Timothy Keller Sermons Podcast by Gospel in Life

By Tim Keller

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 Oct 20, 2020
wisdom

aship
 May 27, 2020
confident joy in the love of Jesus! Loved hearing and seeing Jesus more clearly.


 Apr 5, 2020

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 Mar 5, 2020


 Mar 4, 2020

Description

Classic sermons by Tim Keller, Pastor Emeritus of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City and NY Times best-selling author of "The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism." For the latest sermons and additional resources, please visit www.GospelinLife.com

Episode Date
Praying Our Doubts
44:59

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on February 20, 2000. Series "Psalms - The Songs of Jesus". Scripture: Psalm 73:1-3; 12-26.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Nov 20, 2020
Worship
46:59

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on July 7, 2002. Series "Psalms; Disciplines of Grace". Scripture: Psalm 95:1-11.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Nov 18, 2020
Contemplation
44:47

In the book of Psalms, we’re shown various spiritual disciplines, which are practical skills we have to engage if we’re going to grow into the people God designed us to be.

Here in Psalm 27, we learn about adoration — personal individual adoration, contemplative adoration. We will look at Psalm 95 at a later date in which we’ll learn about corporate adoration. You cannot grow without both of them. They have to both be there. They’re both absolutely necessary.

We’re going to focus specifically on verse 4 which talks about the “one thing I ask, one thing I seek.” What is that one thing? We learn three things from this psalm about it: why it’s so important, what it is, and how to do it.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on June 2, 2002. Series "Psalms; Disciplines of Grace". Scripture: Psalm 27:1-14.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Nov 16, 2020
Honey from the Rock
44:01

Spiritual disciplines are the practical skills you have to be able to exercise in order to grow into the person God wants you to be. Psalm 81 shows us how to use various disciplines to handle the wilderness times of your life: the times of suffering, the times of pain, the times of difficulty.

Let’s look at four things that we can learn in this particular psalm: 1) life is a wilderness, 2) there’s a rock in the wilderness, 3) there’s honey in the rock, and 4) God has sent his son Jesus to pass the test in the wilderness (v.7) on our behalf. You yourself will become sweet, joyful, and beautiful through the work of Jesus Christ, who was tested in the wilderness and passed that test perfectly.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 19, 2002. Series "Psalms; Disciplines of Grace". Scripture: Psalm 81.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Nov 13, 2020
Confession
43:39

We’re studying spiritual disciplines in the book of Psalms. Today, we’re looking at another practical spiritual competency you must engage in if you’re going to grow into the person God wants you to be: confession. 

When you know you’ve messed up, when you know you’ve failed, when you know it’s your fault, how do you get up again after you’ve fallen in such a way that you have more joy and power than before? How do you get up not broken but get up in better shape than you were before? Let’s look in psalm to see our need for confession, the way of confession, and the secret basis of confession.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 12, 2002. Series "Psalms; Disciplines of Grace". Scripture: Psalm 32:1-11.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Nov 12, 2020
Praying Our Anger
42:58

We’re looking at spiritual disciplines that the psalms teach us, disciplines by which we grow into the people God wants us to be. These disciplines help us face forces that could spiritually derail us. One of the things that’s going to happen in life is serious mistreatment, where you become the object of mistreatment from other people and things in this world. What are you going to do with that mistreatment and the anger that comes from that?

This passage is going to tell us some very important things about how to handle mistreatment and how to deal with your anger over mistreatment. We’ll first look at three things the psalmist does with his anger: he owns his anger, he prays his anger, and he limits his anger. Then we’ll look at three practical things that we can do with our anger on this side of the cross.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 28, 2002. Series "Psalms; Disciplines of Grace". Scripture: Psalm 137:1-9.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Nov 10, 2020
Finding God
47:06

When it comes to physical growth and health, you have two kinds of practices or disciplines. You have trainers and you have doctors. Through nutrition and exercise, trainers help you get further than you were. They help you make progress physically. But when you get sick or maybe injure yourself, you need a doctor to get you back on track. You need trainers to get you forward from where you were; you need doctors to get you back to where you were physically.

We need the same things spiritually. There are spiritual disciplines that are more like training – disciplines by which you grow into the person God has meant you to be, such as meditation and prayer. But there are other spiritual disciplines that are more defensive. That is, they’re ways of treating problems and difficulties. This is what we find in Psalm 42-43. We learn about a specific condition to which we are susceptible and then we’re given a set of cures for this condition. Becoming skilled at dealing with this condition is absolutely critical if you’re going to make spiritual progress.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 21, 2002. Series "Psalms; Disciplines of Grace". Scripture: Psalm 42:1-43:5.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Nov 06, 2020
The Liberty of Obedience
45:09

In Philippians 2:12 Saint Paul says, “Work out your salvation in awe and wonder.” Notice he didn’t say, “Work for your salvation.” He said, “Work out your salvation.” You can only work out something you already have. Whatever salvation is, the spiritual gift of grace is not something you just clutch or hold on to, but it’s something you have to work out into every part of your life. You have to work it out into your identity, into your psychology, your sociology, your relationships, your approach to the world, into everything. That’s how we change. That’s how we become new. 

This change is done through disciplines of grace. The discipline that we’re looking at today in Psalm 119 is scriptural application: how Scripture leads us into obeying God’s word. We don’t get changed and we won’t obey God, unless we’re willing to come in under the authority of God. Let’s look at these two things in this psalm: 1) what’s wrong with trying to be your own ultimate spiritual authority and 2) how you can put yourself under God’s authority in a way that’s transforming and not stifling.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 14, 2002. Series "Psalms; Disciplines of Grace". Scripture: Psalm 119:32-49.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Nov 04, 2020
Meditation
41:27

We’re going to look at the processes by which a supernaturally changed heart comes about – the disciplines of grace. Now what are the ways that this happens? Over the centuries, Christians have looked to the Psalms maybe more than any other place in the Bible to learn about these disciplines of grace and today, we’re starting with the first psalm.

So let’s ask ourselves what we learn from this passage about meditation, which is one of the disciplines of grace – it’s one of the ways in which we work out our salvation into every nook and cranny of our lives in awe and wonder (Phil 2:12). There are four things we’re going to learn about meditation from the passage: the promise of meditation, the principle, the practice, and the puzzle.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 7, 2002. Series "Psalms; Disciplines of Grace". Scripture: Psalm 1:1-6.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Nov 03, 2020
The Parable of the Seed; On Hidden Power
34:10

When Christianity is ever covered in the newspaper or on TV, Christianity is typically discussed and seen as a cultural or intellectual position. So people tend to talk about Christianity something like this: “Well, you know, there are various positions, there are various points of view on the nature of God and the nature of the soul, morality and ethics and the meaning and purpose of life. There are these various positions, and the Christian position is one of them.” They try it on the way somebody tries on a dress, looking to see whether it brings out your best parts and hides your worst parts. 

It is possible to adopt Christianity only in word. That means to say, “I accept the position. I accept the point of view. I accept the ideals. I accept the beliefs.” You can do this and yet not have received it as it really is as a power. The kingdom of God is not in word, but in power (1 Corinthians 4:20). 

Now see, Jesus, without using the word, is saying the same thing here in this parable. He is saying Christianity is a ruling power. It’s not just a set of ideals, such as forgiveness or God’s love. It’s much more than that – it’s a power. Let’s consider two things about this power: Christianity is the power of new life and it is the power of growth.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on August 21, 1994. Series "The Parables of Jesus (1994)". Scripture: Luke 13:18-21.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 30, 2020
The Parable of the Beggar; On Hell
42:39

We’re looking at the subject of hell, one of the most unpopular classic doctrines of orthodox Christianity. I’m asking you to consider it today for two reasons: 1) I submit to you that unless you understand, unless you can reflect on, unless you can agree with the Christian doctrine of hell, you have no idea of how much love God has shown us; and 2) Jesus, the one who teaches us the most about God’s love, is the one who teaches us this doctrine of hell. Jesus, the Lord of Love, the one who knew the most about love, teaches us the most about hell. 

Jesus intertwined the love of God and hell so much that you really can’t reject just one and accept the other. They have to be taken together. Let’s take a look at what Jesus teaches in this story of two men. If we want to understand hell, we have to see what he says about 1) the two men in this life and 2) the two men in the next life and 3) the two men in our life.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on July 17, 1994. Series "The Parables of Jesus (1994)". Scripture: Luke 16:19-31.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 28, 2020
The Parable of the Tree; On Repentance
35:34

In this parable, Jesus is teaching about repentance. Now there are a lot of different opinions about repentance. For example, the famous poet Lord Byron said, “… the weak alone repent!” Yet Shakespeare  said in one of his characters, “I’ll repent, and that suddenly … I shall be out of heart shortly, and then I shall have no strength to repent.” Do you see? The one poet says, “It takes weakness to repent,” whereas Shakespeare sees it as taking strength to repent. He sees it as being an achievement.

Now who is right? Is repentance a sign of strength or is it a sign of weakness? Shakespeare is much more profound at this point, and he’s much closer to what Jesus Christ says. Jesus says repentance is the key to everything. Jesus says repentance is the way in which we should process everything that comes to us — it is the grid through which everything should pass. He tells us 1) we need it, 2) how to do it, and 3) how he brings it about in us.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on July 10, 1994. Series "The Parables of Jesus (1994)". Scripture: Luke 13:1-9.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 26, 2020
Second Lost Son (and the Dance of God)
45:22

We’re studying the parable of the prodigal son. We read that the younger brother comes to the father and says, “Give me my slice of the inheritance.” He says basically, “Even though you’re not dead, I want your things, but I don’t want you. I don’t want you involved with my life. Give them to me. I’m leaving.”

You have to understand in that culture this was an absolute outrage. He had brought tremendous humiliation on the family. He essentially destroyed the family estate by insisting it be liquidated and then he goes off and squanders it. This is immense, and yet when he returns, we see the father he betrayed, the father he humiliated, welcomes him with open arms and a kiss.

What we’re going to see is that this string of parables is not ultimately about an assurance to bad and immoral and messed-up people, but it is an in-your-teeth warning to good people. In this entire chapter Jesus Christ is saying nothing comes between you and God like morality and goodness and decency and respectability. How can this be? To answer this, let’s consider two things about the elder brother: 1) The elder brother is lost; and 2) he is more lost than the younger brother.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 25, 1998. Series "The Prodigal Son and the Elder Brother". Scripture: Luke 15:20-32.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 23, 2020
First Lost Son (and the Kiss of God)
44:57

The purpose of the prodigal son was to blow out the existing paradigms, the existing categories, human beings had for their understanding of their relationship with God. Some people have what you might call a moralistic view of life. The moralistic view of life says, “The problem with the world is not me; it’s them, those immoral types.” Then you have another kind of person. The other kind of worldview is what we could call a relativistic view of life. The relativistic people are the ones who say, “The problem with the world isn’t me; it’s them, those condemning types.” Generally, the relativistic types, the younger brother types, tend to move. They tend to go away from their hometown, while the moralistic types tend to stay where they were raised and they live very “good” lives. 

Jesus says, “Look at these two brothers. Look carefully. They are both lost. They are both alienated from the father’s heart.” In both cases, they will not come in and the father has to come out to bring them in. Jesus Christ lays bare the flaws of both of these paradigms. Jesus is talking about an experience of God – the kiss of the Father, the love of the Father. Let’s look at the three things have to happen: You have to come to your senses; You need a love that’s prior to your repentance; You need an elder brother who will foot your bill.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 18, 1998. Series "The Prodigal Son and the Elder Brother". Scripture: Luke 15:11-24.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 21, 2020
Lost Treasure (and the Search of God)
42:34

Now Jesus seems to be continually arguing when we read the accounts of his life in the Bible. Why does he do so? Because Jesus would speak to people, but when people listened to him, they would take his words, they would take the sayings, and they would pour them into their own categories. They would listen to him, in a sense, through their own categories — their own biases, assumptions, and predetermined beliefs. Of course, that meant they weren’t really listening to Jesus at all.

What Jesus is saying continually is “I come in to blast out all of your foundational assumptions. I demand to be the thing through which you see everything. I’m here to open up new vistas, new realms of knowledge. I’m here to explode your paradigms.” First we’re going to look at what those foundational assumptions are — the grid that people believed to be true, the old set of assumptions, the prevalent and pervasive understanding of religion. And then we’re going to discuss the new paradigm, the new worldview that Jesus brings to the world.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 11, 1998. Series "The Prodigal Son and the Elder Brother". Scripture: Luke 15:1-12.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 19, 2020
The True Older Brother
33:44

In the very beginning of Luke chapter 15, Jesus speaks to religious leaders — teachers of the law — who look at Jesus fraternizing with “sinners,” and they say to him basically, “Why are you hanging out with all these lost people?” The people who are spiritually lost — meaning far from God, away from home, alienated from God. Why is Jesus fraternizing with them?

In response, Jesus gives three parables, and they’re all about lostness. The third parable is this one, the parable of the prodigal son – the most amazing, shocking, category-busting message of Jesus about what it means to be spiritually lost. Jesus is basically trying to get across a new idea, a better idea, than the Pharisees had of what it means to be spiritually lost. 

Let’s look at this new category of spiritual lostness that Jesus introduces: 1) what it is; 2)  how you can judge whether you’re in the category yourself (what the signs are of that condition); 3) what do you do with it if that’s you, and 4) what are some of the implications for our church.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on November 9, 2008. Series "The Fellowship of Grace". Scripture: Luke 15:17-32.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 16, 2020
We Had to Celebrate
36:56

The twentieth century philosopher Martin Heidegger believed all human beings were characterized by unheimlichkeit, which means homesickness. It means to be alienated, to feel that we’re not really home in this world, to feel that we are in exile, that we’re in a world that’s profoundly at variance with our deepest desires. Why would that be? What are we going to do about that? Those profound questions are all addressed and actually answered by this wonderful parable in Luke 15. 

We’re going to see how Jesus so brilliantly ties this story in with one of the main themes of the entire Bible, which is exile and homecoming. Let’s take a look at how it does that under three headings: the human condition, the divine solution for it, and the new Communion that is the result.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on November 2, 2008. Series "The Fellowship of Grace". Scripture: Luke 15:17-32, Isaiah 25, Matthew 19.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 14, 2020
And Kissed Him
35:14

The one thing everybody knows when you read the parable of the prodigal son is it’s about forgiveness. The parable is a beautiful picture of a father that forgives his son and welcomes him home. 

Let’s take a look first at what it teaches us about forgiveness and then ask the question … What kind of community would we be if we took the teaching about forgiveness seriously? Consider these four headings: forgiveness is assertive, it’s sacrificial, it’s powered from inside, and it leads to a resurrection.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 26, 2008. Series "The Fellowship of Grace". Scripture: Luke 15:11-24, Matthew 5, Matthew 18, John 1.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 12, 2020
To Be Called Your Son
35:16

This great parable of the prodigal son teaches us many insights as to how the grace of God affects our relationships with each other, how it creates a unique community, a unique human society. Today we’re focusing on the theme of sonship. What did sonship mean in ancient culture? What does sonship mean in the Bible? We have to understand this if we’re going to grasp not only the narrative in the text but some of the greatest information we can get about what God has given to us through Jesus. Let’s take a look at these four things: the character of sonship, the practice of sonship, the community that results from sonship, and the accomplishment of sonship.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 19, 2008. Series "The Fellowship of Grace". Scripture: Luke 15:21-24, Galatians 3-4, Revelation 21.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 09, 2020
He Came to Himself
38:49

We’re looking at the parables of Luke 15. Of course, the biggest, longest, and most famous of them is the parable of the prodigal son. We see how the grace of God not only changes my individual life or your individual life, but how the grace of God creates a new kind of community, a new kind of human society, and how it creates new kinds of relationships.

This parable is essentially an image about the meltdown of a community and the restoration of it. The key theme we’re going to look at in this text is the theme of repentance — this is crucial for the restoration of community. Even though the word is not in this text, what we have when the younger son decides to go back to his father is an example of repentance. Let’s notice three things: the importance of repentance, the anatomy of it (what it’s actually made of), the key to doing it, and the kind of community that results from it.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 12, 2008. Series "The Fellowship of Grace". Scripture: Luke 15:11-20; Psalm 51; James 5:16.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 07, 2020
Give Me Mine
37:07

In Luke 15, we’re learning how the gospel creates a special kind of community, and how it creates a new kind of community. We’re looking at the last of the three parables: the parable of the lost son. It’s the most famous. And it’s the longest.

I’d like you to think about this story in a slightly different way than you probably want to do. I’d like you to consider the story is giving us a picture of an assault on community because of idolatry. And this is only overcome by agony. This is our first avenue into understanding this very rich and important text.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 5, 2008. Series "The Fellowship of Grace". Scripture: Luke 15:11-14.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 05, 2020
He Welcomes Sinners
35:57

We’re looking at the parables Jesus tells in Luke 15: the parable of the lost sheep, the parable of the lost coin, and the parable of the lost son. 

These are famous parables and they all show us how God’s grace can change someone’s life. The not only show us how God’s grace changes us individually but forms us into a unique kind of human community. With the grace of God, the gospel creates a completely unique and distinct kind of community — a community the world has never seen.

Let’s take a look at the sheep, the search itself, and the shepherd and see what each one of those teaches us about how God’s grace creates community.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on September 28, 2008. Series "The Fellowship of Grace". Scripture: Luke 15:1-10; Ephesians 2.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Oct 02, 2020
Let Them Give Up Their Violence
41:07

The book of Jonah is awfully relevant to our situation, especially today. Jonah has been asked to go to the capital of Assyria, the great rising, emerging imperial world power. It  was a violent place. It slaughtered helpless people. Jonah’s response to that is anger. He wants them punished. He is angry at them for their violence. Yet, in one of the great surprises in all of biblical narrative, there’s probably no more surprising turn than what we see in this book. 

God refuses to accept either the violence of Nineveh or the poisonous anger of Jonah. Let’s take a look and see what this text tells us about violence: first, the surprising sources of violence, secondly, the remarkable strategy we should take with violence, and then lastly, the ultimate solution for violence.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 7, 2001. Series "The Church in the City". Scripture: Jonah 3:1-4:5.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 30, 2020
Those Who Cling… Forfeit the Grace
47:01

We continue to see the relevance of Jonah’s situation and the story of Jonah to our own. Jonah was a prophet and he had a relationship with God. He was a preacher. He had faith. He had an understanding of who God was and who he was. He was moving along in his world just fine. Then his world changed, because God came to him and said, “Now I call you into a new ministry, a new situation. I want you to go to Nineveh.”

It was a violent and ruthless and imperialistic nation. It was, as it were, a clear and present danger to the very existence of Jonah’s country. He was filled with disdain, hatred, bias, and bigotry. To use the technical theological term, Jonah freaked out. 

What we see next is that Jonah has a spiritual breakthrough. He moves to a new level. Let’s look at four things we can learn from Jonah through this experience: the key to spiritual transformation, the method of spiritual transformation, the marks of spiritual transformation, and the continual need for it.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on September 30, 2001. Series "The Church in the City". Scripture: Jonah 2:1-3:3.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 28, 2020
They Greatly Feared
42:21

Jonah is a prophet. God has come to him and told him to go to Nineveh, the capital of Assyria, the implacable foe, the implacable enemy of his country. “Go to that city and preach against it. Warn them about God’s anger.” What Jonah does, of course, is he runs away. He refuses to do it. He goes in another direction.

Jonah’s on the run. Why? Because Jonah has fear in his heart. He’s afraid to go to Nineveh, because why put himself in the very midst of his enemies? 

We’re going to see what the Bible says about fear by noticing three features of the story: the stormy sea, the religious sailors, and the willing substitute. The stormy sea is who we are. The religious sailors show us the wrong thing to do about it. And the willing substitute is what to do about it.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on September 23, 2001. Series "The Church in the City". Scripture: Jonah 1:4-17.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 25, 2020
Running from God
46:02

The book of Jonah is really one of the best possible places to get an overview of what the Christian message is about. This passage, this text, the book, is about sin. But it doesn’t actually ever use the word sin. Not only does it profoundly map out the real nature of sin, it gives us an understanding of sin that goes deeper than what traditionally you’d think the definition of sin is. It also deconstructs the very danger contemporary people are so afraid of. It shows you not only a concept of sin, but it gives you a concept of sin you can’t use to oppress people once you’ve grabbed it. You can’t use it that way.

It’s one thing to believe in sin. It’s another thing to understand it and understand your own heart. We’re going to take a look at four features in the narrative, and each one is going to tell us something about sin. The four features we see are in verse 1. We see the coming word. “The word of the LORD came …” In verse 3, we see the running man. In verse 5, we see the deathly sleep. And lastly, we see the stormy hope.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on September 9, 2001. Series "The Church in the City". Scripture: Jonah 1:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 23, 2020
God's Love and Ours
37:39

Jonah was called to go to Nineveh to preach, and after a lot of detours, he did. When he got there and began to preach, we’re told that Nineveh, by and large, the populace turned from its violence and its evil ways. Now this is a marvelous thing and we would expect great joy in Jonah’s heart. But surprise, in 4:1, we read, “But Jonah was greatly displeased and became angry.” Why is that? The bottom line is Jonah can’t figure out God’s love.

Jonah, like everybody, believes in love in general, but when it comes right down to it has a fatally inadequate understanding of how love actually operates, and in particular, how God’s love actually operates. In the same way, many, maybe most, of our own struggles and collapses (just like Jonah here) are due to our own inadequate understanding of how God’s love really, really operates.

Let’s look at two things that God is trying to get across to Jonah. First, God’s love is refining fire. It is life-purifying. Secondly, God’s love is a seeking fire, a seeking power, a seeking love.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on September 16, 1990. Series "Jonah". Scripture: Jonah 4:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 21, 2020
Angry Enough to Die
37:56

Jonah went into a big city like New York — Nineveh was proportionally bigger — and he saw a massive change. He saw repentance that was culturally transforming. The people turned from their violence and evil ways. In response to this amazing thing, we’re told, “But Jonah was greatly displeased and became angry.” What’s going on here?

How can we explain Jonah’s mood swings, his tremendous emotional instability, able to praise God in chapter 2 and a few days later saying, “I am angry enough to die?”The answer is a divided heart. Jonah believed in and served the true God, but he also believed and served a rival god. As a result, his heart was divided between worshipping two different things. 

Hearts divided between more than one god create that kind of instability we see in Jonah. They create the kind of misery and drivenness of Jonah. And what we see is that it could be true of us as well. Now let’s just ask two questions of the passage: 1) What’s a divided heart? And 2) how can we heal a divided heart?

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on September 9, 1990. Series "Jonah". Scripture: Jonah 4:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 18, 2020
Abounding in Love
39:57

The last chapter of Jonah is a surprise chapter. It’s the most surprising ending of any of the books of the Bible. If you gave this whole chapter a title, you might call it “The Incredible Collapse of Jonah.” Why would a preacher get exceedingly angry when, as a response to his preaching, he’s actually turned a culture away from violence, oppression, and wickedness to the living God?

The incredible collapse of Jonah is because of a misunderstanding of God’s love.There are several lessons we can learn, but one is that God’s love is a patient love. Fruitful Christians like Jonah can fall back into old patterns of sin and self-deception but  only the patient love of God stands between them and oblivion. God’s patient love is such that he will always bring his children back.

Why is God’s patient love not more operative and powerful in our lives? How can God’s patient love be more powerful and operative in our lives? Let’s look at four things we can do: 1. Examine your heart; 2. Confess sin; 3. Make sure you realize God’s patient love is the thing that will keep you out of despair; and 4. Seek reality.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on September 2, 1990. Series "Jonah". Scripture: Jonah 4:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 16, 2020
The Secret Siege of Nineveh
35:45

Nineveh, which is the capital of Assyria, was the greatest city the world had yet seen. It was an impregnable fortress. Military might, economic might, cultural might …Nobody in their right mind would even think of besieging the city, let alone trying to capture the city, because you couldn’t even get an army around it. Who had an army that could stretch around the circumference of this city? But the foolishness of God is wiser than the wisdom of men, and God decides, not just to besiege the city, but to sack it with an army of one.

God did it by taking one person (one man, in this case) and turning that one man into a city-changer, into a world-changer. Then, by doing so, he was able to sack the greatest city in the history of the world up to that time. How did God make Jonah an Army of one? There are four things that we learn: God’s persistent grace makes you an army of one; God’s calling makes you an army of one, God’s strategy, and God’s power.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on August 26, 1990. Series "Jonah". Scripture: Jonah 3.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 14, 2020
Your Own Grace
38:08

We’ve seen that Jonah was called to preach in the great city of Nineveh, he refused and fled from God, God sent a storm to reclaim him, and the storm made things such that Jonah was thrown over the side of the boat into the ocean. There, he was swallowed by a great fish. The result is, in the belly of the deep, Jonah prays a prayer of faith, and he grasps the grace of God.

We’re going to look, not so much at the subject or topic of the prayer, but the phenomenon of the prayer itself. How did Jonah, who was in this condition of utter despair, of cowering fear, and of rebellion … How did he come from that position to a posture of triumphant faith by the end of the prayer? The answer is that faith rose up and it brought with it Jonah’s heart. We’ll see his faith that he exercised was done in three stages. First, he calls, then he remembers, and finally he commits.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on August 19, 1990. Series "Jonah". Scripture: Jonah 2:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 11, 2020
Faith Rising
43:11

The plot line of Jonah goes like this. Chapter 1: God says to Jonah, “Go and preach to Nineveh, the greatest city in the world.” Chapter 2: Jonah refuses and flees on a boat. Chapter 3: God sends a great storm on the ocean to reclaim Jonah. Chapter 4: Jonah is thrown into the sea and swallowed by a fish.

The point of all of this is right here in this chapter, almost exactly in the very center of the book. The point is about God’s grace. This book says a religious professional, a preacher, and even more than that, a prophet who received direct revelation from God can be deeply and profoundly in the dark about God’s grace. Jonah’s deepest fears, his racial prejudice, and his lack of endurance are all tied to his blindness to the reality of grace. Let’s look at three questions that this passage answers for us: 1. What is the grace of God? 2. How do you receive the grace of God? 3. How do you know you have received the grace of God in your life?

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on August 12, 1990. Series "Jonah". Scripture: Jonah 2:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 09, 2020
The Church Before the Watching World
42:41

Jonah is called by God to go to Nineveh, the greatest city in the world, and warn the city about impending disaster and preach there. Jonah refuses, heads in the other direction, and gets on a boat. God sends a storm to hunt him down, endangering the lives of everyone on the ship. Jonah, recognizing this, offers to be thrown into the ocean so the lives of the other sailors will not be forfeit.

We’re going to pause and look at the sub-plot here: Jonah and his relationship and impact on the sailors and their impact on him. God uses the sailors to teach Jonah something about himself and the world. In doing so, let’s just take a look and see how God will teach us something about ourselves and how we are supposed to regard the world.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on August 5, 1990. Series "Jonah". Scripture: Jonah 1:4-16; Philippians 2.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 07, 2020
Love Beneath the Waves
39:34

We’re looking at the Book of Jonah and we’ve seen that one subject is sin and grace. Even though there are many places in the Bible that talk about those topics very theologically, the great thing about the book of Jonah is it presents these concretely. Sin is running away from God, and grace is God chasing us down, hunting us down in love, and intercepting our self-destructive behavior. 

We’ve learned that Jonah ran from God – he literally decided to get as far away from God as he possibly could. Then God sent a storm, and so the plot thickens. This chapter is about the storm God sent and about Jonah’s response to the storm. 

Until you see you are not competent to run your life, you are not competent to run your life. This is an intervention of God. Let’s look to see how God intervenes and uses the storm as a way of teaching Jonah about himself and about sin and grace.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on July 29, 1990. Series "Jonah". Scripture: Jonah 1:1-17.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 04, 2020
Runaway Believer
40:35

The book of Jonah is a very simple story. It’s a book about a man running away from God and about God pursuing him, and as a result of that, this book is one of the very most concrete ways to learn what the Bible means by sin and grace. 

Almost everybody is familiar with the words sin and grace, but what they actually mean is another thing. Essentially (as concretely as you can put it), sin is running away from God and grace is God’s effort to pursue and to intercept self-destructive behavior. That’s it. Sin and grace. Running and chasing. 

In this passage, we’re going to see, first of all, Jonah is called to do something. Secondly, Jonah runs away from it. Thirdly, we’ll see how God pursues him.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on July 22, 1990. Series "Jonah". Scripture: Jonah 1:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Sep 02, 2020
The Quality of Mercy: Stories of Justice and Reconciliation (An Open Forum)
34:41

We have all faced these questions at some point or another: How can you live with both justice and mercy in the world? Can mercy and justice be combined? Can forgiveness and justice be combined? I’m not sure that immediately grabs you as one of the great problems in your life or in the culture, but it is.

We have at least two problems, and I’m going to show you it’s because of a third. We have a problem of public justice. In public justice, when one group has really wronged another group, should there be forgiveness? How can there be forgiveness and justice? On the other hand, personally, if someone has wronged you, how can there be both forgiveness and at the same time justice? 

Let’s break this down, and let’s show there’s a problem of public justice, there’s a problem in the area of private justice, and it’s all because there’s a huge problem with perfect justice.

This talk was given by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on February 27, 2000 as part of the Redeemer Open Forum series. Open Forums were specifically designed for skeptics or those wrestling with the claims of Christianity.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 31, 2020
Creation Care and Justice
42:22

We’re looking at the book of Proverbs and the subject of wisdom. At the heart of what Proverbs says it means to live a wise life is caring for justice. “The righteous care about justice for the poor, but the wicked have no such concern.” This little word for caring is way too weak an English word to get across what’s actually being said here. The Hebrew word here is yada`, which is the most deep and intimate and experiential word in the Hebrew language for knowledge. It is knowledge so passionate and so intense and so intimate that it’s a synonym for sexuality when used in the book of Genesis. 

This proverb is saying, “You’re not wise unless you are living an intensely passionate life, committed to justice.” What does that mean? Let’s look at this under four headings: Why do we need justice? What is justice? Who does justice? And how can we be one of the ones who do justice?

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 16, 2005. Series "Proverbs: True Wisdom for Living". Scripture: Proverbs 3:18-20, 27-32; 11:10-11; 19:17; 29:7.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 28, 2020
Blessed are the Poor
43:01

I read a treatise by Jonathan Edwards on the Christian’s duty to the poor. I was really struck by something: one of the marks of the church (not just urban churches) is care and involvement with the poor. That’s how Jesus designed it. Edwards said, “Where have we any command in the Bible laid down in stronger terms, and in a more peremptory urgent manner, than the command of giving to the poor?” He is saying there is nothing clearer and stronger in the Bible than our duty for care and involvement with the poor — not just churches near poor areas, not just certain kinds; everybody.

The Sermon on the Mount — Jesus’ famous sermon on the principles of the kingdom — is clearly something he preached very often. We read, “Blessed are the poor; woe to the rich. Blessed are the empty; woe to the fool.” There’s no way to spiritualize this away. There’s no way to allegorize it away. There’s no way to “metaphorize” it away.

The Bible tells us the gospel, if you get it, does three things to you with regard to the poor. The gospel is an agent in us knowing the poor, becoming the poor, and loving the poor. Knowing, becoming, and loving. The gospel does them all.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 5, 1998. Series "The Church - How to Believe Despite Christians". Scripture: Luke 6:20-26.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 26, 2020
The Tenth Commandment
36:04

We’ve been looking at the Ten Commandments. We’ve said the Ten Commandments are without doubt the single most influential set of ethical directives in the history of the world. We now come to the tenth commandment, and it is perhaps the key, in some ways, to understanding all the rest.

This commandment expresses one of the most important principles to believing and practicing the Christian life that I know of. This theme is something that is part and parcel of what we talk about at Redeemer a lot. When we take a look at this text, notice verse 21: “You shall not covet …” If we meditate on it, we’ll see three things: what we need, why we need it, and how to get it.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on August 19, 2007. Series "Deuteronomy - Doing Justice, Preaching Grace". Scripture: Deuteronomy 5:1-6, 21.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 24, 2020
False Testimony
32:06

We’re looking at the Ten Commandments, and today we’re getting to the ninth commandment. I always tend to hear all the commandments in Cecil B. DeMille tones. “Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor.” I don’t know if you remember it. There was sort of a little pillar of fire, and these little comments were coming out of it into the stone tablets in the Cecil B. DeMille movie, The Ten Commandments.

In spite of how famous these Ten Commandments are — by far, the most influential, ethical set of directions in the history of the world — most of us don’t know exactly what each commandment requires, and even fewer of us know how to get the power to be able to actually and practically live as the commandments require.

We’re going to take a look here at the ninth commandment, “Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour.” As we look at what the text tells us, we’ll see three things. We learn what people need, why they need it so much, and how you can become the kind of person that gives it to them.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on August 19, 2007. Series "Deuteronomy - Doing Justice, Preaching Grace". Scripture: Deuteronomy 5:1-6, 20.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 21, 2020
Not by Bread Alone
37:38

We’re looking at the book of Deuteronomy, which we have said is a series of sermons preached by Moses just before he died. The subject is: “Having experienced the salvation and grace of God, how should we then live? How should that concretely affect and shape the way we live?” It’s a very practical book, and no passage is more practical than today’s, because here we have some insights about how you handle suffering and pain and grief and difficulty. There’s nothing more practical than that.

We learn three things from the text. First, we can’t survive in the wilderness. Secondly, we can’t survive without the wilderness. Thirdly, therefore, we only have one hope.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on June 17, 2007. Series "Deuteronomy - Doing Justice, Preaching Grace". Scripture: Deuteronomy 8:1-16.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 19, 2020
Grace – therefore, Holy
42:15

In Deuteronomy 7, we come upon a topic that is a very controversial topic and a difficult one for, I think, everybody actually. This word that comes up a couple of times in the first couple of verses, where it says, “The Lord your God chose you out of all the peoples on the face of the earth to be his people …” He chose you. Both the Old Testament and the New Testament say that if you believe, you believe because God has chosen you. He came to you, and he opened your heart, and that’s the reason you believe.

People struggle mightily with this whole idea, and so we’re going to see how this text helps us — it text helps us struggle very smartly and wisely. It’s going to tell us three things. Being chosen by grace produces a deep humility and a radiant community, because it creates, at bottom, an absolute security. Let’s take a look at the first point.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on June 10, 2007. Series "Deuteronomy - Doing Justice, Preaching Grace". Scripture: Deuteronomy 7:6-11.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 17, 2020
Knowing God
35:53

We’re looking at the book of Proverbs every week, and that means we’re looking at the subject of wisdom every week. Wisdom, while not being less, is more than being moral and good. Wisdom is knowing what the right thing to do is in the vast majority of life situations in which the moral rules don’t apply, that they don’t address.

Today we come to a theme that runs all through Proverbs and, in fact, all through the whole Bible. That is, that the beginning of wisdom is the fear of the Lord. There’s a place in Job where God actually shows how important the term is when he says, “Have you considered my servant Job? There is none like him in all the earth; a man who fears God and shuns evil.” It’s obvious the term fear of the Lord is something that is a summary of everything we’re supposed to do and be.

So why is it so important and what in the world is it? Today we’re going to see how the fear of the Lord is 1. beginning with God, 2. knowing God, 3. trusting God, and 4. discovering the grace of God.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on June 3, 2007. Series "Deuteronomy - Doing Justice, Preaching Grace". Scripture: Deuteronomy 6:4-23.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 14, 2020
God's Law
36:03

The book of Deuteronomy is a series of sermons Moses preached just before he died. In it, he lays out, in the most comprehensive and practical way, how you should live if you experience the grace and salvation of God. If you experience God, how should that actually affect the way in which you live your life? It’s a very, very practical book and an incredibly comprehensive book.

Today, we get to the Ten Commandments. This is one of the most influential texts in the entire history of the world. Let’s take a look and see what we’re taught about it. It’s awfully basic, but it’s awfully basic because it’s awfully important. There are four things we’re going to learn here about God’s Law: 1. the origin of the Law; 2. the substance of the Law; 3. the problem of the Law, and 4. the solution to that problem.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 27, 2007. Series "Deuteronomy - Doing Justice, Preaching Grace". Scripture: Deuteronomy 5:6-21, 24-29; James 2:10; Luke 19:41-42; 2 Corinthians 5:21.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 13, 2020
The Fire of God
39:33

We’re looking at the book of Deuteronomy, and there’s probably no single book of the Bible that is more comprehensive in showing us how we should live if we’ve actually met God. 

The primary concept of the book of Deuteronomy is the concept of covenant. The Bible says you can only relate to God covenantally. Right away, we say, “What’s a covenant? Is it a contract?” We’re going to see our relationship with God is far more personal and intimate than a contractual relationship. At the very same time, far more binding and solemn and accountable than a friendship. It’s covenantal.

In this chapter there are three awesome terms — awesome images — Moses introduces for us to understand what it means to have a covenantal relationship with God. Those three terms are jealousy, idolatry, and the fire of God.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 20, 2007. Series "Deuteronomy - Doing Justice, Preaching Grace". Scripture: Deuteronomy 4:15-24; 33-36.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 10, 2020
The Grace of Law
35:53

Deuteronomy is a series of sermons by Moses just as he was about to die, giving the people of Israel a comprehensive look at, now that they had received God’s grace, how they should live. It begins with this story about the children of Israel who had come to the border of Canaan actually 40 years before Moses is preaching these sermons. Because of the report of the spies about the size of the inhabitants and about the danger of going in, they had failed God. They had failed to obey him and listen to him and turned away. It was a great disaster.

This passage teaches us some basic things about who we are and who God is. Here’s what we learn from this passage: 1. what’s wrong with the human heart, 2. two forms wrongness can take, and 3. God’s solution for it.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 13, 2007. Series "Deuteronomy - Doing Justice, Preaching Grace". Scripture: Deuteronomy 1:26-28, 34-36, 41-46.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 07, 2020
Doing Justice and Mercy
43:48

Each week we're taking a look at a piece of the vision of Redeemer and this is it: As a church of Jesus Christ, Redeemer exists to help build a great city for all people through a movement of the gospel that brings personal conversion, community formation, social justice and cultural renewal to New York City and through it, the world.Today, we're looking at social justice.

We're doing it this week, partly because it's Palm Sunday, which is the Sunday that Jesus Christ was declared the King and rode into Jerusalem. In the Bible, one of the primary things that kings did was to administer Justice. And this morning we're going to  look at how Jesus Christ fulfills justice and how he does justice in the world. 

First, we're gonna learn about the startling importance of justice. Secondly, the fulsome nature of justice, and thirdly, how we get the ability to do justice in the world.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on March 20, 2016. Series "Where We are Going: The City and the Missions". Scripture: Isaiah 58:1-14.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 05, 2020
A Community of Justice (Part 2)
45:42

We’re looking at the book of James, which is a book that asks and answers this question: If you really believed the gospel of Jesus, if you really believed what Jesus said he came to do, what would that mean for the way in which you live your life every day? What does that look like on the ground? What practically does that look like?

Every single week, we’re looking at another part of the book of James, in which he’s showing us how belief in the gospel affects the way we actually live day to day. James is contrasting God’s wisdom with the world’s wisdom or with what the Bible calls foolishness. 

Let’s look at it under four headings. What he’s telling us here is about 1. a problem we have, 2. the reasons it is a problem, 3. the thing that can make the problem worse, and 4. the thing that can make the problem better or solve it.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 17, 2010. Series "The Gospel in Community: The Book of James". Scripture: James 4:13-5:6.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Aug 03, 2020
A Community of Justice (Part 1)
36:59

The book of James is a practical book. James, unlike Paul, doesn’t so much break the gospel apart to show you what it is; James assumes the gospel and shows you what your life will look like if you believe it. 

Today, we’re going to see 1. what kind of community you ought to be, 2. why you ought to be it, and 3. how we can become that kind of community.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on December 6, 2009. Series "The Gospel in Community: The Book of James". Scripture: James 2:1-17.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 31, 2020
Praying the Gospel
40:47

The book of Psalms is the preeminent place to see how to deal with your emotions and the conditions of the heart. Psalms, in a certain sense, is almost God’s counseling case book — not his counseling textbook, but his case book. Not a place where you have lots of principles laid out, but lots of actual cases of people struggling with anger and loneliness and doubt and emptiness and grief and fear and anxiety and shame and guilt, every condition the human heart struggles with and wrestles with.

Yet, in the Psalms, you occasionally have a psalm like this — it shows us how to handle life in general. David lays out the basic key to deal with all conditions, all circumstances of life, any situation. It’s, in a way, the basic way to handle the problems of life. That’s what this psalm is about.

We’re going to learn here 1.why we need to remember, 2. where we need to remember, 3. what we need to remember, and 4. how we need to remember. This is the key to handling life.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on March 19, 2000. Series "Psalms - The Songs of Jesus". Scripture: Psalm 103:1-22.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 29, 2020
Praying Our Guilt
45:24

The Psalms give us a unique way to deal with our emotions and feelings. It’s unique because, on the one hand, in religious circles, amongst religious people, there is a fear of admitting and facing our feelings. In secular circles, there’s the opposite mistake, which is there’s a tendency to simply see expression of feelings and discovery of feelings as a good in itself, and once you’ve found what those feelings are, that’s who you really are. The Psalms say it is very bad and dangerous to either deny your feelings or vent your feelings — to either stuff your feelings or bow down to your feelings.

The Psalms tell us we’re supposed to pray our feelings. Not just pray about our feelings, but to actually take them before God and pour them out in a pre-reflective way and process them in the presence of God, in the light of who he is and who we are, in the light of the realities that come to us, that bear down on us, as we’re in his presence. 

Today we look at a psalm about guilt and shame — having your heart broken under a sense of failure, liability, and general unworthiness. In these eight verses, we actually see guilt and shame likened to 1. a hole, to something we’ve sunk down in, and 2. we’re shown a rope you throw a person, that’s available for a person who’s in that hole of guilt and shame, and 3. we see a little bit about the process of how you climb out with that rope.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on March 12, 2000. Series "Psalms - The Songs of Jesus". Scripture: Psalm 130:1-8.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 27, 2020
Praying Our Fears
42:41

The Psalms are deeply emotional prayers. If you’re a modern person, a modern New Yorker, religious or non-religious, you have a tendency to say, “Now David, we mustn’t be angry at our enemies. We must control ourselves.” But the Psalms are too real for that. The Psalms give us a unique approach to emotions.   

David is being deposed as king, and there’s an army after him to literally imprison and kill him. But David is not just simply being attacked physically; he’s being attacked psychologically and spiritually. His very identity is under attack and assault as well.

David is really at the bottom. So what’s he going to do about it? The four things he does, the four steps out of the pit, are all there in verses 3–8. I’ll tell you what they are, and then we’ll go through them: Follow your thread, relocate your glory, see the substitute, and remember the people.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on March 5, 2000. Series "Psalms - The Songs of Jesus". Scripture: Psalm 3:1-8; Genesis 15:1,8.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 24, 2020
Praying Our Tears
35:34

As you can see, these psalms are about weeping, suffering and grief. Religious people, by and large, want to deny the power and the depth of their feelings. On the other hand, secular people tend to see discovery and expression of your feelings almost as a good end in itself. To bow to your feelings or to stuff your feelings, to be over-awed by your feelings or under-aware of your feelings are both dangerous. 

The Psalms give us a gospel third way of dealing with your feelings. The Psalms do not say to deny or vent, but to pray your feelings. Pray your deepest feelings. Bring them before God and process them. There are three things these texts tell us. Expect tears, invest tears, and pray your tears.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on February 27, 2000. Series "Psalms - The Songs of Jesus". Scripture: Psalm 39:12-13, 126:1-6; 2 Corinthians 4:17; Psalm 16, Psalm 17.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 22, 2020
Praying Our Doubts
44:59

The Psalms are not so much about lofty, high doctrine as they are about how the human heart works, the deep recesses of the motives and emotions of the human heart. And what we’re now going to look at in Psalm 73 is doubt. 

Doubt always masquerades as more intellectual than it is, but doubt is a condition of the soul and the heart. Here’s a person filled with doubts, struggling with doubts about God and about faith. Let’s see what the condition is, what the cause of the condition is, and what the cure of the condition is.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on February 20, 2000. Series "Psalms - The Songs of Jesus". Scripture: Psalm 73:1-3; 12-26.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 20, 2020
David's Passion
35:30

We’re looking at the life of David, and this episode in 2 Samuel 6 is a strange one for modern readers. One of the very first things David does after he becomes king is he wants to bring the ark of the covenant to Jerusalem. To do so meant putting, in a sense, God’s worship in the very center of the national life and in the very center of David’s life. 

Two fascinating incidents happen first; one is the death of Uzzah, a man who simply tries to keep the ark from falling off the cart. David is frightened and angry, thinking, “This God is more holy than I thought.” Secondly, the ark is given to Obed-Edom, the Gittite, and there the ark actually doesn’t do anything but make them prosper, showing God is more gracious than he thought. 

Let’s notice three things when David brings the ark of the covenant into Jerusalem: David is a changed man. Secondly and thirdly, the first thing that changes him and the second thing that changes him.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 31, 2015. Series "David: The Man of Prayer". Scripture: 2 Samuel 6:1-23.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 17, 2020
David's Mercy
41:35

We’re going through the books of 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, which tell the story of King David’s life. Each week we look at a new episode, and each week the episode ties us into another major biblical theme. This week, this particular story talks to us and tells us quite a bit about what it means to love people who have wronged you.

What I’m going to do is kind of recount the story, and as we recount the story, we’re going to see what it tells us about loving a neighbor, loving an enemy or someone who has wronged you, loving a fool, and where you get the power to do so.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 24, 2015. Series "David: The Man of Prayer". Scripture: 1 Samuel 26:7-14, 21-25.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 15, 2020
David's Friend
32:28

We’re looking at the life of David, and the life of David is a little bit of a challenge for a preacher because we have more information in the Bible about the life of David than about any other figure. Therefore, the narrative arcs are longer in this part of the Bible than normal.

If you’re going to follow David’s relationship with Saul or David’s relationship with Jonathan, you have multiple texts, so we did something a little unusual today, and we gave you four texts. We’re going to show you how they tell us about the rightly famous friendship between Jonathan and David; and what these texts and what the Bible tell us about the importance of friendship.

Let’s take a look at what we learn from the relationship of David to Jonathan about the 1) absolute importance of friendship, the constituent elements of friendship — what it’s made of — and 3) the requisite power in order to be a friend and to have friends.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 17, 2015. Series "David: The Man of Prayer". Scripture: 1 Samuel 18:1-4; 19:4-7; 20:40-42; 23:15-18.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 13, 2020
Saul's Jealousy
33:51

We’re looking at the life of David, and it’s interesting how this ancient text every week yields so much insight about very current problems (you could even say perennial problems), and this week we get a portrait, a simple portrait of something that is a lot bigger problem than most of us think of it as being. Saul’s life is being destroyed by envy.

Envy. Over the years, I’ve had plenty of people come to me to talk about issues like anger and despondency, but almost never does somebody come to me and say, “I have a problem with envy.” I’ve had lots of people say, “You need to preach on this issue,” or “You need to preach on that issue. These are important issues.” Never, I want you to know, has anyone ever asked me to preach on envy.

Yet, Aristotle … Not just the Bible but all of the ancients understood envy is one of the deadly sins, one of the things that destroys people’s lives, one of the things that’s making the world such a miserable place, so let’s look at what this passage tells us about envy: what it is, what it does, and how we can escape it.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 10, 2015. Series "David: The Man of Prayer". Scripture: 1 Samuel 18:1-14.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 10, 2020
David's Courage
38:44

Of all the episodes in the life of David, his encounter with Goliath is the most famous, it’s the most dramatic, it’s the most often told, and it’s probably the one that deals with the most fundamental question of all … How do you deal with fear? How do you have the courage to face life?

The ordinary way this text is read to answer that question is kind of like this. Goliath represents your fears. Look at them. They’re intimidating, but David is your inspiring example to show you how to handle those fears, which is to go right at them. Banish the fears. Face your fears, and the bigger they are the harder they will fall.

I’m here to say that’s a shallow understanding, even a deceptive understanding of how to read the text, and it has a lot more in here to answer that question if we read it a little differently, so let’s, first of all, ask the question, “What is this telling us?” I think it’s going to give us two answers. It’s going to show us the problems of counterfeit courage, but it will also show us the way to true courage.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 3, 2015. Series "David: The Man of Prayer". Scripture: 1 Samuel 17:32-50.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 08, 2020
David’s Anointing
43:37

We’re looking at the life of David, and it impresses me how each week each time we look at a new episode we not only are getting ancient history, but we’re always getting some question addressed that has quite modern, contemporary … I should actually say perennial … relevance. For example, I think the question we’re going to be helped to answer today is … What do you really look like? Am I ugly? Am I attractive? What do I really look like? This passage helps us answer these questions.

There are a number of ways to read a passage, so let’s read this one while keeping that question in mind. Let’s notice what it teaches us about 1) the importance of true beauty, 2) the source of true beauty and 3) the secret of both detecting and developing true beauty.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 26, 2015. Series "David: The Man of Prayer". Scripture: 1 Samuel 16:1-13.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 06, 2020
Saul's Rejection
38:07

We’re looking at the life of David, and today we get to a text that actually gets us to address one of the most urgent and important questions you could ask: what’s wrong with the human race? The problem is we know how we should live, and we aren’t able to do it. Why do we do the terrible things we do when we basically know how we should live? One answer is in this passage from 1 Samuel. It’s not the only answer, but it’s an extremely important one. It’s a small but important subject I want to bring to your attention. To get at it, let’s ask these questions: How did Saul fail? Why did Saul fail? How can we escape the thing that destroyed him?

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 19, 2015. Series "David: The Man of Prayer". Scripture: 1 Samuel 15:10-23.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 03, 2020
Hannah's Prayer
39:46

We’re going to be looking at the life of David, who is not only the author of most of the Psalms but was a great man of prayer. First and second Samuel are often called the book of David. This story begins with a woman who radically changes her life through prayer. She’s a desperate woman. She’s culturally oppressed, but she takes control through prayer, so it’s very appropriate.

She’s obviously the forerunner of David and the mother of the forerunner of David. Let’s take a look at this very attractive person. Her name is Hannah.

We are first going to look at Hannah’s sorrow, which we’re given more insight to in the first few verses. Secondly, Hannah’s response to her sorrow. Lastly, in her great song, only of which a few verses we were able to read, we see a Savior who Hannah is looking forward to who actually enables her to respond to the sorrow in the way she does.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 12, 2015. Series "David: The Man of Prayer". Scripture: 1 Samuel 1:3-11, 18-20; 2:8-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/partner and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jul 01, 2020
What is Love?: An Open Forum
26:50

Whenever you really fall in love, you want to completely give yourself away. You want to just let all your defenses down. You want to be completely vulnerable. On the other hand, we also see love is continually letting us down because people are letting us down.

When you love someone, you’re loving a human being. That human being to whom you’re giving complete trust will tend to let you down. There’s something cosmic about love. There’s something, on the other hand, completely fickle about love.

Do you have a philosophy of life, an understanding of the world, that can account for all the various aspects of love, explain them and enjoy them? There is one model of love I’m going to call the conservative ideal. There’s another model I’m going to call the liberal ideal. Both of them don’t work. Then there’s another model of love which, I think, is the Christian model that pulls it all together.

This talk was given by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on November 19, 1995 as part of the Redeemer Open Forum series. Open Forums were specifically designed for skeptics or those wrestling with the claims of Christianity.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 29, 2020
Surprised by Joy: An Open Forum
39:38

The subject of this talk is one of those perennial human questions. Joy, happiness–what is it? How do you get it? In these gospel spirituals, we see the celebration of the oldest roots of the African American music, which said the solution to the joy problem is the message of the Christian gospel.

I would suggest to you that there are three themes in the music. The first is that there’s a joy vacuum that’s very deep in the human heart. Secondly, there are joy strategies every human being has. You have some way of trying to fill that joy vacuum. You might have this one or that one. You may change them, but there are joy strategies. And lastly, this music has a solution for the joy vacuum.

This talk was given by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 6, 2002 as part of the Redeemer Open Forum series. Open Forums were specifically designed for skeptics or those wrestling with the claims of Christianity.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 26, 2020
My Problem with Religion: An Open Forum
37:10

I’d like to look at two objections, two problems people have with God today. First of all, the problem of evil and suffering. How could a good and powerful God allow that? Secondly, the problem of the exclusiveness of religion. If you think you have the truth, if you think your religion is right, if you think you have the superior take on spirituality, doesn’t that lead to exclusion and oppression and abuse?

You say, “Well, you’re a minister, so obviously you don’t think those problems are very big.” No. I think that’s quite wrong. They have great weight, and I think we’re all in the same boat here. Whether you believe in God or you really don’t believe in God, you still have those problems.

The real question is are they insurmountable? Is there a way through them? I would like to at least give you a way through. Let me give you something to consider as a possible way through.

This talk was given by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on November 9, 2003 as part of the Redeemer Open Forum series. Open Forums were specifically designed for skeptics or those wrestling with the claims of Christianity.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 24, 2020
What Happened When Jesus Died?: An Open Forum
21:49

In some ways, the key prayer in Mozart’s requiem is in the “Rex Tremendae,” the king of terrible majesty. It says, “… who saves those who are being saved freely.” In spite of all the talk about judgment day, we get mercy.

Now on what basis do we get mercy? On what basis do we get rest, if we don’t deserve it? When modern people in Western society listen to something like Mozart’s Requiem, there are certain questions that come up right away.

First, did Jesus really die like that? Was he a sacrificial lamb? Was Jesus crucified on the cross? Did that really happen historically, or was that just made up? Second, why did Jesus have to die like that? What’s the whole idea? Why was it even necessary? Third, what difference does it make to us?

This talk was given by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 4, 2004 as part of the Redeemer Open Forum series. Open Forums were specifically designed for skeptics or those wrestling with the claims of Christianity.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 22, 2020
Who is this Jesus?: An Open Forum
43:42

What we’re going to do is look at the question–who is Jesus Christ?

The resurrection of Jesus Christ is both intellectually credible and existentially satisfying. I’ve come to see over the years that those are the two tests of any valid worldview, philosophy or religion. It has to be both rational, coherent, and it has to be true. It has to meet my needs. It has to connect with my experience.

Don’t come to Christianity because it’s relevant–though, it certainly is. Don’t come to Christianity because it’s exciting–though, absolutely, it is. Don’t come to Christianity because it’ll meet your needs–though, it certainly will. Come because it’s true. And because it’s true, it’ll meet your needs, it’s exciting, and it’s relevant.

This talk was given by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 1, 1994 as part of the Redeemer Open Forum series. Open Forums were specifically designed for skeptics or those wrestling with the claims of Christianity.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 19, 2020
A Reason for Living: An Open Forum
36:35

Miguel de Cervantes, Albert Camus, Aldous Huxley, Tolstoy, Voltaire, Shakespeare, Jesus Christ–they all know the average person is so busy in both work and play that you go years and years without asking yourself, “What is my reason for doing all this? What is my reason for life? What’s my whole life about?” Put another way: “When all is said and done, what will I have really accomplished?”

Do you want freedom? The great thinkers will say that if you want absolute freedom to live your life the way you want, you have to admit the utter meaninglessness of life. If you want complete freedom, you must face utter meaninglessness. That’s the first point.

The second point is nobody can live that way. To really believe life is meaningless gets you into convolutions that are emotional, psychological, logical, philosophical. You can’t even live that way, because life does have meaning. Let me argue that both freedom and meaning are found in Jesus Christ.

This talk was given by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on February 27, 1994 as part of the Redeemer Open Forum series. Open Forums were specifically designed for skeptics or those wrestling with the claims of Christianity.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 17, 2020
The Reason for God: An Open Forum
42:18

I want to talk about the reasoning behind belief in God–what the reasons for God and belief actually are. Why is the reason for God important? How does it work? What are the actual reasons for God?

This talk was given by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on March 2, 2008 as part of the Redeemer Open Forum series. Open Forums were specifically designed for skeptics or those wrestling with the claims of Christianity.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 15, 2020
Literalism: Isn’t the Bible historically unreliable and regressive?
41:05

Each week we’re choosing one of the things that most trouble people today about Christianity. The problem with Christianity we now come to centers around the Bible. Many people in a place like New York would say this: “There are many good things in the Bible, but you shouldn’t take every word of it literally. There are legends in there. Don’t insist on it being entirely trustworthy and completely authoritative in everything it says.”

What do we say to that? I’d like to argue (to the contrary, of course) that you should trust the Bible. You can and should trust the Bible in three ways: historically, culturally, and, most of all, personally.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on November 5, 2006. Series "The Trouble with Christianity: Why it's so Hard to Believe it". Scripture: Luke 1:1-4, 24:13-32; 1 Timothy 1:9-11, Deuteronomy 2:24-27.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 13, 2020
Hell: Isn’t the God of Christianity an angry Judge?
37:36

Every week, we’re taking one of the things that in our culture troubles people the most about Christianity. We’re now going to look at the Christian teaching that God is a judge and a judge who consigns people to hell.

Someone says, “How can you possibly reconcile the concept of judgment and hell with the idea of a loving God? They just don’t go together.” What do we say about that? I’d like to argue that understanding what the Bible says about hell is crucial for understanding your own heart, for living in peace in the world, and for knowing the love of God.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 22, 2006. Series "The Trouble with Christianity: Why it's so Hard to Believe it". Scripture: Luke 16:19-31; Romans 6.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 10, 2020
Injustice: Hasn’t Christianity been an instrument for oppression?
38:47

We’re in a series taking the things that people in our culture (especially in New York City) are troubled by with regard to Christianity. This time, the objection could be put like this. The Christian church has a long history of oppression, and people acting in the name of Jesus Christ have engaged in systemic, economic, and cultural oppression of various races and classes. Therefore, the beliefs of Christianity are not credible and we shouldn’t believe them.

What do we say to this? Here’s three things we can learn from the book of James that address the problem. First, the passage will teach us the biblical God actually chooses the poor and the oppressed. Secondly, anyone with a true spiritual connection to that God inevitably does the same. Thirdly, we will learn how we can make that connection.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 15, 2006. Series "The Trouble with Christianity: Why it's so Hard to Believe it". Scripture: James 2:1-17.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 08, 2020
Absolutism: Don’t we all have to find truth for ourselves?
41:52

We’re looking at the things that trouble people the most about Christianity. Now, we come to one that could be put like this: “Christians believe they have absolute truth. They have some things everyone should believe and everyone should do. But people who have absolute truth,” the objection goes, “undermine freedom. They tend to oppress people who are different than they are and impose their views on others. Everyone should be free to determine their own truth and what is right or wrong for them.”

What do we say to that? There are three things to say. Truth is a lot more important than you would think, freedom is a lot more complex than you would think, and Jesus is a lot more liberating than you think. Those principles are found in this passage. Let’s look at them.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 8, 2006. Series "The Trouble with Christianity: Why it's so Hard to Believe it". Scripture: Galatians 2:4-16.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 05, 2020
Suffering: If God is good, why is there so much evil in the world?
32:55

We’re looking at the problems people in our culture, and especially in New York City, have with Christianity. We’re now going to look at the one you could call the problem of evil and suffering. And it’s a very formidable one for Christian belief.

The problem goes something like this. If God allows evil and suffering to continue because he can’t stop it, then he might be good, but he’s not all-powerful. On the other hand, if God allows evil and suffering to continue because he could stop it and yet won’t stop it, then he might be all-powerful, but he’s not good. It’s a pretty formidable argument. What do we say to it?

Let’s first look at why getting rid of your belief in God in order to understand evil and suffering will not help. And then three ways, according to Peter, we can face suffering and evil in our lives. Peter says you have to look back to something, you have to look ahead to something, and you have to look into something to handle evil and suffering in this world.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 1, 2006. Series "The Trouble with Christianity: Why it's so Hard to Believe it". Scripture: 1 Peter 1:3-12.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 03, 2020
Exclusivity: How can there be just one true religion?
41:02

We’re beginning a series looking at the main objections, the main problems, people in our culture have with Christianity. The objection we’re looking at now can be summed up in one word: exclusivity. The problem is this: how can you possibly claim your religion is the only true religion, that you have the one truth?

Religion, generally speaking, has a very strong tendency to divide people and create strife amongst human beings. In fact, I would go so far as to say religion tends to create a slippery slope in the heart that moves all the way down to even oppression and violence. So what do we do about this? We have to do something.

I would suggest that right now, people are trying to address the divisiveness of religion in two ways. There are two main strategies people are taking, but I’d like to show you they won’t work. Lastly, I’d like to give you a strategy that I think will.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on September 24, 2006. Series "The Trouble with Christianity: Why it's so Hard to Believe it". Scripture: 1 John 4:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Jun 01, 2020
The Flesh and the Devil
36:48

This particular passage is about the devil. Here’s what we’ll learn: there is a devil, and the devil works through our own heart sin.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 15, 1994. Series "Splendor in the Furnace; 1 Peter, Part 2". Scripture: 1 Peter 5:5-11.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 29, 2020
How to Handle Suffering
43:15

Peter is very, very realistic about the troubles of life. Yet he gives us a secret here. He says it’s possible not just to survive suffering but to use suffering–not just to get through it, but to actually use it.

There are two things this passage tells us. First, what troubles, griefs, and losses really are–what their nature is. Secondly, how you should respond to them. As I think I’m going to show you, understanding their nature is 50 to 70 percent of responding. To understand what trials are, you’re already halfway home to responding to them in such a way that’s profitable and beneficial to you.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 8, 1994. Series "Splendor in the Furnace; 1 Peter, Part 2". Scripture: 1 Peter 4:12-19.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 27, 2020
Life in Christ’s Body
26:58

“The end is near. Therefore, be clear minded, sober, love one another, serve.” Let’s look at what this verse teaches in both its form and its content, because it’s very striking and very practical.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 24, 1994. Series "Splendor in the Furnace; 1 Peter, Part 2". Scripture: 1 Peter 4:7-11.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 25, 2020
Two Ways to Live
32:52

To the world, the ways in which Christians behave will not just look different; it will look crazy. Peter says that you will be looked upon as extremely strange, going against nature even, in many ways. As a result, you’re going to have lots of abuse heaped on you.

Inside the Christian faith, you can often see how obvious it is that we should live in certain ways. But outside of the Christian faith, the world has a whole different plausibility structure and set of assumptions. Therefore, the way Christians act looks absolutely berserk, absolutely bizarre, strange, and crazy.

But Peter says, “You live according to the will of God.” And the question immediately arises–how do you do that? How can you live a life like that in the face of not just a kind of abuse, but really, a war of plausibility structures?

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 17, 1994. Series "Splendor in the Furnace; 1 Peter, Part 2". Scripture: 1 Peter 4:1-6.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 22, 2020
Trusting God in Difficult Times - A Tale and an Idiot (Ecclesiastes 8)
09:18

Today we continue a special series of meditations by Tim Keller — "Trusting God in Difficult Times." This new series is meant to encourage you to trust God more deeply and to meditate on his word and what it promises, to give you strength and hope in difficult times. Today’s meditation is from Ecclesiastes 8 and includes a Q&A with Tim and Kathy Keller.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 21, 2020
Holiness; Overview
35:06

1 Peter is about how we can live in such a way that the trouble and pain and suffering that inevitably comes into our lives will not crush us or make us weaker things, but instead make us stronger–refine our character, turn us into great people. How does that happen? How can the sufferings of life actually become tools that hone you and polish you and refine you?

What we need is right here in verse 16: “Be ye holy; for I am holy.” That’s the heart of this passage. First of all, it teaches us God is holy. Secondly, it teaches us we can be holy. Thirdly, we can be holy because God is holy. No hope otherwise.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 17, 1993. Series "Splendor in the Furnace; 1 Peter, Part 1". Scripture: 1 Peter 1:13-21.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 20, 2020
Trusting God in Difficult Times - It All Ends in Praise (Psalm 150)
08:27

Today we continue a special series of meditations by Tim Keller — "Trusting God in Difficult Times." This new series is meant to encourage you to trust God more deeply and to meditate on his word and what it promises, to give you strength and hope in difficult times. Today’s meditation is from Psalm 150 and includes a Q&A with Tim and Kathy Keller.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 19, 2020
How to Handle Trouble
35:37

The theme of the whole book of 1 Peter is about how a Christian can face troubles and suffering in such a way that it turns us into something splendid, instead of crushing us.

In the Christian life, suffering and glory are inextricably bound up together, because our great forerunner, our great pioneer and savior Jesus Christ, came to glory through suffering. As a result, that is the pattern for all of us. Suffering and glory are bound together.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on September 26, 1993. Series "Splendor in the Furnace; 1 Peter, Part 1". Scripture: 1 Peter 1:6-9.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 18, 2020
My Servant Job
37:47

Job is a man who is plunged into agony, and for chapter after chapter, we’ve been seeing Job confused and angry, crying out to God in prayer. Two things keep coming up through all that. Job says, “I don’t want to suffer without explanation, and I don’t want to suffer without vindication.” He keeps saying, “I want to appear before God. I want to talk to God. I want to meet God face to face.” Therefore, if you’re reading through the book of Job, you know the only way this story can end is for God to actually show up and respond to Job.

And God does. This is the climax of the whole book. There are three things we’re going to learn about this final climactic appearance of God before Job. Let’s look at the argument of God, the silences of God, and God’s wonderful, terrible storm.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on February 10, 2008. Series "Job - A Path Through Suffering". Scripture: Job 38:1-3; 40:8-12; 42:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 15, 2020
Trusting God in Difficult Times - Where is Your Faith? (Luke 8)
08:46

Today we continue a special series of meditations by Tim Keller — "Trusting God in Difficult Times." This new series is meant to encourage you to trust God more deeply and to meditate on his word and what it promises, to give you strength and hope in difficult times. Today’s meditation is from Luke 8 and includes a Q&A with Tim and Kathy Keller.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 12, 2020
If a Man Dies, Shall He Live Again?
33:53

We’ve seen that Job is a devout believer in God, a pillar of his community, and suddenly and inexplicably everything is taken away from him–his wealth, health, family–and he’s plunged into darkness. In this middle part of the book, there are these long speeches by Job, and true to reality, most of the time he’s basically expressing confusion and anger.

Then in this passage, Job wrestles through to a couple of high points of remarkable faith and insight. What we see here is Job coming to grips with three resources that everywhere in the Bible we are told Christians have in order to face suffering. Everywhere from the Old Testament to the New Testament, we’re told Christians have these three resources in order to face suffering: to know the comfort of the presence, to know the challenge of the glory, and the joy of the resurrection.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 20, 2008. Series "Job - A Path Through Suffering". Scripture: Job 13:20-24; 14:7-17.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 11, 2020
Miserable Comforters
36:19

How do you get through the inevitable suffering that will come to you? The answer is comfort. A shock absorber system in a car doesn’t eliminate the bumps in the road, but it keeps the car from being shaken into pieces by the bumps. You have to have sources of comfort and strength when you go through suffering–not that it eliminates the suffering, but that the suffering won’t actually shake you to pieces.

Job had three friends. They show up, and from basically chapter 3 all the way into the 20s, they speak to Job in cycles to try to comfort him, to try to help him interpret and understand his suffering. And they do an absolutely terrible job of comforting.

Yet, even by looking at how they don’t comfort well, we’re going to learn something about where the sources of comfort must come from. We’ll look at this passage under three headings: the bad comfort we get from Eliphaz, the better comfort we actually see in Job, and the ultimate comfort we get from somebody else.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 13, 2008. Series "Job - A Path Through Suffering". Scripture: Job 5:1-7; 6:1-10.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 08, 2020
Trusting God in Difficult Times - Don't Waste Your Sorrows (Psalm 126)
08:38

Today we continue a special series of meditations by Tim Keller — "Trusting God in Difficult Times." This new series is meant to encourage you to trust God more deeply and to meditate on his word and what it promises, to give you strength and hope in difficult times. Today’s meditation is from Psalm 126 and includes a Q&A with Tim and Kathy Keller.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 07, 2020
Questions of Suffering
35:24

There’s nothing more certain than that you’re going to suffer. When you suffer, it’s so natural to ask the question: Why? In fact, instinctively, sometimes it’s the very first thing out of your mouth when tragedy hits. Why me? Why this? Why now? Why them?

There is no book of the Bible or piece of literature in the whole world that addresses the great “why question” of suffering with the intellectual and philosophical integrity, the emotional and dramatic realism, and the spiritual wisdom of the book of Job.

Right out of the gate, we get some major advice about how to suffer the inevitable burdens of human life. We’re going to learn here, first, you have to avoid pat answers to the question of suffering. Secondly, you need to embrace living without an answer to the question. Thirdly, you need to anticipate the ultimate answer to the question of why.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on January 6, 2008. Series "Job - A Path Through Suffering". Scripture: Job 1:8-22.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 06, 2020
Trusting God in Difficult Times - Talking to Yourself, Not Listening to Yourself (Psalm 42)
09:37

Today we continue a special series of meditations by Tim Keller — "Trusting God in Difficult Times." This new series is meant to encourage you to trust God more deeply and to meditate on his word and what it promises, to give you strength and hope in difficult times. Today’s meditation is from Psalm 42 and includes a Q&A with Tim and Kathy Keller.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Hope for New York. 

In light of the Covid-19 pandemic, GivingTuesday is promoting May 5th as a special giving day — GivingTuesdayNow — to promote giving to nonprofits during this extraordinary time of need.

Today, Tim and Kathy Keller would like to invite you to make a gift to Hope for New York's Relief Fund. Their ministry mobilizes volunteers and provides financial resources to support over 60 non-profit affiliates serving poor and marginalized communities in New York City.

As you can imagine, the need since mid-March has grown exponentially. Presently, almost all affiliate programs have been modified or limited due to COVID-19, but the affiliates are determined to continue caring for the most vulnerable populations across five boroughs.

Every gift makes a difference. You can give to Hope for New York at gospelinlife.com/nyc and 100% of your donation will provide critical relief grants and resources to Hope for New York’s affiliates.

Thank you for your generous support of this vital ministry.

May 05, 2020
Walking with God Through Pain and Suffering (Talk + Q&A)
58:20

Suffering is like the Great Wall of China. There’s no way around it. Many are personally suffering at the present moment. Others are not, but are nevertheless rightly troubled by it. Both groups of people will inevitably ask the question–why? But they’ll ask it in different ways.

Let’s look at the general problem of suffering with the question: How do we understand it? And then the personal problem: How do we survive it, how do we face it?

This special talk and Q&A were held at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on October 2, 2013.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 04, 2020
The New City
43:37

You can’t really look at the whole gamut of Jesus’ life unless you also look at Pentecost. What is Pentecost about?

Back in Exodus 18-20, you have a mountain (Sinai), a ministry (the law of Moses), and a new people (Israel). That’s what the first Pentecost was. But that’s also what you have here in Acts. The sun rose that day. But by the time the sun went down, Pentecost meant something completely different. It meant something greater. It meant something infinitely beyond it.

What Pentecost means is there’s a new mountain, there’s a new ministry, and there’s a whole new people whom God has brought into being.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on June 1, 1997. Series "The Real Jesus Part 4; The Lord". Scripture: Acts 2:1-12.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

May 02, 2020
Trusting God in Difficult Times - How to Become Evergreen (Psalm 1)
08:00

Today we continue a special series of meditations by Tim Keller — "Trusting God in Difficult Times." This new series is meant to encourage you to trust God more deeply and to meditate on his word and what it promises, to give you strength and hope in difficult times. Today’s meditation is from Psalm 1 and includes a Q&A with Tim and Kathy Keller.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Apr 30, 2020
The Ascension
41:46

Just as it is ridiculous to build a beautiful house if nobody lives in it, just as it is ridiculous and of no use preparing an incredible, beautiful meal if nobody ever eats it, and just as it is silly to build a bomb to make way for a road if you build it without a detonator, so the birth, the death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ are of no use without the ascension. The ascension is the detonator for everything else Jesus Christ did.

The ascension is that which takes what Jesus Christ was and did on earth and releases it into the universe and into your lives with all of its healing power. Let me just look with you at the power of the ascension, the nature of the ascension (what it is), and the meaning of the ascension (what difference it makes).

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 18, 1997. Series "The Real Jesus Part 4; The Lord". Scripture: Acts 1:1-12.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Apr 29, 2020
Peter Meets Jesus
33:20

Now we come to the very last of the resurrection appearances. In some ways, John 21 is just filled with messages, filled with lessons, for how we’re supposed to live on earth until he comes back.

But in particular, there are four beautiful things we’re told here about the gospel, about the central message of who Jesus is, what he came to do, and how we should relate to him. We have here a great picture of the unity of the gospel, the forwardness of the gospel, the surgery of the gospel, and the intimacy of the gospel.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 11, 1997. Series "The Real Jesus Part 4; The Lord". Scripture: John 21:1-17.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Apr 28, 2020
Thomas Meets Jesus
40:30

In the gospel accounts, Thomas is pushing, pushing, pushing, and finally in this passage comes right out and says it. What does he say? “My Lord and my God!” That’s what it means to be a Christian, and you’re not a Christian until you say it. On the one hand, it’s a propositional statement. Jesus is Lord of the universe and God himself–there’s content to the faith. And on the other hand, it’s personal. He doesn’t just say, “Lord and God,” he says, “My Lord and my God!” and so he rests his life on it.

This is what John has been trying to get us to. Until you see him as that–not just a nice person, a savior who kind of helps you over the hard times in your life, someone who you go to church for on high holy days and pray to when you’re in trouble. This has to be the one who is the center of your life; the one you bow down to.

How do you get to that? How are we going to come to faith in Christ? How are we going to strengthen our faith in Christ the same way Thomas found? Let’s look at four practical ways to find faith or encourage your faith.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on May 4, 1997. Series "The Real Jesus Part 4; The Lord". Scripture: John 20:24-31; Acts 1:21-22; 1 Corinthians 15:8; Ephesians 2:20; 1 John 1:1-2; John 8:19,45-46,58; John 12:44-45; Exodus 3:14; John 6:53.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Apr 24, 2020
Trusting God in Difficult Times - Habakkuk 3
10:39

Today we continue a special series of meditations by Tim Keller — "Trusting God in Difficult Times." This new series is meant to encourage you to trust God more deeply and to meditate on his word and what it promises, to give you strength and hope in difficult times. Today’s meditation is from Habakkuk 3 and includes a Q&A with Tim and Kathy Keller.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Apr 23, 2020
John Meets Jesus
45:11

We’ve been looking at the people Jesus met and dealt with after his resurrection in the resurrection narratives in Luke. And now we’re going to be looking at them in John.

Before we begin in the Gospel of John, I think it’s fair to pose two questions to you. First, why should you trust these accounts? Why should you trust and why can you trust they are telling you what happened? And secondly, why should you care what they say?

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 27, 1997. Series "The Real Jesus Part 4; The Lord". Scripture: John 20:3-9;21:18-24.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Apr 22, 2020
Trusting God in Difficult Times - Habakkuk 2
10:05

Today we continue a special series of meditations by Tim Keller — "Trusting God in Difficult Times." This new series is meant to encourage you to trust God more deeply and to meditate on his word and what it promises, to give you strength and hope in difficult times. Today’s meditation is from Habakkuk 2 and includes a Q&A with Tim and Kathy Keller.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Apr 21, 2020
The Disciples Meet Jesus
43:19

Jesus Christ is teaching us in this passage about the nature of the resurrection, that if we believe in him there’s a future for us. He says there’s a resurrection in the future we wait for and there’s a resurrection in the present we can experience now. It’s an understanding of both of those that radically shaped the early Christians, and it’s a disorientation to those that’s behind the fact that the Christian church looks different from that today.

The concept of the resurrection of the future that Jesus talked about is revolutionary. It’s paradigm-busting, but it’s only an intellectual concept. It’s only the knowledge of something in the future, and it isn’t operative in our lives unless the knowledge of the future resurrection becomes operative through the experience of a present resurrection, a spiritual resurrection now. So let’s look at those two.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 20, 1997. Series "The Real Jesus Part 4; The Lord". Scripture: Luke 24:36-49.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Apr 20, 2020
Two Meet Jesus
36:18

One of the most amazing things about Luke 24 is all that’s left out. In Acts 1, written also by Luke, we’re told that Luke knew about the fact that Jesus was actually on earth for 40 days after the resurrection teaching his disciples and appearing to people, meaning there were probably scores of other dramatic experiences people had of meeting with the risen Lord.

It makes these select few that Luke does preserve all the more remarkable. If Luke only preserves three, then it’s right for us to assume he must think these three, in all their features, convey to us the meaning of the resurrection better, perhaps, than any of the other appearances.

So it’s right for us to say, “What do they teach? What do we learn?” Not just that Jesus is risen, but what about the fact that Jesus is risen? Here’s what we’re going to learn. We’re going to learn about their spiritual blindness and how to have a personal encounter with Christ.

This sermon was preached by Rev. Timothy Keller at Redeemer Presbyterian Church on April 13, 1997. Series "The Real Jesus Part 4; The Lord". Scripture: Luke 24:13-32.

Today's podcast is brought to you by Gospel in Life, the site for all sermons, books, study guides and resources from Timothy Keller and Redeemer Presbyterian Church. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast and would like to support the ongoing efforts of this ministry, you can do so by visiting https://gospelinlife.com/give and making a one-time or recurring donation.

Apr 17, 2020