Social Media Marketing Podcast helps your business thrive with social media

By Michael Stelzner, Social Media Examiner

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Social Media Examiner’s Michael Stelzner helps your business navigate the social jungle with success stories and expert interviews from leading social media marketing pros. Discover how successful businesses employ social media, learn new strategies and tactics, and gain actionable tips to improve your social media marketing. Find show notes at https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/podcast/

Episode Date
YouTube Ads: What Marketers Need to Know
52:34
Do you want to diversify your social media advertising? Wondering how to make YouTube ads work for your business? To explore how to reach more customers with YouTube ads, I interview Tom Breeze. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tom Breeze, YouTube ads expert and founder of YouTube ad agency Viewbility. His book is titled Viewability: Harness the Power of YouTube Ads and Be There for Your Customer When It Really Counts and his course is YouTube Ads Workshop. Tom explains how user intent on Facebook and YouTube differs and why intent matters to advertisers. You'll also discover a seven-step framework to create YouTube ads that sell. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Ads Tom's Story Tom's journey with YouTube was heavily impacted by his university studies. He graduated with a master's degree in psychology, and at around age 23, he began working with businesspeople who had anxiety about public speaking. In 2008, he started doing workshops on the subject and used Google ads to grow the business by driving traffic to his site. Then, at a 2-day presentation workshop, a few people asked for help using video to present their businesses. Oddly, Tom had just created his own video and was already seeing results; conversions on the site had increased from 7% to 22% almost instantly. As more people requested the video training rather than the public speaking training, Tom rapidly transitioned into YouTube video. He wanted to help his clients get more views, and by extension, more business. He learned how to optimize video titles, tags, and descriptions, and dove into learning more about SEO strategies. When Tom teamed up with a business partner to learn how videos could rank well in all search engines—not just YouTube—they established an entire agency around SEO. But as SEO evolved and got more complicated, Tom noticed their results started to drop. To better serve his clients, Tom decided to use his experience with Google AdWords to test ads for YouTube video. He chose a video that had been created for SEO purposes and plugged it into Google AdWords. He targeted a few simple keywords and ran the video as a YouTube ad. The results were incredible. From there, the SEO business evolved into an agency that focuses exclusively on YouTube ads. Listen to the show to learn what kind of results Tom saw from his first YouTube ad. Why YouTube Ads Matter Next, I ask Tom why marketers should consider advertising on YouTube. First, Tom says, YouTube has a lot of ad inventory available so it's easier for marketers and businesses to get placements. Second, YouTube users are highly engaged on the platform. In 2015, users in the 18-49 age range spent 4% less time watching TV than the year before, while time watching YouTube video rose by 74%. This year, YouTube reported its 1.9 million active users are collectively watching more than one billion minutes of video daily. These people are actively using YouTube as a search engine, the average viewing session is clocking in at 40 minutes, and the potential to connect with the right audience is very high. Imagine an engaged user is looking for help and finds your YouTube content. You immediately have an opportunity to create a great first brand experience. Finally, despite all these positives, only 1 in 10 brands has actually used YouTube ads. So while the ad inventory is a lot bigger, the competition is a little lower. Listen to the show to find out why many brands haven't tried YouTube ads. How YouTube Viewers Differ From Facebook Viewers When I ask Tom why advertising on YouTube is different than advertising on Facebook,
Dec 14, 2018
Twitter Marketing: Creative Ways to Connect With Your Audience
47:01
Wondering how Twitter engagement can help your business? Looking for tips on sharing authentic tweets and conversations with prospects? To explore creative ways to interact with your Twitter fans, I interview Dan Knowlton. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dan Knowlton, a creative marketer, speaker, and trainer. He co-founded KPS Digital Marketing, an agency that specializes in social and video marketing. Dan explains why he stopped using Twitter automation tools and how other tools help marketers engage with fans more effectively. You'll also discover tips for starting conversations and building relationships on Twitter. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Marketing Dan's Story About 5 years ago, Dan became interested in marketing while studying business management and marketing at the University of Brighton in the UK. However, he didn't take any of the digital or social media marketing classes. His coursework and early work experience focused on traditional marketing. After graduation, Dan worked for a big company in London as part of a program for new graduates. The company trained him to run a branch as if it were his own business so he learned about sales, customer service, managing a team, team building, communication, and so on. However, the job was like running a business without the perks of running your own business, so he quit. Dan moved back in with his parents, and then traveled around Thailand and pursued his interest in online marketing. He began by learning about the topic from sources like Social Media Examiner, Content Marketing Institute, and Digital Marketer. After following a tutorial by Matthew Barby about growing a social media following, Dan was excited to see his Twitter following grow. Dan continued to get good results for himself and his dad's company, so he set up a digital marketing agency with his dad and his brother. They wanted to help bigger companies with their online marketing, too. They now work with global brands running creative campaigns with video content and social media marketing, and the agency is growing. Listen to the show to hear Dan share more about his early success growing a social media following. Advantages of Twitter Marketing To understand the benefits of Twitter marketing, marketers should think about the ways in which Twitter is the go-to platform and how their marketing can fulfill the needs of people who use it. For starters, Twitter is a place to discuss live events. With the event hashtag, you don't even need to attend the event to join the conversation. People also go to Twitter to learn about breaking news. Twitter is unique because you can follow or have conversations with high-profile people and celebrities. Compared to LinkedIn or Facebook, Twitter makes high-profile people seem accessible. People who would never answer your email might respond to you on Twitter because they're in a different mindset when they use Twitter. Marketers can use the conversational nature of Twitter for customer service and networking. To illustrate, Buffer and Mailchimp use Twitter to provide empathetic customer service and instant solutions to people's problems. Tweets can provide much better service than a voicemail menu or a website form, and simultaneously show how supportive your business is. For online networking, Twitter chats are the perfect place to meet and engage with people online. Twitter is also a great place to continue conversations and build relationships that begin at online events. When you look at all of the ways Twitter can help marketers, you can see it's the perfect platform for middle-of-funnel acti...
Dec 07, 2018
Revenue Optimization: Maximizing ROI on Your Ads
54:10
Want your Facebook and Google ads to generate more revenue? Curious how Google Analytics data can help you find website optimizations that will help? To explore how optimizing the customer journey helps you boost sales, I interview Tanner Larsson. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tanner Larsson, an eCommerce optimization expert who focuses on revenue and the author of Ecommerce Evolved. His consultancy is Build Grow Scale, and he hosts an event called Build Grow Scale Live. Tanner explains how marketers can analyze their whole customer-acquisition process to optimize revenue. You'll also discover how analytics data can identify four revenue leaks that are easy to fix. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Revenue Optimization Tanner's Story In 2001, Tanner owned window cleaning and Christmas light businesses that were doing well, but he was bored. So he began learning about online marketing and sales with eBay and quickly became a PowerSeller. Although he loved selling online, the technology for eBay sellers was still so basic that he spent lots of time doing things he didn't like, such as weighing packages and printing labels. Tanner then left eBay for ClickBank, an affiliate platform for informational and digital products. Inspired by people selling how-to business courses, he created one about building a window cleaning business. When he didn't get rich from this course, he realized the online space wasn't a magic place for making money. It was simply another business medium. Tanner then began learning about online marketing and sales tactics. He not only loved implementing everything he learned, but also needed a new way to make a living. After almost going blind, he had a cornea transplant, which involved a long, restrictive healing process. Because he couldn't go outside or pick up anything over five pounds, he had to sell his window cleaning business. After shifting to online sales, Tanner realized he preferred selling physical widgets, gizmos, and gadgets online. When you're selling an informational product, you have to go above and beyond to convince someone they need to buy it. Selling a physical product is easier for him because he can simply provide the supporting information. Today, as a founder of Build Grow Scale, Tanner focuses only on eCommerce. The scope of his work has included online stores, sales funnels, and hybrid solutions. Through all of his big wins and losses, he's tested everything and learned to focus on a data-driven approach to eCommerce. Some big losses with a Shopify store were especially useful in shaping Tanner's thinking about eCommerce. At first, the Shopify store took off, selling tens of thousands of products per week. But after a sudden change, he was writing $200,000 checks each month to keep the business afloat because the cash flow couldn't keep up with the growth. After Tanner figured out what wasn't working, he started looking at data in a different, deeper way. Although his principles are based on eCommerce, you can use them for selling more than physical products. They would also work for visual products, services, and so on. Listen to the show to hear more about Tanner's experience selling on eBay. 3 Mistakes Marketers Make When Acquiring Customers When marketers try to acquire customers, Tanner often finds they make three big mistakes. First, they're too focused on acquiring a customer and the first sale. Specifically, they want to cover all of their expenses and extract a profit from the first sale. This approach is a recipe for disaster and makes staying in business more difficult because you generate real profit from subsequent sal...
Nov 30, 2018
LinkedIn Video: How Marketers Can Create Videos People Watch on LinkedIn
49:01
Looking to connect with an audience that has buying power? Wondering how to reach LinkedIn users with video? To explore how LinkedIn video marketing works, I interview Goldie Chan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Goldie Chan, a LinkedIn video expert. She produces a daily video show about marketing on LinkedIn. Her courses on lynda.com include LinkedIn Video Marketing for Personal and Brand Pages. Goldie explains how LinkedIn's video audience and metrics compare to those on YouTube and Facebook. You'll also discover tips for creating and optimizing LinkedIn videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: LinkedIn Video Goldie's Story Goldie has been working in digital marketing for more than 10 years, focusing on social media strategy and content creation. In that time, she's worked with lots of platforms creating all kinds of content including Facebook live video, Twitch video, Instagram content, Pinterest, and now LinkedIn video. Goldie has also worked in a range of industries. She moved from a tech startup to fashion. Then she worked for Legendary Entertainment as director of social and community. The company handles blockbuster movies that tend to work well in China and in the U.S., such as the King Kong franchise and The Great Wall. Goldie worked on both paid and organic social, and on building their community. In August 2017, Goldie was taking a break in her career and got into the LinkedIn video beta. It was the perfect time to create content she enjoys, and she loves pop culture. Her first 50 videos explored branding, metrics, and historical facts about pop culture phenomena. This project evolved into her daily channel (#dailygoldie), which has subscribers from all over the world. Today, her channel continues to look at the marketing and business impact of pop culture phenomena. For example, she might explore where the majority of the marketing budget for Harry Potter went. Looking at how the books, movies, and franchise in general are marketed works with LinkedIn's business focus. And for Goldie, this approach is more interesting than expressing her fandom. Although her daily show is primarily about marketing, Goldie also talks about branding as it relates to her experiences because she frequently travels around the world. When she's speaking, she shares tips that will help her audience. As a proponent of building community, she created #LinkedInCreators, the hashtag most people who create content use on LinkedIn. Because Goldie has been posting daily videos, she can track how LinkedIn video has been developing over the past year. Whenever a bug or any issues have occurred, she witnessed it firsthand. She has found the journey to be amazing, and for the 1-year anniversary of LinkedIn video, she hosted the official LinkedIn party in New York with their video team. In addition to running Daily Goldie on LinkedIn, Goldie owns Warm Robots, a social media strategy agency. For clients like The Art Institutes, she helps figure out how to tell their stories in ways that encourage people to join and feel involved with the brand. She also helps C-level executives create their personal brands on LinkedIn and elsewhere. Listen to the show to hear Goldie share a story about helping an executive determine whether content was appropriate for Instagram. How LinkedIn Video Compares to YouTube and Facebook Video Goldie believes marketers who are already invested in YouTube or Facebook video should consider LinkedIn because its unique audience offers great opportunities. LinkedIn has more people who work in the top levels of their profession and attracts people who are gainfully empl...
Nov 23, 2018
Modern Marketing: Wisdom From Seth Godin
44:31
Wondering how empathy can help your marketing stand out? Curious how trust and tension help marketers retain their customers? To explore what is and isn't working for marketers today, I interview Seth Godin. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Seth Godin, one of the great thinkers of our era. He's a prolific blogger and the author of 18 books including Tribes, Permission Marketing, and Purple Cow. His podcast is called Akimbo. His latest book is This Is Marketing: You Can't Be Seen Until You Learn to See. Seth explains why marketing messages should focus on improving people's lives. You'll also find examples of businesses that use empathy, trust, and tension to market their products. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Modern Marketing Seth's Podcast Seth's podcast Akimbo is about bending the culture, or seeing the culture and how we change it. The name Akimbo comes from the word for a bend in the river and for bending your arms to show power, the way Wonder Woman stands on a building with her hands on her hips, looking down on the bad guys. When Seth named his podcast, he also wanted his podcast to start with the letter A because many podcast apps list podcasts in alphabetical order. You're at a disadvantage if you call your podcast Zodiac Seven. Seth had an earlier podcast, Startup School, which was incredibly successful. However, he considers Akimbo to be his first real podcast because he created Startup School in 2 days as an artifact of an event he ran; he didn't create it as a podcast. Seth has been hosting the Akimbo podcast for a little over a year and has released about 35 episodes at the time of this interview. Each episode is about 20 minutes, he has no guests, and he doesn't read the ads. At the end, he answers questions that people send from all over the world. Because Seth shut down the comments on his blog, I ask how he likes interacting with his audience in the Q&A. He says answering the questions is fun. The key difference is that the questions aren't comments and they aren't anonymous. Before he started the segment, he was worried about screening 50 good questions. However, he doesn't get many, and they're all good questions. To prepare for each episode, Seth writes the show notes first. The notes are a list of topics and often include links to relevant articles and videos. Then he riffs based on the show notes. He records the episodes by himself in the shower at his office, which is covered in foam. The shift from writing by himself to talking by himself is fascinating. Seth believes his podcast is reaching the right people in the right way: drip by drip. He doesn't spend any time or energy promoting the podcast. It's there for people who want it. Listen to the show to hear how Seth started his podcast after planning it for 10 years. What's Wrong With Marketing Today In the author's note to This Is Marketing, Seth says, "It's time to do something else with marketing to make things better." I ask what about marketing today isn't working that prompted him to write that. He responds by outlining two problems. First, some marketers are selfish, narcissistic, short-term spammers who think their behavior is fine as long as they don't break the law. They call senior citizens at home to sell them worthless collectible coins. They try to hassle people, put them in a squeeze page, or get them to buy something they don't want or need. As a result, marketing has a second problem: the people who might be willing and able to improve marketing are hesitant to call themselves marketers or do marketing because they think the only way to do it is to be one of those scammer...
Nov 16, 2018
How to Create Ads That Move People to Action
48:42
Want a faster, better way to optimize your ads? Did you know that focusing on customers' emotions can help? To explore how to use emotional messaging to move people to action, I interview Talia Wolf. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Talia Wolf. She's the founder of GetUplift, an agency that specializes in conversion rate optimization for websites, landing pages, and advertisements. Her course is called Emotion Sells: The Masterclass. Talia explains how to research customers' emotional connection to your product and why applying your findings improves conversions. You'll also learn how to stand out with different types of ads, color psychology, and emotional imagery. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Emotion in Advertising Talia's Story In 2007, Talia got her start in conversion optimization by mistake. At a social media agency, she worked with big local brands that focused on likes, engagement, and comments. When she asked these brands about their goals for leads and sales, they rarely knew the answer. To help increase conversions, she changed the Facebook ads and landing pages, guessing what would work. When Talia learned that an entire industry is devoted to optimizing ads, landing pages, websites, and funnels, she began finding out more about it. The more she learned, the more she loved it, which led to her starting a conversion optimization agency in 2010. For the first few years, she had to convince people to spend more money on optimizing current assets than on buying more ads and traffic. Talia's struggles to prove her value and get results inspired her to abandon her intuitive approach to conversion optimization and develop a process based on emotion and psychology. The process quickly improved her results. Within weeks, her client conversions doubled, and some even improved tenfold. She also began attracting more clients. Today, Talia runs GetUplift and helps companies optimize their websites using emotion and psychology. She also teaches her process through her masterclass. Talia teaches how to identify your customers' emotions in order to understand why people buy from you. She also explains how to apply what you learn to increase conversions from ads, landing pages, and so on. Listen to the show to hear how conversion rate optimization helped improve the sales page for Social Media Marketing World. How Emotion Helps You Optimize for Conversions Talia explains the benefits of focusing on customer emotions in order to optimize your ads and landing pages. First, you can save money and time. Because the customer-focused approach helps you find what works faster, you spend less money on testing and refining your ads. Most companies spend a lot of money driving traffic to their website or landing pages. Often, they spend money changing their ads and targeting, and still don't get the desired results, so they just continue to throw more money at different target audiences. Or they might think of conversion optimization as changing a button or headline, or adding a few more bullets. Talia says customer-centric conversion optimization is focused on understanding people on a deeper level than demographic details like gender, location, profession, income, devices they use, etc. Instead, you focus on the real challenges and pains that people coming to your website want to solve. Common marketing tactics don't help customers understand how your product helps them. To visualize this, you're not focused on the customer when you change the color of a button or the way you explain your product's features and pricing. What does help is understanding customers' emotions, pains,
Nov 09, 2018
Facebook Video: Insight From a Facebook Watch Success Story
44:56
Wondering how creators succeed with video on Facebook Watch? Curious how it compares to other social media video? To explore what marketers can learn from a successful Facebook Watch creator, I interview Rachel Farnsworth. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Rachel Farnsworth, a Facebook video expert. She's the founder of the Stay At Home Chef and author of the book, Slow Cooker Cooking. Her Facebook Watch show, Recipes, has more than 4 million subscribers. Rachel explains how her experience with Facebook Watch compares to videos on her Facebook page and YouTube channel. You'll also discover tips for measuring Facebook video performance and running ads on Facebook Watch. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Video Success With Facebook Watch Rachel's Story In 2008, when Rachel became a stay-at-home mom, she started a blog. She didn't love being a stay-at-home mom. She was bored and yearned for connection. On her blog, she shared recipes for friends and family because she loves cooking. In 2012, after she had her last child, she started trying to make money from her blog. At that point, her goal was to cover the grocery bill. Rachel's husband, who's a software engineer, suggested she make video part of her business because he believed video was the future of the internet. Although Rachel didn't watch a lot of online video at the time, she decided to try making some videos and putting them on YouTube. Rachel says her first videos were terrible. She didn't edit them, so viewers saw her turn on the camera and walk around in front of it. Everything was in real time. She quickly realized her videos weren't good, deleted those initial attempts, and began practicing offline. She experimented with new styles that showed only the food and not her face, but at that point, she still wasn't proud of her work. In 2016, BuzzFeed launched Tasty, which performed well and helped Rachel see the possibilities in what she was already doing. She started honing her craft with her own style and improved the quality of her videos. She also started a video business, making original videos for the Facebook pages of other online creators. Making videos for other Facebook pages was a tremendous learning experience. In 6 months, Rachel made about 1,000 top-down, hands-only cooking videos. After working with about 100 different pages on Facebook, she developed a keen sense for what succeeds on Facebook and what doesn't. With an understanding of how to create videos and what works on Facebook, Rachel returned to creating her own videos in October 2016. In less than 3 months, she went from 52,000 to 1 million followers. For these videos, she chose content from her blog that would translate well to video. Her first video, a 60-second homemade rolls recipe, is still among her most viewed videos. When Facebook announced Watch in June 2017, Rachel learned everything she could about it. She talked to everyone she knew who might be connected to Facebook Watch about their experiences with it. When Facebook came to Salt Lake City, where Rachel lives, they invited top YouTube creators in the area, who suggested Facebook invite Rachel, too. At that time, Rachel's YouTube channel had about 150,000 subscribers, so it was a legitimate YouTube channel but not a major component of her business. After meeting with Facebook, Rachel pursued a Watch page by sending emails and following Facebook employees on LinkedIn. She says she pushed the limit to break into Facebook Watch. Rachel launched her Facebook Watch page, Recipes, on February 26, 2018. Because Watch is a search-based platform,
Nov 02, 2018
How to Drive Organic Traffic With Bots
50:07
Want more website visitors? Wondering how Messenger bots can help? To explore how to bots can drive organic traffic to your website, I interview Natasha Takahashi. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Natasha Takahashi, a chatbot expert and founder of the School of Bots, a community for marketers seeking to master bots. She also hosts the There's a Bot For That live show, and she has a range of courses including Chatbot Agency Accelerator. Natasha explains how to integrate chatbots into your social media and email marketing. You'll also discover tips for growing your bot subscriber list and engaging with subscribers effectively. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Messenger Bots That Drive Website Traffic Natasha's Story In 2016, after working as a marketer for tech startups and with a few clients of her own, Natasha was planning to launch a social media marketing agency with her co-founder, Kyle Willis. To stay on top of everything happening in social media marketing, she watched F8 (Facebook's developer conference) remotely, where they announced Facebook Messenger bots. At the conference, Facebook showed enterprise examples, but right away, Natasha wanted to start testing whether Messenger bots would be effective for her clients, which were small- and mid-sized businesses. She thought if she could learn to market with bots really well, she might be able to make her new agency stand out. After about 4 or 5 months, Natasha's bot marketing was going well for her clients. As is common with bot marketing, her clients had high open and click rates. They also had good conversion and retention rates. Since getting started with bots 2 years ago, Natasha and her agency have built about 100 bots. Today, in addition to her chatbot agency, Natasha and Kyle run School of Bots, which launched in January 2018. They created it as a resource for chatbot marketing and strategy, with free articles, videos, and interviews with thought leaders. Their goal is to provide up-to-date content in a niche that changes quickly. At the same time, Natasha and Kyle launched the Chatbot Agency Accelerator, which teaches people how to build their chatbot agencies and add chatbots to their offerings. Although they didn't push this program, it's taken off. They've grown the community, and Natasha has been doing a lot of speaking engagements. Listen to the show to hear Natasha share what some of her hopes were as she became an entrepreneur. Why Use Messenger Bots? Natasha thinks right now is the perfect time to build a bot for your company or clients because, with all of the buzz about bots, people know about them but may not fully understand them. Although WhatsApp surpassed Messenger in terms of number of users, Natasha still recommends focusing on Messenger because its users still send more messages per month than WhatsApp users do. Also, Facebook Messenger works with chatbot platforms like ManyChat and Chatfuel, which are designed for non-coders and make it easy to create a chatbot and get results. Right now, other platforms like Slack, Skype, Telegram, and WhatsApp are still just like email in terms of how you can use them to market to users. Messenger chatbots are also a great way to drive traffic to your website now that the Facebook algorithm no longer prioritizes social posting. With a chatbot, no algorithm is controlling what people see; you can control the conversation between your page and the user. Thus, driving traffic with a chatbot is much easier than it is with a regular post to your Facebook page or even an email. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts about chatbots versus email.
Oct 26, 2018
Why We Abandoned Facebook Video Longer Than Two Minutes
29:18
Earlier this week, we made the decision to stop publishing three weekly shows on Facebook. I'd like to share some important marketing lessons we discovered and a resource I think you'll enjoy. Here's the video I released on Facebook, announcing the move: https://www.facebook.com/smexaminer/videos/279608756015802/ Here's why we killed two shows and moved a third one over to YouTube. All of our analysis showed that people are NOT watching video on Facebook. Especially if it's longer than about a minute or two. Why? Facebook is a highway and no one stops to watch video (at least for us.) Instead, they scroll. However, YouTube is where people prefer to watch videos that are longer than a few minutes. Here's what a typical video's retention looks like for us on Facebook: Here's the exact same video on YouTube: And we saw this pattern, over and over. The challenge for us is our YouTube audience is small—21,000 vs 533,000 on Facebook. The hardest decision was moving our 7-minute weekly docuseries (The Journey) exclusively to YouTube. It's a "behind the scenes" reality show that reveals how we do our marketing. Last week's show was about our launch strategy for our conference. Below are instructions on where to find that show. Prior to this week, our thinking was all about distributing the show as far and as wide as possible. My mindset was "go where our tribe is." So we published it natively on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and YouTube. At first glance it looked like we were getting 10X the views on Facebook. But the retention graphs told a different story. When I actually looked at the data, it was VERY clear that YouTube is the channel where people are actually watching our videos. Publishing Facebook content that people don't watch or engage with is bad for our page. It sends the wrong signals to the algorithm. It's not a smart strategy. So despite a small group of people on Facebook saying they absolutely loved our show, not many more were watching. Also, here is a more detailed explanation of my reasoning: https://www.facebook.com/smexaminer/videos/930051237180491/ So, that's my why. If you want to discover a lot more about how I think and how we do our marketing, this is exactly what we cover each week on The Journey. Here are some important links: How to subscribe to The Journey: There are two important steps. First click on this link and hit subscribe. The important second step is to hit the bell.  That will ensure you get notifications when we release a new episode, even if you don't hang out on YouTube a lot. Two of our recent shows worth watching: Leaning Into Launch Day: Me and my team conclude testing and begin a multi-channel product launch. Will our hard work pay off? Watch and see. Analyzing for Improved Results: Watch as we analyze what worked during launch week and begin exploring new ideas. We also prepare for a big launch of "The Journey." I want to thank you for being a loyal subscriber. It's my hope that you follow along with what we’re doing on YouTube. I'm confident you'll discover new marketing ideas and get to know us better. What do you think? Did we make the right decision? Where do you watch longer video content? Share your thoughts in the comments below.
Oct 24, 2018
How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Marketing
50:38
Wondering what artificial intelligence features are coming to social media and advertising platforms? Want to know how machine learning can improve your marketing? To explore how artificial intelligence will impact social media marketing, I interview Mike Rhodes. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Mike Rhodes, an expert in helping businesses with customer acquisition. He's the co-author of The Ultimate Guide to Google AdWords and CEO of WebSavvy. He offers courses on Google Display Network, AdWords, Google Data Studio, and more. Mike explains why marketers need to understand artificial intelligence and shares examples that illustrate its impact. You'll also discover how artificial intelligence can automate bidding, targeting, and messaging for your ads. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Artificial Intelligence for Marketers Mike's Story Early in his career, Mike learned that he loves helping business owners see what's around the corner. In the 1990s, Mark worked for a helicopter firm in Hawaii. In exchange for flying lessons, he helped the firm computerize. (His boss flew the helicopter in Magnum P.I.) In 2004, Mike learned how Google AdWords (now Google Ads) helped small businesses and did campaigns as favors. A few years later, Mike started his agency. His focus on future tools and techniques put him in the right place at the right time. This focus also led to Mike's interest in artificial intelligence (AI). About 3 years ago, he realized businesses will need to move from reading and listening to more sophisticated ways of interacting with customers, and learned all he could about the topic. In learning about AI, Mike wasn't focused on how to build AI-enabled technologies. He was interested in knowing how to use AI so he could figure out how it's relevant to business owners. Specifically, he spots the business problems and helps businesses identify which of those problems require AI. He also knows which off-the-shelf tools use some AI and which don't. Listen to the show to hear Mike share a story about flying a helicopter into a Kauai canyon. Why Artificial Intelligence Is Important to Marketers To explain why AI is important, Mike shares a comparison from Andrew Ng, an AI and machine learning expert. Andrew says AI is the new electricity. Just as electricity started being used to power everything 100 years ago, AI is being added to everything now. The advent of electricity changed everything, including transport, factories, and more. Similarly, AI will change the knowledge economy. For marketers, the coming changes are important because your business will benefit from being aware of AI-based tools and techniques before your competitors are. If you work on the agency side, you want to help your clients lead with AI. Although marketers don't need to understand AI in great detail, they do need to know enough about AI to spot opportunities. The Hollywood version of AI features robots with guns turning us into paperclips. The reality is more mundane and incremental. We're a long way off from AI that can run Google campaigns or send your kids to school and cook dinner. However, artificial narrow intelligence (also shortened to narrow intelligence or ANI) is likely to start replacing an increasing number of human tasks. You can think of ANI as incredibly smart software. Mark thinks, in a very optimistic version of the future, smart machines will enable us to do things that we can't do today or will do tasks we can do much, much better. In other words, ANI will enable us to hand over menial tasks so we have more time for creative, strategic, or compassionate work.
Oct 19, 2018
How to Cultivate Community With Facebook Groups
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Want more engagement in your Facebook group? Looking for tips on shaping your group's culture? To explore how to build a loyal and engaged community inside of Facebook groups, I interview Dana Malstaff. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dana Malstaff. She's the author of Boss Mom and host of the Boss Mom podcast. Her membership site is called Boss Mom Vault, and she's built a thriving community in a Facebook group. Dana explains how to lay the groundwork for a new group and attract members. You'll also learn how to foster group culture and engagement. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Group Engagement Dana's Story On New Year's Eve, Dana rang in 2013 celebrating her last day at her full-time job. She started the new year as an entrepreneur and an expecting first-time mom. Although she was scared and had no idea how to do either, she wanted to be amazing at both. At the time, she felt isolated, living in Columbus, Ohio, surrounded by people who had full-time jobs and no kids. After Dana's son was born, he went to daycare while she worked, and she felt a massive amount of guilt working at home and sending her baby to school, even though that's what she wanted to do. At one point, while she was working on her laptop in a café, the sight of a mom, daughter, and grandma made her cry. When Dana told her husband that she wanted to move back to San Diego, California, where her parents still live, he said, "I'll quit my job tomorrow, and we'll sell the house." Two months later, when her son was five months old, Dana was living in San Diego, surrounded by people who had kids and businesses. Being among people who were doing something similar to her was empowering. At Hal Elrod's Best Year Ever Blueprint, Dana met some people who started a mastermind group, and one of them was Azul Terronez, who helped Dana write her book, Boss Mom. The book talks about how she stopped feeling guilty about creating things while raising a child. As the book succeeded, Dana wove the Boss Mom idea into her whole brand. As part of that effort, Dana created the Boss Mom Facebook group, but Boss Mom is something much bigger than a Facebook group. Dana envisioned it as a movement with a culture. In the Facebook group, Dana guides the Boss Mom culture and creates a foundation for what people expect from it, a process similar to building culture at a company. This summer, Dana launched Boss Mom meetups, so the community has an online and offline presence. When you think about your topic as a movement with a culture, you treat it differently than many people treat their Facebook groups. With this approach, Dana's Facebook group has grown to 33,000 members, most of whom discovered the group organically through Facebook recommendations or referrals from friends. The group adds an average of 120 members weekly. Dana's group isn't only large and growing; it also has high engagement. Each month, on average, about 70% of her group members are active participants. The group has 85,000 to 89,000 interactions and about 5,000 posts each month. Listen to the show to hear Dana and me discuss possible reasons why she found more entrepreneurs in San Diego than Columbus. How to Build a Facebook Group When Dana started her Facebook group, she made a common mistake: posting in the group and telling people they should hang out with her. For a while, she was the only one posting, which is a sad and depressing experience for most group owners. She hoped other people would comment and thought engaging everyone was her job alone. Otherwise, she thought no one would engage. However,
Oct 12, 2018
How to Get Customers to Evangelize Your Business
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Want to increase your business's exposure in social media feeds? Curious how word of mouth can help you overcome algorithm changes? To explore how talk triggers encourage customers to evangelize your business, I interview Jay Baer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jay Baer. He's the author of multiple books, including Hug Your Haters, and co-author of the new book Talk Triggers. He also founded Convince & Convert. Jay explains why talk triggers help your business stand out from your competition and on social media. You'll also discover the elements of successful talk triggers and ways they can generate word of mouth. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Word-of-Mouth Marketing Why Is Word of Mouth Important? To start, Jay defines what "word of mouth" means to marketers. It's when a customer tells somebody else about a particular business. This conversation could be face to face or online via email, Skype, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, WeChat, or any number of other media. Also, the conversation could be one to one or via a review site like Yelp, TripAdvisor, or Angie's List. As Jay and co-author Daniel Lemin did research for the book, they found that 83% of Americans have engaged in word-of-mouth recommendations in the past 30 days. Sometimes you don't notice you're giving a recommendation. At a recent party, Jay listened to the conversations for 3-4 minutes and heard at least 8 recommendations for movies, books, software, and conference speakers. Most research Jay and other engagement labs have done focuses on online word of mouth, which is anonymous or semi-anonymous. A Yelp reviewer doesn't know who'll see their review. When you tweet, you know only that you're speaking to your followers in the aggregate. However, the newest research finds that online word of mouth accounts for only half of all recommendations. The other half of all recommendations are offline and happen in face-to-face conversations or over the phone, so these recommendations are just as important as online ones. Also, in business, neither type of word of mouth is studied as much as it should be. Depending on your business and product, word-of-mouth recommendations influenced 20%-90% of every dollar that you have. After outlining how important word-of-mouth recommendations are to every business, Jay notes that businesses typically don't have a word-of-mouth strategy. Whereas businesses have an overall digital strategy and strategies for social media, public relations, and content, they approach word of mouth by assuming their customers will talk about them. But maybe customers won't. Jay draws a distinction between a word-of-mouth strategy and a viral post. Businesses welcome virality because it provides disproportionate reach, and they'll try to produce posts they hope will go viral with a surprise-and-delight tactic. That is, the business treats a particular customer in a remarkable way, hoping the customer shares their experience on social and it goes viral. Aiming for a viral post isn't a strategy; it's a stunt. It's like buying a lottery ticket. Although delighting a customer in this way isn't a bad idea, this approach isn't a strategy because it's not repeatable. Even if you're fortunate enough to have a viral post, you can't grow your business with viral social media posts over and over. To grow your business with an approach that's scalable, you need to think about how you can encourage word-of-mouth conversations every day. You need to do something different in your company so that customers notice and tell their friends, who tell their friends. When businesses are doing this,
Oct 05, 2018
How to Sell With Facebook Lead Ads
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Want your Facebook funnel to be more profitable? Wondering how Facebook lead ads can help? To explore how to sell with Facebook lead ads in an unconventional way, I interview Oli Billson. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Oli Billson. He's a business growth expert who specializes in direct response and marketing automation. He's co-host of Path to Purchase Podcast, and his course is called Next Level Growth. Oli explains why a mobile-only funnel that collects phone numbers helps you have conversations that improve sales. You'll also discover tips for setting up Facebook lead ads, qualifying leads, and texting with prospects. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Funnel with Lead Ads Oli's Story Oli grew up in the UK, and at a young age, he became a high-performance tennis player who played all over the world. After he fell out of love with tennis, he needed another way to channel his energy. He'd always looked up to his father, who was in business, so when Oli was 15 years old, he started his first business building custom computers. The business grew quickly, and soon he was exporting computers to Asia. Oli went on to build several businesses fairly organically and through mainstream media advertising. Then in 2003, he started advertising with Google AdWords. At the time, pay per click was new, and the ads had amazing results with cheap leads and quality customers. Because Oli believes no one should rely on a single traffic source, he was quick to start running ads when Facebook introduced its advertising platform. Google AdWords was intent-based, whereas Facebook ads worked more like display advertising. Oli viewed Facebook ads as a huge opportunity to dial into all of the demographic and psychographic details for audience targeting. Today, Oli spends most of his time running Next Level Business, an eLearning platform that helps entrepreneurs and business owners grow their businesses beyond seven figures. He also runs an agency called Oliver Billson that does marketing and consulting for thought leaders. Listen to the show to hear more about Oli's experience with Google AdWords. Common Facebook Funnel Mistakes When your sales process relies on someone having a conversation with a prospect to make the sale, the funnel needs to collect information that helps you have that conversation. Often, funnels that don't work aren't designed with this end conversation in mind. Instead, these funnels focus on activity at the top of the funnel. For instance, a funnel might generate leads, but those leads don't convert into prospects with whom you can have a quality conversation and make a sale. Traditionally, marketers generate brand awareness through advertising on various broadcasting media or online, and then the sales team actually talks to people. Now that almost everything is sold online, the sales process has lost a little bit of the human touch. There are still plenty of products, though, that require the seller to talk through the sale with potential customers. Oli has found that even when an automated, end-to-end marketing sales funnel with Facebook Ads is working, it's not as profitable as it could be. So retooling your funnel to focus on conversations has a lot of side benefits over an automated sales process. Listen to the show to hear Oli share more about who can use marketing and sales tactics focused on conversations. The Best Way to Sell With Facebook Lead Ads Oli finds most people focus on driving Facebook traffic offsite using the Conversions objective. This approach is great if you want to send people to a landing page, offer value, collect information,
Sep 28, 2018
How to Get More Engagement With Facebook Live
40:33
Want more people to watch, share, and comment on your live videos? Looking for tips on improving the quality of viewer engagement? To explore how to get more engagement with Facebook Live video, I interview Stephanie Liu. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Stephanie Liu, a live video expert and social media consultant. She hosts a Facebook Live show called Lights, Camera, Live, which is focused on helping businesses succeed with live video. Stephanie explains how to promote your Facebook Live video with events and crossposting. You'll also discover how questions, requests to share, and bots can improve Facebook Live video engagement. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Engagement With Facebook Live Stephanie's Story Stephanie is an ad agency veteran. After working in the ad agency world for about 15 years, she decided to start her own business focused on a social media strategy. In a crowded field, Stephanie decided the best way to stand out was to do live video. She wanted to be an early adopter to separate herself from the pack. About 2 years ago, when Periscope was a big deal and Facebook Live was just rolling out for the masses, Stephanie started going live with OBS Studio, and Facebook Live provided the most client referrals. In a collaboration with Chef Claudia Sandoval, the winner of MasterChef Season 6, Stephanie had one of her early successes with live video marketing. Claudia was working with T-Mobile and MasterChef on a Facebook Live promotion for the new T-Mobile Tuesdays app. Claudia noticed Stephanie's efforts to break into live video and asked for Stephanie's help figuring out how to do it. Stephanie planned a low-tech live video with Claudia using a regular iPhone 6 and one ring light. They created plans to generate buzz before the live event, keep people engaged during the broadcast, and keep the app top of mind and tip of tongue after the live broadcast. During the live stream, Claudia made her famous Tres Leches Cake recipe. The broadcast lasted about an hour and a half. The whole time, someone held the iPhone by hand. They didn't have a tripod because Claudia was moving around the kitchen, and this was before anyone was using a live gimbal. The results of the promotion were amazing. As soon as Claudia went live, the video had 843 peak live viewers. Right after the broadcast, 1.5 million people opened the T-Mobile Tuesdays app, and Claudia's cookbook had 178,000 downloads. Since then, Stephanie has continued to help clients build their brands and bottom lines with live video. Whether a client is launching their own Facebook Live show or incorporating live video into their events, Stephanie helps make their live video marketing a success. Listen to the show to hear Stephanie talk about her friendship with Claudia. Why Focus on Facebook Live? Stephanie thinks marketers who want to hit the ground running with Facebook should focus on Facebook Live because it has 10 times more reach than all other types of Facebook content. Since Facebook changed its algorithm in January 2018, organic reach has been dwindling to nothing. Facebook Live video also has six times more interactions than recorded video. These interactions keep your brand top of mind and tip of tongue, and are a way to attract the meaningful engagement that Facebook wants. I note that the results Stephanie has seen with reach and engagement reflect what Social Media Examiner experiences, going live multiple times per week. Stephanie has also learned that a new product, Facebook Live Producer, will make going live much easier. At the Facebook F8 conference in May 2018,
Sep 21, 2018
Pinterest Strategy: How to Get More Traffic From Pinterest
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Want more visitors to your website? Wondering how Pinterest can help? To explore how to drive more traffic to your website with Pinterest, I interview Jennifer Priest. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jennifer Priest, a Pinterest expert and social media strategist. Her courses are Smart Pin Pro and Hashtag Pro. She also blogs at SmartFunDIY.com. Jennifer explains how to improve the visibility of your pins with hashtags. You'll also discover how fresh images and multiple boards help you boost website traffic. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Pinterest Strategy Jennifer's Story Jennifer started using Pinterest in its early days when you needed an invitation from a current user to join. For several years, she was a Pinterest user for personal, not professional, reasons. In 2014, she started monetizing her blog, which she used to promote her crafting classes and supplies. However, her sponsored content, ads, and affiliate links didn't bring in much money. Her blog wasn't getting enough traffic. Although she was pinning her content and thought she was doing all of the right things, she wasn't seeing the amazing results from Pinterest that she heard people raving about. In 2015, to improve her Pinterest strategy and increase traffic to her blog, she began researching and testing Pinterest strategies on her blog and with her clients' Pinterest accounts. Seeing how the math worked helped her zero in on a strategy that increased traffic. Today, Jennifer still has her blog and runs an agency, Smart Creative Social, where she manages Pinterest accounts for clients whose products are sold in big stores like Walmart and Target. Since she started researching Pinterest marketing strategy, the tactics she uses have evolved as the platform has announced many changes and new features. Because Jennifer and many of her clients are solopreneurs or very small businesses, she continues to emphasize automating Pinterest marketing as much as possible. The strategies have to be something they can actually do in the course of their day. They can't use strategies that require hours of their time. Listen to the show to hear about the time-consuming tactics Jennifer avoids. Why Use Pinterest? Pinterest is growing quickly. It has about 250 million monthly users, and the male demographic is growing. From a traffic perspective, Pinterest has become a resource similar to Google in that Pinterest helps people find content and new ideas. For instance, people use Pinterest to find recipes or ideas for planning their lives. Pinterest is also about sharing. Even if you don't pin your content on Pinterest, other people can. However, you have more control over how your content appears there if you understand how the platform works and actively pin your content yourself. I add that for Social Media Examiner, Pinterest drives organic traffic in a way that Twitter and Facebook don't anymore. Listen to the show for more of my thoughts on organic traffic from different social media platforms. How Pinterest Hashtags Drive Search Traffic Jennifer has a sophisticated strategy for increasing traffic with Pinterest that includes adding hashtags, refreshing pins, and maintaining multiple boards. With this strategy, she blogs less frequently than she used to and focuses on driving traffic to her content. Pinterest added hashtag functionality in September 2017, and Jennifer is excited about how hashtags index content and help users find it. On Pinterest, hashtags have a lot of power if you think of them as keywords. To illustrate, if you use the hashtag #ThanksgivingDinner,
Sep 14, 2018
Instagram Live: How to Create and Repurpose Live Content
47:59
Want to grow your audience with Instagram Live? Looking for tips on creating Instagram Live videos? To explore how to create and repurpose Instagram Live videos, I interview Todd Bergin. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Todd Bergin, also known as Todd.LIVE. He's a live video and Instagram video expert. His course is called Instagram Live Podcaster. He's also the host of the 'Grammer School podcast and the Entrepreneur Live podcast. Todd shares tips for improving your content, video, audio, and lighting. You'll also discover tactics for building your audience and repurposing Instagram Live videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Live Todd's Story Todd started his first business and developed a taste for entrepreneurship when he was 13 years old. Someone stole his bike, and his parents couldn't afford to replace it. To make money, he started knocking on doors and making deals to mow lawns, rake leaves, and other lawn care jobs. After college, Todd tried a few different careers and businesses. In South Carolina, he owned a fresh market with 14 employees, but quickly realized that type of business wasn't his calling. While he was in law school around 1998, he started selling items on eBay and Amazon, and followed the news cycle to determine what would sell well. By 2009, Todd had been practicing law for several years and started his first Internet-based business outside of eBay or Amazon. After he became interested in firearms, he needed aftermarket parts for a gun that didn't work very well and found someone to make parts for him and his friends. That effort turned into a business that he still runs himself, sending things out about 2 days per week. Because that business has done well, Todd was able to quit practicing law and try other things. His wife was able to quit her six-figure job, too. Todd started other online businesses that didn't work out but were good learning experiences. In fact, around 2015, one of those businesses, a business coaching company, naturally led him to live video and teaching people how to do it. In the live videos Todd made to market his business coaching skills, he found himself talking more about how to do live video than how to become a full-time entrepreneur. He also realized teaching people how to set up a studio is easier. You can build a studio in a weekend, but a successful business can take years. A few live video pioneers further inspired Todd to pivot to live video coaching. When Todd was sick in bed with the flu, he watched Gary Vaynerchuk do a Super 8 (going live on eight platforms at once) for 8 hours to promote his book, Ask Gary V. Todd watched the whole thing and was inspired by how Gary reached people all over the place, had a lot of fun, and changed lives quickly. Vincenzo Landino was another source of inspiration. Early on, his live videos displayed lower thirds (text in the lower third of the screen). He also used a split screen to bring people on his show. Todd taught himself how to set up a studio that allowed him to go live on multiple platforms and use multiple computers using Wirecast and Switchboard Live. He also took a class to begin building his audio production skills. By the time Instagram Live showed up, Todd found it refreshing because Instagram makes it so easy to go live as a broadcaster and for viewers to find you. Since Todd began doing live video, he found that people spend more time on Instagram than YouTube or Facebook. People check Instagram while they're in line at the grocery store or wherever they go. Also, Instagram has done a brilliant job of making it easy for everybody involved to cr...
Sep 07, 2018
How to Build Better Stories With Collaboration and Improv
45:31
Want fresh ideas for your marketing content? Curious how improv techniques can help? To explore how collaborative storytelling can help you create engaging or interactive content, I interview Kathy Klotz-Guest. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Kathy Klotz-Guest. She's a storytelling expert and the author of Stop Boring Me. She also hosts a Facebook Live show called Yes, And Brand Show. Kathy explains why collaborative storytelling encourages your audience to engage with and share your content. You'll also discover how to turn ideas from a collaborative story session into awesome social media posts and videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Collaborative Storytelling Kathy's Story Kathy became a storytelling expert after working in technology and communications for 15 years. Although she worked in the tech and marketing world during the day, she was also telling stories on stand-up and improv comedy stages 5 or 6 nights per week. When she left her day job, her goal was to share how concepts from improv can help businesses. Improv is short for improvisational, and improv comedy is all about a team getting suggestions from the audience and building a scene based on those suggestions in real time without a script. It's collaborative, and Kathy thinks business storytelling can work this way, too. Specifically, because improv encourages the audience to participate and collaborate in the experience, the audience is incredibly engaged. As the improv team tells stories, people are at the edge of their seats. Also, with the audience's input, the stories go in amazing directions. The improv model is a huge contrast to the boring old models of storytelling in business. These models aren't collaborative. They're focused on the business instead of the audience. By bringing to companies the improv concepts of creating together and collaborating with audiences, Kathy thought businesses could create stories with their customers and partners, and have more fun. At first, Kathy tried these tactics in her day job running marketing and communications for a technology company. Then the birth of her son was a catalyst to move forward with her idea. That was 8 years ago. Today, she works with companies on their storytelling and communications. Specifically, Kathy helps companies identify where their communications aren't effective or collaborative. Many companies can improve communications among both internal teams and with their audience. To do that, she helps them rethink the entire storytelling experience so they listen to and include their audience. She calls this mix of improv-meets-narrative strategy collaborative storytelling. Listen to the show to hear Kathy discuss how the show Whose Line Is It Anyway? is a good example of improv. The Benefits of Collaborative Storytelling When you create stories with your customers and have more interactive experiences, you have higher engagement, better ideas, and a better sense of what your customers like and don't like. This collaborative effort begins internally. Teams often have untapped capital. However, because the team isn't communicating or maybe just doing the same things over and over, the team isn't developing fresh ideas. Another part of this collaborative style is reaching out to customers by asking them to finish a story, share what they like about it, or explain how they'd make it better. When you co-create a story with your audience, they're going to share it because people share things they help create. When you create with your audience, you increase their emotional investment in that outcome. Also,
Aug 31, 2018
Messenger Bot Funnels: How to Nurture Prospects Toward a Sale
53:41
Thinking about getting into Messenger bots? Wondering how to use bots to get people into marketing funnels? To explore what you need to know about setting up a successful funnel using Messenger bots, I interview Mary Kathryn Johnson More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Mary Kathryn Johnson, a Messenger bot expert who advises and helps businesses build bots. Find out more about her at MessengerFunnels.com. She also hosts the Parent Entrepreneur Power podcast. Mary explains why Messenger bot funnels complement and improve upon email marketing. You'll also discover how meaningful audience interactions and lead magnets can move people into an automated Messenger funnel. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Messenger Bot Funnels Mary's Story Mary has worked in online business since 2003. Right before she began working with bots, she was hosting the Parent Entrepreneur Power podcast, which she began in 2014, and consulting with businesses on digital marketing. Most of Mary's consulting clients were in the beauty industry: estheticians, spas, hair salons, and so on. As their businesses grew, they didn't have time to do their own digital marketing and began asking Mary to do it for them. To fill this need, Mary created an agency called Beauty Tech Tools in 2016. For about a year, she did all of their digital marketing. Mary made significant changes to her business after she discovered bots in January 2017. She signed up for a webinar hosted by Andrew Warner, who was highlighting the benefits of bots, such as 80% open rates and 60% click-through rates. Although Mary typically prefers webinar replays to actually attending, she happened to have the time to attend this one. During the webinar, Andrew built a bot live with Chatfuel. Based on what she learned, as well as all of her knowledge and experience in marketing, Mary began changing everything she was doing for her clients. She switched all of her beauty industry clients over to bots and began phasing out her other marketing services to focus exclusively on bots. Mary thinks bots make sense with the whole marketing journey. Marketers keep fighting for higher numbers and for people to move into their funnels, and see content and offers. To accomplish the shift to bots, Mary began with a few trial projects that helped her prove to herself that her plan would work. First, she pre-sold two bot-based funnels for $1,000 each. Mary usually doesn't say she builds bots because that's like saying you build emails. Instead, she focuses on the funnel aspect, which is why she named her new company Messenger Funnels. After Mary had this initial success with bots, she took Andrew's course and began building bot funnels for more clients. Bot funnels are similar to email funnels, but in Messenger. Also, after continuing her work with bots, Mary has discovered how bots are useful beyond just automated sequences. Today, she's helped more than 50 clients. To serve her clients, Mary doesn't just build a bot. She also makes sure it fits a client's current marketing and sales strategy, and the client's future vision for their marketing. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts about Mary's success in podcasting. Why Messenger Bots Are Important Right now, Facebook Messenger is the communication channel where almost all of your prospects are. You should communicate with them where they choose to be. That's why you need to figure out how Messenger bots work for your products or services, and then incorporate the Messenger marketing strategy into your overall marketing and sales strategy. To people who don't see the purpose of using Messenger...
Aug 24, 2018
The Facebook Ad Algorithm: What Marketers Need to Know
50:15
Want to lower your Facebook ad costs? Looking for tips to optimize your Facebook ad campaigns? To explore the Facebook ads algorithm, I interview Ralph Burns. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Ralph Burns, a Facebook ads expert. He runs Tier 11, an ad agency focused on serving eCommerce businesses. He's also a co-host of the Perpetual Traffic podcast. Ralph explains how your bidding and campaign objective settings can help or hurt your ads budget. You'll also learn how the Facebook ads algorithm determines whether your ads provide a good user experience. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ad Algorithm Ralph's Story Around 2007 or 2008, Ralph began running online ads on his sales and management blog. With AdWords, the blog had good pay-per-click traffic. In 2009, Ralph's blog led to his being fired from his corporate job in sales and management. To make more money, he became an affiliate, selling other people's stuff with pay-per-click ads via networks such as Yahoo! and MSN. When Facebook started placing ads in the right column, Ralph began running affiliate ads on Facebook, too. Back then, the targeting wasn't nearly as good as it is today. The only targeting options were gender, age, where someone lived, whether someone was interested in men or women, and relationship status (single, married, or it's complicated). With the targeting options available, Ralph thought he could be successful running a dating offer and became a super affiliate for the dating service Christian Mingle. Through this experience, Ralph learned that Facebook was a tremendous platform with an amazing amount of traffic. When Facebook started running ads in the news feed, Ralph became one of the early adopters of direct response advertising and he's been doing it ever since. Along the way, Ralph started his agency, Tier 11. In the beginning, the agency worked primarily with information-based products such as coaching services. Today, Tier 11 focuses primarily on eCommerce clients but still works with some information-based products. To sell physical products, Tier 11 uses a strategy called the eCommerce amplifier, which converts cold audiences into purchasers or even long-term customers. The agency has a large team, is rigorous about choosing clients, and has a close relationship with Facebook. Listen to the show to hear Ralph and me discuss the pros of being fired. Why Does Facebook Have an Ad Algorithm? The Facebook ad algorithm works with the auction and is a big black box few people understand. Facebook uses the ads algorithm to determine the best ads to show the best audience while also creating a good user experience. In January 2018, Mark Zuckerberg said Facebook will prioritize meaningful interactions. This priority shift has changed how the algorithm and auction work. The Facebook ad algorithm doesn't give highest priority to the highest bid because Facebook wants to create a good user experience. If advertisers monopolize the news feed, Instagram, the right-hand column, or wherever you're advertising on Facebook, people won't return to Facebook. As a public company, Facebook needs more advertisers to generate the earnings that interest Wall Street. But it also has to keep its users happy. The auction manages these competing factors by way of the Facebook advertising algorithm. I note that since the problems with political ads and Cambridge Analytica, Facebook is probably especially sensitive to ads that turn people off. Not all ads are created equal and therefore shouldn't necessarily be shown. Ralph agrees and adds that the news around Facebook's political ads has shown his...
Aug 17, 2018
How to Grow: Wisdom From 6 Years of Podcasting
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In this special edition of the Social Media Marketing podcast, I reveal four lessons I have picked up from 6 years of podcasting (and growing Social Media Examiner). The topics I'll cover include how to grow anything, how to succeed via omission, how to achieve thought leadership, and my view on competition. I'll also share the original story of this podcast and much more. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I share stories from the podcast that illustrate how to grow your business. I explain how finding help and understanding your audience can help your business succeed. You'll also find tips for becoming a good thought leader and collaborating with others in your industry. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Grow How The Social Media Marketing Podcast Started In the summer of 2012, I knew we were launching Social Media Marketing World in 2013. While many people knew about Social Media Examiner, they didn't necessarily know who I was. I was looking for a creative way to get in front of my audience. At the same time, I noticed that many of my peers were moving toward podcasting. I reached out to Cliff Ravenscraft and hired him to teach me everything I needed to know about podcasting. A couple of months later, on August 10, 2012 I went live with our first episode. In those early days, I used to the show to introduce people to myself and the guests who would speak at Social Media Marketing World. The existing Social Media Examiner audience contributed to the initial success of the show, and that year 1100 people attended the conference. And I had discovered a true passion. In 6 years, we have broadcast 314 weekly episodes. The show has just shy of 15 million downloads and continues to be ranked in the top 100 podcasts in Apple's Business category. While the show has, for the most part, remained unchanged, we did update a few things in 2018. We have a new voice and new music for the intro and outro, and we updated the cover art Listen to the show to hear Mike reminisce about some of his early show topics. How to Grow by Getting Help I'm good at what I do because I've perfected it over the years. However, my perfectionism is also perhaps my biggest weakness. The process for producing this podcast is a great example of how my perfectionism can get in my way. When I started this podcast, I did everything. I recruited and scheduled each guest, and recorded and edited the podcast audio. Then my team turned it into a blog post and scheduled it. With this process, I spent 3 to 4 hours working on each episode. However, as Social Media Examiner continued to grow, I started to feel the squeeze of my other responsibilities and wondered if I could hand off parts of the podcast process. Today, my assistant completes a detailed analysis of all of the people that I'm considering for the show. Her analysis includes examples of their speaking and audio, thought leadership, and focus. She also gives me her gut reaction. If her gut reaction says a prospective guest isn't a good fit, I don't even read the rest of the email. I say that I agree and we move along. In 2018, I finally gave up editing the podcast. Although I enjoy editing in Adobe Audition, I found someone better than me, and the cost is worth it. Now, I spend 90 minutes producing the podcast. First, I do a 30-minute pre-call where I get to know the guest so we sound as if we've been buds forever during the interview. We also use this time to discuss the topics so there are no surprises during the hour-long interview. I didn't know what the impact of saving a few hours per week would be. But it's been huge for me.
Aug 10, 2018
Facebook Analytics: What Marketers Need to Know
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Wondering how Facebook Analytics differs from other analytics tools? Want tips for improving the performance of your funnels and ads? To explore how Facebook Analytics can help marketers, I interview Andrew Foxwell. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Andrew Foxwell. He's a Facebook ads expert who runs Foxwell Digital, an agency for direct-response eCommerce brands. He's built and run numerous trainings for Jon Loomer and co-hosts the eCommerce Influence podcast. Andrew explains how Facebook Analytics compares to Facebook Insights and Google Analytics. You’ll also learn how Facebook Analytics helps you analyze funnels and the lifetime value of a customer. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Analytics Andrew's Story After college, Andrew worked as a Windows server engineer but realized that type of work wasn't for him. In 2008, he volunteered for a congressional campaign, where he worked on the candidate's website, among other things. After the candidate won the election, Andrew went to Washington, D.C., where he worked on the congressperson's press, Facebook page, and Twitter. As part of Andrew's work in D.C., he also worked on new rules for members of Congress so they could use their official funds to advertise on social media. Before that, members could only send glossy mail pieces. After the rules changed, candidates could run ads that said, "Like my page to learn more about my economic policy," and things like that. After continuing to work with members of Congress through another company, around 2013, Andrew became director of social at 3Q Digital in San Francisco. There, he worked with brands like GoPro, Fitbit, Eventbrite, and Square. Soon after he started that job, Facebook announced the ability to run ads in the Facebook news feed; whereas before, ads appeared only on the right. Seeing the full arc of Facebook advertising and its development has been an interesting experience. Andrew believes it's become much more effective for advertisers. Now we're in an age of transparency with Facebook advertising, which is fantastic. Today, Andrew runs Foxwell Digital, where he and his wife help people understand how to build a social direct-response program and make sure it's lucrative. He also stays on top of new social advertising features and capabilities, which is how he found Facebook Analytics. In fall 2017, after playing around with Facebook Analytics for a month, Andrew called John Loomer and said they should create a program about it right away. Their program began running in December 2017. Andrew is interested in Facebook Analytics because it begins connecting a lot of dots for people. Listen to the show to hear Andrew discuss his work with the internal Facebook Analytics team. What Is Facebook Analytics? To introduce Facebook Analytics, I ask Andrew to explain what it is and how it's different from Facebook Insights and Google Analytics. Andrew says Facebook Analytics, at its core, allows you to see how your Facebook properties connect. For instance, you can see how audiences for your Facebook page and Facebook pixel connect or overlap. You also see how people interact with your website. Because Facebook pixel is a core component of Facebook Analytics, you can see how people travel through your site and interact with different parts of Facebook events. As an example, Facebook pixel has a purchase event, a lead event, and other events you can customize. Facebook Analytics gives you an idea of how these interact. You'll find Facebook Analytics in Ads Manager or Business Manager (click the menu in the upper left, select All Tools to see all options,
Aug 03, 2018
How to Create a Live Show on YouTube
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Wondering what you need to stream a live video show? Looking for tips on working with the hardware and software? To explore what you need to create a live show on YouTube, I interview Dusty Porter. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dusty Porter, a video and tech expert. He hosts the YouTube Creators Hub podcast. He's active on YouTube and a TubeBuddy ambassador. Dusty explains how to use OBS live-streaming software to produce quality audio and video. You'll also discover tips for appearing on-camera and creating a structure for your show. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Live Video Shows Dusty's Story Dusty got his start in video with a screencast he created to help a freelance partner learn how to do something in Adobe InDesign. That was the first screencast and the first YouTube video he ever made. After he uploaded the video to YouTube, he forgot all about it. A year later, in 2007, Google emailed Dusty to say the video was doing well and ask if he'd be interested in making money with its partner program. He was interested, and when he logged into his YouTube account, he saw the video had 208,310 views. He remembers this number precisely because he was so surprised by all of the interest, especially given the poor quality of the video. At that point, Dusty realized the potential of making YouTube videos. That same day, he put together his gear and a studio, and began the journey to creating his current business, Porter Media. To hone his skills, Dusty took classes at his local technical college, focusing on videography and audio production. He believes his story shows that you simply need to be willing to learn to get started. In 2011, when YouTube live video was released, Dusty was quick to begin using it. However, the software and systems were limited. You could click a button to go live, but you couldn't set up events or plan your live stream. Justin TV, which is now Twitch, was first to the live-streaming market, and Dusty also tried Google Hangouts. Although Dusty's early work in live video was mostly dabbling, in late 2013 and 2014, he began to see live streaming as important to the future of video. YouTube significantly improved its live streaming so it's now actually in the live-streaming game. Since starting his business, Dusty has created 700 YouTube videos and more than 100 streams on YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, and other platforms. Listen to the show to hear why the original name of Dusty's YouTube channel didn't work. Tips for Starting a Live Show on YouTube When you want to start a live show, you can use the same tools to live-stream on any platform, whether that's Facebook, YouTube, Periscope, or elsewhere. Most people live-stream via their mobile devices. They simply tap the Live button on whatever platform they're using. Few people use tools like OBS Studio. (OBS stands for Open Broadcaster Software, and we discuss it in more detail later.) To do a live show on YouTube, your very first step is to create a channel. Make sure your channel name and imagery fits your branding. If you search YouTube for help starting a live show, you'll likely see some of Dusty's videos in your search results because he tries to simplify the process. Even with a more sophisticated setup that includes OBS, you can complete the setup in 30 minutes to an hour. After you have a YouTube channel, you download OBS, which is free. Then you open YouTube's Creator Studio, and on the Live Streaming tab, the on-screen instructions walk you through the setup process. From there, you can set up your first event or live stream. I ask about Dusty's show for TubeBuddy,
Jul 27, 2018
Instagram Stories Strategy: How to Make Stories That Benefit Your Business
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Want to attract more leads with Instagram? Curious how a story arc on Instagram Stories can help? To explore how to use Instagram Stories for business, I interview Tyler J. McCall. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tyler J. McCall. He's an Instagram marketing expert who's focused on Instagram strategy. His membership community is the Follower to Fan Society. He also co-hosts The Recurrent Revenue podcast. Tyler shares timesaving tips for repurposing content for Instagram Stories. You'll also learn how to boost follower engagement by creating Instagram stories with a beginning, middle, and end. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Stories Strategy Tyler's Story Tyler's love of Instagram began when he started a side business selling a room-and-linen spray called Mr. McCall's Fine Fragrances. Tyler made this spray on his kitchen table with essential oils and printed the labels on the copy machine at his full-time workplace. He turned to Instagram as a way to market the spray. Tyler's marketing background was grounded in the non-profit world. For about 8 years he worked full time doing non-profit marketing management, such as volunteer recruitment, fundraising, sales, and so on. However, in 2014 and 2015, when he began marketing the spray, the influencer age of Instagram was also just beginning. On Instagram, Tyler was following a ton of different people whose content he loved. Those people tended to be home, lifestyle, and travel bloggers. He communicated with people, built relationships, and commented on others' content. When Tyler launched his product, he sent direct messages to the people he followed (who had tens or hundreds of thousands of followers) asking if he could send them the spray so they could let him know what they thought. They all said yes. Soon, Tyler was receiving product reviews, and they posted about the spray on their Instagram accounts. (This was before influencers charged for posts.) For a year, Tyler built the business via online and in-person sales. Toward the end of 2015, he left his full-time job and started doing social media management with a focus on Instagram for other people. Through these initial jobs, he discovered he enjoyed the work and started a small agency with a close friend. They helped local businesses create Instagram content and manage accounts. After Tyler and his agency partner went their separate ways, he focused on building an Instagram presence for himself, as well as local and national clients. He now teaches his clients how to use Instagram in an intentional way. When you grow the right kind of community, you can grow your business and sell more online. When Instagram Stories came out in August 2016, Tyler had just gone on Snapchat, which was really hot. The Snap Spectacles came out, and WOW airlines did a cool Snapchat marketing campaign for the whole summer. The airline let five or six influencers take over their Snapchat account and flew them around the world for the whole summer. Inspired by the WOW campaign, Tyler focused on Snapchat but soon began posting regularly to Instagram Stories. He quickly realized the connections he made and relationships he developed helped his business. Instagram Stories helped him make sales. People joined his mailing list, Facebook group, and programs. He also booked coaching clients. Today, Tyler is on Instagram Stories virtually every day, creating some kind of content for his followers. Listen to the show to hear more about how Instagram Stories interrupted Tyler's plan for Snapchat.
Jul 20, 2018
Facebook Ads for Webinar Funnels: How to Maximize Your Results
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Want a scalable way to share your webinar? Looking for tips on building trust with a cold audience? To explore how to build a Facebook ads funnel for an evergreen webinar, I interview Andrew Hubbard. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Andrew Hubbard. He's a Facebook ads expert who specializes in helping people sell digital products and services to fill their evergreen webinars. His course is called Amplified Ads. Andrew explains how to develop an evergreen webinar and automate your funnel. You'll also discover tips for creating Facebook retargeting ads that build warm audiences, boost webinar attendance, and improve conversions. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Evergreen Webinar Funnels Andrew's Story Like many people, Andrew started working with Facebook ads in a roundabout way. Around 2012, he ran his first ad for a side project. After his initial ads had good results, he ran Facebook ads to sell mobile app installations, and those ads were successful too. His Facebook ad cost was $1 per user, and each user spent $2 in the app. That's when he realized the real potential of Facebook ads. In late 2014, Andrew left his full-time job as a business analyst for Australian Public Service and started his own business. At first, his consulting work focused on his skills as a business analyst because that role was comfortable and familiar. However, after a client learned about his experience setting up Facebook ads, they asked for his help, and those ads had good results, too. After that early success with Facebook ads, Andrew started thinking about switching his focus to helping people with ads. To test his idea, he looked for an ad-management client. He chose a target market, found an influencer in that target market, and offered to help that person for free in exchange for a case study. For the influencer, Andrew got a $6 return on each $1 spent. Andrew deliberately chose an influencer because he believed the case study would help prove that his services were valuable. Influencers and businesses making more than $1 million per year won't hire an unknown person to manage their ads. The case study helped him build his reputation and gain people's trust. After Andrew did the case study, his business grew quickly. At first, he had clients for all sorts of things, including eCommerce, different types of social media advertising, and so on. However, he enjoyed working with webinars the most, and that's where he had the best results. Because webinars worked best for him, they became the focus of his business. Listen to the show to hear Andrew talk about his first webinar clients. What's an Evergreen Webinar Funnel? To create an evergreen webinar funnel, you first need to create a webinar that works as a video recording, which you offer on an ongoing basis. In the webinar, you present some content and pitch a product or service at the end. Your webinar can be a recording of a live webinar or a recording created without an audience. Andrew prefers a recording of a live webinar because sharing it live helps you know whether the webinar works. To find the right content for an evergreen webinar, Andrew suggests doing a series of live webinars and choosing the one that converts the best. With a recorded evergreen webinar, you can present your offer to large numbers of clients and potential customers. Doing a live webinar every day is incredibly time-consuming, and you can scale only to a certain point. But the recorded evergreen webinar can play whenever you schedule it. Behind the scenes,
Jul 13, 2018
Messenger Bot Strategy: How Businesses Can Use Bots
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Want to boost conversions while lowering marketing costs? Wondering how Facebook Messenger bots can help? To explore how to improve your marketing and sales with Messenger bots, I interview Molly Pittman. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Molly Pittman. She's a Facebook Messenger bot expert. She also co-hosts the Perpetual Traffic podcast. Her business is Digital Strategy Book Camps, and she's an ambassador for ManyChat. Molly explains why Messenger bots have high open rates and convert customers without being pushy. You'll also discover how you can easily improve marketing campaigns with Messenger bots and ManyChat Growth Tools. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Messenger Bots Molly's Start With Messenger Bots When Facebook released a Messenger ad placement in November 2016, Molly was actively running Facebook ads and covering Facebook ads for Digital Marketer. She immediately realized bots would become more important because Messenger ads would require marketers to automate different responses. So along with Messenger ads, Molly became interested in bots and ManyChat. Molly focused on ManyChat because so many people mentioned it to her. Ezra Firestone told her the tool could build a Messenger subscriber list. When 10 other people told her the same thing, she knew ManyChat was something she needed to check out. To see how it worked, she installed it on the Digital Marketer and Ryan Deiss pages. Soon, Molly was on this podcast talking about her early experiments with ManyChat because it was a marketer-centric platform. At Social Media Marketing World 2018, Molly also moderated a keynote with Chatfuel and ManyChat, which are two major contenders in the marketing world. Now she's doing some work for ManyChat. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts about Social Media Examiner's chatbot strategy. The Present and Future of Messenger Bots To begin our conversation, I note that the 2018 Social Media Marketing Industry Report revealed that only 15% of marketers are using Messenger bots, but 51% plan on using Messenger bots in the next year. So these bots have come a long way but are still a growing, early-stage technology. Molly says marketing on Messenger and communicating with bots present a huge opportunity for marketers because you can communicate with people in a place where they want to have the conversation. Any communication channel where people exchange short, simple messages, whether that's Messenger or WhatsApp, is hot right now. Specifically, Facebook Messenger has more than 2 billion active monthly users, which is more people than those who use the Facebook app with the news feed. So Messenger is important because it's where people are having conversations with their family and friends. Also, the consumption and adoption rates for Messenger are incredibly high. For example, Molly has a client with a campaign audience of more than 10,000 people and a 96% open rate on Day 6 of a follow-up sequence. Open rates are so high because people tend to open messages in Messenger. It's less crowded and more personal than email. Also, many people receive message notifications. When you look at using bots to help you have those conversations on Messenger, the present state of bots is different from the future-focused examples you see at Facebook's F8 developer conference or those created by large companies that have invested in state-of-the-art bots. Right now, most people don't program Facebook Messenger bots to answer any question that a consumer might ask your brand. Instead,
Jul 06, 2018
Twitch: What Marketers Need to Know
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Want to know how Twitch is growing live video audiences? Wondering how Twitch supports loyal, engaged communities? To explore what marketers need to know about Twitch, I interview Luria Petrucci. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Luria Petrucci. She's the cofounder of Live Streaming Pros, a website that offers incredible content and services for live streaming and helps you master live video. She's also helping the next generation of young entrepreneurs build their business skills. Luria explains how the Twitch ecosystem supports creators and influencers focused on a range of topics. You'll also discover tools and tips for building a loyal community via live video. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitch What Is Twitch? Before Twitch was Twitch, it was called Justin TV, which was one of the earliest live-video platforms along with Ustream. Today, Twitch is a live-streaming platform owned by Amazon. Each month, Twitch has more than 100 million unique users and 2.2 million broadcasters. It also has about 15 million active daily users, which means they're either watching or broadcasting content. Nearly half of the users watch more than 20 hours of content each week. Currently, about 81.5% of users are male and 55% of them are 18-34 years old. For about the last 5 years, Twitch has been known as a gaming platform where you watch people play games. However, for the past year, Twitch has been actively expanding its content base, which will make it relevant to more businesses. After posting some videos back in 2007, Luria recently returned to Twitch and goes live 5 days a week for her Geeks Life channel, which covers geeky topics. Luria has a lot of fun with this channel. It has a weekly show as well as content about gaming, behind-the-scenes details about producing video on demand (VOD), and a live vlog. However, Twitch's popular communities go beyond geeky topics like programming, video editing, and comics. It also has communities for music, art, and DIY. Music broadcasters play guitar or piano or sing, sharing covers or original compositions. Visual artists share painting, drawing, and sculpture. DIY enthusiasts focus on a range of topics such as sewing, cooking, and LEGO. On Twitch, community is the number-one priority for the platform and the people who use it. For example, Twitch has big yoga and LGBT communities. Although the yoga community will learn by doing yoga, the live-streaming content is focused more on hanging out than being educational. You can watch and interact through your computer, a mobile device, or TV box. Listen to the show to hear Luria share more about the different types of content on Twitch. How Twitch Differs From YouTube YouTube is primarily recorded video, whereas Twitch focuses on live video. You can upload videos and watch them even if you missed the live broadcast. However, Twitch users don't watch as much on-demand content. Luria says that user behavior might change as the platform changes, but Twitch is only beginning to evolve. Like YouTube, Twitch has a search feature that works really well. However, Luria finds that the results deliver live content first and then VOD. Also, Twitch has a Browse tab where you can discover popular communities such as gaming, music, and art. Unlike YouTube, Twitch is 100% focused on community. It's about people, not marketing. Twitch has no algorithms so you see only the notifications that you ask for by following someone. On each person's channel is a Follow button at the top. After you click that button to follow someone,
Jun 29, 2018
Curiosity Marketing: A Better Way to Win Loyal Customers
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Want your audience to ask about your products? Wondering how to spark people's interest? To explore how to use curiosity in your marketing, I interview Chalene Johnson. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chalene Johnson. She's a marketer, speaker, and teacher. She's also the author of the book Push and founder of 131 Method, a site that helps people get healthy and lose weight in non-traditional ways. Chalene explains how authentic connections and a little bit of mystery keep your audience interested in your content. You'll also discover tips for creating cliffhanger content and answering people's questions. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Curiosity Marketing Chalene's Story Most people know Chalene from her work in health and fitness. She's appeared in many infomercials and exercise DVDs. However, she's been successful in fitness because she loves business and helping people solve problems. In fact, Chalene has spent a large part of her professional life teaching people about marketing, building an online business, and developing passive income. Chalene finds that marketers often copy other people who are successful (or assumed to be successful). But when you do that, you lose authenticity and fail to listen to yourself. You do things that don't come naturally to you and don't tune into what you like, what would grab your attention, and how you would like to be talked to. When Chalene finds herself thinking she should do what her competitors are doing, she reminds herself of her passion for her own message and desire to serve others. Also, you don't know the ins and outs of someone else's method. For instance, you don't know how big their team is, how much experience they have, how much traffic they receive, or what they want their lifestyle to look like. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on the problems with following someone else's playbook. Why Is Curiosity a Powerful Concept? People want to connect the dots, and when they can't, their curiosity is powerful and motivating. For example, when a child can't see what's under the bed, they imagine something's under there. In business, your goal is to get people's attention, maintain it, and engage with them. Curiosity can help you accomplish those goals. Nowhere is keeping people's attention more challenging than on TV, where you see shows like Storage Wars pique viewers' curiosity before cutting to a commercial. Storage Wars is a cable TV show where abandoned storage units are auctioned off. Sometimes they're filled with nothing; sometimes they're filled with amazing treasures. To keep you engaged, just before the show cuts to commercial, the door on the storage unit slides up so you can glimpse inside. Then you're left wondering, "Was the unit a bust or was there something valuable in it?" Chalene thinks it's important to translate this tactic to marketing to keep people's attention. The longer you have someone's attention, the more likely you are to build trust. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on cliffhangers. Chalene's Strategy Chalene's strategy for curiosity marketing is built on authenticity, growing your community, and asking questions. To make these concepts easy to remember, she has a phrase for each part of her strategy. Borrowed Words Are for the Birds: When the language in your copy or social media video uses someone else's language, your words don't feel authentic. Only the words that you use feel natural. When someone's being inauthentic or they're uncomfortable, it's so easy to identify.
Jun 22, 2018
How to Use Facebook Ads to Improve Your Video Views
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Want longer video views on Facebook? Wondering how the Facebook suggested video feed can help? To explore a creative way Facebook ads can improve your video views, I interview Paul Ramondo. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Paul Ramondo. Paul is a Facebook ads expert who vlogs about digital marketing. His agency, RamondoMedia, helps people generate leads and sales using Facebook ads. His course is called Funnels 101. Paul shares how Facebook's suggested video feed increased watch time of his vlogs to 100%. You'll also discover Paul's step-by-step process for setting up Facebook ads to maximize video views. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Watch Time Paul's Story In 2008, Paul loved going to local music shows. He wasn't a musician but wanted to be involved in any way he could. So he started running shows for a local event-management company. At the time, print media was important but also quite expensive. Although Facebook wasn't widely used in Australia, MySpace was huge, especially in the music scene. So Paul got his start in social media marketing running promotions for local shows through MySpace. The platform was free, whereas a traditional print magazine ad cost $300. This work sparked Paul's love for marketing. In fact, at around the same time, he chose to study marketing when he went to university. After Paul finished his degree, he started working at a social media startup agency in Perth. In that role, he created organic content mostly for Facebook but also for other social platforms. He also started playing around with Facebook ads. Back then, Facebook ads were basic sidebar ads with limited targeting options. At first, Paul didn't really know what he was doing, but after he began to understand how ads worked, he was absolutely hooked. He became even more excited about his work after the Facebook pixel became available and he could track what people did on websites. Paul was especially interested in tracking ads' impact on eCommerce. As an example, the ability to accurately track the revenue your ad spend generated as well as other metrics was exciting. From that point forward, Facebook ads became his primary focus. Before Paul started his company, he worked at different agencies and on the client side. For one client, Paul built a funnel that used Facebook to reach a qualified audience. The funnel took the audience through awareness, generating traffic to blog articles, a lead magnet, and then conversion. By spending about $6,000, the funnel generated $164,000 worth of sales in a 34-day period. That experience also helped Paul realize he wanted to focus on Facebook ads. Listen to the show to hear more about Paul's successful Facebook funnel. Paul's Experience Increasing Facebook Video Watch Time About a year ago, Paul started vlogging on YouTube, mostly as a creative outlet. He was spending a lot of time creating content and at first pushed it out only to his YouTube channel. People were engaging with the content, but the reach was incredibly small. Paul was spending so much time creating his vlogs, he wanted more viewers and started repurposing his vlogs on his Facebook page. His YouTube channel had about 100 subscribers, whereas his Facebook page had about 4,000 followers. As soon as he started sharing his vlogs on Facebook, he began getting hundreds more views. Then Paul did a deep dive into the analytics, comparing his Facebook page insights to his YouTube subscriber analytics. People who were watching his vlogs on Facebook were watching 10% to 15% of each episode,
Jun 15, 2018
Fun: How to Love the Work You Do
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Are you struggling to balance your work and personal life? Wondering if the hustle and grind are worth the toll they take on you? To explore how to bring fun back into your work, I interview Joel Comm. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Joel Comm. Joel co-hosts The Bad Crypto Podcast and is the author of 15 books. His latest book is The Fun Formula: How Curiosity, Risk-Taking, and Serendipity Can Revolutionize How You Work. Joel shares how he learned the importance of living life on his terms. You'll discover how the Fun Formula can improve your life. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Fun at Work Why Joel Wrote The Fun Formula On social media, businesspeople are bombarded with the message that they need to hustle and grind to succeed. If you want to get to the top, if you want to beat your competition, you need to hustle and grind every day. Get up and into the office before your competition, and work while your friends barbecue on the weekends. Joel thinks this philosophy is incredibly damaging and counterproductive to a successful business and a fulfilling life. For Joel, hustling or grinding caused him to spin his wheels more than anything else. It hurt him and his relationships. That's why Joel sees this mindset as potentially dangerous. During his 23 years of doing business online, Joel has succeeded not because he worked incredibly long hours, but because he was curious, explored something he was passionate about, took a risk and was willing to fail, and allowed things to unfold in a natural manner. Essentially, he succeeded when he was having the most fun. Joel thinks the hustle and grind mentality goes back to his parents' generation. They believed hard work is a virtue, and so does Joel. At times, you do need to buckle down and do the work. But the hustle and grind mentality is unsustainable as a lifestyle. Just because working hard sometimes is a good thing doesn't mean working hard all the time is even better. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on balancing work and fun. Authenticity on Social Media Social media encourages people to share only the positive things in their lives, not the real difficulties or struggles that they're having. People want to seem popular with lots of friends and also highly successful. Some people focus on promoting themselves and sharing only what's good. Others lie about who they really are and what they're going through. Another issue is relying on social feedback (such as likes, comments, shares, follows, and retweets) for one's self-esteem or sense of self-worth. This social feedback pumps people up. However, social media wasn't intended to be a place where people's lives seem perfect or are validated with likes, comments, and shares. Joel thinks these issues put the focus in the wrong place. Rather, Joel has the most respect for people who are authentic on social media by sharing the good, the bad, and the ugly. They're the people he's most likely to trust and buy from. In addition to authenticity, I mention the fear of missing out. Because I've been working hard on some projects, I'm not active on Instagram or doing anything with stories on Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat. Although I enjoy watching my colleagues share stories about their lives, I also wonder if I'm doing something wrong because I'm not sharing stories. I ask for Joel's thoughts on this fear. Joel responds by describing how his activity on Snapchat has changed. Before marketers became active on Snapchat, Joel was making original, creative, engaging content. His Snapchat following grew quickly,
Jun 08, 2018
Personal Brand Pivot: How to Become The Next You
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Wondering how you can become known for something new? Looking for tips to help you focus your brand on a different area? To explore how to pivot your personal brand, I interview Amy Landino. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amy Landino (formerly Schmittauer), the host of AmyTV. She's a video blogger, speaker, and coach. She's also the author of Vlog Like a Boss. Amy explains how she researched and tested new content before rebranding her YouTube channel. You'll also find tips to help you determine whether pivoting your brand is right for you. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Pivoting Your Personal Brand Amy's Pivot From Video Marketing to Empowerment Amy is known for her work as a video marketing consultant, which she did for about 10 years. In 2011, after she left her 9-to-5 job, she branded herself to convey that she was someone you could trust because even then, she had to contend with oversaturation in the social media consulting space. With all the incredible thought leaders, Amy wanted to stand out. In the marketing business, people didn't frequently talk about how to make a good video, and Amy had that skill. She started using YouTube in 2007 and became an active user in 2008. With her first public YouTube channel, Schmittastic, Amy learned how to make video and market content to get viewers. Although she didn't think of it as marketing, it led to her love for the industry. In 2011, when Amy started her business channel, Savvy Sexy Social, she wanted viewers to know, like, and trust her for social media and video content marketing. On this channel, Amy consistently produced three episodes per week, and her YouTube presence was helpful as she started and grew her business. She needed clients, and the videos were the best way for Amy to market herself. At first, Savvy Sexy Social offered social media advice that would help organizations be more social. Video became a big part of the conversation because video was her medium. In other words, because Amy used video to teach what people wanted to know, she began teaching people how to use video to teach what they know. In 2017, Amy's book about video blogging came out. She also married and changed her name. And her channel content was evolving. Savvy Sexy Social was no longer the right name, so she knew the name had to go. Ultimately, Amy built up to a big change and decided to make 2018 her time to pivot. In January, she released a video under her new name and welcomed people to AmyTV. httpv://youtu.be/6aQwsOIteoo Amy pivoted and rebranded her channel for several reasons. First, she had more to share than tips and tricks about video. Most of all, her audience wanted more. Plenty of people tuned into her channel with zero intention of "vlogging like a boss." They simply admired her motivational content, which Amy discovered by reading comments on her videos. Whenever Amy shared a video, she tried to understand what was going on in viewers' minds after they watched it. She wanted to know their first barrier to entry. As she investigated those comments and dug into the issues of her audience, she discovered they wanted her to talk about productivity, time optimization, and how to go after success even if you don't feel destined for it. Amy knew this change was coming for a couple of years. She didn't rebrand just because of her name change. In early 2016, she started to wish she was known for something else. But she also felt she'd worked very hard on what she had and wasn't done yet. She felt like her video work was a project she needed to finish before taking...
Jun 01, 2018
Alexa Flash Briefings: What Marketers Need to Know
45:25
Want to reach people regularly via their smart speakers? Wondering how Alexa flash briefings work? To explore how marketers can benefit from Alexa flash briefings, I interview Chris Brogan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chris Brogan, a digital marketing advisor for large businesses. He specializes in customer experience marketing with a focus on emerging technology. He's also host of the new podcast, Making the Brand. Chris explains why now is the time to tap into the Alexa platform. You'll also discover how to save time developing flash briefing content and managing your audio. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Alexa Flash Briefings Chris's Start With Smart Speakers Chris says he's never on the bleeding edge of anything. The first time he encountered a smart speaker, he wasn't impressed. You could ask it to play a song, but he doesn't play music nonstop in his house and has nicer speakers than that device. However, when Chris learned about Alexa flash briefings and similar technologies on other platforms, he saw a business application for a conversational interface. For example, when Chris bought a Windows laptop to play a game with his son, he set up the laptop through Cortana, the Windows conversational interface. In retail shopping, to compete with Amazon, Google Home partnered with Walmart and eBay. Apple has Siri. Marc Benioff, CEO of Salesforce, just announced he's trying to make a conversational interface for doctors so they can do prescriptions and patient care through an audio device as well. As the major technology companies come out with their own conversational interfaces, the increasing competition suggests these companies know something about this technology that regular folks don't. As the technology continues to emerge, Chris thinks the current opportunities mean that now is the right time for marketers and companies to start thinking about how to use it. Listen to the show to hear Chris discuss how conversational interfaces are like Jarvis from the movie, Iron Man. The Potential for Alexa Flash Briefings As artificial intelligence and voice recognition technologies continue to improve, natural language processing allows people to interact with a device without using perfect syntax. The software doesn't have to hear all of the words perfectly. It can guess the meaning from context. For instance, any of these devices can respond to a user who says, "Blank product, tell me about the weather," or "Blank product, is Ed Asner still alive?", or "Blank product, when is the next time Avengers: Infinity War is playing in my neighborhood?" In all sorts of cases, you can use this technology instead of looking at your screen. Chris believes voice technology is in the same place as mobile several years ago, when people were saying, "Mobile's coming. Mobile's coming." After mobile truly arrived, websites that didn't prioritize mobile stopped appearing in Google search results. Similarly, because voice technology can now understand what we say regardless of inflection, accent, and so on, magical things are happening. Industry leaders are talking about the increased adoption of smart speakers. A very recent article from PSFK said 65% of people age 25 to 49 interact with an AI assistant (which is another term for a smart speaker) at least once a day. Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, says voice and conversational AI represent a new age of computing. However, PwC notes that people's misunderstanding of what smart speakers do or lack of trust in the technology has slowed adoption.
May 25, 2018
Crisis Planning: How to Publicly Respond to Business Problems
45:08
Want to be prepared for problems in your business? Wondering how to plan a public response to any issue? To explore when and how businesses should respond publicly to a crisis, I interview Gini Dietrich. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Gini Dietrich, a crisis management professional. She's the founder and CEO of Spin Sucks, a site that helps businesses thrive with their public online communications. She also hosts the brand-new Spin Sucks podcast. Gini explains how to handle a range of problems from online trolls to crises that threaten your reputation or revenue. You'll also find tips for preparing company leaders to speak transparently to the public and handling a crisis quickly and effectively. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Crisis Planning What Is a Crisis? In the past, PR agencies focused on crisis communications, and they were able to specialize in it because the crises were so few and far between. Today, somebody can be upset with a flight, a hotel stay, or a Crock-Pot killing a fictional TV character and take to Twitter, Facebook, or any social network where the issue can become blown out of proportion. Today, everybody has a megaphone because of social media. Before, if you were upset with somebody or something, you told your neighbor, your friends, and your family, but your message was contained to about 30 people. Today, you can be upset about something and share it with thousands of people. In this environment, it's important to identify an issue versus a crisis. You have an issue when somebody is antagonizing you or pushing your buttons, but their comments aren't going to go anywhere. On social media, issues are common and might be painful for a day or two or maybe even a week. But as long as the comments don't cause reputation or money loss, it's an issue, not a crisis. A crisis has the potential to cause a stock price decline or a loss of customers, revenue, or reputation. Issues and crises exist on a spectrum, where a troll creating an issue might be a level 1, and the money or reputation loss is a level 10. You need to think about how you respond to each level in between. I ask whether the Cambridge Analytica story would be a level 10 crisis for Facebook. Gini says she would categorize that crisis as an 8 or 9 because the whole world is talking about that story, so Facebook has taken a reputational hit. However, after Mark Zuckerberg testified before Congress, stock prices went up. Because Facebook isn't losing money, the crisis isn't a 10. Listen to the show to hear Gini and me discuss how well Facebook handled the Cambridge Analytica crisis. How to Handle Issues Gini was recently in a Facebook group conversation with Jay Baer and Mitch Joel about whether to respond to trolls who leave negative, one-star book reviews on Amazon. Mitch Joel suggests not responding because his book won't be for everybody. However, Jay Baer thinks you should respond to them in order to hug your haters and make them feel warm and fuzzy. From a crisis perspective, Gini leans more toward Jay Baer's perspective. Although you're not necessarily going to change the mind of a troll, a negative reviewer, or the person who's upset with you, your response can incentivize other people who see your response. Because people can leave negative things online anywhere at any time, how you respond can mitigate the situation. Gini recommends leaving a professional, non-emotional response one time. If the troll comes back, you can say, "I'd love to have this conversation with you offline. Let's connect via phone, email,
May 18, 2018
How to Generate Leads and Sell With Live Video
44:51
Want to increase leads and sales? Wondering how live video can help? To explore how to sell and generate leads with live video, I interview Nicole Walters. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Nicole Walters. She's an income strategist and hosts a live show on Facebook called The Monetized Life. Her course is called $1K in 1 Day Academy. Nicole and I will explore how you can use live video to build a following and generate leads. Nicole has figured it out, and we're going to talk a little bit about her story, how she's doing it, and bring you lots of tips today. Nicole shares her formula for hosting a live video that provides valuable content. You'll also learn how a live product launch can boost sales. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Leads and Sales With Live Video Nicole's Story Nicole's journey toward entrepreneurship started with a blog she created in 2011. At first, her blog documented her process of cutting off all her hair and growing it back without chemicals. From there, she continued blogging every day about hair and beauty. When Nicole started her blog, it was a side project. She was an executive working a 9-to-5 corporate job. She loved showing up in the office every day, working with people, and doing work that she loved. As Nicole applied what she'd learned in corporate America to her blog, her blog business began to thrive, and she built a decent following. However, Nicole began to realize that although blogs were popular, she did really well on video. The problem was that she lacked the video editing skills to compete on YouTube. Nicole says her YouTube videos were disasters because they went nonstop for 15 minutes without any editing. However, her competitors, who were also in the blogging space, had the editing expertise to produce Steven Spielberg–like flicks. Their videos were so good, she wouldn't have been surprised to see pyrotechnics. When Nicole decided to leave her corporate job and pursue blogging full-time, live video was really starting to pick up. Her first platform was Periscope, and during her live videos, she documented her preparations to quit her job and transition to full-time blogging, and her plan to consult with businesses on the side. When the day finally came for Nicole to quit, she went live to say, "Guys, today is the day. I'm going to quit. I'll be back." But when people asked her to keep them on the line, she did. She quit her job live, online, in front of 10,000 people. That choice was scary because she didn't know what her boss would say or how the process would go. Because she had such a large live audience, she was receiving messages like rapid fire. Over the course of that entire day, more than 150,000 people watched the video. But in the moment, Nicole forgot all about her phone. Her mind was racing from the knowledge she was quitting her job. Fortunately, the whole thing went well. Later, people told Nicole the video was inspiring or they were scared for her. People also told her she was making a bad decision and burning a bridge. But Nicole had no plans to return to her full-time job. She was going headfirst into entrepreneurship. As she shared how scary her transition to full-time blogging was, live streaming became her thing. On Periscope, people call her ScOprah because she spends all her time there. Today, Nicole still loves live video, but now she uses it more intentionally. She has a signature format. Also, she doesn't follow a multi-step model for moving people into her funnel. Instead, she builds a relationship with her audience by sharing vide...
May 11, 2018
Marketer to Instagram Influencer: The Josh Horton Story
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Want to become an Instagram influencer? Wondering how to maximize the exposure of your Instagram posts? To explore how to become a full-time Instagram influencer, I interview Josh Horton. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Josh Horton, known online as Jugglin' Josh. He's a marketer turned influencer with more than a million followers across all of the social channels. He also holds 12 Guinness World Records, and he's been on The Ellen Show. Josh explains how he uses various Instagram features to share content and grow his following. You'll also learn how producing content for YouTube differs from Instagram. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Becoming an Instagram Influencer Josh's Story In 2011, Josh graduated from college and planned to be a professional juggler. After performing for several months, Josh joined a social media agency started by a friend of a family friend. Josh was the eighth hire, and he started out part-time, deleting spam and cusswords from Facebook pages. When the company (McBeard Media, which later became part of Fullscreen Media) began to grow, they offered Josh a full-time job. Because he worked remotely, he could work full-time and continue performing on the side, juggling and traveling for shows. After a couple of years, Josh was managing a team of coordinators, graphic designers, and video editors. He helped run day-to-day operations of multiple brand pages, including Sony Pictures. Every movie from Sony Pictures had its own Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and sometimes Snapchat account. He also helped create graphics and videos posted to other brand pages every day. However, the deeper Josh fell into this job, the less he focused on juggling. In 2015, when Josh turned 25 years old, he realized he had no juggling gigs booked. Although juggling was a side hustle, it was also his passion. So within a month of his birthday, he quit his job. Originally, he planned to focus on performing on stage at halftime shows and corporate and community events. But because he knew all this stuff about social media, he decided to also try growing an Instagram following. Josh focused on Instagram because he enjoyed that platform the most and figured it was the easiest place to grow a following. Today, although Josh is still performing, his social media following has grown to a point where it makes him more money than his performances do. Listen to the show to learn more about Josh's work at the social media agency. How to Grow a Following on Instagram When Josh quit his job, he had around 8,000 Instagram followers. Now, he has about 260,000. Josh began trying to grow his following soon after Instagram launched its video feature. From his agency work, Josh knew he needed to make something that was so good people would want to like, comment on, or share it. Compelling Videos: To encourage engagement, Josh edited his juggling videos into polished content with music and transitions. With those videos, he gained followers organically. Then he found viral video accounts on Instagram, which have millions of followers and post other people's content. He gained a lot of followers when those accounts reposted videos of his trick shots. Some of those accounts reposted his videos with permission, and others didn't get permission. As long as the accounts tagged Josh, he was okay with it. Collaborations: Josh also started collaborating with other Instagram influencers to continue building his following. In fact, Josh keeps performing in part because his travels allow him to connect with other influencers.
May 04, 2018
Facebook Groups: How to Develop Engaging Communities
44:24
Want to create an engaged Facebook group? Are you looking for creative ways to develop a loyal community inside a Facebook group? To explore how to develop an engaged and responsive community with Facebook groups, I interview Caitlin Bacher. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Caitlin Bacher, a Facebook Groups expert who has helped many people start and grow successful Facebook groups. She hosts the Social Boss Facebook group, and her course is called The Fab Facebook Group System. Caitlin explains how to choose a niche for your Facebook group that complements your business goals. You'll also discover tips for promoting engagement and moving group members into your marketing funnel. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Groups Caitlin's Story Shortly after her daughter was born, Caitlin was looking to earn extra income for her family. She started freelancing as a social media manager because she loved social media and always had an affinity for building communities, whether they were on- or offline. By 2014, she had attracted a few steady clients and joined a couple of Facebook groups for social media managers. These groups were a godsend to Caitlin, not only because they offered valuable information, but more importantly, they allowed her to connect with other social media managers in a meaningful way. By the end of 2014, Caitlin had decided to switch to social media coaching and knew starting her own Facebook group would be an important component of this business. Caitlin started without an email list, social media following, or team. But she did have a really clear vision for the community that she wanted to create and a 100% commitment to making it happen. Caitlin typically chooses the content she teaches based on her experience and uses the lessons she learned to make things easier for others. When she started coaching, she focused on Instagram so she had a big Facebook group geared toward talking about Instagram. However, as her group evolved, Caitlin saw her Facebook group had more traction than her Instagram, where she sold her Instagram coaching and courses. People were obviously in the Facebook group to learn from Caitlin, but they were also there to connect and support each other. Caitlin sensed a difference between her group and other groups. In groups that focused on facts or tips and tricks, people came in and out for content or help troubleshooting something specific. However, people visited Caitlin's group to see what Caitlin and their friends were doing while having their morning coffee or after they dropped off the kids at school. It was an amazing shared experience. Since then, Caitlin started coaching people on running Facebook groups. Three years later, Caitlin's attention and focus on her vision have paid off. She's running a million-dollar business that fully supports her family and helps thousands of others grow communities to support their businesses. Listen to the show to learn how Caitlin used Periscope in her group before Facebook Live existed. How to Start a Facebook Group When Facebook announced changes on January 11, 2018, Mark Zuckerberg himself said the news feed will prioritize posts from friends, families, and groups over pages. For those of us who value community, the news feed changes are a real opportunity to go all-in with Facebook groups. If you're thinking about starting a group, it's important to understand that the group isn't all about you. You're building something bigger than yourself. Create a group only if you have a real desire to connect with peopl...
Apr 27, 2018
How to Use Facebook Lookalike Audiences With Custom Audiences
47:41
Want to expand your ad reach on Facebook? Looking for new ways to target potential customers? To explore creative ways to combine Facebook lookalike audiences with custom ad audiences, I interview Rick Mulready. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Rick Mulready. Rick is a Facebook ads expert and host of the podcast, The Art of Paid Traffic. He's also a regular speaker at Social Media Marketing World. His new membership site, The ROI Club, is focused on Facebook ads. Rick explains custom and lookalike audience options that help you make the most of your customer list. You'll also discover how to use website visitor data, engagements, and lead ads to find new potential customers. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Lookalike Audiences What Is a Facebook Lookalike Audience? A lookalike audience is a targeting audience based on a custom audience. Examples of custom audiences include people on your email list, website visitors, and Facebook users who engage with your video or Facebook page. When you create a lookalike audience of a custom audience, Facebook finds users who have similar attributes to the people who are in that base custom audience. For example, say you have an email list custom audience. To create that audience, you uploaded a list of 10,000 people and Facebook has matched those emails to 6,000 Facebook users. For a lookalike audience based on this custom audience, Facebook will look for Facebook users with similar attributes to those people on your email list. Facebook knows a lot about its users. Although the data is anonymized, Facebook makes that data available to advertisers to help them reach their ideal target audience. Listen to the show to hear Rick's and my thoughts about all of the things Facebook and Google know about users. Why Use a Lookalike Audience? Lookalike audiences give you a way to reach a cold audience beyond interest or behavior targeting. For example, say you're showing targeted ads to warm traffic, such as people on your email list, website visitors, or Facebook fans. Lookalike audiences give you a way to reach cold audiences that are like those warm audiences but much bigger. Depending on how closely you want to match your base audience, you can set up a lookalike audience size that's anywhere from 1% to 10%, where the 1% includes only those people who most closely match your base audience. In the U.S., that 1% audience is about 2 million people. As you move toward 10%, the audience size increases but the matching becomes more generic. You can control the size with a slider that appears when you create the audience. In Facebook Ads Manager, open the Audiences tool and click the Create Audience button. Select the option to create a lookalike audience, and then a box pops up where you select a source, a location, and then the audience size. The source is the custom audience on which you want to base the lookalike audience. The location is the country or regions on which you want to base the lookalike audience. The audience size has the slider that lets you choose 1%, 2%, 3%, and so on. You also see an advanced option to create multiple versions of that lookalike audience size. Although a lookalike audience is a cold audience, it's not super-cold (compared to interest or behavior targeting) because Facebook is using the algorithm to match attributes from your warm audience to create this new lookalike audience. To reach new people who aren't already in your warm audiences on Facebook, you definitely want to use and test lookalike audiences.
Apr 20, 2018
Predictive Analytics: How Marketers Can Improve Future Activities
40:30
Want your marketing to be more efficient? Wondering how predicting your marketing cycles can help? To explore how marketers can get started with predictive analytics, I interview Chris Penn. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chris Penn, the co-founder and chief innovator at Brain+Trust Insights. He's also the co-host of the Marketing Over Coffee podcast and the lead analytics expert for Social Media Marketing World. Chris explains how to ensure the quality of underlying data used in predictive analytics. You'll also discover data sources and tools used to make predictions. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Predictive Analytics Chris's Story Chris got started in analytics through his background in IT. In 2003, he started working as IT director of a student loan startup, where his role expanded beyond traditional IT responsibilities. In addition to running the web and email servers, he also updated the websites and sent the weekly email. Chris was doing this work before Google Analytics existed, so when the CEO of his company asked how the websites and emails were performing, Chris didn't have an answer. To figure it out, Chris and his team started developing their own tools to understand the basics, like how many people visited the website each day. Over time, the analytics practice became a core focus for Chris. He was not only trying to learn what happened, but why it happened and how the business could respond. Listen to the show to hear Chris discuss his educational background. What Are Predictive Analytics? Predictive analytics use statistics and machine learning to analyze data and make predictions. Humans are very predictable. We all follow routines, such as brushing our teeth and then taking a shower, or putting on each piece of clothing in a certain order each morning. Because humans are predictable on both a micro and a macro scale, marketers can mostly predict what will happen. For instance, in North America, if you're a B2C marketer, you pretty much know that you're going to be busy from November 1 to December 26 because that's a peak time for product sales. Similarly, if you're a B2B marketer, your busy time is January 1 to about the end of May. Then business picks up right after Labor Day in the United States and Canada and continues through U.S. Thanksgiving. Outside of those times, it's a lot harder to be a marketer, whether you focus on digital, social, or paid. Listen to the show to hear more examples of predictable human behavior. What Can Predictive Analytics Do? Because we know these things generally, machines can help us make these predictions more specific. The value of predictive analytics is their specificity. If you know which week you should do more Facebook Live or spend less on ads, you can be more efficient and effective in your marketing. If you know how to predict, you can make money, save money, save time, and not get fired. Predictive analytics specifically focus on trying to find out what happens next. For the average marketer, time series predictions (or when something is going to happen) are the most conventional and useful application. To illustrate, if you're a social media marketer, you want to know when to staff up your customer service team to answer customer inquiries. Predictive analytics can also figure out things like when someone will buy a new car or if they're expectant parents. However, those applications are more nuanced than time series predictions. Listen to the show to hear about my experiences with predictive analytics when I was a B2B write...
Apr 13, 2018
How to Combine Facebook Ads and Content for Better Results
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Want to optimize the content in your Facebook ads? Wondering how to build connections that improve conversions? To explore strategic ways to combine content and Facebook ads, I interview Keith Krance. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Keith Krance, a Facebook ads expert. He's host of the Perpetual Traffic podcast, founder of Dominate Web Media, and coauthor of The Ultimate Guide to Facebook Advertising. Keith explains how to create content and calibrate your budget for each phase of the customer journey. You’ll also learn how to apply Keith’s Facebook ads formula to lower your ad spend. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ad Content Keith's Story Keith became a Facebook ads consultant in a roundabout way. He grew up in a small town thinking you had to be a doctor or lawyer to be successful. However, he didn't want to go to school for the years it took to enter those professions. Instead, he went to the University of North Dakota to become an airline pilot and, four years later, was flying for a regional airline. However, as a young pilot, Keith realized he didn't have the seniority to be home for Christmas or Thanksgiving. After a friend gave him the book, Rich Dad, Poor Dad, Keith started his entrepreneurial journey, which he feels is a true reflection of his personality. In 2003, while he was still flying, he started investing in real estate. After doing well with real estate, he began investing in local franchise businesses. By 2005, he was out of the real estate game and became a franchisee of two different businesses. He had a couple of different partners and five different locations. Over the next five years, Keith focused on his franchise businesses and became interested in Facebook ads around 2010. He was already learning about the digital marketing world when his girlfriend told him about Facebook. He was amazed by what he could do with Facebook ads compared to billboards, for which he paid $10,000 per month to advertise in a mediocre location. From that point, Keith went all-in on Facebook and quickly learned how to run successful ads. Due to changes in the franchise business, Keith eventually transitioned completely out of that industry and decided to focus entirely on helping other people learn how to advertise on Facebook. Keith began building his consultancy by networking and getting results for local clients. At a consulting event for Perry Marshall, Keith connected with a client who hired him because he had self-published a book. About 5 months later, word had spread that Keith had cut a client's lead cost by 68%, and Perry Marshall's team reached out to Keith about working together. After Keith had worked with Perry for a while, Perry asked him to coauthor The Ultimate Guide to Facebook Advertising, which is now in its third edition. Keith also started the Perpetual Traffic podcast with Digital Marketer and was working on growing his agency. Since then, Keith found a partner to run the agency so he could focus on the education and consulting certification side of the business. Listen to the show to hear more details about Keith's transition from piloting airplanes to running an agency. The Big Mistake in Facebook Advertising In Facebook advertising, the big mistake people often make is focusing on the wrong stuff. They don't take time to truly understand human psychology or the Facebook and Instagram platforms. To help people focus on the right things in their ads, Keith suggests thinking of Facebook and Instagram as online versions of a party or a business networking group.
Apr 06, 2018
LinkedIn Prospecting: How to Find and Connect With Future Customers
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Do you want more clients? Wondering if LinkedIn can help you acquire more business? To explore how to use LinkedIn to find leads and turn them into customers, I interview John Nemo. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview LinkedIn marketing expert John Nemo. Author of LinkedIn Riches: How to Use LinkedIn for Business, Sales and Marketing, John is also host of Nemo Radio podcast, which is focused on online marketing and lead generation. He has worked to rewrite LinkedIn profiles for well-known individuals such as John Lee Dumas, Ray Edwards, and Chris Brogan. John shares which LinkedIn and third-party tools he uses to identify and manage his prospects. You'll discover how John develops LinkedIn connections into pre-qualified leads and clients. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: LinkedIn Marketing John's Story Back when John had a day job in marketing, he was bitten by the entrepreneurial bug and wanted to start his own marketing agency. However, leaving a safe day job was hard when he was the sole breadwinner for his wife and three boys younger than age 10. In late 2012, with one client and enough money for 30 days, John decided to make the leap into starting his own business. To find more clients, John had a plan to use LinkedIn for prospecting. Until John started his business, he (like a lot of people) viewed LinkedIn only as a place for job-seekers and recruiters. Your profile was a résumé. But after he began viewing LinkedIn as a way to find clients, his perspective on the platform changed. Motivated by the need to feed his children, John stayed busy on LinkedIn bringing in clients for his marketing agency. Within 90 days, John had replaced his six-figure salary, generated revenue, and had a bunch of clients in the door. He had to start hiring staff and kept growing his business, continuing to use LinkedIn to get new clients. After a few years, the marketing agency felt too much like John's old job. He was managing staff and doing payroll instead of creating stuff. From there, John pivoted to helping people learn how to find clients on LinkedIn. In 2014, John published LinkedIn Riches. Then he created an online course (also called LinkedIn Riches). Today, John has a one-man shop, creating online courses and working with a small group of clients and customers. With his more entrepreneurial lifestyle, John can choose the things he wants to do, and LinkedIn has been the engine behind where his business is today. Listen to the show to hear John share how often he uses LinkedIn now. Why Prospect on LinkedIn? If you're looking for business-to-business (B2B) prospects, LinkedIn is the best place on the planet because it has the market cornered right now. No other B2B network has as many members and as much reach as LinkedIn does. Currently, LinkedIn has about 550 million members in 200 different countries, and two new members join every second of the day. LinkedIn is a behemoth and one of the most visible websites in the world. Looking for prospects on LinkedIn is effective because it's like a search engine for professionals. For all its members, LinkedIn has categorized, analyzed, sorted, tagged, and saved every little bit of data. By leveraging all that data, LinkedIn can help you find your prospects. For example, within 3 seconds, you can find a list of CEOs in San Diego who work in the health care industry and have a company with more than 10 employees. If you understand what to say to people, LinkedIn is like the world's biggest professional coffee shop. You can have one-on-one,
Mar 30, 2018
How to Get Started With Messenger Bots
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Are you interested in Facebook Messenger bots? Wondering why you should use bots and how to set them up? To explore how to get started creating Facebook Messenger bots, I interview Dana Tran. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dana Tran, a bot expert who writes about Messenger bots. Dana's course Bot Essentials can be found on her website ThinkTuitive.com. Dana shares the three things you need to consider before building a bot. You'll discover which bot-building platforms Dana recommends. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Messenger Bots Dana's Story As a digital coach, Dana helps people become more productive by teaching them how to make the most of technology. She first learned about Messenger bots after watching the keynote video from the Facebook 2017 F8 conference. After doing a bit of research, she developed her current focus on Messenger bots and how businesses can use them. Through her research, Dana was just amazed at how quickly and easily you can build an interactive experience. As a tech-lover, Dana loves playing with new toys, and Messenger bots were no exception. Dana saw something magical and special about Messenger bots. They're fun and interactive, and you don't need to code at all to build one. Dana also sensed that bots had lots of potential. Because bots were new at the time, not much information was available, so she decided to write blog articles and courses about bots. Listen to the show to hear why I was impressed with Dana's writing about bots. Why Use a Bot? In some ways, bots mimic email marketing, which is why some people refer to bots as email marketing 2.0. Bots can help you build your subscriber list, generate leads, deliver lead magnets, and broadcast messages. You can also combine Facebook ads with bots, include bots in an ad campaign sequence, or automate follow-ups. Beyond email marketing tasks, bots can answer basic questions. You can also ask questions that help you learn more about users. However, Dana emphasizes that bots are not smart. Right now, the biggest misconception is that Messenger bots can answer anything and everything. Dana notes that Facebook has tried to fix this misconception. David Marcus, the Head of Messenger at Facebook, said, "We never called them chatbots. We called them bots." The idea is that bots don't possess the ability to chat about anything. When you focus on using bots to answer basic, common questions, bots save a lot of time. You can automate certain tasks that don't require a human. To illustrate, if you have a store, people likely ask all the time about your hours that day or during the holiday season. With a bot, you can automate that task and free up your time for more meaningful conversations. Because Messenger bots are interactive, you can use them to customize what you share with people. Dana says this interactivity reminds her of the old Choose Your Own Adventure books she read as a kid. Also, this interactivity makes bots stand out as a great tool. For example, instead of sending everybody the same long email that tries to speak to all of the people on your list, a bot can ask a question to learn about the user. Based on a user's answer, the bot can tag them or save their response to a custom field and then follow up with another relevant question. In other words, bots help you avoid spamming people with a bunch of messages, hoping they gravitate to one specific idea. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on using bots to support sales and customer service. How to Start Creating a Bot
Mar 23, 2018
How to Build a Facebook Ad Funnel
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Do you want more conversions from your Facebook ads? Wondering how funnels can help? To explore how you can build Facebook ad funnels that improve conversions, I interview Susan Wenograd. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Susan Wenograd, a Facebook ads expert who specializes in Facebook ad funnels. She's also a consultant and regular speaker on Facebook ads. Sue explains how video-based funnels create micro-conversions. You'll discover how to nurture prospects using a Facebook ad funnel. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Funnels Susan's Story Susan got her start in ecommerce in the mid-2000s, when she worked for Circuit City. Back then, her focus was email marketing and paid search. After she moved to another job, she learned about Facebook advertising. At the time, Facebook ads were easier to learn because Facebook had half of the advertising features it does now. Running Facebook ads, Susan was able to experiment and get to know the platform. She loved that these ads took her back to the marketing 101 stuff she enjoys: branding, content, the language you use, and so on. Facebook ads allowed her to use a little more creativity than paid search did. Listen to the show to hear Susan discuss how Facebook ads became one of her specialties. Common Mistakes When people set up a Facebook ad, they often choose the wrong objective. With a conversion-focused campaign, you can set up a multitude of conversions that you want to track or optimize for. These include custom conversions based on interactions with your site. The standard ones are view content, lead, add to cart, and purchase. Susan finds that people often pick a conversion objective that doesn't get a lot of conversions. For example, they'll target filling out a contact form on their site or something that just happens a handful of times per week. However, Facebook recommends that the conversion type you choose happens about 50 times per week per ad set. Those numbers are formidable. A lot of people don't know that, though, so they pick something that doesn't happen very often. When you run a conversion campaign that doesn't have enough data, Facebook isn't exactly sure how to optimize for it. With few exceptions, Susan finds that the Facebook recommendation is accurate. If you have a super niche audience with one kind of person who's buying one type of product, your campaign can sometimes work with a lower number of conversions. Essentially, Facebook needs at least 50 conversions to look at the users and see who they are and what they do in order to find other users who are like them. Without that data, Facebook just struggles. It doesn't really know who it's looking for. To maximize your ad spend, Susan suggests changing how you think about conversions. The ultimate conversion might be someone signing up for software or buying your product. But your audience takes steps before they convert that are also worth noting. Your initial engagement goal might not be your ultimate conversion goal, but a cue that helps you reach those who sign up or buy. For instance, a coach who sells an informational product wants customers who'll sign up for an expensive mastermind or a similar offering. People aren't going to do that right away. The incremental goals you use to get there might include downloading a free guide, signing up for a webinar, and so forth. In other words, you need to think about those smaller steps where maybe you do get 50 conversions per week. By targeting an action that happens earlier in the funnel,
Mar 16, 2018
Personal Branding: How to Create and Market Yourself
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Want to reach more subscribers, fans, or prospects? Wondering how building a personal brand can help? To explore how to build and use a personal brand, I interview Chris Ducker. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chris Ducker, serial entrepreneur and author of Rise of the Youpreneur. He's also host of the Youpreneur Podcast and founder of the Youpreneur Summit. Chris explains how to define your niche of expertise and why doing so helps your business succeed. You'll discover tips for promoting your brand on podcasts, social media, and at live events. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Personal Branding Chris's Story Chris considers himself a traditional, old-school entrepreneur. Until around 2008, he used the Internet only to check email and watch YouTube videos. The businesses he owned had brochure-like websites that were boring and stuffy. By late 2009, Chris had burned out, as a lot of entrepreneurs do. In 2010, Chris and his wife set a goal: remove him from the day-to-day work of his businesses as much as possible. By October of this "virtual CEO" year, he had hired eight people to replace him, no longer worked in the office, and was working only 4 days a week. In his newly found spare time, Chris started podcasting, blogging, and shooting videos. He devoured Gary Vaynerchuk's Crush It! in 2 hours and saw a way to build a business going forward. By the end of that year, he had created an email list of about 5,000 subscribers and people were genuinely tuning into the Chris Ducker Show. A couple of years later, while Chris was recovering from back surgery, he began taking stock of how businesses were growing, where they were growing, and what people were doing to build them. That's when he came to a huge realization about the value of personal branding: In all of his companies' big acquisitions, people wanted to do business with him first. Only later were they working with his companies. That's when Chris launched ChrisDucker.com and his personal brand. I ask where "Youpreneur" came from and what it means. Chris says after his personal brand was in place, he started to attract people of the same mindset. These were speakers, content creators, authors, coaches, consultants, YouTubers, and live streamers. They were all building businesses based on themselves, their expertise, and their personalities. A Youpreneur is somebody who's building a business around who they are, what they stand for, how they want to be known, and whom they want to serve. Youpreneur launched in 2015 as an online community and continues to grow. Chris wrote a book and launched the inaugural Youpreneur Summit last year in London. The summit sold out 4 months before the event. It was a huge success and they're doing it again this year. Listen to the show to discover why Chris is happier working as an entrepreneur. The Importance of Personal Branding Personal branding has been around for a long time. For instance, Zig Ziglar is a personal brand everyone knows. What Zig did brilliantly, Chris explains, was to create a brand around his message and how he could affect change. Years after his passing, people still talk about Zig all the time. Some might call that a legacy. Chris calls it leaving a stamp on the world, because of an incredibly strong personality and personal brand. Most importantly, when you talk about people of influence, like Zig Ziglar or someone living, such as Sir Richard Branson, their reputation is their brand. It's what people say about them when they're not in the room, at the conference, at the dinner party,
Mar 09, 2018
Instagram Stories: How Businesses Can Make the Most of Stories
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Do you want to create more engaging and effective Instagram stories? Are you using all of the Instagram Stories features available to you? To explore how you can use the latest Stories features, I interview Sue B. Zimmerman. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Sue B. Zimmerman, an Instagram expert who helps businesses and marketers take their Instagram marketing to the next level. She's the author of the Instagram Strategy Guide. Sue explains how she uses Instagram Highlights to drive traffic to her website. You'll discover how to enhance your Instagram stories with GIFs, location hashtag stickers, adjustable fonts, and more. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Stories Instagram Highlights Instagram Highlights are the best content from your stories, the clips you don't want to disappear. A story appears on your Instagram profile for only 24 hours, but a highlight lives forever unless you choose to delete it. On your Instagram profile, highlight reels are located below your bio and right above your feed. In your highlight reels, include the story clips that get a lot of eyeballs and engagement, which indicate your best content. Also, you can strategically name and brand your highlight reels. With a limit of about 11-12 characters, you have to keep names short, which has the benefit of making the names easy to read. Sue's Instagram profile has a few highlight reels. One, which is simply called Blog, features clips about her blog posts. After she shares a blog post through stories, driving traffic to her website, she can put the blog post clip from her story into her Blog highlight reel. Each highlight in this reel has an image and a note to swipe up, which takes you directly to the blog post. (Only business accounts with more than 10,000 followers have access to the swipe up feature.) Other highlight reels on Sue's Instagram profile are The Social Sip (her Facebook Live show) and Free Guide, which links to her Instagram Strategy Guide. Also, in her introductory highlight reel, Sue explains who she is, why she does what she does, and the value she can offer. An introduction highlight reel is a great opportunity to show people the faces behind your brand. Another example Sue gives is from an advertising agency with a great behind-the-scenes highlight reel. To name the highlight reel, the agency uses the acronym BTS. This agency also has reels for their team, events, tips, and office. I ask Sue how the analytics for stories compare to those for highlights. Sue says her story numbers constantly go up. She gets 1,000 to 2,000 views per clip. Her highlights also go up, although not as fast. She's gotten 700 to 1,000 views on a highlight clip. Sue says the best highlight reels are those that align the cover with the business and brand. You can change the cover, name, and image in the front of the highlight. To brand the cover, hire a graphic designer or use a resource such as Canva to create a simple image that reflects your business branding. For instance, the highlight cover for Sue's live show is a microphone in her brand colors. You then add that image to a story that you save to your highlight reel and designate as your cover image. (Also, don't delete the image from your story; doing so deletes the image from your highlight, too.) To size your image for your highlight reel cover, you can pinch or expand the image with your fingers. Listen to the show to hear my idea for creating a highlight reel of Social Media Marketing World. Instagram Live Sue's favorite new feature on Instagram Live is dual br...
Mar 02, 2018
Twitter Engagement: How to Connect With People on Twitter
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Wondering how to increase your reach on Twitter? Want tips for building your audience and boosting engagement? To explore the Twitter algorithm and creative ways to interact with others on Twitter, I interview Andrew Pickering and Peter Gartland. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Andrew Pickering and Peter Gartland, also known as Andrew and Pete. They authored Content Mavericks, and are known for creating highly shareable content, specifically on Twitter and YouTube. They also have a podcast called The Andrew and Pete Show. Andrew and Pete explain why engagement is essential to increasing your visibility on Twitter. You'll discover different types of tweets Andrew and Pete use to add value for their audience. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Engagement Andrew and Pete's Story Andrew and Pete's "bromance" started in 2008. They met at university, became great friends, and bonded over their ambition to one day rule the world. Although they planned to run a business together after graduation, Andrew also wanted to move to the other side of the country to live with his girlfriend so Pete decided to move to Newcastle and be the third wheel. As new, young kids in a big city, Andrew and Pete had no contacts and no customers but wanted to run a marketing company. Although the duo did the things they read about (tweeting, posting on Facebook, and blogging on their website), their online presence was doing nothing. However, in-person networking was bringing them a ton of business. At in-person networking events, Andrew and Pete stood out as a little bit wild. They threw chocolates across the room and always had party poppers. Soon they became known in their local area as the fun marketing duo. Andrew and Pete were personable and up for a laugh in person, but their online presence was corporate and boring. So they decided to put what was working for them offline into their social media content. After they began using social media to interact with others and create engaging content, their online presence started to take off. Their content would get shared and people started to know them online. This was in 2011 when there was only Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Twitter was the one that really suited them best. It was fun, fast-paced, engaging, and quick to use, but most importantly, open. Twitter was like those open networking rooms. They could walk in and say hello to whomever they wanted. Listen to the show to discover how we met at Social Media Marketing World 2015 and the impression Andrew and Pete made on me. The Twitter Algorithm When Twitter began using an algorithm to determine what users see, the algorithm didn't make drastic changes. That's because Twitter classifies itself as a news site, not a social media platform, and wanted users to continue seeing timely tweets. Even with the algorithm, Twitter is still the best place to find out what's happening right now. Facebook is more about what's happening this week, and Facebook's algorithm shows you more posts that are older. To understand the Twitter algorithm, start with the two main elements of your Twitter feed: your main timeline and a new bit called "In case you missed it." The main timeline is no longer chronological. You might see a tweet from half an hour ago, one from 2 minutes ago, and another from 7 minutes ago. What you see is ranked based on your interests, but Twitter still tries to make what you see fairly timely. Also, Twitter sometimes slips a tweet from someone you don't follow into the timeline.
Feb 23, 2018
Webinars: How to Market and Sell Using Webinars
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Looking for a proven way to sell courses and consulting? Interested in boosting webinar attendance and conversions? To learn about selling products and services via webinars, I interview Amy Porterfield. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amy Porterfield. Amy is an online marketing expert and host of the Online Marketing Made Easy Podcast. Her course is called Webinars That Convert. Amy explains how live versus recorded webinars impacts conversions and connection with your audience. You'll discover how to craft an effective email sequence for webinar promotion and follow-up. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Webinars Amy's Story Amy had her first experience with webinars when she worked for Tony Robbins. The webinar was a first for Tony too, and the response was great. About 800 people paid $100 to attend. The night before, Amy and Tony practiced for the webinar on the GoToWebinar platform. When they were done, Amy hit a button to end the practice session but accidentally deleted the webinar instead. In an instant, Tony and all 800 customers received an email saying, "This webinar has been canceled." A panicked Amy and team stayed up all night working with GoToWebinar to piece Tony's webinar back together. In that moment, Amy hated webinars and never wanted to do one again. However, by morning the problem was resolved. Everyone received a follow-up email saying the webinar was still happening. Although Amy was a nervous wreck, the webinar was a huge success. She then realized webinars allow you to connect in a very personal way. The connection aspect of the webinar was awesome and Amy was hooked. About a year later, in 2010, when Amy started her own business, webinars became the number-one way she promoted her online courses. Hey friends! I'm hosting a webinar all about Pinterest - if you're interested, join us! www.amyporterfield.com/pinterest Posted by Amy Porterfield on Friday, March 22, 2013 Although she's still had snafus, the wins outweigh the losses. Indeed, Amy has done webinars for all of her live launches except one, for which she did a three-part video series. However, she still added webinars afterward. Amy likes webinars because she loves to give before asking for anything in return. Webinars are a great way to teach and sell. Over the years, Amy has improved her ability to align the free content with the pitch, but giving is still her motivation for offering webinars. Before she starts a live webinar, she puts herself in this giving mindset by saying to herself, "No matter if they buy or not, they walk away today feeling excited, inspired, and driven to take action." Because Amy does a lot of business promotion, she appreciates the way webinars allow her to slow down. They allow her to make an impact before asking for anything in return. She's built a multimillion-dollar business primarily based on webinar promotions. Listen to the show to hear Amy's thoughts on improving something that works versus trying new things. What to Sell on a Webinar While some experts say you could sell anything on a webinar, Amy disagrees. Webinars are ideal when you're selling knowledge and the product allows someone to continue learning in a medium that's similar to the webinar itself. For example, pre-recorded online courses sell well. In the webinar, you can break down what's included in a $1,000 course, explain how your audience can get the course right away, and share the link. Then attendees simply sign up and receive the course immediately. The process is seamless. Similarly,
Feb 16, 2018
YouTube Community Tab: How YouTube Is Changing
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Want to keep your YouTube subscribers engaged? Interested in new YouTube features that help promote your videos? To explore big changes from YouTube, I interview Tim Schmoyer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tim Schmoyer, founder of VideoCreators.TV, a YouTube community of more than 340,000 video creators. He's the leading expert on building a loyal tribe on YouTube. Tim explains how creators can use reels, GIFs, and more to engage subscribers while producing videos that keep people watching. You'll discover how the Community tab content appears to subscribers on mobile and desktop. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Community Tab: How YouTube Is Changing The YouTube Changes When most people think of YouTube, they think of uploading polished video that your subscribers and others can discover and comment on. However, over the past year, YouTube has added new features including Contacts (similar to Friends on other platforms) and the ability to post photos, polls, text updates, and quick little videos in the Stories format. The new features indicate a focus on community development and ways to stay in front of your audience beyond uploading polished videos because those take time to produce. A YouTube subscriber is similar to a follower on Twitter or a like on a Facebook page. In all three cases, someone is agreeing to see updates from you. However, a friend on Facebook is a two-way connection because Facebook friends see updates from each other. That's how contacts work on YouTube. After you have a contact on YouTube, you can send a video in a private conversation. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53SxHLXieXw The old-school way was to copy the URL and send it via text or Twitter. But if, for example, Tim and I are contacts, Tim could message me within YouTube and say, "Hey Michael, check out this new video from Gary Vee. I think this would be a great topic for you to talk about at Social Media Marketing World." In other words, the YouTube Contact feature allows you to share videos and have private conversations about those videos with a group of friends, similar to a conversation in Facebook Messenger. So if you're working on a project with several peers, you can create a group on YouTube to easily share videos related to that project. The group can then have an organized, structured conversation about the videos inside the app. Tim notes most of the new features, including Contacts, are mobile-only (not yet available on desktop). They're being developed on platforms where people seem most likely to be using these types of features. Reels is YouTube's answer to the Stories format on other social media platforms. A reel is a 30-second clip from your smartphone. After you record video for a few seconds, you can add emojis and stickers or swipe for different filters. When you're done, post the video to your reel and your subscribers can view it. You can set a reel so that it's only available for 24 hours or make it an ongoing, long-term reel. The 24-hour reels, which people are used to, are good for quick, behind-the-scenes posts. YouTube subscribers are notified of new reel content via mobile. At the bottom of the YouTube app, tap the Subscriptions icon and a row of channels to which you subscribe appears at the top. A dot indicates that a channel has new videos and a huge square indicates the channel posted to its reel. Tap a channel and then you can see the 30-second clips in its reel. An ongoing reel, which doesn't expire after 24 hours, is good for an event that lasts longer than a day.
Feb 09, 2018
How to Use Video Content to Sell
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Wondering how video can support your sales process? Looking for tips on how to use video in your marketing funnel? To explore how video can turn leads into customers, I interview Marcus Sheridan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Marcus Sheridan, an amazing keynote speaker. Formerly known as The Sales Lion, Marcus is a partner at IMPACT, a digital sales and marketing agency. He also wrote the book They Ask You Answer and co-hosts The Hubcast Podcast. You'll discover how to create four types of video that are essential to a company's online sales process. Marcus explains the importance of involving your sales team in your videos and how to help them shine on-camera. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Use Video Content to Sell How Marcus Got Into Video Marketing In 2009, when Marcus was still working full-time at his swimming pool company, River Pools, he started blogging, and by the end of the year, produced and uploaded his first video, "The Truth About Salt Chlorine Generators: Everything You Should Know." He filmed the video in his office at night. Because he lit the video with two big work-construction lights, Marcus says he looked too pale, like he'd been at the bottom of a lake for 3 days. Still, the video was a huge victory. When Marcus uploaded his first YouTube video and hit Publish, he realized it was a special medium. Because people have become visual learners, Marcus' philosophy at River Pools was (and continues to be) "Unless we show it, it doesn't exist." And today, the River Pools YouTube channel has a few million views. Marcus says that when similar businesses in the marketplace talk about what makes their company special, they all tend to say the same thing. So showing (instead of telling) prospects what you can do helps your business stand out. With the importance of showing your work in mind, The Sales Lion started teaching companies how to develop a culture of in-house video production. I ask about Marcus' show The Balance, which he produced for about a year. Marcus says there's so much content about the hustle and grind, and some people find it inspiring, whereas others find it depressing and demotivating. Marcus wanted The Balance to emphasize that you can crush it personally and professionally. Creating the show was fun and taught him a lot about the documentary process. That learning curve was messy. Although people tend to aim for perfection, video is humbling. It's messy. Because businesses will need to become media companies whether they like it or not, the time to start embracing that messy process is now. It will help you become comfortable behind and in front of the camera, as well as with the process of uploading and distributing video. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vshxqIvSYCg By 2019, 80% of the content consumed online will be video. What percentage of your website is video and visual content? Because everyone is becoming a media company, you ought to start thinking of yourself as a one-person shop. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts about social media video trends in the next 3 years. How to Get Started With Video Content Over the last 8 years, Marcus hears most often not from business owners who need help, but from frustrated marketers. They know what would work and see the trends, but their team (the CEO, sales manager, whomever) doesn't buy in. Now they're having this issue getting buy-in for video. Almost every single time, good ideas are rejected because the decision-makers aren't educated about marketing and sales.
Feb 02, 2018
Storytelling With Video: The Journey
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Want to use video to help more people know, like, and trust you? Wondering how to create episodic video content that keeps people watching? To explore how and why we produce a weekly video documentary, I pull back the curtain on our show, The Journey. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I share my experiences leading up to and then creating The Journey. You'll discover how sharing the struggles of entrepreneurship has helped my team and business. I'll share tips for creating your own show. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Storytelling With Video My Early Storytelling When I was around 10 or 12 years old, I remember sitting on my neighbor's huge front porch and telling stories to the neighborhood kids. I'd make up crazy, fantastic 20- to 30-minute stories on the fly that involved all of my friends' parents and siblings. I guess I knew early on that storytelling would become important for me later in life. A proverb says, "Tell me the facts, and I'll learn. Tell me the truth, and I'll believe. Tell me a story, and it will live in my heart forever." The story I'm sharing in this podcast involves facing fear, facing giants, and going on an incredible journey. About a year ago, we did these NPR-style stories on our podcast and hired Jay Acunzo to do the series. The 5- to 7-minute stories came from Social Media Marketing World attendees and employees at our company, and were very well-produced. From the audio files and some B-roll footage, we then created videos and posted them on social. People absolutely loved the video versions of these stories. There was something magical about showing what was behind the story. Making a Party an Exceptional Experience Have you wondered what it takes to make a conference party an exceptional experience? Go behind the scenes at Social Media Marketing World to discover how we do it! - Erik Psst...want to join the fun? Learn more here: http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/world17fbdoc1 Posted by Social Media Examiner on Tuesday, January 3, 2017 Up to that point, with the exception of our live video show, everything Social Media Examiner did was focused on the written word and produced audio content. The emotional response after we turned the audio stories into videos planted a seed inside my brain that would later germinate. I thought maybe we could do something more regularly with video. I had watched Gary Vaynerchuk (DailyVee) crush it with video. Around the same time, my daughter, who was turning 13, wanted to get into YouTube. It freaked me out, so I decided to see what it's like to create video content. I had this journey of 30 days of live vlogging, calling it an experiment. Because I didn't have time for produced video, I went live every day via my iPhone on a selfie stick so I could learn what having a daily vlog was like. I hiked canyons, wandered around the Social Media Examiner building, and got comfortable being the authentic me on camera. A lot of crazy stuff happened. I had flies fly into my mouth while I was live. I had trees smack me in the face. I tripped. I had people looking at me weird, like, "What the heck? Who's this guy wandering around with this stick and a phone on it?"   My journey to becoming a vlogger, maybe... Posted by Michael Stelzner on Thursday, April 6, 2017 I made it to day 25 and quit because I didn't have anything more to say. I felt like I had successfully accomplished something: going 25 days straight, creating on-the-fly content. It was a great experience to be my true self. Prior to this, everything I did was thoroughly scripted, figured out,
Jan 26, 2018
Facebook News Feed Changes: Why We Need a New Strategy
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Welcome to this week's edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week's Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore Facebook news feed changes with Michael Stelzner and other breaking social media marketing news of the week! Watch the Social Media Marketing Talk Show If you're new to the show, click on the green "Watch replay" button below and sign in or register to watch our latest episode from Friday, January 19, 2018. You can also listen to the show as an audio podcast, found on iTunes/Apple Podcast, Android, Google Play, Stitcher, and RSS. For this week's top stories, you'll find timestamps below that allow you to fast-forward in the replay above. Facebook Shifts Organic Reach for Page Posts: Last week, Facebook announced major changes to how it organically serves page posts from businesses and publishers. In a statement on the Facebook Media site, the company announced it will now "prioritize posts that spark conversations and meaningful interactions between people... [and] posts from friends and family over public content." While many marketers and business page owners took this to mean the end of their Facebook content reach or the effectiveness of their Facebook ads, industry experts have reassured page owners that this recent change merely requires an adjustment to their Facebook strategies and may actually benefit those using their Facebook presence to authentically engage and interact with their community. (5:22) One of our big focus areas for 2018 is making sure the time we all spend on Facebook is time well spent. We built... Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday, January 11, 2018 Facebook Tests New "Watch Party" Feature for Groups: Facebook is testing a new video experience called Watch Party. This new feature allows Facebook group admins and moderators to select any public video on Facebook (live or recorded) and share it with other members of the group, who can then watch at the same time and in the same place. The videos will also have a dedicated comment reel with everyone watching and reacting to the same moments together and creating a deeper shared viewing experience. Facebook watch parties are being tested with "a handful of Groups" but the company is looking to expand this new feature soon. (51:45) Instagram Tests New "Type" Feature for Stories: In December, it was reported that Instagram is currently testing five new fonts for Instagram Stories among users in Japan. This week, it was discovered that Instagram is now testing these fonts with a new text-only Stories format called Type. The Next Web reports that this feature appears as an additional option at the bottom of the Stories camera, along with Boomerang and Rewind. There are several fonts and backgrounds to choose from, but users can also upload their own image to use as a background or apply a filter that emphasizes the text. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-AtAmc-dr0 Instagram Adds New "Show Activity Status" Feature in Direct Messages: Instagram's new Show Activity Status notification in Direct Messages now shows other accounts you follow and anyone you have messaged in the past when you were last active on Instagram apps. Android Police reports that this option is found under Settings and can be disabled if you don't want others to see this alert. However, disabling also prevents you from seeing when someone else was last active on Instagram. Instagram starts showing activity status in direct messages https://t.co/ssVQlTzUor pic.twitter.com/Kxj3hN5iIL — Android Police (@AndroidPolice) January 18, 2018 LinkedIn Sunsets Groups App for iOS and Unveils Group Updates for Web and Mobile: In an email sent to group admins, LinkedIn introduced some upcoming changes that entail "re-integrating [LinkedIn] Groups back into the core LinkedIn experience." The official announcement from the company states that t...
Jan 20, 2018
YouTube Ranking: How to Get More Views on YouTube
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Want to increase the visibility of your YouTube videos? Wondering how to help your videos perform well with the YouTube algorithm? To explore how to get more views for your videos on YouTube, I interview Sean Cannell. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Sean Cannell, a YouTube expert who specializes in video influencers, video equipment, and video marketing. He creates videos for multiple channels with 200,000+ subscribers each. His course is Video Ranking Academy. You'll discover how to help your videos appear as suggested videos and rank well in search results. Sean explains how views, comments, and referrals from outside YouTube boost a video's ranking. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Ranking Sean's Story Sean learned about producing video and doing it consistently through a volunteer role with his church. Around 2003, the youth pastor asked Sean to record weekly video announcements. The first year, Sean made 52 videos. Then he began creating videos for Sundays, too. So before YouTube even launched, Sean was producing 104 videos a year. By 2007, Sean was managing the church's YouTube channel and learning about creating titles and thumbnails. From that experience, Sean started a business creating wedding videos and commercials, and working with YouTubers, coaches, authors, and speakers to help them leverage the power of YouTube. After about 15 years of handling the different aspects of YouTube and video production behind the scenes, Sean launched his current business, through which he's built a personal brand. Sean's main personal channel, Think Media, has tips and tools for building your influence with online video. He focuses on the tools (cameras, lighting, microphones). He also helps people who want to improve the videos they produce or stream via a smartphone, or who want to level-up their video production. The other channel, Video Influencers, is a weekly interview show where video influencers share their best advice. Sean talks to YouTubers and people using video on Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, or any other platform. All in all, since Sean started working with video, he's probably published more than 2,000 videos and thus has seen a lot of video data. Listen to the show to discover how Sean feels about his early videos. What YouTube's Algorithm Considers Most people think video views are the most important metric. If a video has a million or even 10,000 views, it must be amazing. However, a few years ago, YouTube changed the algorithm, and now minutes watched matter more than views. Minutes matter most, Sean says. The emphasis on minutes watched makes sense if you think about YouTube's perspective. A video with a deceptive (or clickbait) title may get only 1 or 2 seconds of view time because the viewer quickly realizes the video isn't what they thought it would be. However, when somebody commits to a video for even 60 seconds, it definitely has more value because it keeps viewers on the platform longer. The order in which Creator Studio displays YouTube analytics reflects this emphasis on minutes. The top metric is watch time, the second is views, and the third is subscribers. Although views and subscribers matter, YouTube is most concerned with viewer sessions. With watch time, YouTube's algorithm considers two factors. First, YouTube wants people to watch content on your channel. So if you upload a 10-minute video and someone watches 7 minutes, that's great. Second, YouTube measures time on the platform. For example, when you send an email with a link to a YouTube video,
Jan 19, 2018
Facebook Video Ad Sequences: Converting by Addressing Objections
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Do you use Facebook video ads? Want them to be more effective? To explore how to use Facebook video ads to sell in a very creative way, I interview Tommie Powers. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Tommie Powers, a Facebook ads expert who specializes in helping businesses that sell products people use over and over. His course is called Video Ads Academy. Tommie explores examples of common objections and how to use Facebook video ads to overcome them. You'll learn how to discover which objections your prospects have. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Video Ad Sequences Tommie's Story Although Tommie had been interested in and excited about the Internet since high school, he didn't begin thinking of it as a way to make money until 2007, after he had heart failure. Because he needed a way to provide for his family, he got into affiliate marketing. After trying a bunch of stuff, he stumbled across Google AdWords and began running Google ads for affiliate products. Tommie had always been good with numbers and recognizing patterns, so interpreting AdWords data and patterns came naturally to him. After he figured out the patterns with AdWords, his affiliate marketing performed well within the first year, and he's been buying ads ever since. When Facebook started offering ads, Tommie began buying those ads. In 2012, he began buying YouTube ads. Based on his success with those, he began running Facebook video ads when they were first offered (about 3 years ago). Listen to the show to hear Tommie talk about how a NASA Space Grant Program in high school helped him identify his pattern recognition ability. Why Use Facebook Video Ads? Tommie believes Facebook video ads are more powerful than YouTube ads. YouTube doesn't drive a lot of conversions. It's good for driving brand awareness and search behavior and engaging people, but people don't always convert. People search YouTube or Google and then convert on other channels. Tommie thinks Facebook ads drive more direct conversion because Facebook ad targeting enables you to reach either niche or broad audiences. YouTube is more of a broadcast, mass-appeal medium, similar to television. Although YouTube offers good targeting options, they're nothing like what Facebook can do. Listen to the show to hear Tommie explain why attributing conversions to YouTube is difficult. How to Sell With Facebook Video To create successful Facebook video ads, focus on the offer, the audience, and the message. First and foremost, you need a good offer. If the offer isn't strong, your Facebook ad won't work. If you're competing in your market or have sold well in a medium outside Facebook (or through paid ads online), you clearly have an offer that's working. Next is the audience, and Facebook audience targeting makes reaching that audience really easy. The last piece is the message. Your message needs to engage your audience and communicate that when prospects buy your product or service, they'll achieve their desired outcome. I ask about Tommie's objection-stacking philosophy. He says it's Sales 101. The basic premise of the sales process is overcoming objections. People don't buy if they have an objection that you can't overcome. With objection stacking, you're basically creating a sales process inside your advertising campaign. To develop the right message, first figure out what communication will elicit a positive, meaningful response from your audience. Engagement is critical because Facebook won't serve your ad if you don't have a good relevance score.
Jan 12, 2018
Twitter Renaissance: Is It Time to Reconsider Twitter?
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Wondering what advantages Twitter offers social media marketers? Looking for tips on interacting with customers? To explore the opportunities marketers have on Twitter, I interview Mark Schaefer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Mark Schaefer, author of KNOWN, The Content Code, and The Tao of Twitter, now in its fourth edition. He's co-host of The Marketing Companion Podcast. He's also been one of my most frequent guests. Mark explains why marketing to Twitter's loyal and creative users is different from marketing on Facebook or YouTube. You'll discover examples of successful Twitter marketing, ranging from well-known brands to local mom-and-pop stores. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Twitter Renaissance Twitter's Relevance The first, second, and third editions of The Tao of Twitter came out in 2010, 2012, and 2014 respectively. When he was working on the newly released fourth edition, Mark wrestled with Twitter's relevance because it's changed so much. In the beginning, Twitter was hot, fun, and conversational, but many people today see it as kind of spammy. When Mark did his deep dive to rediscover what Twitter is today, he found Twitter has three worlds. The first is Wall Street, where Twitter doesn't have a good reputation. Twitter hasn't done a good job of monetizing the company and assets. Because Twitter is constantly compared to Facebook and doesn't get the same kind of revenue and user growth, Wall Street has a negative tone toward Twitter. However, Twitter's earnings announcement a few weeks ago exceeded expectations. The second is the business (social media) world. There are plenty of Google AdWords and Facebook ad experts, but who are the Twitter ad experts? Not much is going on with Twitter advertising because a lot of brands and companies use Twitter as a broadcast channel. They know Twitter is about conversations and relationships, but they still post links. It's hard to scale being human and conversations at the corporate level. When the approach these companies use on Twitter doesn't work, they blame Twitter and get disheartened. Twitter world number three is filled with the 330 million active users who love it. They're loyal, they have fun, they chat with each other, and they play games. Twitter is also where news breaks. Twitter is part of the fabric of these users' lives. Mark is interested in the gap between the Wall Street and business perceptions of Twitter, and the loyalty of its users. For instance, Twitter is bigger than Snapchat, which gets a ton of attention. Twitter has more advertising options, better dashboards, and more measurables than Snapchat. So why the lack of action in the Twitter world? Mark thinks Twitter will have a renaissance. A few months ago, Facebook announced that it's running out of places for ads, so ad prices will go up and competition will be stiffer. When companies seek out alternatives, they may look to Twitter, especially because Twitter has a massive, engaged, loyal audience that's under-served by brands. Indeed, Mark has found that Twitter users are more brand-loyal than Facebook or YouTube users. Thus Twitter offers an opportunity. Businesses just need to rediscover what Twitter has to offer and make a consistent effort to succeed there. While Mark and I agree that Facebook is the center of all social media, Mark says businesses need to look at their social media marketing on a case-by-case basis. Twitter might have some advantages for small- to medium-sized regional businesses because it can help them tune into local conversations. To demonstrate,
Jan 05, 2018
Using Facebook Ads to Turn New Customers Into Repeat Customers
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Looking for tips on building customer loyalty? Need innovative ideas to generate more revenue? To explore how to use Facebook ads to turn your new customers into loyal fans and repeat customers, I interview Maxwell Finn. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Maxwell Finn, the co-founder of Unicorn Innovations, a Facebook ad agency that specializes in customer acquisition. His clients include Pat Flynn, Kevin Harrington, 3M, and American Express. His online course is called Facebook Ad IQ Academy. Max explains why treating repeat customers differently from new customers helps reduce Facebook ad spend. You'll discover specific ad sequences for targeting new customers versus repeat customers. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Using Facebook Ads to Turn Customers Into Loyal Repeat Customers Max's Story Max's grandfather and father (both entrepreneurs) built the largest privately owned commercial real estate company in the world, and that led to Max's pursuit of marketing. Back in 2006 and 2007, Max used SEO and Web 2.0 to help their agents build their brands and make more money. Because Max wasn't passionate about the real estate world, he decided to work with software as a service. Right out of college, he became involved with a startup that raised a good amount of money and eventually had 500,000 users. After learning about ecommerce through his work with the startup, Max began working with Kevin Harrington after Kevin's time as an investor on Shark Tank. Kevin was a huge public figure, incredibly influential, and brilliant, Max says, but didn't have the online presence that fit his persona as a star and successful entrepreneur. Max and his partner, Jeremy Adams, helped Kevin and that work naturally evolved into their agency. At the agency, people asked Kevin for help with their products and all of those products needed online marketing support. That's where Max and Jeremy came in. So Kevin brought in a product, sourced it, and got it on TV. Then Max and Jeremy helped with the funnels, marketing, Facebook ads, Shopify store, and so forth. Their partnership was a perfect match that allowed them to offer clients a full range of services. Max has been working on the Facebook ads side for about five years and has invested heavily in it since day one. Today, Max and Jeremy are running their own agency, Unicorn Innovations, and in addition to client work, they offer digital courses. Listen to the show to discover why the 2008 recession was an interesting time for Max to begin his career in marketing. Benefits of Targeting Current Customers Many marketers and business owners have a flawed assumption that when someone becomes a customer, that customer will always buy from the business because their product and followup are so incredible. In reality, the business still needs to compete for customers. Other companies will try to get the customer to leave your brand and go to theirs. One transaction isn't enough to build loyalty. If, for example, you've been drinking Coca-Cola for two decades, your grandparents drank it, and your parents drank it, moving to a different brand is harder. However, after a first-time purchase, your business doesn't have that kind of brand equity and loyalty. It's really important not to neglect your customers. When you reach out to customers, Facebook ad retargeting offers advantages over email followup. If you're great at email followup and you're lucky, you get 20% to 25% open rates. So out of 1,000 customers, 800 to 850 of them don't get your email messages. However,
Dec 29, 2017
LinkedIn Native Video: What Marketers Need to Know
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Wondering how LinkedIn native video could help your marketing? Interested in tips for sharing LinkedIn video that grows your reach and leads? To explore what you need to know about LinkedIn native video, I interview Viveka von Rosen. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Viveka von Rosen, co-founder and chief visibility officer at Vengreso, a social selling consultancy. She's also author of multiple books, including LinkedIn: 101 Ways to Rock Your Personal Brand. Viveka talks about the topics, tools, and analytics that help her produce effective LinkedIn native videos. You'll hear how Viveka shares LinkedIn video posts via her personal profile today and what changes we might see in the near future. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: LinkedIn Native Video What Is LinkedIn Native Video and Why Use It? LinkedIn native video is a video you record on your phone or computer and then upload to LinkedIn. To share a video with this feature, click the video camera icon, upload your video, and then share it as an update. Native video has been rolling out to everyone on both mobile and desktop so you should have it. If you don't see it on mobile, make sure your LinkedIn app is up to date. The LinkedIn algorithm gives native videos more weight so they show up more often in the feed. Viveka has tested this by posting the same video as a YouTube video link and a native video on LinkedIn. The native video gets substantially more visibility. Video gives people a sense of who you are, especially if you're in marketing and comfortable on camera. Although LinkedIn has traditionally been behind nearly every other social media platform that's had video, people who are specifically in the LinkedIn space now have an opportunity to showcase their brand, knowledge, and products and services. I mention that LinkedIn's CEO recently hinted that he might be interested in acquiring original content (Shark Tank-type material) for their platform, indicating that LinkedIn is pretty serious about video. Viveka agrees, noting that a lot of folks were concerned that Microsoft would kill LinkedIn after purchasing it. However, she doesn't see that and loves a lot of the changes LinkedIn has made. Video is getting people who thought of LinkedIn as the "fuddy-duddy of social media" to use it actively again. It's a really powerful platform. Listen to the show to discover why I'm so excited about the ways video is changing LinkedIn. Details and Data Although video updates do really well, updates of about 1,300 characters (not Publisher posts) seem to be popular right now. These updates don't include links. Instead, links are referenced in the post with text such as "See link in first comment below." These long posts get exponentially more views than a typical update and the algorithm seems to weight them a little bit better than video. Keep in mind that videos will naturally get greater visibility because they're more interesting. You can also add 1,300 characters in a video post. Videos start playing automatically in your feed and someone has to watch for at least 3 seconds for it to count as a view. User settings determine whether audio is on or off. Viveka sets her audio off, but if a video looks interesting, she'll turn it on. That's why it's important to have captions like you do on Facebook. Unfortunately, LinkedIn doesn't yet have an auto-captioning feature. Right now, LinkedIn video isn't live, although Viveka has heard rumors that live video might be coming. In its current form, LinkedIn video is almost live because you can post video right ...
Dec 22, 2017
Video Creator to Traditional Media Star: The Zach King Story
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Want to know how a well-known creator and book author got his start on YouTube? Interested in how he grew his business on social media platforms? To explore how making YouTube tutorials ultimately led to a book and movie deal, I interview Zach King. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Zach King, a filmmaker and YouTube personality who's known for creating digital magic. More than 20 million people follow him on Instagram. He just released a brand-new children's book called Zach King: My Magical Life, and has a movie option with Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment. Zach explains how trying new social platforms like Vine helped him develop his signature style, sponsorships, and audience. You'll discover how Zach's responsiveness to his audience led him to try new ideas every step of the way. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Video Creator to Traditional Media Star How Zach Became Known The first time Zach applied to film school, he didn't get in. He decided to keep making movies by creating a YouTube channel. While he was figuring out what content to create, his parents encouraged him to do what was comfortable. For Zach, that was teaching people how to create visual effects using Final Cut Pro software. Around early 2008, Zach began teaching Final Cut Pro on YouTube by recording his screen. He slowly gained a following, and at around 30,000 followers, Zach started getting comments from his audience, complimenting his special effects and asking what would happen if he added a story to them. In response to this feedback, Zach created one of his first viral videos, Jedi Kittens. The video, which came out in 2011, is about two cats dueling with light sabers. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NtgtMQwr3Ko At that point, Zach had been teaching for several years. It was great because even though around 40,000 YouTube subscribers wasn't a ton, it was great for business. He posted hundreds of free tutorials and eventually paid off school by upselling 8-hour training courses. Zach started doing this when he was 19 or 20, and he's almost 28 now. I ask what it was like to have a hit like Jedi Kittens. Zach says he felt this rush of adrenaline, as well as a desire to replicate that success. For a young creator, a million views was awesome (and a lot of views compared to now). However, he realized 10-15 million views were needed to really call a video "viral." He couldn't picture what that looked like but continued to experiment with what did or didn't work, and grew his audience by accident. Around November 2013, Zach got into Vine and was kicking himself for being 9 months late to the platform. Whenever a new social media platform came up, he'd wait for his friends to get into it before creating content for it because doing so is time-consuming. His housemates logged onto the Vine app several times every day. Zach realized Vine had a special effects category that fit with the tutorials he was creating on YouTube. On Vine, Zach started by posting a few of his tricks and these posts developed into his magic theme. He had about 300,000 followers in the first 2 or 3 months, which was similar to the following on his YouTube channel. As his Vine following quickly surpassed his YouTube following, Zach began to see Vine as a primary way to support his business. Through short videos, Zach developed what he calls his "magic style": a visual effect with a magic twist at the end. The effects are as visual and physically interesting as possible because that approach works well on a small mobile screen where most of his viewers watch.
Dec 15, 2017
Visual Personal Branding: How to Build a Loyal Following With Images
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Want to create a strong connection with your followers? Wondering how to capture photos that authentically tell your brand's story? To explore how to develop your visual personal brand on Instagram and beyond, I interview Jenna Kutcher. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jenna Kutcher, host of the Goal Digger Podcast. She's formally a professional wedding photographer. Thousands of people have taken her online course, The Instagram Lab. Jenna explains how to curate photos and write captions that tell authentic stories. You'll discover tips for taking compelling photos and planning your Instagram feed around an overall strategy. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Visual Personal Branding Jenna's Story During college, Jenna studied corporate business and thought she'd become a CEO. After graduation, she got her dream job as an executive at a Fortune 500 retailer but quickly realized she wasn't inspired by her work. Jenna decided to pursue something creative and purchased a $300 camera on Craigslist. She had no idea that camera would be her one-way ticket out of corporate America. Jenna started a blog, where she shared how she loved photography, even though she says she had no idea what she was doing. Within a year, Jenna booked 25 weddings and was able to leave her corporate job to pursue full-time entrepreneurship. Fast-forward six years. Jenna had photographed more than 125 weddings and was doing well, while a lot of her creative friends struggled to make ends meet. They weren't sure how to run a business or how to market themselves. Jenna realized she must be doing something different to be able to build a six-figure business in three years flat, using a skill in which she had no background. She decided to teach others what she was doing. As Jenna pivoted to teaching, Jenna began to learn how to market herself online. Although the technical aspects of online marketing were intimidating at first, Jenna took courses, looked at how other people were marketing themselves, and then challenged herself to figure out her unique selling proposition. Jenna loves putting her own twist on what other people are doing. Today, Jenna has more than 150,000 Instagram followers, and she's proud of the engagement she gets from them. They're always excited to see what's coming next. As Jenna's business continues to evolve, so does her Instagram account. Jenna shares pictures of her and her life that create connection along with facets of her business that drive income. However, her Instagram posts don't always come from a place of selling. Listen to the show to hear about the conversation that inspired Jenna to switch from wedding photographer to teacher. How to Create a Visual Personal Brand First of all, Jenna says, you don't have to be a professional photographer to stand out on social media. It's easy for people to look at her content and say, "Well, of course you're doing well. You are a professional photographer." Jenna doesn't attribute her success to that. It's the way she puts her Instagram feed together, which is like a visual magazine, an editorial piece about her and her brand. Although Jenna's Instagram is curated, it's still authentic. She looks at the overall story and pieces it together through photos, captions, and Instagram stories. The curation of social media is a beautiful thing, she adds. People go onto social media to escape, to find solutions, or to be inspired. A visual brand is like a billboard for your business. Share what you want other people to know about you in a way that creates a connection lo...
Dec 08, 2017
5 Social Tools for Social Media Marketers
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Want to save time creating content and ads for your social media marketing? Interested in tools that help you track content and ad performance? To explore tools that simplify a marketer's job, I interview Ian Cleary. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Ian Cleary, the founder of RazorSocial.com, a digital agency with a popular marketing technology blog. He's also the co-founder of OutreachPlus, an email marketing outreach tool. See OutReachPlus.com. Ian explains how specific tools can help you find and share articles, blog posts, and user-generated content. You'll discover Ian's recommended tools for creating video, making website content easy to share, and managing big ad campaigns. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: 5 Social Tools for Social Media Marketers Find Content to Share via Feedly Building relationships involves identifying who's creating relevant content and sharing it. When the creators notice you sharing their content, they'll hopefully share yours, too. Ian uses Feedly to find the content he shares. Feedly pulls all of the blogs and websites he follows into one place. It's a great alternative to subscribing to a bunch of emails or checking the site of every blog you follow for a new article. Within Feedly, Ian uses collections to organize all of the blogs and websites he follows. For example, he has a collection for social media, and within that collection, he keeps up with a lot of influencers, people he looks up to, and knows write great articles. On a daily basis, Ian logs into Feedly to see the latest articles from all of his sources. Within each grouping, Ian looks for the latest posts. Depending on how the blog or site is set up, he can either read an entire article within Feedly, or read part of it and then click a link to the blog to read more. In this way, Ian curates the best articles for himself and to share with his audience. The Boards feature, which Feedly released about a year ago, also helps Ian curate content. Ian keeps one board for himself and another to share content with his team. For instance, if Ian finds a really good article, he'll add it to his team board, put a comment on that article, and then someone on his team will share it on social media. With the comments feature, Ian can do more than post a link to share. He can write something that relates to the linked article and then his team can turn it into a tweet or a Facebook update. Feedly has desktop and mobile versions, and the mobile versions have a nice interface. When Ian is out and about, he uses the mobile version to catch up with his feeds whenever he has a few extra minutes. Feedly can share items to platforms like Twitter on its own, but if you use automation or scheduling tools, Feedly also integrates with some of those. For example, if you use Zapier (an automation tool), you can integrate Feedly with it to share something to Twitter or Facebook, or save an article somewhere. Feedly also has Buffer (social media scheduling) integration, so just enable Buffer and add an article straight into the queue. The free version of Feedly allows you to follow up to 100 different sources. The pro version costs $5.41 per month and includes unlimited boards (among other features). The team version is $18 per month per person and adds a lot of team-based functionality. One new Feedly feature is a mute filter, Ian adds. If certain words or things you don't want to see appear in your feeds, you can mute them. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on Feedly and sharing others' content. Create Videos With Lumen5
Dec 01, 2017
Future of Live Video: 360 Live and Virtual Reality Live
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Wondering what emerging technologies are coming to social media? Curious about how to share immersive experiences with 360-degree video or virtual reality (VR)? To explore live 360 video and VR for marketers, I interview Joel Comm. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Joel Comm, a live video expert. He's the author of the books Live Video Revolution, Twitter Power 3.0, and many others. He's the co-host of The Bad Crypto Podcast, which is rising in the iTunes ranks. Joel explains how social media marketers can take advantage of live 360-degree video and VR. You’ll learn about consumer-friendly equipment for sharing 360 video and VR experiences. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Future of Live Video What Is 360 Video? A 360-degree video is shot with a camera that captures a 360-degree view. A 360-degree camera may have a lens on the top that captures everything all around it. Other 360-degree cameras have lenses on two sides that capture everything top to bottom, left to right, and then stitch together all the images. A 360-degree view makes videos completely immersive. The viewer can see everything within the range of the camera, whereas traditional video is limited to wherever the camera is pointing. Because 360-degree video brings people into an experience just as if they're there, this type of video is a powerful storytelling tool. Also, people find it empowering to control where they're looking. People can swipe around with a finger on a mobile device or click around with their mouse via desktop to look in any direction. A live 360-degree video is broadcast through live video apps including Facebook, YouTube, and Periscope that have adopted 360-degree video. 360-degree video has all sorts of applications. Joel has seen people in the travel industry, or just traveling, using 360 live. For example, viewers can experience being in St. Mark's Square in Venice, on a surfboard on the ocean, or in a museum. They're able to look around and see what the broadcaster is experiencing. The travel realm will be a huge arena for live 360. Travel Oregon: Mt. Bachelor 360 Video There's a reason Mt Bachelor is a playground for all winter enthusiasts. Just take a look around. Posted by Travel Oregon on Friday, February 3, 2017 Also, realtors use 360 video to show off homes, apartments, and business spaces to give people a virtual tour of a property that's for sale without actually going to the location. Prospective buyers can click around, look at a house, and imagine where their furniture might go. As part of a home tour, you might walk through the back door into the backyard so that the viewer can click around to see how it looks. Last spring, Joel shared a live 360 video from the Denver Zoo. A baby giraffe was at the zoo, and people are always interested in baby giraffes. Joel shared his experience through his Insta360 Nano camera, which plugs into his iPhone and turns it into a 360-degree camera. Joel went live on Periscope, broadcasting the baby and adult giraffes. Viewers loved being able to have that experience with him. Because viewers can look anywhere as the video plays, Joel points out interesting views by saying something like, "Look at that baby giraffe over there." To remind viewers how to look around, he'll say, "Just swipe and you can see everywhere. Swipe down to look up at the sky and swipe up to look down at the ground." Baby Giraffe at Denver Zoo in 360 --#golive https://t.co/2VY4VwER2T — Joel Comm (@joelcomm) April 2, 2017 Plus, live video allows you to interact with the live audience,
Nov 24, 2017
Facebook Ad Custom Audiences: Retargeting Those Who Know You
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Want to create Facebook custom audiences that move people into your sales process? Looking for tips on using new Facebook custom audience options? To explore ways to use custom audiences for Facebook and Instagram ads, I interview Amanda Bond. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amanda Bond, a leading Facebook ad strategist. She's a regular correspondent on the Social Media Marketing Talk Show. Her Facebook ads course is called "The StrADegy System." Amanda explains how custom audiences based on engagement can trigger an ad sequence that furthers your marketing objectives. You’ll discover tips for promoting events and segmenting audiences based on video views. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ad Custom Audiences Custom Audiences Overview When you advertise on Facebook, you can target people who have an existing relationship with your business. This existing relationship is the basis for custom audiences, which are really remarketing or retargeting audiences. Audience types: Facebook gives you six options for defining the existing relationship between your business and your ad audience. To find these options, open Facebook Ads Manager and then go to the Audiences tool. After you click the button to create a custom audience, you see all of the ways you can define the existing relationship with your business. For starters, you can target customers by uploading a CSV file of customer data, such as email addresses from your customer database or webinar attendees. This option also allows you to target ads to people on your email list. When you choose to create an audience of website visitors, Facebook adds people who visited your site and thus triggered the Facebook pixel. With this option, you can segment the audience (for example, by targeting people who visited this page but not that one). You can create as many exclusions or multiple page visits as you want. If you're an app developer, you can create an audience of people who are interacting with your app activity. A new option is offline activity, such as traveling to a store or calling on the phone. Amanda predicts that offline activity tracking will start attracting businesses with larger advertising budgets to the Facebook ecosystem. Amanda is especially fired up about the engagement option because it's fun and so in line with social media marketing. With the engagement option, you create an audience of people who have interacted with your business via Facebook or Instagram. Engagement types: You can define an engagement audience based on six different engagement elements. The first is video, which allows you to create an audience of people who have watched at least 3 seconds of your videos on your Facebook page or your Instagram business profile. Amanda discussed Facebook Video Retargeting for Live Video and Beyond the last time she appeared on this podcast. The second element is lead forms. If you already use lead ads, you can get back in front of people who have opened or completed your lead form. Third, the canvas experience is like a little micro-website within the Facebook platform. Create a list of people who have opened those collections or canvases on Facebook. The fourth option is Amanda’s favorite: Facebook page engagement. You can reach anyone who has visited or interacted with your Facebook page again through advertising. The options here, discussed later in the show, should motivate any business owner to spend more time on their social channels. The fifth option is similar to Facebook page engagement,
Nov 17, 2017
YouTube Pre-Roll Ads: How to Acquire Customers With Video
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Want your ads to drive more sales? Interested in the benefits of YouTube pre-roll ads? To explore how to sell products and services with YouTube pre-roll ads, I interview Billy Gene Shaw. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Billy Gene Shaw, a Facebook and YouTube marketing expert. His agency helps businesses acquire customers. He's also the founder of the School of G.E.N.E.I.U.S. Billy Gene provides tips for creating attention-grabbing pre-roll ads and offers that compel viewers to click a call to action. You'll discover how to serve YouTube pre-roll ads via a specific video, topic, or location. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Pre-Roll Ads Billy Gene's Story When Billy Gene was at a professional low, he was making cold calls all day, selling online education from a university he didn't believe in. After he found out the company's CEO made $25 million a year in online business, he quit the next day. Billy Gene called one of his buddies who had just inherited some money and said, "Dude, we need to figure out something about this online stuff." Long story short, they discovered Facebook ads and Billy Gene saw and fell in love with the possibilities. This was in 2012 and 2013, when Facebook ads appeared only in the right column, not in the news feed. Over the last few years, Billy Gene has worked with a lot of franchises like Massage Envy, Kia Motors, and Orange Theory Fitness. His agency helps them get more customers. When a company hires his agency, they want results, Billy Gene explains. They don't want a new website or organic posting. They want one thing: more money than what they're spending working with him. If you can bring a business three times the revenue you cost them, those relationships last a long time. Listen to the show to hear Billy Gene list his basic tools for attracting customers in an automated and predictable way. What Are YouTube Pre-Roll Ads and Why Use Them? When you're on YouTube looking to be entertained, the pre-roll video is the one that pops up before your video. The ad isn't what you searched for and you can't skip it for the first five seconds. These ads are also called in-stream ads. Billy Gene spends a lot of money on advertising across several platforms: Facebook, Instagram, billboards, podcasts, and so on. In 2017, he believes YouTube is the most profitable, easiest, fastest, and most affordable way to get customers. If you're not using YouTube ads, you're missing out on a giant opportunity, he says. Everyone is Facebook-centric these days. People are finally becoming hip to social media and they start with Facebook. Because there's a bigger barrier to entry with video on YouTube, it's much less competitive. Both platforms use a bidding system, and where there are more people it's more expensive. Plus, Facebook is increasing prices, especially with the holidays coming up. When the market zigs, you should zag. YouTube is the zag, which is why it's so profitable right now. Plus, it gives you the opportunity to physically be in front of your customers. Seeing someone's face, watching their body language, and taking in their environment build a level of trust that you can't do with an image. Listen to the show to discover what prevents people from doing YouTube ads. Examples As an example of what YouTube ads can do, Billy Gene talks about an ad promoting his membership site. Members pay about $100 per month, and he teaches a new skill each month. For the first year, he reached about 300 to 400 members using only Facebook ads. Beginning this year,
Nov 10, 2017
The Facebook Algorithm Explained for Marketers
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Want to maximize the reach of your Facebook posts? Wondering how the Facebook relevance score and boosting posts can help? To explore what marketers need to know about the Facebook algorithm, I interview Dennis Yu. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dennis Yu, a Facebook ads expert and CTO of BlitzMetrics: a business that's part school and part agency for social marketers. For the past 20 years, Dennis has been working in marketing and analytics. He used to work at Yahoo! running analytics. Dennis explains how Facebook’s algorithm prioritizes different types of engagement and post content. You’ll discover how Dennis boosts posts to manage ad costs. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: The Facebook Algorithm Explained for Marketers Dennis' Story Dennis, who has done analytics at Yahoo! and helped build the website for American Airlines, has always been into math and data. In May 2007, when Facebook launched its app-building platform, he built one of the first apps. Dennis had one of the original Facebook accounts and shares that in the beginning, Facebook didn't really have analytics, a news feed, or an ad system. As his app gained several million users, Dennis discovered a treasure trove of data. These days, Dennis builds training systems that help young adults become apprentice digital marketers. His passions have always been mentorship and creating systems that enable him to scale his mentorship efforts. Students complete the training, are certified, and are then paid to work on packages. The system is completely self-funded so every penny goes back to training young adults. Dennis thinks this reinvestment is the only way for businesses to scale. The training courses are based on actual execution. The more execution, the better the training and the more data available for developing standards for working with Facebook, Google, and other platforms. Working with big organizations such as the Golden State Warriors, Rosetta Stone, food companies, and car companies gives BlitzMetrics a lot of data. This data helps them see patterns better and create benchmarks. For example, they can see that posting photos to galleries leads to more reach than posting single photos. Listen to the show to hear Dennis discuss similarities between the Facebook algorithm and Google search. The Purpose of the Facebook Algorithm Back in 2007, you could trick the algorithm pretty easily; post statuses or get enough people to talk about something, and it would take off. Since then, the Facebook algorithm has become smarter because Facebook has more data. More users produce more things such as video, images, and apps. Instead of looking at pure engagement, the algorithm now looks at how long people watch videos, click-back rates, and other factors that indicate whether something is a legitimate signal. Today, the algorithm's job is to show users relevant content. The more content (more friends and more posts), the stronger the algorithm's filter power has to be to deliver relevant content. For instance, the average user has more than 500 friends and likes 150 or more pages. The amount of content being produced keeps growing, while the user's attention remains finite. The more friends added and pages liked, the stronger the algorithm's filter power needs to be to determine what a certain user wants to see. The number of times a user logs in per day also matters. The algorithm needs to work differently for a user who logs in once or twice per day versus 20 times per day. Plus, based on where you are, what you're doing,
Nov 03, 2017
How Social Media Has Evolved and Where It Is Headed
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Want to prepare for emerging social technologies and marketing tactics? Wondering how to reach your audience as algorithms change? To explore the past, present, and future of social media marketing, I interview Brian Solis. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Brian Solis, a digital analyst and futurist at the Altimeter Group. He's considered one of the founding fathers of social media marketing. He authored The Social Media Manifesto and the book Engage. His most recent book is X: The Experience When Business Meets Design. Brian explores the insights revealed in his most recent update to The Conversation Prism. You'll discover how human aspiration and intent can help you reach your desired audience as social media continues to evolve. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How Social Media Has Evolved and Where It Is Headed Social Media in 2007 The early days of social media were a really exciting time, Brian explains. After Web 2.0 in Silicon Valley in the mid-2000s, Facebook opened to the public in 2006, Twitter appeared in 2007, and early social networks like Friend Feed and Friendster were still around. Some people saw the promise of social media but most of the world had no idea. There was zero direction. Social media was, and still is in some ways, the Wild West. When Brian wrote The Social Media Manifesto, he was thinking about the idea of a revolution. Social media had the potential to be a great democratizer of information. Social media was a platform where everyone could share their voice. As someone who struggled to get through to traditional media or buy media to reach people, Brian believed that the ability to reach people directly and people-to-people engagement were going to be the future of all media. Brian wrote the manifesto so individuals, marketers, brands, and traditional media would think about the potential and how to be part of the movement, rather than try to control it and broadcast through it. At the time, Brian ran a couple of companies, including an early digital agency/lab dedicated to helping startups reach their markets. Using techniques that might be considered "growth hacking," the agency found clever, nontraditional ways of helping companies with few resources get as big as they could so they could get acquired, make an IPO (initial public offering), or simply reach profitability. Brian was in and around the development of not only social media but also many other social technologies. Brian says after the rise and fall of Web 1.0, Web 2.0 showed promise but was then hit with the economic challenge of the 2008 recession. However, Brian was interested in the way social media seemed almost recession-proof. It took everything by storm. For instance, South by Southwest Interactive enjoyed a surge in popularity around 2005 through 2007 with the rise of Web 2.0 and social media. Plus, it was the beginning of entrepreneurship, at least in this era. Everybody in every industry was suddenly a social media pro. You had marketers, advertisers, coaches, you name it. Everybody latched onto social media because it seemed like it was the next gold rush. Social media showed the promise of fantastic opportunities, not just from a market or a profit standpoint, but for changing the world. Brian wanted to do his part to steer social media in a positive and productive direction. Listen to the show to hear more about the evolution of the Internet and social media. The Conversation Prism Brian started working on The Conversation Prism in 2007, and it officially launched in 2008 at South by Southwest w...
Oct 27, 2017
Chatbots: Marketing Automation via Messenger
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Wondering how chatbots can improve open and click-through rates on Facebook? Want to build funnels into your chatbot messaging? To explore how to develop marketing messaging that works in Facebook Messenger chatbots, I interview Andrew Warner. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Andrew Warner. When Andrew was younger, he built a company to $30 million in annual sales. Today, Andrew is the founder of Mixergy, a site and podcast focused on tech startups. Andrew's newest venture is called Bot Academy, a site focused on chatbots. Andrew explains the many advantages chatbots offer compared to email. You'll discover how tags and the right content can create interactive and engaging chatbot conversations. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Chatbots How Andrew Got Into Chatbots Since 2008, Andrew has been running Mixergy, a podcast and website focused on helping newer tech entrepreneurs learn from a variety of experienced tech entrepreneurs and exploring topics like their backgrounds, how they built their businesses, and why those businesses worked. Although Andrew had made angel investments in chatbot software companies, he didn't really use them in his work until his company had a problem with its email open and click-through rates. A big part of Mixergy's business is growing their email list for relationship-building with future customers. To improve those rates, Andrew tried many things including adjusting their funnel, but nothing worked. Then Andrew realized he was complaining to his team about the problem not with email, but via chat apps such as Facebook Messenger, iMessage, and Slack. Although Andrew was communicating with people he loved and worked with using chat, he was using email to communicate with prospective customers. He began to question whether email was the issue. Andrew decided to test how communicating with customers via chat would impact the metrics for his business communications. When they communicated with customers via chat, open rates rose from 20% to 30% with emails to 80% to 95% on Facebook Messenger. Click rates rose from 5% on email to more than 50% on Messenger. Andrew recalls driving from San Francisco to Napa to get away from work for the day. Two different people called him during the drive and said, "Please show me how you're reaching people on Facebook Messenger." That's when Andrew realized chatbots were the future and he could build a business based on chat. The first company Andrew invested in was Assist, founded by his friend Shane Mac and the founder of Geek Squad, Robert Stephens. One of their tests was this chatbot that at first worked on SMS text messages and then Facebook Messenger. They were so plugged in that when Facebook was thinking about chatbots, the duo went to Facebook's offices to talk about it. Then when Mark Zuckerberg announced chatbots at F8 2016, Andrew asked himself, "Why am I not paying more attention to what Shane and Robert Stevens are telling me?" That's when he started to get really lit up by the idea of chatbots. Listen to the show to hear about other efforts that didn't help Andrew improve metrics for his email list. What Chatbots Can Do and Why Marketers Should Care Chatbots can provide a sense of immediacy that email doesn't. Marketers can use this immediacy to share timely reminders and links. For example, someone who registers for one of Andrew's webinars receives the message, "Press this button and my chatbot will remind you on Facebook Messenger." When it's time for the webinar, the chatbot reminder makes the recipient's phone vibrate and ...
Oct 20, 2017
How to Get Leads and Customers at Events
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Wondering how taking part in live events can help your business? Interested in tips on networking and sponsorships for events? To explore how to connect with and develop leads by attending physical events, I interview Emily Crume and Demian Ross. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Emily Crume and Demian Ross from our biz dev division at Social Media Examiner. Each has been attending events for years with an eye on prospecting. Emily and Demian explain how attendees can prepare for an event and network with people they want to meet. You'll discover how different types of event sponsorships can build brand awareness and help you find prospects. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Grow Your Leads and Customers at Events Why Consider Events to Prospect? Events are a great way to meet people and develop long-term relationships, Emily explains. Events are also a great way to increase awareness of your business. At the time of this interview, Emily is at INBOUND in Boston with "22,000 of my new potential best friends." Everyone is attending sessions and learning from each other. Emily is going to demos, meeting new customers, and finding potential tools and solutions for the Social Media Examiner audience. Her secret mission is to find opportunities, which is why so many people go to events. It's also about speeding up the KLT (know, like, and trust) factor, Demian adds. You've got to get to know someone and like them, and then you'll be open to trusting them. People want to do business with people they trust. Because you're physically able to talk to and reach out to people and build a connection, you expedite that relationship. Networking in person is still so important, even in 2017. When I first started Social Media Examiner in October 2009, I went to two events, BlogWorld and MarketingProfs B2B Summit. In about a week, I accomplished something that would normally take a year or more. Something magical happens when you meet people face to face, even if opportunities don't present themselves immediately. Whether you're in the event world, a consultant looking for customers, a company that sells digital or physical products, or in professional services, you can benefit from going to events. Listen to the show to discover some of the people I became friends with at events in October 2009. Attending Events Emily, Demian, and I discuss the four different levels of event involvement. The first level is buying a ticket and going to an event. At Podcast Movement and VidSummit, my goals were to network, so all I did was stand in the halls, talk to people, and meet some of my existing contacts. Often, those contacts would introduce me to new people. Also, I might host a breakfast, lunch, or dinner. When you sit down to share a meal with people, amazing opportunities present themselves. Emily likes to meet with existing customers and support their activities at events. For instance, she'll attend their sessions and go to their demos so she can also learn more about their businesses and find ways to help them connect more deeply with our audience. Go to activities that align with your type of business, she suggests. Learn new things, get inspiration, and hone your craft while finding other like-minded people. Demian goes to events to meet with people who see the power of exhibiting, as well as to discover who their decision-maker is (something easier to find out in person). He wants to learn about what people do so we can see whether it's a good fit. Whether you're there to scope out exhibitors or as an attendee,
Oct 13, 2017
Creating Short, Snackable Videos for Instagram and Beyond
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Wondering how to film and edit compelling 60-second videos? Want your videos to boost social media engagement? To explore how to create short videos for Instagram and Facebook, I interview Lindsay Ostrom. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Lindsay Ostrom, founder of PinchofYum.com and author of the Tasty Food Photography ebook. She also co-founded Food Blogger Pro, a membership site for developing and monetizing food content. Lindsay explains why short videos work and how to create a hook that captures viewers' attention. You'll discover tips for lighting and editing your videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Creating Short, Snackable Videos on Instagram and Beyond Lindsay's Story Lindsay began her career as an elementary school teacher. She taught fourth grade and loved it. After school, Lindsay liked trying different things in the kitchen and started a food blog as a hobby. Lindsay enjoyed creating the recipes, and the game of seeing how many followers and comments she could get. Even in the early stages, she liked digging into the analytics. The blog started in 2010, and after a year, traffic continued to pick up. Then Jane Wang, the mother of one of the founders of Pinterest, pinned one of Lindsay's recipes. At the time, Jane Wang had one of the most followed accounts and her pin was a lucky break that led to a spike in the blog's growth and led Lindsay on the path toward blogging full-time. Eventually, Lindsay and her husband both left their day jobs to work on Pinch of Yum. They now also have a team of five people. The majority of the content is, always has been, and probably always will be food and recipes. The blog posts include several pictures, the recipes in text, and videos. The blog has a lifestyle side too. Once or twice a month, if something significant happens in their lives, Lindsay talks about it on the blog, although not in a recipe post. The rest of the content is food with personal stories woven into them. Pinch of Yum has about 124,000 followers on Pinterest; 270,000 on Facebook; and 466,000 on Instagram. Listen to the show to hear what Lindsay calls the "funny/embarrassing" part of her blog's growth story. What Are Short, Snackable Videos? Short, snackable videos are around 60 seconds long and typically show only someone's hands as they create a recipe. These videos are like a bridge between a photo of a recipe and a full-blown cooking show. Tasty, which most people are familiar with, deserves a lot of the credit for popularizing this style of food video. Meatball Sub Boats Enjoy a meatball sub without all the mess with this easy meatball sub recipe ! FULL RECIPE: http://bzfd.it/2gd3OQl FIND IT IN OUR APP: http://tstyapp.com/m/isOMiDheUF Posted by Tasty on Friday, August 25, 2017 These videos are frequently shot from an overhead angle. When Lindsay creates her videos, she wants to make people feel like they could be in the shoes of the person cooking. The videos provide an intimate but quick look at how a recipe works and why certain ingredients work together. A snackable video differs from a longer type of food video in both the way the info is given and the way people consume it. For example, a YouTube-style video about how to grill a steak might be five minutes long, and someone might talk about how to choose the best cuts of steak, what temperatures to use, and other specifics characteristic of a deep dive. Snackable videos, like the ones Pinch of Yum produces, are short and have a narrower focus such as a good idea for dinner or some tips and tricks.
Oct 06, 2017
YouTube Remarketing: How to Retarget People on YouTube
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Want your YouTube ads to convert? Looking for effective ways to build remarketing audiences for your ads? To explore tactics for remarketing with YouTube, I interview Brett Curry. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Brett Curry, CEO of OMG Commerce and a YouTube ads expert. He authored "The Ultimate Guide to Google Shopping" for Shopify. He's also host of the eCommerce Evolution podcast. Brett explains different ways to combine search, shopping, and YouTube options to build target audiences that convert. You'll discover how to estimate the cost of YouTube ads and manage your budget. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: YouTube Remarketing Brett's Story Right out of college, Brett started a small ad agency. In school, he sold radio ads, but he loved the way local TV ads made an impact and created local celebrities. In 2004, Brett got into search and SEO, which led to building OMG Commerce in 2010. OMG Commerce is a full-funnel ecommerce marketing agency. At every stage of the funnel, the agency focuses on attracting the right shoppers to each client's brand. To do that, they combine search, shopping, display, and YouTube ads. Brett thinks that search ads and YouTube ads are a match made in heaven and that YouTube ads create unique opportunities for remarketing. For example, OMG Commerce has a client that sells iPhone accessories. At the top of the funnel, if someone is looking at iPhone case reviews, the agency targets that person with a YouTube ad. Someone actively searching on Google for a specific product such as an iPhone 7 Plus screen protector will see a Google Shopping ad. When someone who clicks doesn't convert, they begin seeing remarketing ads. Although OMG Commerce primarily uses Google products, Brett believes in using any kind of marketing that works. Also, connecting the dots at the top, middle, and bottom of the funnel is important. Brett's agency makes sure clients have AdWords conversion tracking, Google Analytics, and the correct attribution model. Then the agency pulls together all of these elements so their clients see the impact. Listen to the show to learn how Brett's company built their claim to fame. YouTube Versus Facebook Ads Brett says a lot of merchants getting good results advertising on Facebook want to know if they can do something similar on YouTube with the Google Display Network. The answer, for the most part, is yes. (Remember that Google owns YouTube.) Businesses usually want to do both YouTube and Facebook ads. Compared to Facebook, YouTube advertising has advantages. Facebook counts a video view after three seconds, whereas YouTube counts a video view after someone has watched for longer. With YouTube, a view counts after 30 seconds or the length of the video if it's shorter (like a 15-second ad). That longer view time is a better measure of whether someone is engaged with the video. Plus, YouTube is expanding the ways you can target viewers. With in-market audiences, you can target people who are in the market for a particular type of product. For instance, if you work in the skincare business, you can choose people whose search patterns indicate they're in the market for skincare products or services. With affinity audiences, you can target someone who's into travel, food, or something else. Brett thinks one of the best options is the ability to target someone based on their search behavior because YouTube is the number-two search engine (behind Google). Search behavior offers great insight. For example, you can learn not only that someone is looking for recipes,
Sep 29, 2017
Product Evangelism: How to Evangelize and Create Advocates
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Want to create an intensely loyal fan base for your product? Wondering how a product evangelist can help? To explore how product evangelism supports the sales process, I interview Guy Kawasaki. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Guy Kawasaki, the chief evangelist at Canva, a brand ambassador for Mercedes, and formerly the evangelist for Apple Computer. He's written many books including The Art of the Start and Enchantment. His new course is called The Art of Evangelism: How to Promote Your Product, Service, Company, or Idea. Guy explains the benefits of evangelism. You'll discover the most powerful tool for an evangelist. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Product Evangelism Evangelizing for Apple Guy started working for Apple around 1983 or 1984, during the introduction of the Macintosh computer. As a software evangelist, his job was to convince developers to write Macintosh software and peripherals. Apple used the term evangelism because the company viewed Macintosh as not merely another personal computer platform, but as good news. "Evangelism" comes from Greek, meaning "bringing the good news," so Guy brought the good news of Macintosh to developers and explained how it would, in the words of Steve Jobs, "dent the universe." Initially, the response was enthusiastic because Macintosh was so different from the Apple II and the IBM PC. Macintosh offered a way for many developers to write the software they always wished they could use. The graphic user interface and color provided a brand-new palette. After the positive initial reaction, the honeymoon period wore off. Developers found writing Macintosh software difficult because they lacked tools and documentation. Anyone who was used to developing 80x24 column-based software had to work with MacPaint and MacWrite. Also, developing for a graphical user interface required a completely different mindset. Guy explains how his background in jewelry sales (an intensely personal business) helped him with evangelism for Macintosh. Because Macintosh was new technology, it required the suspension of disbelief. People needed to believe this new personal computer platform could succeed. Instilling developers with that belief is also a very personal interaction. Today, the concept of evangelism is similar to how it was back then, whether you're creating graphics with Canva or computing with Macintosh. The difference is a product evangelist has so many more tools now. There's social media, video conferencing, all kinds of things that break down distance, barriers, and costs. Listen to the show to learn what tools Guy had for evangelism back in the day. Benefits of Evangelism The difference between evangelism and sales is an evangelist typically has the other person's best interest at heart. It's not about fulfilling a sales quota and earning commission. When Guy worked for Apple and asked people to support Macintosh, he believed it would empower them and add a new line of revenue to their businesses. Today, as the evangelist for Canva, when Guy asks people to use it, he truly believes it will make them better graphic designers and enable them to create graphics that will increase their effectiveness as a communicator. If someone uses Canva, bought a Macintosh, or wrote Macintosh software, it was good for him, Guy adds. However, it was also good for the other party. That's the crucial difference between evangelism and sales. Guy also emphasizes that evangelism requires a great product. Today, social media makes product evangelism fast, free, and easy.
Sep 22, 2017
How to Work With YouTube Influencers
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Want your ads to reach an enthusiastic niche audience? Have you considered collaborating with YouTube video influencers? To discover how to work with influential YouTube creators, I interview Derral Eves. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Derral Eves, one the world's top YouTube video marketing experts. He's consulted with many of the world's largest YouTube channels and is also the founder of VidSummit, an industry conference for video creators, agencies, and brands. Derral explains how to collaborate with YouTube influencers and maximize your ads budget. You'll discover what you need to know about how to disclose influencer/brand relationships. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Work With YouTube Influencers Derral's Story Since 1999, Derral has worked with brands and businesses through his agency. Originally, Derral's focus was using search engine optimization to increase websites' visibility. After YouTube came along, his agency began optimizing clients' lead generation videos on Google. Derral helped the owner of a pest control company quintuple his business, and over a year, helped The Piano Guys go from being unknown to having 1.8 million subscribers and hundreds of millions of YouTube video views. Through his work with The Piano guys, Derral saw the power of audiences and the influencing power of his client. He was shocked at how engaged and excited people could get about sharing someone else's vision, mission, and purpose. Through YouTube, The Piano Guys created a tribe and became visionaries. They brought people together and spread their uplifting message to the world through music and visual representation. People who work together and grow communities can ultimately change the world, Derral believes. Derral decided to focus solely on developing audiences and building influence and sold off the other portion of the business around 2007 or 2008. Since this transition, Derral has been especially attracted to projects and people that are making a difference in the world. Derral and his company have helped 14 different channels start from scratch, reach more than a million subscribers, and generate 21 billion video views. After working with every vertical on YouTube, Derral has found a system for creating audiences. Also, he's learned how influencers affect their tribe and get people involved in changing the world. As Derral and his team have navigated this landscape, they've learned that influencers aren't a new trend. They've been around since the beginning of time. People are put in positions of influence. Derral has also learned that the way influencers communicate and interact with fans can make a big difference. By simply interacting like a regular person with their audience, influencers can have a positive impact on people. Listen to the show to hear Derral give an example of a great interaction between a fan and an influencer. Why Work With YouTube Creators? One of the biggest challenges an agency faces is how to get the most visibility for their clients. You can always pay for an ad; however, influencers can make an impact that an ad can't because the fans who engage with a specific creator or influencer are willing to listen and take direction from that influencer. Those fans have a sense of loyalty to the influencer, who's already part of their lives. When agencies look for the most effective way to reach their intended audience, they have choices. They can do a targeted ad, integrate an influencer in the ad and target the influencer's demographic,
Sep 15, 2017
Medium: Why Bloggers Should Consider Publishing on Medium
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Want to position yourself as an authority on a specific subject? Have you considered publishing your blog posts on Medium? To explore how Medium can benefit bloggers and marketers, I interview Dakota Shane. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dakota Shane, a social media columnist for Inc.com. He co-founded Arctiphi, a social media agency for breweries and restaurants. He's also a top writer in the social media category on Medium. Dakota shares how to maximize your content's reach using Medium. You'll discover tools and tactics for building your email list with Medium articles. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Medium Dakota's Story Right after Dakota graduated from college in 2015, he and his brother launched their agency. Dakota was learning all he could about marketing, social media marketing, and content marketing from podcasts, books, and client experience. Dakota comes from a family of creative people and grew up writing stories. In his career, this writing bug stayed with him and he wanted to write about what he was learning as a marketer. At the time, his two choices for housing content were the blogosphere and LinkedIn. Although the blogosphere was the gold standard, Dakota felt that the landscape was saturated and it would take too much time and effort to gain a following while also working a full-time job and running a business. The articles Dakota wrote on LinkedIn flopped, and the platform also seemed a little too formal for his voice. When Dakota found out about Medium, he was excited because it looked like a place where he could talk and write the way he wanted. Based on everything he'd learned since college, Dakota wrote an article titled 200+ Podcasts, 100+ Articles, and 20+ Books in 11 Bullet Points. Then he dug up the personal Twitter handle of the editor of his favorite Medium publication (The Mission) and sent him the link. The editor replied, saying the article looked great and would be published in the morning. The next day, Dakota woke up to a slew of notifications: hundreds of people shared and thousands of people had already read the article. He saw the power of Medium as a platform and realized his life and business were about to change for the better. Dakota has been seriously writing on Medium for the last year and a half, and his consistency on the platform has led to opportunities with niche social media blogs. To get those opportunities, he gathered links to his highest-performing works on Medium, wrote a pitch on why he would be a good fit for their publication, saved it as a draft, and kept sending it out. After landing spots on bigger social media blogs, Dakota used those credits as leverage to get his first speaking gigs and podcast interviews. On his third try pitching to Inc.com, he landed a column and has been writing for them for the past few months. Listen to the show to discover who shared Dakota's first Medium post. Why Write on Medium? There are four reasons to write on Medium. First, Medium provides a ready-made audience that most writers, creators, or marketers don't have and that would take years to build. Second, and most importantly, Medium presents an opportunity right now because it's at that sweet spot between an emerging platform (which could be a risk) and an established platform (which could be saturated). Since it's in this position, Medium can open doors for a creator, writer, or marketer to brand themselves as an authority on a specific subject. Although Medium has kept recent metrics to themselves, as of late 2016 there were 60 million monthly use...
Sep 08, 2017
How to Generate Revenue With Your Content
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Want to make money from your content? Wondering how a loyal audience can create business opportunities? To explore business models that help publishers generate revenue, I interview Joe Pulizzi. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Joe Pulizzi, founder of the Content Marketing Institute and Content Marketing World. He's written five books including Epic Content Marketing and Content Inc. His newest book is called Killing Marketing: How Innovative Businesses Are Turning Marketing Cost Into Profit. Joe explains how high-quality content can transform marketing from a cost center into a profit center. You'll discover the different ways you can monetize your content. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Generate Revenue With Your Content Why Joe Wrote Killing Marketing Joe and co-author Robert Rose work mostly with large businesses. They've been seeing a trend where businesses are viewing marketing as a profit center rather than a cost center. Only a few companies are currently doing things this way. However, Joe believes that over the next 5 or 10 years, marketing as a profit center will be the rule, not the exception. The premise of the book (and the philosophy) is to create trusted relationships with your audience and monetize that relationship by doing more than selling products. You can monetize your business in 10 different ways. Joe says the biggest mistake people make with their marketing is they set up their marketing department wrong. They seek opportunities for the sales team and don't see all of the potential in what their companies can be and sell. Any business that has lasted 10 or 15 years has evolved over time. Yes, selling products is important but you can't lead product-first anymore. The only competitive advantage people have today is communication. Everything else can be duplicated. Marketers need to be refocusing on making markets and creating opportunities for organizations; however, many have lost sight of those objectives. When the focus is on people, not necessarily products, companies can sell all kinds of things they never thought about before. Listen to the show to discover how marketers typically view marketing. Companies Embracing This Premise BabyCenter.com, owned by Johnson & Johnson, is one of the largest sites dedicated to mothers. Eight out of 10 mothers use the site, which is a stellar resource for research and development. Johnson & Johnson monetizes the site directly and launches new products from it. Red Bull Media House is judged as a profit center and media company. Although they're the marketing arm of Red Bull (and want to sell more product), their revenue comes from advertising and content syndication. They package and sell their videos to companies like The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. They also sell subscriptions (The Red Bulletin Magazine has two million subscribers). One of Joe's favorite examples is Arrow Electronics, which is the 118th company on the Fortune 500 list. They're like the Amazon.com for electronics equipment and they target electrical engineers. Two years ago, they went to Hearst and UBM (Content Marketing Institute's parent company) and bought 51 media properties, including EE Product News. Now, Arrow Electronics is the largest media company in the electronics industry. Although the media division is a marketing arm for the company, the media division is also extremely profitable. Plus, it helps the company sell more products and services. In most cases, marketers simply target customers or prospects with the goal of getting t...
Sep 01, 2017
Selling With Video: YouTube and Facebook Video Marketing
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Want to create a sales video that converts? Looking for expert tips about building rapport with your prospects? To explore how to sell with video on YouTube and Facebook, I interview Jeremy Vest. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers, business owners, and creators discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jeremy Vest, founder of Vidpow, the YouTube-certified agency for big brands and channels including Hewlett-Packard, Funimation, and ServiceMaster. He also created Adobe TV, a video training site for Adobe, and he's the host of the TubeTalk podcast. Jeremy explains how to hook your viewing audience and introduce them to your product. You'll discover why remarketing is essential to improving conversions from your videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Selling With Video Jeremy's Story Jeremy has been designing websites and marketing products online since 1998. He also loved teaching college-level web design, graphic design, and marketing classes. When Internet bandwidth increased enough to do online videos and courses, Jeremy realized he could teach many more people via video so he created xTrain, a video-based training company. Then, when YouTube came out in 2005, Jeremy started getting into it immediately. About four years ago, Jeremy launched Vidpow, which helps brands with strategy for creating videos. In his work for Vidpow, Jeremy combines his love for design with his interest in marketing, especially analyzing what improves conversion rates. Vidpow helps brands understand the universe of video and how to navigate it. Over four years, Vidpow has helped clients get more than a billion organic views. Listen to the show to find out how many websites Jeremy has created since 1998. Misconceptions About Selling With Video After Jeremy helps a client create an awesome ad or video strategy, the first thing the client often asks is, "Why aren't we getting massive sales?" Jeremy has to explain that there's no magic pill to sell stuff. It just takes time. Before people take their relationship with your brand to the next level, they need to see your brand 7 to 20 times, whether it's an email, your website, or social media ads. Even the most viral videos and the best sales videos don't produce that result. Instead, someone who has watched your video lands on your web page and gets put into your company's remarketing process. Jeremy believes that video is better than images for selling online. If a picture is worth a thousand words, what's a video worth? Text and pictures are great, but video has the highest capacity to show emotion. Showing your product or service with a video helps it sell better than any type marketing, other than connecting in person. Another misconception is that lots of views mean that your video is a success. However, if you're reaching the wrong people, they won't watch your video for very long. Because the YouTube algorithm prioritizes how long people watch your content, lots of short view times can harm your marketing. Listen to the show to hear me discuss a problem with an Instagram apps article that received lots of views. Traits of Successful Sales Videos Whether your video is on Facebook, YouTube, or Instagram, the first five seconds of your video have to be weird. Seth Godin calls this concept the purple cow. Even if you have a good or great video, odds are most people won't even watch it. The average view duration of Facebook video is six seconds so you have only a few seconds to engage someone and tell their brain to keep watching. One of Jeremy's favorites is the video created by Derral Eves and the Harmon Brothers for Squatty Potty.
Aug 25, 2017
How to Optimize Your Facebook Ads: A Proven Approach
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Want to improve the performance of your Facebook campaigns? Wondering how to successfully test and fine-tune your Facebook ads? To explore his process for optimizing Facebook ads, I interview Azriel Ratz. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Azriel Ratz, author of the Facebook Pixel eBook and the Facebook Ads Mastery online course. He manages Facebook ads for clients across the globe. Azriel explains how he researches audiences and creates ad sets. You'll discover which metrics to consider when testing Facebook ad performance. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Optimize Your Facebook Ads Azriel's Story About five years ago, Azriel started working for a friend whose business had an email list of 1,000 subscribers at the time. Azriel's job was to post on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, and Twitter and figure out what posts worked or didn't work. When Azriel looked at the analytics and noticed that certain Facebook posts worked really well, his friend suggested scheduling posts at certain times and targeting the posts based on what was already working. For instance, they created yes-or-no poll questions on Facebook, which attracted a lot of reach and activity. The polls asked how people felt about the day's news. They also posted these questions on the website: A basic form asked a poll question and a reader had to give their email address to respond. With this approach, the email list grew to the tens of thousands, all without spending money on ads. Azriel's friend wanted to know what would happen if they started putting money behind these posts, so they started running serious tests on Facebook. Over the next three years, the list grew to about 150,000 email addresses and led to ecommerce sales and client work. Two years ago, Azriel started his own business, focusing solely on optimizing Facebook ads for clients. He discovers what audience and content work best and then uses Facebook ads to target each client's best potential audience with the best potential ads. As a result, clients get the best return on their ad spend. Listen to the show to discover what Azriel studied in college. The Value of Optimizing Ads Most people think that creating Facebook ads is a very basic process. They know who they want to talk to and what they want to say. Based on that knowledge, they create an ad, choose an audience (thinking Facebook will figure it out), and let the ad run. They believe the cost is what it is, and they can't do anything about it. However, Azriel explains, if a business talks to the same person a different way by creating slightly different ads, this change could possibly save the business money on the cost to reach that person. Over time, a savings of even one cent per click could potentially save a company hundreds of thousands of dollars, depending on the ad spend. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on conversion rate optimization. Azriel's Process Azriel's process reflects the structure for creating ads in Ads Manager. However, before you begin creating ads in Ads Manager, you can use the specifics of Azriel's process to begin thinking about how to build your ads. Identify what business goal you want to achieve by running these ads: Do you want to get leads? Do you want people to attend your webinar? Do you want people to visit your store? Your business goal helps you choose which type of campaign will most likely get you the right results. If you choose a page likes campaign, don't expect to get webinar subscribers. A video view campaign isn't ideal for getting purchases on your website.
Aug 18, 2017
Growing Social Media Examiner: The Bumpy Road of Pursuit
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Ever wonder how Social Media Examiner started? Are you curious about the obstacles we faced in building a sizable media entity? Sit back and learn the story that led millions of people to us. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, my friend Mark Mason, host of the Late Night Internet Marketing Podcast, interviews me to celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Social Media Marketing podcast. We'll explore the core skills that helped me move into social media marketing. You'll also learn how I make strategic decisions about the future of the company. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Pursuit My Entrepreneurial Journey Before Social Media Examiner, I was known as a writer. I wrote a book called Writing White Papers and helped a lot of out-of-work journalists figure out how to go from writing for magazines and newspapers to writing for businesses. The job of a white paper is to persuade and educate. Businesses with expensive or complex products or services use white papers to communicate about them. For instance, a big corporation would hire someone to talk to the engineering and sales departments and translate that foreign language into something a customer could understand. Mark asks how important the helping aspect is to me as an entrepreneur. Whatever I do, I want to help the largest number of people in a way that doesn't place a huge strain on me personally. There's only so much of me to go around, and by creating products that are highly scalable, I can make helping others a big part of what I do. For example, this podcast has more than 10 million downloads and Social Media Examiner has 60 million readers. I wasn't an overnight success, however. When I started Social Media Examiner in 2009, I felt like I was really late to the social media game. A lot of people say they feel they're late today. What I lacked in timing I made up for in my ability to ask questions, understand complex things, and communicate how these things work in a way everyone can understand. This skill has helped me throughout my career. In the 1990s, my focus was creative agency work and designing websites, which was novel at the time. I also helped people design annual reports, trade show booth displays, and corporate logos. When I transitioned into a writer and later into social media, my communication skills continued to serve me well. When I started Social Media Examiner, my secret skill wasn't that I knew anything about social (I knew nothing). It was my ability to discern which people knew things, extract information from them, and convey that knowledge to my audience. No matter what you do, figure out which of your skills allow you to travel into a new space. Then you can be really successful. My entrepreneurial journey has never been easy. By the same token, I think if it had been easy, I would have been bored and moved along to the next thing. I like a challenge and solving puzzles. I'm not one of those people who wants to build a system and then sit back and retire on a beach. I want to keep pushing the envelope and figuring out ways to be better. When I was in college, I dreamed that I was in a room with a couple of hundred people who were congratulating me on my success. I had the dream when I was around 20 years old, and I'm 49 now. That dream didn't come true for around 25 years. Although I've always had certain levels of success, I've never had something amazing happen overnight. I've always been the tortoise, not the hare. I realized my dream had come true in 2014, the second year of Social Media Marketing World,
Aug 11, 2017
Live Video Tools: The Best Apps for Going Live
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Are you planning to start a live video show? Want to know which tools you'll need to broadcast live? To explore the best live video apps and software to produce your own live show, I interview Ian Anderson Gray. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Ian Anderson Gray, the founder of Seriously Social, a blog focused on social media tools. Ian is also a live video tools expert. His courses include Seriously Social OBS Studio and Seriously Social Wirecast. Ian explores the best live video software for beginning and advanced broadcasters. You'll discover which software and add-ons offer the features you need. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Live Video Tools Ian's Live Video Story When Facebook Live started rolling out, Ian felt like everyone had access before he did, because he was an Android user (at the time) living in the United Kingdom. In his search for a workaround, Ian discovered OBS Studio, a free tool for Macs and PCs. With OBS Studio, Ian found a way to broadcast from his computer to his Facebook page, profile, and groups. That was his entry into Facebook Live and live video. Ian wrote a blog post on how to broadcast from your computer with OBS Studio and went out of his way to make the process as easy as possible for people to understand. He even included a tool that allows people to get the magic stream key necessary to broadcast with OBS Studio. Since Ian posted the article last year, the article has had just under three million views. Listen to the show to discover what platform Ian tried using before Facebook Live. What Stops Marketers From Going Live? Two things stop marketers from going live: "the fear and the gear." But Ian believes fear is what really gets in people's way. People are afraid they'll say something silly or wrong. They might be worried their cat will jump on the keyboard, the webcam will fall over, and it will be a complete disaster. Or maybe they're afraid others will think they're a fraud. Marketers also have issues with technology. People think they can't go live because they don't have this webcam, that phone, or a decent lighting setup. Those are excuses for people who are simply scared of getting on camera and communicating their message. Everyone gets nervous, explains Ian, who's trained as a professional singer. He feels it too. The key is to channel your nervous energy into your performance. If you feel nervous or scared, Ian says, it's a good thing. It shows you care. The best performance Ian ever gave was when he was absolutely petrified before he went on stage. The worst performance was when he was entirely complacent. He thought the performance would be absolutely fine, and it turned out to be a disaster. To help you overcome that fear, Ian recommends warming up your voice before each broadcast. Exercise the lower part of your voice up to the high part of your voice. These exercises will likely make you feel a bit more at ease. Also, when you warm up, using the high and low parts makes your voice more engaging. By using your vocal range, you're not trying to become a different person. You're heightening your personality by putting more energy behind it. Listen to the show to hear Ian's example of a vocal warm-up and what your voice might sound like if you don't warm up. Basic Apps The easiest apps for live broadcasting are web-based. Fire up your browser (Safari, Chrome, Internet Explorer, etc.), and go to the tool's web page. BeLive, probably the best-known app, has an advantage because has a free trial. You can broadcast up to two 20-minute broadcasts...
Aug 04, 2017
Our New Podcast: Social Media Marketing Talk Show
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Have you noticed that social networks seem to change every week? How can anyone possibly keep up, right? We have a great new (and free) solution for you--the busy marketer. I'm excited to announce the new Social Media Marketing Talk Show audio podcast. Each week your friends at Social Media Examiner bring you: #1 News: Our news team breaks down the critical social updates of the week. #2 Commentary: We bring on industry experts to talk about what the news means. #3 Tips: You'll discover actionable insight that could give you an advantage. Social Media Marketing Talk Show In each episode, we cover the top 10 to 20 major announcements from Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube, and Snapchat for the last week. On this week's Social Media Marketing Talk Show with Michael Stelzner, we explore Facebook's latest growth with Mari Smith; Amazon's social network, Spark, with Jeff Sieh; LinkedIn's new Web Demographics tool with Viveka von Rosen; and other breaking social media marketing news of the week! Your Action Plan Step 1: Click here now to SUBSCRIBE in iTunes/Apple Podcasts app (scroll down for other options). Step 2: Click the Subscribe button. Step 3: Download the episodes. Step 4: Sit back and enjoy the content, knowing you'll never miss important social media marketing news. Step 5: If you like Social Media Examiner, we'd love a review. Confused? Watch this video to discover how to subscribe on your iPhone. Here are some quick links to the new show on all major platforms: iTunes/Apple Podcast | Android | Google Play | Stitcher | RSS Hear More About the New Show To learn more about this new show, listen to this special episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast below...
Aug 02, 2017
Search to Social Ads: How to Use Google With Facebook to Build Niche Audiences
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Does your business serve a specialized customer base? Wondering how to reach specific niche audiences with Facebook ads? To explore a strategy for retargeting specialized audiences using Google ads in combination with Facebook ads, I interview Shane Sams. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Shane Sams, the co-host of the Flipped Lifestyle podcast, a show focused on helping families make money online. He describes himself as a normal guy from Kentucky who loves helping others. He's also the founder of the Flip Your Life Community. Shane explains how to use website traffic generated by Google ads to retarget Facebook users. You'll discover how highly focused keywords help manage your marketing costs. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Search to Social Ads Shane's Story Shane and his wife Jocelyn met at the University of Kentucky. After graduation, Jocelyn initially worked a corporate job and Shane coached football. They then decided to become schoolteachers, which they did for about 10 years. Shane taught social studies and continued to coach, while Jocelyn was an elementary school librarian. After some bad experiences at work, Shane realized he had traded control of his life for job security. He started looking for other things to do because he knew there had to be a better way. This was in 2012. One day, as Shane and his wife were driving around town, Shane said, "I wonder if I can get 100 people to send me $50." She asked what he was talking about and Shane said that out of the 7 billion people on the planet, surely 100 would give him $50. If they all did that in a month, it would be $5,000, and for 12 months in a row, it would be $60,000. If they could do that every month, they could quit teaching. Shane didn't know how he was going to make this money but he was determined to figure it out. He began seeking information about business. One day while mowing the grass, Shane decided to look up business podcasts. An image of a guy looking at the podcast art with his eyeballs caught Shane's attention. It was Smart Passive Income with Pat Flynn. In the podcast, Pat talked about how he sold a study guide and would email it to people. Shane decided he and Jocelyn could sell PDFs of information. After trying different things online, they were finally able to figure it out. They sold lesson plans to teachers and football playbooks to coaches. A year later, Shane and Jocelyn replaced their income. As soon as they quit their jobs (which they did on September 27, 2013), people started asking questions. For example, Lindsay, a friend of Jocelyn's, quit her job to be a stay-at-home mom and wanted advice on making money online. They helped Lindsay create digital products and she made $1,000 on the Internet in a month. This money enabled Lindsay to be at home with her daughter every day. After Shane and Jocelyn realized their experience and knowledge could change the lives of others, they started Flipped Lifestyle. It has helped a lot of people. People ask why it's called Flipped Lifestyle. Shane explains that everybody flipped out after Jocelyn and he left their jobs, where they had tenure and insurance. Shane recalls how his mom cornered him and said, "Shane Sams, you have babies. You have lost your mind. You have flipped out. And I do not approve of this decision." Hence, Flipped Lifestyle. Listen to the show to hear Shane recall how much sharing online business skills meant to his friends. Why Combine Google Ads With Facebook? Early on, Shane and Jocelyn discovered a lot of the marketing advice available online didn't work for ...
Jul 28, 2017
Messenger Chatbots: How to Get Started
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Wondering if Messenger chatbots are right for your business? Want to know how to build your own chatbot? To explore why and how to create Facebook Messenger chatbots, I interview Ben Beck. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Ben Beck, a bot expert who writes a weekly column for ClearVoice.com. He has an online course focused on generating leads with chatbots. Ben explores what you need to know to get started with chatbots. You'll discover the best tools for creating chatbots. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Messenger Chatbots Ben's Story Ben's relationship with bots started when he was a teenager in the mid-1990s. He chatted with ALICE, the first bot to use natural language processing. ALICE had a rudimentary interface that worked via the Internet. You typed into a little box and a response showed up. Although Ben looked at the code for ALICE, it was too complex for him to figure out how to tinker with it. However, ALICE sparked Ben's interest in chatbots and he's been watching them ever since. Fast-forward to 2004. Ben got into online marketing, starting with SEO and online advertising. Over the last six or seven years, his interest shifted to marketing automation and email marketing. In the last five years, Ben has been using systems like HubSpot and Marketo to do email drip campaigns and as robust solutions for lead generation. Last year, Facebook released the option to use chatbots inside of Facebook Messenger. People naturally converse with these bots to get information about a business, submit information, get help with booking vacation plans, and more. Ben thinks bots will be the new lead generation method. Although bots may not unseat email, they'll be just as big. Listen to the show to hear my thoughts on the impact of Facebook. What's a Chatbot? A chatbot is a software application built to simulate a human-like conversation. Ben believes it was Matt Schlicht, the creator of Octane AI (a chatbot-building platform), who compared chatbots to a game of tennis. For the longest time, chatbots have followed a chat-reply, chat-reply sequence (or hit it over the net, receive, hit it back). Chatbots are now starting to take on human-like capabilities. The range of a chatbot's abilities can be huge. For instance, if you were planning a family trip to Disneyland, you could visit their site and type questions into their pop-up box like, "What time does the park open on September 12?" and a chatbot could give you the answer. In this hypothetical example, the bot watches for certain patterns in a string to determine the response. An advanced chatbot could use the best in artificial intelligence (AI) technology to learn. For example, Disney could take their conversations with customers over the last five or six years and feed them into their AI platform. The chatbot could become more human-like by studying questions and responses between an actual person and a park guest. However, the way a bot learns through AI capabilities has the potential backfire. About a year ago, Microsoft released Tay, a chatbot that learned by interacting with people on Twitter. For the first day or two, tons of people interacted with Tay, but as a result of people's communications, the bot became racist and picked up other bad conversational habits, so Microsoft had to pull it down. Listen to the show to learn more about Microsoft's chatbot fail. Facebook Messenger Chatbots Currently, Facebook Messenger has more than 1.2 billion users and Facebook is putting a lot of money into getting people on the platform.
Jul 21, 2017
Video Authenticity: How to Perform On-Camera
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Do you want to connect with your audience via video? Looking for tips to convey confidence and authority? To explore how to improve your on-camera performance, I interview David H. Lawrence XVII. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview David H. Lawrence XVII, an actor and professional voice artist. You may recognize him as the Puppet Master from the TV show Heroes. He specializes in audio and video communication and his course is called Camera Ready U, where he helps actors and marketers with their on-camera performances. David explores ways to be yourself in front of the camera. You'll discover how to prepare for a video performance. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Video Authenticity David's Story David started as a voiceover talent and moved into on-camera work. In both cases, after David found success, people asked him how he achieved that success. At events such as Social Media Marketing World, David talked about simple things people can do on-camera to be authoritative or authentic. For instance, he talks about how to hold your hands, what to do with your eyes, or how to hold your posture. After speaking, David would be mobbed by people asking about his course, so he decided to create one. As David developed his course, he discovered he knew so much more than he realized about his area of expertise. David created an inventory of all of the things he knew and that became the Camera Ready U curriculum. The same thing happened with voiceovers. David started by teaching commercials and ultimately created 36 different classes for VO2GoGo, covering not just the art of voiceover, but also the business and technology aspects. Listen to the show to discover how long David has been in the entertainment industry. Least Important Factors for Video Videos don't have to be perfect. Comb your hair, brush your teeth, put on makeup, wear your cool outfit, and whatever else you need to establish your base. After you do that, the key is not to be a better version of yourself, but your most authentic self with all of your flaws. That's what makes you human. Don't kick yourself if you flub a word or don't remember to turn your shoulder. People will connect with you when you're simply being yourself. And you can't be yourself when you're constantly trying to be that better version of yourself. The notion of perfection gets in the way of being real. Also, your equipment doesn't matter. If you want to get very artsy, you might need a more expensive camera. But you don't even need to buy a camera. You can start vlogging immediately with your smartphone. You may need to add a light, but you can simply set up a table lamp. Plus, you might want to get a $20 lavaliere microphone from Amazon. And that's it. You can do whatever you want with that minimal setup. Listen to the show to hear David and me discuss how people can hold themselves back with an "I can't until I..." mentality. Authenticity On-Camera Have you ever watched a video and thought, "This guy's a bag of wind" or "She's fake"? It's because they've spent too much time trying to present and too little time being themselves. The people viewers connect with most often are those who seem down to earth and genuinely interested in the subject. When you stop worrying about how you look and sound, you can start thinking about the content. And when you can focus on your content, viewers feel you're speaking to them. You make a connection. When you're completely interested, immersed, and can't wait to help people with their needs, your authenticity meter goes through the roof.
Jul 14, 2017
Facebook Ads: Creative Ways to Attract Prospects and Customers
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Do you advertise on Facebook? Are your ads converting? To explore how to better use Facebook ads to reach leads and customers, I interview Zach Spuckler. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Zach Spuckler, a Facebook ads expert and host of the Heart, Soul & Hustle podcast, a show about generating more leads, sales, and conversions. His course is called Rock Your FB Ads. Zach shares his framework for building leads with Facebook ads. You'll discover mistakes many marketers make with Facebook ads. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ads Zach's Story Over the last 10 years, Zach has dabbled in most forms of online marketing, including affiliate marketing, direct sales, website flipping, consulting, and Facebook ads. About two and a half years ago, Zach was running a successful vegan food blog called The No Fuss Vegan as a hobby while working a job and studying for a master's degree. As the blog grew, the hours of work that Zach put into developing recipes, and styling and shooting photos for his blog left him feeling burnt out. He liked what he was doing but he didn't love it. Zach took three months off to explore what work made him happy and realized it was marketing. He loved testing his ads, and messaging and building his list. That's when he launched Heart, Soul & Hustle. When Zach started this business, he was committed to a foundational principle: Instead of teaching people theories that worked, his teaching would be grounded in what he had learned through experience. His first digital course came out a few months later. He had been doing one-on-one Facebook ad management using Periscope for promotion. Zach did a Periscope at Starbucks, saying, "I can't really teach you how to make a million dollars. I'm not a six-figure coach. But I have gotten my income up to about $1,000 a week on Periscope. Is that something you want to learn about?" He set up a PayPal button in real time and did about $1,200 in sales. That's when everything started to come together. Zach realized he could own his expertise without faking it. He could be fully transparent and show people what he was doing at his current level, and that approach would resonate with people. Zach's passion has always been ads, and his intention when he started the company was to create a Facebook ads course. However, everybody wanted to learn about live streaming, so he tabled the ads program in response to his market. However, he still launched the program a year later and has had a blast testing everything with Facebook ads such as Messenger, retargeting, and Facebook Live. About a year ago, Zach realized he had become a total workaholic and could use Facebook advertising to help him do the heavy lifting. He scaled up his ad spend and hired an ads manager. Although Zach emphasizes that ads don't do all of the work, his ads nevertheless work for him whether or not he can show up on a particular day. Today, hundreds of people take Zach's courses. His company does launches with thousands of people, they have incredible affiliates, and they've been affiliates. Investing in advertising has opened so many doors that he can't help but get excited about it. Listen to the show to hear about Zach's earliest experience working online. Facebook Ad Mistakes The market has been evolving but marketers aren't all keeping pace. A few years ago, you could run a Facebook ad to a sales page and make money. You could even run ads directly to a checkout page. But back then, most Facebook users didn't realize that a sponsored post in the news feed was an advertisement. Today,
Jul 07, 2017
Creating Advanced Facebook Custom Audiences Using Google Tag Manager
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Are you looking for advanced ways to build Facebook audiences for retargeting? Do you know you can combine Google Tag Manager with Facebook Pixel Events? To explore the value of using these tools together, I interview Chris Mercer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Chris Mercer, an analytics expert who specializes in helping marketers measure and optimize their marketing. His course is called Master the Fundamentals of Google Tag Manager. You can find him at MeasurementMarketing.io. Chris explores how to use Google Tag Manager to take your Facebook retargeting to the next level. You'll discover how to create and use Facebook Pixel Events in your Facebook marketing. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Pixel Events and Google Tag Manager Chris's Story Chris, who has a background in sales and marketing, left corporate America to investigate online business. Five or six years ago, he started a site called WP Training Videos. The site was designed to help people understand and learn WordPress, but after customers requested help with building websites, the company's business model changed. To learn about analytics, Chris installed Google Analytics and set up tracking on opt-in and lead generation forms. When he showed his analytics to a client, the client stopped asking about changing the website design and wanted to learn more about tracking results. Chris soon had more clients who were interested in analytics, and about four or five years ago, the business pivoted again. Chris's business became Measurement Marketing, which is dedicated to making Google Analytics more accessible to the masses. His clients were often people who installed Google Analytics but didn't know how to use it. Today, Chris works with marketers, marketing teams, and agencies. He shows them what's important to measure, helps them build measurement machines, and shares what to do with the data they collect. Listen to the show to discover one of the biggest struggles for marketers. What Is Google Tag Manager? Google Tag Manager is a tool that was designed to solve an enterprise-level problem. The problem arose about 10 years ago when this new upstart, Facebook, started putting out pixels (snippets of code to copy and paste on a site) that enabled marketers to track things online. It was revolutionary at the time. After the Facebook pixel arrived, large businesses had to figure out how to bridge the gap between marketing and IT. To add the code to web pages, marketing had to submit IT help desk tickets, because IT developers were the only people allowed to mess with the website. As a result, IT departments developed bottlenecks and couldn't focus on the right projects, and marketing teams couldn't get the pixels on the pages fast enough. By the time IT added a pixel to a page, the campaign that marketing wanted to measure had been over for eight weeks. Tag Manager was created to solve that problem. Marketing teams can use it to put out individual snippets of tracking code (for instance, a Facebook remarketing or conversion pixel) that they can use at any point without having to involve developers. Tag Manager gives marketers granular control over their measurement and tracking. I ask about the difference between Google Tag Manager and Google Analytics, and Chris explains Google Analytics does three main things. It collects its data, stores the data, and builds reports based on the data. Google Tag Manager replaces Google Analytics' ability to collect its own data. Tag Manager collects the data and sends it to Google Analytics so it can stor...
Jun 30, 2017
Live Video Strategy: How to Create a Show That Engages
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Interested in broadcasting live video? Have you considered starting a live video show? To explore how to create a successful live video show, I interview Luria Petrucci. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Luria Petrucci, a live video expert. She's the host of Live Streaming Pros, a live show dedicated to helping businesses produce professional live streams. She's helped big brands such as AT&T and Panasonic, and influencers such as Michael Hyatt, Amy Porterfield, and Pat Flynn. Luria explores four levels of broadcasting equipment. You'll discover how to create an engaging flow for your live show. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Live Video Strategy Luria's Story Luria got started with video in 2005. She was one of the first video podcasters to create content for the video iPod. (This was before the iPhone and long before YouTube "became a thing.") Shortly thereafter, Luria started doing live video, too. By 2007, she was live-streaming from a professional studio and from mobile devices and began learning how live video creates a connection with her audience. Ever since, she's been doing a weekly or daily show. Before Periscope and Facebook Live, Luria's live-streaming tech included a NewTek TriCaster and Ustream. She also did some YouTube. Justin.tv (which is now Twitch) and Livestream were the other early platforms, although they focused more on business. Although Ustream focuses more on businesses now, it concentrated on creators back then. Luria enjoys seeing other people getting excited about going live, because she's believed in live video for so long. She says live video creates a strong relationship with her audience and is the reason her audience has stuck with her for 11 years through massive business changes, partnership changes, and all of the hard stuff that goes on in business. People tell her they've been watching her since day one. (Note: Back then, Luria was known as Cali Lewis.) Listen to the show to discover what tech Luria used in the early days, as well as what live video was like at the beginning. Why Consider Live Video Live video is the best marketing conversion tool Luria has ever seen because of its impact. When people are watching you on live video, they know you're not faking it. When you're selling something or trying to lead people into a funnel, live video is easy because of what Luria calls the "conversational call to action." Like most people, Luria has a hard time selling. People don't like to sell because they don't like to be sold to. The conversational call to action is really about helping people. You're letting them know you're there for them and will take care of them. When you offer something in a live video, it's easier to sell it because you're not really selling. When somebody asks a question, your answer proves the value of your products or services. Also, although the excitement for and accessibility of live video is new, its formulas and structure are proven. Listen to the show to hear what I love about live video. The Four Levels of Live Video Gear Luria explains what gear you need for live video in four levels. She calls level 1 the "selfie stream." You hold your mobile phone in your hand and the live video is raw, up-close, and personal. For level 2, add some gear to your mobile phone such as a microphone, video stabilizer, and a light. This gear adds a little polish to your video and removes the shakiness. Level 3 is going live from a computer with software like Wirecast. Finally, level 4 is for TV-quality video.
Jun 23, 2017
Social Customer Care: Apps and Processes for Success
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How does your business respond to customer concerns and inquiries? Do you have a social customer care plan in place? To explore how to improve customer care for your business, I interview Dan Gingiss. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dan Gingiss, author of Winning at Social Customer Care, head of global social media at McDonald's, and host of the Focus on Customer Service podcast. Dan explores the most important qualities of social care representatives. You'll discover tools to make providing social customer care easier. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Social Customer Care Why Social Customer Care Is Important Offline experiences don't stay offline for long, Dan explains, particularly when they're bad. They get discussed online and things can get out of control. (Just watch the news!) Marketers need to care because they're the ones at the helm of social media handles. Plus, whenever you do social media marketing (organic or paid, but especially paid), people ask customer service questions. When people see your brand in their feeds, they remember their questions or problems. Your marketing is their reminder. More marketing leads to more people talking back. And that can be a good thing. Listen to the show to discover what marketers should never say. Who Should Do Social Customer Care The ideal people for social customer service are those who are naturally empathetic, want to talk to customers and solve their problems, and can remain calm when an angry customer is yelling at them. You don't need to involve everyone, and the people who are involved should like talking to people. These days, social customer care agents are doing work that blurs the line with community management. Which role deals with someone commenting on your really cool sponsorship with the NFL versus someone asking a question about your product or service versus a customer who is really angry because you screwed up? That line may not always be clear. When the marketing department owned all of social media, they were okay with the first two. They loved talking about football and could answer questions. However, when they started getting complaints or complicated questions, they had to call customer service for backup. Customer service's job was to know about the products and services, how to fix things when they went wrong, and most importantly, how to talk to other people. A social customer care agent could be a phone rep, an email rep, or a chat rep. Depending on the size of your organization, the social person may need to have phone skills as well as writing skills. In a large company, people in customer service may work only on the phone, chat, or social. But in a smaller business, one person might handle phone calls and Twitter. However your organization divides up the work of customer service, Dan emphasizes that everyone involved should have the same customer service training. Customers should have a consistent experience, no matter which customer service channel they choose. You've probably seen examples of people calling a company, talking to an agent, and not liking the answer. So they go to Twitter to get a different answer. The biggest mistake the company can make is to give a different answer on Twitter because then you teach everybody to just go to Twitter. Listen to the show to hear Dan discuss what skills customer care agents might need in the near future. Customer Support Bots Although bots have a role in customer support, they still have a ways to go. For instance, Dan tried using a bot to buy flowers and when he needed...
Jun 16, 2017
Facebook Video Retargeting for Live Video and Beyond
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Do you post videos on Facebook? Have you tried retargeting your live and uploaded videos? To explore techniques for retargeting your videos, I interview Amanda Bond. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amanda Bond, who's known as the "Ad Strategist" specializing in Facebook ads. Amanda also advises top social pros and has taught the ADdicted Facebook Ads course. Online, she's known simply as Bond. Amanda explores Facebook video ads and retargeting. You'll discover how to use Amanda's technique to warm up your Facebook followers. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Video Retargeting for Live Video and Beyond Amanda's Story Before Amanda started working in social media marketing, she worked with big brands such as Pepsi and Labatt. As a salesperson for Pepsi, she went door to door to compete with Coke. After she sent two truckloads of Pepsi to a store for a large sale, Coke sent three. Looking over 110 pallets of pop, Amanda realized that the impact she was having in her sales role wasn't aligned with where she wanted to show up in the world. To move forward, Amanda decided to give back through her local Rotary service club. As the club's youngest member, she was encouraged to become their social media manager. When Amanda started working with her Rotary club in 2013, social media marketing felt like magic. Talking to people on the Internet seemed to create relationships out of thin air. However, Amanda quickly learned the impact of social when she used social media marketing for a live local Rotary event. To promote the event, the Rotary club used traditional marketing such as ads in the newspaper, and Amanda used everything she'd been learning about social media marketing. Throughout the weekend, the club expected 4,000 people to attend, but 23,000 people actually came, largely due to social media. That was Amanda's impetus to change direction in her career and she became a social media manager. As she became more versed in Facebook ads, she found that being an ad strategist was a great niche for her as a math and data nerd. Amanda now teaches and helps other businesses behind the scenes. She loves doing the deep dives into the data, helping people see the story the numbers are telling. Listen to the show to hear about Social Media Examiner's role in Amanda's early social media marketing efforts. What Retargeting Means The words retargeting and remarketing are interchangeable. Most people know about retargeting through the Facebook pixel, which is a tiny code snippet you add to your website. When someone lands on a page with this code, the Facebook pixel sends a message back to Facebook, saying something important is happening. Facebook has opened up new ways to retarget people (or show them content or ads based on prior actions), including video retargeting. Because Facebook has been emphasizing live video and video in the news feed, Amanda is especially excited about these video retargeting features. Anytime somebody sees at least three seconds of a video (recorded or live), Facebook takes note of who they are and puts them into a retargeting custom audience that you can use to retarget them again and again. I ask why you would want to retarget someone who watched a Facebook video. Amanda says it's part of getting people to know, like, and trust your brand. You want to start nurturing conversations that may lead to a sales transaction. As the Ad Strategist, she calls this framework "Connect, Convert, Close." In that connection phase, your audience may be cold (they may not know or have heard of you),
Jun 09, 2017
Influencer Marketing: How to Scale Your Social Media Exposure
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Wondering how to increase your business's reach on social media? Have you considered partnering with an influencer? To explore how to develop business relationships with influencers, I interview Neal Schaffer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Neal Schaffer, author of three social media books including Maximize Your Social. He teaches social media strategy at Rutgers University and is the founder of PDCA Social, an agency that specializes in helping Japanese businesses leverage American social media platforms. Neal explores the difference between paid and earned influencers. You'll discover how to use influencer marketing to scale your social media results. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Influencer Marketing Why Influencer Marketing? Social media is a noisy place and the days of 100% organic success are over. Brands, companies, and practitioners need to use paid social to get noticed. In this environment, Neal believes other people can accelerate your social media marketing efforts. Put simply, you need to consider other users on social media who might be able to help spread the word about your brand and amplify your message. Neal identifies three different types of "others": your employees or partners (employee advocacy), your fans (brand advocacy), and influencers (also known as influencer marketing). Each type is powerful in its own way, and in 2017, influencer marketing is the most mainstream. It can help you cut through the noise in a different way than paid social. Plus, influencer marketing is ideally more authentic and leads to more engagement. I ask Neal to explain what influencer marketing is, for people who are new to the concept. Neal says influencer marketing involves partnering with people who have influence over others. In the old days, newspaper writers and television broadcasters had tremendous influence. Now, in certain online or social media communities, people on YouTube or Instagram are famous and influential in a way that's similar to big-name media celebrities. Some social media influencers focus on one network, such as Instagram or YouTube, whereas others have appeal across several platforms. With influencer marketing, you work with an influencer who talks about your brand, and those mentions of your product or service have a positive effect on your business. People become influencers on social media because they're creating their own valuable content. They have a regular audience that cares about the influencer's tips, recommendations, or other content. However, unlike a true celebrity, a person doesn't need a million followers or subscribers to be an influencer. They need to have relevance only in their community. For example, a YouTuber may have never heard of a podcasting influencer. That's okay. The podcaster needs to have influence only within their specific podcasting community. Listen to the show to hear more about how social influencers compare to big-name celebrities. How to Discover and Evaluate Potential Influencers To begin, use listening tools and do keyword searches to learn who in your industry is talking about topics or products relevant to your business. For instance, a consumer brand selling to moms needs to know which mommy bloggers are talking about products similar to theirs, or which Instagrammers are taking photos and using hashtags related to their products. A B2B company needs to seek out tech bloggers who carry a lot of weight. Remember, influence isn't only about the number of followers. Find people who are producing content that seems to have an effect.
Jun 02, 2017
Local Social Media Marketing With Facebook and Instagram
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How do you promote your business locally? Are you using Facebook and Instagram? To explore how to reach a local customer base on social media, I interview Bruce Irving. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Bruce Irving, the host of the Smart Pizza Marketing podcast, where he helps local pizza restaurants master marketing. He's a former pizzeria owner and you can find him at SmartPizzaMarketing.com. Bruce explores why social media marketing is worthwhile for local businesses. You'll discover tips to get your local business started with social media video. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Marketing for Local Business Bruce's Story Bruce has been in the pizza industry since he was 16 years old. He worked his way up and then partnered with someone to run his own pizza business. The restaurant did a pretty high volume of sales for their style of restaurant, which had 10 seats plus takeout and delivery. Starting in the late 1990s, Bruce and his partner used old marketing methods such as direct mail, which worked well until the mid-2000s. Around 2008, the effectiveness of that kind of marketing started to dwindle, so they tried marketing their restaurant on social media. Even as the economy struggled after the 2008 economic crash, their pizza business was successful and growing. When relatives and friends in the pizza business started asking how Bruce and his business partner used different types of marketing to grow, they began sharing their methods. Bruce decided he wanted to talk to other pizzeria operators so they could learn from each other. In 2015, Bruce started his podcast and the knowledge-gathering he did for it evolved into creating an agency that helps local pizza-specific restaurants run social media and digital advertising. For the last 16 months, Bruce has been running the agency full time, helping local pizzerias grow their business and get better results with online marketing. Listen to the show to discover why podcasting was a great way for Bruce to learn from other business owners while running his own pizza restaurant. Video in Social Media A pizzeria is a very visual style of restaurant. The cooks often work the pizza dough and put together pizzas in front of a big window because it's entertaining. Even more traditional restaurants are moving to the open-kitchen concept because the chef creating the food is part of the show. To bring this entertaining element to the web, Bruce encourages clients to do video. A lot of them shy away from video in the beginning, but it's important to become comfortable in front of the camera. Different styles of videos work in any business, not just restaurants. For instance, you can do tutorials. You can also give people a look behind the scenes. If you have the best pizza in town, show your fans why. Do you make your own dough? Do you use a special kind of sauce? Do you cut up all of your own vegetables? Showing what makes your restaurant special helps you compete with every other place in your neighborhood and the big chains. Your personality also differentiates you from your competitors. If you're a personable owner and can be charismatic in front of the camera, your personality (along with your products and services) separates you from other brands.   It's all in the sauce - the special Stanislaus Pizza Sauce married with PizzaMan Dan's secret blend of spices - which makes your PizzaMan Dan's pizza mouth watering delectable! TODAY ONLY - yes, MONDAY - we're celebrating our long time relationship with the family-owned Stanislaus Farms in Stanislaus Count...
May 26, 2017
Facebook Ads Strategy: How Marketers Can Win With Facebook
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Do you use Facebook ads? Want to make them more effective? To explore how to create a successful Facebook ads strategy, I interview Nicholas Kusmich. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Nicholas Kusmich, author of Give: The Ultimate Guide to Using Facebook Advertising to Generate More Leads, More Clients, and Massive ROI. He also heads up the H2H Media Group, where he consults and manages accounts for high-profile speakers and authors. Nicholas shares how the four M's can help you plan your Facebook ad strategy. You'll discover the three key elements every Facebook ad needs. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Ads Strategy Nicholas' Story Nicholas got into Facebook ads almost by accident. He had been marketing his products on the Internet without any success, even though he followed what everyone said to do: Create a course or ebook, and get paid traffic to sell it. His next step was to try Google ads, but then Google had another algorithm adjustment. Fortunately, around that time, two websites' ad platforms were being released in beta: Plenty of Fish (the dating site) and Facebook. Nicholas jumped in to advertise his products on both and soon realized Facebook was going in a very aggressive direction. He was in the right place at the right time. Nicholas learned about Facebook advertising very quickly and got the advantage of being an early adopter. This was about five years ago. These days, Nicholas runs his marketing business with two key services. His boutique agency serves clients in a fully managed scenario. His business also offers marketing training and consulting for business owners and entrepreneurs who want to implement their marketing for themselves. Listen to the show to hear what Facebook ads were like in the early days. The Role of Facebook Ads in Marketing Nicholas loves the paradox of Facebook's size. On one hand, Facebook is an enormous platform: around two billion users log in for at least a few minutes each day. Therefore, regardless of your type of business or message, your prospects are probably using Facebook. Moreover, you don't need a 30-second spot on the Super Bowl to reach hundreds of millions of people. With Facebook, you can do that with a few clicks of a button. On the other hand, Facebook allows advertisers to zero in on a small, specific audience because Facebook aggregates data. Facebook notes where people check in, what they like, whom they follow, and what they mention. And it makes that kind of information available to advertisers. So, for instance, if Nicholas wanted to target a Beverly Hills housewife who lives on a particular street based on her zip code, and who shops at Whole Foods, has an Amex card, and spent money on it in the last seven days or so, he could. This capability makes Facebook an interesting platform for an advertiser (a business owner or entrepreneur) who has a message, product, or service and who knows the audience they're trying to reach. Facebook allows people to advertise at far lower cost than traditional advertising. So in the grand scheme of marketing, Nicholas believes Facebook advertising is the best direct-response platform and distribution channel to get a message to your ideal prospects. Listen to the show to discover the joke at Nicholas' office. How to Put Together a Facebook Ads Strategy A lot of people focus on the tactics, such as how much to bid for the ad or what objective to use. Those are legitimate concerns, but Nicholas doesn't think they're the big needle-movers.
May 19, 2017
Facebook Video for Marketers: Strategy for Future Success
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Do you create videos for your business? Wondering how to best leverage your videos on Facebook? To explore Facebook video strategy, I interview Jay Baer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jay Baer, a digital marketing and social media strategist. He authored Hug Your Haters, a book about social care, and also hosts the Social Pros Podcast and the Jay Today show. Jay discusses the differences between video on Facebook and YouTube. You'll discover the tech and tools Jay uses to produce his own videos. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Video for Marketers Facebook Versus YouTube Jay says a lot of people do very well with YouTube videos, and just as many do well with Facebook videos. However, not too many people do equally well with both because each platform has a specific use case. People watch YouTube as a replacement for television entertainment or they're searching for how-to videos. On Facebook, videos appear in the news feed and can interrupt people while they're on the platform. At Convince & Convert, Jay says they advise clients to think about what the video is and under what circumstances people will want to watch it. Based on that assessment, choose one of the platforms as the primary home for the video. I mention how views of The Last Jedi trailer on Facebook far surpassed views on YouTube within the first 30 minutes of its release. Jay responds by noting a few factors that might have contributed to that difference at that particular point in time. One is that Facebook allows users to share content with others easily. Also, Facebook defines a "view" differently than YouTube. Although we both suspect most viewers of The Last Jedi are watching the whole trailer, marketers should remember that Facebook counts 3 seconds as a view, whereas YouTube requires 30 seconds. Also, a video on Facebook may receive substantially more views immediately after it's posted but the YouTube video may receive more views in the long run, especially on a strong YouTube channel. To clarify how The Last Jedi example pertains to the everyday marketer, Jay stresses that Facebook drives exposure based on engagement. So if you put a video on Facebook and a disproportionate number of people like, comment, and share, then a disproportionate number of people will see the video in their feed. This visibility gives even more Facebook users an opportunity to share the video with somebody else, and the cycle continues. Jay sees this ripple effect every time he posts a video on Facebook. If he gets immediate engagement, then more people see it. If he doesn't, users' engagement with the video will plateau. Next we talk about streaming live video to Facebook versus YouTube. For vlogging, Jay says that you could use both Facebook and YouTube. Jay does something like this with his Jay Today show. He streams the live video first on his personal Facebook profile and posts the video file elsewhere afterward. Jay explains that Facebook's API prevents you from live-streaming anywhere else while you're streaming to Facebook Live. To stream to Facebook Live, Periscope, and YouTube Live simultaneously, you would need multiple phones or computers. That limitation is one reason Jay goes to Facebook Live first; he can't be anywhere else. He also notes that on YouTube (for now at least), you need to have 1,000 or more subscribers to stream live video from a mobile device. So YouTube's live video feature isn't as widely accessible as Facebook's. Listen to the show to hear Jay discuss his approach t...
May 12, 2017
Google Analytics and Social Media: What Marketers Need to Know
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Do you track the return on your social media activity in Google Analytics? Want to discover some valuable shortcuts? To explore cool hacks for Google Analytics, I interview Annie Cushing. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Annie Cushing, Google Analytics expert and chief data officer at Outspoken Media digital marketing agency. She's a total analytics geek who loves teaching other marketers how to make the most of their analytics data. Annie explores Google Analytics, social reporting, dashboards, and more. You'll discover how to customize Google Analytics reports for yourself. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Google Analytics and Social Media What's New in Google Analytics Starting May 15, 2017, Google Analytics will allow people to do remarketing across multiple devices. Annie explains that if someone visits your site on their mobile device and then comes back to it on their laptop, as long as they're logged into Google in both places, you'll be able to target them across their devices. This new capability is a huge step forward for remarketing audiences because few people shop only on their computer, tablet, or phone. Annie explains that Google previously relied on user IDs to offer remarketing features, but most businesses couldn't implement the technology very easily. Only advanced analysts could set it up for sites where users were highly incentivized to log in. Because most businesses don't have sites like that, this new ability is groundbreaking. Annie says one issue she regularly sees with clients is they seldom use Google Analytics for retargeting. Instead, they use AdWords and DoubleClick. However, Google Analytics enables marketers to get much more granular with targeting. For instance, you can serve an ad to someone who visited a certain page but didn't convert or to someone who put something in a cart but didn't check out. Hopefully, multiple-device retargeting will incentivize more people to take advantage of Google Analytics. Listen to the show to discover how a retargeting ad saved Annie last Christmas. Google Optimize Google recently announced they were releasing Google Optimize, a free tool for A/B testing. For example, say you want to experiment with product page design, such as the placement of the price or Buy button or different font colors or text. In an A/B test, you run two versions of your page and compare how each version performs. Up until this point, Optimizely has been the industry standard. At Social Media Examiner, we use Visual Website Optimizer. Annie believes Google Optimize is perfect for small- to mid-sized or even large businesses. (Google Optimize 360 is the enterprise-level version.) Annie recommends that businesses get what they can from the free version first. Then as your organization develops more sophisticated testing needs (for instance, reducing the bounce rate or increasing the conversion rate), consider paying for more advanced features. Annie also notes that Google Optimize is user-friendly. To move things around, you simply drag and drop. You don't have to ask a developer to customize the page for you. Listen to the show to hear my description of how optimizing tools work. Ad Blockers and Do-not-track Technology Annie explains how ad blockers and do-not-track tools impact your analytics data differently. If you run display ads on AdWords, then ad blockers will impact your overall effectiveness. As people choose to block ads, impressions and conversions will decrease. A lot of publishers,
May 05, 2017
Facebook Marketing: Why It Is Time to Rethink Everything
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Do you use Facebook to market your business? Wondering how marketing on Facebook is evolving? To explore how marketers should adjust to Facebook's recent and future changes, I interview Mari Smith. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Mari Smith, the world's leading Facebook marketing expert. She co-authored Facebook Marketing: An Hour a Day and is author of The New Relationship Marketing. Mari shares why it's time for marketers to rethink how they use Facebook. You'll discover where Mari believes Facebook is headed. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Marketing The Facebook Algorithm Mari explains that the Facebook algorithm pre-filters content that users see in their news feeds. The algorithm manages the vast amount of content posted to Facebook and thus helps advertisers, while hopefully showing Facebook users the most relevant content among the thousands of posts they could see. Users can have as many as 5,000 friends, join up to 6,000 groups, and follow up to 5,000 pages. With posts coming from all of these sources, users might see as many as 15,000 posts. Mari says that the Facebook algorithm narrows down what users actually see to about 1,500 posts, and from that pool of content, narrows what users might see even further to about 300 posts. Mari says the algorithm is complex with about 100,000 weights, of which only about a half-dozen are known. For instance, Facebook favors stories from users' friends, video content, and so on. Also, when the algorithm came out in 2008, along with Facebook business pages, it made the news feed non-chronological. Mari explains that the algorithm exists because Facebook needs to keep users coming back and also offer value to advertisers. Each day, the average user logs on about 14 times (more for marketers), and is on Facebook an average of 50 cumulative minutes. That creates a huge captive audience, which is a massive amount of potential to offer advertisers. To maintain that value, the algorithm encourages user engagement. Mari notices how she loves keeping up with her friends and community via Facebook and sees an advertisement about every third post. The better the targeted ad, the more likely she is to respond. Mari also notes that by encouraging user engagement, the algorithm also encourages users to share information with Facebook. This information helps Facebook keep the users and advertisers happy. I ask what marketers should do so users see more of their content in the news feed. Mari recommends not only sharing video, but also slightly increasing the length of videos. For uploaded videos, Mari has discovered a minimum of 90 seconds makes content more visible. For a live video, Mari recommends broadcasting for at least 5 minutes. Mari says Facebook favors slightly longer video because it enables Facebook to insert mid-roll ads. These ads break in and run for about 20 seconds. At the moment, mid-roll ads are in beta and you have to sign up before they'll appear in your video. Also, Mari says these ads appear only if you have at least 2,000 followers of your profile or page and 300 concurrent viewers. Mari explains that the decline in Facebook user posts and the algorithm's preference for camera-based content are related. Facebook is moving more into the camera mode because over the past three or four years, users have been sharing fewer status updates. Typing a post is harder than snapping a picture and adding sticker or filter. Mari stresses that real-time signals are also important to the visibility of your co...
Apr 28, 2017
Facebook for Local Business: Creative Ways to Grow
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Is your local business on Facebook? Wondering how to market your business more effectively? To explore how to use Facebook in creative ways, I interview Anissa Holmes. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Dr. Anissa Holmes, the author of Delivering WOW: How Dentists Can Build a Fascinating Brand and Achieve More, While Working Less! Her podcast is the Delivering WOW Dental podcast. She's a practicing dentist and teaches Facebook marketing courses for dentists. Anissa explores how local businesses can grow using Facebook. You'll discover why Facebook is more valuable for local businesses than review websites. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Marketing for Local Businesses Anissa's Story After practicing dentistry in the U.S. for several years, Anissa moved to her husband's home country of Jamaica in 2010 and started a new dental practice from scratch. She knew most dentists typically get 10 to 15 new patients per month through referrals, but with a startup practice in a totally different country, she decided to try promoting her new practice on Facebook. In early 2010, Anissa set up a Facebook business page and began sharing what happened in the practice each day, including behind-the-scenes snapshots and stories about how the practice's dental services were changing people's lives. Anissa's strategy worked. Her practice began getting 5 to 10 new patients a month. Anissa figured she was onto something and began buying Facebook ads. As the Facebook algorithm changed, she made adjustments. Her practice now spends about $500 a month on Facebook and those marketing efforts attract about 50 new patients every month. With such outstanding growth, the practice's revenue tripled, and Anissa's practice was able to pay for a new office with three times the space totally out of profits. The practice is debt-free and so is Anissa. She shares that this financial success and security is a result of the business growth she achieved through Facebook marketing. After dentists started asking Anissa how her practice was achieving those crazy results, last year Anissa created a Facebook course and began lecturing to dentists all over the world about Facebook. The journey has been interesting, Anissa says, and she attributes the success to Facebook. When new customers come in, they already know the practice and how it can solve their problems. They're already connected and ready to make a purchase. Listen to the show to learn more about Anissa's background. Why Local Businesses Need to Go Beyond Review Sites If your new customers hang out on Facebook, Anissa says, that's where you need to be. People aren't hanging out on Yelp or Google. Most people (including Anissa) check Facebook first thing in the morning, between daily tasks, and in the evening. That's why Facebook marketing needs to be your focus. Anissa says creating the right content is important. A lot of businesses post information about how great they are and share a lot of stock content, but Anissa says that really doesn't work. She stresses that local businesses need to share their story and what makes their business unique. For example, if you have a plumbing company, what are you offering that's different from everyone else? To compete with photos of kids, community happenings, and articles, Anissa creates engaging posts that connect with people and make them want to click, including content about community impact and what her practice does to change patients' lives. Anissa also shares testimonials.
Apr 21, 2017
Instagram Business Profiles: Why Marketers Should Upgrade
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Have you considered moving to an Instagram business profile? Wondering what advantages you'll gain? To explore Instagram business profiles, I interview Jenn Herman. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Jenn Herman, a social media consultant and Instagram marketing expert. Her blog, JennsTrends.com, has placed in our top 10 social media blogs three different times. She also wrote an ebook called The Ultimate Beginner's Guide to Instagram. Jenn explores Instagram analytics. You'll discover valuable Instagram business profile features. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Business Profiles The Instagram Algorithm The Instagram algorithm came out last year and Jenn explains that for marketers, the algorithm is helpful. You can use it to get better reactions from, engagement with, and reach to your target audience. Jenn stresses that the Instagram algorithm is more personal than the Facebook algorithm. On Facebook, when something is really popular, Facebook is more likely to show that content to more people. However, the Instagram algorithm is based on personal use, not public use. Instagram users don't necessarily see someone's content just because others engage with it. That said, the Instagram content that each user engages with most does show up higher in his or her feed. To make the Instagram algorithm work for your marketing efforts, Jenn recommends sharing the best content for your customers and followers. When you emphasize quality over quantity, your users are more likely to stop, engage, comment, like, and so on. As a result, your followers will constantly see your content higher in their Instagram feeds. Also, Jenn says the Facebook and Instagram algorithms re-sort content differently. Facebook constantly re-sorts content, whereas the Instagram algorithm doesn't. Instead, on Instagram, the re-sorting is based on how often you post and how often a user logs into Instagram. For example, if a user logs on and then logs on three hours later, Instagram re-sorts only the content uploaded in the last three hours. The content that appeared during the user's last login appears exactly as it did before. For marketers, this approach to re-sorting means that your Instagram followers won't miss your content if they scroll far enough through their feeds. For example, say someone follows Social Media Examiner and likes to engage with its Instagram posts. The user logs in after 24 hours and Social Media Examiner has posted three times. In this case, Jenn says the user will see Social Media Examiner's three posts higher in his or her feed, but not necessarily back to back. I ask what marketers can do to encourage fan activity and make their content seen first. Jenn says the key is having better content and (counter-intuitively) posting less content. When you post a lot, Jenn says it's more difficult for that content to show up high in your followers' Instagram feeds. People are more likely to skip your posts. However, gorgeous posts can create a strong connection with your followers and people are more likely to engage. To increase the chances people see and engage with your Instagram posts, Jenn recommends posting your best content three times a week. Also, Jenn suggests adding calls to action. In a text overlay or caption, encourage people to leave a comment or tag friends in the post. The algorithm will see that engagement. I ask Jenn how the algorithm applies to Instagram Stories versus the Instagram feed. Jenn says that at least for now,
Apr 14, 2017
Live Video: Tips and Techniques for Creating Great Content
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Do you broadcast live video? Want to learn how to create an engaged following? To discover what he's learned from broadcasting over 1,000 live streams over the last two years, I interview Alex Khan. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Alex Khan, the founder of Attractive Media, a German social media agency that helps businesses with live video. You can find him online at alexkhan.tv. Alex shares his formula for beginning and ending live video. You'll discover how Alex makes his live videos look more professional. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Live Video Alex's Story Alex started his first website in the late 1990s, back when email open rates were incredibly high. In 2005, he became managing director of Attractive People, a social network. In that role, Alex discovered what builds trust and how people behave on social networks. In 2012, Alex founded Germany's first mobile marketplace for fashion, which another company later acquired. Alex continued working behind the scenes in social media until 2015, when Twitter acquired Periscope for $100 million. After a company acquired his own app, Alex says he was curious about what a $100 million app could do. In March 2015 on the first day Periscope became available, Alex downloaded it and it immediately blew him away. Alex knew that driving engagement builds trust and increased visibility; however, creating engaging content was (and is) a challenge. Periscope helped Alex solve the engagement challenge because he could start a one-to-many conversation from anywhere at any time. Alex says it's still fascinating that you can reach so many people for free. In the beginning, Alex directed his live videos with his employee as the Periscope star. They created fun content such as jumping in a pool, which had nothing to do with Alex's area of expertise. After a few weeks, Alex's business partners shared their concern that this fun content wasn't professional, especially because Alex was COO of the company. Alex agreed that their point was valid, so he decided to change his subject matter. With 10 years of experience in social media, Alex knew people would have questions about how to use this new platform. He decided to use his expertise to help people understand how to build their audience with live video. I ask Alex to share a snapshot of his audience today. Alex says that in only two years, he's built his audience from nothing to 230,000 followers and 55 million hearts on Periscope. Through cross-promotion, Alex has attracted a total of 400,000 followers on social media. To build that audience, Alex says his experience working in social media, building companies, and training people gave him the necessary expertise, but live video technology was also a critical gateway. Listen to the show to learn about Alex's first live broadcast on Periscope. Advice for Going Live Alex says that even after doing more than 1,000 Periscope broadcasts, he still gets nervous. For Alex, three questions spin around in his head when he thinks about going live: "Who are the people watching me? Will they like me? What will I tell them?" Alex has found that his viewers are regular people who are early live video adopters and curious about what he has to say. When you provide something that's valuable, Alex believes people will like you. He says the key is to educate, inspire, or entertain viewers. As far as what to tell viewers, Alex believes people watching live video are always interested in five topics:
Apr 07, 2017
Google Analytics: How to Analyze the Behavior of Your Site Visitors
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Do you want to learn more about how people use your website? Wondering how the Behavior reports in Google Analytics can help? To explore how to navigate the Behavior section of Google Analytics, I interview Andy Crestodina. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Andy Crestodina, author of Content Chemistry and co-founder of Orbit Media. Andy specializes in content marketing and Google Analytics. Andy explains how to analyze the behavior of your website visitors. You'll discover a few Google Analytics tricks to employ immediately. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Google Analytics Why Marketers Should Care About the Behavior Category In Google Analytics, the Behavior category is one of five main categories that you find on the left-hand sidebar. Andy says the categories are organized from the top of the funnel down to the bottom. The first category is Real-Time, or people on your website at the moment. Real-Time is followed by Audience (who those people are), Acquisition (where they came from), Behavior (what they did), and Conversions (who took which successful profitable action). People dedicate a lot of time to the Behavior category because the reports show what's happening on each URL and how people flow through your website. Andy says you can see where people go, how much time they spend on pages, bounce rate, percentage of people who leave after seeing just one page, number of pages per visit, and so on. The Behavior category is the core of Google Analytics reporting. What you find through Behavior reports is often surprising, Andy continues. Although a website is designed to encourage visitors to navigate through it in certain ways, the Behavior reports show how visitors actually move through your site. Listen to the show to hear an explanation of the value of behavior analytics with a restaurant analogy. Behavior Flow Report Andy believes Behavior Flow is an interesting and sometimes confusing report because it mashes up data from other reports. The Behavior Flow report looks almost like an infographic. It shows how many people are on your website, where they move as they navigate from page to page, and the page where they leave your site. After the starting page, the next column is first interaction, the column after that is second interaction, and so on. Behavior Flow shows the most popular path through your website, which is important. Knowing the most common path helps you prioritize changes to your website. For example, if you have only 10 minutes to work on your website this week, you need to spend that time on the pages people visit most often. Even if your website has thousands of pages, a small percentage of those pages receive the most traction and traffic. Therefore, when you have a great piece of content such as a beautiful testimonial or a compelling visual, you want to put it where people are more likely to see it. If your website was a city with a highway flowing through it, you'd put your billboards on the highways, not on little backstreets. In the Behavior Flow report, the first column is the Landing Page option, which reflects where your website traffic comes from. You can change the default Landing Page option to see the website traffic from a specific source. For example, you can select social options to see how people coming from different social networks move through your site. Next, you see the Starting Pages column. Andy says this column lists only the top pages. (For analysis of a specific page,
Mar 31, 2017
Facebook Messenger Marketing: What Marketers Need to Know
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Do you want to communicate with your customers via Facebook Messenger? Wondering how Facebook Messenger bots and Messenger ads can help? To explore this topic, I interview Molly Pittman. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Molly Pittman, the vice president of marketing at DigitalMarketer. She specializes in customer acquisition and teaches regularly for DigitalMarketer Engage, which is the company's membership community. You'll discover how businesses can benefit from integrating Facebook Messenger features into their marketing. Molly shares use cases for Facebook Messenger marketing. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Facebook Messenger Marketing Why Consider Messenger Ads? As soon as Facebook Messenger ads became available in November 2016, Molly started experimenting with them. Molly says she's excited about Facebook Messenger ads because they're not just a new interface element or feature. Facebook Messenger ads are a whole new channel. Molly believes the value of Facebook Messenger ads lies in the app's popularity and convenience. More than one billion people communicate via Facebook Messenger. Because that's where people are having conversations with friends, family, colleagues, or whomever, Molly believes businesses should be connecting with their customers via Facebook Messenger, too. The app's popularity makes Facebook Messenger a good place to buy ads, connect with prospects, and talk to customers. Molly says that DigitalMarketer's initial tests have shown good results. The open rate and consumption are really high. Molly has seen the benefit from the consumer's standpoint, too. A few months ago, as Molly was driving in Austin, she saw a new apartment complex being built. Molly was interested, so she went to the company's Facebook page and contacted them through their Message Us button. They responded almost instantaneously. Every step of her communication with the company was done through Facebook Messenger. I ask Molly if she believes Facebook Messenger will replace email. Molly responds that email will likely always be a powerful tool for marketers, certainly for the next five years. However, she says Facebook Messenger isn't necessarily a replacement but is the mode of communication most similar to email. In some aspects, Messenger is better than email, she continues, because people tend to respond instantaneously on Messenger, whereas people don't feel compelled to respond to emails right away. Listen to the show to hear Molly and I discuss our predictions for the future of Facebook Messenger. The Types of Messenger Ads Molly explains the two types of Facebook Messenger ads. The first one is called a destination ad because when you set it up, you choose Facebook Messenger as the destination (as opposed to your website). Like a regular ad, a destination ad appears in the news feed and can display a video, carousel, or image. When someone clicks the ad, a message to your Facebook page opens in Facebook Messenger and you can begin a conversation. For example, the first test Molly ran was a simple destination ad that said, "Do you have questions about how DigitalMarketer can help grow your business? We'd love to chat." When someone clicked the ad, a Facebook Messenger window opened where the person could type his or her message to DigitalMarketer. Molly says you can target anyone with destination ads, such as your custom audiences and interests. The opportunities are endless. The other type is a sponsored message, which is more like an email.
Mar 24, 2017
Animated Visuals: How to Bring Still Images to Life
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Do you use visuals on your blog and social media? Have you considered animating them? To explore how to use animated visuals in your content, I interview Donna Moritz. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview visual marketing expert Donna Moritz. Her blog Socially Sorted was recognized as one of Social Media Examiner's Top 10 Social Media Blogs in 2015, 2016, and 2017. Donna explores three popular types of animated images. You'll discover tools to easily animate your own images. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Animated Visuals Why Animate As people scan their social media feeds, they're making lightning-fast decisions about what content they'll pay attention to. In this context, animated visuals add a little bit of movement that can attract the eye and add value in a short, snappy way. Donna explains that short animations can be less intimidating to create than video. Animation is simply combining drawings, photographs, text, or computer graphics to make them move. You don't need to talk in front of a camera. Short animations can also be a way to develop your audience. Donna says if you can make a strong first impression with a short animation, that animation can encourage viewers to watch longer videos and further engage with your content. Listen to the show to hear Donna discuss the findings of a small MIT study that investigated how quickly people interpret images. Popular Formats Donna says that quick animations aren't divided into formal types, but you do tend to see a few common approaches. In a one- to three-second animated image, the background is typically fixed and only text is animated. For example, she points out, Social Media Examiner does these on Instagram. She says you might also see a mini slideshow. "Video is your window of opportunity to get seen the Facebook news feed." - @mari_smith #SMMW17 #marketing #socialmedia #business #entrepreneuer #socialmediamarketing #smm #socialmediatips #smallbusiness #new #socialmediaexaminer #professionaldevelopment #smb #socialmediastrategy #businesstraining #quote #quoteoftheday A post shared by Social Media Examiner (@smexaminer) on Feb 8, 2017 at 4:58pm PST A GIF is a silent animated loop often used to convey a feeling. GIFs have become hugely popular on social media. GIFs started appearing in blog posts and emails but have spread to messaging apps like Slack and Facebook Messenger. For example, in a blog post about social media strategies that drive her crazy, Donna says the only way she could express her frustration was with a Muppet GIF from Giphy. Another type is a 3- to 10-second video, which you could create with something like the Ripl app. (More on that below.) Finally, Instagram and Snapchat stories enable you to blend and share quick successions of images or videos. All of these types of content are easy to create because so many tools are available. Listen to the show to hear about audio in short video. The Pros and Cons of GIFs In blog posts and in email, GIFs are a great way to highlight particular emotions, add humor, or simply break up the content. Donna says she once sent out the wrong email to her subscribers, so she used a GIF to apologize. However, you need to be careful about how you use GIFs. Donna recommends using GIFs sparingly. In a blog post, use no more than two GIFs, and in email one is enough. Donna says too many GIFs are like strobe lights going off at a nightclub. When you insert a GIF in an email, Donna suggests checking the file size and compressing the GIF bef...
Mar 17, 2017
How to Use Facebook to Market Your Products
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Do you have products to sell? Have you tried using Facebook ads to promote your products? To find out how to market products via Facebook, I interview Steve Chou. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Steve Chou. Steve and his wife run an ecommerce site that sells handkerchiefs and linens at BumblebeeLinens.com. He's also host of the My Wife Quit Her Job podcast and the website MyWifeQuitHerJob.com, where he teaches people how to sell physical products online. Steve explains which Facebook ad types he uses to sell his physical products. You'll discover how Steve uses email and Facebook ads in tandem. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Use Facebook to Market Physical Products Steve's Story As Steve and his wife were preparing for their wedding, his wife wanted a nice handkerchief because she expected to cry during the service. After shopping around, they imported a bunch of handkerchiefs from Asia. After using only a few, Steve and his wife listed the rest on eBay, where they sold like hotcakes. Later, when Steve's wife became pregnant with their first child, she wanted to quit her six-figure income job. They reconnected with the handkerchief vendor and opened their online store, Bumblebee Linens. At first, Steve worked as a microprocessor designer by day, and after the baby went to bed, Steve and his wife ran the business. It became such a success that they maintained their income even after his wife quit her job. Steve explains that soon afterward, their friends began wanting to have kids and quit their jobs, and they kept asking Steve how to launch an ecommerce store. Instead of answering the same questions over and over again, Steve began blogging about his experiences running the store. That's how MyWifeQuitHerJob.com got started in 2009. To generate sales in the early days, Steve used Google AdWords. His brother-in-law worked at Google in the AdWords division and showed Steve how to use it. Back in 2007, Steve generated a lot of sales via clicks that cost him about 10 to 15 cents. Steve says online content also helped generate sales. They wrote articles to help brides and provide craft ideas for their products. After three to six months, the articles started ranking in search engines and sent traffic to their store, too. Today, Bumblebee Linens sells handkerchiefs, linen napkins, linen towels, lace parasols, aprons, and more. Steve says the store has several target audiences. The handkerchief audience includes people planning weddings and an over-55 crowd. Event and wedding planners are the target audience for napkins and moms are the audience for Mommy & Me aprons. The company has in-house embroidery machines for personalizing their products. Listen to the show to learn more about the audience and the content on MyWifeQuitHerJob.com. Win-back Campaigns Steve explains that a win-back campaign targets people who have already purchased from your shop because those people are more likely to buy again. To run this type of campaign, you need to figure out who those people are, and if they haven't purchased within a certain timeframe, give them an incentive to come back. You can automate a win-back campaign with an online merchant system. For example, if someone hasn't purchased from Bumblebee Linens in 60 days, they automatically receive an email and a Facebook ad with a 10%-off coupon. To automate the Facebook component of the campaign, Steve says the ecommerce system Klaviyo allows Bumblebee Linens to export a specific segment (in this case people who haven...
Mar 10, 2017
Thought Leadership: How to Become Known to People Who Matter
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Do you want to be recognized as an expert in your field? Wondering how to make a name for yourself? To explore how to become known, I interview Mark Schaefer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Mark Schaefer, a prolific blogger, author, and speaker. He's written Social Media Explained, The Content Code, and The Tao of Twitter. He's also been a frequent guest on this podcast. His newest book is KNOWN: The Handbook for Building and Unleashing Your Personal Brand in the Digital Age. Mark shares how to position yourself as a thought leader. You'll discover the four things it takes to become known. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Thought Leadership How Mark Became Known Before Mark launched his business, he was a global director of ebusiness at a Fortune 100 company. He had won a bunch of awards and had seven patents, a big global team, stock options, and a company car. After he left that job to start his business, Mark realized everything that he was known for at his previous company no longer mattered. He thought he was known, but he wasn't. As Mark grappled with being the go-to guy for nothing, he learned the only thing that matters in terms of your online presence is to be known. Being known isn't about being famous, but having an appropriate digital presence to help you achieve your goals. Mark says that building expertise and becoming known is a process. Nine years ago, as Mark started to teach and write for his own business, he struggled. Like everyone else, he started at the bottom. For instance, when Mark started blogging, he didn't know anything about it. Later on, Mark wrote a book about blogging. When he started consulting, he knew very little about it, but now he consults for big companies. Mark emphasizes that to start, you don't have to be an expert. You only need to be open and willing to learn continuously. I ask Mark what helped him become known again in the second phase of his career as he was building his own business. Mark says his goals, one of which was speaking at Social Media Marketing World, helped, but enjoying the journey was also important because becoming known takes time. Mark says some people set milestones that unknowingly let other people validate their work. However, as he was interviewing known people for his recent book, they often mentioned the positive impact they have on others. Mark believes this sense of mission is important because it defines who they are from within and motivates them as they put in the time necessary to become known. Listen to the show to discover how many years it takes to become known. What Prompted the Book Mark explains the two seeds that led to him write KNOWN. As research for his last book, The Content Code, Mark interviewed Jay Baer. They debated whether just anybody can become known or if you need a certain "it" factor. For three and a half years, this question stayed with Mark and he began wondering whether becoming known involved a process that he could define. The other seed, Mark explains, came from his conversations with consulting clients. People from all over the world ask Mark questions like, "How do I get in a position where I can write a book someday?" "How do I get in a position where I can be a speaker someday?" "How do I get appointed to a board?" "How do I attract more clients in my industry?" "How do I become regarded as a voice of authority?" Mark found himself giving the same answer over and over again: "To do that, you have to be known.
Mar 03, 2017
Video Blogging: How to Create Consistent YouTube Content
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Do you create videos to promote your business? Have you considered starting a regular video blog? To explore vlogging, I interview Amy Schmittauer. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Amy Schmittauer, an online video expert. She founded Vlog Boss Studios and regularly produces awesome content for her YouTube channel, Savvy Sexy Social. She's also the author of the brand-new book, Vlog Like a Boss: How to Kill It Online with Video Blogging. Amy explores how video blogging can help your business. You'll discover what you need to start your own video blog. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Vlog Like a Boss What Is Vlogging? The term vlog builds off the word blog, and a vlog is simply a blog in video form. In a vlog, you can share anything you might do in a blog post, such as a tutorial or a story from your life. Consistency is best for vlogging. If you post a vlog here and there, you won't gain much traction. Amy says most vlogs that do well have a regular schedule. I ask Amy about how using YouTube for vlogging is different from the other ways people use YouTube. Amy says the purpose of a vlog is to help people discover you. Videos that may be suitable for YouTube but that don't help people discover you, such as a product commercial or an introduction to your company, don't make great vlog posts. To be discovered, think of the users who are searching for a concern, a specialty, or the answer to a question. Think about what a potential customer or audience member might want to know, create a video about the topic, and upload it to YouTube. Listen to the show to discover Amy's thoughts about vlogging on mobile apps like Snapchat and Instagram, which have video and social. Amy's Vlog When Amy launched Savvy Sexy Social, she was just getting started as a social media marketer. She thought teaching people the best way to do things on social media would to attract an audience and potential clients. She wanted her vlog to be informative and fun. She didn't want social media to feel like a chore. To juggle her content marketing with her client work, Amy says she scheduled her vlog posts to appear three days a week but she created the week's videos all in one day. She would pick three topics (which could be an app, a product, or a general social media tip), record the videos sitting in front of her bookshelf, and then edit and schedule them for the rest of the week. Amy emphasizes that people didn't have to know who she was to find her videos via search. They just needed to have a question about a topic in her videos. For instance, Amy created a video about a hack to make tweets a little longer. She thought the topic was something new that people didn't know much about, and the video became one of her popular vlog posts. The video's headline focused on the Twitter tip but the video also introduced viewers to Amy. httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJRp22IXqXY Amy shares the simple vlog format she used for a long time. She introduced her topic, delivered information about the topic that her viewers would value, and gave an actionable item that would give them results right away. Then she wrapped up with, "By the way, I'm Amy. Hope you can subscribe and stay tuned." In the last year, Amy says she's been having fun with her format so her community could get to know her a little more personally. For instance, throughout January, she documented the journey of launching a book. This approach was more of a lifecasting vlog, but her audience was learning through Amy's experience.
Feb 24, 2017
How to Use Facebook Ads to Boost Your Best Content
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Do you use Facebook ads? Have you considered creating Facebook ads from your top-performing organic posts? To explore how to identify and boost your best Facebook content, I interview Larry Kim. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Larry Kim, the founder and chief technology officer for WordStream. He's a frequent blogger, pay-per-click expert, and social advertising ninja. Larry explains how to improve the performance of your best content with Facebook advertising. You'll discover how to budget for Facebook ads. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: How to Use Facebook Ads to Boost Your Best Content Larry's Backstory Larry's company, WordStream, does search engine and social media advertising, and Larry believes that it's important for businesses to do both types. For instance, B2B software companies build new features, functions, and solutions that nobody is searching for yet. However, with social ads, these businesses can target people who are likely to buy their software based on demographics, interests, or behaviors. Unlike an individual advertiser who has data about only one business, Larry is able to spot trends and patterns in online advertising because WordStream manages approximately $1 billion of ad spending across Facebook, Bing, and Google and runs thousands of campaigns for different clients. WordStream analyzes all of these campaigns to figure out data such as the typical cost per click and typical engagement rates. Listen to the show to discover the percentage of WordStream's clients using Facebook advertising. How Algorithms Work To understand the algorithms, Larry says it's important to think about the context in which your ad appears. (Our conversation focuses on Facebook, but Larry says the same is true for ads on Twitter and other social media platforms.) When you sponsor or promote a post, you're one of thousands or even millions of companies going after the same audience. Larry explains that the Facebook algorithm is designed to handle that volume in a way that keeps Facebook engaging for users so they come back. To determine which posts to show users and how much to charge the advertiser, Larry believes that the algorithm looks at many different factors, but the main one is engagement (clicks, likes, comments, or shares). A post with low engagement has an engagement rate of 1% to 2%. (Only 1 or 2 people out of 100 engage with the post.) A high-engagement post has a rate of 10% to 15%, and the average is around 2.5% to 3%. Larry emphasizes that Facebook doesn't want users' news feeds filled with ridiculous updates that no one cares about. A company trying to promote garbage content with low engagement rates will be dinged with very few ad impressions. The ad might not even be shown. If the ad does show, the click-through rate will be expensive (a few dollars per click versus a few cents). The reverse is also true. Facebook rewards companies that promote interesting content by showing their ads and charging only pennies per click. Listen to the show to hear Larry's thoughts about how engaging ad content needs to be compared to organic content. Unicorns Because algorithms reward engaging content, Larry believes that the winning advertising strategy is simple: promote your unicorns. These outlier posts do spectacularly well. They get three to five times more traffic than the average post and are among the top 1% to 3% of your most engaging content. For instance, a unicorn post might have a 20% engagement rate,
Feb 17, 2017
Instagram Stories: How to Create Engaging Stories
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Do you use Instagram? Wondering how Instagram stories work? To explore how to craft Instagram stories for business, I interview Sue B. Zimmerman. Instagram Stories The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It's designed to help busy marketers and business owners discover what works with social media marketing. In this episode, I interview Sue B. Zimmerman, an Instagram marketing expert who helps businesses and marketers take their Instagram marketing to the next level. She's the author of the Instagram Strategy Guide ebook and a regular speaker at Social Media Marketing World. Sue shares how a number of businesses are creating engaging Instagram stories. You'll discover several techniques to improve your own Instagram stories. Share your feedback, read the show notes, and get the links mentioned in this episode below. Listen Now You can also subscribe via iTunes, RSS, or Stitcher. Here are some of the things you'll discover in this show: Instagram Stories Why Marketers Should Consider Instagram Stories Sue started using Instagram Stories as soon as the feature rolled out in 2016. She still uses Snapchat, but she says now she mostly relies on Instagram Stories. She says pulling together content to tell a story is creative work, similar to scrapbooking. Sue recommends that you develop a thread that keeps people engaged in your story from start to finish. Also, create Instagram stories with content that's original to Instagram, rather than duplicating content from other platforms. Sue says Instagram stories have three main benefits: First, Instagram stories direct followers to your actual Instagram feed, where your posts are always available. (Instagram stories disappear after 24 hours.) Stories that are entertaining and engaging give your followers a quick and easy way to consume your content. Engagement is important to the new algorithm that determines what people see in their Instagram feed. Because Instagram stories boost engagement with your Instagram posts, they improve your chances of showing up at the top of people's news feeds. Listen to the show to discover when Sue still uses Snapchat instead of Instagram Stories. Instagram Stories and Posts We talk about the highly produced content that marketers often feature on their Instagram feeds, and Sue says high production value is not necessary for Instagram stories. Sue shares a few examples of businesses that use Instagram stories in creative ways. These businesses create stories that are different from the content in their regular Instagram feeds. For example, Jenny Schatzle, who owns a gym in Santa Barbara, uses Instagram stories to let people know when she's starting new sessions. Her stories are more like ads, which is a completely different approach than her regular posts on Instagram. Sue has also seen companies with products (such as shoe company M.Gemi) use stories to feature sales and direct people to their Instagram feeds. Sue notes that marketers use text differently on Instagram posts and stories. The more successful accounts on Instagram typically include the text in the description, not on the photo itself, so people connect with the experience of the product or service that the photo depicts. However, in an Instagram story, text can add value. People who don't have the volume turned up in the story can read the text on the video or the photo. I ask how Instagram Stories has changed the way people interact with content on Instagram. Sue shares a few changes she's noticed since the release of Instagram Stories and the algorithm change. Although she's been posting less frequently on Instagram, Sue gets more engagement with her posts over a longer period of time. She attributes that engagement to having active Instagram stories. People discover Sue through her stories, which provide value.
Feb 10, 2017