Inside Appalachia

By West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: Local

Open in iTunes


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast


Description

Inside Appalachia tells the stories of our people, and how they live today. Host Jessica Lilly leads us on an audio tour of our rich history, our food, our music and our culture. Watch Inside Appalachia videos Follow the Inside Appalachia podcast on Soundcloud here . Subscribe to the Inside Appalachia podcast here or click the red button below. Inside Appalachia is a production of West Virginia Public Broadcasting with help from public radio stations in Kentucky, Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and West Virginia.

Episode Date
Indie Pro-Wrestling, A Look Back: Inside Appalachia
3942
This week on Inside Appalachia, we take another look at the world of independent pro-wrestling. While pro-wrestling is popular across the country and all around the world, the sport has a rich and storied history here in Appalachia. In this episode we’ll take a glimpse at the action, intensity, and drama (real-life and otherwise) that happens between the ropes. We’ll visit Madison, W.Va., where All Star Wrestling (ASW) draws hundreds of people to most matches and meet Gary Damron who organizes all of the shows. We’ll also talk the inimitable Rocky Rage, a professional wrestler from the area and his switch from local hero to bad guy. And we’ll learn why Tim Hagen, who used to wrestle under the name of Vance Desmond -- or Violent Vance Desmond, depending on whether he was the villain or the good guy -- decided to turn his passion for the sport into an opportunity to teach young wrestlers. We’ll also visit Oak Hill, W.Va., where a local TV station aired a weekly show called “Saturday
Dec 07, 2018
Another Look at Economic Development: Inside Appalachia
3555
Since the War on Poverty in the 1960s, federal funds to help revitalize coal country have poured in from Washington, D.C. And in recent years, a new federal push has brought millions of dollars worth of funding to projects that are intended to create jobs and retrain people in coal country for work in other fields. There are also a number of state initiatives to help generate job growth. But have these projects worketd? In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll take a look back at an episode that aired earlier this year. It told the story of several programs that received federal funding to try to jump-start economic development in Appalachia through agriculture. We'll learm about an effort to grow lavender on a former strip mine, the challenges farmers face in West Virginia and the work of the West Virginia Community Development Hub nonprofit. View the original story to see more photos. Listen on SoundCloud. Music in this show was provided by Dinosaur Burps , Dog and Gun, Strictly
Nov 30, 2018
A Sense of What’s Possible: A Struggle to Stay Follow-Up
3401
This week we’ll revisit an episode that originally aired earlier this spring about two young people who are learning farming as part of a workforce development program called Refresh Appalachia. We'll also get an update on where Colt Brogan and Crystal Snyder are today. The federal government has tried for years to encourage economic growth in this region, from President Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty that launched more than 50 years ago to federally-funded retraining programs for displaced coal miners and their families. The Appalachian Regional Commission approved more than $150 million for economic development in 2017 alone. Crystal and Colt spent two and a half years as farming apprentices with Refresh Appalachia, a job-training program with the nonprofit Coalfield Development Corporation , based in southern West Virginia. The organization’s five apprenticeship programs teach skills like carpentry and solar panel installation, and participants can work toward their associate’s
Nov 23, 2018
Another Look At The Pope’s Long Con
3248
This week on Inside Appalachia, we’ll take a look back at a story we aired earlier this year. The story details the life of Kentucky politician and pastor Danny Johnson and the investigation that exposed a long line of questionable actions that preceded his rise to power. “ The Pope’s Long Con ” from the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting has earned several national honors, including a Peabody Award . The five-part investigation revealed some shocking facts about Johnson’s personal life, including one account from a woman who alleges that he sexually molested her. On Dec. 12, 2017, a day after a print version of this report ran, Johnson held a press conference at his church, where he denied the accusations. A day later, he killed himself. For more information about this story, see the original post here . Listen on SoundCloud Glynis Board produced and mixed our episode this week. Roxy Todd edited this episode. Our executive producer is Jesse Wright . Molly Born is our web
Nov 16, 2018
Who's Telling Appalachia's Story? Appalachian Writers Discuss Their Work
3260
On today’s show, we’ll hear from people who write novels, short stories and newspaper articles, each one telling Appalachia’s story in his or her own way.
Nov 09, 2018
Revisiting Mark Combs' Struggle to Stay: Headed Home?
3223
On this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll take a look back at the story of Mark Combs — a comedian, an actor and dog owner moving from West Virginia across the country to chase big dreams. What could possibly go wrong? And we’ll get a new update on where he is now.
Nov 02, 2018
Werewolves, Panthers and Ghosts...Oh My, Appalachia!
3233
On this special Halloween episode of Inside Appalachia, we’re doing something a little bit out of the ordinary for us—we’re suspending our disbelief. Telling and retelling stories is part of our Appalachian tradition. Long before TV or the Internet came along, a well-told tale was often how our ancestors entertained each other and kept the crisp chill at bay as the darkness of winter approached.
Oct 26, 2018
Changing Coal Communities and Overcoming Poverty in Appalachia
3233
Jeannette Walls grew up poor in America. She wrote about it in her memoir "The Glass Castle," which has remained on the New York Times bestsellers list for more than eight years. She spent most of her childhood west of the Mississippi River, but her father, who was originally from West Virginia, eventually brought her family back to McDowell County, where she lived for four years. In this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll listen back to an interview Jessica Lilly did with Walls in 2017, just before the movie inspired by her book was released in theaters.
Oct 19, 2018
Appalachian Food: What Happens When Local, Traditional Foods Get Trendy?
3243
The Inside Appalachia team is hitting the road and heading to Beckley for its first LIVE Listening Party the evening of Bridge Day. Join us for an evening of live interviews, videos, art and music. The event will be at the Raleigh Playhouse and Theatre in Beckley on Saturday, Oct. 20, at 7 p.m. -- and it’s free. Seating is limited, so don’t forget to RSVP .
Oct 15, 2018
The Tough Landscape of Economic Development: Inside Appalachia
3549
Since the War on Poverty in the 1960s, federal funds to help revitalize coal country have poured in from Washington, D.C. And in recent years, a new federal push has brought millions of dollars worth of funding to projects that are intended to create jobs and retrain people in coal country for work in other fields. There are also a number of state initiatives to help generate job growth. But have these projects worked?
Oct 05, 2018
Celebrating 'Apple-Atcha', Inside Appalachia
3235
Here in Appalachia, it’s apple season. Did you know that Golden Delicious Apples originated right here in West Virginia? In fact, apples are our state fruit. Apples have been a major agricultural industry for the Mountain State.
Sep 28, 2018
From Coal to Music: Appalachia's Connection to the United Kingdom
3241
Coal miners and their families in Appalachia take great pride in their work and the fellowship that surrounds coal mining. As Jeremy Brock, one former Kentucky coal miner, put it: "It's a culture. It's a brotherhood." “Once you get used to it, I wouldn’t do nothing else," he told the documentary project, Humans of Central Appalachia, in 2016.
Sep 21, 2018
Baseball as Transcendence: How Appalachia's Pastime Creates Character, Camaraderie
3376
As we head into the final weeks of summer, this week on Inside Appalachia we explore the impact of baseball throughout the region. We’ll learn about the history of early baseball in the coal camp towns of southern West Virginia, and go inside the legendary baseball bat factory — the Louisville Sluggers. And we’ll meet a man who went from living in an isolated timber town in Pocahontas County, West Virginia to being a professional umpire for the Cincinnati Reds.
Sep 14, 2018
LGBT Issues Across Appalachia
3180
This week on Inside Appalachia we're revisiting an episode from earlier this year, exploring issues in our region’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. We’ll hear from a teenager getting ready for an LGBT formal. We’ll learn how difficult it can be to access healthcare in eastern Kentucky for one gender nonconforming Appalachian. We’ll also take a look at efforts in West Virginia to provide legal protection to people regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Rainbow Formal Here in West Virginia, a group of LGBT teens have decided to unite, to give each other hope, and to have a good time. We'll hear about this Rainbow Formal, the first of its kind in the state. West Virginia is also one of the many states where legislators have not passed laws that would ban employment and housing discrimination -- as well as discrimination in restaurants, hotels, parks and other public places -- based on sexual orientation or gender identity. WVPB's Dave Mistich will
Sep 07, 2018
Road Trip: Appalachia’s Hidden Gems
3368
This week on Inside Appalachia, we’re going on a road trip to meet people who are working in Appalachia to preserve American culture and traditions.
Aug 31, 2018
Fighting HIV and Hepatitis Inside Appalachia
3270
In parts of Appalachia, needle exchange programs have brought controversy, and they sometimes carry a stigma that such offerings enable, or even encourage, drug use. But supporters say the practice, especially when coupled with addiction treatment options for participants, can help get them on a path to recovery.
Aug 24, 2018
Drama, Mayhem and Trust: Indie Pro-Wrestling in Appalachia
3848
This week on Inside Appalachia, we explore the world of independent pro-wrestling. While pro-wrestling is popular across the country and all around the world, the sport has a rich and storied history here in Appalachia. In this episode we’ll take a glimpse at the action, intensity, and drama (real-life and otherwise) that happens between the ropes.
Aug 17, 2018
Farming, Race, Poverty, and the Media Inside Appalachia
3081
Being a farmer isn’t easy. One woman in Georgia found that getting assistance as a black farmer can be especially tough. Shirley Sherrod said she found discrimination in the federal government’s farm assistance programs, and she and other farmers fought back in the biggest class action lawsuit in U.S. history. Listen to the episode to hear the results of the lawsuit, and what it meant for farmers across the country.
Aug 10, 2018
Inside Appalachia Features the Pope’s Long Con
3260
This week on Inside Appalachia, we’ll learn about the life of Kentucky politician and pastor Danny Johnson, and the investigation that exposed a long line of questionable actions that preceded his rise to power.
Aug 03, 2018
This One Sentence Helped Purdue Pharma Sell Billions of Dollars Worth of Opioids
3243
Between 1999 and 2015, roughly 300,000 people in the United States died from opioid overdoses. And of the five states with the highest rates of drug overdose deaths in 2016, four were in Appalachia. In this week's episode of Inside Appalachia, we'll hear a special report from The Uncertain Hour , a podcast from American Public Media's Marketplace. Their investigation, which first aired in December, centered on a lesser-known but significant aspect of the opioid crisis: how Purdue Pharma marketed OxyContin, its highly addictive pain medication.
Jul 20, 2018