Reveal

By The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX

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Rebecca Y.
 Aug 5, 2018

A Podcast Republic user
 Jul 27, 2018

A Podcast Republic user
 Jul 12, 2018

Miq
 Jul 8, 2018
Thoroughly researched podcast. Extremely well crafted.

Description

The official free download of the award-winning radio program “Reveal,” produced by The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX. Hidden stories, uncovered – that's what this show is about. It takes you deep inside stories that impact your world, revealing injustice and holding the powerful accountable. The first-of-its-kind investigative program on public radio, "Reveal" is hosted by Al Letson and updated regularly.


Episode Date
No place to run (rebroadcast)
51:06

In Texas, the foster care system is failing the vulnerable children it’s meant to protect, leaving many without a safe place to live. Foster children often end up on the streets or in jail, which is one of the few places where they can receive treatment services. This week we look into the crisis in foster care, and efforts to fix it.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Aug 11, 2018
Trapped: Abuse and Neglect in Private Care
50:32

Deep in the backroads of central Florida, hidden between trees dripping with Spanish moss, sits the campus of an infamous center for the developmentally disabled. Its story shows what can happen when families have nowhere else to find care for their loved ones.

After years of complaints, Carlton Palms is finally being shut down. But its parent company, Bellwether Behavioral Health, is still running group homes across the country, where new allegations have arisen.

WNYC reporter Audrey Quinn investigates the company and speaks to a family whose son was abused at two of Bellwether’s New Jersey facilities. She discovers that, with national spending on autism services expected to increase 70 percent by 2025, the company is owned by a private equity firm.

Then, reporter Elly Yu investigates the death of a DACA recipient while at an Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center in rural Georgia.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Aug 04, 2018
Take No Prisoners: Inside a WWII American War Crime
50:47

In December 1944, Adolf Hitler surprised the Allies with a secret counterattack through the Ardennes forest, known today as the Battle of the Bulge. In the carnage that followed, there was one incident that top military commanders hoped would be concealed. It’s the story of an American war crime nearly forgotten to history.

After desperate house-to-house fighting between German and American forces, American soldiers wrested control of the Belgian town of Chenogne. Americans rounded up the remaining German prisoners of war, took them to a field and machine-gunned them.

Reporter Chris Harland-Dunaway found an entry in General George S. Patton’s handwritten diary referring to the incident in Chenogne. Patton called it murder. So why then was there no official investigation?

Through vivid interviews with a 93-year-old veteran who witnessed the event, conversations with historians and the last surviving prosecutor from the Nuremberg Trials, and analysis of formerly confidential military records, we investigate why justice never came for the American soldiers responsible for the massacre at Chenogne.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Jul 28, 2018
Poisoned, Ignored and Evicted: The Perils of Living With Lead (rebroadcast)
50:55

Old paint, old pipes and demolition dust often are sources of toxic lead. It’s a poison known to cause neurological damage in children. For adults, new science shows lead exposure increases the risk of heart disease. Reveal investigates the lurking threat from the dust of urban demolitions to the wilds of Wyoming. This episode was originally broadcast March 31, 2018.

In Detroit, dust is a particular concern. Because of the population drop, the city is tearing down tens of thousands of empty homes. Contractors are supposed to follow strict protocols on  demolitions, but when those rules are not enforced, lead dust can drift around the neighborhood, poisoning children in unsuspecting families. Reporter Eilís O'Neill explores the impact.

Next, we go to the Fruitvale neighborhood in Oakland, California, where the rate of kids with high lead levels in their blood was greater than in Flint, Michigan, during the height of the water crisis there. Reporters Angela Johnston and Marissa Ortega-Welch of KALW in San Francisco explain how high housing costs and lead exposure are connected and introduce us to public health nurse Diep Tran, who says lead poisoning puts enormous stress on families.

I've seen parents go into shock,” Tran says. “Most of them are anxious. Some feel guilty and go into denial, which is not good for the child, because parents in denial don't want to work with us. How can the child recover if we don't help the family?”

She says her only option sometimes is to advise families to move to a homeless shelter to escape exposure to lead.

Paul Flory could not escape. He grew up in Idaho’s Silver Valley, a longtime mining area that’s now a lead-laced Superfund site. Host Al Letson talks with him about going to school next door to a smelter and the struggles he’s had after his childhood lead poisoning was recorded – and then largely ignored.

Finally, we discover how tiny fragments of lead bullets hurt hunters’ unintended targets: eagles, condors and other scavenging wildlife. We trace lead dust from game guts to eagle brains in Wyoming.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Jul 21, 2018
Behind Trump's Energy Dominance
50:55

President Donald Trump has pledged allegiance to what he calls America’s “energy dominance.” This is good news for the oil and gas industry. We examine what this means for Alaskan villagers coping with climate change, Native American artifacts in Utah and birds flying over the U.S.  

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To find out, we talk with a former Interior Department official who became a whistleblower after helping relocate Alaskan Native villages threatened by rising temperatures. We also examine the energy industry’s influence on the Trump administration and visit public lands in southeastern Utah, where parcels leased for oil and gas exploration contain sensitive Native American archeological sites.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Jul 14, 2018
Families Splintered Apart, by Government and by Storms
50:54

This week, we continue our ongoing investigation into what happens to immigrant children after they’re detained by the U.S. government. Our latest story investigates a vacant office building being used by a defense contractor to house children.

Then, we travel to the Gulf Coast to learn why last year was the costliest hurricane season on record. In Houston, we discover that homes flooded by Hurricane Harvey were actually built inside a reservoir.

We end on the Louisiana coast, where officials say they can no longer provide protection to homes most vulnerable to flooding, and that residents will have to abandon them.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Jul 07, 2018
Hunting the Ghost Fleet
50:33

This week’s episode of Reveal investigates shark fishing in Central America and a U.S.-based seafood company that claims to be a model of sustainability.

We start in the jungles of El Salvador, where reporter Sarah Blaskey and photojournalist Ben Feibleman investigate one of the largest shark-fishing operations in the region. The men who crew these boats are migrants from Vietnam who work under grueling conditions.

Next, we follow reporters from The Associated Press as they continue their award-winning investigation into the seafood industry. Robin McDowell, Margie Mason and Martha Mendoza look into one of the country’s leading sustainable seafood companies, Sea to Table.

The company provides seafood to restaurants, universities and private homes across the country, claiming all its fish are wild caught and directly traceable to a U.S. dock. The reporters examine whether those claims hold up.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Jun 30, 2018
Al Letson Reveals: Pussy Riot
12:34

Far from the World Cup stadium cheers, a prisoner held in Russia is six weeks into a hunger strike.

Reveal host Al Letson talks with Masha Alyokhina, a founding member of the Russian feminist punk rock collective Pussy Riot, about the efforts to free Oleg Sentsov, a Ukrainian filmmaker convicted of an armed plot during Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. He denies any involvement. His supporters fear U.S. President Donald Trump has undermined their cause. Alyokhina knows the topic well: She spent time in prison for challenging Russian President Vladimir Putin, too.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Jun 28, 2018
Ripped Apart: Families Separated at the Border
51:03

President Donald Trump said he was ending family separation at the border this week. But we’ve stayed on the story, investigating the issues that remain: children being drugged at migrant shelters, asylum-seekers being denied at ports of entry and the problems with Trump’s new detention plan.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Jun 23, 2018
Losing ground (rebroadcast)
50:04

This episode was originally broadcast July 1, 2017.

Picture an American farmer. Chances are, the farmer you’re imagining is white – more than 9 out of 10 American farmers today are. But historically, African Americans played a huge role in agriculture. The nation’s economy was built largely on black farm labor: in bondage for hundreds of years, followed by a century of sharecropping and tenant farming.

In the early 1900s, African American families owned one-seventh of the nation’s farmland, 15 million acres. A hundred years later, black farmers own only one-quarter of the land they once held and now make up less than 1 percent of American farm families.

The federal government has admitted it was part of the problem. In 1997, a report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture said discrimination by the agency was a factor in the decline of black farms. A landmark class-action lawsuit on behalf of black farmers, Pigford v. Glickman, was settled in 1999, and the government paid out more than $2 billion as a result. But advocates for black farmers say problems persist.

On this episode of Reveal, reporter John Biewen of “Scene on Radio” tells the story of a black farmer who says the USDA treated him unfairly because of his race.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Jun 16, 2018
Reveal Answers Your Questions About Immigration
51:00

Last fall, we threw out a simple question after a show about U.S. immigration policies: What do you wish you knew about immigration?

Across the country, listeners responded with hundreds of text messages – from small towns in Iowa, Colorado and Massachusetts to big cities such as Los Angeles, Atlanta and Chicago.

We chose four questions and took our team of reporters and producers to task to answer them.

To figure out the answers, we go deep into immigration court, help one listener uncover her grandfather’s secret past about entering the country and break down the path to legal citizenship. On the way, we meet scam artists, attorneys, asylum seekers and do-gooders learning immigration law for kicks.

Jun 09, 2018
Cops on a Crime Spree
53:12

Baltimore’s police department was already notorious.

But this year, eight former police officers were convicted on federal racketeering charges stemming from an FBI investigation. They belonged to an elite task force charged with getting guns off the city’s streets. Instead, the plainclothes cops roamed Baltimore neighborhoods at will, robbing people on the street, breaking into homes to steal money, drugs or guns and planting evidence on their victims.

The targets of the Gun Trace Task Force included drug dealers and ordinary citizens. One of its favorite tactics was to speed toward a group of men on a street corner, chase whoever ran and shake them down. On top of all this, the officers falsified their timesheets to almost double their salaries.

This episode of Reveal asks if the task force was simply a rogue operation or if the officers were aided and abetted by fellow cops and even supervisors within the department.


Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Jun 02, 2018
Inside a Rehab Empire
26:31

The collision of the opioid epidemic with criminal justice reform has created a boom for the rehab industry. Those with wealth and insurance often are able to pay thousands of dollars for private long-term programs. But the less fortunate have become easy prey for rehabs with a tantalizing promise: freedom from addiction for free.

Reveal reporters Amy Julia Harris and Shoshana Walter have been uncovering the ways that some of these rehabs exploit their desperate clients. In this episode, they describe to host Al Letson the shocking things they found at one rehab in the mountains of North Carolina.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

May 31, 2018
What cops aren't learning (rebroadcast)
51:00

Some police departments are embracing a set of tactics designed to reduce the use of force – and prevent police shootings. Rather than rushing in aggressively, officers back off, wait out people in crisis and use words instead of weapons.

But this training isn't required in most states. Reveal teams up with APM Reports and finds that most cops spend a lot more time training to shoot their guns than learning how to avoid firing them.

This episode was originally broadcast on May 6, 2017.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

May 26, 2018
Across the Desert and the Sea
50:34

African migrants fleeing persecution or seeking opportunity often end up in Libya, where they are tortured and trafficked. Many try to escape to Europe, only to be intercepted at sea and returned to Libya. On this episode of Reveal, we bring you one reporter’s dispatch from a treacherous migrant rescue operation and explore how Europe’s immigration policy is helping Libyan warlords.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

May 19, 2018
Reveal Presents: The View from Room 205
51:00

In 2014, WBEZ Chicago reporter Linda Lutton followed a class of fourth-graders at William Penn Elementary School on Chicago’s West Side. She wanted to explore a big idea that’s at the heart of the American dream: Can public schools be the great equalizer in society, giving everyone a chance to succeed, no matter where they come from or how much money their families have?

Lutton told the story in a Peabody Award-nominated show, “The View from Room 205.” This week, Reveal presents a condensed version of that documentary.

Don’t miss the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

May 12, 2018
More to the Story: Wildfires
19:48

Reveal revisits our investigation into California’s deadliest wildfires. Last October, more than 170 fires ripped across Northern California, burning more than 9,000 buildings, causing millions of dollars in damage and killing 44 people. Along with our partners at KQED we’ll examine what’s being done to ensure that emergency response failures are not repeated as the next wildfire season approaches.

Don’t miss the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

May 09, 2018
More to the Story: Redlining
17:56

Reveal digs deep – and gets results. By mining data from 31 million records, we discovered a pattern of routine mortgage loan denials to applicants of color in more than 60 U.S. metropolitan areas. Our story led to attorneys generals’ investigations and lawmakers’ demands for accountability at the federal, state and city levels. It also led to thousands of questions from you, our listeners. Our reporters answered a handful of them.

Don’t miss the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

May 05, 2018
Institutions of Higher Earning (rebroadcast)
51:00

Across the country, universities are being criticized over issues of money: from how they spend their endowments, to how they raise tuition, to how they award financial aid. Many students are feeling the pinch. They’re going into debt to pay for their education, or abandoning their dreams of a college degree altogether. This week on Reveal, we take a look at the bottom line for universities and students. This episode was originally broadcast on Dec. 9, 2017.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Apr 28, 2018
Trumping Hate
50:35

There’s been a lot of conversation about whether Donald Trump has inspired a new wave of hate in America.

Reveal reporter Will Carless set out to understand the president’s role in hundreds of hate incidents across the country, with help from the Documenting Hate project led by ProPublica. He found a striking pattern that extended across races, religions and sexual orientation. We also examine what’s going on inside the government agency that’s supposed to be fighting discrimination, the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. And we ask what it takes for bystanders in hate speech incidents to become allies.

Don’t miss the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Apr 21, 2018
Tesla and Beyond: Hidden Problems of Silicon Valley
50:59

Tech companies in Silicon Valley are under the microscope for not living up to their idealistic pledges to save the world. On this week’s episode of Reveal, we investigate companies on the cutting edge that are struggling to solve some old-fashioned problems: Worker safety at Tesla, and diversity at Google and beyond.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Apr 14, 2018
Trump’s Mystery Mansion
12:50

In 2008, a small-time scam artist transferred a Beverly Hills mansion to Donald Trump for $0. Reveal reporters Lance Williams and Matt Smith tried to figure out why. The people involved in the deal say it was all a mistake. Real estate experts have never seen anything like it. Join us for a stranger-than-fiction tale on this special Reveal podcast.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Apr 12, 2018
Checking into President Trump’s Washington DC Hotel
50:25

In 2016, the Justice Department alleged that Malaysian officials stole billions of dollars from their people and funneled some of it through the United States.

Reveal teamed up with Washington D.C.’s public radio station, WAMU, to dig into one of the largest investigations ever by the Justice Department’s Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative.

It’s a tale that features cameos from Leonardo DiCaprio, Donald Trump, the world’s largest yacht, a Malaysian playboy known for his lavish spending in New York nightclubs, and – as you might imagine – lots of Champagne.

Don’t miss out on the next big story. Get the Weekly Reveal newsletter today.

Apr 07, 2018
Full of Lead: How Bullets are Poisoning Eagles
14:46

Lead – the toxic metal used for years in paint, plumbing, mining and more – still poisons people in all kinds of ways. Lead also kills wildlife when animals scavenge carcasses shot with lead bullets and left behind by hunters. Eagles and condors are not the hunters’ intended targets, but they’re dying from bullet dust.

The Obama administration tried to phase out all lead ammunition on certain federal lands right before leaving office. But President Donald Trump’s interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, overturned that order his first day on the job.

Reveal follows a bullet’s journey in the wilds of Wyoming.



Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Apr 04, 2018
Poisoned, ignored and evicted: The perils of living with lead
39:14

The toxic water of Flint, Michigan, reminded us that lead is a very persistent poison. This week, Reveal investigates the lurking threat of lead from the dust of urban demolitions to the wilds of Wyoming.

Hear how contractors help one another cut corners on demolitions, putting kids at risk, while city officials study the problem. Meet a public health nurse who explains why she advises families to choose a homeless shelter over a lead-tainted apartment, and learn how childhood lead poisoning still affects one man decades later. Progress has been made cleaning up lead. But much remains to be done.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 31, 2018
Where criminals get their guns
51:00

Across the country, criminals are arming themselves in unexpected ways. In Florida, they’re stealing guns from unlocked cars and gun stores. In other places, they’re getting them from the police themselves, as cash-strapped departments sell their used weapons to buy new ones. On this episode of Reveal, we learn where criminals get their guns and what cars can teach us about gun safety.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us on fb.com/ThisIsReveal, Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 24, 2018
The kids aren’t all right
51:00

Federal law requires colleges and universities to track and disclose sexual assaults on campus. It’s different for kindergarten through 12th grade, where there are no similar requirements for cases involving assaults between students. In elementary, middle and high schools across the U.S., the Associated Press found a shocking level of sexual violence among students. The AP also uncovered a new dimension to the problem – on U.S. military bases.  

On this episode of Reveal, we delve into results from the AP’s continuing investigation.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 17, 2018
Built to Burn
17:08

Last year, California had its deadliest and most destructive wildfire season in recorded history. No fire killed more people or burned down more buildings than the Tubbs Fire. Reveal investigates what made the Tubbs Fire so devastating by delving into the history of one of the hardest-hit neighborhoods.



Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 14, 2018
Warning System Down: California’s Deadliest Fires
35:13

Wildfires raged across Northern California in October, burning through the state’s famed Napa and Sonoma wine regions. In all, more than 170 blazes ripped across an area the size of Maryland and Delaware combined. Scores awoke to flames at their doors, and 44 people were killed in the deadliest fire event in state history.

On this episode of Reveal, we team up with KQED to examine what led to delays in evacuations and why so many fire victims received no warnings at all. As wildfires grow more intense, are first responders keeping up?

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 10, 2018
Video: Atomic vets
0:00

Hundreds of thousands of U.S. veterans took part in nuclear tests after World War II, and into the Cold War. Many of these vets suffer long-term health issues including lung problems and cancer, and many haven’t received compensation for their injuries and feel abused, neglected and forgotten by the government and a country that exposed them to unforeseen risks. This story of the veterans who witnessed secret atomic testing is a co-production with our friends at the RetroReport.

Mar 08, 2018
Deja Nuke: Return of the Nuclear Threat
51:00

With the threat of nuclear war once again a part of the national conversation, Reveal looks at nuclear threats both foreign and domestic. This episode takes listeners to Iran and finds out what life is actually like inside North Korea.

As the Trump administration pushes for the biggest increase in spending on nuclear weapons since the Cold War, Reveal explores how they’ve changed. Instead of annihilation, think “flexible” nuclear weapons that can threaten “limited” nuclear war. That’s the idea anyway.


Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 03, 2018
My Town, Chi-Town
50:34

Chicago is experiencing a reversal of the great migration that propelled African Americans northward in search of opportunity in the first half of the 20th century. Since 2000, a quarter-million black Chicagoans have left. The reasons include decades of bad policy and broken promises on affordable housing, education and public safety.

On this episode of Reveal, we team up with the Data Reporting Lab in Chicago to examine how trauma care teams have done more than law enforcement to reduce the gun homicide rate and with The Chicago Reporter to describe how activists are pushing back against the shutdown of 50 public schools at once.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Feb 24, 2018
The red line: Racial disparities in lending
50:16

It’s been 10 years since the great housing bust and lending is back. Not everyone is getting a fair shot at getting a loan. In dozens of cities across the country, lenders are more likely to deny loans to applicants of color than white ones – even when you take into account how much money they make and how much they want to borrow.

This type of housing discrimination was outlawed 50 years ago but it’s making a comeback. On this episode of Reveal, we dig into the new redlining.

This episode features an interactive text-messaging tool that allows you to learn more about who gets conventional home loans where you live. To get started, text HOME to 202-873-8325.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Feb 17, 2018
Dropped and dismissed: Child sex abuse lost in the system
51:00

The scandal around USA Gymnastics and former Olympic team doctor Larry Nassar is shining a spotlight on the sexual abuse of young athletes. This week, Reveal revisits the story of a woman who decides to confront the coach she says abused her decades earlier.

Reporter Tennessee Watson was abused by her gymnastics coach when she was a kid in the 1980s. Over 25 years later, when she learned he still was coaching children, she called the police. Her inside account of the arduous process of seeking justice in her own case exposes discrepancies in prosecutors’ responses to reports of child sexual abuse and highlights a lack of accountability.



Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Feb 10, 2018
How Bernie Made Off: Are we safe from the next Ponzi scheme?
50:09

Bernard Madoff may be a fading memory from the past, but for reporter Steve Fishman, the fallen financier’s story holds lessons for today. Madoff masterminded one of the biggest Ponzi schemes in history, duping thousands of investors out of tens of billions of dollars. His scam rocked Wall Street for years.

In this episode, we trace the rise and fall of Madoff through Fishman, who spent years interviewing investors, regulators and even Madoff himself from inside federal prison. We learn how Madoff pulled off his scam, and why nobody caught on for decades. We also hear from experts who say that investors still are vulnerable to financial fraud, especially in the era of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.



Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Feb 03, 2018
Too Many Pills
51:00

On Reveal, we share how the government failed to stop the opioid epidemic. A Washington Post/60 Minutes partnership with Reveal tells the story of how a DEA insider and his team of lawyers and investigators tried to stop drug distribution companies from flooding America with truckloads of pain pills. His effort was met with backlash from his own agency, the drug industry and Congress. We also hear the intimate chronicle of one wife’s discovery of her husband’s video diaries after his death from a fentanyl overdose.  Finally, Reveal host Al Letson talks with Jan Rader, the fire chief in Huntington, West Virginia, about her fight to preserve life in the face of a crushing epidemic. Rader was profiled in the Oscar-nominated documentary “Heroin(e).”


To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Jan 27, 2018
#MeToo: Rape on the Night Shift
51:00

The #MeToo movement has swept from Hollywood to Capitol Hill. The careers of powerful men ended as women spoke out against workplace harassment and assault.

On this episode of Reveal, we look at what happens when the people involved aren’t celebrities or powerful. We team up with KQED, the UC Berkeley Investigative Reporting Program, FRONTLINE and Univision to investigate sexual violence against female janitors.

They usually work alone at night and that isolation can leave them vulnerable. A lot of them are immigrants, some living in the country illegally.

Plus, we talk with an investigative editor for The New York Times who helped steer the coverage that toppled Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Jan 20, 2018
The mystery of Mountain Jane Doe
51:00

Investigators dig up an unidentified murder victim, 45 years after she was buried, in an attempt to give her back her name. The exhumation leads to a series of unexpected revelations about who she was and why she may have been killed. Her case speaks to the complexity – and importance – of opening up cold cases. This Reveal story is one of thousands from the crisis of America’s unidentified dead.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Jan 13, 2018
Video: Fought for, Forgotten
0:00

This short film was produced by the Glassbreaker Films team at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Glassbreaker Films is an all-female group of filmmakers working to promote gender parity in investigative journalism and documentary filmmaking.

Competing threats to the bayous of Louisiana are leaving some Donald Trump supporters torn between the president’s various policies. The shrimping industry, which accounts for 15,000 jobs in the state, has seen a drastic decline in sales due to international imports. And while Trump’s “America first” promises have given shrimpers hope, he has also made devastating cuts in environmental funding that would drastically damage the fragile bayous. Between 1932 and 2010, southern Louisiana has lost, on average, a football field of land to coastal erosion every hour. And it’s estimated that by 2100, rising sea levels across the country will force 13 million people to move away from their homes on American coasts.

Watch more of The Divided series here: revealnews.org/thedivided

Jan 11, 2018
The Tide is High
51:00

The damage inflicted on the United States by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria will likely make the 2017 hurricane season the costliest in our history. But what is the government doing to prepare for the storms yet to come.

In this hour, Reveal goes to Texas, Louisiana and Puerto Rico to investigate the government policies that let people build in harm’s way, make it difficult to move them to safety and fail to accurately tally the dead.


Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Jan 06, 2018
A Revealing Year
51:00

Reveal has had a busy year – our team has chased stories from Oklahoma to Bermuda. We exposed a rehab program that provides labor at a chicken processing plant that’s been called a slave camp and followed the money trail of the Paradise Papers, leaked documents that revealed international tax shelters for some of America’s biggest companies. We reported on the rise of hate crimes and investigated hate groups.

In this episode, we look at some of our best reporting from 2017 and how Reveal has made an impact in our world.


Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Dec 30, 2017
Fire and Justice
51:01

In 1988, two powerful explosions shook Kansas City, Missouri, killing six firefighters. Nine years later, five people were convicted of arson and sent to prison for life – but were they innocent?

Reveal investigates problems in the case and whether federal agents pressured witnesses to lie. We also follow the life of one of the defendants and his bid for freedom.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Dec 23, 2017
The Pentagon Papers: Secrets, lies and leaks
51:01

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian meddling in the U.S. elections seems to yield a new bombshell every week. Amid such high-profile revelations, we revisit a decades-old story that echoes to this day among the powerful in the nation’s capital.

This episode of Reveal tells the story of Daniel Ellsberg, a former government strategist responsible for leaking the Pentagon Papers – thousands of classified documents that called into question America’s war in Vietnam. Our story juxtaposes Ellsberg’s story with that of Robert Rosenthal, our former executive director, whose first journalism job exposed him to the top-secret documents.  

Those papers are the subject of a new movie in theaters this holiday season. Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” depicts the Washington, D.C. paper’s decision to publish the Pentagon Papers after the Nixon administration sued the first news organization to expose them, The New York Times.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Dec 16, 2017
Institutions of Higher Earning
51:00

Across the country, universities are being criticized over issues of money: from how they spend their endowments, to how they raise tuition, to how they award financial aid. Many students are feeling the pinch. They’re going into debt to pay for their education, or abandoning their dreams of a college degree altogether. This week on Reveal, we take a look at the bottom line for universities and students.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us on fb.com/ThisIsReveal, Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Dec 09, 2017
Video: Based on a True Story
0:00

This short film was produced by the Glassbreaker Films team at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Glassbreaker Films is an all-female group of filmmakers working to promote gender parity in investigative journalism and documentary filmmaking. The initiative is funded by The Helen Gurley Brown Foundation.

 

The 2000 film “Erin Brockovich” seemed like a successful David versus Goliath story. A single mom of three took on PG&E for contaminating drinking water in Hinkley, California, and came out victorious, suing and winning $333 million from the giant utility company. But whatever became of the tiny town?

For the roughly 600 residents who received part of that payout, the ending wasn’t all happy. Residents who lived there in the ‘90s, such as Roberta Walker, say they suffer from residual health problems. And while they can’t disclose how much money they received from the lawsuit, they say it wasn’t enough to keep them afloat for long. Now, 21 years after the lawsuit, it seems the same public health hazard continues to affect the welfare of Hinkley residents.

From natural disasters to national tragedies, the media swarms around major stories, hurling those affected into the spotlight. But what happens after the cameras are gone and the country moves on to the next headline? The Aftermath revisits stories that once dominated the news, investigating where people are now and what has happened since, to tell the story after the story.

For more on The Aftermath series: revealnews.org/theaftermath

Dec 07, 2017
Where criminals get their guns
51:00

Across the country, criminals are arming themselves in unexpected ways. In Florida, they’re stealing guns from unlocked cars and gun stores. In other places, they’re getting them from the police themselves, as cash-strapped departments sell their used weapons to buy new ones. On this episode of Reveal, we learn where criminals get their guns and what cars can teach us about gun safety.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us on fb.com/ThisIsReveal, Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Dec 02, 2017
Video: Until Something is Done
0:00

This short film was produced by the Glassbreaker Films team at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Glassbreaker Films is an all-female group of filmmakers working to promote gender parity in investigative journalism and documentary filmmaking.

In the early hours of 2009, 22-year-old Oscar Grant was fatally shot by a Bay Area Rapid Transit police officer at the Fruitvale station in Oakland, California. The shooting was captured on cellphone video and made headlines nationwide, leading to a national conversation about police brutality. The officer who shot Grant was convicted of involuntary manslaughter and served 11 months in prison out of a two-year sentence.

In the following years, as more police killings made the news, Grant’s mother, Wanda Johnson, decided to turn her pain and grief into a purpose. With Grant’s uncle, Cephus Johnson, she established The Oscar Grant Foundation, which led to a movement made up of mothers like her, whose sons were killed by police. She gathers with these women to help them find justice and ensure that their children are not forgotten. The number of members continues to grow steadily every year.

Watch the rest of The Aftermath series at: revealnews.org/theaftermath

Nov 30, 2017
Her own devices: Is a contraceptive implant making us sick?
51:00

In Texas, women with limited access to abortions are traveling across the border to find a drug that will induce miscarriages. In Mississippi, anti-abortion groups are opening crisis pregnancy centers across from abortion clinics to persuade women to keep their babies. And one company offers permanent birth control through the insertion of a simple device – that’s ended up causing health complications for thousands of women.

This week, we look into pregnancy and the ways people try to prevent it, end it and save it.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Nov 25, 2017
Pizzagate: A slice of fake news
50:24

On this episode of Reveal, we look at #Pizzagate. This story takes us into the world of right-wing Twitter trolls, pro-Trump political operatives and fake-news profiteers from St. Louis to Macedonia. Reveal unravels how this conspiracy theory spread and tries to answer one big question: How did America become a post-truth country?

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us on fb.com/ThisIsReveal, Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Nov 18, 2017
Video: Grieving in a Fishbowl
0:00

This short film was produced by the Glassbreaker Films team at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Glassbreaker Films is an all-female group of filmmakers working to promote gender parity in investigative journalism and documentary filmmaking.

After a mass shooting, the media descends on the victims. They’re asked time and again what they saw, what they felt and why they think it happened. After the dead are counted and the shooter’s motives are scrutinized, the survivors try to cope and move on.

Heather Martin was a senior at Columbine High School in Colorado when two teenagers shot and killed 12 students and one teacher. More than a decade later, 12 people were killed and dozens more injured in a shooting at an Aurora movie theater, just miles from where Martin lived.

To create a space for survivors to talk about their grief and traumatic new realities, Martin co-founded The Rebels Project, a nationwide support network that connects survivors of mass tragedy to help them process their experiences.

Martin says she desperately wants the group to stop growing, but every year, more members are joined by tragic circumstances.

Nov 16, 2017
Losing ground
51:00

In 1996, Eddie Wise, the son of a sharecropper, purchased a farm with a loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Twenty years later, the USDA foreclosed on the property and evicted him. Reveal investigates his claim that he was discriminated against because of his race.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us on fb.com/ThisIsReveal, Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Nov 11, 2017
The Paradise Papers
51:00

Remember the Panama Papers? It was a massive 2015 document leak that exposed a system in which offshore companies enable crime and corruption. The Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation that followed, led by The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), was a collaboration among more than 100 newsrooms across the world. It led to a flurry of resignations and indictments and took down leaders in Iceland and Pakistan.

This week, Reveal journalists teamed up with ICIJ for a new bombshell: The Paradise Papers.

This time around, the action is centered on more than 13 million confidential files leaked to Suddeutsche Zeitung and shared with the ICIJ’s global team of more than 300 journalists. Many of the confidential documents, emails and voicemails come from Appleby, a Bermuda-based law firm. The leaks shed light on how corporate giants move their cash from one offshore tax haven to another.

The Paradise Papers also open questions about Trump’s Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’ financial ties to Russian companies.

And they disclose how Facebook and Twitter received backing from Kremlin-controlled Russian banks. This comes at a time when the two tech giants are facing scrutiny by the U.S. Justice Department and Congress.

This global collaboration involves a team of journalists from 67 countries. Reveal is the first U.S. public radio show and podcast to tell the story through audio. Don’t miss this episode, and stay tuned for a series of partners’ text stories on our site in the coming days.

Nov 05, 2017
A Divided Road
0:00

Shortly after President Donald Trump’s election, two friends, Lauren and Martina, decided to provide free legal aid to people living in the country without permission. They left their home in New York and traveled across the country by van to meet people in need of help. Lauren is an immigration lawyer and Martina is an immigrant from Mexico. In just a few months, they traveled to 12 states and estimated they advised nearly 200 immigrants on a shoestring budget.

Nov 02, 2017
Inside Trump’s Immigration Crackdown
51:00

Beyond the planned border wall and limits on new refugees, the federal government wants tighter restrictions on immigration to this country. On this episode of Reveal, we examine efforts throughout the U.S. to deport migrants faster, detain them longer and prevent them from obtaining visas that might offer a path to legal residency.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Oct 28, 2017
Heroin Diaries
15:00

On this special episode of Reveal, reporter Jack Rodolico in partnership with New Hampshire Public Radio brings us an intimate look at the people affected by the opioid epidemic.

On May 22, 2015, Daniel Couzins died of a fentanyl overdose at 31. Couzins, an assistant manager at a New Hampshire bank, had started using heroin to quell his severe depression and anxiety – a feeling he likened to “a conference room of people yelling at each other” inside his head. Becoming addicted was never his plan. Things just ended up that way.

When Couzins died, he left behind a series of video diaries that his wife, Jennifer, discovered. The tapes offer a harrowing look at how opioid addiction can slowly take over – and end – a life.

“I need to watch them,” Jennifer says, “because I need to know.”

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Oct 26, 2017
Too Many Pills
31:18

On Reveal, we share how the government failed to stop the flow of millions and millions of pills that fuelled the national painkiller epidemic. A Washington Post/60 Minutes partnership with Reveal tells the story of a DEA insider who tried to stop drug distribution companies from flooding America with truckloads of pain pills. His effort was met with backlash from his own agency, the pharmaceutical industry and Congress.


To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Oct 21, 2017
Recovering from Rehab
0:00

In 2010, Brad McGahey was sentenced to a year in prison for buying a stolen horse trailer. But when he went before a judge, he was told he was going to carry out his sentence by working instead, through a program called CAAIR, or Christian Alcoholics & Addicts in Recovery.

McGahey wasn’t addicted to anything at the time of his sentencing. Hundreds of men are sent to CAAIR in lieu of a prison sentence each year. The program promises recovery from addiction for participants, but most of their time is spent working at a chicken processing plant, where they pull guts and feathers from slaughtered chickens and prepare them for distribution to companies such as Walmart, KFC and PetSmart.

Oct 19, 2017
Access Denied: The Fight for Public Education
51:06

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos wants parents to have the ultimate choice of where their children go to school – public or private – and taxpayers to make it possible. This week, Reveal examines how DeVos might funnel federal education dollars toward private school tuition, yet leave school choice rules up to the states. Plus, we’ll look at how hundreds of thousands of students in Texas were denied the special education they are guaranteed under federal civil rights law.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Oct 14, 2017
Al Letson Reveals: The fight to end affirmative action in higher education
19:25

President Trump’s Department of Justice is investigating claims that Harvard is discriminating against Asian American students in its admissions program. Harvard has been accused of capping the number of Asian American students to make room for other ethnicities.

Al talks to Edward Blum about the case. Blum has made a career out of challenging race-based college admissions. And he and his group, Students for Fair Admissions, filed a lawsuit against Harvard three years ago that makes some of the same claims the Justice Department is now investigating.

Oct 12, 2017
All work. No pay. Life at a rehab work camp.
51:08

Desperate to reduce crowding in jails and prisons, court systems all over the country are trying diversion – alternatives to putting offenders behind bars. On today’s Reveal, we peek behind the good intentions and uneven results.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Oct 07, 2017
Before Prison
0:00

In 2013, Robyn Allen received a 20-year sentence for trafficking in illegal drugs. She says she sold methamphetamine to support her family after a back injury left her without work. But the reasons Allen started using the drug run much deeper. In spite of taking measures to reduce its long-standing record as the No. 1 incarcerator of women in the country, Oklahoma keeps locking up women at more than twice the national average. Oklahoma incarcerates 151 out of every 100,000 women, often given harsh sentences for nonviolent drug crimes. This has taken its toll on several generations of women in the state.

Oct 05, 2017
Does the Time Fit the Crime?
51:00

The number of women in U.S. prisons and jails has increased more than 700 percent since 1980. And for 25 years, Oklahoma has led the nation in locking up women. This week on Reveal, we look at the causes behind this spike.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Sep 30, 2017
Street fight: A new wave of political violence
51:42

A few weeks ago, Reveal host Al Letson jumped in to protect someone who was being attacked by counter-protesters in Berkeley, California. We found the man behind the attack. He says he’s a member of antifa and is taking the fight to white nationalists. We also interviewed rally organizers who are connected to right-wing extremists.  

In the aftermath of the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, militants from the left and the right are taking their battles to the streets. This week on Reveal, we examine who they are and whether they’re hurtling the country toward more civil strife.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Sep 23, 2017
The rise of the new German right
51:00

In just a few days, Germans will go to the polls to vote for a new government in an election that feels strangely familiar. For decades, Germany’s elections have been subdued and predictable, but this campaign cycle has seen a rise of fake news, hate groups and right-wing politicians with a nationalist agenda. There also are allegations of Russian meddling.

This week on Reveal, we team up with Coda Story to look at the rise of right-wing populism in Germany’s election.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Sep 16, 2017
Running from cops
51:08

In cities across America, black men are on the run. On April 4, 2015, in South Carolina, Walter Scott was killed while running away from a police officer. Eight days later, Freddie Gray ran from police in Baltimore. He was caught and later died in custody.

On this episode of Reveal, we explore the consequences of fleeing from the police through two stories, both set in Baltimore.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Sep 09, 2017
The perfect storm
50:49

Hurricane Harvey brought unprecedented rain and destruction to Houston, and it likely will take years for the city to recover. In the aftermath of the storm, we get an eyewitness account of what residents are experiencing from Reveal’s Neena Satija.

Then we revisit her earlier reporting about Houston’s vulnerability to hurricanes and rain.

In 2008, Hurricane Ike swept through Texas and resulted in billions of dollars in damage. But it could have been much worse. Just like Harvey, that storm turned at the last minute and didn’t hit Houston head on. So imagine if Ike happened again, but with slightly higher winds, and this time, the storm didn’t turn but headed straight toward Houston.

In this hour of Reveal, we work with The Texas Tribune and ProPublica to take a look at a computer model of a worst-case hurricane called “Mighty Ike,” and what that would mean for Houston and the nation.

Sep 02, 2017
Rise of a movement
15:23

While covering Sunday’s “Rally Against Hate” in Berkeley, California, today, Reveal host Al Letson witnessed a man being attacked by a group of protesters. The man was balled up on the ground, fending off blows from several people. Al jumped in front of the batterers, protecting the man from further injury. On this special episode of Reveal, Al talks about what happened and how the battles between right- and left-wing protesters are playing out.

Aug 28, 2017
Follow the money: Citizen sleuths investigate
17:31

How much is President Donald Trump worth? And is he or anyone in his administration profiting from their positions? Reveal is teaming up with the Center for Public Integrity to investigate those questions.

We’ve created a database listing all the assets that members of his administration have disclosed. Now we’re digging through those documents to see whether there are any conflicts of interest – and we’re asking the public to take part in our investigation. Citizen sleuths already have uncovered some leads. By crowdsourcing this project, we can monitor whether any policy changes end up benefiting members of the president’s team.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Aug 26, 2017
Hate on the march: white nationalism in the Trump era
51:00

In the wake of the protests by neo-Nazis and white supremacists that turned deadly in Charlottesville, Virginia, President Donald Trump has come under fire for not immediately and clearly condemning American racists. It’s not the first time. Trump and those close to him have often played down the threat of violence committed by white supremacists across the country.

This week, through interviews with key Trump supporters and advisers, we explore if we should have seen Charlottesville coming and if we should expect more race-based clashes on the way.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Aug 19, 2017
The mystery of Mountain Jane Doe
52:04

Investigators dig up an unidentified murder victim, 45 years after she was buried, in an attempt to give her back her name. The exhumation leads to a series of unexpected revelations about who she was and why she may have been killed. Her case speaks to the complexity – and importance – of opening up cold cases. This Reveal story is one of thousands from the crisis of America’s unidentified dead.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Aug 12, 2017
No country for sanctuary seekers
51:01

President Donald Trump has promised to withdraw federal money from jurisdictions that do not help immigration agents find and deport people living illegally in this country. This week, we look into places that offer sanctuary to those immigrants – and what the conflict between federal and local policies means for them.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Aug 05, 2017
Her own devices: Is a contraceptive implant making us sick?
51:00

In Texas, women with limited access to abortions are traveling across the border to find a drug that will induce miscarriages. In Mississippi, anti-abortion groups are opening crisis pregnancy centers across from abortion clinics to persuade women to keep their babies. And one company offers permanent birth control through the insertion of a simple device – that’s ended up causing health complications for thousands of women.

This week, we look into pregnancy and the ways people try to prevent it, end it and save it.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Jul 29, 2017
Deadly waters
51:00

The U.S. Navy spends tens of billions of dollars each year building and repairing ships. But how safe are the shipyards where that work is done? Reveal investigates how lax safety has been allowed to persist at shipyards that thrive on military contracts.

This hour also will explore one of the newest warships in the Navy’s fleet and whether it’s living up to expectations. And we’ll tell the story of one man’s unexplained disappearance on the high seas.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal, or Instagram @revealnews.

Jul 22, 2017
No where to run
51:00

In Texas, the foster care system is failing the vulnerable children it’s meant to protect, leaving them without a safe place to live. Many end up on the streets or in jail, which is one of the few places where they can receive treatment services. This week we look into the crisis in foster care, and efforts to fix it.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal, or Instagram @revealnews.

Jul 15, 2017
Al Letson Reveals: Roger Stone
22:04

President Donald Trump has been in office for six months. On this week’s podcast special, Reveal host Al Letson speaks with someone who helped get him there – Roger Stone.

Stone is a former campaign adviser to Trump and helped set the tone of the 2016 election. For decades, he’s played hardball politics as a Republican strategist and now is the subject of a documentary. He and Letson discuss political dirty tricks, white supremacy and Russian meddling in the November election.


To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal, or on Instagram @revealnews.

Jul 13, 2017
The smuggler
50:59

In 2015 French radio reporter Raphael Krafft was covering the refugee crisis. Then one day, one refugee asked for his help. Raphael followed his moral compass… which led him on the journey of a lifetime.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us at fb.com/ThisIsReveal, on Twitter @reveal, or Instagram @revealnews.

Jul 08, 2017
Losing ground
50:35

In 1996, Eddie Wise, the son of a sharecropper, purchased a farm with a loan from the USDA. Twenty years later, the USDA foreclosed on the property and evicted him. Reveal investigates his claim that he was discriminated against because of his race.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us on fb.com/ThisIsReveal, Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Jul 01, 2017
Trial and terror
51:00

President Donald Trump has used the threat of foreign-born terrorists to justify his travel ban – but since 9/11, nearly every terrorist attack in the United States has come from within. On this episode of Reveal, we investigate which domestic terror episodes get tracked and why.

To explore more reporting, visit revealnews.org or find us on fb.com/ThisIsReveal, Twitter @reveal or Instagram @revealnews.

Jun 24, 2017
America’s ring of fire
50:43

Last fall, Reveal reporters predicted that wildfires would spread to new parts of the country, and  to more densely populated areas. Now, we revisit that hour with a new story about Kansas, a state that’s battling not only wildfires, but also significant underfunding of its forest firefighter team.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Jun 17, 2017
After the bubble burst
51:00

America’s housing bust created both winners and losers – and homeowners have been the biggest losers. Last year, the rate of homeownership in the U.S. hit its lowest point since the 1960s.

So who are the winners? This episode of Reveal takes you into the world of people who are still profiting, from rent-to-own investors in Detroit to President Donald Trump’s best friend, a real estate mogul.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Jun 10, 2017
Is Egg Donation Safe?
0:00

Dr. Jennifer Schneider lost her 31-year-old daughter, Jessica Wing, to colon cancer in 2003. To this day, Schneider wonders whether there was a link between her daughter being a three-time egg donor and  her diagnosis  the tumors that were eventually found on her ovaries and abdomen. But because there are no studies of the long-term risks of egg donation, Schneider may never know if the procedure had something to do with why her daughter was diagnosed with colon cancer at such a young age. She has become a strong advocate for egg donor studies and an egg donor registry.

Jun 08, 2017
Misconceptions
51:42

This week, we’re trying an experiment that will give you a little something extra while you’re listening. To get started text “Hey Al” to 202-873-8325.

The world’s first “test tube baby” turns 40 next year. As she’s grown up, so has the medical specialty that produced her: in vitro fertilization. It’s a big business addressing a big demand.

On this episode of Reveal, we examine the stakes – and high costs – of IVF.

Jun 03, 2017
The kids aren’t all right
51:00

Federal law requires colleges and universities to track and disclose sexual assaults on campus. It’s different for kindergarten through 12th grade, where there are no similar requirements for cases involving assaults between students. In elementary, middle and high schools across the U.S., the Associated Press found a shocking level of sexual violence among students.

On this episode of Reveal, we delve into the results of AP’s yearlong investigation.

 Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

 Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

May 27, 2017
The man inside: Four months as a prison guard
51:11

The government’s back in business with private prisons. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has reversed the Obama-era decision to phase out federal use of corporate-run prisons.

On this episode, Reveal revisits an hour with Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer who takes you inside a private prison on lockdown.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

May 22, 2017
Video: One year at Standing Rock
0:00

Jasilyn Charger was one of the first people to set up camp at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in April 2016. Along with youth from neighboring tribes, the then-19-year-old helped raise awareness about construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline by staging a 2,000-mile run from North Dakota to Washington. By the time the group returned to Standing Rock, the camp population had swelled into the thousands. One year later, she reflects on the protests and how the movement has changed the course of her life.

May 18, 2017
Standing Rock and beyond
51:00

The oil protests at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation drew national attention. On Reveal, we team up with Inside Energy to go behind the scenes and meet the young people who started the fight. This upcoming hour looks at how those protests put at-risk teens on a healthier path and how other Native tribes are grappling with energy projects on their sovereign land.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

May 13, 2017
What cops aren’t learning
51:00

Some police departments are embracing a set of tactics designed to reduce the use of force – and prevent police shootings. Rather than rushing in aggressively, officers back off, wait out people in crisis and use words instead of weapons.

But this training isn’t required in most states. Reveal teams up with APM Reports and finds that most cops spend a lot more time training to shoot their guns than learning how to avoid firing them.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

May 06, 2017
Running from cops
51:02

In cities across America, black men are on the run. On April 4, 2015, in South Carolina, Walter Scott was killed while running away from a police officer. Eight days later, Freddie Gray ran from police in Baltimore. He was caught and later died in custody.

On this episode of Reveal, we explore the consequences of fleeing from the police through two stories, both set in Baltimore.

Apr 29, 2017
Russia’s new scapegoats
50:59

In light of recent reports about Chechnya’s anti-gay kidnappings, torture and killings, Reveal revisits stories that expose what it’s like to be gay in Russia. Right now, hateful rhetoric against the LGBT community appears on a daily basis on Russian TV and in speeches by Russian politicians. Reveal traces the roots of the anti-gay movement and shows how President Vladimir Putin uses this agenda to quash political dissent, exert influence on neighboring nations and bash the West.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Apr 22, 2017
Toxic burden
51:00

At a time when environmental protections are under more threats than ever, Reveal visits minority communities facing toxic burdens.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Apr 15, 2017
Al Letson Reveals: The color of feminism
15:40

From women’s 19th-century fight for the right to vote to the Women’s March this year, racism has affected feminist movements.

In this podcast special, Al Letson recalls the #BlackWomenAtWork stories that went viral recently and talks with Kimberly Foster, the founder of For Harriet and a very frank video commentator, about her dream to “bring down the system.”

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Apr 13, 2017
If you can’t afford a lawyer
50:42

If you can’t afford a lawyer, one will be appointed to you – that’s how it’s supposed to work. But in New Orleans, the lawyer in charge of representing poor people accused of crimes is saying no. His office doesn’t have enough money or time to do a good job, he says, so he’s refusing some serious cases, which is jamming up the courts and leaving hundreds of people stuck in jail with no lawyer. His goal? To break the system in order to fix it.

Reveal follows up on this story that we first brought you last fall.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Apr 08, 2017
The mystery of Mountain Jane Doe
51:00

Investigators dig up an unidentified murder victim, 45 years after she was buried, in an attempt to give her back her name. The exhumation leads to a series of unexpected revelations about who she was and why she may have been killed. Her case speaks to the complexity – and importance – of opening up cold cases. This Reveal story is one of thousands from the crisis of America’s unidentified dead.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Apr 01, 2017
Against their will
51:00

Powered by the internet, the sex trade is reaching into all corners of the country. Reveal follows up on what’s happened since we first took you inside the hidden places – real and virtual – where people are exploited for sex.

Produced in collaboration with APM Reports, we’ll hear stories from the pot fields of Northern California to the streets of Chicago and suburban Seattle.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 25, 2017
Al Letson Reveals: Former NATO official imagines war with Russia
10:41

Since President Donald Trump took office, we’ve heard plenty about Russia. Some have said tensions with the country could lead to conflict – even another world war.

In this podcast special, Al Letson talks to former top NATO commander Richard Shirreff, who spells out these fears – which are very real for him – in his new novel.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 23, 2017
Richard Spencer’s cotton farms
50:46

On this episode of Reveal, three stories of men are at the center of controversy.  

He’s been punched on the streets of Washington, D.C., and kicked out of a major conservative political gathering, and yet white nationalist Richard Spencer has left Montana to set up shop in the nation’s capital. What does he have to show for it?

A Marine veteran breaks the news of hundreds – possibly thousands – of naked photographs of female service members being shared online. We hear his story.

Nearly 30 years ago, six firefighters in Kansas City, Missouri, died in an arson explosion that shook the city. Reveal follows a man in the case who was sent to prison for life as he’s released and reunited with his family.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 18, 2017
The smuggler
51:10

In 2015, French radio reporter Raphael Krafft was covering the refugee crisis. On the border with Italy, he met desperate families turned away by his country.  

Then one family asked Krafft for his help crossing the border. As a journalist, he was supposed to be objective, but that was getting harder to do. So he followed his moral compass, which led him on the journey of a lifetime.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 11, 2017
Al Letson Reveals: Sebastian Gorka on America
13:15

This week, Reveal host Al Letson speaks to Sebastian Gorka, deputy assistant to President Donald Trump. Usually, Gorka is sent out by the White House to discuss threats outside the U.S. In this special podcast, he and Al discuss domestic issues.

Gorka talks a lot about the backbone of America, “real Americans” and the people he calls “the chattering classes.” But who are the “chattering classes”? And what is “the real America”? The outspoken Trump adviser lays bare his views on the country.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 09, 2017
Up against the wall
51:00

President Donald Trump wants to build a wall between America and Mexico. Hundreds of miles of border fence are already in place, but most of the nearly 2,000-mile stretch is uncovered. This episode of Reveal explores the political, logistical and geographic barriers that may get in the way of the president’s plans.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 04, 2017
Al Letson Reveals: Vicente Fox on Trump’s wall
18:03

Many people have strong feelings about President Donald Trump’s plan to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Former Mexican President Vicente Fox is among the most outspoken.

In this podcast special, host Al Letson digs into whether Fox doesn’t like the wall – or the new U.S. president.

Watch for F-bombs.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Mar 02, 2017
The religious freedom loophole
51:00

America was built on the idea of protecting religious liberty. But what happens when religious groups take advantage of these special freedoms to make money, skirt rules or hurt children?

We revisit an hour of Reveal that explores the tricky territory of religious freedom and how different groups have exploited this loophole.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Feb 25, 2017
School haze
51:00

Across the country, thousands of public schools are within 500 feet of pollution-choked roads like highways and truck routes. Next time on Reveal, we investigate the high levels of exhaust surrounding U.S. schools and how the bad air is affecting the millions of children who are breathing it in.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Feb 18, 2017
Video: In Sickness and in Health
0:00

John Williams Jr.’s life changed irrevocably in 2014 when he was in a horrific crane accident while working at a   VT Halter shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

Williams, an experienced crane operator, lost part of his skull, his vision and his independence. He suffered severe brain damage that left him with the mental capacity of a child.

Wanda, his wife of almost 20 years, now takes care of him. Their love remains strong, but they have lost the life and relationship they once knew.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Feb 16, 2017
Deadly waters
51:16

The U.S. Navy spends tens of billions of dollars each year building and repairing ships. But how safe are the shipyards where that work is done? Reveal investigates how lax safety has been allowed to persist at shipyards that thrive on military contracts.

The hour also will explore one of the newest warships in the Navy’s fleet and whether it’s living up to expectations. And we’ll tell the story of one man’s unexplained disappearance on the high seas.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Feb 11, 2017
Trial by fire
50:30

In 1988, two powerful explosions shook Kansas City, Missouri, killing six firefighters. Nine years later, five people were convicted of arson and sent to prison for life – but were they innocent?

Reveal investigates problems in the case and whether federal agents pressured witnesses to lie. This month, one of the defendants will make his case for freedom before a federal judge.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Feb 04, 2017
Split down the middle
51:01

At a time when Donald Trump is assuming leadership of a divided nation, Reveal heads to Jacksonville, Florida, one of the most divided cities in America.

We look at policing, immigration, education and other issues through the eyes of people with very different perspectives and find out that residents here are not on the same page.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Jan 28, 2017
Dropped and dismissed: Child sex abuse lost in the system
50:59

This week, Reveal revisits the story of a woman who decides to confront the man she says abused her decades earlier.

Reporter Tennessee Watson was sexually abused by her gymnastics coach when she was a kid. Over 25 years later, when she learned he still was coaching children, she called the police. Her inside account of the arduous process of seeking justice in her own case exposes discrepancies in prosecutors’ responses to reports of child sexual abuse and spotlights a lack of accountability.

Help us hold the powerful accountable and speak for the most vulnerable. Please go to www.revealnews.org/donate to support our work today.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Jan 21, 2017
Water wars
51:00

Next to the air we breathe, it’s the planet’s most precious resource: fresh water. And it’s disappearing. The world’s largest food company describes the lack of water as a looming catastrophe that is expected to play out in the coming decades. In this episode of Reveal, we look at what’s happening in places that already are running out of water.

Help us hold the powerful accountable and speak for the most vulnerable. Please go to www.revealnews.org/donate to support our work today.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Jan 14, 2017
America’s digital dumping ground
51:00

You got that new computer or phone you wanted for the holidays – but what happens to your old gadgets? They might not end up where you expect. Next time on Reveal, environmentalists follow the global trail of America’s electronic castoffs.

Help us hold the powerful accountable and speak for the most vulnerable. Please go to www.revealnews.org/donate to support our work today.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Jan 07, 2017
The year in Reveal
51:00

This year on Reveal, we’ve dug into issues that affect people’s lives across the country. We told stories about worker abuse, toxic schools, women’s sports and private prisons. So we decided to round out this season with something different: This hour, we look back at stories you, our listeners, told us were the most memorable.

Help us hold the powerful accountable and speak for the most vulnerable. Please go to www.revealnews.org/donate to support our work today.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Dec 31, 2016
The Pentagon Papers: Secrets, lies and leaks
51:00

Our holiday gift to you is a story we first brought you back in May. It touches on corrupt politicians and keeping the public in the dark. Don’t worry, it has nothing to do with this year’s election. In fact, this story takes us back more than 40 years.

Consider this show a trip with the ghost of investigations past, where we take a look back at the Pentagon Papers – how they became public and why they’re so important.

Help us hold the powerful accountable and speak for the most vulnerable. Please go to www.revealnews.org/donate to support our work today.

Head over to revealnews.org for more of our reporting.

Follow us on Facebook at fb.com/ThisIsReveal and on Twitter @reveal.

And to see some of what you’re hearing, we’re also on Instagram @revealnews.

Dec 24, 2016
Turbulent times, turbulent skies
50:58

On this episode of Reveal, we explore the backstory of Donald Trump’s chief strategist, Steve Bannon. Plus, just in time for the holidays, we take a look at some real travel nightmares and the airlines that cause them.

Dec 17, 2016
Secrets of the Watchtower
51:00

For the past two years, Reveal reporter Trey Bundy has been uncovering how the Jehovah’s Witnesses hide sexual abuse in their congregations – in fact, it’s official policy. The religion’s leaders have been going to extreme lengths to keep the details from public view.

On the next Reveal, we track down people who know the religion’s dark secrets.

Dec 10, 2016
If you can’t afford a lawyer
50:38

If you can’t afford a lawyer, one will be appointed to you – that’s how it’s supposed to work. But in New Orleans, the lawyer in charge of representing poor people accused of crimes is saying no. His office doesn’t have enough money or time to do a good job, he says, so he’s refusing some serious cases, which is jamming up the courts and leaving hundreds of people stuck in jail with no lawyer. His goal? To break the system in order to fix it.

Dec 03, 2016
A welfare check
51:00

This week, Reveal’s bringing you an episode we first aired this summer. With Republicans in full control of the Federal government, there’s a good chance Welfare Reform will be an issue they may take on. So in anticipation of that, it is worth taking another look at what’s worked and what hasn’t.

Today, only a quarter of welfare dollars actually goes toward basic assistance – housing, transportation or essential household items. So we’ll revisit a road trip we took with Marketplace’s new podcast “The Uncertain Hour” and find out the surprising ways different states use welfare dollars.

Nov 26, 2016
Glare of the spotlight
50:59

In this hour of Reveal, we’re going to revisit an Oscar-winning movie about The Boston Globe’s investigative team that exposed the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal: “Spotlight.” We’ll take you behind the scenes of that investigation, look at the legacy of the groundbreaking story and see how other journalists went on to expose more crimes by Catholic priests around the world.

Nov 19, 2016
The secret Trump voter
51:00

How did everyone miss the Donald Trump supporters who were hiding in plain sight? On Reveal, we’ll learn why they kept a low profile – until Election Day that is – and hear what they have to say now that their candidate is headed for the White House. We’ll also meet an emerging leader of the alt-right movement who is packing his bags and leaving rural Montana for Washington D.C., where he’ll advocate for a white supremacist agenda.

Nov 12, 2016
A frank conversation with a white nationalist
23:41

This week, Reveal’s been working on a show about – what else – the election.

But first you need to hear this: Our host Al Letson spoke with Richard Spencer the day after the election. Like many people, Spencer was both thrilled and surprised that Donald Trump won – and he has a specific agenda. Spencer’s a white nationalist. He sees Trump’s election as the first solid steps toward a new, post-America, whites-only nation.

Listen in as Al has a frank conversation with Spencer that reveals starkly different views of the same world.

Nov 10, 2016
Host of problems
51:00

Au pair is a French term meaning “on par with,” a relationship of equals. Every year, thousands of young people travel to the United States as au pairs to provide child care for American “host families” while experiencing a new culture. But life as an au pair isn’t always easy. Reveal takes a look at the problems that can leave au pairs adrift and vulnerable to exploitation and abuse.

Nov 05, 2016
And justice for some
51:00

Unless you’ve been caught up in the justice system, most Americans’ understanding of courts come s from what you see on TV.  

In popular dramas like “Law & Order,” everyone gets a lawyer, the crime is solved in a neat and timely way, and – of course – justice is served. But in real life, it doesn’t always work out that way. On this Reveal, we take a look at the cracks in the system that prevent people from getting a fair shake.

Oct 29, 2016
How to (really) steal an election
51:00

With the presidential race in the homestretch, it seems like we hear talk about rigged elections and threats of cyberattacks just about every week. So, how safe are our votes? Is it possible to steal an American election? Reveal looks at the technology we’ll be using to vote next month, and whether the trend toward internet voting will make our ballots more vulnerable.

Oct 22, 2016
[Update] Billion-dollar scam
29:58

This week, we’re revisiting California’s workers’ compensation program that covers 15 million workers across the state. Reporter Christina Jewett discovered serious fraud in the system after reviewing thousands of documents. They showed that in the past decade, more than 80 people have been accused of cheating California’s workers’ comp medical system out of $1 billion.

Find out what’s happened since we first aired that episode. And at the end of this week’s episode, we tell you about a big development in a different story – one that we’re actively reporting on.

Oct 15, 2016
America’s Ring of Fire
51:00

Wildfires are getting bigger, more expensive to fight and closer than ever to where people live. The consequences can be deadly. The next episode of Reveal examines how wildfires got so dangerous – and how some areas are fighting back.

Oct 08, 2016
Voting rights – and wrongs
50:59

This presidential election is the first since the Supreme Court gutted historic voter rights protections. Reveal examines the impact of state laws that rushed in to fill the void. Are they fighting fraud or changing election outcomes?

Oct 01, 2016
Russia’s new scapegoats
51:10

A Russian journalist is murdered in St. Petersburg – not for what he’s reported, but for being gay. Reveal exposes what it’s really like to be gay in Russia and neighboring countries today, where hateful rhetoric against the LGBT community appears on a daily basis on TV and out of the mouths of politicians. Reveal traces the roots of the anti-gay movement and shows how President Vladimir Putin uses this agenda to quash political dissent, exert influence on neighboring nations and bash the West.

Content advisory: This show concerns discrimination against LGBT people in Russia.  In order to allow listeners to understand the extent of the discrimination, the show includes interviews with people promoting the anti-LGBT agenda, who use bigoted, offensive language.

Sep 24, 2016
No choice: Failing America’s veterans
51:00

Two years ago, the system that provides American veterans with health care was rocked by scandal when whistleblowers told the world that vets were dying while the Phoenix VA concealed them on a secret waiting list. Reveal revisits the Phoenix scandal, and then investigates what happened next, examining how a national effort to get veterans faster care turned Alaska’s homegrown health care system upside down, and how a deeply troubled VA hospital in Cincinnati responded to its own scandal by blaming the messengers.

Sep 17, 2016
Against their will
51:05

Powered by the internet, the sex trade is reaching into all corners of the country. Reveal takes us into hidden places – real and virtual – where people are exploited for sex. Produced in collaboration with APM Reports, we’ll hear stories from the pot fields of Northern California to the streets of Chicago and suburban Seattle.

Sep 10, 2016
[Update] The man inside: Four months as a prison guard
51:01

This week, Reveal revisits an hour with Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer inside a private prison on lockdown. We take an unfiltered look at America’s private corrections industry and follow up on some big news.

Sep 03, 2016
[Update] Sick on the inside: Behind bars in immigrant-only prisons
51:00

Recently we got some big news: The Department of Justice will end its use of private prisons. This means that about a dozen prisons – that house about 22,000 people convicted of federal crimes – will be shut down. It’s the biggest announcement in the history of private prisons.

In light of this news, we’re revisiting an hour of Reveal that investigates medical negligence in the private prison system for immigrants. And in a new segment, we learn about the roadblocks prison regulators encountered when they tried to fix these problems.

Aug 27, 2016
[Update] Cat Fight
51:00

Find out what’s happened since we first took a look at two cats whose fates diverged. One, an invasive predator, is encouraged to thrive and hunt; the other, a native wildcat, is being hunted and trapped. We revisit these cat stories on the next Reveal.

Aug 20, 2016
Dropped and dismissed: Child sex abuse lost in the system
51:00

Reporter Tennessee Watson was sexually abused by her gymnastics coach when she was a kid. Over 25 years later, when she learned he still was coaching children, she called the police. Her inside account of the arduous process of seeking justice in her own case exposes discrepancies in prosecutors’ responses to reports of child sexual abuse and spotlights a lack of accountability.

Aug 13, 2016
From A to Zika
51:00

The Zika virus already has spread swiftly across the island territory of Puerto Rico. And now, Miami is reporting its first cases in people infected by local mosquitoes. This week, Reveal takes us to the front lines of the battle against the disease.

Aug 06, 2016
[Update] Mighty Ike
51:00

As the country enters the peak of storm season this summer, we want to return to an issue we first talked about earlier this year.

What would happen if a major hurricane hit Texas? The state is home to the Houston Ship Channel, one of the world’s busiest maritime waterways. And along the Ship Channel are refineries and chemical plants that make up the nation’s largest refining and petrochemical complex. It’s a pretty major economic hub.

In this hour of Reveal, we revisit a story with The Texas Tribune and ProPublica that takes a look at what would happen if a worst-case storm hit the region in the not-so-distant future – a storm that scientists have dubbed “Mighty Ike.”

Jul 30, 2016
[Update] Farm to fork: Uncovering hazards in our food systems
51:00

This week, Reveal revisits an hour of stories dedicated to food. We take a look at the complicated networks of labor, trade and regulation that carry meat, produce and other products to our tables.

Jul 23, 2016
A welfare check
51:00

Twenty years ago, President Bill Clinton vowed to end welfare as we know it. And he did.

Today, only a quarter of welfare dollars actually goes toward basic assistance – housing, transportation or essential household items. On this hour of Reveal, we take a road trip with Marketplace’s new podcast “The Uncertain Hour” and find out the surprising ways different states use this money, for things such as relationship counseling and college tuition for well-off kids.

Jul 16, 2016
[Update] Eyes on Cops
17:38

The scenes of violence caught on video recently have been a painful reminder of the strained relations between the public and the police in our country.

This friction is not new. What is new is the technology: cameras and smart phones that record and transmit the violence live or within minutes.

In Minnesota, the person who captured the aftermath of an officer-involved shooting was in the car with the victim. In Baton Rouge, the videos were made by bystanders. And in Dallas, the first images we saw of the sniper shootings came from people on the ground, in the crowd. But there’s also an organized movement of people who consider it their jobs to police the police and they, too, are recording. Some people call them “cop watchers.”

In light of recent events we’re revisiting a story we brought to you last year. It’s a look at the cop watching movement in Texas – including in a suburb of Dallas where tensions over the practice already were on the rise.

Jul 15, 2016
Bordering on insecurity
51:00

One border official did it for sex. Another blamed depression and financial trouble. Yet another allegedly received cash and a “deluxe” hot tub worth $10,000.

The circumstances of their crimes differ, but prosecutors say these defendants have something in common: The corrupt actions they’re accused of weakened the same U.S. borders and ports of entry they were assigned to protect.

On this episode of Reveal, our joint investigation with The Texas Tribune profiles federal border officials who were arrested for or convicted of acts of corruption that allegedly compromised their mission to stop crime and keep their country secure.

Jul 09, 2016
Who’s getting rich off your student debt?
51:00

Just about everyone involved in the student loan industry these days – banks, private investors and even the federal government – makes money off the borrowers. On this episode of Reveal, we explore how this happened and who’s profiting from student debt.

Jul 02, 2016
The man inside: Four months as a prison guard
52:06

Prisons are almost impossible for reporters to get inside, and few people know what life inside is like for inmates and guards. But one journalist cracked the shell of secrecy by getting a job as a prison guard. He witnessed cost-cutting measures and reported safety concerns affecting prisoners and staff. On this episode of Reveal, we take an unprecedented look inside the multibillion-dollar private prison industry.

Jun 25, 2016
After Orlando
51:00

This week’s attack on a nightclub in Orlando, Florida, was the largest mass shooting in American history. Reveal goes to Orlando to hear from survivors and learn how the FBI investigates potential terrorists. We explore how security companies screen potential employees such as Omar Mateen, the nightclub shooter. We also investigate how the NRA and gun control groups use data on gun violence to shape the debate.

Jun 20, 2016
Poison lurking in schools
51:00

Across the country, tens of thousands of public schools could be contaminated with toxic polychlorinated biphenyls – a compound more commonly known as PCBs, which were used mainly in the caulking of windows. On this hour of Reveal, we take a closer look at this sleeper chemical that was banned in 1979 but still poses a serious health risk to kids today.

Jun 13, 2016
Lawless Lands
51:04

On the next Reveal, we’re taking you to lawless lands. From Africa and the Middle East to places in Oregon and Texas, we explore what happens in the absence of government and find out who or what comes in to fill the void. Sometimes, it’s a strongman enforcing his will; other times, it’s just anarchy, and occasionally it’s something completely unexpected.

Jun 06, 2016
[Update] Alleged cult leader plays shell game with US foreign aid
51:00

Reveal went to the African nation of Malawi to find out why the U.S. government has continued to give grants to a charitable organization that it knew was linked to an international fugitive. Find out what’s happened since we first reported on the story and exposed this connection.

May 30, 2016
The Pentagon Papers: Secrets, lies and leaks
50:47

On this episode of Reveal, we look back at the Pentagon Papers – how they became public and why they’re so important. But this isn’t just a history lesson. You can draw a straight line from what happened in the ’70s to today’s debate about government secrets and what happens to the people who expose them.

May 23, 2016
[Update] A mountain of misconduct
51:00

Find out what’s happened since we first told you about 40 years of alleged abuse and neglect of people with disabilities at specialty rehab centers across the U.S.

We teamed up with New Hampshire Public Radio health and science reporter Jack Rodolico to unveil how these for-profit facilities thrived on public dollars with little oversight.

May 16, 2016
Women’s sports: A man’s game
50:59

In this hour of Reveal, we’re looking into Title IX, the historic law meant to bridge the gender gap in schools. We mostly see this rule play out in school sports teams, but behind the athleticism and fanfare, there’s a story of failure.

Reveal reporters go inside campuses to discover that there’s actually been a decline in female coaches since the law’s outset. And how exactly does the government make sure that a school is following Title IX? These answers and more on the next Reveal.

May 09, 2016
The price of admission
51:00

The U.S. Supreme Court is about to make a decision that could affect college admissions across the country. And Texas’ Top 10 Percent Rule plays a starring role. On this episode of Reveal, reporter Neena Satija, of our partner The Texas Tribune, tells us how an attempt to boost diversity in Texas colleges could, paradoxically, end affirmative action. She also takes a long look at the Top 10 Percent Rule and whether it allows students from economically diverse backgrounds to attend the state’s top public universities.

We’ll hear from two high-achieving young Texans: Genesis Morales and Grayson Rutherford. They’re college-bound students who attend high schools only 10 miles from one another but whose experiences are worlds apart.

We’ll also take you to Berkeley, California, and look at that school district’s integration plan. Over five decades, that plan has worked, for the most part – Berkeley’s kindergarten through eighth grade system is a model for the rest of the country on how to integrate schools. But the city’s single high school faces unexpected challenges.

May 02, 2016
Guns and America’s murder board
51:01

On this hour of Reveal, we take a look at the toll of gun violence in the country, who’s documenting the carnage and how lives can be saved.

Apr 25, 2016
[Update] Decoding discrimination in America’s temp industry
51:00

Earlier this year, Reveal reporter Will Evans told us about the discrimination certain temp workers face.

In case you missed it: A blatant system of racial discrimination pervades the temporary jobs sector – which is one of the nation’s fastest-growing industries in terms of employment.

So what happened when we revealed that some people were hired based not on their résumé, but on the color of their skin?

This hour of Reveal revisits the three stories about how some temp agencies hire by race and who loses out. And we’ll bring you up to date on what’s happened since they originally aired.

Apr 18, 2016
Kids crossing borders – alone
51:00

In a collaboration with The Bureau of Investigative Journalism in the United Kingdom and KQED in California, this episode of Reveal tells the stories of children crossing borders alone. You’ll hear about the wars they’re fleeing, where they’re trying to go and what happens to them when they get there.  

We followed migrants who traveled from Afghanistan to Sweden to London, from El Salvador and Mexico to California, and we found that kids seeking safe harbor in Europe and the U.S. often confront years of uncertainty and insecurity when they arrive. 

Apr 11, 2016
Billion-dollar scam
49:36

California’s workers’ compensation program covers 15 million workers across the state. If you get hurt on the job – fall off a ladder, for instance – it’s the system you turn to. Most employers are required to carry workers’ comp insurance, which helps cover medical bills and lost wages for injured employees.

But Reveal reporter Christina Jewett has discovered serious fraud in the system after reviewing thousands of documents. They show that in the last decade, more than 80 people have been accused of cheating California’s workers’ comp medical system out of $1 billion.

Apr 04, 2016
New day dawning on the night shift
51:00

Every day, invisible armies of men and women head to work, where they’re assigned to do something that helps make our lives a little bit easier. Some of these workers clean our buildings, some assemble our smartphones, and some cook our favorite cheap eats.

On this hour of Reveal, we revisit an investigation that is starting to see some real impact: Rape on the Night Shift. We also take another look at the toxic chemicals used in electronics manufacturing, and we bring you a new story about a black market of undocumented workers is are supplying labor to Chinese restaurants all over the country.

Mar 28, 2016
Alleged cult leader plays shell game with US foreign aid
51:00

You know those Planet Aid clothing donation boxes you see on the side of the road? Those clothes and over $100 million in U.S. grant money are supposed to help people in southern Africa.

But when Reveal went to Malawi to find out what actually happened, people told us that some of the projects didn’t pan out.

Our investigation finds that the U.S. government knew an international fugitive was linked to the projects, but kept the money flowing. Reveal goes behind the bin and across an ocean to find out what’s going on.

Mar 21, 2016
When Mad Men meet dark money
51:00

Money in U.S. politics was once a straightforward thing, but we’re now in the era of dark money. The dollars changing hands run well into the billions, and corporations and hedge fund moguls spend freely behind a veil of secrecy.

Enter Mad Men: This heap of money is fueling a barrage of political ads. Messages, which have cost more than $300 million so far, are being designed specifically for you – popping up in your Facebook feed or streaming into your living room during commercial breaks.

In this hour of Reveal, we collaborate with The Center for Public Integrity’s campaign finance reporting team and WAMU in Washington to look at who’s spending, how much, where the money’s flowing and what it’s paying for.

Mar 14, 2016
Mighty Ike
51:02

Texas is home to the Houston Ship Channel, one of the world’s busiest maritime waterways. Also in Houston, and along the Ship Channel, are refineries and chemical plants that make up the nation’s largest refining and petrochemical complex. It’s a major economic hub.

But what would happen to the area if a major hurricane hit?

In 2008, Hurricane Ike swept through Texas, and resulted in billions of dollars in damages. But it could have been much worse. The storm turned at the last minute and didn’t hit Houston head on. So imagine if Ike happened again, but with slightly higher winds, and this time, the storm didn’t turn but headed straight toward Houston …

In this hour of Reveal, we work with The Texas Tribune and ProPublica to take a look at what would happen if a worst-case storm hit the region in the not-so-distant future – a storm that scientists have dubbed “Mighty Ike.”

Mar 07, 2016
The religious freedom loophole
51:00

America was built on the idea of protecting religious liberty. But what happens when religious groups take advantage of these special freedoms to make money, skirt rules or hurt children?

This hour of Reveal explores the tricky territory of religious freedom and how different groups have exploited this loophole.

Feb 29, 2016
Glare of the spotlight
51:00

Oscar season is upon us, and one of the best picture nominees is a film that hits pretty close to home for us at Reveal: “Spotlight.” In case you haven’t seen it yet, it’s a movie about The Boston Globe’s investigative team that exposed the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal.

In this hour of Reveal, we’re going to take you behind the scenes of that investigation, look at the legacy of the groundbreaking story and see how other journalists went on to expose more crimes by Catholic priests around the world.

First up, we tell you what happened after the “Spotlight” movie ended and how The Boston Globe continued to expose cover-ups in the Catholic Church.

In the second segment, Minnesota Public Radio exposes a priest abuse scandal in the Twin Cities, more than a decade after The Globe’s original investigation. Reporter Madeleine Baran spent two years looking into the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis and uncovered how the church had been making secret payments to known abusers while continuing to conceal clergy sexual abuse from the public.

And finally, Global Post reporter Will Carless takes us to Latin America on the trail of priests who fled the U.S. after being accused of sexually abusing children.

Note: This episode contains graphic content related to child sexual abuse.

Feb 22, 2016
Another look at the perilous price of American energy
50:45

On this hour of Reveal, we take another look at three of our major investigations that explored energy production in the United States, and we’ll bring you up to date on what’s happened since they originally aired.

From Washington to North Dakota and Oklahoma, we’ll revisit how fracking has opened new realms of oil and gas production and examine some of the complex consequences of so-called energy independence.

Feb 15, 2016
Sick on the inside: Behind bars in immigrant-only prisons
51:00

Anyone who serves time for a federal crime will end up in what prison experts say is the best-run system in the country: the Federal Bureau of Prisons. But if you’re not a U.S. citizen, you could end up in one of 11 facilities that don’t have to follow the same rules – and are run by private companies instead of the government.

This hour of Reveal investigates medical negligence in this parallel private prison system for immigrants. We also expose the shift in criminal justice policy that helped fill up these prisons.

Feb 08, 2016
Pumped on Trump
50:57

We’ve heard a lot from Republican candidate Donald Trump since he announced his bid for the presidency. With his celebrity lifestyle and made-for-reality-TV personality, some people didn’t take Trump’s campaign seriously – but his polling numbers aren’t a joke, and he is seriously in the lead.

Trump is buoyed by a rising legion of supporters: people who want to help Trump make America not only great again, but “bigger, better and stronger.”

This hour of Reveal will delve into the hearts and minds of these Trump supporters. Who are they? Why do they support Trump? And if The Donald doesn’t get the Republican nomination for president, who will they turn to next – if anyone?

We sent a team of reporters and producers out to Trump events to find the answers to some of these questions. We also teamed up with a polling group, YouGov out of Stanford University, to find out even more about the people who support Trump – like where they live and what issues are most important to them. Some of the results will surprise you – they surprised us.

Feb 01, 2016
Do not drink: The water crisis in Flint, Michigan
51:00

The economically depressed city of Flint, Michigan, is making headlines across the country because there’s something in its water that shouldn’t be there.

You may have heard about the problems in Flint: about how the tap water can be brownish, stinky, funny-tasting. After denying there was a problem for more than a year, state and city officials finally admitted it – there was too much lead in the water.

On this hour of Reveal, you’re going to hear the whole story of how people in Flint went from trusting their tap water to fearing it. And thanks to Michigan Radio’s Lindsey Smith, who produced an incredible documentary called “Not Safe to Drink,” we dive right in.

Jan 25, 2016
Cat Fight
51:00

We live in a country of cat lovers. About 80 million cats live in our homes today, but what about the other 80 million living outside of the house?

In this episode of Reveal, we take a look at two cats whose fates diverged – one, an invasive predator, is encouraged to thrive and hunt; the other, a native wildcat, is being hunted and trapped.

Jan 18, 2016
Decoding discrimination in America’s temp industry
51:00

Business is booming for staffing agencies across the country – the temporary jobs sector is one of our fastest-growing industries in terms of employment. But there’s another side to the temp world: a blatant system of racial discrimination that evokes practices of America’s pre-civil rights era.

This hour of Reveal will explore this type of discrimination and look at how it’s affecting people around the country. We begin in Tennessee with two sisters, born in Russia, who ended up recruiting workers for a temp agency. And they claim some people were hired not based on their résumé, but on the color of their skin.

Jan 11, 2016
When working conditions are ripe for change
16:54

About one-third of the fresh tomatoes sold in the U.S. come from Florida. Mainly migrant workers from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean hand-pick the tomatoes in or near the town of Immokalee, just north of the Everglades.

For decades, Florida tomato pickers endured some of the worst working conditions in America. Beatings, rape and sexual harassment were common problems. Often, there were no toilets, shade or clean drinking water. Work hours were unpredictable and wages were extremely low. There were even cases of slavery.

In 1993, the Coalition of Immokalee Workers began to organize. At first, it focused on ending slavery in the fields, then expanded its work to deal with wage theft and abuse. In 2001, it launched the Fair Food Program. The group brought about change by pressuring large retailers to use their market muscle to demand higher standards from suppliers.

Host Al Letson and producer Jonathan Miller of Homelands Productions travel to the Sunshine State to tell us what happened after the tomato workers organized, pushed for reform and got the public to help.  

Dec 22, 2015
From the battlefields to the strawberry fields
12:36

Strawberries used to be a delicacy. The fruit is fragile, prone to disease and requires a very particular climate to grow.

But these days, you can buy strawberries almost anywhere at any time – including in Barrow, Alaska, a polar community with an average annual temperature of -9 degrees Fahrenheit.

So how did strawberries become so ubiquitous, and what are the consequences for farmworkers? The answer takes us on a meandering tour back to World War I, the Hawaiian pineapple fields of the 1930s and a savvy marketing campaign in the 1970s and ’80s.

Dec 15, 2015
The fowl business of salmonella
19:52

In the U.S., even chicken that has passed all federal food safety requirements still can make people sick.

This proved true in 2013 after a massive salmonella outbreak linked to Foster Farms sickened hundreds of people in 29 states.

But even with reforms in the works, the U.S. government still allows companies to sell chicken that is infected with salmonella.

So how can you avoid it? Do you abstain from buying factory farm chickens and go for the local ones? How about raising chickens in your own backyard? Reporter Katharine Mieszkowski and producer Jillian Weinberger take us on a salmonella road trip and expose a massive gap in our food safety system.

Dec 08, 2015
The Wright family’s all right (Lakeview Extra)
08:27

Part 4 of 4: Our Lakeview series ends with one family that sent their son to the facility as a last resort. Jim and Ginger Wright pulled their son Derek from the facility last winter. We sit down with the Wrights to find out how their son is doing now.

To help Reveal deliver you even more investigative journalism, on the air and in your podcast feed, support us on Kickstarter.  Visit https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cir/help-reveal-go-weekly

Dec 01, 2015
A special message from our sound designer and engineer
01:37

Lead sound designer and engineer Jim Briggs makes Reveal sound as good as it does. He steps out from behind the editing equipment to tell you why you should support our Kickstarter by December 10 (hint: you can get a uniquely designed reward just from him).

Support us here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cir/help-reveal-go-weekly.

Nov 26, 2015
Meet the Brennicks
18:29

Part 3 of 4: Lakeview NeuroRehabilitation Center originally was part of a national chain of brain injury rehab centers called New Medico, owned by Charles Brennick of Boston. Nursing-home abuse investigator Sue Bessette teamed up with former New Medico patient Lucy Gwin in the early ’90s to uncover fraud and abuse across a $10 billion industry – leading to an FBI investigation.  

We look for answers about why and how the Brennicks are still in business, heading to the swamps of Wauchula, Florida, to visit with Charles’ son, Joseph, at his brain injury rehab center, the Florida Institute for Neurologic Rehabilitation.

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To help Reveal deliver you even more investigative journalism, on the air and in your podcast feed, support us on Kickstarter.  Visit https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cir/help-reveal-go-weekly

Nov 24, 2015
Video: Support our Kickstarter to bring you more ‘Reveal’ episodes
0:00

We’re launching a Kickstarter to help us bring you more investigative reporting, with our show going weekly starting in January.  Check it out at http://ow.ly/UTJva

Nov 21, 2015
Inappropriate love triangle blossoms at rehab
15:46

Part 2 of 4: We travel back to the late 1990s with the story of another Lakeview patient, Amy Mueller, then a teenager, and her romantic relationship with at least one staff member.

Mueller’s family later sued the facility for billing for services that never were provided and putting her in danger.

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To help Reveal deliver you even more investigative journalism, on the air and in your podcast feed, support us on Kickstarter.  Visit https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cir/help-reveal-go-weekly

Nov 17, 2015
Exposing the horrors on The Mountain
21:50

Part 1 of 4: Reporter Jack Rodolico spent a year uncovering allegations of patient abuse and fraudulent billing practices at Lakeview NeuroRehabilitation Center – like charging Medicaid for changing channels on a TV. Along the way, he encountered a crusading mother who made secret recordings of state regulators in a desperate attempt to get someone to help her daughter.

Please take our listener survey! We want to know your thoughts about the show: visit surveynerds.com/reveal.

Nov 10, 2015
[Update] Assault on justice
18:14

When you hear the charge “assaulting a police officer,” you might assume that an officer has been hurt or injured while serving the community. But in Washington, D.C., you might not be able to take so-called APOs at face value.

In this story from May, reporter Patrick Madden of WAMU found that the charge of assaulting a police officer, which is meant to shield police from danger, also can be used as a tactic against citizens.

Students at the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University and WAMU researched 2,000 cases to see where most APO charges go down in D.C. Check out the map they made to see where these arrests took place. Notice that concentrations occur in the central part of the urban area and in predominantly black neighborhoods in the Southeast.

Nine out of 10 people charged were African American, even though half of the district’s population is black.

Nov 03, 2015
Water bills bleeding them dry
10:08

We’ve talked a lot about areas without water and the problems that arise, but here’s a look at another side of it.

New York City gets more than 50 inches of rain and snow a year, but the cost of its water has almost tripled over the past 15 years.

Reporters Kat Aaron and Matthew Schuerman of public radio station WNYC explain why and take a look at how these soaring rates are affecting low-income New Yorkers.

Oct 27, 2015
Video: The Secret History of American Surveillance
0:00

Few remember that the origins of our modern American surveillance state were forged over 115 years ago, half a world away in the Philippine Islands.

To read more visit: http://tinyurl.com/q2mbzbf

Credits

Director and Producer

Ariane Wu

Narrator

Hilary Hess

Motion Graphics Artist

Richard Levien

Sound Mixer

Christopher Galipo

Music courtesy of Audio Network

“Queensland Drover” by Mark Johns

“Parade” by Chris Blackwell

“Squirrel Picnic” by David O’Brien

“Snare Drum March” by Patrick Hawes

“Battle Call” by Patrick Hawes

“Neutrinos” by Paul Mottram

“Towers of Glass” by Matt Hill

“Devious Thoughts” by Paul Mottram

Additional music

“Action Man” by Terry Keating and Warren Slye

PostScript theme music

Jason Kick

Executive Producer

Amanda Pike

Editorial Directors

Robert Salladay

Amy Pyle

Images and footage courtesy of

VideoBlocks

Electronic Frontier Foundation

Shutterstock

Beachfront B-Roll

Peter Menchini

Democracy Now

“This Week With George Stephanopoulos”

Fox News

Yale University Art Gallery

Library of Congress

National Archives and Records Administration

AT&T

University of California Libraries Internet Archive

University of Michigan

U.S. Army

911archive

C-SPAN 2

Flickr user Stephen Melkisethian

U.S. Air Force

IBM Archives

Special thanks to

Ali Winston

Yasha Levine

Fernando Diaz

Oct 22, 2015
Growing hay a world away
11:34

What happens when your ancient desert springs start drying up? Why, you find another source, of course!

Saudi Arabia is almost out of water. For decades, farmers drilled for groundwater to transform their deserts into irrigated fields suitable for crops. Note how the area in the Wadi As-Sirhan Basin changed between 1987 and 2000.

Reveal’s Nathan Halverson and Ike Sriskandarajah don’t travel quite that far to get the story.

Last year, Saudi Arabia’s largest dairy company, Almarai, bought 9,600 acres of land in a desert in the American Southwest. The company then converted it into hay fields to feed – get this – cows back home.

Oct 20, 2015
But not a drop to drink…
14:32

Clean drinking water isn’t a problem most of us worry about in the United States today. But there are still communities in our country where water is brown or green out of the tap. It’s got stuff floating in it. It smells bad.

Neena Satija of our partner The Texas Tribune heads to two Texas towns that sit along the Mexican border to meet with residents who’ve fought for drinkable tap water for decades.

Oct 13, 2015
Secret super water users
13:43

Got green? Those with money sure do – both in their pockets and around their houses in the form of sprawling lawns and towering hedges.

If you didn’t know California was experiencing a historic drought, driving through the streets of Beverly Hills and Bel Air would only keep you in the dark. The area is lush and dazzling. Streets bask in the healthy green glow of the abundant trees, grass and plants growing carelessly about.

Unsurprisingly, some of the state’s biggest known water guzzlers live here.

But finding out exactly who they are isn’t easy. Reveal reporters go on the hunt for extreme water bingers in the rain-starved Golden State. These super-users are living in homes consuming millions of gallons of water a year.

So who are these guzzlers? And why are they allowed to keep their yards green?

Oct 06, 2015
Matching the lost and the found
13:35

Throughout this month, we’ve heard about NamUs, a federal database of missing and unidentified persons. This system allows law enforcement agencies and amateur sleuths to search and gather information about active cases. Networks and communities of volunteer detectives have grown online – sleuthing on their own time.

In an effort to make matching those lost and found easier, Reveal’s data team created a new tool using data from NamUs.

Reveal’s Ike Sriskandarajah visits with web sleuth Polly Penwell in Michigan.  She helped solve a cold case using a very basic home setup.  And Senior News Applications Developer Michael Corey explains the new Reveal tool that might help sleuths solve more of these cases in the future.

Sep 29, 2015
Buried in Blue Earth
17:36

In 1980, 18-year-old Michelle Busha left home and never returned. It’s every family’s worst nightmare and it’s a circumstance so tragic that it touched a complete stranger thousands of miles away.

Reporter Michael Montgomery meets two women who didn’t know each other, but each had a deep connection to the young woman who disappeared 35 years ago.

Solving the case was bittersweet. Both women found the answers they were seeking, but one had to face the reality of her sister’s chilling death.

Sep 22, 2015
Unidentified migrants reach undignified end
19:55

Out of the thousands of unidentified bodies scattered across the country, many are found in South Texas, where migrants are crossing into the U.S. from Mexico.

Crossing the border is treacherous – it’s hot and there’s a lot of ground to cover. Dehydration and heatstroke claim many who try to make the trek. And dying in Brooks County means that sometimes, their bodies aren’t found, let alone identified.

So what happens to these remains? Host Al Letson and producer Delaney Hall travel to the border to find out, and they interview The Investigative Fund’s John Carlos Frey about what he learned while reporting this story.

Sep 15, 2015
She never left Harlan alive
16:47

In 1969, a young woman was stabbed to death in Harlan, Kentucky, and buried without a name.

To many locals, she’s known as “Mountain Jane Doe.” To Darla Jackson and Todd Matthews, her case deserved a little extra digging.

We follow Darla and Todd into the wooded hills of Harlan to exhume the body of Mountain Jane Doe. What they end up finding is unexpected.

Sep 08, 2015
Change in the air in Virginia
16:31

In April, we learned that schoolchildren in Virginia have been referred to police at almost three times the national rate – and most of these students have special needs or are African American.

Susan Ferriss of The Center for Public Integrity introduced us to Kayleb Moon-Robinson, a sixth-grader with autism who was charged with disorderly conduct and felony assault based on incidents at school.

We catch up with Kayleb and take a look at the impact this story has made since it first aired. Local and state officials now are re-examining how children are dealt with in schools.

Aug 25, 2015
The Con Man and His Mentor
13:04

Do you remember Ted Liming? He’s a truck driver from North Dakota we met in an earlier episode. He was looking for a safe place to invest a substantial sum of money and stumbled upon secureinvestment.com when searching online for, well, secure investments. Spoiler alert: It was a scam.

Ted’s not-so-excellent adventure into the world of foreign exchange trading led David Evans, an investigative reporter for Bloomberg Markets Magazine, to another story that’s affected thousand of people and, more specifically, their wallets.

Evans takes us to the Caribbean, where we meet Jared Martinez – a character who oozes swagger and runs the largest school for forex trading in the U.S. We also meet one of his  former students, who ended up in jail for bilking investors out of millions of dollars.

Aug 18, 2015
Shunned and Shamed by Jehovah’s Witnesses
23:51

In February, we heard about at the culture of secrecy within the Jehovah’s Witnesses. Reveal reporter Trey Bundy told us how the Witnesses’ religious hierarchy was keeping allegations of  child sexual abuse from law enforcement and how the organization’s policies allowed perpetrators to strike again and again.

Since our story aired, Bundy has fielded hundreds of messages from people relaying their experiences as Jehovah’s Witnesses. These messages reinforce our findings that sexual abuse is not an isolated problem within the religious organization.

Bundy also travels to Oklahoma to meet a woman who says she was shunned by the Jehovah’s Witnesses after accusing an elder of abusing her.

Aug 11, 2015
Video: The Buzz(kill) about Caffeine
0:00

Caffeine is arguably the most popular drug in America. But what do you really know about it? This short video explains how the beloved stimulant became the key ingredient in top-selling soft drinks and how those drinks came to be blended with foreign-made synthetic caffeine. It also examines the regulatory mess surrounding this potentially lethal drug in the U.S.

To read the full story go to: https://www.revealnews.org/article/the-buzzkill-about-caffeine/

Director, Producer and Editor

Ariane Wu

Based on reporting by

Murray Carpenter

Narrator

Al Letson

Additional Narration

David Gill

Illustrator

Anna Vignet

Production Assistants

Anna Vignet

Greta Mart

Motion Graphics Artists

Sam Ward

Richard Levien

Colorist

Gary Coates

Sound Mixer

Christopher Galipo

Music

“For a Good Catch”

“Magnetically”

“String Along”

“The Hornet’s Nest”

– Courtesy of De Wolfe Music

“Circus-Fanfare”

“And Hey Presto”

“Unstoppable”

– Courtesy of Audio Network

PostScript Theme Music Composer

Jason Kick

Executive Producer

Amanda Pike

Editorial Director

Robert Salladay

Images and footage from

U.S. Treasury Department

Eastman Classroom Films

News On The Street

Washington University Archives

Aug 06, 2015
The long tale of the short-handled hoe
07:02

We take a look back at a historic battle over workers’ rights in California. It all started in “the salad bowl of the world” – aka Salinas Valley – and the fight was over a simple tool: the short-handled hoe.

This smaller hoe looks like a standard gardening tool, but workers had to bend over pretty far to use it. Doing that kind of work for 12 hours a day caused debilitating and permanent back damage for those tasked with maintaining huge fields of vegetables.

This short hoe – or “cortito” in Spanish – became a symbol of cruelty, oppression and literally back-breaking labor. That is, until a lawyer in the early 1970s took on big ag, and the story of “el cortito” was heard before the California Supreme Court.

Music: “The Migrant’s Song” by Peter Krug, performed by Danny Valdez and Augustin Lira, from “Broadside Ballads, Vol. 4: The Time Will Come and Other Songs from Broadside Magazine” (Folkways Records)

Aug 04, 2015
Disposable workers in Asia
12:05

Today, there are millions of electronics workers around the world – especially in places where labor laws are even less strict than those in the U.S.

Since the 1980s, the electronics industry largely has moved overseas in search of cheaper labor. Reporter Sandra Bartlett went to South Korea, where one of the largest electronics companies, Samsung, is headquartered. There, a movement has sprung up to investigate the illnesses and deaths among Samsung factory employees.

Last year, Samsung publicly apologized and promised to compensate sick workers and the families of those who died. But the company didn’t acknowledge that the work environment was responsible.

Samsung is keeping its manufacturing process a secret even as its expansion grows in new countries such as Vietnam.

Jul 28, 2015
Toxic tech in America
10:00

In 1975, when she was 18 years old, Yvette Flores got her first job. She helped assemble delicate parts to make some of the first supermarket checkout scanners.

When her son Mark was born five years later, he had severe disabilities. It took 30 years for her to connect her son’s problems to that first job. Yvette discovered that she’d been inhaling and ingesting lead all day in the factory where she worked. And she’s not the only one. An occupational medicine doctor who treated workers in Silicon Valley in the 1970s and ’80s tells us about the widespread illnesses and injuries he saw – and how hard it was to get companies to open up about what was making his patients sick.

Reveal reporter Laura Starecheski partnered up with Jim Morris from The Center for Public Integrity to bring us Yvette and Mark’s story and also alert us to an alarming practice: Chemical exposures that never would be acceptable outside a plant’s fence are not only tolerated, but legal, inside the plant.

Jul 21, 2015
Nuclear Bomb Industry Booming
18:53

Seventy years ago this week, the U.S. Army detonated the first atomic bomb in New Mexico. To mark this anniversary, we look at where America’s nuclear program is today and whether the U.S. is living up to its promises not to increase its nuclear capabilities.

Jul 14, 2015
Rape on the Night Shift
28:27

Thousands of office janitors work at night, alone, sweeping up the crumbs from our sandwiches, taking out the garbage and scrubbing bathrooms. Many are immigrants – some undocumented – and many are women. With these conditions, they are particularly vulnerable to sexual violence.

In this segment, we hear from members of a tiny nonprofit who try to root out abuses in the cleaning industry; women who’ve sued janitorial companies for failing to protect them from rape and harassment; and an accused rapist who has run his own cleaning company.

This story is a part of a collaborative 18-month investigation with FRONTLINE, Univision, the Investigative Reporting Program at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and KQED.

Jul 07, 2015
Video: Man-made earthquakes: Fact or fiction?
0:00

Earthquakes in Oklahoma used to be something of a rarity, but a few years ago, that began to change. Starting in 2009, the number of quakes began to increase. By 2014, the state was experiencing three times as many quakes as California.

What’s going on? This short video explains why this is happening across the U.S. and who scientists think the culprits are.

—-

Credits

Director and Producer

Ariane Wu

Based on reporting by Michael Corey and Joe Wertz

Narrator

Duncan Heath

Additional narration

Queena Kim

Video Editor

Ariane Wu

Production Assistants

Anna Vignet

Greta Mart

Animation by

Naissance

Sound Mixer

Christopher Galipo

Music

“News Flash”

“Walking Man”

“Outlaw Trail”

“Hobo in the Hood”

“Desert Drop”

“Vampire Strut”

“Rockabilly Jo”

Courtesy of Audio Network

Executive Producer: Amanda Pike

Editorial Director: Robert Salladay

Images and footage from

U.S. Energy Information Administration

Whitehouse.gov

Oklahoma Geological Survey

Oklahoma Corporation Commission

“Superman: Electric Earthquake” (1942)

The FracTracker Alliance

California Department of Conservation Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources

Northern California Earthquake Data Center and UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory

California Geological Survey

United States Geological Survey

Jul 03, 2015
Oklahoma’s man-made earthquakes
16:33

In 2014, Oklahoma had more than three times as many earthquakes as California, and this year, the state is on track for even more. A lot of them are small, but some towns are seeing a quake almost every day, and seismologists warn that large and damaging earthquakes are becoming more likely. The government in the Sooner State has only recently acknowledged the scope of the oil and gas industry’s role in the problem.

 

Reveal’s Michael Corey and Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma hop in a car and drive toward the epicenter of two earthquakes that had just struck near the town of Guthrie, Oklahoma, to see the after-effects for themselves and talk to the people who live in the area. Are residents troubled by or numb to the earthquakes?

 

In this story, the reporters travel throughout the state speaking to experts, helping us gain a better picture of Oklahoma’s man-made earthquakes.

If you want to see how the number of earthquakes has grown over the years in Oklahoma compared with the rest of the country, check out our interactive map at revealnews.org.

Jun 30, 2015
The father of fracking, and tracking oil trains
18:26

In a story produced in collaboration with Marketplace from American Public Media, we explore the history of hydraulic fracturing – aka fracking – in North Texas, where the technologies that are now employed in the Bakken were born.

Host Al Letson talks to Marketplace energy reporter Scott Tong about George Mitchell, a man many refer to as the father of fracking. Tong did a rare interview with Mitchell a few months before he died in 2013.

Also: Washington is one of the biggest oil refining states in the country, with a million and a half barrels heading its way each week by rail. And while America’s energy boom means cheaper oil, shipping massive amounts of crude can lead to another kind of boom: So far this year, five oil trains have derailed and caught fire.

BNSF Railway, one of the largest freight railroad networks in North America, has lobbied the state Legislature to kill any bills that would encourage or require increased transparency. The company says it’s an issue of national security and “proprietary business information.” But some residents and public officials want more information.

KUOW reporter Ashley Ahearn of the public radio collaboration EarthFix meets a citizen who’s leading the fight for transparency on the part of railroads. Last year, Dean Smith gathered volunteers in his community and founded the Snohomish County Train Watch, a group that counts trains – around the clock. Watchers take shifts and note what the trains are carrying and what time they passed through.

In this story, Ahearn joins Smith on a train-spotting shift to see how it works.

Jun 23, 2015
Death in the Bakken
19:13

The recent oil boom in North Dakota – driven by hydraulic fracturing and advances in technology – is a big reason why the U.S. is now the world’s leader in combined oil and natural gas production.

But the boom in the Bakken shale, which stretches over North Dakota, Montana and parts of Canada, has made it one of the deadliest places for workers in the country.

Reveal reporter Jennifer Gollan headed to North Dakota to examine the story of one young man’s tragic death, exposing the dangers that oil workers face. Her investigation found that deeply entrenched corporate practices and weak federal oversight have inoculated major energy producers against responsibility when workers are killed or injured, while shifting the blame to others. No energy operators that lease or own wells have been cited for worker deaths in North Dakota or Montana over the last five years, Reveal’s analysis found.

Oil companies offer financial incentives to workers for speeding up production – potentially jeopardizing their safety – and shield themselves through a web of companies to avoid paying the full cost of settlements with affected workers and their families when workers are injured or killed.

Jun 16, 2015
Public evidence in private hands
11:34

Body cameras can capture evidence against criminals, with a potentially exonerating or damning record of evidence for law enforcement officers.

In the wake of the events in Ferguson, Missouri, more than 7,000 police agencies around the country have purchased body cameras with the help of federal grants.

Reveal reporters Ali Winston and Amy Walters take a look inside the camera, at the evidence trail left behind. Because where there are a lot of video cameras, there’s a lot of information – and money.

Winston and Walters also head to Seattle to find out how Taser International Inc., an industry leader in body cameras, plans to manage this massive cloud of video data.

Jun 02, 2015
Eyes on Cops
15:49

Smartphones have turned virtually everyone into a filmmaker. This has meant that many people’s reaction to an event large or small is to whip out their phone and start recording. So what separates these everyday citizens from people who consider themselves “cop watchers?”

Cop watchers are a loose band of activists who consider it their job to police the police. They’ll show up at traffic stops or hang out in areas with a large police presence so they can document the activities of police.

You now can find cop-watching groups in dozens of cities across the country. But some officers are starting to push back, saying these groups interfere with their jobs and endanger the public.

Neena Satija, who works for Reveal and The Texas Tribune, takes us to places where tensions between cops and cop watchers have started to flare up. In Texas cities like Austin and Dallas, activists are being arrested, and police departments are asking state lawmakers to step in.

May 26, 2015
Rodney King’s accidental ally
09:50

On March 3, 1991, a black man was pulled over in Los Angeles – and what happened next showed the entire nation what police brutality looks like.

George Holliday, a man just looking to test a new video camera, ended up capturing a critical 81 seconds of Rodney King’s life. Eighty-one seconds in which Los Angeles police officers hit King more than 50 times with fists and batons. King’s beating is one of the most famous acts of police violence in modern American history.

Our host Al Letson talks to Holliday, the man behind the camera that night 24 years ago. We hear about what happened that evening, how he feels about the role he played in pioneering citizen journalism and his thoughts on capturing police misbehavior on video today.

Special thanks to Möbius for use of their track “Overheated” for this episode.

May 19, 2015
Assault on justice
20:50

When you hear the charge “assaulting a police officer,” you might assume that an officer has been hurt or injured while serving the community. But in Washington, D.C., you might not be able to take so-called APOs at face value.

Reporter Patrick Madden of WAMU found that the charge of assaulting a police officer, which is meant to shield police from danger, also can be used as a tactic against citizens.

 

May 12, 2015
Dirty shooting ranges poison police
17:00

As you’d expect, armed law enforcement officers are required to keep their sharp-shooting skills, well, sharp. This means they must spend time at firing ranges for routine training sessions.

But while firearms training is meant to keep both the police and the public safe, it actually poses a hazard to the officers themselves.

For over a year, The Seattle Times has been investigating how people shooting at dirty gun ranges across the U.S. have suffered from lead poisoning. Sometimes, they’ve lost feeling in their hands and feet. Other times, they’ve been too tired to get out of bed.

Police are especially at risk because they have to go to gun ranges to keep their jobs. We hear from a corrections officer who got sick, and we talk to the family of an officer who died after a weeklong training session. We also look at steps firing ranges can take to prevent lead exposure.

May 05, 2015