Climate One

By Climate One at The Commonwealth Club

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Subscribers: 215
Reviews: 2

Benno Hansen
 Jul 11, 2019
Climate change is a ratings killer, but Climate One just keep on going with very serious, qualified and important episodes.

Nina Fautré
 Jul 10, 2019
Climate One gets right into the hottest (pun intended) topics on global warming, giving a voice to varied points of view. I have learnt a lot from the guests, and also enjoy the audience questions. Extra stars for recording live !

Description

Greg Dalton is changing the conversation on energy, economy and the environment by offering candid discussion from climate scientists, policymakers, activists, and concerned citizens. By gathering inspiring, credible, and compelling information, he provides an essential resource to change-makers looking to make a difference.

Episode Date
Daniel Yergin: Energy, Markets and the Clash of Nations
51:00

From pipelines to clean power, major economies like Russia and China are brokering developments in oil, gas, and renewables that will shape climate and politics for years to come. But the arrival of COVID, plummeting oil prices, and renewed expectations for addressing diversity and sustainability are changing the way successful industries must do business.

Will the pursuit of energy and economic efficiency help solve our global dependence on fossil fuels — or leave many societies behind? Are the days of shareholder capitalism and profit-first decision-making behind us?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Daniel Yergin, Author, The New Map: Energy, Climate, and the Clash of Nations
Roger Martin, Author, When More is Not Better: Overcoming America’s Obsession with Economic Efficiency

This program was recorded on August 24 and September 14, 2020.

Sep 18, 2020
Living With Fire
52:00

Wildfires are nothing new – they’ve been part of the west’s ecology for millennia. But burning fossil fuels and suppressing the burning of forests over the past century have led to larger, more frequent and ever-more catastrophic wildfires. And burning trees release carbon dioxide. California’s fires now are so big and fierce that they threaten to erase the state’s progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. And even for those miles from the flames, the smoke from raging wildfires presents an extra danger in the age of coronavirus.

"How and when exposure to wildfire smoke increases the likelihood of infection with COVID-19, we’re still trying to figure that out," says Vin Gupta of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. "But there is a clear symmetry between exposure and the likelihood of infection."

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:

Part 1:
Wade Crowfoot, California Secretary of Natural Resources
Julie Cart, Reporter, CalMatters

Part 2:
Leroy Westerling, Professor of Management of Complex Systems, University of California, Merced

Part 3:
Vin Gupta, Affiliate Assistant Professor of Health Metrics Sciences at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington

Additional Interview:
Lenya Quinn-Davidson
, Director of the Northern California Prescribed Fire Council.

This episode was recorded in August 2020.

Sep 11, 2020
Polluting and Providing: The Dirty Energy Dilemma
52:00

The cost and health burdens of electricity production have long been higher for low-income communities of color than for wealthy white ones. But for many of those communities the fossil fuel industry is also a source of jobs, tax dollars, and cheap energy. “It makes it difficult for anyone to speak out against the hand that’s feeding them,” says Ivan Penn, Alternative Energy Reporter for The New York Times. “The NAACP would typically support the positions of the utility companies.” So is the industry an example of community leadership, manipulative greenwashing — or something in between?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Speakers:
Derrick Hollie, President, Reaching America
Jacqueline Patterson, Director, NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program
Ivan Penn, Alternative Energy Reporter, The New York Times
Vien Truong, Climate Justice Director, Tom Steyer PAC

Additional Interview:
Andres Soto, Richmond Community Organizer, Communities for a Better Environment

This program was recorded via video on August 11, 2020.

Sep 04, 2020
Climate Change Through the Artist's Eyes with Alonzo King
51:00

Can art help us process our changing climate? The story of climate change is typically told in the language of facts and figures, graphs and charts. But through dance, music, sculpture and other media, artists can reach people on a deeper and more emotional level, designing cultural moments that can bring us together - and bring us to tears.

Choreographer Alonzo King sees the union of art and science as the perfect balancing act. “There is nothing that exists that you can create that does not have science -- it's impossible,” says King. “There's nothing that doesn't have music. It's impossible.”

A conversation about art, beauty and humanity in the age of climate disruption.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Alonzo King, Choreographer and Founder, LINES Ballet
Nora Lawrence, Senior Curator, Storm King Art Center

Additional Speaker:
Adam Schoenberg, Composer

This program was generously underwritten by the Sidney E. Frank Foundation and was recorded via video on August 6, 2020.

Aug 28, 2020
COVID-19 and Climate: Implications for our Food System
51:00

Coronavirus outbreaks in food markets, food plants, and farmworker communities have impacted food access and put a spotlight on food insecurity. Farmers are hurting as supply chains for fresh, perishable foods shrivel, while food banks have seen a surge in demand that has required distribution support from the National Guard. “Farmers saw a lot of increased demand direct to consumer, which requires extra labor, extra packaging -- just so much time essentially creating a whole new business model,” says Lisa Held, Senior Reporter with Civil Eats. Will COVID-19 change our food system for good?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Lisa Held, Senior Policy Reporter, Civil Eats
Karen Ross, Secretary, California Department of Food and Agriculture
Helene York, Professor, Food Business School, Culinary Institute of America

Additional Speakers:
Shay Myers, CEO, Owyhee Produce
Gabriel Morales, Program Director, Brandworkers

This program was recorded via video on July 30, 2020.

Aug 21, 2020
Flooding in America
52:00

Miami may be the poster child of rising waters in the U.S., but further inland, states are grappling with torrential flooding that is becoming the new norm. The Great Flood of 2019 caused destroyed acres of farmland and caused billions in damage throughout the Midwest. And scientists predict that there’s more climate-related precipitation to come. What does that mean for America’s aging infrastructure?

“It’s absolutely going to fail for future climate events,” warns Martha Shulski of the Nebraska State Climate Office. “If you're not planning for the climate of 2040 or 2060 then there's going to be failure. There's going to be impacts in a very extreme way perhaps.”

What happens when there is too much water — or not enough? “The problem with water is we treat it as if it’s, you know, inexhaustible,” says Betsy Otto, Global Water Director at the World Resources Institute. How are companies and communities planning for a future of water saturation and scarcity?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Julia Kumari Drapkin, CEO and Founder, ISeeChange
Ed Kearns, Chief Data Officer, First Street Foundation
Martha Shulski, Director, Nebraska State Climate Office; Nebraska State Climatologist
Betsy Otto, Global Water Director, World Resources Institute

Additional interview:
Jack Mulliken, farmer in Northeast Nebraska

This program was recorded on July 28 and August 4, 2020, and is generously underwritten by the Water Foundation.

Aug 14, 2020
Billion Dollar Burger
51:00

Long before the coronavirus began disrupting America’s trillion-dollar meat industry, lab-grown proteins were upending the way we consume chicken, pork, and beef. With an environmental footprint far smaller than traditional animal agriculture, are cell-cultured and plant-based meat products — now on the menus of major chains like Burger King — still the future of food?

"While no one should reasonably be expected to eat a thousand dollar, million dollar burger, so too should we really be questioning the concept of a dollar burger," says Sophie Egan, author of How to Be a Conscious Eater: Making Food Choices That Are Good for You, Others, and the Planet. Will food science and tech help us make better-informed decisions for our bodies and the planet, or do we need to get back to basics?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Sophie Egan, Author, How to Be a Conscious Eater: Making Food Choices That Are Good for You, Others, and the Planet
Chase Purdy, Author, Billion Dollar Burger: Inside Big Tech’s Race for the Future of Food

Additional Speaker:
Riana Lynn, CEO of Journey Foods

This program was recorded via video on July 9, 2020.

Aug 07, 2020
The Future Earth: Eric Holthaus and Katharine Wilkinson
51:00

Science has given us a realistic picture of what Earth will look like with unmitigated climate change: increased extreme weather events, crippled economies, and a world where those with the least are the hardest hit.

By creating community and sharing feelings of fear and determination, “you can rely on each other and feed off each other…having an ecosystem of all these different people and entities and organizations that are involved in this great transformation effort is so critical,” says Project Drawdown VP Katharine Wilkinson.

What would a radically re-envisioned future look like? What solutions do we need to replace tomorrow’s doom-and-gloom projections with thriving equitable cities, renewed political consciousness and carbon-free economies? A conversation on reimagining our role in creating climate solutions.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Eric Holthaus, Author, The Future Earth: A Radical Vision for What's Possible in the Age of Warming (HarperOne, 2020)
Katharine Wilkinson, Vice President, Project Drawdown

Additional Speaker: Michael Méndez, assistant professor of environmental planning and policy at the University of California, Irvine

This program was recorded via video on July 21, 2020.

Jul 31, 2020
Billionaire Wilderness
51:00

For many of us, the story of the American wilderness begins when Europeans arrived on these shores and began conquering it. The wide open spaces of the American West loom large in our country’s mythology. But what often gets written out is the history and culture of those native societies who were here to begin with - and whose relationship to this land is very different.

In some places like Jackson Hole, Wyoming, one-percenters contribute generously to preserve and protect the pristine wilderness they love, while the people who work for them are often struggling, working two or three jobs. “The idea of ...giving your time and philanthropy to protect nature is through this elite sort of white lens that can be based on, you know, this romanticized view of nature,” Farrell says. “And a nature that for example for Yellowstone had to remove certain people to create that Eden.”

How are public and private land interests competing in the American West? Can conservation and recreation coalesce in a way that is inclusive of all communities?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Dina Gilio-Whitaker, American Indian Studies Lecturer, California State University San Marcos
Justin Farrell, Author, Billionaire Wilderness: The Ultra-Wealthy and the Remaking of the American West (Princeton University Press, 2020)
Diane Regas, President and Chief Executive Officer, The Trust for Public Land

Additional interview: Jessica Newton, Founder, Vibe Tribe Adventures

This program was recorded via video on July 7, 2020.

Jul 24, 2020
John Kerry: The Global Dynamics Of Decarbonization
51:00

The COVID-19 pandemic is expected to cut U.S. carbon emissions by 7.5% in 2020 — exactly the rate needed globally to meet the climate goals outlined in the Paris Agreement. Can other major economies like China and Europe make plans to decarbonize at the same rate without throwing their economies over a cliff? What happens when the world’s top clean energy exporters are also the top greenhouse gas emitters? With post-COVID economic recovery plans taking precedence, will the transition to a clean economy be pushed to the back burner?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests (in order of appearance):
John Kerry, Former U.S. Senator and Secretary of State
Justin Wu, Head of Asia-Pacific, Bloomberg NEF
David Sandalow, Inaugural Fellow, Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University
Julia Poliscanova, Senior Director of Vehicles & E-mobility, Transport & Environment
Lisa Fischer, Senior Policy Advisor, E3G

This program was recorded between April 21 and June 26, 2020.

Jul 17, 2020
The 2020 Election with Tiffany Cross, Rick Wilson and Rich Thau
51:00

Racism, police and the pandemic are dominating hearts and headlines, but will they translate to votes in national and regional elections? One study found wavering Trump voters rank immigration and climate change as top reasons for a possible vote change, but it’s unclear if that will materialize. Other studies contend climate doesn’t even rank on the minds of swing voters. Young, liberal Americans are leading the charge on climate, but Bernie Sanders learned they are more likely to protest than vote.

What issues are top of mind for Obama-Trump voters in swing states? How will the Coronavirus and racial justice crises of 2020 impact voters this cycle?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Tiffany Cross, Co-Founder, The Beat DC; Author, Say It Louder! Black Voters, White Narratives, and Saving Our Democracy
Rich Thau, President & Co-founder, Engagious
Rick Wilson, Republican Political Strategist

This program was recorded via video on June 23, 2020

Jul 10, 2020
Real Talk: Racism and Climate
51:00

The national uprising ignited by the murder of George Floyd has cast a spotlight on the country’s embedded, institutional racism, including the fraught relationship between environmentalism and communities of color. Air pollution, severe weather and the economic upheaval brought on by climate change impacts black and minority communities first and worst, yet their voices are often left out of policy responses and market solutions. How can we amplify and advocate for leaders of color in the fight against climate change? What can allies do to create a green movement that is inclusive and actively anti-racist?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Mustafa Santiago Ali, Vice President of Environmental Justice, Climate, and Community Revitalization, National Wildlife Federation
Glynda Carr, CEO and Co-Founder, Higher Heights for America
Robert Bullard, Distinguished Professor of Urban Planning and Environmental Policy, Texas Southern University

This program was recorded via video on June 11, 2020

Jul 02, 2020
Reimagining Capitalism: Wealth, Power, and Patriarchy
51:00

Expanding oil extraction and clean energy, supporting capitalism while fighting climate change: can humans ever really have it all? In their new books, authors Hope Jahren and Rebecca Henderson explore how a healthy climate might coexist with a consumption-driven economy — and what we need to change to get the best of both worlds.

Meanwhile, is Norway the perfect example of having it all — or just a walking contradiction? Like “a drug dealer who doesn’t use its own product”, Norway’s sovereign wealth fund is the largest in the world, supported exclusively by petroleum revenues. As they continue to explore new avenues for drilling, the country has also moved away from using the fossil fuels they produce, electrifying their economy and leading in climate friendly technologies.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests (Part 1):
Hope Jahren, Researcher, Centre for Earth Evolution and Dynamics, University of Oslo
Rebecca Henderson, John and Natty McArthur University Professor, Harvard University

Guests (Part 2):
Richard Milne, Nordic and Baltic Correspondent, The Financial Times
Sveinung Rotevatn, Norwegian Minister of Climate and Environment

Part 1 of this program was recorded on April 7, 2020.

Part 2 of this program was recorded on May 25, 2020.

Jun 26, 2020
Empowering Women: The Climate Solution We Don’t Talk About
52:00

As the global population approaches eight billion, humans continue to test the number of bodies that can fit onto a planet of finite resources. Empowering women through access to education and family planning may be at the core of establishing a healthy population balance, not just for the planet’s sake, but for ours. So why aren’t we talking about it more? How big a role can gender equity play in reducing our global carbon footprint — and who gets to decide?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Musimbi Kanyoro, Former President & CEO, Global Fund for Women; Chair of the Board, United World Colleges
Ertharin Cousin, Visiting Scholar, Stanford Center on Food Security and the Environment; Former Director, World Food Programme
Corrine Sanchez, Executive Director, Tewa Women United

Additional speaker:
Evelyne Ajwang, Programme Manager MNCH/FP at Pathfinder International

This program was recorded via video on May 21, 2020.

Jun 19, 2020
Will Climate Matter in the Election?
51:00

With less than four months before early voting begins in the presidential election, America is enraged and inflamed across the country. People of all races are expressing their anger and solidarity in the streets and on social media.

Separately, COVID infection rates are rising in over 20 states including South Carolina, Georgia, Utah and Washington. Still, primary voting continues apace. So how will the turmoil across America impact the November election? How will voters cast their ballots? And how will climate concerns rank amid racial strife and the global pandemic?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Vanessa Hauc, Journalist, Telemundo
Jeff Nesbit, Executive Director, Climate Nexus
Nathaniel Stinnett, Founder and Executive Director, Environmental Voter Project

Additional interviews:
Antony Leiserowitz, Director, Yale Program on Climate Change Communication
Natasha Kennedy, graphic designer in Seattle

This program was recorded via live stream on June 3, 2020.

Jun 12, 2020
A Decade of Oil: From Deepwater Horizon to Deflation
51:00

America's latest oil boom began with a bang, literally, on Earth Day, 2010. That’s when an offshore oil rig owned by BP exploded, killing eleven workers and spilling nearly five million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. John Hofmeister, co-founder of Citizens for Affordable Energy, was in Washington D.C. at the time.

“We simply have to get what are called negative emissions. The oil and gas industry, I think, is supremely qualified to have the scale, to have the engineers, to have this expertise, to undertake problems like that.” But can this tiger change its stripes? Heather Richards, who follows the oil industry for Energy & Environment News, is not so sure.

“Even though [the oil and gas business] has expertise, I don't think it's necessarily quite as easy to shift this industry,” she says. “It's difficult I think from this seat to say with great confidence ‘we’re just gonna move into the offshore wind, we’ll just do that.’”

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
John Hofmeister, Former President, Shell Oil Company; Founder and Chief Executive, Citizens for Affordable Energy
William K. Reilly, Former U.S. EPA Administrator; Co-Chair, National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill
Heather Richards, Energy Reporter, Energy & Environment News

This program was recorded via video on May 19, 2020.

Jun 05, 2020
REWIND: Fate of Food / Plate to Planet
51:00

How do we go about feeding a planet that’s hotter, drier, and more crowded than ever? The connection between global warming and the dinner table isn’t always obvious when we go to the grocery store. But our choices about how we put food on our plates, and what we do with the waste, contribute to as much as one third of total greenhouse-gas emissions. How can we continue to feed the planet without destroying it in the process? Can a clean, climate-resilient food system be built to distribute calories in a way that is efficient and equitable?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests (Part 1):
Twilight Greenaway, Contributing Editor, Civil Eats
Amanda Little, Professor of Journalism, Vanderbilt University

Guests (Part 2):
Mark Kurlansky, Author, MILK! A 10,000-Year Food Fracas
Anna Lappé, Author, Diet for a Hot Planet: The Climate Crisis at the End of Your Fork)

Part 1 was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco on June 18, 2019.
Part 2 was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco on May 16, 2018.

May 29, 2020
COVID-19 and Climate: The Future of Energy
51:00

After decades of relying on imported oil, the U.S. achieved the unthinkable and became the world’s largest producer. Production has doubled over the past decade, and in February reached its highest level ever - thirteen million barrels a day. But as it turns out, all of that overabundance has led to a different kind of oil crisis. “We’re producing more oil and gas than ever,and this industry’s stocks are tanking,” says Amy Harder, energy reporter for Axios. Meanwhile, renewables are experiencing unprecedented growth. What will be the lasting impact of the COVID-19 recession? What is the future of energy in a post-pandemic world?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Amy Harder, Energy Reporter, Axios
Jason Bordoff, Founding Director, Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University
Scott Jacobs, CEO and Co-founder, Generate Capital
Julia Pyper, Host and Producer, Political Climate Podcast

Additional interview: Chris Rawlings, founder of Veteran L.E.D.

This program was recorded via video on May 6, 2020.

May 22, 2020
Storytelling Through the Climate Crisis
52:00

How do we confront the reality of a future that will be hauntingly different from today? Some authors are using fiction to create relatable narratives while sparing us from a deluge of sobering facts that can make audiences feel detached. The dystopian worlds in the films Mad Max and The Hunger Games do the same to both entertain and distance viewers from the realities of an increasingly destabilized climate. Can fiction give access to hopes and fears that we can’t handle in our daily lives? How are authors like Jenny Offill and Roy Scranton using stories that let readers experience climate change, while also keeping it at arms’ length?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Jenny Offill, Author, Weather
Roy Scranton, Author, Learning to Die in the Anthropocene

This program was recorded via live stream on April 10, 2020.

May 15, 2020
Zero-Emission Cities
51:00

Can we solve the climate crisis by reimagining our cities? Climate activists have long envisioned the zero-carbon cities of the future. Now, with COVID-19 shutting down congested urban areas, city dwellers from Los Angeles to New Delhi are getting a rare taste of clean air and blue skies.

But the view is also more clear of things more painful to see - social inequalities that have existed for generations. “This is an opportunity to think about what kind of systems do we actually want, what kind of future do we envision for our cities and for our economy,” says sustainability expert Eva Gladek. “And how do we actually try to address multiple challenges at once when looking toward that future.”

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Ani Dasgupta, Global Director, World Resources Institute, Ross Center for Sustainable Cities
Eva Gladek, Founder and CEO, Metabolic
Lauren Faber O'Connor, Chief Sustainability Officer, Office of Mayor Eric Garcetti, City of Los Angeles

Additional interview: Lubna Ahmed, Director of Environmental Health, WE ACT for Environmental Justice

This program is generously underwritten by ClimateWorks Foundation and was recorded via video on April 20, 2020.

May 08, 2020
Fossil Fuels in the Ground and in Your Portfolio
51:00

When institutional investors divest from fossil fuel companies, does it make a difference, or is the impact merely symbolic? Some advocate keeping your stock and your influence, using investor dollars to encourage change from within. We’re not all managing billions in assets, but how can we use our nest eggs to help finance a green economy?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Brian Deese, Managing Director, Global Head of Sustainable Investing, BlackRock
Lori Keith, Portfolio Manager, Parnassus Investments
Pratima Rangarajan, CEO, Oil and Gas Climate Initiative
Anne Simpson, Director of Board Governance & Strategy, CalPERS

This program was recorded via video on April 16, 2020.

May 01, 2020
COVID-19 and Climate: Economic Impacts
52:00

The COVID-19 recession is unfolding at historic speed and depth. New jobless claims reached a record 10 million in just two weeks. Wall Street’s fear gauge closed at an all-time high in mid-March. Environmentally, though, the shutdown has come with some temporary benefits — decreased travel, cleaner water, a plunging demand for oil. But crashing the economy isn’t exactly a climate solution.

How will the coronavirus recession reshape the economy and prospects for addressing climate in a post-pandemic world? How does this economic crisis compare to others in history?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Kathleen Day, Finance Lecturer, Johns Hopkins University; Author, Broken Bargain: Banks, Bailouts, and the Struggle to Tame Wall Street
Amy Myers Jaffe, Director, Energy Security and Climate Change Program, Council on Foreign Relations
Matt Rogers, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company

Additional interviews:
Shubhayu Saha, Health Scientist, Climate and Health Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Phil Ting, California State Assembly Member

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on April 15, 2020.

May 01, 2020
COVID-19 and Climate: Implications for Public Health
52:00

What can the spread of coronavirus teach us about the spread of climate change? Both crises have global reach, invisible perpetrators, and require aggressive, early action for containment. But while an infectious disease is acute and deeply personal, the impacts of a changing climate are systemic and vague. Scientists point out that the coronavirus family — which includes COVID-19 and SARS — originated as an animal disease that can be passed along to humans. With increased human development encroaching into wildlife areas, should communities be preparing for more pandemics?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Brian Allan, Associate Entomology Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Aaron Bernstein, Interim Director, The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (Harvard C-CHANGE)
Barbara Gottlieb, Director of Environment and Health, Physicians for Social Responsibility

Additional interviews:
Jason Rohr, Professor at the University of Notre Dame

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on April 3, 2020.

Apr 17, 2020
What’s the Future of Nuclear Power?
51:00

Nuclear power - revive it or allow a slow death? Today, about a hundred nuclear plants provide 20 percent of America’s electricity.

Once touted as a modern power source, nuclear fell out of favor after a series of major accidents – most notably those at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. A handful of the plants that once dotted the landscape have been shuttered because they can’t compete with cheaper sources of power. By the end of the century, the industry was languishing. But the urgency of climate change causes some to advocate giving nuclear a new lease on life. A discussion about the health of the nuclear power industry today, and the 21st century innovations that could point to a new path forward.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Per Peterson, Professor of Nuclear Engineering, UC Berkeley
Edwin Lyman, Acting Director, Nuclear Safety Project, Union of Concerned Scientists
Ken Farabaugh, Former Employee, Vermont Yankee
Jose Reyes, Co-Founder & Chief Technology Officer, NuScale Power
Jacob Dewitte, CEO, Oklo
Christine Parthemore, Chief Executive Officer, The Council on Strategic Risks

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Apr 10, 2020
COVID-19 and Climate: Human Response
52:00

Why does an invisible, life-threatening virus prompt a nationwide emergency, but invisible, life-threatening gases don’t? Experts have been emphasizing the dangers of unchecked climate change for years, underscoring the need for rapid, bold action early-on to avoid the worst impacts. Now health experts are pushing the same level of global mobilization to quell the spread of the novel coronavirus. Why are humans wired to respond to some fears and emergencies more than others? Can the reaction to the COVID-19 pandemic teach us anything about how humans respond to other invisible, global threats?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Peter Atwater, Adjunct Professor of Economics, College of William & Mary
Susan Clayton, Whitmore-Williams Professor of Psychology, College of Wooster
Robert H. Frank, Henrietta Johnson Louis Professor of Management, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business

Additional interviews:
Shannon Osaka, Climate Reporter, Grist

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 24, 2020,

Apr 03, 2020
REWIND: Aligning Profits with Planet / The Circular Economy
51:00

“How do you move from a place of simply trying to stop bad things and asking instead how would you make products and services in a sustainable manner?” asks Adam Davis of Ecosystem Investment Partners. Is it possible to protect profits and the planet? Despite claims that a win for the environment is a loss for the economy, corporations are finding innovative ways to have it both ways, realizing that protecting watersheds and ecosystems can also protect their business.

Now, innovative companies are “going circular” by transforming how their products are designed, used, and remade. Can a circular economy salvage the climate and save the planet?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests (Part 1):
Gretchen Daily, Professor of Environmental Science, Stanford University
Adam Davis, Managing Partner, Ecosystem Investment Partners
Barbara Grady, Senior Writer, GreenBiz.com

Guests (Part 2):
John Lanier, co-author, “Mid-Course Correction Revisited: The Story and Legacy of a Radical Industrialist and his Quest for Authentic Change” (Chelsea Green, 2019)
Beth Rattner, executive director, Biomimicry Institute
Peter Templeton, president and CEO, Cradle to Cradle Innovation Institute

“Aligning Profits with the Planet” was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco on July 27, 2017
“Can a Circular Economy Salvage the Climate?” was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco on May 7, 2019

Mar 27, 2020
Me vs We: What Matters Most for Climate Action?
51:00

Addressing the climate challenge requires incremental and transformational change on both personal and systemic levels. That means altering our personal habits as citizens, consumers, employees and parents. At the same time, society needs to fundamentally modernize the food, transportation, building and energy systems. That mind-blowing amount of change is so daunting, it’s no wonder people want to skip away into the happy land of denial. How should we think about change — and how do our words shape our behavior? Where does change really begin?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
George Lakoff, Professor Emeritus of Cognitive Science and Linguistics, UC Berkeley
Amanda Ravenhill, Executive Director, The Buckminster Fuller Institute
Margaret Klein Salamon, Founder and Executive Director, The Climate Mobilization

Additional interviews:
Jonah Gottlieb, Student and Director of Schools for Climate Action

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on February 26, 2020.

Mar 20, 2020
What the 2030 Climate Deadline Really Means
51:00

For years, scientists have been saying that the climate battle will be won or lost in the next decade. The IPCC has stated that to avoid climate catastrophe, global emissions must be halved by 2030. Politicians and the media have picked up the message; some making it a rallying cry. But is a ten-year goal realistic? What is needed to get people to take notice of -- and take action on -- the climate deadline?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Chris Field, Faculty Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University
David Fenton, Founder, Fenton Communications
Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist and Author

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on February 24, 2020.

Mar 13, 2020
Big Ideas with Dan Esty & Andy Karsner
51:00

Does solving climate change mean re-thinking old top-down approaches and embracing big change at high speed? A half-century after the first Earth Day, some environmental advocates argue it’s time to challenge some of our basic assumptions about climate action. In the new book A Better Planet: 40 Big Ideas for a Sustainable Future, editor and Yale law professor Dan Esty showcases innovative ideas designed to push the boundaries of possible climate solutions from leaders in industry, government, business, and land management.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Dan Esty, Hillhouse Professor of Environmental Law and Policy, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and Yale Law School
Andy Karsner, Former Assistant Energy Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on February 10, 2020.

Mar 06, 2020
Oil and Opioids on Trial
52:00

Tobacco companies, opioid suppliers, gun manufacturers and the fossil fuel industry -- all have been brought under fire, and into the courts, for knowingly causing public harm, and even death, with their products. Should corporations be held liable for harmful outcomes like mass shootings, the opioid crisis, and climate change? We all benefit from the energy fossil fuels provide, from the lights we turn on to around-the-world airline flights. How much responsibility falls on the product, and how much on the user?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Ann Carlson, Environmental Law Professor; Co-Director, Emmett Institute on Climate Change & Environment Co-Director, UCLA
Ellen Gilmer, Senior Legal Reporter, Bloomberg News
Ted Boutrous, Partner, Gibson, Dunn, & Crutcher LLP
Scott Segal, Partner, Bracewell

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Feb 28, 2020
Is California’s Climate Progress Going Up in Smoke?
51:00

California has been at the forefront of America’s climate fight since Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed the country’s first major climate law in 2006. The state’s suite of policies for decarbonizing the economy survived industry-funded attacks in court and at the ballot box, and remained largely consistent under Democratic and Republican governors. But a recent report by Next 10, an independent think tank, indicates the state will meet its 2030 goals 30 years late. Is California really the climate leader it’s purported to be?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Rachel Becker, Environment Reporter, CalMatters
Kate Gordon, Director, California Governor's Office of Planning and Research; Climate Advisor to Governor Newsom
F. Noel Perry, Founder, Next 10

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on January 23, 2020.

Feb 21, 2020
Building a Resilient Tomorrow
52:00

Climate-fueled floods, fires and droughts have devastated America’s cities and rural areas. Our natural response is to regroup, recover and rebuild. But should we instead be preparing for managed retreat? In her book Building a Resilient Tomorrow: How to Prepare for the Coming Climate Disruption, Alice Hill warns that the consequences of failing to prepare for further global warming will be staggering. How will we manage the costs of the growing climate threat?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Alice Hill, Senior Fellow for Climate Change Policy, Council on Foreign Relations, co-author, Building a Resilient Tomorrow: How to Prepare for the Coming Climate Disruption (Oxford University Press, 2019)
Sherri Goodman, Senior Strategist, The Center for Climate & Security; Former U.S. Deputy Undersecretary of Defense (Environmental Security)
Janet Ruiz, Strategic Communication Director, Insurance Information Institute

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on January 27, 2020.

Feb 14, 2020
Driving Forces: How Climate Fuels Human Migration
51:00

From the first humans to venture out of Africa 60,000 years ago to the displaced refugees of today, migration has always been a part of human life. And in parts of the world where immediate threats include violence and poverty, climate change probably isn't a driving motivation to leave home.

But with erratic weather, extended droughts, and resource scarcity fueling political conflict and pressures on vulnerable rural livelihoods, it's impossible to leave climate out of the conversation. How is climate change fueling the mass movement of humans around the world, and what does that mean for national security and economies?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Paul Salopek, Journalist and National Geographic Fellow
Dina Ionesco, Head of the Migration, Environment and Climate Change (MECC) Division at the UN Migration Agency (IOM)
Francesco Femia, Co-Founder, The Center for Climate and Security
Oscar Chacon, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Alianza Americas
Lauren Markham, Author, The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life

Parts of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Feb 07, 2020
What is a Just Transition?
51:00

Our nation’s dependence on fossil fuels has led to climate disruption and inequality. Underserved communities are the ones most harmed by pollution, lack of green space and heat-related illness. Transitioning to clean energy would seem to be the obvious answer. But in the process of trying to right old wrongs, do we risk leaving some communities behind? What does a just transition to a cleaner, greener economy look like?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Vien Truong, Principal, Truong & Associates
Darryl Molina Sarmiento, Executive Director, Communities for a Better Environment
Kevin de León, President pro Tempore Emeritus, California State Senate

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on January 14, 2020.

Jan 31, 2020
REWIND: Drawdown / Solving Climate Change
51:00

When it comes to cutting carbon pollution, where do we start? Today’s solutions are doable, but daunting: decrease global meat consumption, improve family planning, shut down coal-fired power plants, or expand solar energy. Some countries have taken concrete steps to replace fossil fuels with nuclear, hydro and renewable energy, but the absence of U.S. climate leadership is causing heads of state to ease off their goals. What are the most impactful steps we can take individually and collectively to reduce our impact on the planet?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:

Part One
Kate Brandt, Sustainability Officer, Google
Jonathan Foley, Executive Director, Project Drawdown
Lois Quam, U.S. Chief Executive Officer, Pathfinder International

Part Two
Sonia Aggarwal, Vice President, Energy Innovation
Joshua Goldstein, Professor Emeritus of International Relations, American University
Staffan Qvist, Energy Consultant

Part One of this program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on July 11, 2019, and originally aired on August 2, 2019.
Part Two was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on January 17, 2019, and originally aired on February 3, 2019.

Jan 24, 2020
REWIND: Exploring Climate Psychology / Getting Outside in the Digital Age
51:00

We all know about the environmental effects of climate change. But what about its impact on our mental health? Therapists report that their patients are exhibiting symptoms of what they call “climate anxiety” – loss of sleep, changes in appetite, feelings of grief, anger and hopelessness. One way to cope with the stress and depression brought on by global warming is to get out into the natural world. Two Climate One discussions from the past year explore the psychology of climate change and highlight the importance of reconnecting with nature to maintain physical and mental well-being.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Part One:
Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist; Author, Environmental Melancholia: Psychoanalytic Dimensions of Engagement (Routledge, 2016)
Leslie Davenport, Psychotherapist; Author, Emotional Resiliency in the Era of Climate Change: A Clinician’s Guide (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2017)
Bryant Welch, Clinical Psychologist; Author, State of Confusion: Political Manipulation and the Assault on the American Mind (2018)
Part Two:
Phil Ginsburg, General Manager, San Francisco Recreation and Parks
Rebecca Johnson, Co-Director, Citizen Science at the California Academy of Sciences
Nooshin Razani, Pediatrician and Founder/Director of the Center for Nature and Health at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland

Part One of this program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on November 29, 2018, and originally aired on December 16, 2018.
Part Two was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 15, 2019, and originally aired on March 22, 2019.

Jan 17, 2020
Inconspicuous Consumption: The Environmental Impact You Don't Know You Have
52:00

Everyday choices – like deciding which shirt to buy or on which platform to binge-watch shows on – may impact the planet more than you think. Tatiana's Schlossberg's new book Inconspicuous Consumption: The Environmental Impact You Don’t Know You Have, looks at how seemingly small choices can have a big impact on the climate. We sit down with experts in the fashion and energy sectors, two industries with a big carbon footprint, to see how far individual actions can take us – and when it's up to companies and producers to take the lead.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Miranda Ballentine, CEO, Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance
Rebecca Burgess, Founder and Director, Fibershed
Gary Cook, Senior Corporate Campaigner, Greenpeace
Amina Razvi, Executive Director, Sustainable Apparel Coalition
Tatiana Schlossberg, Author, Inconspicuous Consumption: The Environmental Impact You Don't Know You Have

Parts of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Jan 10, 2020
Dr. Robert Bullard: The Father of Environmental Justice
51:00

Often described as the father of environmental justice, Dr. Robert Bullard has written several seminal books on the subject and is known for his work highlighting pollution on minority communities and speaking up against environmental racism in the 1970-1980s. Climate One honors Robert Bullard with the ninth annual Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Robert Bullard, Distinguished Professor of Urban Planning and Environmental Policy, Texas Southern University
Adrianna Quintero, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Energy Foundation

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on December 12, 2019.

Jan 03, 2020
The Big Climate Stories of 2019
51:00

2019 saw a number of significant events in the climate world. Wildfires, floods, wind and extreme weather continued to batter the nation from California to Florida. There were firestorms in Congress and Tweetstorms from the White House. The rise of the youth climate movement, the advance of electric cars… and the emergence of climate as a top-tier campaign issue. Two reporters who cover the climate beat discuss the stories dominated their news feeds this year - and the ones that aren’t getting heard.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Coral Davenport, Energy and Environmental Policy Reporter, New York Times
David Roberts, Energy and Climate Change Reporter, Vox

This program was recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Dec 27, 2019
Blackout
51:00

The 2018 Camp Fire was one of the most destructive in California’s history, resulting in over eighty deaths and destroying the town of Paradise. Dry weather and hot winds fanned the flames - but the spark that lit them came from a faulty transmission line. That and other wildfires have been found to be the result of negligence on the part of California’s biggest utility, PG&E. Their solution? Pulling the plug on millions of customers. But who pays the bill? And with PG&E facing bankruptcy, how will California power its future?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Russell Gold, Reporter, Wall Street Journal
JD Morris, Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle
Catherine Wolfram, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs & Chair of the Faculty; Cora Jane Flood Professor of Business Administration, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley
Emily Wimberger, Climate Economist, Rhodium Group
Loretta Lynch, Former Commissioner, California Public Utilities Commission
Danny Kennedy, Managing Director, California Clean Energy Fund

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Dec 20, 2019
Rewind: Jonathan Safran Foer and David Wallace-Wells
50:00

A look back at conversations with two writers confronting the climate challenge in 2019. In The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming, David-Wallace Wells allows fear — along with a storyteller’s appreciation for the human drama involved — to move him out of climate complacency. In We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast, Jonathan Safran Foer asks how individuals can change their behavior to create new climate-sensitive social norms.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Katharine Hayhoe, Professor and Director, Climate Science Center, Texas Tech University
Jonathan Safran Foer, Author, We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast
David Wallace-Wells, Deputy Editor, New York Magazine; Author, The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming
Helene York, Chief Procurement Officer, Guckenheimer Enterprises; Faculty Member, Food Business School, Culinary Institute of America

Portions of this program were originally broadcast on June 28, 2019 and October 4, 2019.

Dec 13, 2019
High Risk, High Hopes: A Year of Climate Conversations
51:00

2019 has been a year of climate rising. Youth activists skipped school and took to the streets, the Green New Deal thrust climate equity into the spotlight, and Democratic presidential candidates were forced to respond. Even a few Republicans dared to suggest climate is a concern that needs to be addressed. Join us for a look back on the big ideas that shaped some of our favorite episodes from 2019.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests (in order of appearance):

Isha Clarke, Student Activist
Ed Markey, U.S. Senator (D-MA)
David Gergen, Founding Director, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School
Andrew Wheeler, Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Carlos Curbelo, Former U.S. Representative (R-FL)
Tom Steyer, 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidate, Activist, Businessman
Valencia Gunder, Founder, Make the Homeless Smile
David Wallace-Wells, Deputy Editor at New York Magazine; Author of The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming
Katharine Hayhoe, Professor and Director, Climate Science Center, Texas Tech University

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Dec 06, 2019
Shadows to Spotlight: Climate in the Media
50:00

Murder, love, and the human experience are the stuff of great stories, as podcasts like Serial and RadioLab have shown us. But climate change? Not so much. The story is overwhelming and the ending is predictable and depressing, say radio producers.

But coverage in national newspapers has increased since President Trump took office. It’s also expanded from science and environmental beats to culture, health and finance. And as the conversation shifts further toward companies’ role confronting climate impacts, the story of business and climate is gaining prominence and ramping up pressure on corporations.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Aron Cramer, CEO, BSR
Amy Harder, Reporter, Axios
Ellen Horne, Radio/podcast producer; former Executive Producer, Radiolab
Patrick Temple-West, Reporter, The Financial Times

Portions of this program were recorded at the BSR 2019 Conference in San Jose, California.

Nov 29, 2019
Letters to The Boss: Help Fix Our Climate
51:00

Climate change has become a major risk factor for corporations. With groups like the Carbon Disclosure Project grading companies on their carbon footprint, employees, consumers and investors are taking note -- and woe to those CEOs who are slow to pick up the ball.

“We’re gonna start to see some efforts where silence is complacency and it’s no longer acceptable,” says Joel Makower of Greenbiz. “You’re gonna have to get off the sidelines, to use the football metaphor, and get into the game one way or the other. And companies that aren’t, I think, are gonna find themselves facing some new pressures.”

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Sarah Read, User Experience Researcher for Prime Video, Amazon; Amazon Employees for Climate Justice Member
Jacob Adamson, Software Development Engineer, Amazon; Amazon Employees for Climate Justice Member
Joel Makower, Chairman and Executive Editor, GreenBiz Group
Andrew Winston, Author, Green to Gold: How Smart Companies Use Environmental Strategy to Innovate, Create Value, and Build a Competitive Advantage (Yale University Press, 2006)
Sara Law, Head of Global Initiatives, Carbon Disclosure Project
Swami Venkataraman, Senior VP and Manager, ESG Analytics and Integration at Moody's Investors Service

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Nov 22, 2019
John Browne: Engineering the Future
51:00

Can oil companies reinvent themselves as clean energy providers? John Browne attempted it over more than a decade as CEO of British Petroleum, where he led the company's “Beyond Petroleum” rebranding campaign. In his new book, Make, Think, Imagine: Engineering the Future of Civilization, Browne argues that the solution to reducing emissions and addressing climate change is a mass deployment of engineered technology — and that the tools we need to get there already exist. Join us for a conversation on the potential of energy incumbents to become innovators.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guest:
Lord John Browne, Former CEO, British Petroleum; Author, Make, Think, Imagine: Engineering the Future of Civilization

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 30, 2019.

Nov 15, 2019
California’s Story: How Did It Get Here?
51:00

California has long led the country in environmental action. It established strong automobile emission standards; it preserved fragile lands from development; it set energy efficiency standards for buildings and appliances. But as climate change fuels megafires across the state and the state’s largest electric utility shuts off power to more than a million residents, can the state’s legacy of environmental leadership save it from climate disaster? In a state already accustomed to swinging wildly between drought and flood, what will become of the California dream?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
David Vogel, Professor Emeritus of Business and Politics, UC Berkeley; Author, California Greenin’ How the Golden State Became an Environmental Leader
Huey Johnson, Founder, The Trust for Public Land; former California Secretary of Natural Resources.
Jason Mark, Editor, Sierra Magazine; Author, Satellites in the High Country: Searching for the Wild in the Age of Man
Mark Arax, Author, The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California
Diana Marcum, Reporter, Los Angeles Times
Faith Kearns, Scientist, California Institute for Water Resource

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on July 24, 2018 and July 17, 2019.

Nov 08, 2019
Libation Migration: Beer, Wine and Climate Change
51:00

America’s most popular alcoholic beverages are about to take a hit from climate. Mild, sunny growing conditions have made California king of a $62 billion wine industry, and more than 7,000 breweries in the U.S. rely on barley, a key ingredient in beer that is partial to the cool temperatures of northwestern states and Canada. But both grapes and barley are sensitive to a changing climate. And years of disruptions from drought, fires, and rising temperatures have brewers and winemakers wondering: will business as usual survive into the next generation?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Esther Mobley, Wine Critic, The San Francisco Chronicle
Dan Petroski, Winemaker, Larkmead Vineyards
Katie Wallace, Director of Social & Environmental Impact, New Belgium Brewing

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 15, 2019.

Related links:
The end of Cabernet in Napa Valley?
Decreases in global beer supply due to extreme drought and heat
Larkmead Vineyards
New Belgium Brewing
Articles by Esther Mobley

Nov 01, 2019
Cities for the Future
51:00

Cities around the world are bracing for a growth spurt. With over half of the global population living in urban centers, and another 2.5 billion expected to join them by 2050, it’s time to rethink the traditional car-centric cityscape. How do we redesign our cities to withstand the challenges of cars, climate change and rapid population growth?

This week on Climate One, one of our favorite summer 2019 episodes on building sustainable cities that make public life healthier, more inclusive and more dynamic.

Guests:
Liz Ogbu, Founder and Principal, Studio O
Laura Crescimano, Co-Founder/Principal, SITELAB Urban Studio
Jan Gehl, Architect and Founding Partner, Gehl Architects, author, “Cities for People” (Island Press, 2010)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco on June 3, 2019 and first broadcast on July 12, 2019.

Oct 25, 2019
Law and Disorder: Climate Change in the Courts

The jury is out on whether our legal system is equipped to deal with climate change. While some parts of the country are inundated by floods, others are resisting the growth of oil and gas infrastructure — and both are running into the law.

Do youth have a constitutional right to a clean environment? At what point should disaster preparedness become disaster law? Does water have legal rights? A discussion on how many facets of the climate challenge are pushing, and changing, the law.

Guests:
Michael Gerrard, Andrew Sabin Professor of Professional Practice, Columbia Law School
Laura Tuggle, Executive Director, Southeast Louisiana Legal Services
Tanisia Reed Coachman, Resident, Arbor Court Apartments
Nicholas Kusnetz, Reporter, InsideClimate News

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Oct 18, 2019
Scorched Earth: Culture and Climate Under Siege
50:00

From the Amazon to the Congo to California, our planet’s forests are being decimated. And along with them, the stability of our climate. Why? Because trees are among our most effective weapons against carbon emissions. The Amazon alone is responsible for removing five percent of the world’s 40 billion tons of CO2 emissions from the air each year.

When forests burn, carbon storage is lost -- along with biodiversity, indigenous culture, and more. Join us for a conversation about the climate factors and the global consumerism driving deforestation, as well as the seeds of change being planted by organizations, corporations, governments and individuals.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Paul Paz y Miño
, Associate Director, Amazon Watch
Tara O’Shea, Director of Forest Programs, Planet
Corey Brinkema, President, Forest Stewardship Council U.S.

Related Links:
Amazon Watch
Forest Stewardship Council
Indigenous Environmental Network
Forest 500 – Powerbrokers of Deforestation
H&M, VF Corp. Ditch Brazilian Leather Over Amazon Rainforest Fires (Huffington Post)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on September 24, 2019.

Oct 11, 2019
Jonathan Safran Foer: We Are the Weather
51:00

Is clinging to habits and cravings destroying our future? An outspoken critic of factory farming and animal-centric diets, Jonathan Safran Foer writes that stopping climate change begins with a close look at what we eat — and don’t eat — at home for breakfast. At the office, industry leaders like Google are taking steps toward veggie-forward diets by reducing meat, rather than cutting it out entirely.

But when it comes to global food habits, are societies up for changing norms — individually and collectively — at a scale ambitious enough to meet the challenge?

Guests:
Jonathan Safran Foer, Author, "We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast"
Helene York, Chief Procurement Officer, Guckenheimer Enterprises; Faculty Member, Food Business School, Culinary Institute of America

For more information on this episode, visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts. This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 24, 2019.

Related links:
We Are the Weather – Jonathan Safran Foer
Guckenheimer’s Culinary Philosophy
Marin Carbon Project – Carbon Farms

Oct 08, 2019
Jonathan Safran Foer: We Are the Weather
51:00

Is clinging to habits and cravings destroying our future? An outspoken critic of factory farming and animal-centric diets, Jonathan Safran Foer writes that stopping climate change begins with a close look at what we eat — and don’t eat — at home for breakfast. At the office, industry leaders like Google are taking steps toward veggie-forward diets by reducing meat, rather than cutting it out entirely.

But when it comes to global food habits, are societies up for changing norms — individually and collectively — at a scale ambitious enough to meet the challenge?

Guests:
Jonathan Safran Foer, Author, "We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast"
Helene York, Chief Procurement Officer, Guckenheimer Enterprises; Faculty Member, Food Business School, Culinary Institute of America

For more information on this episode, visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts. This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 24, 2019.

Related links:
We Are the Weather – Jonathan Safran Foer
Guckenheimer’s Culinary Philosophy
Marin Carbon Project – Carbon Farms

Oct 04, 2019
Heavy Weather: Balancing Joy and Despair
51:00

Can we still find happiness in our daily lives without ignoring the dark reality of climate chaos? Author and meditation teacher Mark Coleman recalls experiencing just that juxtaposition of joy and sadness working on an article on a ridgetop north of San Francisco during the wildfires of late 2018.

“It was just such a poignant moment of going into nature for refuge and solace and at the same time being reminded of the fires and the climate crisis,” Coleman says, noting the irony that he the article he’d been asked to write was about meditation and nature.

Love and grief are at the center of Coleman’s practice for coping with climate anxiety. “We love this planet, we love this Earth, we love all of the abundance and the beauty and the diversity and complexity,” he explains, “[and] because we love, we feel the pain we feel the grief. The grief is a natural, healthy immune system response to a problem.”

Mica Estrada, a professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California San Francisco, agrees that feeling grief is a valuable coping mechanism – even if it hasn’t always been encouraged.

“I think for a long time that [grief] was seen as a weakness and I think we’re finally hitting an age where grief is seen as a strength,” she says. “I think we have lived in a time when the dominant culture says don’t feel too much. And I do feel like we’re finally growing up and saying listen, real strength is being able to feel what we’re feeling.”

Guests:
Mark Coleman, Mindfulness and Meditation Teacher; Author, Awake in the Wild: Mindfulness in Nature as a Path of Self-Discovery
Mica Estrada, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, UCSF

Related Links
Mark Coleman - From Suffering to Peace: The True Promise of Mindfulness
Good Grief Network: 10-Steps to Personal Resilience & Empowerment in a Chaotic Climate
Climate Change Education Partnership

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 5, 2019.

Sep 26, 2019
My Climate Story: Terry Root
25:00

Scientist Terry Root’s research has helped reveal how climate change puts bird and animal species at risk for extinction. For Root, the climate connection is also personal: she was married to the late Steve Schneider, a Stanford professor and pioneer in communicating the impacts of climate change, who died suddenly in 2010.

“It's been a fabulous career, but it has been very painful at times, very painful,” says Root, who was the lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report in 2007 when it was co-awarded the Nobel Peace Prize with Vice President Al Gore.

This piece is published in partnership with Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

Guest:
Terry Root, Senior Fellow Emerita, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University

Related Links:
10 years after he monkey-wrenched a Utah oil and gas lease auction, Tim DeChristopher is ‘feeling demoralized' by ‘the state of the world’ but sees hope in humanity (The Salt Lake Tribune)
Stephen Schneider, a leading climate expert, dead at 65 (Stanford News)

Sep 20, 2019
A Tale of Two Cities: Miami and Detroit
50:00

Climate change is upending Miami’s real estate markets, turning one of its poorest neighborhoods into some of the most desirable real estate around. It’s a phenomenon known as “climate gentrification,” a term coined by urban studies professor Jesse Keenan.

In a 2018 paper, Keenan writes that while gentrification is most often driven by supply – that is, a surplus of devalued property that invites development and transformation – climate gentrification is the opposite.

“[It]is really about a shift in preferences and demand function,” says Keenan. “And that's a much broader phenomenon in terms of geography and physical geography or markets in some markets than any kind of localized gentrification in a classic sense.”

In other words, as people are attracted to areas of lower vulnerability, developers see an opportunity to make a killing. Valencia Gunder, a community organizer and climate educator in Miami, recognizes the irony. She says that in that city’s earliest days, Haitian, Bahamian and Caribeean immigrants were barred from living in the tony beachfront areas.

“Black people had to live in the center of the city, which is different than most America, because usually low income black communities are in lower lying areas…and so everything they did that they thought they were doing to hurt us, actually ended up helping us in the long run.”

But there’s only so much Little Haiti to go around. As longtime residents are being priced out of their community, climate change isn’t helping matters.

“Once the water comes in, Little Haiti will be beachfront property,” Gunder predicts.

“Bottom line, it’s gonna be beachfront property, it’s going to be the new shore. So it's become like the hottest toy on the shelf.”

Guests:
Valencia Gunder, Founder, Make the Homeless Smile
Jesse Keenan, Lecturer, Harvard University Graduate School of Design
Guy Williams, President and CEO, Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice

Related Links:
Make the Homeless Smile Miami
The CLEO Institute
100 Resilient Cities
Climate could exacerbate housing crisis in South Florida (Sierra Club)
Climate Gentrification: from theory to empiricism in Miami-Dade County, Florida
Magic City Innovation District
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Retirees flee Florida as climate change threatens their financial future (Money)
Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Sep 19, 2019
My Climate Story: Ben Santer
29:00

In 1995, Ben Santer authored one of the most important sentences in the history of climate science: “the balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climate.” While one of the first statements to identify humans’ role in driving climate change, the vitriol that followed was personal and malicious, impacting both Santer’s career and family.

“If you spend your entire career trying to advance understanding, you can't walk away from that understanding when someone criticizes it or criticizes you,” says Santer, now a scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Berkeley. With his research contingent upon government funding, Santer is concerned about the future of climate science under an administration that does not prioritize it.

This piece is published in partnership with Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

Guests:
Ben Santer, Climate Scientist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Related Links:
At Hot Center of Debate On Global Warming (New York Times)
Yes, humans are causing climate change. And we've known for 40 years. (Popular Science)

Sep 17, 2019
From Wheels to Wings: Our Flying Car Future
50:00

Can we beat the traffic by taking to the skies?

For more than a century, the automobile has ruled our city streets, chaining us to grid-shaped streets choked with lines of traffic. And for many of us, seemingly endless hours of daily commuting.

“But what if we can remove those chains?” asks JoeBen Bevirt of Joby Aviation. “What do our lives, what do our cities, how does the world look 20 years from now or 50 years from now? That's what gets me up everyday. So my mission is to save a billion people an hour a day in their daily commutes.”

The ability to sail above the freeways in a flying car, getting to work in minutes instead of hours, has long been the stuff of science fiction. But JoeBen Bevirt is already on his way towards making it a reality. He’s raised more than $100 million to develop a five-seater that he claims will be faster, cheaper and quieter than helicopters. And not just as a plaything for the rich, Bevirt promises.

“We really want to be able to launch this at an affordable price point that’s accessible to everyone,” he says. “That is similar cost to taking a taxi on a cost per passenger mile. And then our ambition is to get it to the cost of personal car.”

Other startups around the world are also developing drones or flying cars. Urban air mobility – or UAM -- is coming.

For now, there are still many challenges to getting those flying cars off the ground, from infrastructure to regulatory issues, from air traffic to zoning. Not to mention mechanics and design – what will the flying car of the future look like? Auto industry consultant Charlie Vogelheim says what comes to mind for most consumers is a cross between the Jetson’s family-sized space capsule and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

“The thing that people keep thinking about when they think about flying cars is, ‘where is that car that I can drive and then the wings come out?’”

Guests:
JoeBen Bevirt, Founder and CEO, Joby Aviation
Uma Subramanian, CEO, Aero Technologies
Jennifer Richter, Partner, Akin Gump
Charlie Vogelheim, Principal, Vogelheim Ventures

Related Links:
Air-Taxi Startup has a Working Prototype (Bloomberg)
How Airbus is working to take urban mobility airborne (Pitchbook)
Bringing Urban Mobility into the Third Dimension (Urban Future)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on August 20th, 2019, and was made possible by the ClimateWorks Foundation.

Sep 13, 2019
How Pro Sports Can Be a Player in Climate
51:00

From stadiums packed with fans, to food, beer, and waste – pro sports can have a big carbon footprint. But could the core values of athletics — integrity, teamwork, and commitment — be the same values we need to tackle the climate challenge?

”Doing sports the right way is more important now than ever,” says Jim Thompson, Founder of the Positive Coaching Alliance. “We spent a lot of time as adults trying to get kids to do certain things. What if we spend our time trying to encourage them to become the kind of people who want to do the right thing?”

Thompson, whose PCA trains youth sports coaches around the country, is a newly converted climate evangelist. “Our country, the whole world is gonna need leaders – people who do the right thing when it matters,” he says. “That's my definition of character, when you do the right thing when it matters, and what happens in the next 10 years matters a lot.”

So do pro athletes have a special role in getting their fans and teams to talk about climate?

“I think somebody needs to prompt the questions out of them, because I don't think most people aren’t going to just come out and just start talking about climate change,” says Dusty Baker, a special advisor with the San Francisco Giants who had a 19-year career as a hard-hitting outfielder and a 20-year career as a big-league manager.

Baker, who is also an avid bird hunter and solar power entrepreneur, admires the star athletes who do speak out on climate or other social issues, but he understands why others may be reluctant to do so. “You spend all your life trying to get to this goal” he explains,”and you realize it's a very limited period of time and also there's somebody always trying to take your job.”

Ultimately, the best agents for climate action in the sports arena might be the businesses and the customers – that is, teams and their fans.

“Through sport and food we have a huge opportunity to influence the world in a positive way,” says Roger McClendon, Executive Director with the Green Sports Alliance, an association of teams and venues employing sports as a vehicle to promote healthy sustainable communities throughout the world.

McClendon previously served as the first chief sustainability officer with Yum! Brands, whose holdings include Taco Bell, Pizza Hut and KFC restaurants, where he challenged the company to run cleaner.

“[Pro teams] are businesses but they have the responsibility to serve their consumers and their consumers are fans,” he says. “When the fans or the customers start saying this is important to them, then usually businesses start to listen.

Guests:
Dusty Baker, Special Advisor, San Francisco Giants
Roger McClendon, Executive Director, Green Sports Alliance
Jim Thompson, Founder, Positive Coaching Alliance.

Related links:
Positive Coaching Alliance
Baker Energy Team
Green Sports Alliance
NBA Green
How climate change is affecting outdoor skating (NHL.com)
San Francisco Giants reclaim the Green Glove Award (MLB.com)

Sep 06, 2019
Carbon Offsets: Privileged Pollution?
51:00

A carbon offset is a credit – a way to offset a unit of pollution created in one place by, say, planting a tree, or otherwise sequestering carbon, somewhere else. But in the race to bring carbon emissions to zero, are offsets a legitimate tool, or a delusion that allows heavy emitters a way out of taking real action?

“I just need to recruit everybody to make sure the forests remain forests and the farmlands have as many trees as possible,” says Pauline Kalunda, Executive Director of Ecotrust Uganda,
a non-governmental conservation organization in Uganda. She uses money from carbon offsets purchased in wealthy countries to help build environmental resilience at the community level. Buying offsets can help fund carbon-reduction projects in developing economies with limited funding – but they don’t help reduce dirty air back home.

“We ultimately need to get to a point where it is really, really expensive to pollute so that people pollute a lot less,” maintains Kahlil Baker, Executive Director of Taking Root, a Canada-based group which also works with the offset market to promote economic development among smallholder farmers in Nicaragua. Voluntary offsets are great for eco-conscious consumers who want to ease their climate guilt. Do they run the risk of letting individuals think they’re off the hook for their carbon sins?

“I’m a lot less worried about offsets from individuals than I am about Chevron offsetting,” says Zoe Cina-Sklar, a climate justice campaigner with the advocacy group Amazon Watch. She worries about corporations and other large polluters using offsets to avoid accountability under state climate policies.

Barbara Haya, a research fellow at UC Berkeley’s Center for Environmental Public Policy, who studies California’s offsets program, echoes this worry. “We’re allowing businesses in California like Chevron and Phillips and other large emitters to continue to emit,” she claims, “because they're buying these credits that many of which don't actually represent real emissions reductions.”

But Rajinder Sahota, who leads the Cap and Trade program for the California Air Resources Board, disagrees with the takeaways of Haya’s research. “The offsets don't play a specific line item in reducing emissions towards our target,” she counters, “they are a compliance currency under the cap and trade program.”

Ultimately, carbon offsets work best, as Derik Broekhoff from the Stockholm Environmental Institute puts it, as the icing on the cake and not the cake itself. “The advice for voluntary offset has always been reduce your own emissions first,” he suggests, “and then turn to offsets as a kind of additional even charitable contribution that you can make towards both helping the climate and making the world a better place.”

Guests (in order of appearance):
Pauline Kalunda, Executive Director, Ecotrust Uganda
Kahlil Baker, Executive Director, Taking Root
Pennie Opal Plant, Co-Founder, Idle No More Bay Area
Zoe Cina-Sklar, Climate Justice Campaigner, Amazon Watch
Barbara Haya, Research Fellow, Center for Environmental Public Policy
Rajinder Sahota, Assistant Division Chief, Industrial Strategies Division, California Air Resources Board
Derik Broekhoff, Senior Scientist, Stockholm Environmental Institute

Aug 30, 2019
Tom Steyer: Power Disruptor?
51:00

Would you vote for the candidate who says he’ll declare climate change a national emergency on Day One of his presidency? Businessman and activist Tom Steyer says his willingness to use emergency powers to deal with the climate crisis sets him apart from the crowded field of Democratic candidates.

“You have to start on day one, urgently – it's an emergency, treat it like an emergency,” Steyer urges. “I would give the Congress a 100 days … to pass something like the Green New Deal, but they've had 28 years to pass something like the Green New Deal, and actually we don't have the luxury of waiting any longer.”

Steyer also cites his record fighting the corporate takeover of the US government as another mark of distinction.

“I am the person who spent 10 years as an outsider organizing coalitions of American citizens to take on corporate interests and to register voters engage voters and turn them out at the polls,” he notes, while also affirming that his grassroots organizing will continue independently of his campaign and the election.

But as the Democratic Party moves to the left, with a more diverse candidate pool than ever, is now the right time for another wealthy white man to insist he’s the best person for the job?

“I think there's a very simple challenge for everybody who wants to be the Democratic nominee,” says Steyer,” and that’s to have something to say that people want to hear ... I think that if I'm saying something that touches people and they believe that I'm a credible messenger, then they'll respond.”

Guest:
Tom Steyer, Activist, Businessman, 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidate

Related links:
Tom Steyer for President
NextGen America
Need to Impeach

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on August 19, 2019.

Aug 23, 2019
Superpower: How Renewables are Transforming America’s Energy Future

What’s new in renewable energy?

In April, 23 percent of America’s electricity came from renewables, surpassing coal for the first time. Ten states, and Puerto Rico and Washington DC, have policies in place to run on 100 percent clean power in coming decades.

Achieving that presents a host of challenges, from updating an aging electricity grid to financing energy innovation to figuring out how to transport and store the renewable power. Fortunately, says author Russell Gold, we have the talent to take those challenges on.

“There's a lot of creativity in the space right now,” says Gold. “There's creativity on reducing demand, there's creativity in how we aggregate solar… and frankly, given what's going on with the climate, we sort of need to be trying them all -- simultaneously.”

And if we succeed, we stand to gain a lot more than just cleaner air, a stable planet and lower electricity bills. We also open the door to a wealth of employment opportunities. Bloomberg’s Lynn Doan says this is the perfect time to diversify a sector that has been traditionally dominated by white males – what she calls the industry’s “dirty little secret.”

“The renewable energy industry is creating more jobs than any other industry in the United States,” says Doan. “The solar technician and wind technician jobs -- those are the two fastest-growing professions in the U.S. today. So if women and minorities are missing out on this renewable energy industry opportunity, then they’re being left out of the biggest job boom that America has to offer today.”

Something else to look forward to? The end of the gas-guzzler. Jigar Shah, co-host of The Energy Gang podcast, says drivers won’t miss having to stop to fill up their tank. “It’s not like an enjoyable experience; it’s a necessary evil for what they need for mobility,” he tells the audience. “And I think people are starting to realize now that with these 200-plus mile range electric vehicles, you really can go across the country.”

Guests:
Russell Gold, Reporter, the Wall Street Journal; Author, Superpower: One Man's Quest to Transform American Energy (Simon & Schuster, 2019)
Jigar Shah, Founder, SunEdison; Co-Host, The Energy Gang podcast
Lynn Doan, Team Leader, Power and Gas-Americas, Bloomberg News

Related Links:
Superpower: One Man's Quest to Transform American Energy (Russell Gold)
The Energy Gang Podcast
Women Are Missing Out on the Biggest Job Boom in America (Bloomberg)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on August 5, 2019.

Aug 16, 2019
The Land of Dreams and Drought
51:00

The California dream, with its promise of never-ending sunshine, fertile soil and rivers running with gold, has been beckoning people west for over two hundred years. But making that dream come true for an ever-increasing population has taken its toll on the landscape. Is the California dream coming to an end?

When its current water system was built in the 1960s and ‘70s, California’s population was about half of the forty million who live there today. And every one of its citizens needs water to drink, bathe and cook. Add to that the demands of agriculture, livestock and the natural ecosystem, and the pool of available water gets smaller and smaller.

“When the resource is finite then you have to make choices,” says author Mark Arax. “And so in the San Joaquin Valley they're gonna have to choose which land deserves that water. It's alfalfa, it's Holsteins.”

In his new book, The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California, Arax pulls back the curtain on the backroom deal-making between billionaire investors and regulators that has, in some cases, stolen the water right out from under our feet. Faith Kearns, a scientist with the California Institute for Water Resources, says it’s been going on for years. Even she has trouble keeping up.

“I think there is a lot of stuff that goes on really behind the scenes and that is completely inaccessible to most of us, even those of us who work on this topic professionally,” says Kearns.

California now experiences regular weather whiplash, amplified by climate change, careening between record drought and extreme rainfall. Diana Marcum won a Pulitzer Prize for her series of articles on California’s central valley farmers during the drought. Years of parched weather have taught her to appreciate the green times we do get.

“I think that’s one thing I took away from the drought,” Marcum recalls. “During it I kept thinking, I wish I would've paid more attention. I wish I could picture the snow. I wish I could picture the grass.

So right now I'm trying to look so hard that it almost hurts”

Guests:
Mark Arax, Author, “The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California” (Knopf, 2019)
Diana Marcum, Reporter, Los Angeles Times
Faith Kearns, Scientist, California Institute for Water Resources

Related Links:
The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California (Mark Arax)
A Kingdom From Dust (Mark Arax)
Scenes from California’s Dust Bowl (Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times)
California Institute for Water Resources

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on July 17th, 2019.

Aug 09, 2019
Drawdown: Do We Have What It Takes to Solve Climate Change?
51:00

When it comes to solving climate change, where do we start?

The organization Project Drawdown has published a list of top solutions for climate change – impactful actions already in existence that not only reduce carbon emissions, but also improve lives, create jobs and generate community resilience.

“If you’re thinking about how to solve climate change here's where you start,” says Jonathan Foley, Project Drawdown’s executive director.

“Electricity is about a quarter of the problem. Food, agriculture and forest are also a quarter of the problem...then you’ve got buildings, industry and transportation. Those are the five things we’ve got to change.”

One item that might surprise many is dealing with global overpopulation. And that starts with improving education and reproductive freedom for the world’s girls and women.

“If women have the opportunity to be able to have a voice and be agents in their community and their country globally, we have the opportunity to have the kind of innovation that we need to be able to combat this,” says Lois Quam of Pathfinder International.

“That human right to decide whether and when and how many and with whom we want to have a child, the ability to exercise that right is…one of the top strategies to combat climate change.”

It’s quite a to-do list – and it’s only the beginning. How to sort through the many daunting tasks ahead of us?

Don’t be discouraged, says Foley. It almost doesn’t matter where we start, as long as we’re doing something. Corporations, policy makers, communities and individuals all have a part to play in achieving climate drawdown.

This point was driven home to the audience and panelists alike by an additional guest, 13-year old Kea Morshed. His YouTube channel, Movies with Mic1, demonstrates the many ways we can all challenge ourselves to take action on climate change.

“At the end of the day, it's gonna be behavior change by all of us that’s necessary,” Foley tells Climate One. “It’s gonna be policy change, business operations change and changes in capital, money. “So don’t pick one lever, pull them all, you know - everybody bloody one you can find!”

Guests:
Kate Brandt, Sustainability Officer, Google
Jonathan Foley, Executive Director, Project Drawdown
Lois Quam, U.S. Chief Executive Officer, Pathfinder International

Related Links:
Project Drawdown: Solutions
Pathfinder International
Greenpeace: Click Clean
Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance (REBA)
Movies with Mic1 (Youtube)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on July 11, 2019.

Aug 02, 2019
The Art of the Green Deal
51:00

The climate conversation in Washington has changed enough that Democrats and Republicans are talking climate deals. A lot of that change can be attributed to the Green New Deal, a Democratic resolution introduced by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Ed Markey.

“What we're doing with the Green New Deal is we’re putting together an army that won't just be a resolution, it's a revolution,” boasts Markey, who has served over 40 years in Congress and co-authored the last big legislative push for national climate policy a decade ago. Markey says that he and AOC “share a passion to create a movement which is going to change the relationship between the American people and the fossil fuel industry.”

That relationship is also targeted in the Green Real Deal, a market-based alternative to the Green New Deal put forward by Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida. “Fossil fuels are not our future. They just aren’t,” proclaims Gaetz, very much out of step with GOP orthodoxy in general and the current administration’s policies in particular.

Less surprising than a Republican proposing to eliminate fossil fuel subsidies is that a GOP call for climate action is coming from Florida. Gaetz, whose district in the Florida panhandle was battered by Hurricane Michael in 2018 is an ardent supporter of President Trump – except when it comes to climate science.

“You can either believe the climate deniers, or you can believe your lying eyes,” he says, “and I'm from the pro-science wing of the Republican Party.” But are there really any prospects for a legislative deal passing while a pro-fossil fuel climate denier occupies the White House?

“It's more likely to see ideas like this passing as ballot initiatives in states as test kitchens that can then kind of branch out to other states than something really holistically passing through Congress before 2020,” says Miranda Green, an energy and environment reporter covering Congress for The Hill.

Still, Green is impressed with Gaetz’s fossil fuel iconoclasm and even with Trump’s apparent need to address climate – if never actually by name – in a recent White House speech. “It shows that the issue of climate change has really put itself at the center of politics right now,” she says, “at the center of the political debate.”

Guests:
Senator Ed Markey, D-MA
Representative Matt Gaetz, R-FL
Miranda Green, Energy and Environment Reporter, The Hill

Related links:
Sunrise Movement: The Green New Deal
Congressman Matt Gaetz Unveils the “Green Real Deal”
Articles by Miranda Green

Jul 26, 2019
The Fate of Food
51:00

How will we feed a planet that’s hotter, drier, and more crowded than ever? Much of it starts with innovators who are trying to re-invent the global food system to be more productive and nutritious. Vanderbilt University Journalism professor Amanda Little chronicles some of these efforts in her new book, The Fate of Food: What We'll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World.

“We see disruption in the auto industry, we see disruption in tobacco – disruption is coming in the meat industry,” says Little, noting how conventional meat companies have been investing in technologies to produce cell-based meat without animals.

Other technological innovations, such as robots that can deploy herbicide with sniper-like precision, can help push agriculture toward more sustainable practices. But she also notes the difficulties that food startups face in getting their products to scale – which often means selling to large, industrial producers.

“We need the sort of good guys and bad guys to collaborate,” she says. “It doesn't mean that that is disrupting the, you know, the rise of local food webs and farmers markets and CSAs and locally sourced foods. It means maybe this is a way of bringing more intelligent practices to industrial ag.”

Twilight Greenaway, a contributing editor with Civil Eats, amplifies these concerns about tech disruption in the food space. “Will there be some [technology] that really can feed into a more democratic food system that allows for different types of ownership less concentrated ownership,” she asks, noting that some startups start out with the goal of selling to a large company.

She likens the current conversation to earlier discussions about the organic farming movement leading to little more than an organic Twinkie. “There’s a lot to say about changing practices on the land and what organic means in terms of pesticides and other environmental benefits,” she cautions, “but on the other hand, you’ll still end up with the Twinkie.”

Guests:
Twilight Greenaway, Contributing Editor, Civil Eats
Amanda Little, Professor of Journalism, Vanderbilt University

Related links:

The Fate of Food: What We'll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World
Climate Change-Fueled Valley Fever is Hitting Farmworkers Hard
Memphis Meats
Blue River Technology
Chow from a 3-D printer? Natick researchers are working on it

Jul 19, 2019
Cities for the Future
51:00

When Ridley Scott envisioned the dystopian Los Angeles of 2019 in “Blade Runner,” he probably didn’t think about how much energy would be needed to run those flying cars and sky-high animated billboards. Or what all those carbon emissions would be doing to the climate.

We’re now living in the world of 2019. Flying cars are still in the future. But with over half of the global population living in urban centers, and another 2.5 billion expected to join them by 2050, maybe it’s time to take a step backward when it comes to getting around the city.
“We know that if you invite more cars, you get more cars,” says architect and urban planner Jan Gehl. “If you invite and make streets you get more traffic. And if you can make more bicycle lanes and do it properly, you get more bicycles.
“And if you invite people to walk more and use public spaces more, you get more life in the city. It's the same mechanism -- you get what you invite for.”

The cities of today have to prepare for a future that includes more heat, more flooding and more people. This means confronting the infrastructure they run on, and making some upgrades. That could have a bigger impact than most people realize.

“Approaching climate change, particularly when it comes to our cities, is this opportunity to do pretty major investments in a sort of significant retooling of cities,” says urbanist Liz Ogbu. “Not just in the U.S., but around the world.”

But large urban projects have historically ended up displacing communities of color by building freeways through their communities or by pricing them out of their own homes and businesses. Some well-known examples of this are Detroit, Miami and Los Angeles. Ogbu warns that it’s important to keep from repeating the mistakes of the past.

“I think it's time that we talk about how do we be intentional about those investments and who benefits,” Ogbu continue. “Because I think the idea that we don't consider it doesn't mean that people don't get harmed.”

Can we create a Tomorrowland that is sustainable, livable and inclusive?

Guests:
Liz Ogbu, Founder and Principal, Studio O
Laura Crescimano, Co-Founder/Principal, SITELAB Urban Studio
Jan Gehl, Architect and Founding Partner, Gehl Architects, author, “Cities for People” (Island Press, 2010)

Related Links:
SPUR: Ideas + Action for a Better City
SITELAB Urban Studio
Studio O
Liz Ogbu TED Talk: What if gentrification was about healing communities instead of displacing them? (Youtube)
Cities for People (Jan Gehl)
Jan Gehl TED Talk: In Search of the Human Scale (Youtube)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on June 3, 2019.

Jul 12, 2019
Climate Winners and Losers
49:00

Do you live somewhere that might actually benefit from climate change? Rising temperatures and seas will produce losers and winners. Some parts of the world will see more moderate weather and economic gains, while others are already seeing sagging property prices and economic losses.

“Many people think oh it’s just the temperature, but actually temperature affects everything,” says Solomon Hsiang of UC Berkeley. Hsiang co-authored a 2017 paper in the journal Science that outlines the impacts of a warmer world on human health and migration, violent crime, food production and wealth distribution.

The study shows that hot days are associated with increased violence as well as with reduced incomes. Hsiang and his colleagues have followed actual U.S. counties over time and found that if the diurnal average is above 85 Fahrenheit, people earn roughly $20 less per year.

So who does come out ahead?

“We do spend a lot of resources trying to cope with the cold,” Hsiang notes. “There are many parts of the world where if you get a little bit warmer…you actually can take those resources that you were spending on shoveling your driveway or paying someone to plow it, and you can invest those in something much more productive.”

But would any of these benefits inevitably offset by the social costs?

“Risk in a changing climate is not just about the climate – that human side of the picture is unbelievably important,” says Katherine Mach, formerly with Stanford University and now at university of Miami. “The huge inequities among countries of the world and the way that impacts that are happening in terms of impacts for food security or water insecurity…will mean
different things when you're in a low income country” without state support to keep the economy moving.

Guests:
Solomon Hsiang, Chancellor's Associate Professor of Public Policy, UC Berkeley
Katherine Mach, Senior Research Scientist, Stanford University

Jul 05, 2019
David Wallace-Wells: The Uninhabitable Earth
51:00

At what point does Planet Earth become inhospitable to life – let alone a flourishing human civilization?

In his new book The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming, David Wallace-Wells explores how climate change will impact not just the planet, but human lives – including how a five degree increase in temperatures would make parts of the planet unsurvivable.

“The more I learned about the science the deeper I got into it… the more scared I was,” he admits, “and from where I sat as a journalist the importance of telling that story so that other people have the same reaction have the same response.

Paradoxically, though he has only been writing about it for a few years, Wallace-Wells has found climate change to invigorate him as a storyteller. “It's an epic saga,” he says. “It's the kind of thing that we only used to see in mythology and theology. We really do have the fate of the world and the species in our hands.”

Another climate communicator, Katherine Hayhoe from Texas Tech University, recognizes the need for storytellers like Wallace-Wells to translate the work of scientists like her.

“We’re not missing the apocalyptic vision of the future, I think we've got that in spades,” she says. “What David’s book does is it takes what we've been saying in scientific assessments for years and even decades, and it rephrases in a way that’s hopefully more accessible for people to understand how bad this could be.”

That said, Hayhoe also recognizes a need for other writers and creative artists to tell climate stories that move us beyond doom-and-gloom. “We scientists are terrible at positive visions of the future, all we’re good at is diagnosing the problem in greater and greater detail,” she laments. “We need others to help us see what that future looks like. Because when you look at something that’s better than what we have today, you can’t hold people back from moving in that direction.”

Guests:
David Wallace-Wells, Deputy Editor, New York Magazine; Author, The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming
Katharine Hayhoe, Professor and Director, Climate Science Center, Texas Tech University

Jun 28, 2019
Can a Circular Economy Salvage the Climate?
50:00

Guests
John Lanier, co-author, Mid-Course Correction Revisited: The Story and Legacy of a Radical Industrialist and his Quest for Authentic Change (Chelsea Green, 2019)
Beth Rattner, executive director, Biomimicry Institute
Peter Templeton, president and CEO, Cradle to Cradle Product Innovation Institute
Mike Sangiacomo, president and CEO, Recology

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco on May 7, 2019

Produce, consume, discard; we all know the routine. Raw materials are extracted, produced into goods, and used – sometimes only once – before turning into waste. And maybe we think that recycling that Starbucks cup or Smartwater bottle is the best we can do for the planet. But that’s the wrong way to think about it, says John Lanier of the Ray C. Anderson Foundation.

“Recycling is not the answer or the solution to advancing the circular economy,” Lanier asserts. It's an answer, but actually one of the weakest ones. It’s what we should do as a last result before we throw something in a landfill.”

Like his grandfather Ray Anderson, a pioneer in corporate sustainability, Lanier advocates for a mindset in which products are designed and manufactured with a focus on permanence, rather than disposability.

“In this vision for the future we become owners of things…not consumers of them,” Lanier explains. “That’s a big and radical shift.”

Rethinking our manufacturing methods and energy resources is another key element, says Beth Rattner of the Biomimicry Institute. “When we start talking about pulling carbon out of the air, taking it from source emitters, pulling methane off of farms and creating new kinds of stuff, new kinds of plastic…that’s the recycling story we should be telling.”

Finding ways to imitate nature’s most efficient methods, such as structural color, is an exciting new development in product design.

“Imagine if everything we made was functionally indistinguishable from nature,” Rattner says. “That's the goal.

“Because when you walk into a forest, that whole forest is working toward a single common good, which is the protection of the forest; that is its survival strategy.”

And as more and more corporations and consumers embrace the concept of a “circular economy,” it may turn out to be ours as well.

RELATED LINKS:
Ray C. Anderson Foundation
Biomimicry Institute
Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute
Recology
Nathaniel Stookey's Junkestra: A Symphony of Garbage | The Kennedy Center (Youtube)
The Ecology of Commerce: A Declaration of Sustainability (Paul Hawken)

Jun 20, 2019
Jay Inslee: The Climate Candidate
51:00

As the 2020 presidential election approaches, Greg Dalton will be sitting down with some of the candidates to talk about their plans for a clean energy supply, a greener economy, and their specific strategies for addressing the climate crisis as President of the United States. Keep your eyes out for those episodes on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee is a notable departure from other Democratic presidential hopefuls who regularly mention, but rarely prioritize climate change. Yet in a recent poll of public policy priorities, Americans ranked climate change next to last. Could a climate-focused candidate nudge the Democratic platform toward bolder action – let alone become the Climate President?

“I've now passed some of the most meaningful climate legislation in American history,” says Governor Inslee. “I’m very confident that I have a unique ability to lead this nation [and] I favor and I appreciate anybody following my leadership.”

Inslee pulls no punches in touting his environmental accomplishments as governor as a model for national climate action. “The kind of thing that we’ve done in Washington State that I believe is a template for success in Washington [DC],” he says, “so we ought to believe that we can have 100% clean electricity that ought to be something that we can tell Americans that they can have because I have told Washingtonians they can achieve that goal.”

The governor is also unequivocal about why he is running for President as the climate candidate.

“I just decided that I wanted on my deathbed to be able to look at my grandchildren and tell them I did every single thing I could to prevent climate change from destroying their future and that includes running for president of the United States.”

Guest:
Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 2, 2019.

Jun 14, 2019
Mindful Travel in the Age of Climate Change
51:00

Guests:
Jennifer Palmer, Founder, Women for Wildlife
James Sano, Vice President for Travel, Tourism and Conservation, World Wildlife Fund
Norbu Tenzing, Vice President, American Himalayan Foundation

We’ve all heard that hopping on a plane is one of the worst things we can do for the climate. So how do we justify the environmental costs of world travel? Seeing the effects of global warming for yourself could be one argument for getting on that flight. For James Sano of the World Wildlife Fund, things got real on a trip to Antarctica.

“I was expecting lots of crevasses and big chunks of ice,” Sano recalls. “But then I suddenly found myself with my skis on a beach. And in the ensuing hundred or so years, the glacier had receded significantly so that there was no ice fall.”

Jennifer Palmer of Women for Wildlife has traveled the world spreading awareness about global warming. She believes that helping to connect those who are being hit hardest by it makes the carbon cost worthwhile.

“There is a piece of me that sits on a plane and says I’m contributing to this,” Palmer admits. “[But] when you think about it in the grand context of the people that I'm helping have the experiences, and they’re becoming ambassadors for these places. They're coming back and they’re telling stories and they’re creating videos and they’re having dialogues. And they’re creating change.”

One memorable experience for Palmer was sharing the film “Chasing Ice” with a community of Bajau people in Indonesia.

“We actually screened the film in the middle of the ocean on their settlement on stilts,” she remembers. “We tied up bed sheets…and they were literally hanging out on boats.”

“To see the looks on their faces as they learned about what is a glacier and how that’s connected to the issues that they’re going on and seeing…to make that connection and to be able to have a dialogue with that community was very special and heartwarming and heartbreaking at the same time.”

Jim Sano had some travel advice for those who want to lighten their carbon travel footprint. Take fewer, long trips if you can, he suggests. Avoid flying first class. And consider your routing: “Many people don't know that a great majority of your carbon footprint is associated with takeoffs and landings,” he reminded the audience. “So while your airfare may be less if you do a one stop, if you take a direct flight, your footprint would be far less.”

Norbu Tenzing, whose father was one of the first people to reach the top of Mt. Everest in the company of Sir Edmund Hillary, welcomes travelers, trekkers and tourists to his beloved Himalayas,“.unequivocally, the highest and most beautiful mountains in the world.” But, he adds, it’s vital to travel responsibly.

“You go to places like Nepal, Tibet or the Himalayas where we have massive problem with global warming,” he says, “it's important to go over there and see firsthand what the issues are, and to come back and try and do something about it.”

Whether we’re scaling Mount Everest or diving with sea turtles in the Galapagos Islands, it’s important to tread lightly – and respectfully – on every corner of our planet. And ideally, use the experience to make the world a better place

Related Links:

World Wildlife Fund

Women for Wildlife

American Himalayan Foundation

Sustainable Travel International

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 19, 2018.

Jun 07, 2019
If You Won't, We Will: Youth Action on Climate
51:00

Guests:
Isha Clarke, Student Activist
Sarah Goody, Student Activist
Julia Olson, Executive Director at Our Children's Trust; Chief Legal Counsel for plaintiffs in Juliana v. U.S.
Ben Wessel, Director, NextGen Rising
Morissa Zuckerman, Bay Area Chapter Coordinator, Sunrise Movement

Although many climate conversations talk about impacts on future generations, all too often those younger generations are not at the table or in the room. So how are young people taking charge of their climate future? For Isha Clarke, a high school student and activist from Oakland, California, by speaking truth to the senior U.S. Senator from her state.

“I think that truth is respectful and that you can speak truth in a way that is compassionate and authentic,” says Clarke, who recently gained fame for a viral video in which she confronts Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein over the Green New Deal.

“I think the conversation now isn’t really about Senator Feinstein anymore,” Clarke says as she reflects on that experience and the ensuing coverage, “it's really about politicians in general and power holders in general, who aren’t and haven't been taking the necessary steps to reverse this climate crisis.

Feeling a similar frustration at her elders’ failure to act more urgently, 14-year old Sarah Goody organized a climate strike in San Francisco.

“Why study for a future that’s not gonna exist?” says Sarah in response to passers-by who question why she’s sitting on a sidewalk rather than in a classroom, “I need to be here now and fighting now for my future.”

Sitting alone outside iconic buildings can be a lonely endeavor, so other slightly-less young activists have found their climate calling by getting involved in more organized movements.

“I see [it] as a civic duty to be involve to be socially engaged in whatever way I can,” says Morrisa Zuckerman, Bay Area chapter coordinator for the Sunrise Movement, the grassroots organization behind the Green New Deal. She and her colleagues have been pressing lawmakers and candidates to make climate action a top priority – and it’s working.

“This Democratic presidential primary is talking about climate change in a way that I don't think any of us necessarily expected,” enthuses Ben Wessel, Youth Vote Director at NextGen America, the environmental advocacy organization founded by billionaire activist Tom Steyer.

Wessel has been impressed by the diversity of motivations that have recently been drawing young people to climate politics. “This is one intersectional movement that has to address our racial injustices our climate injustices and our economic injustices,” Wessel says, “I actually think the Democratic primary electorate is recognizing that more than ever before.”

Elections have consequences; but without more fundamental changes, shifting political winds can erase hard-fought carbon reductions. That’s why for Julia Olson, Executive Director of Our Children's Trust, the most effective climate solution lies in judicial rather than legislative action.

Olson is chief legal counsel for plaintiffs in Juliana versus United States, the lawsuit brought by 21 young people accusing the federal government of violating their fundamental rights under the Fifth Amendment to life, liberty and property by knowingly promoting and subsidizing an energy system that damages climate.

“What we hope to do through our case in lifting up the voice of youth in the Judiciary,” Olson explains, “is to secure the binding constitutional mandate that forces the people in the presidency and in the legislature to actually adopt laws and policies that comply with its constitutional obligation.”

Related links:

Sunrise Movement

NextGen Rising

Youth v. Gov (Juliana v. United States)

Our Children’s Trust

Plant for the Planet

May 31, 2019
David Gergen on Climate Politics and Public Opinion
51:00

Guests:
David Gergen, Professor of Public Service and Founding Director, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School
Marianne Lavelle, Reporter, InsideClimate News
Lori Weigel, Partner, Public Opinion Strategies

What does a former advisor to Richard Nixon think about the climate crisis?

“This is turning out exactly the way scientists predicted, with one exception: it’s happening faster than they thought,” says political analyst David Gergen, who served in four presidential administrations. “The question is what can we do rapidly that would alleviate this and be fair to all.”

Gergen is in favor of urgent acting on climate, but is skeptical of the all-encompassing vision of the Green New Deal. “The last thing we need is another fight that leads to a big environmental bill that the minority won't vote for,” he says referencing the Affordable Care Act, “and it's only voted for by the majority, and then the minority spends the next five years trying to undo it.”

At a minimum, Gergen believes Republicans would be in favor of getting the U.S. back into the Paris Accord and setting a reasonable price on carbon. So what keeps Republican lawmakers from signing on to meaningful climate legislation?

“You have to think that the Republican Party takes a contrary view in part because of the money [from the fossil fuel industry],” he laments. As someone who grew up in tobacco country and lost his father to cancer, Gergen can’t help but see the parallels between that industry and oil companies.

“The science… may not be 100% correct and maybe it's only 95% correct,” he says, “but whatever the number is we should have an insurance policy to protect our kids and our grandkids. I mean it’s just, that’s just obvious common sense.”

That common sense, as more and more voters experience more frequent extreme weather, is serving to move the climate debate forward in Washington. “There’s a lot of signs that voters, you know, they may not completely agree with the Green New Deal,” says Marianne Lavelle, a reporter with InsideClimate News, “but they’re not very happy with having politicians who are just not paying attention to climate and just not doing anything.”

Lavelle credits the proponents of the Green New Deal for the new momentum, though they are not necessarily following a radical new playbook. “The principle that really motivates the backers of the Green New Deal is considering climate change as an economic policy, not just an environmental policy,” she explains, adding that the U.S. had already signed on to an environmental and economic framework for addressing climate change at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992.

As an climate journalist, Lavelle is especially pleased to see Republicans no longer – or at least not as full-throatedly – denying climate change, even proposing solutions, however modest. “This is the thing that we have tried to get across in our coverage,” she says. “For so many years the discussion was stuck on is climate change happening or not and that is not going to be a productive discussion. But a debate on which approach would be better... is a discussion that could become productive.”

Ultimately it is Republican voters who are pushing their legislators to act, since many of them, especially in western states, find their views on energy and conservation at odds with the current administration’s environmental policies.

“The vast majority of Western voters say we need to make sure that we protect [public lands] for all Americans,” notes Lori Weigel, a GOP pollster. “It shouldn't be something where economic value or resource extraction is taking priority over the uses that we’re most familiar with.”

Republican support for immediate action on climate, framed in those terms, has barely moved in the last 20 years. But, Weigel says, “if you broaden your language and talk about should we be transitioning to cleaner energy, should we be taking some sorts of actions, then you get far more Republicans, especially Republican women, especially younger Republicans to say yes – yes, we ought to be doing something.”

“When we talk about clean energy, when we talk about solar and wind and being more energy-efficient, honestly, we see very little partisan distinction on those things.”

Related links:

InsideClimate News

Public Opinion Strategies

Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School

May 31, 2019
David Gergen on Climate Politics and Public Opinion

Guests (in order of appearance):
David Gergen, Professor of Public Service and Founding Director, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School
Marianne Lavelle, Reporter, InsideClimate News
Lori Weigel, Partner, Public Opinion Strategies

What does a former advisor to Richard Nixon think about the climate crisis?

“This is turning out exactly the way scientists predicted, with one exception: it’s happening faster than they thought,” says political analyst David Gergen, who served in four presidential administrations. “The question is what can we do rapidly that would alleviate this and be fair to all.”

Gergen is in favor of urgent acting on climate, but is skeptical of the all-encompassing vision of the Green New Deal. “The last thing we need is another fight that leads to a big environmental bill that the minority won't vote for,” he says referencing the Affordable Care Act, “and it's only voted for by the majority, and then the minority spends the next five years trying to undo it.”

At a minimum, Gergen believes Republicans would be in favor of getting the U.S. back into the Paris Accord and setting a reasonable price on carbon. So what keeps Republican lawmakers from signing on to meaningful climate legislation?

“You have to think that the Republican Party takes a contrary view in part because of the money [from the fossil fuel industry],” he laments. As someone who grew up in tobacco country and lost his father to cancer, Gergen can’t help but see the parallels between that industry and oil companies.

“The science… may not be 100% correct and maybe it's only 95% correct,” he says, “but whatever the number is we should have an insurance policy to protect our kids and our grandkids. I mean it’s just, that’s just obvious common sense.”

That common sense, as more and more voters experience more frequent extreme weather, is serving to move the climate debate forward in Washington. “There’s a lot of signs that voters, you know, they may not completely agree with the Green New Deal,” says Marianne Lavelle, a reporter with InsideClimate News, “but they’re not very happy with having politicians who are just not paying attention to climate and just not doing anything.”

Lavelle credits the proponents of the Green New Deal for the new momentum, though they are not necessarily following a radical new playbook. “The principle that really motivates the backers of the Green New Deal is considering climate change as an economic policy, not just an environmental policy,” she explains, adding that the U.S. had already signed on to an environmental and economic framework for addressing climate change at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992.

As an climate journalist, Lavelle is especially pleased to see Republicans no longer – or at least not as full-throatedly – denying climate change, even proposing solutions, however modest. “This is the thing that we have tried to get across in our coverage,” she says. “For so many years the discussion was stuck on is climate change happening or not and that is not going to be a productive discussion. But a debate on which approach would be better... is a discussion that could become productive.”

Ultimately it is Republican voters who are pushing their legislators to act, since many of them, especially in western states, find their views on energy and conservation at odds with the current administration’s environmental policies.

“The vast majority of Western voters say we need to make sure that we protect [public lands] for all Americans,” notes Lori Weigel, a GOP pollster. “It shouldn't be something where economic value or resource extraction is taking priority over the uses that we’re most familiar with.”

Republican support for immediate action on climate, framed in those terms, has barely moved in the last 20 years. But, Weigel says, “if you broaden your language and talk about should we be transitioning to cleaner energy, should we be taking some sorts of actions, then you get far more Republicans, especially Republican women, especially younger Republicans to say yes – yes, we ought to be doing something.”

“When we talk about clean energy, when we talk about solar and wind and being more energy-efficient, honestly, we see very little partisan distinction on those things.”

Related links:

InsideClimate News
Public Opinion Strategies
Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School

May 24, 2019
Republicans and a Democrat on Climate
49:00

Guests:

Ryan Costello, Former U.S. Representative (R-PA)
Christine Pelosi, Executive Committeewoman, Democratic National Committee
Carlos Curbelo, Former U.S. Representative (R-FL)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco on April 30, 2019.

During the 2016 presidential election, climate change barely surfaced as a campaign topic. This cycle it’s a different story.

“It’s gonna be the first election where it's a major issue,” predicts former congressman Carlos Curbelo (R-FL). “I don't support it, but we can thank the Green New Deal for that.”

Democrats have rallied around the Green New Deal and its lofty promise of a clean energy future. How will it realize its ambitious goals? Still unclear. But there can be no doubt that the tide of climate change awareness is rising among the nation’s voters. And more and more, as their constituents feel the effects of global warming in their own districts, Republicans find that they ignore the topic at their peril.

“In every single community in this country, you are able to identify a few changes to the detriment of all as a consequence of a changing climate,” says Ryan Costello, former U.S. representative from Pennsylvania. Costello, a Republican, now manages Americans for Carbon Dividends, an advocacy group that is supported by oil companies and promotes a price on carbon emissions.

“If you’re along the coast, rising sea levels,” Costello continues. “If you're in the Midwest, the land that you can grow on has shrunk; your crop season has shrunk. If you're in Oregon and Northern California the wildfires -- and on and on and on.

“This is really where the conversation has to go now in the next few years to come -- what the cost of climate change truly is.”

In 2018, Curbelo proposed legislation that would impose a carbon tax, which garnered the support of many of his GOP colleagues. What inspired him to act on an unpopular cause? For the South Florida community that first sent him to congress in 2015, the issue has become very close to home.

“In my community, an area that is at about sea level and where most people live near the sea, the threat is real, it's imminent. We get tidal flooding; our drinking water supply is threatened by saltwater intrusion.

“So that's why I decided to get involved.”

Still, even some Democrats have found themselves caught between the threat of a destabilized climate and other, more immediate, concerns. Christine Pelosi of the Democratic National Committee says that, from her perspective, the conversation is more regional than partisan.

“It has a lot more to do with a couple of things,” she says. “One is the existential threat that climate change presents, and the other is the dialogue in which people from poorer communities - frontline communities, indigenous communities, mining communities, industrial communities - say, ‘well, it may be true that the ecology as we know it is going to change in a dozen years. But your change is gonna change my family's economy in two years.”

As 2020 looms, many Republicans still fear that voicing support of climate solutions could torpedo their chances for reelection. Curbelo, who co-founded the bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus in Congress, believes it’s time to put country ahead of career.

“If you are an elected leader of this country, you have a fiduciary responsibility to your constituents and to the country and to no one else,” Curbelo says. “So, yeah, perhaps leading on climate could make some Republicans vulnerable in a primary, perhaps negotiating with Republicans could make some Democrats vulnerable in a primary.
“Too bad -- that's what you signed up for, and we need you to do your job.”

Related Links:
Climate Solutions Caucus
The Green New Deal
The Green Real Deal
Americans for Carbon Dividends
The Market Choice Act

May 17, 2019
Sea Changes: Why Oceans Play a Bigger Role in Climate Change Than You Think
51:00
May 10, 2019
How Climate Broke California’s Biggest Utility
52:00

PG&E has had a bad few years. A series of record-breaking wildfires culminating with 2018’s devastating Camp Fire propelled the California utility giant into lawsuits, $30 billion in liabilities and, ultimately, bankruptcy. Under new state laws, regulated utilities will have a hard time avoiding blame in fires where their equipment is involved—so what’s ahead for PG&E’s peers and their shareholders when a deadly blaze could spell bankruptcy? What happens when the California dream of living near nature is in direct conflict with disruptive tragedies fueled by climate change?

Guests:
Dian Grueneich, Former Commissioner, California Public Utilities Commission
J.D. Morris, Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle
Mark Toney, Executive Director, The Utility Reform Network
Alex Ghenis, Policy and Research Specialist, World Institute on Disability
Hunter Stern, Business Representative, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1245
Loretta Lynch, Former Commissioner, California Public Utilities Commission
Laura Wisland, Senior Manager, Western States Energy, Union of Concerned Scientists

May 03, 2019
Oppressive Heat: Climate Change as a Civil Rights Issue
51:00

While the environmental movement is typically associated with upper-class white folk, it is also a civil rights issue. Communities of color often live closest to factories and refineries that spew toxic pollution. That’s one reason why polls show more African Americans and Latinos expressing a serious concern over climate change than whites. So why do environmental movements lack diversity, and why has it been so difficult for nonprofits to reach communities of color? We talk to hip hop artist and activist, Mystic, civil rights hero Rev. Gerald Durley and civil rights lawyer, Ingrid Brostrom to learn more.

Guests
Ingrid Brostrom, Assistant Director, Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment
Rev. Dr. Gerald Durley, Board Member, Interfaith Power and Light
Mystic, Musician, Bay Area Coordinator, Hip Hop Caucus

Apr 25, 2019
Fighting Fossil Fuels All the Way to Prison
49:00

How far would you go to make your voice heard on climate change? College student Tim DeChristopher disrupted an auction for oil and gas leases - and landed in prison. Georgia Hirsty and other Greenpeace activists suspended themselves from a Portland bridge to protest an oil rig bound for the Arctic. Such extreme activism gets headlines, and sometimes results. But is radical civil disobedience the most effective weapon for change? Or is collaborating with corporations to encourage sustainable practices a better way to make a difference?

Guests:
Tim DeChristopher, Founder, Climate Disobedience Center
Georgia Hirsty, National Warehouse Program Manager, Greenpeace
Brendon Steele, Director of Stakeholder Engagement, Future 500

Apr 20, 2019
Climate One at Harvard With Obama’s Climate Team
51:00

With the Green New Deal in the national spotlight, a vigorous debate is happening: how ambitiously and broadly must the U.S. act on climate? Are issues like economic equity, job security and public health outside the frame of climate action — or fundamental to its success? Greg Dalton welcomes two key members of President Obama’s climate team: former White House Science Advisor John Holdren and former U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, in a special program recorded at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

John Holdren, Former Science Advisor to President Obama, Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy at Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Gina McCarthy, Former U.S. EPA Administrator; Director of the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Apr 12, 2019
The New Surf and Turf
49:00

Production of animal protein is producing vast amounts of climate-eating gases. But a new generation of companies are creating innovative food products that mimic meat and have much smaller environmental impacts. Some of this mock meat is derived from plants with ingredients designed to replicate the taste and pleasure of chomping into a beef hamburger. Others are growing meat cells that come from a laboratory and not a cow. Could these and other culinary innovations wean Americans away from their beloved hot dogs, hamburgers and tuna melts, reduce our impact on the planet, and help feed the world’s growing population?

Guests:
Patrick O. Brown, CEO and Founder, Impossible Foods
Carolyn Jung, Journalist/Blogger, Foodgal.com
Mike Selden, CEO and Co-founder, Finless Foods

Apr 05, 2019
Insane Mode: Tesla’s Wild Ride
52:00

Despite having the top-selling luxury car in 2018, and a loyal if not rabid customer base, Tesla has been facing major challenges. In August, maverick CEO Elon Musk was slapped with SEC charges over some rather misleading tweets. That move cost him and the company millions in fines and forced Musk to step down as chairman. Other skidmarks for Tesla include production delays, shareholder skittishness and some well-publicized workplace complaints. Host Greg Dalton invites three journalists and Tesla-watchers to assess the health of Tesla, its overall impact on the auto industry and its future as a leader in the green economy.

Guests:

Hamish McKenzie, Author, “Insane Mode: How Elon Musk's Tesla Sparked an Electric Revolution to End the Age of Oil” (Dutton, 2018)

Lora Kolodny, Tech Reporter, CNBC

Katie Fehrenbacher, Senior Writer & Analyst, GreenBiz

Mar 29, 2019
Naturally Wired: Getting Outside in the Digital Age
59:00

What does it take to get people off their phones and into the outdoors? Research has shown the deleterious effects of electronics on weight, sleep, and cognitive development in children, who in 2018 spend four hours or more each day glued to screens. Other barriers like income and proximity to nature make access to the outdoors extremely challenging for some families. Meanwhile, doctors have started prescribing hikes over medications, and terms like “forest schools” and “unstructured playtime” are new buzzwords. So how do we encourage outdoor curiosity and conservation in a generation raised on screen time?

Guests:
Phil Ginsburg, General Manager, San Francisco Recreation and Parks
Rebecca Johnson, Co-Director, Citizen Science at the California Academy of Sciences
Nooshin Razani, Pediatrician and Founder/Director of the Center for Nature and Health at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland

Related Links:

Citizen Science at the California Academy of Science

iNaturalist - A Community for Naturalists

Center for Nature and Health at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital

San Francisco Recreation and Parks

Mar 22, 2019
EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler on Cars, Coal, and Climate
52:00

Greg Dalton sits down for a rare interview with newly-confirmed U.S. EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler on cars, coal, and climate. Mary Nichols, Chair of the California Air Resources Board, responds to Wheeler’s position on vehicle standards, and discusses her agency’s role leading a group of states in contesting the Trump administration’s revised auto emissions rules. Also featuring Albert Cheung of Bloomberg New Energy Finance on the future of personal mobility, and Helen Clarkson of The Climate Group on getting some of the world’s biggest companies to commit to 100% renewable energy.

Guests:
Andrew Wheeler, Administrator, U.S. EPA
Albert Cheung, Head of Global Analysis, Bloomberg New Energy Finance
Mary Nichols, Chair, California Air Resources Board
Helen Clarkson, CEO, The Climate Group

Mar 15, 2019
If Global Warming Exists, Why is it so Cold Outside?
49:00

The last five years have been the hottest on record globally. But this past winter, plunging temperatures, snowstorms and torrential rains throughout the country have a lot of people questioning the reality of climate change. If the planet is warming up, why is the Midwest suffering record cold temperatures?

Climate scientists, communicators and educators join us to talk about about why, after one of the hottest years on record, the country has suddenly gone into deep freeze. On today’s Climate One: climate science explained, and climate myths debunked.

Guests:

Katharine Mach, Senior Research Scientist, Stanford University
Ben Santer, Climate Scientist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
David Fenton, Founder, Fenton Communications
Ann Reid, Executive Director, National Center for Science Education

Mar 08, 2019
Weathering the Storm in America's Cities
51:00

From floods and fires to heavy snow and hurricanes, recent years have brought a raft of extreme weather disasters costing the U.S. hundreds of billions of dollars in damages. How do we fight back? The mayors of three cities on the front lines of climate change – Houston, Miami, and Columbia, South Carolina – discuss what their cities are doing to recover, rebuild and prepare for the next mega-storm. And Seattle Times reporter Jon Talton explains why he thinks fighting climate change should be our biggest priority.

Guests:
Jon Talton, Economics Reporter, The Seattle Times
Steve Benjamin, Mayor, Columbia, SC
Francis Suarez, Mayor, Miami, FL
Sylvester Turner, Mayor, Houston, TX

Mar 01, 2019
Donor Power: The Influence of Climate Philanthropy

Fighting climate change isn’t cheap. Where’s the money coming from? Major philanthropic organizations like Hewlett and Bloomberg are at the forefront of addressing climate change, but could smaller funders be more in touch with grassroots needs? Are big donors out of touch – or just stretched too far? Where is the money coming from, where is it going, what are the biggest wins and what missteps are being made along the way?

Greg Dalton is joined by donors big and small for a discussion on harnessing the power of the purse in the fight against climate change.

Guests:
Tate Williams, Science and Environment Editor, Inside Philanthropy
Larry Kramer, President, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Farhad Ebrahimi, Founder, Chorus Foundation
Sarah Shanley Hope, Executive Director, The Solutions Project
Dan Chu, Executive Director, Sierra Club Foundation
Joe Speicher, Executive Director, Autodesk Foundation

Feb 22, 2019
Can California Go Carbon Neutral?

Just ten years ago, an entire state running on 100% renewable electricity seemed fanciful. But this dreamy vision became reality when, with the backing of big utilities, California committed to 100% use of zero-carbon electricity by 2045. A statewide pledge to go carbon-neutral by 2045 raised the stakes even higher. So what will it take for California to achieve such a feat? Will Governor Gavin Newsom embrace climate initiatives started by former Governor Jerry Brown? Join us for a discussion of California’s surprise gambit to take the world’s fifth largest economy to net zero.

John Hofmeister, Former President, Shell Oil Company; Founder and Chief Executive, Citizens for Affordable Energy
Bob Holycross, Global Director, Sustainability and Vehicle Environmental Matters, Ford Motor Company
Mary Nichols, Chair, California Air Resources Board

Feb 15, 2019
Katharine Hayhoe: Why We Need to Talk About Climate Change

Many of us find it daunting to talk with our neighbors, colleagues and family members about climate change. But climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe says that having those difficult conversations is the first step towards solving the problem. Hayhoe is known as a “rock star” in the climate world for her ability to talk to just about anyone about global warming. She is joined by Stanford atmospheric scientist Noah Diffenbaugh for a conversation about communicating climate change in transparent, engaging, and accessible ways.

Guests:
Katharine Hayhoe, Professor and Director, Climate Science Center, Texas Tech University
Noah Diffenbaugh, Kara J. Foundation Professor and Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University

Feb 08, 2019
How Some Countries Are Solving Climate Change

When it comes to cutting emissions, there are many paths to success. Sweden, France, South Korea, and Ontario have all taken steps to replace fossil fuels with nuclear, hydro and renewable energy, while China is expanding electric car and battery production. But the absence of U.S. climate leadership is causing heads of state to ease off their goals, and violent protests in France against higher diesel taxes are casting a shadow over efforts to combat climate change. Join us for a discussion about who’s moving ahead and who’s moving backward in the transition to a clean energy economy.

Guests:
Sonia Aggarwal , Vice President, Energy Innovation
Joshua Goldstein , Professor Emeritus of International Relations, American University
Staffan Qvist , Consultant, Qvist Consulting Limited

Feb 01, 2019
Cool Clean Tech

Over a century ago, the industrial revolution brought wealth and opportunity to a generation of American innovators. It also brought us dirty coal power and a sky clogged with carbon emissions. The good news? There’s a new generation of entrepreneurs eager to make their fortune by fighting global warming. Creative start-ups are coming up with fresh, climate-friendly ideas for getting around town, powering your cell phones, and even eating breakfast. And there are a growing number of forward-thinking venture capitalist firms eager to seek out and nurture those innovative thinkers

Guests:

Lidiya Dervisheva, Associate, G2VP

Davida Herzl, CEO and Co-Founder, Aclima

Gabriel Kra, Managing Director, Prelude Ventures

Jan 25, 2019
We’re Doomed – Now What?

Can changing our consciousness hold off the climate apocalypse? When we think about the enormity of climate change and what it’s doing to our planet, it’s easy to get overwhelmed, even shut down, by despair. But is despair such a bad place to be? Or could it be the one thing that finally spurs us to action? A conversation about climate change, spirituality and the human condition in unsettling times.

Guests:
Roy Scranton, Author, We're Doomed. Now What? (Soho Press, 2018)
Matthew Fox, Co-Author, Order of the Sacred Earth (with Skylar Wilson, Monkfish, 2018)

Jan 20, 2019
The Hidden Health Hazards of Climate Change

Climate change isn’t just an environmental problem – it’s also a health hazard. Air pollution and
changing weather patterns give rise to heat-related illnesses, asthma and allergic disorders.
Hurricanes and other disasters leave hospitals scrambling to save patients without power and
resources. According to the Centers for Disease Control, insect-borne diseases have tripled in
the United States in recent years – and warmer weather is largely to blame. Jonathan Patz, of
the Global Health Institute calls climate change “one of the most important public health
challenges of our times.

Guests:
Jonathan Patz, Director, Global Health Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Su Rynard, Director, “Mosquito” (Discovery Channel, 2017)
Chuck Yarling, Triathlete
Jessica Wolff, Director, Climate and Health Program, Healthcare without Harm

Jan 13, 2019
The Paris Agreement at Three: Floundering or Flourishing?

In its infancy, the Paris Agreement carried the promise of a truly global climate solution. Supporters still say the Agreement is the first step in setting the global economy toward a sustainable future, but U.N. reports now say current commitments are only a fraction as strong as they need to be, and critics say it's dangerously delusional to think the pact is ambitious enough to avoid catastrophic climate change. Katharine Mach, Senior Research Scientist at Stanford University, and Trevor Houser, Partner at the Rhodium Group, join host Greg Dalton for a Paris checkup, three years on.

Guests:
Katharine Mach, Senior Research Scientist, Stanford University
Trevor Houser, Partner, Rhodium Group

Jan 03, 2019
Going Carbon Negative

The math is clear: lowering greenhouse gas emissions is not enough to keep the earth below 1.5 degrees Celsius of post-industrial warming. The latest science states that actively removing carbon from the atmosphere — storing it in rocks, soil, trees, and even turning it into products like concrete — is critical to restore the carbon and energy balance. To keep our planet from dangerous levels of warming, we’ll need to go carbon negative. Which natural and technological approaches are the most promising? Three experts and host Greg Dalton discuss the necessary negatives for a stable climate.

Guests:

Noah Deich, Executive Director, Carbon180

Diana Donlon, Director, Soil Centric

Mike Biddle, Managing Director, Evok Innovations

Dec 28, 2018
The Big Climate Stories of 2018

We’re making a list (and checking it twice) of 2018’s biggest climate stories, with the help of Vox reporter David Roberts. Roberts notes that while President Trump’s continued rollbacks of environmental protections made the news, the Green New Deal and ongoing decline in costs of clean energy technologies are the year’s big stories. For other parts of the country, wildfires and other extreme weather events made the biggest headlines. Greg Dalton talks to some of California’s leading wildfire experts about how to adapt to the “new abnormal” of more intense and more frequent wildfires.

Guests:
David Roberts, Staff Writer, Vox
J. Keith Gilles, Chair, California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection; Professor of Forest Economics, UC Berkeley
Maggi Kelly, Professor and Cooperative Extension Specialist in the Environmental Science, Policy and Management Department, UC Berkeley
Thom Porter, Chief of Strategic Planning, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE)

Dec 21, 2018
Mind Over Chatter: Exploring Climate Psychology

We all know about the environmental and physical effects of climate change. But what about its impact on our mental health? Therapists report that their patients are exhibiting symptoms of what they call “climate anxiety” – loss of sleep, changes in appetite, feelings of grief, anger and hopelessness. How do we maintain our optimism in the face of a global existential crisis? And how do we talk with others about our fears without turning them off – or freaking them out? Three climate psychologists discuss how to cope with mounting anxiety brought on by climate change.

Guests:
Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist; Author, Environmental Melancholia: Psychoanalytic Dimensions of Engagement (Routledge, 2016)
Leslie Davenport, Psychotherapist; Author, Emotional Resiliency in the Era of Climate Change: A Clinician’s Guide (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2017)
Bryant Welch, Clinical Psychologist; Author, State of Confusion: Political Manipulation and the Assault on the American Mind (2018)

Dec 14, 2018
Fire and Water: A Year of Climate Conversations

From fires and floods to hurricanes and hot temperatures, 2018 put climate on the front page in ways it hadn’t been before. Yet amidst the disruption, clean energy prices continued to fall, climate-conscious technologies continued to progress, and people living on the front lines of climate change found ways to adapt and thrive. Join us for a look back on some of our most memorable conversations of 2018.

Guests (in order of appearance):
Lizzie Johnson
Scott Stephens
Francis Suarez
Steve Benjamin
Sylvester Turner
Solomon Hsiang
Katherine Mach
Arlie Hochschild
Eliza Griswold
Debbie Dooley
Christine Pelosi
Christiana Figueres
Roy Scranton
Davida Herzl
Gabriel Kra
Lydia Dervisheva
Mike Selden
Patrick Brown
Sanjay Dastoor
Megan Rose Dickey

Dec 07, 2018
A Four-Zero Climate Solution

Stabilizing our climate is going to take some hard truths – and hard numbers. “If you look at 1.5 degrees, it's about 13 years,” says Stanford’s Arun Majumdar. “If you look at 2 degrees, it’s 20 years. And after that, it’s zero.” We can fight back with the power of zero: a zero-carbon grid, zero-emission vehicles, zero-net energy buildings and zero-waste manufacturing. Whether through massive technological breakthroughs or deployment of existing technologies, powering these opportunities will require funding and policy changes. Can a four-zero solution lead to a low carbon-future?

Guests:
Hal Harvey, CEO, Energy Innovation, Author, Designing Climate Solutions: A Policy Guide for Low-Carbon Energy (Island Press, 2018)

Kate Gordon, Fellow, Columbia Center on Global Energy Policy

Arun Majumdar, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Co-Director at the Precourt Institute for Energy, Stanford

Nov 30, 2018
Documentaries for the Holiday Season

It’s a holiday movie special as Climate One talks to the directors/producers of four recent documentaries that bring human drama to the climate story:

Hillbilly, which explores the myths and realities of life in the Appalachian coalfields;

My Country No More, the story of one rural community divided by the North Dakota oil boom;

Saving the Dark, which focuses on the battle of dark-sky enthusiasts to fight light pollution;

and Point of No Return, in which two pilots risk their lives flying around the world in a solar-powered plane that is as delicate as a t-shirt.

Guests:
Rita Baghdadi, Co-Director, My Country No More
Noel Dockstader, Co-Director, Point of No Return
Jeremiah Hammerling, Co-Director, My Country No More
Quinn Kanaly, Co-Director, Point of No Return
Sriram Murali, Director/Producer, Saving the Dark
Sally Rubin, Co-Director, Hillbilly

Nov 27, 2018
Are Human Lives Improving?

In their 1968 book The Population Bomb, Paul and Anne Ehrlich warned of the dangers of overpopulation. These included mass starvation, societal upheaval and environmental ruin. This and other dire predictions about humankind earned Ehrlich a reputation as a prophet of doom, and fifty years later he doesn’t see much in the way of improvement. Harvard cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker, on the other hand, prefers to look on the bright side: people are living longer, extreme poverty has been decreasing globally, worldwide literacy is on the rise. Is the glass half empty, or half full?

Guests:

Steven Pinker, Johnstone Professor of Psychology, Harvard University; author, “Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress” (Penguin, 2018)

Paul R. Ehrlich, Bing Professor of Population Studies, Stanford University; co-author, “The Population Bomb” (Ballantine, 1968)

Nov 15, 2018
Saudi America

Production of oil and gas in the U.S. has surged to levels unthinkable a decade ago due to the revolution in hydraulic fracturing, which has helped the country surpass Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world's largest oil producer. In her latest book, Saudi America: The Truth About Fracking and How It’s Changing the World, Bethany McLean explores the past, present and future of fracking in America. Yet new development of fossil fuels is simply not consistent with the math of the Paris climate accord, leading us all to ask: What's next for fossil fuels?

Guests:

Bethany McLean, Author, Saudi America: The Truth about Fracking and How It's Changing the World

Kassie Siegel, Senior Counsel, Climate Law Institute Director at Center for Biological Diversity

Severin Borenstein, E.T. Grether Professor, Haas School of Business, University of California

Nov 09, 2018
Prosperity and Paradox: A Conversation with Arlie Hochschild and Eliza Griswold

Red states, blue states – when it comes to our environment, are we really two different Americas? New Yorker writer Eliza Griswold spent time in southwestern Pennsylvania to tell the story of a family living on the front lines of the fracking boom. Berkeley professor Arlie Hochschild traveled to Louisiana to escape what she calls the “bubble” of coastal thinking. Both writers emerged with books that paint an honest portrait of a misunderstood America. On today’s program, tales of the people whose lives have been impacted by America’s craving for energy, the choices they’ve made, and their fight to protect their families and their environment.

Guests:

Eliza Griswold, Journalist, The New Yorker; Author, “Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018)

Arlie Russell Hochschild, Professor Emerita, University of California Berkeley; Author, “Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right” (The New Press, 2018)

Nov 01, 2018
Climate Silence: Why Aren’t There More Votes?

After a year of climate-amplified fires and hurricanes around the country, New York Times reporter Trip Gabriel tells host Greg Dalton how climate and energy issues are playing in the midterm elections. Nathaniel Stinnett, founder of the Environmental Voter Project, describes what his organization is doing to mobilize the more than 10 million Americans who cite environmental protection as a core value but who don't vote regularly. And Sam Arons, Director of Sustainability at Lyft, explains how his company is encouraging its employees and customers to get out and vote.

Guests:

Trip Gabriel, political reporter, The New York Times

Nathaniel Stinnett, Founder & Executive Director, The Environmental Voter Project

Sam Arons, Director Sustainability Lyft

Oct 26, 2018
Will China Save the Planet?

Chinese factories churn out parts and products that end up in our cars, our kitchens and our cell phones. And all that productivity has improved the lives of its citizens, many of whom can now afford cars and cell phones of their own. It’s also made China the global leader in carbon emissions. But in her new book, “Will China Save the Planet,” Barbara Finamore says that China may well take the lead in saving the world from environmental catastrophe. How? By phasing out coal and investing in green energy to power its factories and keep its cities moving. With the US government cutting efforts to curb carbon pollution, is it possible that China is our best hope for saving the planet?

Guests:
Barbara Finamore, Asia Senior Strategic Director at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC); Author, "Will China Save the Planet?" (Polity, 2018)
Carter Roberts, President and CEO, World Wildlife Fund, United States

Oct 18, 2018
Climate Press Pool: Robert Gibbs and Jeff Nesbit

Climate used to have bipartisan support. Now that the Republican party is skeptical about fighting climate, companies are moving into a leadership void. On the show today we'll hear from two former white house spokesmen in Republican and Democratic administrations now working on climate from different angles. Robert Gibbs addresses what McDonald's is doing to cut its carbon emissions and environmental impact. Jeff Nesbit heads a communications organization trying to get the climate story covered more prominently in the mainstream news media.

Guests
Robert Gibbs, Executive Vice President and Global Chief Communications Officer, McDonald's Corporation
Jeff Nesbit, Author and Executive Director, Climate Nexus

Oct 12, 2018
Christiana Figueres: A Conversation on Mindfulness and Climate

Former UN climate negotiator Christiana Figueres credits Buddhist teachings both for helping her through a personal crisis, and for providing a source of inner strength that sustained her through negotiations at the 2015 Paris Climate Accord and helped contribute to its success. “I realized my commitment and my task here is to change that global mood,” Figueres remembers. “And of course I can't change the global mood before I change myself, because as we know all change starts with self.” Can mindfulness practice help us cope with the realities of climate change?

Guests
Christiana Figueres, Former Executive Secretary, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
Joshua Freedman, CEO, Six Seconds; Author, Inside Change
Meg Levie, Senior Teacher, Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute

Oct 05, 2018
Let's Talk Solutions: Global Climate Action Summit

The Paris Climate Accord was successful in bringing together the entire world around a common goal, but the focus was on what could be done at the national level. In light of the U.S. abdicating their own leadership role, there is a growing chorus demanding that subnational leaders take on the issue of climate change. The goal of GCAS is to inspire and elevate the solutions from those leaders.

This event is in partnership with Cool Effect, Capital Public Radio and in affiliation with the Global Climate Action Summit.

Guests:
Marisa de Belloy
CEO, Cool Effect; Executive Director, Overlook International Foundation

Gina McCarthy
Director, The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Bill McKibben
Founder, 350.org

Tom Steyer
Founder and President, NextGen America

Gloria Walton
President and CEO, Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education

Sep 28, 2018
The World on Fire

Wildfires have always been part of the landscape in the western states. But the size and intensity of fires over the last several years is something new.

They are being called “megafires;” wildfires covering over 100,000 acres each. The higher temperatures and lower humidity, brought on by climate change, are whipping up these hotter and bigger wildfires. And people’s lives are being upended by the flames.

Today we’re exploring the damage megafires are unleashing on life, property and natural ecosystems – and forest management solutions.

Guests
Rich Gordon
President of the California Forestry Association

Lizzie Johnson
Staff Writer for the San Francisco Chronicle

Scott Stephens
Professor of Fire Science at University of California, Berkeley

Sep 22, 2018
Farm to Table 2.0: Chefs Cutting Carbon

Can a menu at a fancy restaurant be a map for solving the climate challenge? A handful of high-end chefs are using their restaurants to show how innovative grazing and growing practices can cut carbon pollution. Anthony Myint, asks “What would it look like if you had ... environmentalism right up there with deliciousness, as your top priorities?” Dominique Crenn, a two Michelin star chef, pushes to move beyond the restaurateurs who she says only pay lip service to responsibly sourcing their food. Theirs is an uncompromising approach to cutting carbon while maintaining the best of the best.

Gwyneth Borden
Executive Director, Golden Gate Restaurant Association

Dominique Crenn
Chef and Owner, Atelier Crenn

Anthony Myint
Chef and Co-owner, The Perennial

Sep 14, 2018
Let's Talk Solutions: Global Climate Action Summit

On the eve of the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS), we started the conversation about how solutions could be led by states, cities, businesses and NGOs.

The Paris Climate Accord was successful in bringing together the entire world around a common goal. But as Gina McCarthy points out, “We need to get together and figure out how you address and drive solutions to climate that actually end up in not just a cleaner and healthier and more sustainable world, but one that’s more just.”

This event is in partnership with Cool Effect, Capital Public Radio and the Global Climate Action Summit.

Guests
Marisa de Belloy
CEO, Cool Effect; Executive Director, Overlook International Foundation

Gina McCarthy
Director, The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Bill McKibben
Founder, 350.org

Tom Steyer
Founder and President, NextGen America

Gloria Walton
President and CEO, Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education

Sep 14, 2018
Climate Gentrification

Solutions to the climate crisis include driving cleaner cars, planting more trees, eating less meat. But how do our housing choices factor into this?

Where we build housing and how close it is to mass transit has a big impact on our carbon footprint. Plans to green our cities should include new, urban housing that’s convenient to transportation. But this runs the risk of boosting the real estate market and gentrifying the neighborhood out of the reach of all but the wealthy. Can we build smart and affordable at the same time?

Guests
Ann Cheng
Transportation expert at TransForm

Isela Gracian
President of the East LA Community Corporation

Rachel Swan
City Hall reporter with the San Francisco Chronicle

Scott Wiener
State senator representing San Francisco, Daly City and Colma

Sep 07, 2018
Carbon Captives: The Human Experience

Fossil fuels have helped bring people out of poverty around the world, and many people working in the industry are proud of their contribution. William Vollmann writes about the lives of laborers and executives in different parts of the vast fossil fuel system. Discussing an alternative path for these communities, National Director of Green for All Michelle Romero advocates, “for some, retraining is a viable option and for others nearing retirement...maybe providing a benefit package that will help.” Explore the lives of those who remain captives of an economy run on carbon.

Guests
Michelle Romero
National Director, Green For All

William Vollmann
Author, No Good Alternative: Volume 2 of Carbon Ideologies

Sep 01, 2018
Permanently Temporary: Living with Rising Seas

The reality of permanent change along the shoreline is starting to slowly sink in. Recent studies indicate that vulnerability to changing tides is starting to be reflected in property markets around the country. And now cities are grappling with how to build roads, airports and other infrastructure for a very uncertain future. How fast and how high will the tides rise? No one knows for sure but every new forecast tends to be faster and higher than scientists predicted just a few years ago.

Elaine Forbes
Executive Director, Port of San Francisco

Nahal Ghoghaie
Bay Area Program Lead, The Environmental Justice Coalition for Water

Larry Goldzband
Executive Director, Bay Conservation and Development Commission

Aug 25, 2018
National Security and Climate Change

What’s the connection between climate change and national security? “Military commanders don't operate on the basis of fiction,” says Leon Panetta, who served as Secretary of Defense and Director of the CIA under President Obama. “Understanding climate change and what was happening had to be part and parcel of our effort to protect our security.” The military has long seen climate as critical to readiness, as Rear Admiral David Titley (Ret) explains. “If you’re directly connecting renewable energy to increasing our combat effectiveness,” explains Titley, “the military is all in.”

Leon Panetta,
Former Secretary of Defense

Rear Admiral David W. Titley, USN (Ret)
Director, Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk, Penn State University

Aug 17, 2018
California Greenin': Shaping America’s Environment

California. Land of sunshine and seashore. In an effort to protect the state’s magnificent landscape, California has led the country in environmental action. It established strong automobile emission standards. It preserved fragile lands from development. But as climate change fuels megafires across the state and sea level rise threatens the coast, is California doing enough, fast enough?

Huey Johnson
Chair, Resource Renewal Institute

Jason Mark
Editor, Sierra Magazine

David Vogel
Author, California Greenin’: How the Golden State Became an Environmental Leader

Aug 10, 2018
The New Surf and Turf

Production of animal protein is producing vast amounts of climate-eating gases. But a new generation of companies are creating innovative food products that mimic meat and have much smaller environmental impacts. Some of this mock meat is derived from plants with ingredients designed to replicate the taste and pleasure of chomping into a beef hamburger. Others are growing meat cells that come from a laboratory and not a cow. Will those options wean enough people from burgers and chicken wings to go mainstream?

Guests

Patrick O. Brown
CEO and Founder, Impossible Foods

Carolyn Jung
Journalist/Blogger, FoodGal.com

Mike Selden
CEO and Co-founder, Finless Foods

Aug 03, 2018
We're Doomed. Now What?

Can changing our consciousness hold off the climate apocalypse? When we think about the enormity of climate change and what it’s doing to our planet, it’s easy to get overwhelmed, even shut down, by despair. But is despair such a bad place to be? Or could it be the one thing that finally spurs us to action? A conversation about climate change, spirituality and the human condition in unsettling times.

Guests:
Roy Scranton
Author, We're Doomed. Now What? (Soho Press, 2018)

Matthew Fox
Co-Author, Order of the Sacred Earth (with Skylar Wilson, Monkfish, 2018)

Jul 27, 2018
Climate Storytellers

Strategic Adviser for Geographic Society, Andrew Revkin, has been writing about climate change since the 1980s, including 21 years for The New York Times. So what are some things he’s learned in those three decades? How has he learned to best tell the story? As New Yorker writer Elizabeth Kolbert knows all too well, covering climate change is journey that can be a challenge. “On some level it’s the worst story ever. It’s sort of everything and nothing and so finding the narrative is very, very difficult,” says Kolbert. This is a conversation with those telling the story of our climate.

Guests:

Andrew Revkin
Strategic Adviser for Environmental and Science Journalism, National Geographic Society
Elizabeth Kolbert
Journalist, The New Yorker
David Roberts
Staff Writer, Vox

Jul 20, 2018
New Wheels in Town
52:22

Electric scooters, skateboards and bicycles are popping up all over in cities all over the country. Ride-hailing companies are also moving to two wheels. Uber bought the bike sharing company Jump, and Lyft followed suit by scooping up Motivate, which operates bike sharing services in San Francisco, Boston, Chicago, New York and other cities. Is an electric skateboard company next? As companies jockey to offer a suite of transportation options what is the future of urban mobility? Are these new urban toys really solving the notorious first-mile and last-mile problem?

Guests:
Stuart Cohen, Executive Director, TransForm
Sanjay Dastoor, Co-Founder, Boosted Boards and CEO, Skip Scooters
Megan Rose Dickey, Senior Reporter, TechCrunch

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on June 20, 2018.

Jul 12, 2018
Making the Grade: Corporations and the Paris Climate Accord
52:22

When you think of climate activism, Wall Street doesn’t immediately come to mind. But as investors are coming to realize, they do have a voice – and a vote – when it comes to corporate environmental action. Responsible investing is a concept that’s been around for many years, but it’s only recently that companies have begun to take notice. And who’s driving that change? Shareholders. Greg Dalton talks with three experts about the ways that market forces can turn the ship, inspiring awareness, transparency and in some cases, even change, in seemingly immovable corporations.

Guests:
Betty Cremmins, Director, Carbon Disclosure Project West
Danielle Fugere, President & Chief Counsel, As You Sow
John Streur, President & CEO, Calvert Research and Management

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco.

Jul 10, 2018
Summer Films on Corn, Coal, Lights and Flights
52:22

It’s a summer movie special as Climate One talks to the directors/producers of four recent documentaries that bring human drama to the climate story: Hillbilly, which explores the myths and realities of life in the Appalachian coalfields; My Country No More, the story of one rural community divided by the North Dakota oil boom; Saving the Dark, which focuses on the battle of dark-sky enthusiasts to fight light pollution; and Point of No Return, in which two pilots risk their lives flying around the world in a solar-powered plane that is as delicate as a t-shirt.

Guests:
Rita Baghdadi, Co-Director, My Country No More
Noel Dockstader, Co-Director, Point of No Return
Jeremiah Hammerling, Co-Directo, My Country No More
Quinn Kanaly, Co-Director, Point of No Return
Sriram Murali, Director/Producer, Saving the Dark
Sally Rubin, Co-Director, Hillbilly

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco.

Jun 29, 2018
Rounding Up the Facts on GMOs
52:22

Are GMOs the answer to our planet’s food shortage? Or do they jeopardize our health, crops and climate by creating a destructive cycle of Roundup resistance? Like many issues these days, it depends on who you believe. Supporters of genetically modified organisms say that altering the DNA of corn and other crops is just another tool in the farmers’ toolbox - an innovation that will help feed a world whose food production has been disrupted by climate change. Opponents maintain that modified crops are dangerous to our health and are resistant to pesticides such as Monsanto’s Roundup, which has been linked to cancer. Join us for a lively conversation about the science and facts behind growing and eating GMOs.

Guests:
Marcia Ishii-Eiteman, Senior Scientist, Director Grassroots Science Program, Pesticide Action Network
Scott Kennedy, Filmmaker, Food Evolution
John Purcell, VP and Global R&D Lead, Monsanto Company
Austin Wilson, Environmental Health Program Manager, As You Sow

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 25, 2017.

Jun 22, 2018
Climate Winners and Losers
52:22

The new climate reality means that even those living on a hill will be affected by flooding in the valley, and those living in the North will be affected by droughts in the South. There are many factors to consider how you will be affected by climate change. “I think this question of inequity is also really, really important,” states Katharine Mach. “And the flipside of that is that wealth is not necessarily protection.”

Who will win and lose as climate disruption impacts agriculture, employment, crime, storms and human mortality. Do you live in the right place to come out ahead?

Guests:
Solomon Hsiang, Chancellor's Associate Professor of Public Policy, UC Berkeley
Katherine Mach, Senior Research Scientist, Stanford University

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 30, 2018.

Jun 15, 2018
Al Gore and Bill Nye
52:22

Looking for a movie that takes climate science to the masses? In the first part of this week’s episode, former Vice President Al Gore joins Climate One along with co-directors Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk to talk about the making of their 2017 movie AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL: TRUTH TO POWER and the solutions that it offers. In the second part, TV’s Bill Nye is joined by director Jason Sussberg, who shadowed Nye as he goes toe-to-toe with outspoken climate deniers and travels the world to show the causes and effects of climate change in the 2017 documentary BILL NYE: SCIENCE GUY.

Guests:
Al Gore, former Vice-President of the United States
Bonni Cohen, Filmmaker, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power
Jon Shenk, Filmmaker, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power
Bill Nye, Television Host, Science Educator
Jason Sussberg, Filmmaker, Bill Nye: Science Guy

Portions of this program were recorded live at the Marines' Memorial Theater in San Francisco.

Jun 08, 2018
Mark Kurlansky and Anna Lappé: Plate to Planet
52:22

Mark Kurlansky and Anna Lappé are two of the country’s most prolific and influential authors writing about feeding a crowded planet with a destabilized climate. The connection between global warming and the dinner table isn’t always obvious when we go to the grocery store. But our choices about how we put food on our plates, and what we do with the waste, contribute to as much as one third of total greenhouse-gas emissions. How can we continue to feed the planet without destroying it in the process? A conversation about the climate costs of global food production – and some possible solutions.

Guests:
Mark Kurlansky, Author, "MILK! A 10,000-Year Food Fracas" (Bloomsbury, 2018)
Anna Lappé, Author, "Diet for a Hot Planet: The Climate Crisis at the End of Your Fork" (Bloomsbury, 2011)

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 16, 2018.

Jun 02, 2018
California Gubernatorial Candidates on Climate One
52:22

For fifteen years, California Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jerry Brown charted a steady bi-partisan course as climate leaders. Their combined legacies include reduced carbon emissions, a clean energy economy and forward-thinking electric transportation. During that time, the effects of climate disruption -- rising seas, shrinking aquifers, wildfires and drought - have become increasingly clear. Greg Dalton sits down with three of the leading gubernatorial candidates to ask them how they plan to take on California’s biggest environmental challenge.

Guests:
Travis Allen, California State Assemblyman (R-Huntington Beach)
Gavin Newsom, California Lt. Governor; former mayor, San Francisco (D)
Antonio Villaraigosa, former mayor, Los Angeles (D)
Felicia Marcus, Chair, California State Water Resources Control Board

Portions of this program were recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco in 2018.

May 30, 2018
Cool Clean Tech
52:22

Over a century ago, the industrial revolution brought wealth and opportunity to a generation of American innovators. It also brought us dirty coal power and a sky clogged with carbon emissions. The good news? There’s a new generation of entrepreneurs eager to make their fortune by fighting global warming. Creative start-ups are coming up with fresh, climate-friendly ideas for getting around town, powering your cell phones, and even eating breakfast. And there is a growing number of forward-thinking venture capitalist firms eager to seek out and nurture those innovative thinkers.

A discussion about clean tech startups and how they could help save the world.

Guests:
Lidiya Dervisheva, Associate, G2VP
Davida Herzl, CEO and Co-Founder, Aclima
Gabriel Kra, Managing Director, Prelude Ventures

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 14, 2018.

May 25, 2018
A Paris Progress Report
52:22

In June 2017, President Trump announced his plan to withdraw the country from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, claiming it disadvantaged the United States. The symbolism of the American government’s retreat overshadowed the reality that the U.S. business community has embraced a low-carbon future. “We committed under Paris to do nothing we weren’t gonna do anyway and that we aren’t doing anyway,” says former Sierra Club chairman Carl Pope. Many countries have also reaffirmed their commitments to the Paris agreement. But how much progress has really been made, both at home and abroad?

Guests:
Gil Duran, Former Spokesman for Gov. Jerry Brown and Sen. Dianne Feinstein
Bill Hare, Founder and CEO, Climate Analytics
Amy Myers Jaffe, Executive Director, Energy and Sustainability, UC Davis Graduate School of Management
Carl Pope Former Executive Director, Sierra Club
Jim Sweeney, Director, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center, Stanford University

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco.

May 18, 2018
The Hidden Health Hazards of Climate Change
52:22

Climate change isn’t just an environmental problem – it’s also a health hazard. Air pollution and changing weather patterns give rise to heat-related illnesses, asthma and allergic disorders. Disasters like Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Irma leave hospitals scrambling to save patients without power and resources. According to the Centers for Disease Control, insect-borne diseases have tripled in the United States in recent years – and warmer weather is largely to blame.

Guests:
Jonathan Patz, Director, Global Health Institute
Su Rynard, Filmmaker, Mosquito
Chuck Yarling, Engineer, Triathlete
Jessica Wolff, U.S. Director of Climate and Health, Health Care Without Harm

This program was recorded at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco.

May 11, 2018
Selling the Science of Climate Change
59:00

The scientific consensus is that human activity is cooking the planet and disrupting our economies. Yet many people still don’t believe that climate change will affect them personally, or they deny the urgency of the problem. Can better communication help sell the science of climate change? “Only the repetition of simple messages changes public opinion and affects the brain,” says David Fenton, a four-decade veteran of PR campaigns for the environment, public health and human rights. “If you are not using effective messages that you repeat, repeat, repeat and are simple, then you get nowhere.”

Guests:
David Fenton, Founder and Chairman, Fenton Communications
Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist, Author and Speaker
Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor of Meteorology, Penn State University
Cristine Russell, Freelance Science Journalist

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco.

May 04, 2018
The Population Bomb, 50 Years Later: A Conversation with Paul Ehrlich
59:00

In 1968, the best-seller “The Population Bomb,” written by Paul and Anne Ehrlich (but credited solely to Paul) warned of the perils of overpopulation: mass starvation, societal upheaval, environmental deterioration. The book was criticized at the time for painting an overly dark picture of the future. But while not all of the Ehrlich’s dire predictions have come to pass, the world’s population has doubled since then, to over seven billion, straining the planet’s resources and heating up our climate. Can the earth continue to support an ever-increasing number of humans? On its 50th anniversary, we revisit “The Population Bomb” with Paul Ehrlich.

Guest:
Paul R. Ehrlich, President, Center for Conservation Biology, Bing Professor of Population Studies, Stanford University; co-author, “The Population Bomb” (Ballantine, 1968)

This program was recorded at Stanford University.

Apr 27, 2018
Geo-Engineering Climate Solutions
59:00

In an emergency, we’re told to “break the glass” and grab the fire extinguisher. If we’re in the midst of a climate emergency, is there a firehose we could spray into the sky to cool down our atmosphere? It may sound like science fiction, but some climatologists endorse research into such techniques known as geo-engineering. But could tinkering with the stratosphere in this way lead to a new ice age – or worse? What group of people could be trusted with such God-like powers? Join us for a discussion of the scientific, moral, economic and technological dimensions of geo-engineering.

This program was recorded live at the Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Apr 20, 2018
Climate One at Duke University: How Climate Change Will Change the Way We Eat
59:00

As the planet gets hotter, it’s affecting many of the foods we love – when and where they’re grown, how they get to the grocery store and how much we pay for them. On today’s program, we’ll talk about migrating crops, shrinking grasslands, and how food producers and restaurants are using technology to better predict and adapt to the new food normal.

Ashley Allen, Senior Manager, Climate and Land, Mars Corporation
Jason Clay, Senior Vice President, Food & Markets; Executive Director, Markets Institute, World Wildlife Fund
Annie Cull, Director of Communications, The Good Food Institute
Karen Leibowitz, Restaurateur & Co-founder, The Perennial

Portions of this program were recorded live at Duke University in Durham, NC on March 22, 2018 and at the Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Apr 12, 2018
Exposed: Dieselgate's Impact on the Auto Industry
59:00

Volkswagen’s brazen cheating on air pollution rules rocked an industry with a history of skulduggery. The scandal has now cost the company $30 billion plus jail time for one. Furthering chaos in the auto industry is a Trump administration looking to roll back emissions standards while California and 12 additional states, making up 36% of the auto market, threaten to maintain theirs.

Alberto Ayala, Air Pollution Control Officer, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District
Edward Niedermeyer, Auto Industry Analyst and Commentator, Autonocast
Margo T. Oge Former Director, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, U.S. EPA

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 27, 2018

Apr 06, 2018
Mindful Travel in the Age of Climate Change
59:00

We’ve all heard that hopping on a plane is one of the worst things we can do for the climate. So how do we justify the environmental costs of world travel? Whether we’re scaling Mount Everest or diving with sea turtles in the Galapagos Islands, it’s important to tread lightly – and respectfully – on every corner of our planet. And ideally, use the experience to make the world a better place. Three veterans of adventure and eco travel talk about doing just that. Join us for a conversation about traveling mindfully and responsibly.

Jennifer Palmer, Founder, Women for Wildlife
James Sano, Vice President for Travel, Tourism and Conservation, World Wildlife Fund
Norbu Tenzing, Vice President, American Himalayan Foundation

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 19, 2018

Mar 30, 2018
Dark Money and The US Chemical Safety Board
59:00

Jane Mayer, Author, "Dark Money: The Hidden History Behind the Rise of the Radical Right"
Vanessa Sutherland, Chairperson, US Chemical Safety Board

In her book “Dark Money: the Hidden History Behind the Rise of the Radical Right,” New Yorker writer Jane Mayer exposes the powerful group of individuals who bankroll our political system. Mayer traces the billions of dollars spent by the Kochs, the Mercers, and other wealthy conservative activists to influence policies related to climate change, the economy and more. And as the Trump administration rolls back regulations, the head of the US Chemical Safety Board, Vanessa Sutherland, wonders how much these billionaires will succeed in weakening government oversight of their business.

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA.

Mar 23, 2018
Is Silicon Valley as Green as it Claims?
59:00

Lynette Cameron, Vice President of Sustainability at Autodesk
Aron Cramer, President and CEO, Business for Social Responsibility
Patrick Flynn, Senior Director of Sustainability, Salesforce

Tech companies are cleaning up their data centers and building shiny new buildings that sip water and energy. But are they really as green as they claim? Many companies issued statements in support of the Paris climate agreement, but their actions will be more important than their statements. According to guest Aron Cramer from BSR, the way we measure how green companies are needs an update. “Companies should be judged not only on what they do, which is more traditional,” Cramer says, “but also what they enable through their partnerships and what kinds of policy frameworks they seek to create.”

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 6, 2018.

Mar 16, 2018
Dooley and Pelosi: Bridging Trump's Divide
59:00

Debbie Dooley, President, Conservatives for Energy Freedom, Co-Founder, Tea Party Movement
Christine Pelosi, Executive Committeewoman, Democratic National Committee

Executive Committeewoman of Democratic National Committee Christine Pelosi, as well as staunch Trump supporter and clean energy advocate, Debbie Dooley, join Climate One for a discussion about the politics of energy more than a year into the Trump presidency. Reviving fossil fuels and rolling back action on climate change has arguably been one area where his agenda has achieved the most traction.

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 1, 2018.

Mar 09, 2018
Cloudy Days for Solar?
59:00

Severin Borenstein, E.T. Grether Professor, Haas School of Business, University of California
Scott Jacobs, CEO and Co-founder, Generate Capital
Lynn Jurich, Chief Executive Officer, Sunrun

When the U.S slapped 30 percent tariffs on imported solar panels, headlines heralded bad times ahead for clean energy in this country. But the stock prices of solar installers increased because the hit could have been worse. Solar entrepreneur and advocate, Jigar Shah, said it was “good news.” Our guest and professor from University of California Berkeley, Severin Borenstein said, “there's no question, this is a policy that was designed to make renewables more expensive because it doesn't make any economic sense beyond that.” Listen to a conversation about the future of solar.

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on February 21, 2018.

Mar 02, 2018
Power Shift: The End of Gasoline Cars?
59:00

Caroline Choi, Senior Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, Southern California Edison
Andreas Klugescheid, Head of Steering Government and External Affairs, Sustainability Communications, BMW Group
Catherine Reheis-Boyd, President, Western States Petroleum Association

After more than a century of ruling the roads, oil is starting to lose its dominance over the auto industry. More and more automakers are introducing electric models, and according to one report, sales of electric cars will surpass those of regular cars within twenty-five years. With Detroit embracing plug-in cars, electric utilities sense an opportunity to grow their business as the age of oil starts to sunset. A conversation exploring the future of the cars we love, the impact of robotic and electric vehicles, and the changing nature of how we get around town.

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on February 13, 2018.

Feb 23, 2018
Weathering the Storm: Mayors of Houston, Miami and Columbia
59:00

Steve Benjamin, Mayor, Columbia, South Carolina
Francis Suarez, Mayor, Miami, Florida
Sylvester Turner, Mayor, Houston, Texas

2017 brought a raft of extreme weather disasters costing the U.S. hundreds of billions of dollars in damages, including hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria. And those are just the ones with names – other areas of the country were hit by floods, fires and drought. How do we fight back? The mayors of three cities on the frontline of climate change – Houston, Miami, and Columbia, South Carolina - discuss what their cities are doing to recover, rebuild and prepare for the next mega storm.

Feb 16, 2018
Climate on Your Plate
59:00

John Purcell, VP and Global R&D Lead, Monsanto Company
Austin Wilson, Environmental Health Program Manager, As You Sow
Scott Kennedy, Filmmaker, Food Evolution
Nicolette Hahn Niman, Author, Defending Beef
Jonathan Kaplan, Director, Food and Agriculture Program, NRDC
Kip Andersen, Founder, AUM Films and Media
Brian Kateman, President and Co-Founder, The Reducetarian Foundation

What should climate-conscious people do to eat most sustainably? How people approach their diet is deeply personal and can be extremely controversial. Roughly 1 in 9 people in the world are undernourished. Addressing hunger while making the food chain more sustainable is critical for addressing climate change. Are GMOs the answer to food shortages, or do they jeopardize our crops with destructive cycles of pesticide resistance? Is our appetite for animal protein unsustainable, is worldwide veganism possible? Greg asks farmers, scientists and others what’s best for climate and our health.

Feb 09, 2018
EPA Then and Now
59:00

Lynda Deschambault, former EPA Staff Scientist
Benjamin Franta, PhD candidate in History of Science, Stanford University
Gina McCarthy, former EPA Administrator

Founded in 1970 under President Nixon, the Environmental Protection Agency was created to protect Americans’ health and environment by writing and enforcing regulations based on laws passed by Congress. While the Agency enjoyed bipartisan support for decades, the last 9 years have seen a decline in support from congressional Republicans. Now the Trump administration, and its new administrator Scott Pruitt, seem largely hostile to the EPA’s mission.

“What I most worry about is the attack on science and the budget challenges that they’re putting EPA under,” says Gina McCarthy, who served as EPA administrator under President Obama from 2013-2017. “Those are systemic things that go well beyond this year and well be on the ability for the agency to easily bounce back.”

McCarthy is less worried about environmental protections being rolled back – she thinks they will withstand the assault in the courts – than the broader disregard for the agency’s mission. “You win an election you get to do things the way that you think is best,” she explains, “but they don't have a right to misinterpret the law. They don't have a right to take science facts off the webpage as if issues like climate change didn't exist.”

McCarthy’s criticisms of the new administration are not simply partisan beefs. She points out that five of the six governors she previously worked for were Republicans, and none asked her to implement policies that undermined public health. “Let's get real here and embrace the science and develop the technologies and invest in the innovations that we need to continue to make progress moving forward,” she urges. “That's what EPA would do under a leader that embraced its mission.”

McCarthy left the agency at the end of the Obama administration, of course. But other EPA staff who stayed on as the new administration took office have spoken out the change in priorities under the current leadership.

“We all know Scott Pruitt's background and he sued the EPA 13 times before he was put in charge of it. So we were like, hmm what’s this gonna be all about,” says Lynda Deschambault, a staff scientist at the EPA for nearly 20 years until she left the agency in late 2017. “People were just sort of dumbfounded [by] this sudden switch, where suddenly we had the people we were regulating were now the regulators.”

The EPA was founded to regulate, among other things, a fossil fuel industry whose products’ harms were less well known than they are today. But newly-discovered documents show oil company executives being told about the science of greenhouse gases as early as 1959.

“I was looking through this transcript of this conference and I thought, what are the chances that anything interesting will be in here,” recalls Ben Franta, a PhD candidate in Applied Physics at Harvard University, describing his research last summer at the Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington, Delaware.

The conference, “Energy and Man,” was in celebration of the hundredth anniversary of the oil industry, and featured nuclear scientist Edward Teller as an invited speaker. “It might not surprise you that he was promoting the use of nuclear power a great deal in his speech,” Franta explains. “But one of the reasons he gave for moving away from oil was this problem with climate change, with global warming with CO2 accumulating in the atmosphere. And that might have been something that the audience didn't quite expect to hear.”

Feb 02, 2018
On the Ice with Michael Mann
59:00

The so-called hockey stick papers, published in 1999, ignited an assault on the science of climate change that still rages to this day. But lead author Michael Mann hasn’t backed off on his mission to educate the public on the science of global warming.

Mann was awarded the seventh annual Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication, by Climate One.

Jonathan Foley, Executive Director, California Academy of Sciences
Dr. Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science, Penn State University

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on January 16, 2018.

Jan 26, 2018
Inheriting Climate Change
59:00

Consumption-crazed baby boomers are leaving millenials with a mountain of debt and a destabilized climate. In his book A Generation of Sociopaths: How the Baby Boomers Betrayed America, Gen-Xer Bruce Gibney argues that the aging baby boomers who still rule the roost politically are holding up progress -- and it’s time they got out of the way.

Carleen Cullen, Founder and Executive Director, Cool the Earth
James Coleman, Student
Bruce Gibney, Author, A Generation of Sociopaths: How the Baby Boomers Betrayed America
Corina MacWilliams, Student
Michael Ranney, Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley
Wilford Welch, Speaker on Sustainability and Resilience

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA.

Jan 20, 2018
Jane Goodall and Yvon Chouinard
59:00

World-renowned primatologist and conservationist Jane Goodall talks about her life’s work, the link between deforestation and climate change and why she sees reasons for hope. Yvon Chouinard, the reluctant entrepreneur who founded Patagonia, Inc., explains how charting his own path through the wilderness led him to create a multi-million dollar sporting goods company committed to environmentally responsible design and production.

Jane Goodall, Founder, Jane Goodall Institute; U.N. Messenger of Peace
Yvon Chouinard, Founder, Patagonia, Inc.

This program was recorded by the Commonwealth Club of California.

Jan 12, 2018
Net Zero Living
59:00

Conservation begins at home – literally. Designing and operating a home that generates as much power as it uses is rapidly becoming a reality. Meanwhile, cities around the country have made zero waste a goal for their landfills. Can it be done? What steps can we take to reduce the trash on our collective backs? And what is it really like to live trash-free?

Diana Dehm, Founder, Trash on Your Back
Kevin Drew, Zero Waste Coordinator, San Francisco Department of the Environment
Lauren Hennessy, Sustainability Outreach Manager, Stanford University
Samuel McMullen, Co-Founder, Live Zero Waste
Ann Edminster, Author, Energy Free: Homes for a Small Planet
Daniel Simons, Principal, David Baker Architects
Sven Thesen, Owner, Net Zero Home

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA.

Jan 05, 2018
Ai Weiwei: Human Flow
59:00

In his new movie, “Human Flow,” artist and human rights activist Ai Weiwei documents the plight of refugees struggling in a hot and crowded world. Greg also talks to an artist who uses music to convey emotional urgency around climate disruption.

Bill Collins, Scientific Advisor, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Stephan Crawford, Founder, The Climate Music Project
Ai Weiwei, Artist and Activist

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA.

Dec 29, 2017
Chaos and Progress: A Year of Climate Conversations
59:00

It’s safe to say that 2017 was not been the best of times when it came to climate. Record-breaking hurricanes, year-round wildfires, and a renewed commitment to fossil fuels all contributed to a chaotic first year under the Trump administration.

Guests (in order of appearance):

Bob Inglis, Former Republican U.S. Representative, South Carolina
Jeremy Carl, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University
Debbie Dooley, Co-Founder, Tea Party Movement
May Boeve, Executive Director, 350.org
Jim Sweeney, Director, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center, Stanford
Amy Myers Jaffe, UC Davis Graduate School of Management
Al Gore, Former United States Vice President
Bonni Cohen, Filmmaker
Bill Nye, Television Host, Science Educator
Jane Goodall, Founder, Jane Goodall Institute
James Coleman, Student
Corina MacWilliams, Student
Ashlee Vance, Reporter, Bloomberg Businessweek
Emily Castor, Director of Transportation Policy, Lyft
Amory Lovins, Co-founder and Chief Scientist, Rocky Mountain Institute
Jen Regan, Chief Sustainability Manager, We Bring It On

Portions of this program were recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA.

Dec 22, 2017
Changing Minds: Climate Politics and Science
59:00

Donald Trump once advocated for climate action. Now, he’s moving Barack Obama’s efforts in the opposite direction. Obama’s former science advisor, John Holdren, talks about the damage being done by today’s White House.

For twenty years, Jerry Taylor ran the energy and climate programs for conservative organizations funded by the Koch brothers, before coming around on climate change. He recounts his journey, going from a climate denier to a climate mainstreamer.

On this episode of Climate One, Holdren and Taylor join Greg to talk about climate science and politics.

John Holdren, Former science advisor to President Obama; Professor of Environmental Policy at the Kennedy School of Government
Jerry Taylor, President and Founder, Niskanen Center

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA in December, 2017.

Dec 16, 2017
Concussions, Cigarettes and Climate
59:00

What do football, tobacco and oil have in common? A common narrative of deceit. When tobacco companies faced public scrutiny about the link between cancer and smoking, the industry launched a campaign questioning the scientific evidence. Oil companies and the National Football League have used the same playbook to mislead the public. Listen to the stories of how industries endeavor to confuse.

Adrienne Alford, Western States Director, Union of Concerned Scientists
Steve Fainaru, Senior Writer, ESPN Investigative Unit; Co-Author, League of Denial
Stanton Glantz, Director, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, UCSF

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on November 29, 2017.

Clip courtesy: Union of Concerned Scientists

Dec 08, 2017
High Tide on Main Street
59:00

The coast line has been basically in the same place for all of human civilization and now that’s changing in very unpredictable and unsettling ways. Oceans will rise faster than the past but no one can say how fast that will happen or what’s the best strategy for protecting trillions of dollars in waterfront real estate.

Kiran Jane, Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel, Neighborly
John Englander, Author, High Tide on Main Street
Will Travis, Sea Level Rise Planning Consultant

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on November 13, 2017.

Music courtesy: MINSTREL by Jason Shaw

Dec 01, 2017
Bill Nye: Science Guy
59:00

Sifting through the Trump administration’s misleading statements on climate change can be a daunting task. That’s where scientist Bill Nye comes in. The Science Guy is on a quest to set the record straight when it comes to anti-scientific thinking and climate denial.

Bill Nye, Television Host, Science Educator
Jason Sussberg, Filmmaker, Bill Nye: Science Guy

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Marines' Memorial Theater in San Francisco, CA on November 6, 2017.

Nov 24, 2017
Jeff Goodell: The Water Will Come
59:00

Rising waters represent the most visible and tangible impact of climate disruption. Protecting people and property from all that water, while simultaneously ensuring billions have enough to drink, will have unfathomable costs and alter the lives of most people living on earth.

Jeff Goodell, Author, Contributing Editor, Rolling Stone
Marco Kraples, Former VP, Tesla; Producer, Before the Flood
Katharine Mach, Senior Research Scientist, Stanford University

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on November 8, 2017.

Nov 17, 2017
Oppressive Heat: Climate Change and Civil Rights
59:00

Communities of color often live closest to factories and refineries that spew toxic pollution. That’s one reason why polls show more African Americans and Latinos say climate is a serious concern than whites.

Ingrid Brostrom, Assistant Director, Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment
Rev. Dr. Gerald Durley, Pastor Emeritus, Providence Missionary Baptist Church of Atlanta, GA
Mystic, Musician, Bay Area Coordinator, Hip Hop Caucus

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on October 31, 2017.

Nov 10, 2017
A Conversation with Amy Goodman and Kenneth Kimmell
59:00

When trying to fight a campaign of disinformation, who better to be on your side than a muckraking journalist like Amy Goodman and a lawyer running the Union for Concerned Scientists, Kenneth Kimmell. Between these two, they have seen it all. They know the lengths the oil industry will go to in order to keep drilling, and they are working to share that information with as many people as possible.

Amy Goodman, Host, Executive Producer, Democracy Now!
Kenneth Kimmell, President, Union of Concerned Scientists

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on October 20, 2017.

Nov 03, 2017
Deep Dive Into the Arctic
59:00

Climate One goes to the front line of climate change - the high Arctic - to hear from the people there how their economies, communities and culture are changing due to global warming.

Nancy Karetak-Lindell, President, Inuit Circumpolar Council Canada
Catherine McKenna, Canada’s Minister for Climate Change
Pascal Lee, Planetary Scientist, NASA’s Mars Institute
Brendan Kelly, Former White House Scientific Advisor
Kuupik Kleist, Former Premier of Greenland
Danko Taboroši, Director Coral and Ice

This program was recorded during a Students on Ice trip to the Arctic in August of 2017.

Oct 27, 2017
Chasing the Harvest in the Heat
59:00

Rising temperatures are making hard outdoor jobs even harder. It is the kind of heat that will ground airplanes and melt rail lines, and health experts say agricultural workers are especially vulnerable, as they are already one of the most economically disadvantaged groups.

This is a conversation on how rising temperatures are changing the way our food is grown and the choices we have at the grocery store.

Blanca Banuelos, Co-Director, Migrant Unit, California Rural Legal Assistance, Inc.
Gabriel Thompson, Freelance Journalist and Author
L. Ann Thrupp, executive Director, Berkeley Food Institute
Dolores Huerta, Worker's Rights Activist

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on September 19, 2017.

Oct 20, 2017
Elizabeth Kolbert and David Roberts: Covering Catastrophe
59:00

Communicating about climate change and convincing the public that something needs to be done about it is a complicated proposition, one that reporters Elizabeth Kolbert and David Roberts face daily in their jobs of covering the looming catastrophe.

Elizabeth Kolbert
Journalist, The New Yorker

David Roberts
Staff Writer, Vox

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on September 22, 2017.

Music courtesy: Harbor by Kai Engle

Oct 13, 2017
California's Climate Crusade
59:00

Some environmentalists said the law extending California’s cap and trade system to 2030 is a sellout to the oil industry and it shortchanges disadvantaged communities that breathe the dirtiest air. How do California’s climate moves play into national politics and policy? Will climate and energy play a meaningful role in the upcoming midterm elections? Will companies make energy policy more of a priority? We look back at how Gov. Schwarzenegger set the tone and how his past leadership continues to influence California’s policies today.

David R. Baker
Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle

Mike Mielke
Sr. Vice President, Environment & Energy, Silicon Valley Leadership Group

Parin Shah
Senior Strategist, Asian Pacific Environmental Network

Studio segment: US Senator Brian Schatz

A majority of this program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on August 29, 2017.

Oct 06, 2017
Happening with James Redford
59:00

Fossil fuels are in favor again in Washington. New opportunities are opening to mine coal and drill for oil despite the fact that the costs for fossil fuels continue to rise in real terms--and in terms of our health and environment. The markets ultimately drive investments, and while regulatory rollbacks and continued subsidies for fossil fuel may slow it down, our guests are certain the energy revolution is coming. Documentarian James Redford declared that, “You don’t have to worry about the future being green, that is inevitable.” He then added, “It is just a matter of when.”

James Redford, Filmmaker

Emily Kirsch, Co-founder & CEO, Powerhouse

Gia Schneider, CEO Natel Energy

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, CA on September 6, 2017.

Sep 29, 2017
Greening Professional Sports
59:00

People who are involved in the sports world have seen the benefits of greening their professions. Many athletes and executives gathered at the Green Sports Alliance Summit in Sacramento, CA where they shared ideas for reducing food waste, running stadiums on clean energy and encouraging fans to reduce their carbon impact.

Justin Zeulner, Executive Director of the Green Sports Alliance
Julia Landauer, Championship NASCAR Driver
Dusty Baker, Manager, Washington Nationals
Jennifer Regan, Chief Sustainability Manager, We Bring It On
Chris Granger, former president, Sacramento Kings
Vivek Ranadive, owner, Sacramento Kings

Portions of this program were recorded at the Green Sports Alliance Summit in Sacramento, CA on June 27, 2017.

Sep 22, 2017
Harvey and Irma: A Hurricane’s Human Fingerprints
59:00

From Katrina and Sandy to Harvey, Irma and José - how is climate change fueling these increasingly destructive hurricanes? Greg Dalton and his guests delve into the politics, costs and human causes of the megastorms pummeling our planet.

Brian Schatz, US Senator, (D-HI)

Ben Santer, Climate Researcher, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

John Englander, Author, High Tide on Main Street: Rising Sea Level and the Coming Coastal Crisis (Science Bookshelf, 2012)

Angela Fritz, Manager, Weather Underground

Kathryn Sullivan, former NOAA Administrator

Hunter Cutting, Director of Strategic Communications, Climate Nexus

Don Cameron, Manager, Terranova Ranch

Barton Thompson, Professor of Natural Resources, Stanford Law School

Portions of this program were recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California.

Sep 15, 2017
Yvon Chouinard
59:00

The explorer, climber, surfer and founder of sporting goods company Patagonia, Inc., has spent a lifetime welcoming adventure – and risk - of all kinds.

Yvon Chouinard, Founder and Owner, Patagonia

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 27, 2016
front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club on July 27, 2017.

Sep 08, 2017
Aligning Profits with the Planet
59:00

It is possible to protect profits and the planet. Despite claims that a win for the environment is a loss for the economy, corporations are finding innovative ways to have it both ways. They are quickly realizing that protecting watersheds and ecosystems can also protect their business.

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club on July 27, 2017.

Sep 07, 2017
Jane Mayer: Behind Dark Money
59:00

Who is bankrolling our political system? Jane Mayer takes us behind the scenes to expose the powerful group of individuals who are shaping our country.

Jane Mayer, Staff Writer, The New Yorker and Author, Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right (Doubleday, 2016)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Louis B. Mayer Theatre at Santa Clara University on April 4, 2017.

Aug 25, 2017
Tesla: Impossible Until It's Not
59:00

Tesla is the most valuable car company in the US, recently surpassing even the auto giant, General Motors. But this high valuation is not due to the number of cars they make and it is certainly not due to profits which are incidentally non-existent. So what is it all about?

Ashlee Vance has written the preeminent biography on the genius driving Tesla, SpaceX and Hyperloop, Elon Musk, with insights gained from his unprecedented access to the eccentric entrepreneur. Peter Henderson talks about Tesla’s make or break moment as with the arrival and scaling of the S model, aimed at average American families.

Peter Henderson, West Coast Deputy Bureau Chief, Thomson Reuters
Ashlee Vance, Reporter, Bloomberg Businessweek

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on July 12, 2017.

Aug 18, 2017
Jane Goodall in Conversation with Jeff Horowitz and Greg Dalton
59:00

Noted conservationist Jane Goodall talks about her life’s work, the link between deforestation and climate change and why she sees reasons for hope.

Jane Goodall, Founder, Jane Goodall Institute; United Nations Messenger of Peace
Jeff Horowitz, Founder, Avoided Deforestation Partners

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 3, 2017.

Aug 11, 2017
Al Gore and An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power
59:00

Former Vice President Al Gore joins Climate One to talk about his tireless fight, training an army of climate champions and influencing international climate policy. Joined by co-directors Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk, this conversation covers the making of their new movie AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL: TRUTH TO POWER and the solutions that it offers.

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Marines' Memorial Club on July 24, 2017.

Aug 04, 2017
Is Climate Denial Destroying Our Planet?
59:00

Climate denial has become both a psychological and a political problem. Can better communication help us expand common ground and move on to solutions?

Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist, Author and Speaker
Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor of Meteorology, Penn State University
Cristine Russell, Freelance Science Journalist
Tom Toles, Editorial Cartoonist, The Washington Post

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on December 12, 2016.

Jul 30, 2017
Chain Reaction: Why Two Wheels are Better than Four
59:00

Getting out of a car and onto a bike is one of the best things you can do for the climate and your personal health. Bike lanes are growing in American cities from New York City to Houston, the country’s oil and gasoline capitol.

Guests:
Amy Harcourt, Co-Founder/Principal, Bikes Make Life Better, Inc.
Caeli Quinn, Co-founder and Executive Director, Climate Ride
Brian Wiedenmeier, Executive Director, San Francisco Bicycle Coalition

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on June 8, 2017.

Jul 21, 2017
Trumping the Climate: Coming in Hot
59:00

The Trump administration’s determination to revive coal mining and domestic oil drilling is causing concern that international efforts to combat climate change will crumble. How much change will the Trump administration really bring to the climate change fight? Join a conversation about energy, the mainstream news media, and markets.

Guests:
Gil Duran, Former Spokesman for Gov. Jerry Brown and Sen. Dianne Feinstein
Amy Myers Jaffe, Executive Director, Energy and Sustainability, UC Davis Graduate School of Management
Jim Sweeney, Director, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center, Stanford

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on June 1, 2017.

Jul 14, 2017
Rounding up the Facts on GMOs
59:00

Are GMOs the answer to our planet’s food shortage? Or are they jeopardizing our crops by creating a destructive cycle of Roundup resistance? Like many issues these days, it depends on who you listen to. Supporters of genetically modified organisms say that altering the DNA of corn and other crops is just another tool in the farmers’ toolbox. While, opponents maintain that modified crops are dangerous to our health.

Guests:
Scott Kennedy, Filmmaker, ""Food Evolution""
John Purcell, VP and Global R&D Lead, Monsanto Company
Austin Wilson, Environmental Health Program Manager, As You Sow
Dr. Marcia Ishii-Eiteman, Senior Scientist, Director Grassroots Science Program, Pesticide Action Network

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 25, 2017.

Jul 07, 2017
Youth in the Streets and in the Courts (Update)Youth in the Streets and in the Courts (Update)Youth in the Streets and in the Courts (Update)Youth in the Streets and in the Courts (Update)
59:00

As Buffalo Springfield sang in 1967, “There’s something happening here…” But today’s youth revolution is happening far beyond the Sunset Strip. The Trump administration’s dismissal of climate change as a legitimate concern is energizing a new generation of teenage activists. Emboldened and supported by groups like Earth Guardians, Heirs to Our Oceans and the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE), young people are taking their knowledge of climate science into the streets and into the courts, pressing for environmental change and for more government action now to protect their future and ours.

UPDATE: Since this discussion was held the fossil fuel trade association, which aligned itself with the federal government, changed their minds, and asked to withdraw from the case. Phil Gregory, one of the attorneys representing the 21 young people suing the federal government, explains what that withdrawal means.

Guests:
James Coleman, High School Senior; Fellow, Alliance for Climate Education
Lou Helmuth, Deputy Director, Our Children's Trust
Corina MacWilliams, Co-director, Earth Guardians 350 Club, South Eugene High School

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on March 16, 2017.

Jul 05, 2017
Water Whiplash
59:00

Californians are accustomed to living through wet times and dry times, but lately things are getting more extreme and much more difficult to predict. After five years of severe drought, Californians are now talking about what it means to have too much water at once. The end of the drought is a blessing, but the state may need to find $50 billion to repair dams, roads and other infrastructure threatened by floods. The damaged spillway at Oroville dam highlighted what happens when the state doesn’t keep its water system in good working order.

How is California preparing for the whiplash of going from really dry to really wet years? What will it take to fix the system that delivers the water that keeps us alive and lubricates our economy? How will the state and federal governments work together to modernize the water system that grows food that lands on dinner tables across the country?

This program is made possible by support from the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation.

Guests:
Don Cameron, General Manager, Terranova Ranch Inc.
Felicia Marcus, Chair, State Water Resources Control Board
Buzz Thompson, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 24, 2017.

Jun 30, 2017
Banking on Change at Standing Rock
59:00

They were an unlikely group of activists; Native American youths concerned about teen suicide sparked the movement against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL)—a movement which ultimately spread across the country. Veterans and others joined in, traveling to the construction site and showing solidarity with activists. Protesters objected to the $3.8 billion pipeline route, which they say threatens freshwater supplies and disrespects ancestral lands.

Guests:
Pennie Opal Plant, Co-founder, Idle No More SF Bay
L. Frank Manriquez, Indigenous California artist and activist
Lynn Doan, Bloomberg News

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 11, 2017.

Jun 16, 2017
Inheriting Climate Change
59:00

Do the baby boomers owe millennials a clean planet? Or is it every generation for itself? Consumption-crazed baby boomers are leaving their younger counterparts with a mountain of debt and a destabilized climate. Yet they still rule the roost politically. In his new book “A Generation of Sociopaths: How the Baby Boomers Betrayed America,” Gen-Xer Bruce Gibney argues that the aging baby boomers who make up most of congress are holding up progress -- and it’s time they got out of the way. How do we span the generation gap? What can boomers do to engage future generations and help empower them in the fight against climate change?

Guests:
Carleen Cullen, Founder and Executive Director, Cool the Earth Bruce Gibney, Author, A Generation of Sociopaths: How the Baby Boomers Betrayed America
Professor Michael Ranney, Department of Psychology, Graduate School of Education, U.C. Berkeley
Wilford Welch, Speaker on Sustainability and Resilience

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 8, 2017.

Jun 09, 2017
How Cities can Solve the Climate Challenge
59:00

Cities around the country are reshaping their economies for a greener future. Mayors and chambers of commerce are promoting smart growth and moving toward cleaner energy, cleaner cars, and cleaner buildings, with or without support from Washington. On today’s show we discuss how local businesses and political leaders in red states and blue states are growing their economies, cutting carbon pollution, and preparing for the challenges of climate disruption in their own communities.

Guests:
Diane Doucette Co-Founder and Executive Director, Chambers for Innovation and Clean Energy
Elizabeth Patterson, Mayor, Benicia, CA
Carl Pope Former Executive Director, Sierra Club
Rod G. Sinks City Council Member, Cupertino, CA

This program was recorded live at The Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on May 4, 2017.

Jun 02, 2017
Texas Surprise
59:00

The Lone Star State leads the country in wind power, thanks to legislation signed by Governor Bush; clean energy has breathed fresh air into Texas’ economy.

Kip Averitt, Former Chair, Texas Clean Energy Coalition
Stephanie Smith. COO, Greencastle LLC
Pat Wood III, Principal, Wood3 Resources

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 25, 2017.

May 26, 2017
#Resist with Annie Leonard and Shanon Coulter
59:00

What can you do if you care about putting your money to work toward a cleaner economy? Join us for a conversation on pressuring companies and personal brands.

Host: Greg Dalton
Guests:
Shannon Coulter, Co-founder, #GrabYourWallet
Annie Leonard Executive Director, Greenpeace USA

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 19, 2017.

May 19, 2017
Amory Lovins: Peak Car Ownership
59:00

Will the arrival of robotic cars lead to the blissful end of traffic? Or will they instead put drivers out of work and clog our streets more than ever before?

Amory Lovins, Cofounder and Chief Scientist, Rocky Mountain Institute
Emily Castor, Director of Transportation Policy, Lyft
Gerry Tierney, Associate Principal, Perkins + Will

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 12, 2017.

May 12, 2017
The New Political Climate
59:00

Can the far right and far left come together on clean energy? Join us for a meeting of the minds between staunch members of both the Tea Party and 350.org.

Debbie Dooley, President, Conservatives for Energy Freedom, Co-founder, Tea Party Movement
May Boeve, Executive Director, 350.org
Sheldon Whitehouse, U.S. Senator (D) Rhode Island

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 29, 2017.

May 05, 2017
C1 Revue: Does Greening The Economy Leave Some People Behind?

Cities are leading the way in the greening of America’s economy. From urban parks and farms to microgrids and living buildings, dynamic urban planning can adapt to changing coastlines and severe weather delivered by a volatile climate. But there’s a risk that green-living innovations become solely the domain of a privileged urban elite. On today’s show we hear how issues from transit to housing to jobs are all affected by our changing climate, and how states like California are working to ensure that everyone benefits from a greener economy.

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California.

May 01, 2017
Jane Mayer: Behind Dark Money
59:00

Who is bankrolling our political system? Jane Mayer takes us behind the scenes to expose the powerful group of individuals who are shaping our country.

Jane Mayer, Staff Writer, The New Yorker and Author, Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right (Doubleday, 2016)
This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 4, 2017.

Apr 28, 2017
Jane Goodall in Conversation with Jeff Horowitz and Greg Dalton
59:00

Noted conservationist Jane Goodall talks about her life’s work, the link between deforestation and climate change and why she sees reasons for hope.

Jane Goodall, Founder, Jane Goodall Institute; United Nations Messenger of Peace
Jeff Horowitz, Founder, Avoided Deforestation Partners

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 3, 2017.

Apr 21, 2017
Sea Heroes: Extreme Edition
59:00

Our planet’s oceans drive our weather and generate much of our oxygen -- and they’re being severely impacted by climate change. What can be done about it?

Liz Taylor, President, DOER Marine
Peter Willcox, Captain, Rainbow Warrior, author, Greenpeace Captain: My Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet (Thomas Dunne Books, 2016)
Stiv Wilson, Director of Campaigns, Story of Stuff

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 12, 2016

Apr 14, 2017
Cigarettes & Tailpipes: Tales of Two Industries
59:00
Cigarette makers downplayed the dangers of smoking for decades with distracting science. How close is the link between tobacco denial and climate denial?
Apr 07, 2017
C1 Revue: Can Our Connected Lives Be Green and Safe?

California has committed to getting one-half of its electricity from renewable sources by the year 2030. But clean energy advocates say the state could be more ambitious and shoot for 100% clean electricity. Still, not everyone agrees on how the existing energy grid can integrate new technologies, or whether getting to 100% is even technically possible yet. On today's program, we hear how smart technology and the "Internet of things" can be part of the solution, while making our lives greener, safer, and more convenient.

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California.

Apr 04, 2017
Youth in the Streets and in the Courts
59:00
Do teenagers have a chance to be heard and make an impact on an issue so complex and massive as the world’s energy system? How are young advocates using social media to advance their cause? Join us for a conversation about kids confronting powerful institutions and finding their own power and voices.
Mar 31, 2017
Climate Equity
59:00

Will a green economy be more equitable than the brown economy? As California transitions to renewable energy, the result will be green jobs, cleaner communities and lower carbon emissions. But will underserved communities get shafted again? The environmental justice community has been concerned that the state’s cap and trade program puts Brazilian rainforests over communities near refineries and factories. Will Sausalito and Vallejo get the same protection from rising seas and other impacts of a destabilized climate?

A conversation about increasing equity while reducing carbon pollution.

Mar 24, 2017
Why Facts Don’t Trump the President
59:00

An information war is raging in our country, in mainstream news and on social media. What is factual and what is an “alternative fact?” Do facts even matter?

George Lakoff, Professor of Linguistics, UC Berkeley
Robert Rosenthal, Executive Director, The Center for Investigative Reporting

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on February 23, 2017.

Mar 16, 2017
Remaking the Planet
59:00

Geoengineering may sound like science fiction, but there are many who believe we can — and should — be taking drastic measures to cool our planet down.

Oliver Morton, Briefings Editor, The Economist; Author, The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World (Princeton University Press, 2015)
Kim Stanley Robinson, Author, 2312 (Orbit, 2012)
Ken Caldeira, Climate Scientist, Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology at Stanford University

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 28, 2016.

Mar 10, 2017
Killing the Colorado
59:00

Every year, 41 million Americans take more water out of the Colorado than nature puts into it. How can we continue to share an ever-shrinking resource?

Kevin E. Kelley, General Manager, Imperial Irrigation District
Abrahm Lustgarten, Reporter, ProPublica
Fran Spivy-Weber, Vice Chair, CA State Water Resources Control Board

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on February 15, 2017.

Mar 09, 2017
C1 Revue: Republican Renegades on Climate
The Trump administration has moved quickly to reverse some of the previous administration’s energy and climate policies. But not all Republicans are on the same page when it comes to climate. Those on the so-called eco-right say action is needed to promote clean energy and prevent climate disruption. On today’s program we hear how Republican renegades find climate solutions in conservative principles, and what we can do when climate denial isn’t just present in the halls of government, but actually controls the levers of power.
Mar 01, 2017
Can Clean Tech Clean Up Our Future?
59:00

The clean tech sector is on the rise - what areas are most promising for growth, jobs and “gee-whiz!” innovation? What will the new administration bring?

Danny Kennedy, Managing Director, California Clean Energy Fund
Holmes Hummel, Founder, Clean Energy Works
Andrew Chung, Founder & Managing Partner, 1955 Capital

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on February 6, 2017.

Feb 16, 2017
Doubt, Deny or Defend: Republicans on Climate Change
59:00

Much has been made of the partisan divide on climate change. But there are Republicans out there who believe it’s real – and they have solutions in mind.

Jeremy Carl, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University
John Hofmeister, Former President, Shell Oil Company
Bob Inglis, Former Republican U.S. Representative, South Carolina

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 24, 2017.

Feb 10, 2017
Green Latinos (02/07/14) (Rebroadcast)
59:06
What are the issues that link the Latino community to the environmental movement? For many, it comes down to la familia. Latinos, who make up nearly 40 percent of California’s population, still tend to live in the state’s most polluted areas, in close proximity to freeways and ports. That translates to increased rates of asthma among Latino children. Other community issues include lack of green space, reduced access to bus service and the internet, and economic barriers to things like electric cars and home ownership. According to Adrianna Quintero of the Natural Resources Defense Council, for Latinos, climate change is less a political issue than personal: it’s “about protecting family members…about thinking about the ties that bind us to people in other parts of the world, whether we arrived two years ago, 10 years ago, or were here before the borders were drawn.” As the three panelists note, Latinos have long embraced the culture of conservation. They point to examples from their own experience – reusing foil, taking grocery bags to the store, sharing resources with extended family members. “I think most Latinos are conservationists,” says Orson Aguilar, Executive Director of The Greenlining Institute, “and I think the question is, is it something cultural, is it something in our DNA, or have we been forced to conserve given our economic circumstances?” Whatever their reasons, Quintero points out that 9 out of 10 Latinos surveyed support action to fight climate change. “Those are enormous numbers,” she says. “It shows that we've underestimated this community for years. We've underestimated the power, we've underestimated the commitment to protecting the environment and we're doing that to our own disservice truly. We need to recognize that there's a tremendous amount of awareness and power in this community.” In this election year, how can the environmental movement engage the diverse community of Latinos to demand change in their own communities, and beyond?

Catherine Sandoval, Commissioner, California Public Utilities Commission
Orson Aguilar, Executive Director, The Greenlining Institute
Adrianna Quintero, Senior Attorney, The Natural Resources Defense Council.

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on February 7, 2014

Feb 02, 2017
C1 Revue: The Future of Oil and Nuclear Power
In 2006, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger launched California's attack on climate change by signing a pioneering law to reduce carbon pollution across the state’s economy. That law, known as AB 32, has put California at the forefront of the global move to protect the climate that supports our economy and lifestyles. More recently, California’s energy utility announced plans to close the state's last remaining nuclear power plant. But will such a move reduce or increase carbon pollution? On today’s program we explore the future of oil and nuclear power through the lens of California’s fight against climate disruption.
Feb 01, 2017
Ecological Intelligence
59:00

What’s really preventing us from enacting environmental change? Blame our brains, says Daniel Goleman, author of Ecological Intelligence. As he explains it, “The problem comes down to a design flaw in the human brain.” Evolution fine-tuned our brains to protect us from immediate survival threats – lions, tigers and bears. But long-term dangers, such as those that threaten our planet today, don’t register. “The problem is that we don't perceive, nor are we alarmed by, these changes,” says Goleman. “And so we're in this dilemma where we can show people, "Well, you know, your carbon footprint is this," but it doesn't really register in the same way as “there's a tiger around the block.” Facts alone aren't enough, he adds, “We need to find a more powerful way of framing them…a way which will activate the right set of emotions and get us moving.”
George Lakoff, a linguistics professor at U.C. Berkeley, sees the issue as a moral, rather than environmental, crisis: “…the greatest moral crisis we have ever been in. It is the moral issue of our times and it’s seen just as an environmental issue.” But morality can mean different things to different people. This sets up a debate that quickly goes from the political to the personal, as Josh Freedman, author of Inside Change, points out. “When we start saying, "okay, they're good, and they're bad," what happens is we're actually fueling this threat system that is what's in the way of us actually solving these problems.”

So what is the solution? How do we retune our primitive brains – and those of our political and business leaders -- to focus on a less than clear, less than present danger?

Throughout the discussion, several key avenues rose to the top: economics, education and emotional appeal. If major institutions can be persuaded to divest from environmentally unsound companies, says Lakoff, “then what will happen is that the prices of the stocks will go down for those energy companies. When they go down that way, they stay down…you have an opportunity to shift investment away in a way that has an exponential feedback loop.”

Educating today’s youth was a powerful and recurring theme for all the speakers. “What kids learn and tell their parents is important,” Goleman said. “Schools are a big counterforce that we can do a much better job of deploying in this battle for minds and heart.”

Despite our primitive wiring, the speakers concluded, we humans do have the capacity for the ecological intelligence – and the morality – to effect global change.

“Your morality is what defines who you are as a human being,” says Lakoff, “it's who you are emotionally and morally as a human being that matters in your life, what you do every day. This isn't a matter of compromise…we have, like, 35 years to turn this around, period. That's not long.”

“All change starts on the inside,” says Freedman, “If we can support children and adults to connect with that capability and to develop what's already there, then things are going to get a lot better.”

Daniel Goleman, Author, Ecological Intelligence: The Hidden Impacts of What We Buy (Crown Business, 2010)
Joshua Freedman, CEO, Six Seconds; Author, Inside Change: Transforming Your Organization With Emotional Intelligence (Six Seconds, 2010)
George Lakoff, Professor of Cognitive Science and Linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley and author of many books, including The Political Mind: A Cognitive Scientist's Guide to Your Brain and Its Politics (Penguin Books, 2009)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 1, 2014.

Jan 27, 2017
Nature's Price Tag (07/25/13) (Rebroadcast)

An emerging area of economics aims to put a price on nature as a way of justifying preserving it in societies dominated by the wisdom of markets. A mountain stream, for example, provides many economic benefits beyond people who own property near it or drink water from it. The same is said of bees that pollinate our food, wetlands that cleans water, and trees that drink up carbon dioxide. If nature were a corporation it would be a large cap stock. Putting a precise tag on something long seen as free is a conceptual leap. However many large companies are starting to realize the extent to which their profits rely on well operating ecosystems.

Larry Goulder, Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics, Stanford
Tony Juniper, Associate Professor, University of Cambridge Programme for Sustainability Leadership; Special Advisor to The Prince of Wales International Sustainability Unit

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California on July 25, 2013

Jan 20, 2017
Is Climate Denial Destroying Our Planet?
59:00

Climate denial has become both a psychological and a political problem. Can better communication help us expand common ground and move on to solutions?

Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist, Author and Speaker
Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor of Meteorology, Penn State University
Cristine Russell, Freelance Science Journalist
Tom Toles, Editorial Cartoonist, The Washington Post

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on December 12, 2016.

Jan 13, 2017
The Sixth Annual Stephen Schneider Award: Naomi Oreskes and Steven Chu
59:00

Science historian Naomi Oreskes has had her share of hate mail from climate deniers. But, she says, “We can't give up on the challenge of explaining science.”

Naomi Oreskes, Professor of History of Science and Director of Graduate Studies, Harvard University, author of “Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming.” (Bloomsbury Press, 2011)
Steven Chu, Former U.S. Secretary of Energy; Professor of Physics and Molecular & Cellular Physiology, Stanford

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on December 15, 2016.

Jan 06, 2017
C1 Revue: Political and Climate Disruption
2016 began in the afterglow of the Paris climate accord, and ended with the triumph of a presidential candidate who has labeled climate change a hoax. So what will 2017 and the Trump administration mean for the future of clean energy? On today’s show we look ahead at how environmentally-conscious lawmakers and businesses might move forward now that Republicans control the White House and both chambers of Congress, and how big blue California might continue to lead the fight against climate change in spite of what happens in Washington.
Jan 01, 2017
Fighting Fossil Fuels All the Way to Prison
59:00

Radical protesters Tim DeChristopher and Georgia Hirsty put the “active” in “activism.” But is civil disobedience the best way to effect real change?

Tim DeChristopher, Founder, Climate Disobedience Center
Georgia Hirsty, National Warehouse Program Manager, Greenpeace
Brendon Steele, Director of Stakeholder Engagement, Future 500

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 19, 2015.

Dec 30, 2016
2016: From Paris to Trump
59:00

2016 began in the after-glow of the Paris climate summit and ended with the election of Donald Trump. A look back at the year’s energy triumphs and setbacks.

2. Speaker List
David R. Baker, Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle
Katie Fehrenbacher, Former Senior Writer, Fortune
Cassandra Sweet, Reporter, Wall Street Journal

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on December 7, 2016.

Dec 23, 2016
What Now for California?
59:00

As Donald Trump moves into the West Wing and the GOP takes control of congress, what will become of California’s environmental trailblazing?

Christine Pelosi, Superdelegate for Democratic Party; Political Strategist
Duf Sundheim, 2016 Republican Candidate for U.S. Senate
Tony Strickland, Former California State Senator; California Chairman, The Committee for American Sovereignty
Tony Thurmond, California State Assemblymember (D-15)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on December 1, 2016.

Dec 16, 2016
Nicholas Stern and Steve Westly
59:00

While federal experts warn that it will cost $44 trillion to rid the U.S. economy of carbon, Citibank counters that failing to act on climate disruption could result in over $44 trillion in public and private losses over the next 25 years. The true cost of either keeping or ditching fossil fuels was up for discussion at a recent Climate One event.

Nicholas Stern, Chair, Center for Climate Change Economics and Policy, London School of Economics
Steve Westly, Founder and Managing Partner, The Westly Group

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 5, 2016.

Dec 09, 2016
Will Trump Force One Run Clean?
59:00

A recent agreement is designed to curb emissions from international plane flights. But what if the new administration doesn’t clear it for takeoff?

Erin Cooke, Sustainability Director, San Francisco International Airport
James Macias, President and CEO, Fulcrum BioEnergy, Inc.
Sean Newsum, Director of Environmental Strategy, Boeing Commercial Airplanes
Annie Petsonk, International Counsel, Environmental Defense Fund

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on November 16, 2016

Dec 02, 2016
C1 Revue: Climate Change on Your Kitchen Table
Climate change is as much about what we eat as what we drive or where we live. Rising heat is hitting chocolate, wine, beer, bread and other foods we love, while our appetites for meat, fish, and dairy are responsible for a host of unsustainable farming practices. So what’s a climate-conscious eater to do? On today’s program we'll look at how climate change affects us at the kitchen table. We’ll ask whether all those craft beers, fair-trade coffees, and single-batch chocolates are part of the solution, or whether going vegan is the key to a climate-friendly diet.
Dec 01, 2016
Yvon Chouinard: Founding Patagonia and Living Simply
59:00

The explorer, climber, surfer and founder of sporting goods company Patagonia, Inc., has spent a lifetime welcoming adventure – and risk - of all kinds.

Yvon Chouinard, Founder and Owner, Patagonia

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 27, 2016

Nov 25, 2016
Redefining National Parks and Family Farms in a Changing Climate
59:00

America’s National Parks are struggling to find a balance between the needs of a growing population and the desire to preserve our natural heritage.

John Hart, Author, An Island in Time: 50 Years of Point Reyes National Seashore (Pickleweed Press, 2012)
Jordan Fisher Smith, Author, Engineering Eden: The True Story of a Violent Death, a Trial, and the Fight over Controlling Nature (Crown, 2016)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on July 19, 2016

Nov 18, 2016
Bread, Wine and Chocolate in a Warming World
59:00

Connecting the dots between the foods we love and our environment may be one way to engage people in the climate change fight – one cup of coffee at a time.

Jonathan Foley, Executive Director, California Academy of Sciences
Simran Sethi, Author, Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love
Helene York, Global Director, Responsible Business, Compass Group@Google

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 18, 2016.

Nov 11, 2016
McKibben & Tamminen: Disruptive Climate and Politics
59:00

Climate change seems to have taken a backseat in this year’s presidential campaign. What’s ahead for the climate movement in the next administration?

Bill McKibben, Founder, 350.org
Terry Tamminen, CEO, Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 21, 2016.

Nov 04, 2016
C1 Revue: Surviving a Megadrought
After last winter’s rains, Californians breathed a collective sigh of relief. But short-term weather is not the same as long-term climate. And state water watchers understand that this rainfall did not break the worst drought in over a thousand years. With the effects of climate change being felt around the country – droughts in some areas and flooding in others – the nation is looking to California as a model for how to handle a new normal. Today we’ll dig into the water woes of this bellwether state. How is California planning for a hotter, drier climate in the cities and down on the farm?
Nov 01, 2016
Villaraigosa, de León, and Mason: Power Politics
59:00

California has been proudly fighting the war on climate change for over a decade. But can it can grow its economy and tackle climate change at the same time?

Kevin de León, President pro Tempore, California State Senate
Melanie Mason, Reporter, Los Angeles Times
Antonio Villaraigosa, Former Mayor of Los Angeles

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 5, 2016.

Oct 28, 2016
Future Cities
59:00

As the world’s population increasingly moves into cities, what is the future of urban life? How can we build in the ability to weather a changing climate?

Jonathan F.P. Rose, Co-Founder, Garrison Institute
Peter Calthorpe, Principal Architect, Peter Calthorpe Associates

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 21, 2016.

Oct 21, 2016
Taking the Temperature of California’s Climate Law
59:00

It’s been ten years since California enacted a landmark law that put it at the forefront of the global war on climate change. Has AB 32 been a boon or a bust?

Fran Pavley, Senator, California State Senate
Catherine Reheis-Boyd, President, Western States Petroleum Association
Dan Sperling, Member, California Air Resources Board

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 20, 2016.

Oct 14, 2016
Rising Seas: Is San Francisco Ready?
59:00

San Francisco developers are planning billions in new construction with a Bayfront view. Yet seas are predicted to rise nearly a foot by 2050. Are we ready?

J.K. Dineen, Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle
Michael Stoll, Executive Director, San Francisco Public Press
Lauren Sommer, Science and Environment Reporter, KQED
Charles Long, Principal, Charles A. Long Properties, LLC
Margie O’Driscoll, Competition Advisor, Resilient by Design
Will Travis, Sea Level Rise Planning Consultant

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 13, 2016.

Oct 07, 2016
Can the Pacific Coast Lead the Transition to a Clean Economy?
59:00

The Pacific states and British Columbia have all pledged to reduce carbon emissions. Can they help accelerate the global transition to a green economy?

Kate Brown, Governor, Oregon
Jay Inslee, Governor, Washington
Mary Polak, Minister of Environment, Legislative Assembly of British Columbia

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 1, 2016.

Sep 30, 2016
Tom Steyer & Andy Karsner: Making Good on the Promise of Paris
59:00

The Paris climate agreement was signed by 196 countries and endorsed by corporate America. But will political rancor sink the ship of progress?

Andy Karsner, Managing Partner, Emerson Collective
Tom Steyer, Business Leader, Philanthropist and Clean Energy Advocate

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 2, 2016.

Sep 23, 2016
Can California Get to 100% Clean Power?
59:00

California is on track to reach 50% renewable energy by the year 2030. But can we do better? What would it take to get us to 100% clean power by 2050?

Mark Ferron, Board of Governors, California Independent System Operator
Mark Jacobson, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University
Steve Malnight, Senior Vice President of Regulatory Affairs, PG&E

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on August 23, 2016

Sep 16, 2016
Earning Green
59:00

We will discuss the hot prospects for building a climate-conscious career. New jobs and avenues for advancement are being created as companies strive to grow cleaner and governments figure out what a disrupted climate means for water, food, transit and housing systems. The young Americans entering the workforce today will create the cool new products, technologies and cities that will grow our economy and stabilize the climate. What are the best career paths for people who want to take advantage of that huge opportunity? What sectors are most promising? Will doing good entail making less? A conversation about building a thriving career based on reducing carbon while increasing social and economic value.

Leonard Adler, CEO, Green Jobs Network
Charlotte MacAusland, Commercial Channel Partner Manager, SolarCity
Lyrica McTiernan, Sustainability Manager, Facebook
Keely Wachs, Director of Communications, Clif Bar
Katherine Walsh, Director, Student Environmental Resource Center, UC Berkeley

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 23, 2016

Sep 09, 2016
Learning Green
59:00

We discuss how doctors, teachers and parents are framing climate change as a children’s issue. The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement saying children’s health will be disproportionately affected by climate. The California Parent-Teacher Association is raising its voice about carbon risk and the Boy Scouts are teaching kids about sustainability.

Giana Amador, Research Analyst, Center for Carbon Removal
Minda Berbeco, Programs and Policy Director, National Center for Science Education
Ryan Condensa, Action Fellow, Alliance for Climate Education
Luis Martinez, Student Activist
Alexander Zwissler, Principal, Einstellung Labs

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 23, 2016

Sep 02, 2016
C1 Revue: Human Health and Social Equity in a Hot World
59:00
Fossil fuels have lifted nations into the modern era, bringing wealth and well being to many. But as we turn away from these carbon intensive energy sources, will the promise of jobs and prosperity from a clean energy society, be fulfilled? Or will the gulf between the haves and have-nots simply widen? And how will we protect everyone from the health impacts of a hot world?
Sep 01, 2016
Will Closing Diablo Canyon Increase Carbon Pollution?
59:00

PG&E recently announced plans to close the Diablo Canyon nuclear plant by 2025 and replace it with renewable energy. What does this mean for Californians?

David R. Baker, Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle
John Geesman, Attorney, Dickson Geesman LLP
Dian Grueneich, Former Commissioner, California Public Utilities Commission
Michael Shellenberger, President, Environmental Progress

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on August 9, 2016

Aug 26, 2016
Can the Internet of Things be Green and Safe?
59:00

Today’s smart homes can be managed from your phone; banking can be done with the swipe of an app. But how vulnerable are we to hackers and cyberterrorism?

General Keith Alexander (Ret.),Former Director, National Security Agency; Founder and CEO, IronNet Cybersecurity
Alfred Berkeley, Former Director, World Economic Forum USA
David Mount, Partner, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on July 20, 2016

Aug 19, 2016
Redefining National Parks and Family Farms in a Changing Climate
59:00

America’s National Parks are struggling to find a balance between the needs of a growing population and the desire to preserve our natural heritage.

John Hart, Author, An Island in Time: 50 Years of Point Reyes National Seashore (Pickleweed Press, 2012)
Jordan Fisher Smith, Author, Engineering Eden: The True Story of a Violent Death, a Trial, and the Fight over Controlling Nature (Crown, 2016)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on July 19, 2016

Aug 12, 2016
Is California Entering a Megadrought?
59:00

As the dry spell continues, studies show that California could be facing a megadrought lasting decades. How do we adjust to the “new normal” in our climate?

Noah Diffenbaugh, Associate Professor, School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University
Peter Gleick, President and Co-founder, Pacific Institute
Karen Ross, Secretary, California Department of Food and Agriculture

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on July 7, 2016

Aug 05, 2016
The Health Hazards of One Degree
59:00

Global warming is hitting closer to home than we think, from a neighborhood child gasping with asthma to a parent collapsing from heatstroke. These realities led U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to assert in April that climate change presents the most complex threat to public health in U.S. history.

Rachel Morello-Frosch, Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Linda Rudolph, Director, Center for Climate Change and Health, Public Health Institute
Robert Gould, Director of Health Professional Outreach and Education, Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, UCSF
Katrina Peters, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, UCSF

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 5, 2016

Jul 29, 2016
Getting Baked: Can Legalizing Pot Help Fight Climate Change?
59:00

In November California voters have the chance to legalize marijuana. Could bringing one of our biggest industries out of the shadows help our environment?

Scott Greacen, Executive Director, Friends of the Eel River
Roger Morgan, Executive Director, Coalition for Drug Free California
Michael Sutton, Former President, California Fish & Game Commission

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 14, 2016

Jul 22, 2016
Sea Heroes: Extreme Edition
59:00

Our planet’s oceans drive our weather and generate much of our oxygen -- and they’re being severely impacted by climate change. What can be done about it?

Liz Taylor, President, DOER Marine
Peter Willcox, Captain, Rainbow Warrior, author, Greenpeace Captain: My Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet (Thomas Dunne Books, 2016)
Stiv Wilson, Director of Campaigns, Story of Stuff

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 12, 2016

Jul 14, 2016
After El Niño Now What?
59:00

Many Californians are wondering if El Niño has saved the Golden State from its historic drought. The snowpack in Sierra Nevada is more robust, reservoirs in Northern California are more full, and Folsom Lake even rose 10 feet in the month of March. However, the state is nowhere near pre-drought conditions. Three experts joined Greg Dalton at the Commonwealth Club to discuss the future of water in the Golden State.

Ashley Boren, Executive Director, Sustainable Conservation
Max Gomberg, Climate Change Manager, State Water Resources Control Board
Gabriele Ludwig, Director, Sustainability & Environmental Affairs, Almond Board of California
Barton Thompson, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 5, 2016

Jul 08, 2016
Old Nukes, New Nukes
59:00

A two-part conversation about the present and future of atomic power in a hot and crowded world.

David R. Baker, Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle
Caroline Cochran, Co-founder and Chief Operating Officer, Oklo
Lucas Davis, Associate Professor, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley
Jessica Lovering, Director of Energy, The Breakthrough Institute
Jose Reyes, Chief Technology Officer, NuScale Power
Ray Rothrock, Partner Emeritus, Venrock

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on March 15, 2016.

Jul 01, 2016
C1 Revue: Climate Control
59:00
When talking about the natural world, we often refer to the beauty that we see around us. But what do we smell, touch, taste - and most importantly hear? Today we’ll take a look at what nature sounds like. We’ll also explore the role of imagination in finding solutions to environmental threats – from fantasy films to engineering the sky to control the Earth’s climate.
Jul 01, 2016
Can the Pacific Coast Lead the Transition to a Clean Economy?
59:00

The Pacific states and British Columbia have all pledged to reduce carbon emissions. Can they help accelerate the global transition to a green economy?


Kate Brown, Governor, Oregon
Jay Inslee, Governor, Washington
Mary Polak, Minister of Environment, Legislative Assembly of British Columbia


This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 1, 2016.

Jun 24, 2016
Tom Steyer & Andy Karsner: Making Good on the Promise of Paris
59:00

The Paris climate agreement was signed by 196 countries and endorsed by corporate America. But will political rancor sink the ship of progress?

Andy Karsner, Managing Partner, Emerson Collective
Tom Steyer, Business Leader, Philanthropist and Clean Energy Advocate

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 2, 2016.

Jun 17, 2016
Nicholas Stern and Steve Westly
59:00

While federal experts warn that it will cost $44 trillion to rid the U.S. economy of carbon, Citibank counters that failing to act on climate disruption could result in over $44 trillion in public and private losses over the next 25 years. The true cost of either keeping or ditching fossil fuels was up for discussion at a recent Climate One event.

Nicholas Stern, Chair, Center for Climate Change Economics and Policy, London School of Economics
Steve Westly, Founder and Managing Partner, The Westly Group

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 5, 2016.

Jun 10, 2016
Remaking the Planet
59:00

Geoengineering may sound like science fiction, but there are many who believe we can — and should — be taking drastic measures to cool our planet down.

Oliver Morton, Briefings Editor, The Economist; Author, The Planet Remade: How Geoengineering Could Change the World (Princeton University Press, 2015)
Kim Stanley Robinson, Author, 2312 (Orbit, 2012)
Ken Caldeira, Climate Scientist, Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology at Stanford University

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 28, 2016.

Jun 03, 2016
C1 Revue: Doubt, Deception, Defiance
59:00
Today, we’re going to extreme ends of climate change debate... and action. While most of us are still comfortable sitting in the center – perhaps accepting the science, but not doing much about it – there are some organizations and individuals who are willing to jump off a bridge to convince us of the peril we face. And there are others who are using misinformation and deception to try to sow doubt in our minds about whether there is any problem at all.
Jun 01, 2016
U.S. Energy Secretary and Business Leaders
59:00

Nearly 200 countries have pledged to go on a carbon diet. But does what happens in Paris, stay in Paris? How does the US plan to keep its climate promises?

Ernest Moniz, U.S. Secretary of Energy
Hal Harvey, CEO, Energy Innovation
Danny Kennedy, Managing Director, California Clean Energy Fund
Lyndon Rive, Co-founder and CEO, SolarCity

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 26, 2016.

May 27, 2016
Earning Green
59:00

We will discuss the hot prospects for building a climate-conscious career. New jobs and avenues for advancement are being created as companies strive to grow cleaner and governments figure out what a disrupted climate means for water, food, transit and housing systems. The young Americans entering the workforce today will create the cool new products, technologies and cities that will grow our economy and stabilize the climate. What are the best career paths for people who want to take advantage of that huge opportunity? What sectors are most promising? Will doing good entail making less? A conversation about building a thriving career based on reducing carbon while increasing social and economic value.

Leonard Adler, CEO, Green Jobs Network
Charlotte MacAusland, Commercial Channel Partner Manager, SolarCity
Lyrica McTiernan, Sustainability Manager, Facebook
Keely Wachs, Director of Communications, Clif Bar
Katherine Walsh, Director, Student Environmental Resource Center, UC Berkeley

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 23, 2016

May 20, 2016
Learning Green
59:00

We discuss how doctors, teachers and parents are framing climate change as a children’s issue. The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement saying children’s health will be disproportionately affected by climate. The California Parent-Teacher Association is raising its voice about carbon risk and the Boy Scouts are teaching kids about sustainability.

Giana Amador, Research Analyst, Center for Carbon Removal
Minda Berbeco, Programs and Policy Director, National Center for Science Education
Ryan Condensa, Action Fellow, Alliance for Climate Education
Luis Martinez, Student Activist
Alexander Zwissler, Principal, Einstellung Labs

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 23, 2016

May 13, 2016
Liccardo, Schaaf and Ting vs. Global Warming
59:00

The global effects of climate disruption will have local impacts on the Bay Area. The political leaders of this region are already planning for a future with a new normal.

Sam Liccardo, Mayor, San Jose
Libby Schaaf, Mayor, Oakland
Phil Ting, California State Assemblymember (D-19)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 20, 2016

May 06, 2016
C1 Revue: Living on Sunshine
59:00
You know that cartoon where the guy has a light bulb over his head and then “bing” it goes on? Well, America is having a collective “light bulb” moment these days. And it’s powered by solar energy. Solar panels are 50% cheaper than just 5 years ago. And energy from the wind is looking just as bright. Today, we’re taking a look at the explosion of clean energy alternatives, how we’re pumping it into new cars and our plans for carrying it over a new electric grid.
May 01, 2016
Cowspiracy
59:00

In the quest for a carbon-neutral lifestyle, it can be difficult to sort out which activities have the greatest negative impact on our climate, from driving a car to eating animal products. The documentary Cowspiracy, produced by Leonardo DiCaprio, contends that animal agriculture is the number one source of climate killing pollution, and environmental non-profits are colluding to keep this information from the American public.

Kip Andersen
, Founder, AUM Films and Media
Nicolette Hahn Niman, Author, Defending Beef
Jonathan Kaplan, Director, Food and Agriculture Program, Natural Resources Defense Council

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 20, 2016

Apr 29, 2016
The Health Hazards of One Degree
59:00

Global warming is hitting closer to home than we think, from a neighborhood child gasping with asthma to a parent collapsing from heatstroke. These realities led U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to assert in April that climate change presents the most complex threat to public health in U.S. history.

Rachel Morello-Frosch, Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Linda Rudolph, Director, Center for Climate Change and Health, Public Health Institute
Robert Gould, Director of Health Professional Outreach and Education, Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, UCSF
Katrina Peters, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, UCSF

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 5, 2016

Apr 22, 2016
Fighting Fossil Fuels All the Way to Prison
59:00

Radical protestersTim DeChristopher and Georgia Hirsty put the “active” in “activism.” But is civil disobedience the best way to effect real change?

Tim DeChristopher, Founder, Climate Disobedience Center
Georgia Hirsty, National Warehouse Program Manager, Greenpeace
Brendon Steele, Director of Stakeholder Engagement, Future 500

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 19, 2015.

Apr 08, 2016
C1 Revue: Climate Science: Hope & Worry
59:00
The historic climate summit in Paris is behind us. And nations around the world are turning their attention to the lofty promises made. Yet scientists and politicians agree that these goals for dialing back global warming are only the tip of the iceberg. With 2015 breaking the record for the hottest year ever, and 2014 holding the number two spot, plans for coping with an increasingly hot and dry world need to be part of the strategy as well. And facing this future can be scary, so we’ll also explore ideas for how to handle the anxiety and stress that many of us are feeling about all this.
Apr 01, 2016
Today's EV Market
59:00

Today’s electric cars are more fun to drive than ever. And for many, they’re more affordable too. Will California reach its goal of a million EVs by 2020?

Sherry Boschert, Co-founder, Plug In America; Author, Plug-in Hybrids: The Cars That Will Recharge America (New Society, 2006)
Eileen Tutt, Executive Director, California Electric Transportation Coalition
Charlie Vogelheim, Principal, Vogelheim Ventures

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on February 24, 2016.

Mar 25, 2016
Beans and Brew
59:00

Coffee, beer and chocolate – oh my! How is global warming affecting our beloved guilty pleasures? Can growers and producers adapt to a changing climate?

Ken Grossman, Co-Founder & CEO, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.
Paul Katzeff, Founder & CEO, Thanksgiving Coffee Company
Brad Kintzer, Chief Chocolate Maker, TCHO Chocolate

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on November 20, 2014.

Mar 18, 2016
Cigarettes and Tailpipes
59:00

Cigarette makers downplayed the dangers of smoking for decades with distracting science. How close is the link between tobacco denial and climate denial?

Lowell Bergman, Investigative Journalist
Stanton Glantz, Director, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, UCSF
Kenneth Kimmell, President, Union of Concerned Scientists
William K. Reilly, Senior Advisor, TPG

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on February 18, 2016.

Mar 11, 2016
Climate Equity
59:00

Communities of color are most affected by pollution, yet they’ve been overlooked by the green movement. How can we ensure environmental justice for all?

Manuel Pastor, Director, University of Southern California Program for Environmental and Regional Equity
Vien Truong, National Director, Green for All
Miya Yoshitani, Executive Director, Asia Pacific Environmental Network

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on February 9, 2016.

Mar 04, 2016
C1 Revue: Food and Climate Change
59:00
Our host Greg Dalton went to the climate summit in Paris to learn what food and energy solutions were being proposed – outside of the closed door negotiations. Coal made from grass. Burgers made from fruit. He came back with food for thought. When the Paris summit was over and the dust settled, Greg sat down with U.S. Secretary of Energy, Ernest Moniz, to get his perspective on the summit’s success – and the prospects for countries actually making good on their promises. Innovating our way to a clean economy, on Climate One.
Mar 01, 2016
Bread, Wine and Chocolate in a Warming World
59:00

Connecting the dots between the foods we love and our environment may be one way to engage people in the climate change fight – one cup of coffee at a time.

Jonathan Foley, Executive Director, California Academy of Sciences
Simran Sethi, Author, Bread, Wine, Chocolate: The Slow Loss of Foods We Love
Helene York, Global Director, Responsible Business, Compass Group@Google

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 18, 2016.

Feb 24, 2016
Handling Your Feelings About Climate Change
59:00

If climate change makes you feel anxious, depressed or powerless, psychologists say you’re not alone. Can talking it out help drive change?

Joshua Freedman, CEO, Six Seconds; Author, Inside Change: Transforming Your Organization with Emotional Intelligence (Six Seconds, 2010)
Renee Lertzman, Climate Engagement Strategist
Joan Blades, Co-founder, LivingRoomConversations.org

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 27, 2016.

Feb 18, 2016
U.S. Energy Secretary and Business Leaders
59:00

Nearly 200 countries have pledged to go on a carbon diet. But does what happens in Paris, stay in Paris? How does the US plan to keep its climate promises?

Ernest Moniz, U.S. Secretary of Energy
Hal Harvey, CEO, Energy Innovation
Danny Kennedy, Managing Director, California Clean Energy Fund
Lyndon Rive, Co-founder and CEO, SolarCity

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 26, 2016.

Feb 12, 2016
Fighting Fossil Fuels All the Way to Prison
59:00

Radical protestersTim DeChristopher and Georgia Hirsty put the “active” in “activism.” But is civil disobedience the best way to effect real change?

Tim DeChristopher, Founder, Climate Disobedience Center
Georgia Hirsty, National Warehouse Program Manager, Greenpeace
Brendon Steele, Director of Stakeholder Engagement, Future 500

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 19, 2015.

Feb 05, 2016
C1 Revue: Cars of the Future
59:00
We’ll never win the climate change challenge if we don’t change the way we make and drive cars. In the U.S. personal vehicles account for nearly one fifth of all our greenhouse gas emissions. And if you add in trucks, trains, planes and ships, it’s more than a quarter of our contribution to climate pollution. So how do we cut down on carbon coming out of the tailpipe? Or... maybe it’s time to give up on gasoline altogether. Is the carbon-free, electric vehicle ready for primetime?
Jan 29, 2016
How We Roll
59:00

Ride-sharing, biking, bussing – when it comes to getting around, there’s a growing menu of ala carte wheels to choose from. Can we curb our cars for good?

Tom Nolan, Chairman of the Board, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency
Jeff Hobson, Acting Executive Director, TransForm
Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez, Staff Reporter, San Francisco Examiner
Padden Murphy, Head of Public Policy & Business Development, Getaround
Chakib Ayadi, Executive Board Member, San Francisco Taxi Workers Alliance
Ozzie Arce, driver for Lyft

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 22, 2015.

Jan 29, 2016
Greening Asia
59:00

As the Asian economy booms, its people have paid the price in polluted air and water. Can business and government solve Asia’s environmental problems?

Mark Clifford, Author, The Greening of Asia: The Business Case for Solving Asia's Environmental Emergency (Columbia University Press, 2015)
Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director, Center on U.S.-China Relations, Asia Society in New York
Stella Li, Senior Vice President, BYD Company Ltd.

Jan 22, 2016
Julián Castro
59:00

The new American Dream is an energy-efficient home in a healthy, green community, and HUD Secretary Julián Castro wants to make it affordable for everyone.

Julián Castro, Secretary, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

Jan 15, 2016
Dr. Chris Field – The Stephen Schneider Award
59:00

The latest recipient of the Stephen Schneider Award calls COP21 “a turning point,” but warns that there’s still much to be done to combat global warming.

Chris Field, Director, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science
Ken Alex, Director, Governor Brown's Office of Planning and Research
Jane Lubchenco, University Distinguished Professor and Advisor in Marine Studies, Oregon State University and U.S. Science Envoy for the Ocean

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on December 15, 2015.

Jan 08, 2016
Down and Dirty
59:00

The meat industry has been much maligned for its part in climate change. But can raising cattle in pastures help turn global warming into global greening?

Diana Donlon, Director, Cool Foods Campaign, Center for Food Safety
Nicolette Hahn Niman, Author, Defending Beef: The Case for Sustainable Meat Production (Chelsea Green, 2014)
Whendee Silver, Professor of Ecology, University of California, Berkeley

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on January 29, 2015.

Jan 01, 2016
C1 Revue: Racing to Zero
59:00
The path towards a clean energy future entails reducing our carbon footprint. But can we actually shrink that footprint down to nothing? That’s the idea behind “net zero” – using no more energy than the clean, green energy we can create. Landfills are another target of the zero movement; put nothing at all in the trash bin. Solutions range from recycling competitions to carrying your trash on your back – just to feel how garbage is weighing us down. Around the country, states, communities and individuals are racing to zero.
Dec 31, 2015
Net Zero Homes and Waste
59:00

Conservation begins at home. Is a Net Zero Energy home in your future? And what steps can we take to reduce the trash on our backs – and in our backyards?

Ann Edminster, Author, Energy Free: Homes for a Small Planet (Green Building Press, 2009)
Daniel Simons, Principal, David Baker Architects
Sven Thesen, Owner, Net Zero Home
Diana Dehm, Founder, Trash on Your Back
Kevin Drew, Zero Waste Coordinator, San Francisco Department of the Environment
Lauren Hennessy, Sustainability Outreach Manager, Stanford University

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 15, 2015.

Dec 21, 2015
T. Boone Pickens
59:00

Will the U.S. oil boom cripple OPEC? Could oil reach $100 a barrel again? What’s ahead for renewables? A conversation with the Oracle of Oil, Boone Pickens.

T. Boone Pickens, Chairman and CEO, BP Capital Management

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on March 24, 2015.

Dec 18, 2015
Climate One in Paris
59:00
Climate One went on the road to check out the action in and around the UN Climate Summit in Paris. While negotiators from 180 countries drilled down on the details of the treaty, a number of side events buzzed with activity. Entrepreneurs and innovators brought their ideas for green technology to the Sustainable Innovations Forum. At the Global Landscapes Forum, agriculture and food security was the focus, with farmers taking a soil-to-table approach. And in the nearby Green Zone, artists and activists gathered to share the eco-excitement and make their voices heard.
Dec 11, 2015
The Road to Paris: Christiana Figueres and William Reilly
59:00

Past conferences have failed to reach consensus on addressing climate change. Can the Paris summit produce a lasting, effective and equitable solution?

Christiana Figueres, Executive Secretary, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
William K. Reilly, Senior Advisor, TPG Capital

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 16, 2015.

Dec 04, 2015
C1 Revue: The Changing Oceans
59:00
Human activity has touched every corner of the Earth. The Arctic, the Amazon, the bottom of the deep, blue sea. Places you and I will most likely never visit – and can hardly even imagine. Yet oil drilling and industrial fishing are changing even these places. And changes there are impacting us at home as well. It’s a small world.
Dec 01, 2015
Atmosphere of Hope
59:00

Climate change awareness and action are growing. Solutions are being implemented, with more in the wings. Are we experiencing an “atmosphere of hope?”

Tim Flannery, Scientist, Explorer, Author, Atmosphere of Hope (Atlantic Monthly Press, 2015)
Ben Santer, Climate Scientist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Rebecca Shaw, Associate Vice President and Lead Scientist, Environmental Defense Fund

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Exploratorium with the Commonwealth Club of California on November 10, 2015.

Nov 27, 2015
Power Drive
59:00

California has an ambitious plan to reduce carbon emissions. Can EVs and driverless cars save the day? Or will they just add to our already clogged roads?

Shad Balch, Environment and Energy Communications Manager, General Motors
Alexandre Bayen, Liao-Cho Professor of Engineering and Director, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley
Hector De La Torre, Member, California Air Resources Board
Diarmuid O’Connell, Vice President of Business Development, Tesla

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Exploratorium with the Commonwealth Club of California on November 2, 2015.

Nov 20, 2015
Charging Ahead: PG&E Tony Earley
59:00

PG&E hopes to become 50% renewable by 2030 by transitioning to renewable power sources and investing in a 21st century grid. Can they reach their goal?

Anthony Earley, Jr., Chairman, CEO and President, PG&E Corporation

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Exploratorium with the Commonwealth Club of California on October 15, 2015.

Nov 13, 2015
Drilling in the Amazon and Arctic
59:00

Big Oil spends billions to squeeze fossil fuel from every nook and cranny of the globe. But is drilling in the Arctic and Amazon as profitable as they’d hoped?

Lou Allstadt, Former Executive Vice President, Mobil Oil
Danielle Fugere, President, As You Sow
René Ortiz, Former Ecuador Oil Minister; Former OPEC Secretary General
Leila Salazar-Lopez, Executive Director, Amazon Watch

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Exploratorium with the Commonwealth Club of California on October 13, 2015.

Nov 06, 2015
Resilient Cities
59:00

El Niño is waiting in the wings, and heat waves, sea level rise and drought are in the forecast as well. How prepared are we to weather the next big disaster?

Nile Malloy, former Director, Communities for a Better Environment
Patrick Otellini, Chief Resilience Officer, San Francisco
Laura Tam, Sustainable Development Policy Director, SPUR

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Exploratorium with the Commonwealth Club of California on October 5, 2015.

Oct 30, 2015
C1 Revue: Global Carbon
59:00
Pope Francis – in his new encyclical, and in his recent talks at both the U.N. and U.S. Congress – says that it is our moral obligation to the poor to address climate change. This time, the world may be listening. In preparation for the upcoming climate talks in Paris this December, China, along with most major nations around the globe, has announced a plan to cut down on fossil fuel pollution. Some say it’s too little, too late. Others are hopeful that we can begin to move the ball forward. China, the Pope and Paris: on the next Climate One.
Oct 26, 2015
Voices of the Wild
59:00

Thanks to climate change, the wild corners of the planet are shrinking or disappearing altogether. How can we preserve the natural world and its creatures?

Bernie Krause, Soundscape Artist; Author, Voices of the Wild: Animal Songs, Human Din, and the Call to Save Natural Soundscapes (Yale University Press, 2015)
Jason Mark, Editor, Earth Island Journal; Author, Satellites in the High Country: Searching for the Wild in the Age of Man (Island Press, 2015)
Tanya Peterson, Director, San Francisco Zoo

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 24, 2015.

Oct 23, 2015
Competition for Power
59:00

Consumers in Marin and Sonoma already have freedom of choice when it comes to renewable power. Now San Francisco voters are about to have their say.

Dawn Weisz, CEO, Marin Clean Energy
Geof Syphers, CEO, Sonoma Clean Power
Matthew Freedman, Staff Attorney, The Utility Reform Network
Phil Ting, California State Assemblymember (D-19)

London Breed, President, Board of Supervisors, San Francisco
Barbara Hale, Assistant General Manager, San Francisco Public Utility Commission’s Power Enterprise
Hunter Stern, Business Representative, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 24, 2015.

Oct 16, 2015
Arctic Melting & Rising
59:00

Few of us will ever venture to the faraway Arctic. But our entire planet is affected by environmental and economic changes happening in the frozen north.

William Collins,Director, Climate and Ecosystem Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Alex Levinson, Executive Director, Pacific Environment
Sergey Petrov, Consul General of the Russian Federation in San Francisco
Hilde Janne Skorpen, Consul General for Norway in San Francisco

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 22, 2015.

Oct 09, 2015
Sylvia Earle (Rebroadcast)
59:00

As the health of our oceans go, so goes the health of our planet. But climate change, overfishing and pollution have taken their toll – what can we do to help?

Sylvia Earle, National Geographic Explorer in Residence

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 27, 2015.

Oct 02, 2015
Hacking the Climate
59:00

Spray painting the sky to deflect sunlight and cool the earth sounds like science fiction. But could geoengineering buy us time against global warming?

Ken Caldeira, Atmospheric Scientist, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University
Albert Lin, Professor, UC Davis School of Law
Jane Long, Co-chair, Task Force on Geoengineering, Bipartisan Policy Center
Armand Neukermans, Physicist and Inventor

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 8, 2015.

Sep 25, 2015
C1 Revue: Climate Fantasy & Denial
59:00
Today we look at fact and fiction in our approach to the climate challenge. A handful of scientists want to tinker with the sky in a process called geo-engineering. Others call this arrogance. Most Americans simply aren’t talking about climate change at all. Why not? Meanwhile, Hollywood has taken notice. It’s rolling out movies depicting a climate catastrophe. Science fiction thrillers describe people resorting to eating bugs after the climate apocalypse. Is truth stranger than fiction?
Sep 24, 2015
Pope Francis: Climate Changer?
59:00

Pope Francis’ bold statement on global warming has prompted a discussion of stewardship across faiths. Can his upcoming visit change the climate in Congress?

Rev. Canon Sally Bingham, Founder and President, Regeneration Project
Father Paul Fitzgerald, President, University of San Francisco
Sam Liccardo, Mayor, San Jose, California

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 10, 2015.

Sep 18, 2015
EPA Chief Gina McCarthy (Rebroadcast)
59:00

From fisheries to food safety, California drought to Toledo tapwater, the EPA is waging the battle against climate change both domestically and globally.

Gina McCarthy, Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 13, 2015.

Sep 11, 2015
Hank Paulson: Dealing with China (Rebroadcast)
59:00

China is both our economic competitor and an ally in the climate change fight. But can it reduce its carbon footprint while lifting its people out of poverty?

Henry Paulson, Former United States Secretary of the Treasury and author of “Dealing with China: An Insider Unmasks the New Economic Superpower” (Twelve, 2015)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 28, 2015.

Sep 04, 2015
Weather Whiplash (Rebroadcast)
59:00

From hurricanes and superstorms to drought, fire and floods — what’s causing our country’s extreme weather events, and how can they be prevented?

Louise Bedsworth, Deputy Director, California Governor's Office of Planning and Research
Kathryn Sullivan, Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Hunter Cutting, Director of Strategic Communications, Climate Nexus

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on March 3, 2015.

Aug 27, 2015
C1 Revue: Alfalfa & Lawns
59:00
Our next program is all about water. We love gold. We fight over oil. But we can not live without water. And as snowpacks melt and aquifers drop, water is slipping through our fingers. How can we make the best use of this most precious resource in our cities and down on the farm? We can’t find solutions if we can’t face the issues. And talking about climate change can be a conversation killer. But it’s easy to talk about the weather. And the increasingly wild weather can give us an opening to talk about the bigger issue of climate disruption.
Aug 24, 2015
Climate Cognition (Rebroadcast)
59:00

Sure, there are climate deniers – but even those who accept global warming as reality often fail to act on it. What will inspire both awareness and change?

George Lakoff, Professor of Linguistics, UC Berkeley; Author, Don’t Think of an Elephant! Know Your Values and Frame the Debate (Chelsea Green, 2004)
Kari Norgaard, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Oregon; Author, Living in Denial: Climate Change, Emotions and Everyday Life (MIT Press, 2011)
Per Espen Stoknes, Economist; Psychologist; Author, What We Think About When We Try Not to Think About Global Warming (Chelsea Green, 2015)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 12, 2015.

Aug 21, 2015
Reinventing Water
59:00

As the drought drags on, water is becoming an ever more precious resource. It’s time to rethink the ways that we use, reuse, share, sell and save every drop.

Anna Michalak, Faculty Member, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science
Martha Davis, Executive Manager for Policy Development, Inland Empire Utilities Agency
Abrahm Lustgarten, Reporter, ProPublica
Tamin Pechet, CEO, Banyan Water and Chairman, Imagine H2O
David Sedlak, Professor of Mineral Engineering and Co-director of Berkeley Water Center, UC Berkeley

Aug 14, 2015
Greening Asia
59:00

As the Asian economy booms, its people have paid the price in polluted air and water. Can business and government solve Asia’s environmental problems?

Mark Clifford, Author, The Greening of Asia: The Business Case for Solving Asia's Environmental Emergency (Columbia University Press, 2015)
Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director, Center on U.S.-China Relations, Asia Society in New York
Stella Li, Senior Vice President, BYD Company Ltd.

Aug 07, 2015
Cli-Fi 2015 (Rebroadcast)
59:00

Climate change is more than a plot device – it’s our reality, and thesigns are all around us. Can Cli-Fi help rally the troops in our battle to save the planet?

Jason Mark, Editor, Earth Island Journal
Kim Stanley Robinson, Author, 2312 (Thorndike Press, 2015)

Aug 02, 2015
C1 Revue: Clean and Cool
59:00
Fossil fuels are at the core of the climate challenge. Even Saudi Arabia’s oil minister has said the fossil fuel merry-go-round will wind down one day. But are companies actually going to leave their oil, coal and gas assets in the ground? That won’t make stock holders very happy. As we look for ways to reduce our carbon footprint familiar culprits come to mind: the car’s tailpipe, the air conditioner, even our hamburger. But our laptops? Really? How much of a carbon impact are we making from posting, liking, tweeting and buying online? Climate One explores the path to a clean and cool planet.
Jul 28, 2015
Almonds and Lawns
59:00

Who’s really wasting our water? As the state heats up, so is the finger-pointing. Can Californians come together to find solutions to the drought?

Ellen Hanak, Senior Fellow and Center Director, Public Policy Institute of California
Felicia Marcus, Chair, State Water Resources Control Board
Paul Wenger, President, California Farm Bureau Federation
Marguerite Young, Director, Ward 3, East Bay Municipal Utility District Board

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 30, 2015.

Jul 24, 2015
How We Roll
59:00

Ride-sharing, biking, bussing – when it comes to getting around, there’s a growing menu of ala carte wheels to choose from. Can we curb our cars for good?

Tom Nolan, Chairman of the Board, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency
Jeff Hobson, Acting Executive Director, TransForm
Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez, Staff Reporter, San Francisco Examiner
Padden Murphy, Head of Public Policy & Business Development, Getaround
Chakib Ayadi, Executive Board Member, San Francisco Taxi Workers Alliance
Ozzie Arce, driver for Lyft

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 22, 2015.

Jul 17, 2015
Clean Cloud (Rebroadcast)
59:00

Many Silicon Valley companies have committed to going 100% renewable. What are Facebook, Ebay and Yahoo! doing to build a cleaner, greener digital world?

Gary Cook, Senior Policy Analyst, Greenpeace International
Lori Duvall, Global Director, Green, eBay
Christina Page, Global Director, Energy and Sustainability Strategy, Yahoo!
Bill Weihl, Sustainability Guru, Facebook

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on March 3, 2015.

Jul 10, 2015
The Road to Paris: Christiana Figueres and William Reilly
59:00

Past conferences have failed to reach consensus on addressing climate change. Can the Paris summit produce a lasting, effective and equitable solution?

Christiana Figueres, Executive Secretary, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
William K. Reilly, Senior Advisor, TPG Capital

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on June 16, 2015.

Jul 03, 2015
The Carbon Bubble (Rebroadcast)
59:00

As supply grows and demand decreases, oil prices are dropping by the barrel. Are we truly in a “carbon bubble”? What can we do to protect our investments?

Kurt Billick, Chief Investment Officer, Bocage Capital
Anthony Hobley, CEO, Carbon Tracker Initiative
Anne Simpson, Director of Global Governance, CalPERS

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on March 12, 2015.

Jun 26, 2015
C1 Revue: Hank Paulson and Gina McCarthy
59:00
Climate change is impacting much more than the environment. It’s also slowly changing the political landscape – in Washington and beyond. What’s the best way to move our economy towards a renewable future? More environmental regulation or less? More financial oversight or freer markets? And with mega economies like China and India creating ever-increasing carbon pollution, how do we bring our international friends – and foes – along with us?
Jun 24, 2015
Sylvia Earle
59:00

As the health of our oceans go, so goes the health of our planet. But climate change, overfishing and pollution have taken their toll – what can we do to help?

Sylvia Earle, National Geographic Explorer in Residence

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 27, 2015.

Jun 19, 2015
Climate Cognition
59:00

Sure, there are climate deniers – but even those who accept global warming as reality often fail to act on it. What will inspire both awareness and change?

George Lakoff, Professor of Linguistics, UC Berkeley; Author, Don’t Think of an Elephant! Know Your Values and Frame the Debate (Chelsea Green, 2004)
Kari Norgaard, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Oregon; Author, Living in Denial: Climate Change, Emotions and Everyday Life (MIT Press, 2011)
Per Espen Stoknes, Economist; Psychologist; Author, What We Think About When We Try Not to Think About Global Warming (Chelsea Green, 2015)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 12, 2015.

Jun 12, 2015
EPA Chief Gina McCarthy
59:00

From fisheries to food safety, California drought to Toledo tapwater, the EPA is waging the battle against climate change both domestically and globally.

Gina McCarthy, Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 13, 2015.

Jun 05, 2015
Hacking the Climate
59:00

Spray painting the sky to deflect sunlight and cool the earth sounds like science fiction. But could geoengineering buy us time against global warming?

Ken Caldeira, Atmospheric Scientist, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University
Albert Lin, Professor, UC Davis School of Law
Jane Long, Co-chair, Task Force on Geoengineering, Bipartisan Policy Center
Armand Neukermans, Physicist and Inventor

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on May 8, 2015.

May 28, 2015
C1 Revue: Power Plays
59:00
Despite soggy prices the outlook for American oil and gas is still promising. Cycles of boom and bust have always been part of the energy industry, which delivers big profits. At the same time, clean energy is creating jobs and clean communities. Rooftop solar for home owners is increasing rapidly and electric cars are gaining cache. In this episode of Climate One’s National Magazine we are looking at the power brokers who are moving the ball forward on renewable energy and those still making a bundle on fossil fuels.
May 27, 2015
Hank Paulson: Dealing with China
59:00

China is both our economic competitor and an ally in the climate change fight. But can it reduce its carbon footprint while lifting its people out of poverty?

Henry Paulson, Former United States Secretary of the Treasury and author of “Dealing with China: An Insider Unmasks the New Economic Superpower” (Twelve, 2015)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 28, 2015.

May 22, 2015
Coal Wars
59:00

Coal provides cheap energy and economic prosperity – along with greenhouse gases and lung disease. Can we wean ourselves, and our planet, off coal for good?

Richard Martin, Author, Coal Wars: The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet (Palgrave Macmillan Trade, 2015)
Bruce Nilles, Senior Director, Beyond Coal Campaign, Sierra Club
Frank Wolak, Director, Program on Energy and Sustainable Development, Stanford University
Brian Yu, Senior Analyst, Citi Research

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 22, 2015.

May 15, 2015
Net Zero Homes and Waste
59:00

Conservation begins at home. Is a Net Zero Energy home in your future? And what steps can we take to reduce the trash on our backs – and in our backyards?

Ann Edminster, Author, Energy Free: Homes for a Small Planet (Green Building Press, 2009)
Daniel Simons, Principal, David Baker Architects
Sven Thesen, Owner, Net Zero Home
Diana Dehm, Founder, Trash on Your Back
Kevin Drew, Zero Waste Coordinator, San Francisco Department of the Environment
Lauren Hennessy, Sustainability Outreach Manager, Stanford University

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on April 15, 2015.

May 08, 2015
Beans and Brew
59:00

Coffee, beer and chocolate – oh my! How is global warming affecting our beloved guilty pleasures? Can growers and producers adapt to a changing climate?

Ken Grossman, Co-Founder & CEO, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.
Paul Katzeff, Founder & CEO, Thanksgiving Coffee Company
Brad Kintzer, Chief Chocolate Maker, TCHO Chocolate

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on November 20, 2014.

May 01, 2015
C1 Revue: Fuel Forward
59:00
Low gas prices are pumping up sales of SUVs and trucks. And since transportation accounts for almost a third of America’s greenhouse gasses, that’s bad news for the climate. But America is awash in big ideas for how to create a healthy economy and healthy communities. One idea is to put a price on carbon. Everyone from oil companies to environmentalists are talking about what might happen if consumers paid the real price for coal and gasoline. Some think it just might boost the economy while also trimming carbon pollution.
Apr 27, 2015
New Food Revolution
59:00

The amount of food needed to feed the earth’s growing population is expected to double by mid-century. How will we manage the world’s food supply?

Karen Ross, California Secretary of Food and Agriculture; former Deputy US Secretary of Agriculture
Jonathan Foley, Executive Director, California Academy of Sciences
Helene York, Director, Google Global Accounts at Bon Appétit Management Company

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on November 28, 2014.

Apr 24, 2015
T. Boone Pickens
59:00

Will the U.S. oil boom cripple OPEC? Could oil reach $100 a barrel again? What’s ahead for renewables? A conversation with the Oracle of Oil, Boone Pickens.

T. Boone Pickens, Chairman and CEO, BP Capital Management

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on March 24, 2015.

Apr 17, 2015
Climate Denial
59:00

Do you believe in climate denial? According to climate scientists, it’s all around us. How can scientists learn to communicate to a skeptical public?

Naomi Oreskes, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard; Co-Author, Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco to Global Warming (Bloomsbury Press, 2011)
Joe Romm, Founding Editor, Climate Progress; Author, Language Intelligence: Lessons on Persuasion from Jesus, Shakespeare, Lincoln, and Lady Gaga (CreateSpace, 2012)
Eugenie Scott, Chair, National Center for Science Education

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on December 16, 2014.

Apr 10, 2015
The Carbon Bubble
59:00