The Modern Art Notes Podcast

By Tyler Green

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Category: Visual Arts

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The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a weekly program about visual art. The program features host Tyler Green's conversations with artists, art historians, curators, critics and authors. It is published each Thursday.

Episode Date
Laurence Kanter, John Klein
53:28

Episode No. 354 features curator Laurence Kanter and art historian John Klein.

Kanter is the curator of "Leonardo: Discoveries from Verocchio's Studio" at the Yale University Art Gallery. The exhibition examines a little-studied period early in Leonardo da Vinci's career: his time as an apprentice in the studio of sculptor, painter and goldsmith Andrea del Verrocchio. In the exhibition, Kanter argues that a pair of predella panels that were made for a large altarpiece in Pistoia, Italy, The Annunciation at the Louvre and A Miracle of Saint Donatus of Arezzo from the Worcester Art Museum were executed by a young Leonardo. The exhibition, which is on view through October 7, is accompanied by a terrific catalogue published by the Yale University Art Gallery and distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $35.

On the second segment, host Tyler Green's 2014 conversation with Washington University-based art historian John Klein about how Henri Matisse migrated projects from cut-outs to decorative art installations. The interview was taped on the occasion of "Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs" which was then on view at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Klein's new book, "Matisse and Decoration" which this interview effectively previews, will be out from Yale University Press in October.

Aug 16, 2018
Giacometti, Brancusi
01:02:00

Episode No. 353 features curators Megan Fontanella and Paulina Pobocha.

Fontanella is the co-curator of "Giacometti" at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. It includes nearly 200 Alberto Giacometti sculptures, paintings and drawings. Catherine Grenier co-curated the exhibition with Fontanella; they were assisted by Mathilde Lecuyer-Maille and Samantha Small. The exhibition is on view through September 8.

On the second segment, Pobocha discusses her Museum of Modern Art, New York, exhibition "Constantin Brancusi Sculpture." The exhibition looks back at the introduction of Brancusi's work to the United States at New York's 1913 Armory Show. "Brancusi" includes 11 sculptures as well as drawings, photographs, films and archival material. It is on view through February 18, 2019.

Aug 09, 2018
Christina Quarles, Peter Hujar
01:04:16

Episode No. 352 features artist Christina Quarles and curator Joel Smith.

Christina Quarles is included in the Hammer Museum's "Made in LA 2018" biennial. "Made in LA" was curated by Anne Ellegood and Erin Christovale and is on view through September 2.

Quarles's work typically includes recognizable elements such as flowers or tables and figures that then dissolve into each other in ways that confuse our ideas of gender, race and space. On her website, Quarles describes this blending of elements as rooted to her own personal history: "The contradiction of my Black ancestry coupled with my fair skin, results in my place always being my displace."

Next month Quarles will be the subject of a "MATRIX" exhibition at the Berkeley Art Museum. She's been included in group shows at the New Museum, the Studio Museum in Harlem, LAXART and at the Santa Monica Museum of Art.

On the second segment, Morgan Library curator Joel Smith discusses his “Peter Hujar: Speed of Life.” The exhibition, which is at the Berkeley Art Museum through November 18, includes 140 photographs and surveys Hujar’s entire career. The exhibition catalogue, published by Aperture, is easily the most important publication about Hujar. Amazon sells it for $34. This segment first aired in February when the exhibition debuted at the Morgan. For images, see Episode No. 326.

Aug 02, 2018
3D: Double Vision, Bridget Alsdorf
01:16:47

Episode No. 351 features curator Britt Salvesen and art historian Bridget Alsdorf.

Salvesen is the curator of "3D: Double Vision" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The exhibition features objects from mass culture, photography and fine art in which makers exploit the nature of perception, and binocular vision, the way our brains turn what our two eyes see into a single image. It is on view through March 31, 2019. (Yes, really.) The outstanding exhibition catalogue is both a good read and a fascinating object in its own right. It was copublished by LACMA and DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $38.

On the second segment, art historian Bridget Alsdorf discusses her contribution to "Women Artists in Paris, 1850-1900," which is now at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Mass. Alsdorf, who teaches at Princeton University, wrote an essay titled "Painting the Femme Peintre" for the exhibition catalogue. It was published by Yale University Press and American Federation of Arts. Amazon offers it for $43.

Jul 26, 2018
Lauren Halsey, Sadie Barnette
01:13:51

Episode No. 350 features artists Lauren Halsey and Sadie Barnette.

Two Los Angeles museums are showing ambitious Halseys. The Hammer Museum has included Halsey's The Crenshaw District Hieroglyph Project (Prototype Architecture) (2018) in its "Made in LA 2018" biennial, and MOCA, is exhibiting Halsey's we still here, there. "Made in LA" was curated by Anne Ellegood and Erin Christovale and is on view through September 2. The Halsey installation at MOCA was curated by Lanka Tattersall with assistance from Karlyn Olvido; it's up through September 3.

Lauren Halsey is a Los Angeles and Atlanta-based artist whose work engages specific communities with architecture and sculpture that mines recent American history, Afrofuturism, the history of black representation and plenty more. She's been in group exhibitions at galleries in California, New York and Europe, and has had residencies at LA's Main Museum, at New York's Recess Art and Studio Museum.

On the second segment, Sadie Barnette discusses her Dear 1968... which is on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego through September 3. The installation is the result of Barnette's research into her family history, specifically her father's participation in the Black Panther Party and the FBI's surveillance of him. Barnette is an Oakland-based artist whose work often explores urbanity, architecture, resistance and survival. Dear 1968... was previously exhibited at Haverford College in Pennsylvania and at the Manetti Shrem at the University of California, Davis. She's been included in group exhibitions at the Berkeley Art Museum, the Pitzer College Art Galleries, MOCAD in Detroit, and more.

 

Jul 19, 2018
Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Naoko Takahatake
01:18:25

Episode No. 349 features artist Sylvia Plimack Mangold and curator Naoko Takahatake.

Mangold is included in "Studio Visit: Selected Gifts from Agnes Gund," which was organized by MoMA's Ann Temkin and Cara Manes and is on view through July 22.

Mangold is among the most prominent painters to respond to emerge in the late 1960s in response to a decade dominated by minimalism and pop art. Her paintings, seemingly rooted in realism but often undermining it, played with perspective, flatness, and often engaged the centuries-long tradition of painters making paintings about painting. In 1994 the Albright-Knox Art Gallery organized a major retrospoective of her paintings; two years earlier the University of Michigan Museum of Art organized a works on paper survey. Her work has long been collected by major museums such as the Kunstmuseum Winterthur in Switzerland, the Saint Louis Art Museum, the Nelson-Atkins, the Metropolitan, Brooklyn, the Whitney and more.

On the second segment, Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Naoko Takahatake discusses "The Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy," which is on view at LACMA through September 16. The exhibition charts the rapid and rich development of the chairoscuro woodcut from its introduction to Italy in 1516 until the end of the sixteenth century. The exhibition is the first major presentation on the subject in the United States. The fantastic exhibition catalogue was published by LACMA and DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $59.

Jul 12, 2018
Holiday clips: "Thomas Cole: Empire to Eden"
54:29

Episode No. 348 is a holiday weekend clips episode with curator Betsy Kornhauser.

Along with Tim Barringer, Kornhauser  is the co-curator of "Thomas Cole: Eden to Empire," which is at the National Gallery in London through October 7. (The re-titled exhibition debuted at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in January as "Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings.") Barringer and Kornhauser's show examines Cole's origins in the north of England during the Industrial Revolution and the impact Britain and Cole's travels through England and Italy had on his American career. It is the first time Cole's work has been examined in the context of his European experiences, and aims to present Cole as not just an American figure, but as a trans-Atlantic figure. The outstanding exhibition catalogue, one of the best of 2018, was published by the Met and is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $65.

For images of art discussed on this week's program, see Episode No. 326.

Jul 05, 2018
Thomas Scheibitz, B. Ingrid Olson
01:16:52

Episode No. 347 features artists Thomas Scheibitz and B. Ingrid Olson.

Thomas Scheibitz is included in "Inherent Structures" at the Wexner Center for the Arts. The exhibition features 16 artists who complicate abstract painting's traditional association with chance and aesthetic purity with work that addresses concerns that range from an exploration of materials and paints to the artists' sociopolitical interests. The exhibition was curated by Michael Goodson and is on view through August 12.

Scheibitz is a Berlin-based painter and sculptor known for developing a distinct abstract language compiles references to objects and forms into colorful wholes. In 2005 Scheibitz represented Germany at the Venice Biennale in a two-person presentation with Tino Sehgal. The Museum for Modern Art in Frankfurt presented his first retrospective in 2012. Other major solo exhibitions have been at the Kunstmuseum Bonn, the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin, and the Camden Arts Centre in London.

B. Ingrid Olson is included in "Being: New Photography 2018," which is on view at the Museum of Modern Art, New York through August 19. The exhibition was curated by Lucy Gallun. Concurrently, Olson is in "Picture Fiction: Kenneth Josephson and Contemporary Photography," which was curated by Michael Darling and Lauren Fulton. It's at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago through December 30. She's also in a two-person show at San Francisco's Jessica Silverman Gallery through July 14. Olson's work, which includes both photography and sculptural elements uses the body, her body, to explore gender, architecture, space, and form. The Albright-Knox Art Gallery just concluded Olson's first museum show, "B. Ingrid Olson: Forehead and Brain," which was curated by Holly E. Hughes.

Jun 28, 2018
Nell Painter, Mark Ruwedel
01:10:25

Episode No. 346 features historian and artist Nell Painter and artist Mark Ruwedel.

Painter is the author of Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over, which is out this week from Counterpoint Press. The "starting over" of the title refers to Painter's retirement after a elite career as an Ivy League historian to return to college as a sixty-something student -- first to take undergraduate studio art courses at Rutgers, then to pursue an MFA at the Rhode Island School of Design. Painter's memoir details her interactions with students and faculty, and how she tried to think through how to make art after having spent decades teaching and writing history. 

Before going to art school, Painter was one of America's most distinguished historians. She is the Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita, at Princeton University. Her books include Standing at Armageddon, Sojourner Truth: A Life, A Symbol, and the New York Times bestseller The History of White People. She is a past president of both the Organization of American Historians and the Southern Historical Association.

Amazon is offering Old in Art School for about $15 in both Kindle and hardcover.

On the second segment, an excerpt from host Tyler Green's 2017 conversation with Mark Ruwedel. The Tate Modern is showing an extensive selection of Ruwedel's through December 3, an installation that was curated by Sarah Allen and Simon Baker. The Ruwedels in London include work from most parts of his career, including his famed railway cuts and his so-called pictures from hell, photographs of Western landscape features named for the devil or his (his?) underworld home. Ruwedel is also included in an exhibition the Denver Art Museum opens this weekend: "New Territory: Landscape Photography Today," a survey of global landscape photography. Curated by Eric Paddock, it's on view through September 16.

Jun 21, 2018
Ursula von Rydingsvard
01:10:38

Episode No. 345 features artist Ursula von Rydingsvard.

The Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philadelphia is presenting "Ursula von Rydingsvard: The Contour of Feeling," an exhibition of roughly 20 von Rydingsvards mostly made since 2000. Curated by Mark Rosenthal, the show is on view through August 26. The exhibition catalogue, which is not yet available, will be published by FWM and Hirmer. In addition, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is showing two von Rydingsvards through April 28, 2019, New York's Galerie Lelong is showing an exhibition of von Rydingsvard's work through June 23, and von Rydingsvard is included in "Studio Visit: Selected Gifts from Agnes Gund" at the Museum of Modern Art, New York through July 22.

Ursula von Rydingsvard is one of America's leading sculptors. Since her first solo exhibition 43 years ago, she has had solo exhibitions at or fulfilled commissions for museums such as the Storm King Art Center, the Art Institute of Chicago, the North Carolina Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center and many more.

See images discussed on this week's program. 

Jun 14, 2018
"Like Life" at the Met, Anne Appleby
01:11:27

Episode No. 344 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Luke Syson and artist Anne Appleby.

Along with Sheena Wagstaff, Brinda Kumar, Emerson Bowyer and Elyse Nelson, the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Luke Syson is a co-curator of "Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300-now)" at the Met's Breuer building through July 22. The exhibition features 120 sculptures from the first or second century to the present and considers how artists have presented the human body, especially with color. The outstanding exhibition catalogue was published by the Met and is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $43.

On the second segment, artist Anne Appleby discusses new work she's showing in "We Sit Together the Mountain and Me" at the Tacoma Art Museum. The exhibition, which is on view through July 8, was curated by Rock Hushka. Appleby's work is held by the Portland Art Museum, the Denver Art Museum, the Berkeley Art Museum, SFMOMA, and more. This interview was recorded in April.

Jun 07, 2018
Carrie Moyer, Aram Han Sifuentes
01:06:50

Episode No. 343 features artists Carrie Moyer and Aram Han Sifuentes.

Moyer is included in "Inherent Structures" at the Wexner Center for the Arts. The exhibition features 16 artists who complicate abstract painting's traditional association with chance and aesthetic purity with work that addresses concerns that range from an exploration of materials and paints to the artists' sociopolitical interests. The exhibition was curated by Michael Goodson and is on view through August 12.

Carrie Moyer is a New York-based painter whose work has mined the history of abstract painting, particularly composition and the way artists have used different materials and techniques. Moyer's work -- and titles -- often point to contemporary life and politics. Moyer frequently writes criticism for outlets such as Art in America. In 1991 she co-founded the lesbian public art project Dyke Action Machine! The Tang Museum organized a survey of Moyer's work in 2013; she's also had solo shows at the Worcester Art Museum, and at the Katzen Arts Center at American University in Washington, DC.

On the second segment, Aram Han Sifuentes discusses her Protest Banner Lending Library, which she's organizing during a summer-long residency at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis. Protest Banner Lending Library is an ongoing, multi-city project in which Sifuentes works with a community to create banners and to borrown from her ever-growing library of handmade banners. The banners typically address contemporary sociopolitical issues. Her work has been exhibited at numerous museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art and the MCA Chicago.

May 31, 2018
Holiday clips: Painted in Mexico, 1700-90
41:49

Episode No. 342 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a holiday weekend presentation of previously recorded interview with curator and historian Ilona Katzew.

Along with Jaime Cuadriello, Paula Mues Orts, and previous MAN Podcast guest Luis Elena Alcala, Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Ilona Katzew is a co-curator of "Painted in Mexico, 1700-1790: Pinxit Mexici." The exhibition is a broad survey of many kinds of 18th-century Mexican painting, including religious narratives, altarpieces, portraits, casta painting and more. It is on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through July 22. The remarkable exhibition catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $60.

Katzew is one of the world's foremost experts on New Spanish painting. She was previously on the program to discuss LACMA's acquisition of a significant Miguel Cabrera casta painting.

May 24, 2018
Inka Essenhigh, Church's Travels
01:05:57

Episode No. 341 features artist Inka Essenhigh and curator Kenneth Myers.

The Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art in Virginia Beach is showing "Inka Essenhigh: A Fine Line," a mid-career survey of the New York-based Essenhigh's work. The exhibition was curated by Heather Hakimzadeh and remains on view through August 19. The exhibition's catalogue, an impressive 216-page monograph that also features work not in the show, was published by the museum. It's available from Virginia MOCA for $45.

Concurrently, The Drawing Center in New York is showing Essenhigh's Manhattanhenge, a site-specific commission for the museum's stairwell. It's on view through August 4, 2019.

On the second segment, Detroit Institute of Arts curator Kenneth Myers discusses his exhibition "Church: A Painter's Pilgrimage." The exhibition considers the paintings Frederic Edwin Church made in the late 1860s and 1870s of his trip to the Middle East and the Mediterranean. It opens at the Wadsworth Atheneum on June 2; the conversation on this week's program was recorded in December, 2017. The exhibition's excellent catalogue was published by the DIA. Amazon offers it for $41.

May 17, 2018
Whistler's Mother, Otobong Nkanga
01:10:56

Episode No. 340 features author and historian Daniel E. Sutherland and artist Otobong Nkanga.

With Georgia Toutziari, Daniel Sutherland is the co-author of "Whistler's Mother: Portrait of an Extraordinary Life." The book, a biography of Anna Whistler, explains both the austere woman represented in James Abbott McNeill Whistler's famed 1871 painting Arrangement in Gray and Black No. 1, better known as Whistler's Mother, and Anna Whistler's involvement in her son's career. Anna Whistler lived a remarkable life that started in the slaveholding South, continued in the rapidly industrializing northeast via her marriage to one of the most prominent railroad engineers of the time, and which took her and her family to St. Petersburg, Russia, Europe and London, where she became her son's unofficial art-world manager and agent. "Whistler's Mother" was published by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $13. (!)

Sutherland was previously a guest on The MAN Podcast in 2014 to discuss "Whistler: A Life for Art's Sake," his terrific biography of the artist. Yale University Press has just released it in paperback. Amazon sells it for $15.

On the second segment, Otobong Nkanga discusses her work on the occasion of "Otobong Nkanga: To Dig a Hole That Collapses Again" at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. The exhibition, a survey of her work which continues through September 2, was curated by Omar Kholeif. Nkanga, who was born in Nigeria and who lives and works in Antwerp, makes paintings, drawings, tapestry, installation and gives performances that explore the history and impact of colonialism, especially in Africa. Much of her work addresses the way such histories have impacted the land, and the viewer's likely connections with that past. She has performed at or her work has been exhibited at the Tate Modern, the Stedelijk Museum Arnhem, the Moderna Museet and the Centre Pompidou, and Documenta 14. The exhibition catalogue was published by Delmonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $25.

May 10, 2018
John Akomfrah
01:06:51

Episode No. 339 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist John Akomfrah.

The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University is presenting John Akomfrah's three-channel video installation Precarity (2017-18), a work that it commissioned for its collection and that debuted at the Ogden Museum as part of the recent Prospect 4 triennial in New Orleans. (Nasher chief curator Trevor Schoonmaker was the curator of Prospect 4.)

Precarity loosely tells the story of coronet player Buddy "King" Bolden, the most popular musician in turn-of-the-twentieth-century New Orleans and a man known for improvisation and volume. In 1907, under circumstances that remain unclear, he was permanently committed to the State Insane Asylum in Jackson with schizophrenia. There are no known surviving recordings of Bolden's work, but historian Ted Gioia credits Bolden and his band with being the originator of what we now call jazz. The film is as much an exploration of New Orleans and southern Louisiana, its history and how its history impacts the present as it is a consideration of Bolden. Precarity is on view at the Nasher through September 2.

Akomfrah, a British artist of Ghanaian descent, is one of the founders of the Black Audio Film Collective, which was active between 1982 and 1998. The collective used film and media to examine issues of Black British identity through film and media. Since then Akomfrah and his producing partners Lina Gopaul and David Lawson co-founded Smoking Dogs Films. Akomfrah's work has been shown at the Tate Britain, the ICA London, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

On the second segment, we'll hear host Tyler Green's March conversation with Akomfrah, taped when the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art presented the U.S. debut of John Akomfrah’s Vertigo Sea in “Sublime Seas: John Akomfrah and J.M.W. Turner.” The exhibition, which pairs a film installation Akomfrah made for the Venice Biennale in 2015 with Turner’s The Deluge, is at SFMOMA through September 16. It was curated by Rudolf Frieling.

May 03, 2018
Terry Winters, Stefanie Heckmann
01:02:03

Episode No. 338 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Terry Winters and art historian Stefanie Heckmann.

The Drawing Center in New York is showing "Terry Winters: Facts and Fictions," a nearly four-decade survey of Winters's drawing practice. The exhibition includes both wall-hung large-scale drawings and smaller works presented in vitrines. It was curated by Claire Gilman. The Drawing Center sells the catalogue for $20. It may be read online for free. Next month, New York's Matthew Marks Gallery will present an exhibition of Winters's recent paintings.

Terry Winters's work has been the subject of many major exhibitions, including most recently a 2016-17 prints survey at the MFA Boston, a 2015 prints survey at the Louisiana in Denmark. Winters has also been the subject of exhibitions at the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, both in New York, the Whitechapel in London and the Kunsthalle Basel.

Winters was previously a guest on the program in 2012.

On the second segment, Stefanie Heckmann discusses "Before the Fall: German and Austrian Art of the 1930s" at New York's Neue Galerie. The exhibition was curated by Olaf Peters; Heckmann wrote for the catalogue and is the head of the fine arts collection at the Berlinische Galerie Museum fur Moderne Kunst. The exhibition, which includes around 150 paintings and works on paper, looks at how artists in Germany and Austria responded to a decade marked by social disintegration, political chaos, and that effectively ended with the beginning of World War II. The exhibition's excellent catalogue is available from Amazon for $37. The show is on view through May 28.

A Harvard Art Museums exhibition on the succeeding decade was featured on the program in February.

See MANPodcast.com for images of art discussed on the program. 

Apr 26, 2018
Kamrooz Aram, Matthew Angelo Harrison
57:10

Episode No. 337 features artists Kamrooz Aram and Matthew Angelo Harrison.

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth is showing "FOCUS: Kamrooz Aram," an installation of Aram's recent sculpture, collage and painting. The exhibition continues Aram's investigation into the complex and non-linear relationship between non-Western art and (Western) modernism, particularly as various artistic traditions push toward abstraction. Curated by Andrea Karnes, the exhibition is on view through June 17.

Kamrooz Aram has had solo exhibitions at the Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens in Belgium, at LA>

On the second segment, Matthew Angelo Harrison discusses his recent work. It's included in "Songs for Sabotage," the New Museum triennial, and in a solo exhibition at Jessica Silverman Gallery in San Francisco. The NuMu triennial was curated by and is on view through May 27. The Silverman Gallery show is up through April 21. He'll also be included in the forthcoming "I Was Raised on the Internet," a group exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.

See images of art discussed on the program. 

Apr 19, 2018
French parks & gardens, Anne Appleby
56:51

Episode No. 336 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator and author Colta Ives and artist Anne Appleby.

Ives, a curator emerita at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is the author of "Public Parks, Private Gardens: From Paris to Provence," and the co-curator (with Susan Alyson Stein) of the Met's exhibition of the same title. The show looks at how developments in landscape design, horticulture and the opening up of royal property combined to focus (mostly) 19thC French artists on parks and gardens. It's on view through July 29. Amazon offers the exhibition's excellent catalogue for $38.

On the second segment, artist Anne Appleby discusses new work she's showing in "We Sit Together the Mountain and Me" at the Tacoma Art Museum. The exhibition, which is on view through June 3, was curated by Rock Hushka. Appleby's work is held by the Portland Art Museum, the Denver Art Museum, the Berkeley Art Museum, SFMOMA, and more.

See images of art discussed on the program.

Apr 12, 2018
Mary Reid Kelley & Patrick Kelley, Aïda Muluneh
01:16:57

Episode No. 335 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Mary Reid Kelley & Patrick Kelley, and Aïda Muluneh.

The Baltimore Museum of Art is exhibiting "Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley: We Are Ghosts" through August 19. The exhibition features two new works by Mary Reid Kelley and her collaborator Patrick Kelley: This is Offal (2016) and In the Body of the Sturgeon (2017), as well as sets and costumes from the films and related lightboxes. The exhibition debuted at the Tate Liverpool before arriving in Baltimore, where it was curated by Kristen Hileman. Baltimore and the Tate produced a small catalogue for the show. As of posting time it's not available from the BMA's store. 

This is Offal debuted as a live performance at the Tate Modern on November 19, 2015. (The video from that performance is available below.) It was inspired by Thomas Hood’s 1844 poem "The Bridge of Sighs," in which a forensic pathologist (Patrick Kelley), is frustrated by the suicide of a young woman (Mary Reid Kelley) whose body is pulled from the Thames River.

In the Body of the Sturgeon tells the story of a fictional American submarine near the end of World War II and its learning of the American dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima via a broadcast from President Harry S Truman.

On the second segment Aïda Muluneh discusses her work, which is included in "Being: New Photography 2018" at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The exhibition, which was curated by Lucy Gallun, is on view through August 19. Muluneh is an Ethiopian photographer whose work is in the collections of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art and the Hood Museum at Dartmouth.

See images of art discussed on this week's show. 

Apr 05, 2018
Holiday clips: Casanova, early Diebenkorn
50:29

Episode No. 334 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a holiday weekend presentation of previously recorded interviews with curators Frederick Ilchman and Scott Shields.

Ilchman, a curator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, is the co-curator of “Casanova: The Seduction of Europe,” a broad look at the over-the-top luxury of European art and decorative arts in the pre-French Revolution decades. It debuted at the Kimbell Art Museum last year, and is on view at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco through May 28. The show is built around the famed Giacomo Casanova, a courtier, lothario and schemester whose memoir provides one of the best insights to an era in which those at the top of society milked their countries for wealth and prestige, leaving little for others. The exhibition was co-curated by Ilchman, the National Gallery of Art’s C.D. Dickerson (who started work on the show while he was at the Kimbell), and the Clark Art Institute's Esther Bell (who worked on the show while she was at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco). The catalogue is absolutely terrific, a great read, a decadent look, and Amazon will sell it to you for $34.

Next, Crocker Art Museum curator Scott A. Shields discusses “Richard Diebenkorn: Beginnings, 1942-1955,” which the Crocker co-organized with the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation. The exhibition looks at work, especially work on paper, that Diebenkorn made before turning to figuration while living and working in Berkeley, Calif. It reveals Diebenkorn working through artists with whom his work is not typically associated, such as John Marin and Arshile Gorky. The exhibition is accompanied by an excellent, well-illustrated catalogue that mines Diebenkorn’s archive to find a surprising range of influences. Amazon sells it for $44. From Sacramento, the show will trael to the Owsley Museum at Ball State University, the Portland (Ore.) Art Museum, the Weisman Museum at Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., and to the Academy Art Museum in Easton, Md. Images of art discussed on the program are here.

Mar 29, 2018
Precisionism at the de Young, Fra Angelico at the Gardner Museum
01:10:07

Episode No. 333 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Emma Acker and Nathaniel Silver.

Acker is the curator of "Cult of the Machine: Precisionism and American Art," the first broad survey of precisionism in nearly 20 years. The exhibition opens at the de Young Museum in San Francisco this weekend, and remains on view through August 12. "Cult of the Machine" includes over 100 works, including paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculpture, and charts the emergence of the style and its roughly three-decade-long history. The exhibition's terrific catalogue, which features scores of illustrations of supplemental artworks, was published by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco in association with Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $52. The exhibition will travel to the Dallas Museum of Art in September.

On the second segment, Nathaniel Silver returns to the program to discuss his new exhibition "Fra Angelico: Heaven on Earth,"  which is at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston through May 20. The exhibition joins Angelico's Assumption and Dormition of the Virgin, acquired by Gardner in 1899 and the first Angelico acquired by an American, with its three companions from the Museo di San Marco in Florence. Conceived by Angelico (and his funder) as a set of reliquaries for the Florentine church of Santa Maria Novella, they tell the story of the Virgin Mary's life. The outstanding catalogue, complete with one of the most beautiful book covers you'll ever see, was published by the ISGM and Paul Holberton Publishing and is available from Amazon for $41.

For images of art discussed on the program, see MANPodcast.com. 

Mar 22, 2018
Fazal Sheikh, John Akomfrah
01:11:41

Episode No. 332 features artists Fazal Sheikh and John Akomfrah.

The Portland (Ore.) Art Museum is exhibiting "Common Ground: Photographs by Fazal Sheikh, 1989-2013," a 25-year survey of Fazal Sheikh's work. The exhibition focuses on Sheikh's portraiture, work that spotlights the individual humanity often forgotten or obscured by war and other ethnic, religious or misogynistic violence. It also includes Sheikh's landscapes, which often suggest the violence or migration that the land in his pictures sustained. The exhibition, which is on view through May 20, was organized by Eric Paddock and the Denver Art Museum. Julia Dolan oversaw the Portland installation.

Sheikh, who was born in New York to an American mother and Kenyan father, spent many childhood summers there. Upon earning a Fulbright scholarship after studying under Emmet Gowin at Princeton, Sheikh returned to Africa and found himself photographing people displaced from Somalia, Ethiopia, Mozambique and Rwanada who were living in refugee camps. Over the ensuing decades he continued to look at places where massive waves of migration, often caused by violence, impacted people and places. He is the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation 'genius' award. Museums such as the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Mapfre Foundation in Madrid, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art have presented solo exhibitions of his work.

Sheikh's website includes a broad presentation of his work and free digital versions of all of his books. Among the series or projects he and host Tyler Green discuss on this week's program are:

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is presenting the U.S. debut of John Akomfrah's Vertigo Sea in "Sublime Seas: John Akomfrah and J.M.W. Turner." The exhibition, which pairs a film installation Akomfrah made for the Venice Biennale in 2015 with Turner's The Deluge, will be on view at SFMOMA through September 16. It was curated by Rudolf Frieling.

In two weeks the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University will exhibit Akomfrah's Precarity, which debuted at Prospect.4. (The version of Precarity at the Nasher will differ slightly from the version shown in New Orleans.) The exhibition will remain on view through August 26. Later this spring, Akomfrah will return to The MAN Podcast to discuss Precarity.

Akomfrah has had many solo exhibitions and dedicated screenings around the world, including at the Tate Britain and at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Mar 15, 2018
Senga Nengudi
01:01:47

Episode No. 331 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Senga Nengudi.

Senga Nengudi came to prominence in the 1960s and 1970s with abstract sculpture made from common materials, work that was often fused with a performative element. Her work is the subject of two ongoing solo exhibitions and her work is included in one ongoing group exhibition:

Listeners may wish to see more about Nengudi in the Hammer Museum's digital archive for the 2012 exhibition "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles, 1960-80."

See images of work discussed on the program at manpodcast.com

Mar 08, 2018
Jill Magid, Thomas Wynn on "First Sculpture"
01:28:03

Episode No. 330 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Jill Magid and archaeologist Thomas Wynn.

Jill Magid is included in the season's two most prominent group shows: "Stories of Almost Everyone," which is at the Hammer Museum through May 6, and "Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today," at the ICA Boston through May 20. "Stories," curated by Aram Moshayedi, is about our willingness (or not?) to believe the stories offered by works of contemporary art. Its catalogue was published by the Hammer and Delmonico Prestel.

The ICA Boston's show is the first major American examination of how the internet has influenced and impacted art-making. It was curated by Eva Respini with Jeffrey De Blois. Its catalogue was published by Yale University Press. (The ICA Boston is one of 14 area institutions to be examining the intersection of art and technology this season.)

Magid's work, presented as installation, sculpture, video installation or via the internet, often examines questions around surveillance, permission and consent. She's had solo shows at or has fulfilled commissions for the University Museum of Contemporary Art in Mexico City, the Berkeley Art Museum, The Intelligence Agency of the Netherlands, the Stedelijk, the Liverpool Biennial and plenty more.

Many of the works Magid and host Tyler Green discuss are presented on her website, including:

On the second segment, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs archaeologist Thomas Wynn discusses "First Sculpture: Handaxe to Figure Stone," at the Nasher Sculpture Center. The exhibition presents ancient handaxes and figure stones as many as two million years old, and posits that their making was motivated by aesthetic decisions, which suggests that they may be considered works of art. Wynn co-curated the exhibition with artist and collector Tony Berlant. It's at the Nasher through April 28. The thought-provoking and beautiful catalogue was published by the Nasher, which offers it for $70.

Mar 01, 2018
"Inventur: Art in Germany, 1943-55" at Harvard, "Paper Promises" at the Getty
01:16:01

Episode No. 329 features curators Lynette Roth and Mazie Harris.

Roth is the curator of "Inventur -- Art in Germany, 1943-55," which is at the Harvard Art Museums through June 3. It is the first exhibition to examine art made in Germany by artists who stayed in Germany throughout World War II. "Inventur" presents more than 160 works made by 50 artists, art made when Germans were forced to acknowledge and address the war, the Holocaust, their defeat and occupation by the Allies, and the beginning of the Cold War. The fascinating exhibition catalogue, which is full of new discoveries and analysis, was published by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $55.

Roth, the curator of the Busch-Reisinger Museum and the head of modern and contemporary art at HAM, was previously a guest on Episode No. 192, when she discussed her catalogue of the Saint Louis Art Museum's Max Beckmann collection.

On the second segment, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Mazie Harris discusses "Paper Promises: Early American Photography," which is at the Getty from Tuesday, February 27 through May 27. The exhibition examines why daguerreotypes-loving Americans were so much slower to embrace paper photography than other nations, and what prompted the belated switch. The terrific catalogue for the exhibition is full of surprising history and is published by the Getty. Amazon lists it at $50.

Feb 22, 2018
Deborah Luster, François Morellet
01:06:02

Episode No. 328 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Deborah Luster and curator Béatrice Gross.

Deborah Luster is featured in Aperture magazine's spring issue, titled "Prison Nation". It spotlights how artists have responded to America's astronomical incarceration rate. The magazine will feature a suite of pictures Luster made in 2013 at Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola, a maximum-security prison. They show actors in The Life of Jesus Christ, a passion play staged by prisoners for the general public. Luster's photographs are also on view in Aperture's New York gallery, which is showing pictures from the issue through March 7.

Concurrently, Luster's work with poet C. D. Wright is on view in "The Art of Collaboration," an exhibition at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University. The exhibition examines how separate elements may come together to make projects deeper and more meaningful. Curated by Melissa Barton, Elizabeth Frengel and Nancy Kuhl, it will be on view through April 15.

Luster's work has most often looked at circles of violence and how they perpetuate themselves. Her work, including portraits of Louisiana prisoners and of places in New Orleans where homicides were committed, is in the collections of dozens of museums such as the Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

On the second segment, curator Béatrice Gross discusses her exhibition "François Morellet," which is at Dia's Beacon and Chelsea locations through June 2. Morellet was a pioneering conceptualist whose abstract work was often built around systems and, later, randomness. This is the first in-depth examination of Morellet's work in the United States in over three decades. Gross's exhibition brochure is available for free download.

Feb 15, 2018
Deborah Roberts, Anita Witek
01:03:33

Episode No. 327 of The Modern Art Notes Podcasts features artists Deborah Roberts and Anita Witek.

The Spelman College Museum of Art is showing "Deborah Roberts: The Evolution of Mimi" through May 19. The exhibition features work Roberts has made in the last half-decade, work that uses collage and girlhood to examine issues of race, gender, and America's present condition. It was curated by Andrea Barnwell. San Francisco's Jenkins Johnson Gallery just opened an exhibition of Roberts's work called "Uninterrupted." It's on view through March 17.

Deborah Roberts was recently included in the group exhibition "Fictions" at the The Studio Museum in Harlem. Her work is in the collections of the Studio Museum, the Blanton at the University of T exas, and the Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University.

The Spelman College Museum has uploaded a conversation between Barnwell and Roberts. Part one is here.

On the second segment, Anita Witek discusses her new installation at the Wexner Center for the Arts. The work, titled Clip, is Witek's first site-specific photomontage to be shown in the United States. It's on view at the Wexner through April 15. Witek has previously shown at the Kunsthaus Wien, the Kunsthalle Graz, at the Leopold Museum and at many other European venues.

Feb 08, 2018
Thomas Cole, Peter Hujar
01:15:43

Episode No. 326 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Betsy Kornhauser and Joel Smith.

Along with Tim Barringer, Kornhauser  is the co-curator of "Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings," which is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through May 13. The exhibition examines Cole's origins in the north of England during the Industrial Revolution and the impact Britain and travels through England and Italy had on Cole's career. The exhibition is the first time Cole's work has been examined in the context of Cole's European experiences and aims to present Cole as not just an American figure, but as a trans-Atlantic figure. The outstanding exhibition catalogue was published by the Met and is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $65.

On the second segment, Smith discusses "Peter Hujar: Speed of Life." The exhibition, on view at The Morgan Library through May 20, includes 140 photographs and surveys Hujar's entire career. The exhibition catalogue, published by Aperture, is easily the most important publication about Hujar. Amazon sells it for $34.

Feb 01, 2018
Wayne Thiebaud (part two), remembering Jack Whitten
01:01:31

Episode No. 325 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features part two of host Tyler Green's conversation with artist Wayne Thiebaud. On the second segment, Green and curator and museum director Kathryn Kanjo remember Jack Whitten.

Thiebaud is one of the world's greatest living painters. The Manetti Shrem Museum of Art at the University of California, Davis has just opened "Wayne Thiebaud, 1958-1968," an examination of Thiebaud's early work and a look at how he developed his signature style and subjects.

 

Jan 25, 2018
Wayne Thiebaud, Minor White
01:11:34

Episode No. 324 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Wayne Thiebaud and curator Julia Dolan.

Thiebaud is one of the world's greatest living painters. The Manetti Shrem Museum of Art at the University of California, Davis has just opened "Wayne Thiebaud, 1958-1968," an examination of Thiebaud's early work and a look at how he developed his signature style and subjects. The exhibition was curated by Rachel Teagle and is on view through May 13. The exhibition's strong catalogue was published by the museum in association with University of California Press. Amazon offers it for $43.

This is part one of host Tyler Green's conversation with Thiebaud. Part two will air next week.

On the second segment, Portland Art Museum curator Julia Dolan discusses her exhibition "In the Beginning: Minor White's Oregon Photographs," which is on view through October 21. White is best known for co-founding Aperture magazine, establishing the photography program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and work he made in the mid-20th century (which curator Paul Martineau discussed on The MAN Podcast on the occasion of a 2014 exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum). Dolan's exhibition features the work with which White effectively began his career in the late 1930s, work White made for the Oregon Art Project, a division of the federal Works Project Administration. The exhibition is split into two phases; the first, featuring works of Portland's industrial infrastructure and more, is up through May 6.

Jan 18, 2018
Louise Bourgeois, Livia Corona Benjamin
01:12:39

Episode No. 323 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Deborah Wye and artist Livia Corona Benjamin.

Wye curated "Louise Bourgeois An Unfolding Portrait," which is on view at the Museum of Modern Art, New York through January 28. She is the world's foremost expert on Bourgeois's work. The exhibition, mostly taken from MoMA's collection, features 300 works, mostly prints and works on paper, but also works on cloth, sculptures and more. In association with the exhibition and its long-term commitment to Bourgeois's (and Wye's) work, MoMA has published an online catalogue raisonne of Bourgeois's prints and books. It features over 4,300 works. The exhibition is also accompanied by an excellent MoMA-published catalogue. Amazon offers it for $34.

Several of the artist's books that host Tyler Green and Wye discussed can be 'paged' through in their entirety on MoMA's Bourgeois website, including:

On the second segment, artist and photographer Livia Corona Benjamin discusses her work. She's included in "Home -- So Different, So Appealing," which is at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston through January 21. The exhibition, a Pacific Standard Time-series exhibition that debuted at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and which was co-curated by MFAH's Mari Carmen Ramírez, Chon Noriega and Pilar Tompkins Rivas, looks at how artists have used the concept of 'home' to examine socioeconomic and political changes in the Americas.

To see more from the two Corona Benjamin series discussed on the program, visit her website:

Jan 11, 2018
Painting in Mexico, 1700-1790, Church's Travels
59:56

Episode No. 322 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Ilona Katzew and Kenneth Myers.

Along with Jaime Cuadriello, Paula Mues Orts, and previous MAN Podcast guest Luis Elena Alcala, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Ilona Katzew is a co-curator of "Painted in Mexico, 1700-1790: Pinxit Mexici." The exhibition is a broad survey of a many kinds of 18th-century Mexican painting, including religious narratives, altarpieces, portraits, casta painting and more. It is on view at LACMA through March 18. The remarkable exhibition catalogue was published by DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $60.

Katzew is one of the world's foremost experts on New Spanish painting. She was previously on the program to discuss LACMA's acquisition of a significant Miguel Cabrera casta painting.

On the second segment, Detroit Institute of Arts curator Kenneth Myers discusses "Church: A Painter's Pilgrimage." The exhibition considers the paintings Frederic Edwin Church made in the late 1860s and 1870s of his trip to the Middle East and the Mediterranean. It's on view in Detroit until January 15. The exhibition's strong catalogue was published by the DIA. Amazon offers it for $41.

Jan 04, 2018
Holiday clips: 'East of the Mississippi' in New Orleans
46:01

Episode No. 321 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a holiday weekend re-air of host Tyler Green's March conversation with National Gallery of Art curator Diane Waggoner.  

Waggoner is the curator of “East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography.” For several decades, the story of America’s nineteenth-century photographic history has mostly run through the West. Waggoner’s exhibition instead looks at how photographers looked at the region between the Mississippi River and the Atlantic Ocean. The exhibition features 175 nineteenth-century photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereographic prints and even paintings. It debuted at the National Gallery of Art this past spring, and it's now at the New Orleans Museum of Art, where it will be on view through January 7. The exhibition catalogue was published by the NGA and Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $41.

Images of art discussed on the program are available here.

Dec 28, 2017
Holiday clips: Rauschenberg at SFMOMA
48:47

Episode No. 320 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a holiday weekend re-air of host Tyler Green's June, 2017 conversation with Leah Dickerman.

Along with the Tate Modern's Achim Borchardt-Hume, Dickerman is the co-curator of "Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends," a retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art through March 25. The exhibition features Rauschenberg's early photography, body prints, combines, performances, prints and more. The exhibition catalogue was published by MoMA.

Dec 21, 2017
PST: LA/LA at MCASD, Pomona College, LACMA
01:13:56

Episode No. 319 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights three exhibitions from the Getty-funded Pacific Standard Time series of exhibitions.

Julieta González discusses "Memories of Underdevelopment: Art and the Decolonial Turn in Latin America, 1960-85," which is at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego through February 4, 2018.

Adela Goldbard talks about her work, especially her interest in fire. Her work is included in "Prometheus 2017: Four Artists from Mexico Revisit Orozco" at the Pomona College Art Museum.

Finally,  Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Wendy Kaplan discusses "Found in Translation: Design in California and Mexico, 1915-1985."

Dec 14, 2017
Jed Perl on Calder, Jo Steffens
01:12:12

Episode No. 318 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features author and critic Jed Perl and author Jo Steffens.

Perl is the author of "Calder: The Conquest of Time, The Early Years, 1898-1940," the first in a planned two-volume biography of American sculptor Alexander Calder. The book was recently published by Knopf.

Jo Steffens discusses "Unpacking My Library: Artists and Their Books," which was recently published by Yale University Press. Steffens edited the book with Matthias Neumann. It is the third in a series that has also spotlighted the libraries of architects and writers.

Dec 07, 2017
Michelangelo, Art and China after 1989
01:12:54

Episode No. 317 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Carmen Bambach and Alexandra Munroe.

Bambach is the curator of "Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The exhibition, which features 133 drawings, three sculptures, a painting and a wood architectural model, all by Michelangelo, and contextualizing contemporary works by his teachers, peers and pupils, is on view through February 12, 2018. The lavish, extensive exhibition catalogue was published by the Met and is distributed by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $58.

Bambach is a curator at the Met. Her previous exhibitions include a 2010 survey of Bronzino's drawings, a 2003 exhibition of Leondardo da Vinci's drawings, and a 2001 show spotlighting the draftsmanship of Correggio and Parmigianino.

On the second segment, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum curator Alexandra Munroe discusses "Art and China After 1989: Theater of the World." The exhibition, which presents work made in or about China by 71 artists and groups between 1989 and the 2008 Beijing Olympics, is at the Guggenheim through January 7, 2018. Munroe co-curated the exhibition with Philip Tinari and Hon Hanru.

Nov 30, 2017
No. 316: SFMOMA's Raw Material, Andrea Chung
54:22

Episode No. 316 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features Raw Material hosts Jessica Placzek and Maddie Gobbo and artist Andrea Chung.

This week the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's Raw Material podcast began its third season. This season's hosts are Jessica Placzek, a reporter for San Francisco National Public Radio affiliate KQED, and Madeline Gobbo, an illustrator and graduate fiction candidate at the University of California, Davis. Season Three of Raw Material looks at California's land and landscapes and how artists and other creatives have made work there.

On the second segment, we'll hear a conversation between host Tyler Green and artist Andrea Chung from July. At the time the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego was presenting an exhibition of Chung's work. Now she's in a two-artist installation at the California African American Museum in Los Angeles, as well as the Prospect 4 triennial in New Orleans.

Nov 23, 2017
No. 315: The Black Photographers Annual, Teenie Harris
59:44

Episode No. 315 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features photographer Beuford Smith and audio from "Teenie Harris Photographs: In Their Own Voice" at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh.

With American art institutions increasingly looking at the long-neglected field of photography by African-Americans, this week's program looks at the work of two museums trying to tell a more complete story of America's history and art history.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond is now showing "Like a Study in Black History: P.H. Polk, Chester Higgins and The Black Photographers Annual, Volume 2." The Black Photographers Annuals were books that were created, published and edited by black artists and that featured the work of black photographers. The Annual was co-founded by Joe Crawford and photographer and editor Beuford Smith, who is the guest on the first segment of this week's MAN Podcast.

Curated by Sarah Eckhardt, "Like a Study in Black History" is on view through April 15, 2018. It is the second in a series of VMFA collection rotations exploring the four volumes of The Black Photographers Annual (1973-80). (The first exhibition may be accessed here.) In conjunction with the exhibitions, Smith granted the VMFA a license to present the four volumes of The Black Photographers Annual online for two years. Each volume may be accessed here:

Smith is social documentarian who was a founding member of the Kamoinge Workshop (which he later led), a black photography collective. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the New York Public Library and the VMFA; the Studio Museum in Harlem and the International Center for Photography in New York have held exhibitions of his work.

The second segment looks at "Teenie Harris Photographs: In Their Own Voice," an exhibition at the CMOA through January 28, 2018. The show, the CMOA's latest in a series of examinations of its Teenie Harris Archive, pairs oral histories with Harris's pictures. This week's program features six audio clips from those oral histories; the related photographs are below.

The oral histories were collected by Ben Houston for the Remembering African American Pittsburgh project at Carnegie Mellon University (which Houston leads). The project was developed by CMU's Center for Africanamerican Urban Studies & the Economy.

The exhibition and the related audio may be more fully accessed via its app, which is available for both Apple and Android devices.

Nov 16, 2017
An-My Lê, Katherine Bradford
01:08:03

Episode No. 314 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists An-My Lê and Katherine Bradford.

An-My Lê is in two exhibitions at the Yale University Art Gallery: "Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope," which considers the work of artists who have left the countries of their birth, and "Before the Event/After the Fact: Contemporary Perspectives of War," which examines how photographers have portrayed war. "Artists in Exile" was curated by Frauke V. Josenhans; "Before the Event/After the Fact" was organized by Judy Ditner. Both exhibitions are on view through Dec. 31. The catalogue for "Artists in Exile" was published by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $45.

Lê is a Vietnamese-American photographer whose work considers the confluence of war, landscape and memory. Her series include:

  • "Viêt Nam," in which Lê's memories of a war-plagued country inform pictures of the contemporary Vietnamese landscape;
  • "Small Wars," an investigation of Vietnam War re-enactments in Virginia and North Carolina;
  • "29 Palms," a look at Marine training exercises in the California desert; and
  • "The Silent General," a look at the post-Civil War American South.

Lê has had solo exhibitions at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Dia Beacon and MoMA PS1. In 2012 she won a MacArthur 'genius' grant.

On the second segment, Katherine Bradford discusses recent work on the occasion of "FOCUS: Katherine Bradford" at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. The exhibition, curated by Alison Hearst, is on view through January 14, 2018. This fall she'll be exhibiting in Prospect 4, the New Orleans biennial that is curated by Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University curator Trevor Schoonmaker.

Bradford's paintings often address traditional painting standards, such as bathers or swimmers, with verve and freshness. Bradford has been included in group exhibitions at museums such as MoMA PS1 and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Her paintings are in the collections of museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Smith College Museum of Art.

 

Nov 09, 2017
Thomas Struth
01:18:11

Episode No. 313 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Thomas Struth.

The Saint Louis Art Museum is set to open "Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics," a survey of 35 works Struth has made over the last decade. It opens to members tomorrow, Friday, November 3, and to the general public on November 5. It will remain on view through January 21. The exhibition was co-organized by the Museum Folkwang, Essen, Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta  in collaboration with SLAM, whose installation was organized by Eric Lutz. The exhibition's catlaogue was published by Mack. Amazon offers it for $41.

Thomas Struth is one of the world's most prominent photographers. His work often looks at the construction of places, including most recently places that he describes as being weirdly invisible. His most recent retrospective, "Thomas Struth, Photographs 1978-2010," was organized by the Kustsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, in his hometown of Dusseldorf, the Whitechapel in London and the Museu Serralves in Porto, Portugal. His last American retrospective was in 2002-03, at the Dallas Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the MCA Chicago.

Nov 02, 2017
Martine Syms, re-visiting Hassel Smith
01:03:44

Episode No. 312 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Martine Syms and art historian Petra Giloy-Hirtz.

Martine Syms is included in "Speech/Acts," a six-artist exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia that examines experimental black poetry and how language has shaped black American experiences. (Jibade-Khalil Huffman, Steffani Jemison, Tony Lewis, Tiona Nekkia McClodden, and Kameelah Janan Rasheed are the other artists.) The exhibition, which was curated by Meg Onli, will be on view through December 23. The museum's website includes a reading group syllabus, gallery guide, exhibition poster, installation views and more.

Syms is an artist and the founder of Dominica Publishing, a press dedicated to exploring blackness in contemporary art and culture. Her work most often uses video, installation and performance to investigate representations of blackness, especially in popular culture. She's been the subject of solo shows at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, White Flag Projects in St. Louis, the Camden Arts Centre and the Institute of Contemporary Art in London, Locust Projects in Miami and more.

On the second segment, Petra Giloy-Hirtz discusses her recent monograph of Hassel Smith, a major figure in the development of post-war painting in San Francisco. (Amazon offers it for just $20!) As Crocker Art Museum curator discussed with host Tyler Green last week, Smith was a major influence on Richard Diebenkorn. This segment originally aired in 2013. For Smith images, see Episode No. 65, and the Hassel Smith Estate's website. New York's Washburn Gallery will open an exhibition of Smith's work from 1959-62 on November 2.

Oct 26, 2017
Carlo Dolci, Early Diebenkorn
56:29

Episode No. 311 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Eve Straussman-Pflanzer and Scott A Shields. At the top of the program, host Tyler Green shares some findings from our recently completed annual survey.

"The Medici's Painter: Carlo Dolci and 17th-Century Florence" is the first American exhibition devoted to the paintings and drawings by Carlo Dolci. Curated by Eve Straussman-Pflanzer, the Detroit Institute of Art's curator of European paintings, the exhibition is at the Nasher Museum at Duke University through January 14, 2018.

On the second segment, Crocker Art Museum curator Scott A. Shields discusses "Richard Diebenkorn: Beginnings, 1942-1955," which the Crocker co-organized with the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation. 

Oct 19, 2017
Bellini landscapes at the Getty, two big gifts to MFA Boston
01:04:13

Episode No. 310 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Davide Gasparotto and Roni Baer.

Davide Gasparotto is the curator of "Giovanni Bellini: Landscapes of Faith in Renaissance Venice." The exhibition, which opened earlier this week at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, features 12 paintings and one drawing that explore Bellini's use of landscapes within his religious pictures.

On the second segment, two extraordinary gifts of 17thC Dutch and Flemish art and a 20,000-volume library to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Curator Ronni Baer discusses. 

Oct 12, 2017
Mark Dion, Anicka Yi
01:16:13

Episode No. 309 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Mark Dion and Anicka Yi.

This weekend, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston opens "Mark Dion: Misadventures of a 21st-Century Naturalist," a survey of over 20 years of Dion sculptures, installations and drawings. The exhibition, which was curated by Ruth Erickson with Jessica Hong, is on view through January 1, 2018. The exhibition catalogue, published by the ICA and Yale University Press, is one of the best art books of 2017. Amazon offers it for $48.

Dion works at the intersection of art, natural history, history and anthropology. His work examines and often critiques humanity's approach to nature, landscape and science through witty address of scientific methodologies and installations that often have roots in Victorian-era presentation.

Dion has fulfilled commissions and had exhibitions at museums all over the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Tate, and the British Museum of Natural History in London. He is also a co-director of Mildred's Lane, a visual art education and residency program in Beach Lake, Pennsylvania.

On the second segment, Anicka Yi. She is included in "Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon" at the New Museum. The exhibition, which was curated by Johanna Burton with Sara O'Keeffe and Natalie Bell, looks at gender in the context of America's national political crisis. It is on view through January 21, 2018. The exhibition catalogue was published by the New Museum. Amazon offers it for $40.

Oct 05, 2017
"Radical Women," and "Casanova"
01:11:47

Episode No. 308 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Cecelia Fajardo-Hill and Frederick Ilchman.

Along with Andrea Giunta, Fajardo-Hill is a curator of "Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960-1985," one of the headline shows of the Getty Foundation-funded "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA" series of exhibitions. The show is the first survey of art made by women in Latin America and US-born Chicanas and Latinas during the sixties, seventies and early eighties. It includes about 116 artists from 15 countries, including Lygia Pape, Zilia Sánchez and Ana Mendieta.

The show will be at the Hammer through December 31. The catalogue is a strikingly thorough English-language source. It was published by DelMonico Prestel. Amazon offers it for $43.

On the second segment, MFA Boston curator Frederick Ilchman discusses "Casanova: The Seduction of Europe," a broad look at the over-the-top luxury of European art and decorative arts in the pre-French Revolution decades. It's on view at the Kimbell Art Museum through December 31. The show is built around the famed Giacomo Casanova, a courtier, lothario and schemester whose memoir provides one of the best insights to an era in which those at the top of society milked their countries for wealth and prestige, leavin little for others. The exhibition was co-curated by Ilchman, the National Gallery's C.D. Dickerson (who started work on the show while he was at the Kimbell), and the Clark's Esther Bell. The exhibition catalogue, which was published by the MFA Boston, is one of the best art books of the year. Amazon lists it for $38.

Sep 28, 2017
Emmet Gowin
01:15:46

Episode No. 307 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Emmet Gowin. 

Gowin's "Mariposas Nocturnas: Moths of Central and South America, a Study in Beauty and Diversity" is just out from Princeton University Press. The book features photographs of hundreds of moths that Gowin has made in Central and South America over the last 15 years. The book includes essays by Terry Tempest Williams and Gowin. Amazon offers it for $41.

Gowin will show related work in "Here on Earth Now -- Notes from the Field" in an exhibition that opens on Sept. 28 at New York's Pace/MacGill Gallery. It will remain on view through Jan. 6, 2018.

See images of this week's program here.

Sep 21, 2017
Photography in Argentina 1850-2010, Jimmie Durham
01:15:28

Episode No. 306 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curators Idurre Alonso and Anne Ellegood.

Alonso is the co-curator of "Photography in Argentina, 1850-2010: Contradiction and Continuity" at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It opens this weekend and remains on view through January 28, 2018. The exhibition, which explores themes that emphasize Argentina's history, features nearly 300 works.

On the second segment, Hammer Museum curator Anne Ellegood discusses her exhibition "Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World." The exhibition, the first US retrospective of Durham's work in 20 years, is at the Walker Art Center through October 7. 

Sep 14, 2017
Carolina Miranda on PST: LA/LA, Leyla Cárdenas
01:00:58

Episode No. 305 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features journalist Carolina Miranda and artist Leyla Cárdenas.

Carolina Miranda is a journalist at the Los Angeles Times. She joins host Tyler Green to preview "Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA," a Getty Foundation-funded series of exhibitions, catalogues and events across southern California.

Cárdenas discusses her recent work, especially Excision (2012), which is included in "Home -- So Different, So Appealing" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. It is the first PST: LA/LA show to open. Curated by Chon Noriega, Pilar Tompkins Rivas and Mari Carmen Ramirez, it will remain on view through October 15, when it will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Sep 07, 2017