University of California system announced this week it will phase out the use of ACT and SAT test scores in its admissions process. Will it ease stress and lower barriers for low-income families? We’ll talk about it. Plus: American oil production and coffee snobbery.

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org. And another big thanks to everyone who helped make our spring fundraiser a success. If you missed it, there’s still time to donate at marketplace.org/givesmart.

May 23, 2020
8 weeks after the CARES Act… how are we doing?
00:26:38

It’s been about two months since Congress passed the big coronavirus relief bill, and 10 weeks since President Donald Trump declared a state of emergency. We’ll talk with some of our contributors and historians about the state of the economy and the historical context. Plus: China abandons GDP targets, Americans settle into working from home for the long haul and we chat with the president of the New York Stock Exchange.

May 22, 2020
Gas prices are low. Will you use any this weekend?
00:10:08

The Hong Kong stock market took a dive today after China signaled moves to tighten Beijing’s control over the territory. The Fed’s pessimism. The average gas price is $1.90 a gallon, but who’s driving? The 40th anniversary of Pac-Man.

May 22, 2020
Hong Kong rattled by planned security legislation
00:06:37

From the BBC World Service: Hong Kong’s status as a global business hub could be under threat. There are growing concerns over China’s plans to impose a new national security law on the city. What could MLB learn from South Korea’s baseball league?

 

 

 

May 22, 2020
How easy it is to get a fake ad on social media
00:07:00

We speak with the president and CEO of Consumer Reports about, among other things, holding social media accountable during COVID-19. Plus, in a break from tradition, no new target for economic growth in China.

May 22, 2020
Restaurants and apps are fighting over fees. Is delivery too cheap to support both?
00:07:21

Most restaurants right now are open for delivery or pickup only, and that means a lot of them are relying on third-party delivery services like Grubhub, DoorDash or Uber Eats. Those services can charge significant fees to restaurants, and some restaurants complain those fees are unsustainable. Some cities have capped those fees and now the delivery companies say the caps are unsustainable. Host Molly Wood speaks with Venessa Wong, a senior reporter at BuzzFeed News.

May 22, 2020
Hank Paulson on the strong dollar
00:15:02

On today’s show, we’ll dig into former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson’s column in Foreign Affairs about how to keep the dollar strong. Plus, Big Tech’s new work-from-home reality check and some useful euphemisms for “President Trump lied.”

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org. And if you can, consider supporting Marketplace with a donation at marketplace.org/givesmart.

May 22, 2020
How to read those unemployment numbers
00:27:00

Another 2.4 million people filed for unemployment benefits last week. That’s down from the week before, but still about the population of Houston. There are two ways the government measures joblessness in this country, and it’s important to keep an eye on both. We’ll explain. Plus: how emerging markets are faring in this crisis, why evictions could surge in Texas and a conversation with the CEO of the travel company Booking Holdings.

By the way, this is the last day of our last fundraising drive for our fiscal year. If you can, make a donation today at Marketplace.org/donate.

May 21, 2020
School’s out (forever?)
00:23:08

When you’re 17 or 18, you’re often making choices that can dictate the course of your whole life. Making those decisions during a pandemic is even harder. Today we follow three high school friends trying to figure out what comes after graduation when a global pandemic is clouding everything.

By the way, today is the last day of Marketplace’s spring fundraising drive. We know not everyone can afford to give, but if you love the show and you are in a position to donate, we would really appreciate it. You can give and find more information at marketplace.org/giveTIU.

May 21, 2020
2.4 million more people filed for unemployment
00:10:02

It’s now 39 million people that have filed first-time unemployment claims since the lockdowns started. Mortgage loan delinquencies skyrocket. Marketplace’s podcast “The Uncertain Hour” has a new episode out about the wealth and poverty history of quarantines.

May 21, 2020
Legislation that could ban many Chinese companies from U.S. stock exchanges
00:08:14

The Senate has unanimously passed a bill that could force some foreign companies off American stock exchanges. Citi announced it will buy up Paycheck Protection Program loans. Toward the bottom rung of California’s housing market, conditions can be unsafe.

May 21, 2020
Facebook will “take down” COVID-19 misinformation
00:07:28

From the BBC World Service: Mark Zuckerberg insists Facebook will only remove content that risks real imminent harm. Airlines race to get travelers back in the sky. How can governments help companies at risk of financial collapse?

May 21, 2020
When ventilators break, iFixit can help
00:06:35

Ventilators, dialysis machines and mechanical beds are more important than ever. That equipment, of course, breaks down. And some manufacturers restrict access to repair information, so hospital technicians can’t just fix things themselves. Molly Wood speaks with iFixit CEO Kyle Wiens, who just launched a public database of medical-equipment repair manuals.

May 21, 2020
Can you deduct a home office on your taxes?
00:17:24

Or will your employer pay for some WFH remodeling? Eh, don’t get your hopes up. We’re fielding a couple of personal finance questions on today’s Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday. We’ll also answer your mail about the confusing surge in the stock market and the future of retail (which we’ll talk about more on our Tuesday episode next week).

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org. And if you can, consider supporting Marketplace with a donation at marketplace.org/givesmart.

May 20, 2020
What will dining out look like post-COVID?
00:25:16

Restaurants, already operating on thin margins, have to balance keeping customers safe and making them feel safe, while trying to restore some normalcy. Today, we look at how one Atlanta Vietnamese spot is doing it. Plus: How Americans spent their relief checks, the coming wave of farm bankruptcies and the fight over hazard pay.

May 20, 2020
An unequal history of quarantines
00:29:08

As long as there’s been such a thing as quarantine, each person’s experience under it has depended largely on their economic status. On this week’s show, we take a tour of quarantines through history, from the bubonic plague outbreaks in 14th and 17th century Italy, to the a typhoid outbreak in New York in the early 1900s and a few other stops along the way. Those quarantines looked very different if you were, say, an immigrant, or a Jewish textile merchant, or a sex worker.

Crises like the COVID-19 pandemic shine a spotlight on all the inequalities already lurking in the system, and ideas of what the government owes to people in quarantine have changed over the centuries too. Long gone are the days of the government sending your family fennel sausage, cheese and wine to make it through.

May 20, 2020
Is it good or bad interest rates are staying this low?
00:08:56

The Congressional Budget Office is now forecasting the U.S. economy will shrink at a 38% annualized rate this quarter. Small upticks in the number of people buying tickets for summer travel. Which colleges plan to reopen this fall? An appeal for city dwellers in France to help out with the harvest.

May 20, 2020
Data on which activities are safer during COVID-19
00:07:41

MIT researchers have created a framework to assess the “cumulative risk” of opening various businesses and public spaces. Johnson & Johnson says it will stop selling the talc-based version of its baby powder. The SBA says PPP loans are getting smaller.

May 20, 2020
Why the Bank of England holds Venezuelan gold
00:07:20

From the BBC World Service: Venezuela’s central bank is taking legal action to get its bullion back. Will Spain extend its COVID-19 emergency measures for a fifth time? An extra public holiday could boost global tourism.

May 20, 2020
Antitrust regulators have an eye on Big Tech’s spending spree
00:05:59

Uber looking to buy Grubhub. Facebook buying Giphy. Apple nabbing NextVR.  Host Molly Wood speaks with Mark Lemley, who teaches antitrust and internet law at Stanford University, about whether regulators will take action against any of these deals. He says Facebook buying Giphy, for example, may not be any worse than its purchase of Instagram. But the combined weight of so many acquisitions could prompt regulators to wade in. 

May 20, 2020
When we go back to work, tech will have a new job
00:31:16

Ready or not, the country is starting to reopen, and some Americans are getting back to work. There’s a lot of new tech on the table for preventing a surge in COVID-19 cases, but what’s actually effective? And what data will you have to give up to use it? Here to talk us through how the American office will change is Chris Calabrese, the vice president for policy at the Center for Democracy & Technology.

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org. And if you can, consider supporting Marketplace with a donation at marketplace.org/givesmart.

May 20, 2020
Home improvement and animation are up, commercial rent is down
00:27:00

Today we’re going to dig into some ripple effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. While companies are looking for breaks from their rent, Home Depot says sales are up, and animation is about the only entertainment production still working. Plus: How remote work in oil and gas … works.

May 19, 2020
Businesses with PPP loans have a new application for getting forgiveness
00:12:26

Housing starts in April fell by more than expected last month, a 30% drop. President Trump’s threat to the WHO. Home improvement sales hold steady. The complicated rules that businesses with PPP loans have to follow to get them forgiven.

May 19, 2020
Electric vehicles show some COVID-19 resilience
00:07:52

Electric car sales will be down this year, but they won’t drop as much as sales for combustion engine cars. Local meat producers with shorter supply chains are having a moment. Prince Charles calls for British people looking for work to help pick fruits and vegetables for the harvest.

May 19, 2020
Will the U.S. really stop funding the WHO?
00:07:19

From the BBC World Service: President Trump issued a 30-day ultimatum to the World Health Organisation over its handling of COVID-19. China sticks 80% tariffs on Australian barley imports. Britain oulines its post-Brexit tariff plans.

May 19, 2020
A new strategy for 5G without Huawei
00:08:32

The Chinese telecom manufacturer Huawei sells a lot of the complex hardware needed for 5G. But what if there were a way to build the networks that didn’t depend on Huawei? A group of 31 companies are pushing for devices that let software do most of the heavy lifting. Host Molly Wood speaks with Doug Brake, director of broadband and spectrum policy at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation.

May 19, 2020
This recession curve could take many shapes
00:14:21

Is it a “V”? A “W”? What about a Nike swoosh? What about a “K”? Stay with us. Also meeting up here today: Masayoshi Son, Chuck E. Cheese and Jesus Christ.

For a full list of stories we talked about today, check out our episode page at makemesmart.org.

May 19, 2020
What does education look like after coronavirus?
00:27:00

We asked the CEO of digital education company Chegg. Plus, we’ll dig into the auto supply chain, examine how banking has changed and get a preview of the new season of “The Uncertain Hour.”

May 18, 2020
J.C. Penney and more bankruptcy in retail
00:08:02

J.C. Penney becomes the latest in a line of major retailers to declare bankruptcy. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell’s message to the government on COVID-19 relief. Walmart earnings and how our shopping habits have changed.

May 18, 2020
Economic recovery could last through 2021, Powell says
00:08:09

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell thinks it might take until the end of 2021 for the economy to recover. Auto companies take steps to protect workers as car factories reopen. What’s it like to be hired remotely during this pandemic?

May 18, 2020
Japan’s worst slump since WWII
00:06:30

From the BBC World Service: Will a $1 trillion stimulus be enough to spur Japan’s economic recovery? Seventy percent of India’s hotels could close due to COVID-19, as economic forecasts worsen. Airlines struggle to deal with the impact of quarantine measures.

May 18, 2020
Real estate disruptors got disrupted by COVID-19
00:06:16

The biggest instant homebuyers — Opendoor, Zillow, Offerpad and Redfin —  stopped making purchases in March, in some cases backing out of deals and forfeiting their deposits. Now, some iBuyers are coming back, but they’ll need to prove the model can survive a downturn. Marketplace’s Amy Scott speaks with Mike DelPrete, who watches iBuying closely. He’s a scholar-in-residence at the Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado Boulder.

May 18, 2020
Will there be a baseball season?
00:20:40

For now, it’s millionaires versus billionaires. The MLB is exploring a way to get baseball season started during the pandemic… and Kai’s out today. So we drafted Andy Uhler to go deep on the players union, salary caps and more. Plus: a playlist for your weekend and, oh yeah, Facebook’s $400 million purchase of Giphy.

For a full list of the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org. And if you can, consider supporting Marketplace with a donation at marketplace.org/givesmart.

May 16, 2020
Most Americans’ retirement savings were low before the pandemic
00:27:00

…Now they might dip into those funds. Today on the show, we’ll look at the long-term effects of this economic crisis. Plus: new retail sales numbers, travel in a reopened China and the Americans staying away from hospitals even when they need care.

May 15, 2020
Everything we didn’t buy this spring
00:09:34

A 16% drop in retail sales for April. Federal regulators have raised a question about the accuracy of a new COVID-19 test that produces rapid results. Data that one vaccine from Oxford is working in monkeys. How farmers in the Northwest are doing as spring harvests come in.

May 15, 2020
Leaving employees to enforce social distancing
00:07:27

As states ease restrictions, businesses begin making plans for reopening. And some of those plans call for the employees to enforce social distancing. Have oil prices bottomed out, with more people moving around? Pawnshops are seeing more business.

May 15, 2020
Cheers, as bars and restaurants start to reopen
00:06:22

From the BBC World Service: Bars and restaurants in much of Europe and Australia have started to welcome back customers. Germany heads into recession as the economy shrinks 2%. How mass transit systems around the world are trying to get back up and running.

May 15, 2020
Ransomware attacks against hospitals are on the rise
00:05:35

Host Molly Wood speaks with Marketplace correspondent Scott Tong about the increase in ransomware attacks against hospitals and other health-care facilities. Tong says places that are working on coronavirus testing and vaccines appear to be especially popular targets. And because these institutions are anxious to restore access to potentially lost patient information, they may ignore authorities’ advice and pay the ransoms.

May 15, 2020
Our parents’ debts (from Terrible, Thanks for Asking)
00:46:34

This week, we’re showcasing a story from our colleagues at “Terrible, Thanks For Asking”: When a supporting pillar is knocked out of a family, the consequences can be costly.

May 15, 2020
If you could work from anywhere, where would you live?
00:16:02

Twitter was the first big tech company to tell workers they could work remotely indefinitely, even after the pandemic wanes. Does this portend tech workers fleeing the high price of living in Silicon Valley, or even a migration away from big cities? We’ll talk about it. Plus: spaceflight simulators, the legacy of “Demolition Man” and the grim outlook for America’s restaurants.

For a full list of all the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org. And if you can, consider supporting Marketplace with a donation at marketplace.org/givesmart.

May 14, 2020
So you’re graduating into a pandemic. Now what?
00:27:00

As colleges and universities across the country plan virtual graduations for the class of 2020, many new graduates are looking for their first jobs in a very different world than they were planning for just a couple months ago. Today we check in with some of them. Plus: how rural libraries are holding up, how consumer spending is changing and the tense dynamic between reopening companies and employees who don’t feel safe coming back.

May 14, 2020
Latina workers are especially vulnerable
00:07:24

Almost 3 million more people filed for unemployment last week. Some groups are getting hit harder than others. And, British cheesemakers lost a lot of business with the closing of restaurants. Direct-to-consumer sales are alleviating some of their surpluses.

May 14, 2020
Gig workers may be missing out
00:07:24

Gig workers are eligible for unemployment benefits, but they might be getting less money than others just because of how their jobs are classified. And, Marketplace’s podcast “The Uncertain Hour” has a new season out now on public policy and “A History of Now.”

May 14, 2020
Midnight lines outside barber shops in New Zealand
00:06:10

From the BBC World Service: New Zealand’s finance minister unveils a “once-in-a-generation” budget to support the country’s businesses as they start reopening. Spain introduces a 14-day quarantine for all foreign visitors. British cheesemakers’ call for public support.

May 14, 2020
COVID-19 is pushing notaries into the digital age
00:05:01

Notarization has been around for centuries. It’s when an official of the state verifies a person’s identity so she can buy a house, adopt a child or draft a will. Lots of states allow online notarization, but the COVID-19 pandemic has forced others states to follow. On “Marketplace Tech” today, a look at how online notarization works, why it costs more and how secure the practice is.

May 14, 2020
Some Airbnb, more MMT and ‘keyboard money’
00:17:44

You guys had a lot of questions after our episode about Modern Monetary Theory, and today we’re going to answer one on Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday. We’ll also talk about the Fed, Airbnb and the history of unemployment in this country.

For a full list of all the stories we talked about today, check out the episode page at makemesmart.org. And if you can, consider supporting Marketplace with a donation at marketplace.org/givesmart.

May 14, 2020
Powell warns of “lasting damage” without more aid
00:27:00

Fed Chairman Jay Powell is live-streaming during this crisis like everyone else, and today he warned of a prolonged recession caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. Today we’ll break down his remarks and what Congress might do about it. Plus: why home prices aren’t falling and how children’s TV changed America.

May 13, 2020
You’re an essential worker. Do you get essential protections?
00:29:51

Chicken is America’s most popular meat. But chicken supply chains — in fact, many of our food supply chains — are in danger of breaking down. Part of the reason is the workers who process and package those goods are getting sick. In some cases, they’re dying.

For the first episode of our new season, “A History of Now,” we focused on America’s chicken supply chain because it raises a huge, looming question: How is it that essential workers don’t have essential protections? How do we get through a crisis — any crisis — if we can’t be sure our food-producing workforce is safe?

May 13, 2020
Fed Chair calls for more emergency spending
00:08:06

Jerome Powell took the rare step of urging Congress and the White House to spend more money to prop up the economy. Big brands are reportedly cutting back spending for TV ads. County officials in Michigan have temporarily stopped foreclosing on properties for unpaid taxes.

May 13, 2020
Washington wrestles over new stimulus
00:07:22

House Democrats have a fresh stimulus bill that would double the amount of aid the government has already spent, to $6 trillion. Uber wants to buy Grubhub. Understanding the continued health insurance coverage known as COBRA.

May 13, 2020
Depression-era unemployment rates
00:10:08

Another 3.2 million people filed for unemployment. Only in a COVID-19 economy could that be an improvement. Facebook’s oversight board is here. Millions of undocumented immigrants and some legal immigrants won’t receive government aid. Sinclair hit with a record FCC fine.

May 07, 2020
Helping the class of 2020 find jobs
00:07:22

Graduating from college during a pandemic can be a career nightmare. One college wants to give its class of 2020 a leg up. Filings for state unemployment benefits have been soaring, but that number misses many people. And, listener stories from Econ Extra Credit.

May 07, 2020
Britain’s sharpest downturn since 1706
00:07:42

From the BBC World Service: The Bank of England warns of a deep recession, though a quick recovery in 2021. Panic after gas leaks from a chemical plant in India. New Zealand’s winter tourism market suffers from a ban on most foreign visitors.

May 07, 2020
Political advertising during COVID-19 is the calm before the storm
00:08:29

Host Molly Wood speaks with Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams, who covers politics and the economy, about how political ads are changing during the pandemic. Adams says online ads may be cheaper, helping cash-strapped campaigns, but consumers are even less in the mood for content that doesn’t either cheer them up or inform them about COVID-19. It could also mean that online ads are way more accessible to bad actors looking to spread misinformation.

May 07, 2020
When we look back, will this be a blur? Or a new beginning?
00:15:23

Will the memories of this COVID-19 outbreak and economy fade away for most of us, or change society forever? That’s one of the big questions for this edition of “Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday.” Plus: Is this 2008 for commercial real estate? And how is unemployment counted anyway? Send your questions for WYWKW to makemesmart@marketplace.org.

Your donations make this show possible. If you can, give today at Marketplace.org/givesmart, and thanks!

May 07, 2020
A third of workers got their hours cut, and a sixth are working more
00:27:00

The economic effects of this pandemic are not equal. In our latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, we found a third of people have lost work, while about one-sixth of them are working more hours. Today we dig into why. Plus, the view on the ground as Texas reopens, a conversation with the CEO of Land O’Lakes and how the flower business is faring ahead of Mother’s Day.

May 06, 2020
A History of Now: The Trailer
00:03:36

There’s not much more uncertain than our current moment. Our day-to-day lives and our economy have been upended by the coronavirus pandemic. On this season, “A History of Now,” we’re digging into the history and policies that help make sense of this current moment, a time where issues of wealth and poverty feel even more stark than usual. New episodes start May 13.

 

 

May 06, 2020
The month the labor force stood still
00:09:06

There were 20.2 million fewer people on American payrolls in April. Airbnb is cutting a quarter of its workforce. Uber and Lyft are reporting first quarter earnings. With COVID-19, the role of big meat producers is changing in the supply chain.

May 06, 2020
Tracking jobs (and joblessness) amid COVID-19
00:07:19

The payroll processor ADP releases its count of layoffs and hiring in April. The unofficial unemployment report is out Friday. Tourism revenue in China was down 60% during the recent holiday. A forecast that half of all department stores located in U.S. shopping malls will close by the end of 2021.

May 06, 2020
Europe’s economy screeches to a halt
00:06:48

From the BBC World Service: Business activity in the eurozone plummeted to its lowest level ever in April. Why have the European Central Bank and Germany’s courts clashed over bond buying? Rethinking aviation’s business model.

May 06, 2020
The tech industry says immigration makes the U.S. more competitive
00:06:07

Host Molly Wood speaks with Michael Petricone of the Consumer Technology Association about the Trump administration’s executive order on green cards and how it’ll affect the tech industry. Petricone says that immigrants make the U.S. economy and tech industry stronger. He adds that limitations on green cards and visas could make it harder for the economy to recover once the COVID-19 pandemic recedes. 

May 06, 2020
The state of the states
00:35:04

Thirteen percent of American workers are employed by a state government, and states get about 70 percent of their income from sales and income taxes. But with businesses shuttered and unemployment claims surging, local governments are facing a huge financial crunch. Here to talk us about what states are facing and what’s ahead is Marc Nicole. He’s president of the National Association of State Budget Officers and the deputy secretary of the Department of Budget and Management in Maryland.

May 06, 2020
41% percent of Americans can’t handle an unexpected $250 bill
00:27:00

The newest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll is out today, and it paints a stark picture of how Americans are feeling amid the coronavirus crisis. We’ll dig into one figure in particular: more than four in 10 Americans say they couldn’t come up with the money for an unexpected $250 expense. Plus, how the health care system is changing, what it’s like to be making COVID-19 tests right now and how hazard pay works.

May 05, 2020
Even before COVID-19, many had economic anxiety
00:10:01

Lower income people were already very anxious well before COVID-19. The price of crude oil has been on a two-day roll. Airlines focus on frequent flyers. The Treasury Department says it will borrow $3 trillion in three months.

May 05, 2020
The data on economic anxiety
00:06:59

The findings of our new Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, a national scientific survey out today. It’s the highest jump we’ve seen in our Economic Anxiety Index®. Plus, an Iranian airline flouted flight restrictions on China, likely contributing to the spread of COVID-19.

May 05, 2020
UK tests contact tracing as government mulls loosening lockdown
00:07:12

From the BBC World Service: Britain trials a new contact-tracing app as it prepares to loosen lockdown restrictions. India exporters feel the COVID-19 pinch. Has the global pandemic reshaped the agenda for U.S.-U.K. trade talks?

May 05, 2020
Safety or surveillance: drones and the COVID-19 pandemic
00:08:58

Host Molly Wood speaks with Ryan Calo, a professor of law at the University of Washington, about the legalities involved in police using drones to monitor social distancing requirements during this pandemic. Calo says that though it can be legal, he is worried about surveillance being combined with AI tools that purport to detect whether people are sick. He raises concerns about companies selling “technical snake oil” and increasing anxieties in an already anxious environment.

May 05, 2020
Is the simulation breaking? Cruises are going to set sail again?
00:16:08

We don’t have enough time today to ponder the nature of our existence, but we are going to talk about these fascinating coronavirus pandemic simulations. Also, yes, Carnival’s plan to start cruises again in August. Plus: Kai’s deep in this thread and Molly’s making bread pudding.

May 04, 2020
There’s still money left for small businesses, but for how long?
00:27:00

The Small Business Administration says that as of Friday, banks have loaned out $175 billion from the federal Paycheck Protection Program. That’s good news for businesses and the banks lending to them. Today, we look at how long that money will last amid a new surge of applications. Plus, what’s going on with Texas oil, how consumer prices are changing and what to expect from Disney’s first-quarter earnings.

May 04, 2020
Who benefits if payroll tax is cut?
00:08:52

President Trump said any new economic stimulus would have to include a cut in payroll tax. Credit cards adapt to the COVID-19 economy. When Warren Buffett talks, investors listen. How TV and movies are filmed during lockdown.

May 04, 2020
Major retail bankruptcies begin
00:07:37

J. Crew has entered bankruptcy protection, the first major retail chain to do so during the COVID-19 era. A global summit aiming to raise more than $7 billion for vaccines and treatments. The 57 million people with jobs labeled “vulnerable.”

May 04, 2020
4 million Italians head back to work
00:06:05

From the BBC World Service: Italy has deep economic scars from its COVID-19 lockdown. The European Commission hosts an online pledge drive to help fund a pandemic vaccine. Air France and Norwegian Air have been handed lifelines.

May 04, 2020
Scientists are working furiously to create COVID-19 tests
00:11:01

Host Molly Wood speaks with Dr. Loren Wold, from the nursing school of Ohio State University, about how he and OSU colleagues have adapted to create COVID-19 tests. He says they’ve needed to create their own fluids to stabilize samples, 3D-print their own nasal swabs and figure out supply chain logistics for test tubes.

May 04, 2020
Elon Musk is tweeting through it
00:18:28

Tesla CEO Elon Musk on Twitter this morning: “Tesla stock price is too high imo,” along with a bunch of other stuff. We need a drink before we can dive into this one. Also today on Economics on Tap: consumer spending, additional stimulus and a remote jazz festival.

May 01, 2020
Work won’t be the same after COVID-19
00:27:00

Even as the economy reopens, returning to work could mean more than just changes to the physical space. Workers could be on staggered schedules and shorter weeks with scheduled remote days. Today, we look at office life post-coronavirus. Plus, fiscal vs. monetary policy, the crush of customer service calls and where those $1,200 checks are going.

May 01, 2020
The stock market’s big April gains
00:08:54

The S&P 500 went up more than 12% in April. It was the stock market’s best month in three decades. Analysts say they expect to see a sales decline of more than 50% for automakers. Amazon’s warning on company spending. Relief efforts for undocumented immigrants.

May 01, 2020
Rent is due. Can people pay?
00:06:51

With May 1 rent due, there are strikes nationally with so many people out of work. Macy’s plans to reopen 68 stores on Monday. An important tax ruling for businesses that got Paycheck Protection Program money. South Africa eases restrictions.

May 01, 2020
Africa’s strictest lockdown begins to ease
00:06:17

From the BBC World Service: South Africa tries to boost its economy as COVID-19 restrictions have already led to heavy job losses. Pineapple prices have spiked there as more people start home brewing. International Workers’ Day turns virtual.

May 01, 2020
Small business emergency lending program expands fintechs’ portfolios
00:09:49

Host Molly Wood speaks with Felix Salmon, chief financial correspondent at Axios, about fintech companies getting involved in the PPP loan program for small businesses. He says PayPal, Square and other fintechs aren’t likely to beef up that side of their businesses beyond the federal program, mainly because they’re not well-equipped to gauge risks on loans that aren’t guaranteed by the government.

May 01, 2020
How about contact tracing for COVID-19 misinformation?
00:14:52

Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff, no great fan of Facebook, has asked other tech giants to follow the company’s example by contacting users who’ve interacted with misinformation. Plus, we’ll talk about the joy of vacuuming and the wonders of nature.

Apr 30, 2020
Confessions of a shopaholic
00:20:51

A woman grapples with her shopping addiction in quarantine.

By the way, we were just nominated for a Webby! Please take a second and vote for us at wbby.co/pod09.

Apr 30, 2020
Keep an eye on the labor force participation rate
00:27:00

We now know that more than 30 million people have filed for unemployment since early March. That’s roughly 1 in 5 people who had a job back in February, before the COVID-19 pandemic hit. But when we get unemployment numbers for April, the rate will likely be far below 20%. So what gives? Today we do the numbers. Plus: AMC bans Universal Pictures, corporate earnings are terrible and influencers are still … influencing.

Apr 30, 2020
The worst string of layoffs on record
00:09:35

Roughly 30.3 million people have now filed for jobless aid. How the pandemic is widening inequality. Tesla’s surprise report of profits during the first quarter of 2020. How big banks were temporarily locked out of the Paycheck Protection Program.

Apr 30, 2020
Low interest rates are a double-edged sword
00:06:58

The Federal Reserve has now decided to keep interest rates super low, near zero. Oil giant Shell cuts investor dividends for the first time in 80 years. And, game theory for robots — they’re learning economics, too, you know.

Apr 30, 2020
Eurozone countries feel the COVID-19 pain
00:06:16

From the BBC World Service: France and Spain posted their biggest economic declines in 25 years, while Italy starts its long road to recovery. Will the European Central Bank intervene? A deal between AstraZeneca and Oxford University could see the U.K. produce a COVID-19 vaccine.

Apr 30, 2020
COVID-19 tracing apps might not be optional at work
00:11:04

Host Molly Wood speaks with David Sapin, who works for consulting firm PwC, about the company’s new contact-tracing app. After an employee self-reports being positive for coronavirus, Sapin says, the human resources department could see if the exposed employee came into contact with co-workers and notify them. He says the app only traces contacts at the workplace, not outside.

Apr 30, 2020
Can states run out of unemployment money?
00:15:32

And can they go bankrupt? That’s just two of the questions we’re tackling in today’s “Whadda Ya Wanna Know Wednesday.” Plus: Should we be concerned Google is in so many schools? Why do big companies get small business money? And maybe the most important of all: How are we staying sane right now?

Apr 29, 2020
This crisis will get worse before it gets better
00:27:00

We’re starting to get a picture of just how much damage the pandemic is doing to the economy: GDP fell 4.8% in the first quarter, and this is the beginning. Plus: Why businesses don’t see the point in applying for emergency loans, the power and limitations of OSHA, and Michael Schur talks about bringing back “Parks and Recreation.”

Apr 29, 2020
Only the beginning of GDP decline
00:11:39

The biggest quarterly contraction in the U.S. economy since the 2008 financial crisis. Ford reports first-quarter losses. Surveying the meat industry amid supply chain disruption and demand shock. Pandemic problems for the global flower trade.

Apr 29, 2020
America’s meat supply and what we know
00:06:48

Some meat processing plants have been identified as virus hot spots, forcing them to close. But the president is keeping them open. The Airbus CEO on what the pandemic means for plane manufacturers. How to build resilient communities during COVID-19 recovery.

Apr 29, 2020
Airbus loses altitude
00:06:10

From the BBC World Service: The boss of Airbus says COVID-19 is the “gravest crisis” to ever hit the aviation industry, as its profits fall sharply. The global flower industry is wilting due to falling demand as producers are having to destroy blooms.

Apr 29, 2020
If it looks phishy, don’t click. COVID-19 is spawning lots of online scams.
00:09:05

Host Molly Wood speaks with Lily Hay Newman, a reporter at Wired, about the recent surge of phishing emails. Newman says with the distraction of the pandemic, people online are more vulnerable to hackers asking for information like login credentials. Some of these messages, she adds, are disguised as fast-food coupons, making it challenging to detect the fraud.

Apr 29, 2020
We need millions of tests to open this economy. So, where are they?
00:33:03

Coronavirus testing is way, way, waaaay behind here, folks. A lack of tests hobbled the government’s efforts to track the pandemic in the U.S. Now health experts say we need millions of tests every week to safely reopen the economy. Here to walk us through the problems in the testing supply chain is Loren Wold, director of biomedical research at the College of Nursing at Ohio State.

Apr 28, 2020
China may be back to work, but the supply chain isn’t
00:27:00

With China a little further along in restarting its economy, it might be reasonable to assume that a company whose supply chain is deeply intertwined with China might have a leg up right now. But it doesn’t really work that way. We’ll take a deep dive into those supply chains today. Plus, how Hollywood productions might work around COVID-19 and a conversation with the CEO of GoFundMe.

Apr 28, 2020
What do company forecasts say?
00:08:46

Some big corporations are predicting improvement in the coming weeks. The Trump administration is trying to ensure that Paycheck Protection loans go to the intended small businesses. Mastercard pledges to get unbanked individuals and small businesses into the financial system.

Apr 28, 2020
COVID-19 aid and inequality
00:07:24

Criticism that smaller and minority-owned businesses didn’t get their fair share from the first round of Paycheck Protection Program money. Wireless and internet carriers are extending grace periods. Apple and Google are set to release their joint contact tracing tool.

Apr 28, 2020
Profits plunge at Europe’s biggest bank
00:06:24

From the BBC World Service: HSBC halts job cuts as concerns mount over loan repayments. Takeout is back as New Zealand starts to relax lockdown restrictions. India criticizes the accuracy of Chinese-made COVID-19 testing kits and cancels an order.

Apr 28, 2020
Houseparty is having a moment. Are your guest lists updated?
00:10:48

Host Molly Wood speaks with the CEO of Houseparty, Sima Sistani, about the sudden surge in the use of the app as people quarantining at home connect for video chats with friends and family. Like Zoom, Houseparty’s privacy practices have come under scrutiny as millions more are using the platform. Keep a close eye on your connections lists, Sistani says, and privacy should not be an issue.

Apr 28, 2020
UFOs? Sure, why not.
00:12:20

After years of leaks and reportage, the Pentagon has finally declassified three videos of Navy pilots encountering unidentified flying objects. You know our own former Navy pilot and current sci-fi geek had to weigh in. But first, a bit about the Payroll Protection Program for small businesses, which restarted again today. After that, though: Aliens. Yes.

Apr 28, 2020
Will round two of small businesses loans go smoother?
00:27:00

Banks began accepting applications for $320 billion in new emergency payroll protection loans this morning. Last time, the process was unclear and bottlenecked. How’d things go today? We spent the day calling banks and small businesses to find out. Plus: The view from Shanghai, surprising essential businesses and why the stock market is not the economy.

Apr 27, 2020
Not all businesses that can reopen will
00:07:56

New guidelines for meat processors, as COVID-19 threatens food supply infrastructure. The SXSW film festival has partnered with Amazon to show some movies for free. Businesses in Georgia must make a decision about whether to reopen or not.

Apr 27, 2020
How will our world reopen?
00:06:59

Even as coronavirus cases and deaths continue to rise in some places, calls for reopening continue. Italy, which has had the longest lockdown in Europe, and New York share plans. And, how musicians are adapting to performances without crowds.

Apr 27, 2020
Boris Johnson says the lockdown must go on
00:06:37

From the BBC World Service: The British leader faces calls to ease restrictions as he returns from COVID-19 treatment. Spain, Germany and Switzerland start to reopen. Canceled garment contracts leave Bangladeshi workers reeling.

Apr 27, 2020
The coronavirus outbreak means an opportunity for fintech companies
00:05:45

In the United States, we’ve traditionally liked using cash and credit cards to pay for things. But the COVID-19 crisis means we’re buying different things in new ways. That represents an opportunity for people to start using financial technology apps like Venmo and Square, even in typically analog places, like farmers markets.

Apr 27, 2020
A very-happy happy hour
00:16:28

First of all, we have to kick off this episode with a big thank you. In just two days, 230 of you donated to support the show. If you wanna join that group, head to Marketplace.org/givesmart. Also on tap today: the continuing scandal in the U.S. Navy, how to reopen local economies, and… New Yorker cartoons? This is public radio after all.

 

 

Apr 24, 2020
Face masks become a lifeline for retailers
00:27:00

Throughout the economy, you’re seeing businesses pivot in response to COVID-19. Auto plants are making ventilators, distilleries are making hand sanitizer and many clothing retailers are making masks. Plus: that Congressional Budget Office report about how bad things will get, what happens when bodegas close down and love in the time of coronavirus.

Apr 24, 2020
Monitoring the economy in real time
00:07:58

The New York Fed builds a new model to measure GDP growth with weekly data. One of the largest producers of shale oil in North Dakota is turning off the spigots for now. Airlines report quarterly losses.

Apr 24, 2020
New federal money for small businesses
00:08:10

The House passed a nearly $500 billion bill authorizing more money for small business loans. Will consumers visit businesses that reopen in certain states? How are day laborers dealing with even more uncertainty in their work lives?

Apr 24, 2020
Venezuelans break lockdown amid food and fuel shortages
00:07:18

From the BBC World Service: The collapse in global oil prices is adding to the stress on Venezuela’s fragile economy. What does the plunge mean for other oil-producing countries? COVID-19 restrictions take a toll on Ramadan preparations in Egypt.

Apr 24, 2020
We can still watch TV together — virtually, that is
00:07:10

Host Molly Wood speaks with VentureBeat’s Dean Takahashi about simultaneous show and movie watching options that are helping us be alone together during the pandemic. He says people have the options of creating group watches via Netflix Party and gaming streaming sites. “Gaming is the new social network,” he says.

Apr 24, 2020
That new $484 billion aid package isn’t enough
00:17:50

Right before we started the taping, the House of Representatives passed another big coronavirus relief bill. President Donald Trump has said he will sign it, but how long will it last? Kai’s predicting another bill in less than 12 days. Plus: The “invisible menace” in Facebook, and we hear from a priest who’s enjoying some Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA (with a selfie you can find on our site).

Correction (4/23/20): A previous version of this story misstated the value of the new coronavirus aid bill. It’s worth $484 billion.

Apr 23, 2020
A $35,000 COVID bill
00:20:33

Danni Askini fought cancer for 18 months before getting COVID-19. Their focus was on surviving, not the cost of care. That didn’t make the bill any easier to take.

Apr 23, 2020
We need to change our economic indicators to keep up with the crisis
00:27:00

With 27 million jobs vaporized in just five weeks, economists, analysts and other observers are realizing that quarterly and monthly economic data just isn’t cutting it anymore. Today, we look at how looking at the economy has changed. Plus: the need for more contact tracers, the states leading on small business loans and putting a dollar value on human life.

Apr 23, 2020
All hiring since the Great Recession is gone
00:08:01

About 4.4 million more people signed up for unemployment benefits last week, bringing to 26 million the total number of laid-off people turning to states for this help in just five weeks. How Vietnam has stopped the spread of COVID-19. A look at some of the unintended consequences of coronavirus policy changes so far.

Apr 23, 2020
A long lockdown makes economic sense
00:07:56

Do unemployment benefits cover the cost of living? Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says states should be allowed to go bankrupt. One economist’s model shows how costly staying open with no lockdown would be for the U.S.

Apr 23, 2020
Europe votes on COVID-19 stimulus
00:06:36

From the BBC World Service: Ahead of an EU summit, Germany’s leader calls for a “spirit of solidarity” on stimulus measures. How has Vietnam tackled COVID-19 so effectively? Some domestic workers are jobless and stranded far from home.

Apr 23, 2020
Digital ads are disappearing, seriously denting revenue for Big Tech
00:08:54

Host Molly Wood speaks with Sara Fischer, a media reporter at Axios, about the state of the digital advertising industry. Usually, Fischer said, the ad industry as a whole grows along with U.S. GDP, with the digital segment outperforming. Since the economy has gone south during the coronavirus pandemic, the digital ad industry’s initial 2020 growth estimate of 12% has dwindled to 4%. Yet even its shriveled prospects look good relative to other media.

Apr 23, 2020
Where will all that extra oil go?
00:16:43

It’s time for another “Whaddya Wanna Know Wednesday,” where Kai and Molly take your questions about the economics of the COVID-19 crisis. On the docket today: What’s it take for contact tracing apps to work? Where will we keep all that excess oil? And the economic impact of mass casualties. You know how we like to keep it light.

By the way, we love doing five episodes per week, but this doesn’t work without your help. Consider a donation at Marketplace.org/givesmart.

Apr 23, 2020
Americans aren’t very good at saving money
00:27:00

How’s your savings account looking? According to the data, not great. But it’s not your fault. Today, we’ll look at the cultural and economic forces that make Americans bad at saving money. Plus: how businesses are preparing to reopen, state funding in a crisis and Netflix is (surprise!) doing pretty well right now.

Apr 22, 2020
New money for COVID-19 relief
00:08:19

The House of Representatives is expected to pass new coronavirus relief money. A report from the World Bank warns that money sent from abroad by migrant workers to their families could fall by as much as 20%. Economic research on the expected and real-time effects of COVID-19.

Apr 22, 2020
Racial disparities among those losing jobs
00:07:54

The worst job and income losses are happening to black and Hispanic workers. Netflix added nearly 16 million new customers in the first quarter. Earnings for pizza delivery companies are expected to be flat or up a bit.

Apr 22, 2020
South Africa catches up on COVID-19 stimulus
00:06:42

From the BBC World Service: South Africa will spend 10% of its economic output on pandemic supports. What can we learn from Germany’s mass-testing approach to COVID-19? Australia’s renewables sector could be the key to economic recovery.

Apr 22, 2020
Is 3D printing ready to fill the gaps in COVID-19 medical equipment needs?
00:08:02

Host Molly Wood speaks with Avi Reichental, an early pioneer in 3D printing, about how 3D printers could help fill the gap for much needed PPE during this pandemic. He says that not only are companies making things, but so are many people who have 3D printers at home. Now, he says, FDA regulations should be revisited and revised so 3D PPE can be quickly approved and certified.

Apr 22, 2020
Trump’s OSHA could mandate essential worker protections, but it hasn’t. Why not?
00:32:40

In the U.S., there are no specific regulations for protecting workers from a disease like COVID-19. President Donald Trump could use the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to mandate essential worker protections, but he hasn’t. Why not? To help talk us through it, we’re joined by Dr. David Michaels, who ran OSHA under President Barack Obama.

Apr 22, 2020
Some home health aides are on duty 24/7
00:27:00

Home health care workers are fighting COVID-19 by trying to keep their clients out of emergency rooms, which sometimes means quarantining with them. Plus: Oil’s storage shortage, declining home sales and how we talk to each other on Venmo now.

Apr 21, 2020
The states relaxing COVID-19 restrictions
00:08:21

Crude oil is nearly free for the taking. We explain why. Some states are going ahead and reopening parts of their economies, even though large-scale testing for this COVID-19 virus still isn’t available.

Apr 21, 2020
Who wants all this oil?
00:08:27

Oil producers are running out of places to put the overflow. How did we get to this point? A new roadmap for states to get access to the millions of COVID-19 tests that governors say they need to reopen economies.

Apr 21, 2020
Will oil woes mean cheaper gas?
00:07:27

From the BBC World Service: U.S. oil prices rebound after falling below zero for the first time in history. A Bollywood movie stunt double says she’s struggling financially as India’s film industry remains shut down.

Apr 21, 2020
Elections 2020: Pandemic may accelerate online voting solutions
00:12:08

Host Molly Wood speaks to Michael Alvarez, professor of political and computational social science at Caltech, about the possibility of people voting online in the November general election. During this pandemic, when people want to minimize coming into contact with other people and anything physical that can potentially transmit COVID-19, like paper, Alvarez says there might be the possibility of people voting through an app to minimize that friction. But federal and state governments, he adds, have to come up with a plan to make that a smooth transition for everyone and avoid any technical crises.

Apr 21, 2020
Who’s organizing those anti-quarantine protests?
00:12:53

Large Facebook groups appear to be amassing protests against local shelter-in-place orders, but the real organizers are apparently a trio of pro-gun activists. We’ll talk about it and the implications of taking those pages down. Plus: A new resource for tracking the virus and how Molly’s staying entertained at home.

Apr 21, 2020
How do you end up with negative oil prices?
00:27:00

U.S. crude oil prices plunged into negative territory today for the first time, falling to minus $37.63 per barrel. That’s possible because storage is the most valuable commodity in the commodity market. We’ll explain. Plus: how experts reckon with COVID-19’s impact on GDP and a conversation with a banker who’s giving small business loans.

Apr 20, 2020
COVID-19 quarantines spark rise in marijuana sales
00:08:27

The Paycheck Protection Program could be getting a boost. Also, Julia Coronado joins us to talk about the markets. Then, we examine how in some states, stay-at-home could mean smoke at home, as marijuana sales have increased due to the COVID-19 repercussions.

Apr 20, 2020
Oil dives as Europe relaxes
00:07:54

From the BBC World Service: Small stores, bookshops and garages start to reopen in Germany. Oil prices reach a 21-year low over growing storage and demand worries. South Africa Airways and Virgin Australia are close to collapse.

Apr 20, 2020
Costco and Instacart delivery service now includes prescription drugs
00:06:51

Leaders in Congress appear to be closing in on a deal with the Trump administration to inject more funds into a small business loan program. With the demand for delivery at a premium, Costco and Instacart have expanded their partnership to include prescription drug delivery. Also, a look into concerns about the U.S. meat supply chain.

Apr 20, 2020
Doing school online: plenty of tech tools, and a learning curve
00:09:14

Host Molly Wood speaks with Holli Plummer, who teaches English and history at a Los Angeles private school, about the learning curve all teachers and students are facing now that everything is being taught online. Plummer says teachers from all over the world are coming together to find solutions to making online learning as effective as traditional classes.

Apr 20, 2020
Whatever you’re going through, it’s OK
00:21:17

It’s important to take care of yourself in these trying times, so we’re back with another happy hour episode, aka Economics on Tap. We’ll cover Trump’s “liberate” tweets, some new mental health data and this oral history of pandemic warnings in Wired. Then a special guest stops by and things get a little chaotic.

Apr 18, 2020
China and the U.S. are growing (or not growing) apart
00:27:00

China’s first-quarter GDP contracted for the first time since 1992, and a new survey shows more American executives seeing the two countries “decoupling” economically. Today we look at another dimension of the pandemic and what it means for global supply chains. Plus: what it’s like to run an unemployment insurance program right now.

Apr 17, 2020
Paying partial rent during the crisis
00:07:09

This month, 84% of apartment dwellers paid rent by April 12. But not everyone could pay all of it. The stock market is buoyed by some health care news. The president of the Philadelphia Fed offers some insight.

Apr 17, 2020
More COVID-19 testing will be key
00:07:15

Among the new federal guidelines for easing the economy back up is more widespread testing. A global perspective on getting back to work after sheltering in place. China’s economy contracts for the first time in decades.

Apr 17, 2020
China’s economy shrinks
00:06:11

From the BBC World Service: The COVID-19 pandemic takes its toll on the world’s second largest economy. Hennessy, orange juice and an unlikely alliance in this week’s global business roundup. What can Iceland teach the rest of the world about virus testing?

Apr 17, 2020
Not enough VR headsets to meet demand. Thanks / no thanks, COVID-19.
00:07:20

Host Molly Wood speaks with Adi Robertson, a senior reporter at The Verge, about how virtual reality is having its time right now. However, due to the global pandemic, VR headsets are on a shortage, which might make the product miss its spotlight. Robertson says we shouldn’t think of VR as a tool for online and homeschooling because it’s expensive and inaccessible for students, given the shortage — not to mention students who already have a hard time getting access to the internet and a decent computer.

Apr 17, 2020
Where Is Congress?
00:14:48

Lawmakers are deadlocked over additional funding for struggling small businesses, and the already-approved loans are almost gone. So why did the Senate adjourn today? And where’s the House? We’ll talk about it. Plus: Why testing is still the biggest coronavirus story, and the 99-year-old raising money for British health services.

Apr 16, 2020
What it’s like getting an abortion in Texas right now
00:15:29

The clock is ticking for one college student after she finds out she’s pregnant in the middle of a pandemic, in a state that’s trying to restrict abortion.

Apr 16, 2020
The real number of unemployed Americans is even higher
00:27:00

Five million more people filed for unemployment insurance last week, bringing the total past 20 million for the month. But the real number is actually much higher. Today, we look at who isn’t counted. Plus, earnings season’s new “COVID metrics,” the New Yorkers not paying rent and the high delivery app fees squeezing restaurants.

Apr 16, 2020
Small business aid is running out
00:07:02

The Payroll Protection Program has run through its money already. About 5.25 million people filed for state unemployment benefits in the last week. Buses in Detroit are now free, but bus drivers have safety concerns as essential workers.

Apr 16, 2020
States under strain with unemployment soaring
00:07:03

Context on the millions more who signed up for state unemployment benefits in the last week. Big banks pledge that stimulus checks will not go toward covering overdraft fees and such. Is the current economic narrative a self-fulfilling prophecy?

Apr 16, 2020
The U.K. is flying in farmworkers
00:06:28

From the BBC World Service: Britain flies in foreign workers to harvest fruit during the COVID-19 outbreak. Germany starts to open up. The challenges of lockdown for many Indian migrant workers.

Apr 16, 2020
Can tech trace the spread of coronavirus? Maybe. Maybe not.
00:09:56

When someone tests positive for COVID-19, one way to try to prevent its spread is for public health officials to track down all the people that person has been in contact with and then isolate them. This is called contact tracing, and the U.S. hasn’t done a great job of it so far. Now Big Tech wants to get involved. Apple and Google announced a program where they allow people who’ve tested positive for the virus to tell an app, which then alerts people nearby via Bluetooth technology. Will it work? “Marketplace Tech” host Molly Wood discusses that with Ross Anderson, a professor of security engineering at the University of Cambridge.

Apr 16, 2020
Why did Zoom win the teleconference race?
00:14:26

There’s a lot of video conferencing software out there, so why did the relatively new Zoom take over the public consciousness so quickly? That’s just one question we try to answer in this week’s Waddaya Want to Know Wednesday episode. Also discussed: inflation, the job market for 2020 graduates and which businesses have actually gotten their relief loans.

Apr 16, 2020
Small businesses are still waiting for relief
00:27:00

As of today, the Small Business Administration’s pandemic emergency lending program has approved more than 1.3 million loan applications worth nearly $300 billion. We’ll check in on the state of the program and some businesses that have applied. Plus, the spring clothing stranded in stores, coronavirus’ effect on college admissions and the country’s yeast shortage.

Apr 15, 2020
9% of U.S. spending has stopped
00:08:51

Retail sales fell dramatically in March, slightly more than the pessimistic forecasts of economists. How to gradually lift stay-at-home orders and phase in economic activity. Do we pay enough to workers at the frontlines of this pandemic? Airlines reach a bailout deal.

Apr 15, 2020
The mental health apps boom
00:07:00

When you turn off large parts of the economy, cities and states aren’t collecting as much in taxes. New numbers on homebuilders’ confidence — or pessimism. Even before the pandemic, online therapy and therapy apps were booming.

Apr 15, 2020
Serving up gourmet student lunches
00:06:10

From the BBC World Service: G-20 officials will decide whether to support an agreement to suspend debt payments for some of the world’s poorest economies. In Spain, some people are heading back to work. One top London chef is swapping the banquet hall for the lunch hall to help feed kids.

Apr 15, 2020
Startup helps feed bank accounts of food stamp recipients
00:10:35

Host Molly Wood speaks with Jimmy Chen, founder and CEO of the startup Propel, which makes an app called Fresh EBT. The app helps recipients of SNAP, also known as food stamps, digitally check their balances. Now, Propel has partnered with GiveDirectly, a nonprofit, to give a one-time cash gift to users of the Fresh EBT app, beginning in areas hardest hit by COVID-19.

Apr 15, 2020
There’s plenty of food. Why can’t we get it?
00:32:32

No matter how many times we hear that the U.S. has plenty of food, the sight of empty grocery store shelves can still provoke anxiety. Should we worry? Here to talk us through the disruptions in the supply chain is Millie Munshi, an agriculture editor at Bloomberg. Plus, we’ll hear from listeners struggling to access small business relief loans.

Apr 15, 2020
It was supposed to be Tax Day tomorrow
00:27:00

In a normal year, the nation’s procrastinators would be firing up tax software or digging around for a W-2 tonight. But now that tax day is delayed three months, there’s a different kind of chaos unfolding for accountants. Plus: a new IMF outlook, the challenges of managing staff remotely and an unexpected essential business: livestock auctions.

Apr 14, 2020
Millions put mortgage payments on hold
00:08:29