Write Your Screenplay Podcast

By Jacob Krueger

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A Podcast Republic user
 Jul 25, 2018

Description

Rather than looking at movies in terms of “two thumbs up” or “two thumbs down” Award Winning Screenwriter Jacob Krueger discusses what you can learn from them as a screenwriter. He looks at good movies, bad movies, movies we love, and movies we hate, exploring how they were built, and how you can apply those lessons to your own writing. More information and full archives at WriteYourScreenplay.com

Episode Date
Destroyer: How to Use Flashbacks in Your Script
27:55
<p>Learn from Destroyer how to use flashbacks in your script. We'll discuss the common pitfalls that can make flashbacks dangerous, and the questions you can ask yourself when using flashbacks to determine if your flashbacks are likely to make the structure of your script stronger, or to get in the way.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/destroyer-how-to-use-flashbacks-in-your-script/">Destroyer: How to Use Flashbacks in Your Script</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jan 10, 2019
MANDY: An Interview with Linus Roache
39:51
<p>Jake: I’m here with Linus Roache, a Golden Globe nominated actor that you probably recognize from Homeland, Vikings, Law and Order, Batman Begins, Chronicles of Riddick, Priest and a ton of other features and TV shows. Linus was just in Mandy with Nicolas Cage, so we’re going to be talking a little bit about that movie. And Linus is also a writer in […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/mandy-an-interview-with-linus-roache/">MANDY: An Interview with Linus Roache</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Dec 03, 2018
BlacKkKlansman: Adapting a True Life Story
25:20
<p>This week we’re going to be talking about BlacKkKlansman by Spike Lee, Charlie Wachtel, David Rabinowitz and Kevin Willmott. When I first went out to see BlacKkKlansman, my hope was that I was going to be able to do a podcast about how to write a movie for a political change— to talk about the confluence of race and politics […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/blackkklansman-adapting-a-true-life-story/">BlacKkKlansman: Adapting a True Life Story</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Oct 19, 2018
SUCCESSION PART 2: How To Write Subtext In Your Dialogue
26:14
<p>In the last podcast we looked at the engine of Succession. We looked at the way each episode was put together, and the way that all these characters come together in each episode to create the season. So today, rather than thinking globally, we’re going to think locally. Rather than looking at the big structure of the piece, we’re going […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/how-to-write-subtext-in-dialogue-succession-series/">SUCCESSION PART 2: How To Write Subtext In Your Dialogue</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 21, 2018
SUCCESSION vs ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT: The Series Engine
18:18
<p>This week we’re going to be talking about Succession. If you haven’t already seen the whole season, don’t worry. We aren’t going to give away any major spoilers. What we’re going to be looking at this week is the structure of Succession: the way that this piece is actually put together and the way the season is created so that […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/succession-series-engine-arrested-development/">SUCCESSION vs ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT: The Series Engine</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 21, 2018
HEREDITARY: The Power of the First & Last Image
23:59
<p>This week we’ll be talking about Hereditary written and directed by Ari Aster. I want to start by talking about the first image of this film. So, if you’re worried about spoilers, we will get to some spoilers later, but you can listen to the beginning of this podcast without concern. The first image of Hereditary is the most important […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/hereditary-first-image-last-image-screenplay/">HEREDITARY: The Power of the First & Last Image</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 10, 2018
DEADPOOL 2: Where Tone Meets Genre in Screenwriting
21:46
<p>This week, we are going to be looking at Deadpool 2 by Rhett Reese, Paul Wernick, and a new addition to the writing team, Ryan Reynolds. If you missed my podcast on the original Deadpool, you might want to check that out as well, because one of the things that is exciting about Deadpool 2 is the way it manages to […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/deadpool-2-podcast-tone-genre-screenwriting/">DEADPOOL 2: Where Tone Meets Genre in Screenwriting</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jun 28, 2018
The Hero Writes Itself: Interview with Katie Torpey
35:24
<p>Jake: I am here today with Katie Torpey, our newest teacher. She is teaching our TV Drama Classes, Write Your Screenplay I, Write Your Screenplay II, Write Your Screenplay III, and The Writing Lab. Welcome, nice to have you.  Katie: Thanks for having me, I am very excited. Jake: I would love to start off by talking a little bit about […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/screenwriting-hero-writes-itself-katie-torpey/">The Hero Writes Itself: Interview with Katie Torpey</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jun 05, 2018
A QUIET PLACE Part 2: Dialogue, Action & The Theme of Your Screenplay
25:43
<p>In the first installment of this podcast, we looked at A Quiet Place in relation to writing action and discussed how all of screenplay formatting really exists for one purpose: to isolate visual moments of action. By isolating visual moments of action we can hypnotize the reader into seeing, hearing, and feeling the story in their mind’s eye, rather than […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/a-quiet-place-dialogue-action-theme-screenplay/">A QUIET PLACE Part 2: Dialogue, Action & The Theme of Your Screenplay</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 21, 2018
Isle Of Dogs Vs. Roseanne – Writing For Political Change
21:28
<p>Please note, this podcast was recorded prior to the recent scandals surrounding Roseanne Barr. We have chosen to leave the podcast on our site because we feel it may have information that is valuable to writers. But the analysis was based upon what the show appeared to be after the airing of the pilot. As recent events have shown, rather […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/writing-stories-political-change/">Isle Of Dogs Vs. Roseanne – Writing For Political Change</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Apr 20, 2018
Nurturing The Inner Artist
49:51
<p>Jake: Hi, I’m Jacob Krueger, and thank you for tuning into a very special episode of The Write Your Screenplay Podcast. This is our 100th episode. I’m so incredibly excited, proud and grateful to all of the listeners that have made this possible for 100 episodes. So, I was thinking, “What am I going to do for my 100th episode?” […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/nurture-inner-artist-100th-episode/">Nurturing The Inner Artist</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Apr 04, 2018
BoJack Horseman: Breaking The Rules Of Structure
27:43
<p>This week we are going to be talking about BoJack Horseman, but we aren’t just going to be talking about the series, we are going to be talking about one very particular episode, and doing a really deep breakdown: Season 4, Episode 9 which is entitled Ruthie. A lot of the times when we talk about television, we talk about […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/bojack-horseman-breaking-structure/">BoJack Horseman: Breaking The Rules Of Structure</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Mar 23, 2018
The Florida Project: Structure Without Structure
26:34
<p>This week we are going to be talking about The Florida Project, by Sean Baker and Chris Bergoch. I am so excited to be talking about this film, especially a week after the Oscars, because this is a film that probably should have been competing for Best Picture. Bria Vinaite probably should have been competing for Best Actress, and Sean […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/florida-project-structure-storytelling/">The Florida Project: Structure Without Structure</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Mar 08, 2018
Find The Emotional Core Of Your Screenplay
27:29
<p>*Please note this interview was from 2018.  The dates for this year’s Screencraft Writer’s Summit in Atlanta is April 5 – 8.  If you want more information on who will be speaking you can visit their site at https://screencraft.org/atlanta/. Jake: This week, I am so excited to be doing something we’ve actually never done before on the podcast: we have two […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/doug-jung-star-strek-beyond/">Find The Emotional Core Of Your Screenplay</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Feb 20, 2018
An Interview With Sebastian Stan From I, Tonya
20:10
<p>Jake: This week I am with Sebastian Stan. Many of you have probably seen I, Tonya and Sebastian’s performance in that piece. We are going to have an interesting conversation with Sebastian, looking at I, Tonya from the perspective of an actor and also from the perspective of a writer. And we’re going to be discussing something that is important […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/sebastian-stan-i-tonya-interview/">An Interview With Sebastian Stan From I, Tonya</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jan 29, 2018
Top 10 Revision Tips Podcast: Part 2
28:46
<p>If you listened to the previous episode of this podcast, you have probably developed a pretty valuable approach for how to revise your screenplay. And you know that approach focuses on these 5 simple tips for revision: #1 – Never Rewrite Without a Goal #2 – Follow Your North Star #3 – Concentrate on What’s Working #4 – Stay Away […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/top-10-writing-tips-part-2/">Top 10 Revision Tips Podcast: Part 2</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jan 24, 2018
Top 10 Revision Tips Podcast: Part 1
24:49
<p>This is a time of year when many of us are thinking about rewrites, both on our scripts and on our lives. So what better time for a podcast about rewriting? Everyone knows that writing is rewriting. But for many writers, the rewriting process can feel so overwhelming that it’s hard to hold onto that creative spark that made the […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/top-10-writing-tips/">Top 10 Revision Tips Podcast: Part 1</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jan 13, 2018
COCO Podcast: Part 2 – The Power of Vignettes
25:12
<p>  COCO Podcast: Part 2 – The Power of Vignettes As we discussed in Part 1 of this podcast, sometimes it only takes one moment to find the structure of your script— the moment where everything comes into clarity and you understand where your movie is really going to live. For the writers of Coco, that place was the real […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/coco-podcast-remember-me/">COCO Podcast: Part 2 – The Power of Vignettes</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Dec 23, 2017
COCO Podcast: Part 1
13:39
<p> COCO Podcast: Part 1 – The Script & The Research By Jacob Krueger This week, we’re going to be discussing Coco, the new Pixar movie by Adrian Molina & Matthew Aldrich. If you haven’t seen this beautiful film yet, then you should run to the theatre immediately, because not only is it perhaps the most visually stunning Pixar film yet, […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/coco-podcast-script-research/">COCO Podcast: Part 1</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Dec 09, 2017
Stranger Things 2 Podcast: PART 2 -The Structure of Two Seasons
24:22
<p>Stranger Things 2 Podcast Part 2: The Structure of Two Seasons By Jacob Krueger In last week’s Stranger Things 2 Podcast, we talked about the way a TV pilot starts up the engine of a series, and the challenges, especially in a TV Drama series like Stranger Things where everything changes at the end of the first season, of getting […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/stranger-things-2-podcast-pt-2/">Stranger Things 2 Podcast: PART 2 -The Structure of Two Seasons</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Nov 17, 2017
Stranger Things 2 Podcast Pt.1
16:26
<p>Stranger Things 2 Podcast: Part 1: Primary & Secondary Structure By Jacob Krueger This week we are going to be looking at Stranger Things, Season 2. And don’t worry if you haven’t seen the whole season, because for this podcast to be valuable, all you need to watch is the first episode. And I’ll save the big spoilers for the […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/stranger-things-podcast-p1/">Stranger Things 2 Podcast Pt.1</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Nov 10, 2017
Mindhunter Podcast
41:55
<p>MINDHUNTER: Writing For David Fincher Interview With Staff Writer & JK Studio Student Pamela Cederquist Live from ITVFEST By Jacob Krueger Jake:  Hello everybody thanks for joining us. This is an exciting event for me for a couple of different reasons. As a lot of you know, we are up here at  ITVfest in Vermont, hosting a retreat for our […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/mindhunter-podcast/">Mindhunter Podcast</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Oct 20, 2017
Mother! Podcast
42:00
<p>Mother! By Jacob Krueger Before we get started with this week’s podcast, I want to take a moment to remind you that you still have a few days left to register for our Annual TV Writing Retreat, October 11-15 in Manchester Vermont. This is our biggest event of the year. We bring our entire faculty– including Jerry Perzigian, former showrunner […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/mother-podcast/">Mother! Podcast</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Oct 07, 2017
War for the Planet of The Apes Podcast with Writer Mark Bomback
42:26
<p>War for the Planet of The Apes Podcast with Writer Mark Bomback By Jacob Krueger JAKE: Today I’m really excited to be hosting my friend Mark Bomback as a special guest on this podcast. As you probably know if you are a listener, Mark is the writer behind the latest two installments of the Planet of the Apes trilogy, Dawn […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/war-for-planet-of-the-apes-podcast/">War for the Planet of The Apes Podcast with Writer Mark Bomback</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 21, 2017
Annabelle: Creation Podcast
23:29
<p>Annabelle: Creation &  The First 10 Pages of Your Script By Jacob Krueger This week we’re going to be discussing Annabelle: Creation, directed by David F. Sandberg and written by Gary Dauberman. Normally, since this is a screenwriting podcast, I don’t talk a lot about directors. But this is a case of a good director taking a struggling script, and […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/annabelle-creation-podcast/">Annabelle: Creation Podcast</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 15, 2017
How To Write A Web Series
45:22
<p>How To Write A Web Series By Jacob Krueger   Jake: This week we are on with Karin Partin, and we are going to be talking about Web Series, which is something I haven’t talked about yet on the podcast. Karin teaches our Web Series Writing Classes here at Jacob Krueger Studio and has a lot to say about Web […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/how-to-write-a-web-series-podcast/">How To Write A Web Series</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 08, 2017
The Big Sick Podcast
24:43
<p>The Big Sick: How To Adapt a True Life Story By Jacob Krueger This week we are going to be talking about The Big Sick by Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani. I am excited to talk about The Big Sick not just because it was a successful film, but also because it allows me to talk about a topic […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/big-sick-podcast/">The Big Sick Podcast</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 24, 2017
More than one main character
20:06
<p> "...There’s no doubt that some of the most successful movies ever, from Dead Poets Society to Little Miss Sunshine, have more than one main character. And at the same time, there are genuine risks when we start telling a story from the point-of-view of more than one main character. In this podcast, Award Winning Screenwriter Jacob Krueger shows you how to write a script with more than one main character and how to avoid the pitfalls when building this kind of complicated screenplay structure..."</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/more-than-one-main-character-podcast/">More than one main character</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 15, 2017
Atomic Blonde
29:58
<p> "...For all its many structural problems, Atomic Blonde does succeed in its extraordinary fight sequences for the same reason that Iron Man succeeds: because the writer knows that guns are no fun.</p> <p>If Iron Man is going to work, you’ve got to get him out of the all-powerful suit. And if Atomic Blonde is going to work, you’ve got to get the guns out of the hands of both the good guys and the bad guys. Because the guns are just too darn easy to use-- too darn easy to kill with-- if they’re used properly.</p> <p>Exciting action sequences don’t come from having the all-powerful weapon-- but from having the challenging weapon; having the knife, having the high heel, having the hand to hand combat, having the object that isn't meant to be fought with.</p> <p>So if you want to write a great action sequence you’ve got to make the most of every location and every object inside that location.</p> <p>Look at the location of your scene and ask yourself; what are all the objects that are available to you? What are all the objects that have never before been used in a fight sequence? And how can you use those objects in the wrong way? How can you surprise the expectations of the characters?</p> <p>How can you force the character to show who they are, to show their own ingenuity, to show their own badass-ness?</p> <p>You almost need to think of each of these challenging locations like a video game set--where each location comes with its own unique challenges, own unique pitfalls, many, many exciting ways to die-- and where everything is either an aid or an obstacle to the character getting what they want. Where every object gets used in the wrong way in order to create the most exciting action sequences possible..."</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/atomic-blonde-podcast/">Atomic Blonde</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 09, 2017
DUNKIRK PODCAST: Dunkirk vs. Saving Private Ryan
29:51
<p>Dunkirk is a particularly interesting script to look at as screenwriters because it breaks pretty much every rule that you’ve likely been told about screenwriting.</p> <p>This is a war movie that (for the most part) isn't about winning but about losing.<br /> It’s a war movie in which planes don’t explode in spectacular fashion but rather disappear silently into the ocean. A movie in which fighter pilots are more concerned with running out of fuel than with bad-ass lines of dialogue.</p> <p>It’s an action movie in which the “good guys” don’t always win, and in which the bad guys can actually shoot.</p> <p>Dunkirk is a movie that flies in the face of every traditional notion of star-power and how it’s supposed to be used in a big budget feature.</p> <p>In fact, it features an actor in a starring role that we have never seen in a major motion picture before-- who spends most of the movie, from the very first scene, simply running away!</p> <p>So what is this screenplay built around that lets it break all of these rules and still succeed?</p> <p>On the simplest level, it’s because audiences don’t come to movies for the things that so many screenwriting teachers, so many producers, and so many writers spend so much time obsessing over.</p> <p>They don’t come for exposition. They don’t come for plot. They don’t come for nice “likeable” characters and memorable dialogue. They don’t come for formulaic structure or wrapping up everything with a bow.</p> <p>Audiences come to movies to go on a journey. To experience something that moves them emotionally, and transports them into a different kind of world…</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/dunkirk-podcast-dunkirk-vs-saving-private-ryan/">DUNKIRK PODCAST: Dunkirk vs. Saving Private Ryan</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 29, 2017
Spider-Man Homecoming Part 2
18:13
<p>"...and you can see, if you look at the structure of Spider-Man: Homecoming, that this isn't just the formula for creating a great bad guy, it is actually a way of creating an entire cast of unforgettable characters, and shaping the journeys they all go on in the script. </p> <p>Because every single one of these characters is really just a person with a really strong want and a really strong obstacle that forces them to reveal their really strong “how”—the way that they pursue the things that they want differently from everybody else..."</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/spider-man-homecoming-podcast-characters-and-structure/">Spider-Man Homecoming Part 2</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 18, 2017
Spider-Man Homecoming
17:16
<p>"...one of the cool things about movies and one of the cool things about life is that pretty much everybody in the world thinks that they are the hero and that other people are the bad guys.</p> <p>And that means that if we want to learn to write bad guys, we need to learn to step into their shoes, and see the world through their eyes-- to empathize with the people that we hate the most, the people that we don’t understand, the people that we think are horrible.</p> <p>There are people who I might feel exist only to antagonize me; there are people who might drive me crazy. But the truth of the matter is, if I stepped in and saw the universe through their eyes, they don’t think of themselves as the antagonist. They think of themselves as the hero...”</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/spider-man-homecoming-podcast/">Spider-Man Homecoming</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 12, 2017
The Craft of Screenwriting
32:48
<p>"...As a screenwriter, you need to see, hear and feel everything.</p> <p>And this is really the hardest part, because we have this urge to finish. And that urge to finish makes it really hard to actually see, hear and feel everything.</p> <p>We want to put a band aid on it.</p> <p>If you’ve ever had a fight with a loved one, you have probably had the same urge, “I want the fight to end.” And the desire for the fight to end doesn’t allow you to actually see, hear and feel what is actually going on. So you just keep glossing over it.</p> <p>And what happens is our little A.D.D. minds want us to escape, “okay over here…no, no, look over here, no, no, no look over here.” Because the other thing about seeing, hearing and feeling everything is it is scary. It is hard and it is scary..."</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/craft-of-screenwriting-podcast/">The Craft of Screenwriting</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 08, 2017
Plays vs Screenplays
26:33
<p>"...The process of writing a screenplay is different from writing a play in many essential ways. The first is the difference in the use of action.</p> <p>For screenwriters, action is the primary tool of structure. But for playwrights, the primary tool is dialogue.</p> <p>Don’t get me wrong. As a playwright, you need to visualize to some degree what is happening on the stage in order to really create your dialogue, in order to create the piece. But you don’t have to communicate that to anybody else. People don’t need to see your play in their mind like they do when reading a screenplay; they need to hear it, and they need to see the big elements.</p> <p>You get to rely on the director, because plays have this thing called rehearsals. </p> <p>It is crazy that rehearsals, for the most part, don’t exist in filmmaking. Even though some of the really great film directors do rehearse-- for example Francis Ford Coppola had a history of bringing the cast up to his estate to rehearse-- most film directors don’t rehearse at all. </p> <p>That’s for a very simple reason: stars cost about $20 million bucks..."</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/plays-vs-screenplays-podcast/">Plays vs Screenplays</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jun 23, 2017
Wonder Woman
21:24
<p>"...If you’ve been following my podcast, you know that I’ve been talking for some time about the desperate need for some smart people to start writing superhero movies.<br /> Action movies and superhero movies are the mythologies of our time-- millions of people see them, and as much as we might like to dismiss them as pure entertainment, the truth is, they irrevocably shape our view of the world, our children’s view of the world, the stories we tell ourselves about how to be our best selves, how to solve our problems, and what it means to be a hero.<br /> In this way, all action movies are political.<br /> Which is why it’s so darn nice to see a movie like Wonder Woman kicking ass at the box office…"</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/wonder-woman-structure-and-politics-action-blockbuster-podcast/">Wonder Woman</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jun 13, 2017
Alien Covenant
37:57
<p>"...As Dan O’Bannon has noted in interviews, the idea that actually spawned the original Alien, was the horror of rape and forced pregnancy-- a horror that so many women have gone through in their real world lives, but that few men could viscerally understand. So instead of going after women in an exploitative way, as so many horror movies have done, he wanted instead to go after the men-- to make that horror visceral to men, in a way that would make them, “Cross their legs” and feel what that is like.</p> <p>And you can see that the entire structure of the Alien franchise, from the structure of each individual script, to the horrifying visuals, to the rules of the universe, down all the way to the production design, the way the alien creatures burst from the chests (and later, in Alien: Covenant from the backs) of impregnated males, every single decision grows from that one simple idea. The deeply personal why that the writer is actually writing it.…"</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/alien-covenant-setting-up-a-trick-ending-podcast/">Alien Covenant</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jun 07, 2017
Chuck, Rocky & The Art of Adaptation
24:13
<p>"...hidden underneath this little character driven drama is actually an adaptation of three different stories. The first is the true life story of Chuck Wepner, a down and out fighter who went 15 rounds with Muhammad Ali and was the inspiration for Rocky. At the same time, it is also an adaptation of the Rocky film. It is a reimagining of Rocky-- stripped all of Sylvester Stallone’s American dream sugar coating. And at the same time, it’s also an adaptation of a third film: an old movie from 1962 called Requiem for a Heavyweight. So here we have this unassuming character driven independent feeling little film, that looks like just a simple biopic, but under the surface, there is actually something very complicated going on..."</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/chuck-rocky-the-art-of-adaptation-podcast/">Chuck, Rocky & The Art of Adaptation</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 24, 2017
Guardians of the Galaxy 2
30:37
<p>"...If you listened to my podcast on Guardians of the Galaxy, Volume 1, you know that I’m a huge fan of James Gunn’s writing. Not just for the brilliant execution of pretty much every moment of his scripts, but also for his overarching use of Theme to give real emotional resonance to these goofy action sci-fi comedies.</p> <p>So, it’s interesting to watch Guardians of the Galaxy, Volume 2 to see James Gunn both succeeding and struggling in the places he’s most strong…"</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/guardians-of-the-galaxy-volume-2-a-dance-between-the-head-and-the-heart-podcast/">Guardians of the Galaxy 2</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 17, 2017
How To Be a Latin Lover
22:11
<p>"...as anyone who’s written comedy professionally can tell you, comedy is not about making the audience laugh. Comedy is about looking inside of yourself and making yourself laugh. Looking inside of yourself and laughing at the things that have hurt you: turning pain into laughter. Or, to quote How To Be a Latin Lover, turning sadness into Salsa... "</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/how-to-be-a-latin-lover-turning-sadness-into-salsa-podcast/">How To Be a Latin Lover</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 10, 2017
Colossal
21:18
<p>"... As Colossal illustrates so powerfully, our job as screenwriters is actually very simple: to look inside of ourselves and find the emotions, the characters, the questions that live there. To look inside of ourselves, find the things that are true, and then externalize the internal. To take the things that live under the surface for us, and put them up on the screen where everyone can see them. Sometimes that means our job is to look at our own monsters. And sometimes that means our job is to claw past the monsters that we believe ourselves to be to find the beauty that lives under the surface…”</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/colossal-externalizing-the-internal-podcast/">Colossal</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 04, 2017
HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN YOUR SCREENPLAY IS DONE?
37:18
<p>One of the hardest things in screenwriting is knowing when you’re finished. Because art is so subjective, there’s always something that can be added, changed, improved or rewritten. Which is why, in the arts, we often don’t get the same feeling of completion that an accountant gets. Or that a salesperson gets. Or that a burger flipper gets. There’s no clear place where it is truly done where all the criteria have been met. </p> <p>So if we’re going to be successful, we need a different way of evaluating ourselves. We need a different type of criteria. In this podcast, Award Winning Screenwriter Jacob Krueger teaches you how to know when your screenplay is done, so you can build the successful career that you are looking for.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/how-do-you-know-when-your-screenplay-rewrite-is-done-podcast/">HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN YOUR SCREENPLAY IS DONE?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Apr 21, 2017
FIX YOUR PITCH!
28:37
<p>...Recently, we’re starting to see a shift with original movies like Get Out, La La Land, Manchester By The Sea, Moonlight and Arrival not only winning awards, but also hugely exceeding box office expectations. We’re also starting to see a trickle up effect, as companies like Amazon and Netflix have started entering the feature film market-- reinvigorating both writers and producers for the potential of a renaissance in feature films that can mirror the one in TV.</p> <p>Which is why Beauty and the Beast’s success scared the crap out of so many big budget writers and producers, especially on the cusp of what seemed like a potential tipping point in the Hollywood model...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/fix-your-pitch-podcast/">FIX YOUR PITCH!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Apr 13, 2017
Beauty and the Beast
17:06
<p>...Recently, we’re starting to see a shift with original movies like Get Out, La La Land, Manchester By The Sea, Moonlight and Arrival not only winning awards, but also hugely exceeding box office expectations. We’re also starting to see a trickle up effect, as companies like Amazon and Netflix have started entering the feature film market-- reinvigorating both writers and producers for the potential of a renaissance in feature films that can mirror the one in TV.</p> <p>Which is why Beauty and the Beast’s success scared the crap out of so many big budget writers and producers, especially on the cusp of what seemed like a potential tipping point in the Hollywood model...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/beauty-and-the-beast/">Beauty and the Beast</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Apr 06, 2017
GET OUT
15:14
<p>Horror movies are obviously about fear. But the best horror movies are not just about scaring the audience. They’re about scaring yourself. About scaring your characters. </p> <p>They’re about reaching into those unexplored corners of yourself left over from childhood traumas, bad life experiences, emotional and physical wounds, paranoias and nightmares that you know you should be over emotionally-- but somehow just aren’t. </p> <p>They’re about taking the childlike fears -- the nonsensical monsters under the bed-- we “know” we should dismiss -- the fears just too bizarre, too unlikely to be real-- and asking ourselves “what if they were?” </p> <p>Allowing our worst nightmares to come to life on the page, and in that way to come to peace-- not with the reality which we depict these stories-- but with the real life experiences-- the metaphors-- that spawned them.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/get-out/">GET OUT</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Mar 23, 2017
INCEPTION
39:17
<p>One of the truly interesting things about Inception is that its structure is actually based upon the principles of hypnosis. In fact, the organizing principles of the dream within a dream within a dream structure of the film almost perfectly mirror the classical hypnosis training you’d receive during a basic hypnosis certification class. </p> <p>Why is this important to you as a writer? Because as writers we all need organizing principles around which to structure our character’s journey…</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/inception-redux/">INCEPTION</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Mar 15, 2017
ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY – What’s Your Structural Focus?
23:06
<p>This week we’ll be looking at Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. Which is about as far as we can go from last installment’s Oscar Winner Manchester By The Sea. </p> <p>Rogue One is a silly joyride of a script, built with half-drawn characters, nonsensical plot twists, and a hundred other flaws. And yet, while clearly feeling a bit trifling in scope compared to the other Star Wars films, it nevertheless delivers in a big way what its audience is seeking.</p> <p>What’s also particularly interesting about Rogue One for screenwriters is the way it dives into a moment that is literally just a blip on the radar in Star Wars: Episode 4, and discovers there an entire backstory, worthy of a film itself.</p> <p>The ability to dive deep into any moment and find drama is one of the most exciting things about screenwriting (and one of the most important skills you can develop as a screenwriter). It means that truly anything-- even just a little question like “how did they find those Death Star plans anyway?” can become a movie, if you’re willing to look closely enough.</p> <p>But it’s also a reminder of how easy it is to get waylaid by backstory and exposition as we write and rewrite our scripts. Because as successful as Rogue One might be as a stand alone film, just imagine the effect it would have had if George Lucas had tried to squeeze all that exciting backstory into Star Wars: Episode 4, rather than just allowing the rebels to already have the plans.</p> <p>He would have been 100 pages into the script, and Darth Vader wouldn’t even have boarded that first starship. We wouldn’t have met Luke Skywalker. We wouldn’t know the real story we were following.</p> <p>So, we’re going to talk about what makes Rogue One work, and more importantly, we’re going to explore a concept called Structural Focus and how you can use it, both in writing and rewriting a script, to keep you focused on what really matters, whether that’s diving deep to find the drama in a specific moment, or keeping yourself above at a bird’s eye view, to keep your focus on the big picture of the story you’re telling.</p> <p>So what makes Rogue One work?</p> <p>If you’ve listened to my podcast on Star Wars: The Force Awakens then you know that these movies are being built more like a TV Series than like traditional Feature Films-- replicating the same Structural Engine over and over again to create a genre experience for the audience that feels the same as the one they got from previous episodes, but just different enough to make them feel like they got value for their money.</p> <p>The elements that compose this Engine are always the same. </p> <p>For the Star Wars franchise, it’s always some version of a Death Star, a McGuffin (usually plans) that everyone is trying to get their hands on, gorgeous space chase and fight sequences with super bad-ass technology, a juxtaposition of jaded “Hans Solo” and innocent “Luke Skywalker” characters working on the same team, a neurotic Droid, a complicated father/child relationship, and most importantly, a spiritual journey in relation to the Force.</p> <p>As Episodes 1, 2 & 3 proved, Star Wars movies abandon these elements at their peril. Successful episodes can shake up these elements and approach them in different ways, but if they ignore them, the films stop feeling like Star Wars and start feeling like something else.</p> <p>And of course if you’ve studied TV Drama, TV Comedy, or Web Series writing with us you know this is the exact same thing that happens in TV Series Writing.</p> <p>Rogue One is just another reconstitution of these same elements-- some, in a vague way, and some in a very specific way.</p> <p>At the core of the film are the characters we care about most. We don’t care about them because we haven’t seen them before. We care about them because we haven’t seen them this way before.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/rogue-one-a-star-wars-story-whats-your-structural-focus/"...
Mar 02, 2017
MANCHESTER BY THE SEA – Tests, Flashbacks & Characters That Don’t Change
33:41
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-manchester-sea-tests-flashbacks-characters-dont-change/">MANCHESTER BY THE SEA – Tests, Flashbacks & Characters That Don’t Change</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Feb 16, 2017
PODCAST – La La Land
14:24
<p>Like poems, screenplays are written in a highly focused format, where literally every word matters. Like poems, screenplays are not just about what happens, but about the rhythm and meter of how it happens. Like poems, screenplays invoke the visual and emotional senses, creating a kind of hypnotic state of hyper-awareness, in which words on the page start to take form and shape in your mind’s eye--playing out as if they were real on that little movie screen in your head. </p> <p>Like poems, screenplays exist within specific genres and forms with specific rules. And, to be successful, like poems, screenplays must both conform to and break with audience expectations in relation to those rules.</p> <p>And like poems, in the best screenplays, form = function. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-la-la-land/">PODCAST – La La Land</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Feb 08, 2017
PODCAST – NOT La La Land
40:47
<p>...I had planned this week to talk about La La Land. But with the new Executive Order barring refugees, immigrants and green card holders from our country, I want to use this podcast for something much more important.</p> <p>As filmmakers, writers, actors, directors, producers, executives, we have a sacred responsibility to our audience. Our films and TV shows shape the narrative of this country, and the belief systems of the hundreds of millions of people who see them. </p> <p>In many ways, the most powerful political movies and TV shows are often the ones that are not overtly political. Because it’s these shows that shape our worldview from the inside, sneaking past our defenses of what we think we believe, and slowly changing the way we view the world. </p> <p>Which is why I want to implore you, as writers, as directors, as producers, as actors, as artists, as filmmakers, to recognize the power of mainstream Hollywood movies and TV shows.</p> <p>These movies are not just popcorn movies. These TV shows are not just mind numbing entertainment. These movies and shows are the mythologies that shape our world. Working on us, through subtle repetition, to shape our view of the world. Powerful because they don’t appear political, because they don’t trigger our intellectual defenses.</p> <p>For years, we’ve dismissed crappy reality programming like The Apprentice as mindless entertainment, not as the storytelling that shapes the worldview of America. </p> <p>But in the wake of this election, we can now see the political power of even the silliest reality show, to shape the worldview of millions of people...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-not-la-la-land/">PODCAST – NOT La La Land</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Feb 02, 2017
PODCAST – The Final Challenge Check-In!
43:33
<p>...Great writing begins with getting your vulnerabilities out on the page-- the parts of you that you don’t normally express, the truths that you don’t normally look at, the characters that exist inside you: both the beautiful ones that you want to share with the world, and also the ones that scare or disgust you, who often represent parts of you that you don’t want to believe are possible, or that you’d never express in the outside world.</p> <p>That doesn’t mean that you are your characters. It means that you contain them. Some, in a form that is already integrated into your personality, and others in a form that is not integrated, or not expressed.</p> <p>Meditation experts talk about breath as a waveform, a symbol of the polarity of life-- the inhale and the exhale, the positive and the negative, the good and the bad, the yin and the yang, the dark and the light.</p> <p>And I’d like to suggest to you to think of writing as a waveform as well...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-the-final-challenge-check-in/">PODCAST – The Final Challenge Check-In!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jan 19, 2017
PODCAST – The Second Challenge Check-In!
21:51
<p>If you’ve been doing the challenge, you’ve probably noticed that there is often fear attached when going inside like this—even if it’s just for one page. </p> <p>You may experience this fear as inertia, a feeling of sluggishness, or just not wanting to. You may experience this fear as disconnected writing—feeling that the stuff you’re putting on the page doesn’t capture or reflect what’s really going on inside of you. You may feel like a part of you is locked up, and you don’t seem to have the key. Or you may be enjoying the heck out of the writing, but finding yourself fearing afterwards that the pieces aren’t going to come together.</p> <p>If you’re experiencing that fear, it’s a good sign. It means you need to keep writing. It means that you are digging in places that actually matter to you. Places that you don’t usually go, or parts of you that you don’t normally show. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-second-challenge-check-in/">PODCAST – The Second Challenge Check-In!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jan 12, 2017
PODCAST – First Challenge Check-In!
14:14
<p>When your judgment of your writing is based on fear, it has very little connection to reality. You may dismiss really brilliant writing as terrible, simply because you're afraid that other people aren’t going to like it. Or you may fall in love with scenes that are not working simply because they feel safe to you. </p> <p>There are a ton of ways to overcome these kinds of fears. </p> <p>It starts with remembering that many of these fears you have about your writing may not actually be real. </p> <p>Oftentimes we have expectations of ourselves as writers that are not fair. If you were taking your first violin lesson, you wouldn't expect to play Carnegie Hall. Yet for a lot of writers there’s so much pressure on making that first script-- that first scribbling, that first page-- something you can sell or something that can lead you to somewhere very specific.</p> <p>The result is that you never actually give yourself the chance to learn. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-first-challenge-check-in/">PODCAST – First Challenge Check-In!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jan 05, 2017
PODCAST – The 2017 Screenwriting Challenge
50:12
<p>We all do our best as writers when we get into a rhythm, but during the holiday season that rhythm can be really hard to maintain. Your schedule gets jammed up, you’ve got parties, you’ve got gifts to buy, you’ve got family visits, you’ve got stress, and you’ve got a little too much vacation time. The next thing you know you haven’t written. </p> <p>Of course that's not even the real problem. The real problem is getting started up again. Ideally you want writing to be part of your daily routine. You want it to be as natural for you as brushing your teeth, getting dressed for work, drinking your morning coffee.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-2017-screenwriting-challenge/">PODCAST – The 2017 Screenwriting Challenge</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Dec 31, 2016
PODCAST – Arrival: The Writer’s Journey
32:21
<p>Our language, and the metaphors of our films, have the power to change us. </p> <p>They change us as writers and they change us as audience members. They shape the conversation and the way we see our world. They shape our trust in our institutions or our distrust of them. They shape the way that we see heroism and the way that we see cowardice. They shape the way we see inclusion or exclusion, the way we deal with our fears and open our curiosity. </p> <p>The language that we use as screenwriters changes our audience. And the wider the audience for your movie, the more people you have the ability to affect. That's why we as screenwriters, particularly if we are writing movies with mass appeal. If we are writing action movies, horror movies, thrillers, sci-fi's, fantasies, romantic comedies, and of course television, we have such a responsibility, because the language that we use as we write changes us. And the language that we present to our audience changes them. </p> <p>Our movies teach people how to live and how to interact with the unknowns of their lives. </p> <p>In this way every movie is a political movie. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-arrival-the-writers-journey/">PODCAST – Arrival: The Writer’s Journey</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Dec 11, 2016
PODCAST – Transparent: The Series and the Craft
26:17
<p>This week we're going to be talking about the series, Transparent.</p> <p>This is a series I've been wanting to talk about for a very long time. And we're going to do so from a different perspective than we usually do when we talk about TV series.</p> <p>Oftentimes on this podcast, when we've spoken about series we've talked about big picture stuff. We've talked about theme and engine and structure. But today, what we're going to do is zoom in really close on one particular episode.</p> <p>We're going to look at Season 3 Episode 5, and we're going to break it down to its fundamental craft elements: the way that the scenes are actually constructed.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-transparent-the-series-and-the-craft/">PODCAST – Transparent: The Series and the Craft</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Nov 17, 2016
PODCAST -Dr. Strange: Feeding The Genre Monster
38:48
<p>This week we're going to be looking at Doctor Strange. And one thing that is inarguable, whether you loved Doctor Strange or hated Doctor Strange, is that this film is succeeding in a huge way not just at the box office but also critically.</p> <p>This is pretty amazing when you consider all the incredibly silly things about Doctor Strange!</p> <p>After all, this is a movie in which the country of Nepal seems to be populated almost entirely with American action heroes, and as far as we can tell only one Tibetan of consequence.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-dr-strange/">PODCAST -Dr. Strange: Feeding The Genre Monster</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Oct 27, 2016
PODCAST – HELL OR HIGH WATER
20:40
<p>One of the things that's really cool about Hell or High Water, and one of the things that's really cool about this script by Taylor Sheridan is the way it uses a twist on an old genre to deliver a movie that far exceeds our expectations of the genre.</p> <p>Hell or High Water isn't just a cops-and-robbers-heist-movie, even though it falls into that genre. Hell or High Water is actually a pretty powerful political film.</p> <p>I want to take a moment to talk about how you write a political film. Because, oftentimes, when we sit down to write a political film, we end up standing up on a soap box and screaming our opinions. We end up making the movie about the opinions, rather than about the story.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-hell-or-high-water/">PODCAST – HELL OR HIGH WATER</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Oct 20, 2016
PODCAST – A TRIP TO CAMBODIA, 7 ACT STRUCTURE & THE ART OF THE OUTLINE
30:52
<p>Those are the goals that I care about when I am on a vacation, just like it’s my goal to focus on being present with my characters when I write. That's my real goal. I just want to have an adventure and I really don't care what happens. I want to experience a culture that's different from mine. It's about meeting people who are different from me. That's what's exciting about my trip.</p> <p>So that's why it doesn't matter if I make it to Angkor Wat; it doesn't matter if I spend my whole time in Phnom Phen; it doesn't matter if I end up on a random beach somewhere for four days. None of these things matter because I don't care what happens to me once I'm there. And that's a way to build a script. We're simply following your character's objective in the moment rather than trying to build their super-objective.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-a-trip-to-cambodia-7-act-structure/">PODCAST – A TRIP TO CAMBODIA, 7 ACT STRUCTURE & THE ART OF THE OUTLINE</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Oct 08, 2016
PODCAST – SULLY
48:00
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-sully/">PODCAST – SULLY</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 22, 2016
PODCAST – STRANGER THINGS (Part 2)
35:12
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-stranger-things-part-2/">PODCAST – STRANGER THINGS (Part 2)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 15, 2016
PODCAST – STRANGER THINGS (Part 1)
28:06
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-stranger-things-part-1/">PODCAST – STRANGER THINGS (Part 1)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 08, 2016
PODCAST – 3 Most Important Elements When Writing For Hire
38:07
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-3-most-important-elements-when-writing-for-hire/">PODCAST – 3 Most Important Elements When Writing For Hire</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 27, 2016
PODCAST – Suicide Squad – Script Soup
31:46
<p>This week we’ll be looking at Suicide Squad. What’s interesting about Suicide Squad is that this is a very bad script by a very good writer (David Ayer also wrote Training Day). So instead of looking at the script like most critics have done and simply bashing it, I want to look at it as I would if I was working with a student.</p> <p>It's really interesting to see that even some of the greatest writers go through exactly the same problems, and can bump up against exactly the same causes of problems that many new and emerging and student writers deal with.</p> <p>The biggest problem with Suicide Squad is not Jared Leto's method acting antics. It's not the egos of all the many stars that were involved. It’s not even the many places where the logic of the script just doesn't make sense.</p> <p>The real problem with Suicide Squad is the problem of too many good ideas.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/suicide-squad-script-analysis-and-reviews-podcast/">PODCAST – Suicide Squad – Script Soup</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 17, 2016
PODCAST – Swiss Army Man: The ‘Bad Screenplay’ Experiment
32:55
<p>If you seen Swiss Army Man and the way the film develops from an off color joke to a deeply moving personal story, you can see that the structure of the film mirrors the process: the process by which the Daniels created it. </p> <p>They start with a really unlikely premise, that certainly doesn't seem like it should sustain a scene, much less a movie. And by running towards it, end up with a meditation on the connection between shame and loneliness, a meditation on love, on friendship, on sex, on attraction, on the way that we hide in plain sight, on what's really important about life, about the strange and sometimes uncomfortable lines between love and friendship, and about the personal journey that we all have to go on in order to figure out who we really are.</p> <p>In one of the most beautiful lines in the movie, Daniel Radcliffe’s character, Manny, asks Paul Dano’s character, Hank, “You want to go home so you can have love, but you ran away because nobody loves you.” </p> <p>The structure of the film forces Hank to come to terms with that dilemma, and with the nature of that loneliness: not the loneliness forced upon us by other people, but the loneliness that is forced upon us by ourselves, when we hide the natural things that make us who we are from the people around us. </p> <p>And the magical realism elements exist, not to be weird or unusual or show how original these writers are, but to dive into the metaphor that drives the movie: how the ways we feel “marooned” by the people around us are often a by-product of the way we maroon ourselves.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-swiss-army-man-bad-screenplay-experiment/">PODCAST – Swiss Army Man: The ‘Bad Screenplay’ Experiment</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 14, 2016
PODCAST – Part 2 – Captain America Civil War: How to Build the Superhero Movie
26:13
<p>The other thing that's really great about Captain America: Civil War is everything is very clear. And this is important in an action movie, where you are reaching out to a vast vast audience. We understand what the goal is, what the intention is of each character and at each moment. We understand where each character stands in relationship to the overall goals driving each side in the movie. We understand what each character wants and we understand why they are fighting each other. We understand what the goal of those fights are, and I do think these writers did a very good job of keeping the love in these relationships alive between these characters. These are all characters who love each other, who have been pushed against each other in an ideological crisis. </p> <p>This is exciting. And yet, the movie is not moving. The movie does not hit you emotionally. It makes you think a bit about politics, which is more than we’ve come to expect in an action movie. But you are going to shed no tears during the movie, and about an hour and 45 minutes in, even though you're still being dazzled, you are starting to get bored. There are no emotional stakes of the movie. You're not really rooting. You’re only being entertained.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-part-2-captain-america-civil-war-how-to-build-the-superhero-movie/">PODCAST – Part 2 – Captain America Civil War: How to Build the Superhero Movie</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jun 09, 2016
PODCAST – Captain America Civil War: How to Build the Superhero Movie – Part 1
12:32
<p>It's interesting to talk about superhero movies because there’s been a big change in the way these movies are built. One of the things that we’re starting to see is that superhero movies, just like other big budget action movies, are actually being built more like TV Drama Series than they are like Feature Films.</p> <p>Just like TV Dramas (and TV Comedies), rather than being built around a traditional character driven structure, these huge budget superhero and action movies are built around a concept called an engine.</p> <p>In a TV Series, the engine is a kind of unique formula, developed by the writers, that guarantees that the series can run for a very long time, creating the same feeling in each episode in a slightly different way.</p> <p>In these mega-budget franchises, the engine works similarly, allowing each “episode” to set up the next. A byproduct of this effect is that an individual action movie is no longer designed to create a cathartic effect that leaves the audience with a sense of completion. Rather, it is designed to leave the audience craving more, with untied strings in each installment setting up the next episode in the franchise, which will once again replicate the same engine in a different way.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-captain-america-build-superhero-part-1/">PODCAST – Captain America Civil War: How to Build the Superhero Movie – Part 1</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 24, 2016
PODCAST – Everybody Wants Some: Structure Without Structure – Part 2
16:32
<p>In Part 1 of this podcast, we discussed the structural elements that allow Everybody Wants Some to overcome the challenges of its meandering plot and nearly total subversion of every rule of screenwriting. But there are other reasons, beyond structure, Everybody Wants Some succeeds, in spite of its complete disregard for the rules. And whether you’re a traditional Hollywood writer, or a rule defying auteur like Richard Linklater, they’re concepts you can use to great effect in your own writing.</p> <p>As we discussed, the first thing that makes Everybody Wants Some succeed is that the characters all want something: everybody wants some.</p> <p>The second thing that makes Everybody Wants Some work is the specificity of the approach Linklater takes to every moment we spend with each of these characters. From the first moment we meet these characters, there is no detail unobserved in this film. There is no detail unobserved in who these characters are. Linklater locks in each character from the very first moment, using a powerful screenwriting technique called Vignettes. If you’ve taken my screenwriting classes, you know how vital Vignettes are when introducing characters, and how they can become the organic building blocks of structure as you discover your character’s journey. So as you watch Everybody Wants Some or reflect on it if you’ve already seen it, notice how each of these characters is introduced with a Vignette: an action, a choice, a decision, something they do that is so specifically them, that it locks them in our minds forever.</p> <p>And this is why Linklater is able to get away with this cast of dozens, and let us feel like we know each and every one of them.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-everybody-wants-some-structure-without-structure-part-2/">PODCAST – Everybody Wants Some: Structure Without Structure – Part 2</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 05, 2016
PODCAST – Everybody Wants Some: Structure Without Structure – Part 1
12:23
<p>This week we’re going to be looking at Richard Linklater's new film Everybody Wants Some. Richard Linklater has called this film a spiritual sequel to Dazed and Confused. He has also referred to it as a sequel to Boyhood, his brilliantly structured (although very unusually structured) film, which basically ends right before this film begins: at the end of boyhood and the beginning of college.</p> <p>Everybody Wants Some picks up the baton where Boyhood left off, and centers around a college baseball player who is just starting college, and the other guys on the team, in the days leading up to the first day of his freshman year. And though the main character may be different from the character in Boyhood, and while the structure may be entirely different than the structure of Boyhood, confined to a few days, rather than evolving over many years, Linklater is once again building a sprawling, multicharacter journey around young kid in a different kind of family, at defining point of discovering his identity and what gives meaning in his life.</p> <p>But the question remains: is Everybody Wants Some actually a good movie? </p> <p>Because Everybody Wants Some basically does nothing that a movie is supposed to do. It has virtually no plot; In fact most of the film is simply spent watching a bunch of bros hang out. It’s built mostly around dialogue, much like a play, rather than the action and images we’re used to seeing as the primary building blocks in movies. It kind-of has a discernible main character (it certainly seems to center around Jake( but the truth of the matter is, Jake doesn't really drive most of the action. </p> <p>In fact, most of the structure isn't really driven at all in the way we traditionally expect, with one character chasing a particularly challenging goal against increasingly difficult obstacles. Instead, it's driven by random events like, “Let's go dancing,” “Let's go to baseball practice,” “Let's pick up some chicks.” Which feels a hell of a lot like the free-flowing structure of any respectable drunken freshman’s introduction to college, but not much like the version of that story we’re used to seeing in a movie.</p> <p>The overall effect is that we’re watching (and for many people, enjoying) a film that seems to have very little structure at all. And this is not because Richard Linklater can't do structure. Because if you've seen Boyhood, you've seen a film that survives upon its rock solid structure as it jumps from year to year to year in a young boy’s life.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-everybody-wants-some-structure-without-structure-part-1/">PODCAST – Everybody Wants Some: Structure Without Structure – Part 1</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Apr 21, 2016
PODCAST – Whiskey Tango Foxtrot: WTF is Wrong with WTF?
16:16
<p>If you go to see Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, you’re going to have a very mixed experience. There are elements of this movie that are truly beautiful, and then there are elements that are just so incredibly dissatisfying. So WTF is wrong with WTF? Why did a movie with such a stellar cast and compelling concept fall so flat both critically and at the box office? And what can you learn from Whiskey Tango Foxtrot about your own writing?</p> <p>Every movie makes a promise to its audience. If you deliver on that promise, you can get away with almost anything. But if you make that promise and you fail to deliver, the audience is going to eat you alive. And that's very much what happened with Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.</p> <p>When you see the trailer for Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, and you see Tina Fey, the first thing you assume is you’re going to laugh your ass off for an hour and a half. As you know if you’ve seen the trailer, there’s a reason for this. The trailer excerpts only the very funniest moments of this film. But the truth of the matter is, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot is barely a comedy. It's primarily a character-driven story about a copy editor who becomes an in-front-of-the-camera embedded journalist in Afghanistan.</p> <p>Now, the idea of doing a funny Tina Fey movie about the war in Afghanistan is a brilliant premise, and once you bring that premise to the table, it is really hard to back away from it. It’s like giving kids a bunch of ice cream and then trying to get them to eat their vegetables.</p> <p>And, to some degree, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot is certainly trying to deliver on that premise; there is an Alfred Molina character who's trying just as hard as he can to be funny, and there are some really funny moments in the piece. But the things that actually work best in the screenplay are not the comedic elements; they’re the dramatic ones.</p> <p>At its core, Whiskey Tango Foxtrot is actually a romance. And it's a very beautifully drawn romance. The script is just not fully cooked yet. As happens all too often, both in Hollywood and in indie film and even in student films, they shot it one draft too soon.</p> <p>So what would a finished version of this script look like? To understand that, we need to look at the screenplay as if we were considering it for a rewrite...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-whiskey-tango-foxtrot-wtf-is-wrong-with-wtf/">PODCAST – Whiskey Tango Foxtrot: WTF is Wrong with WTF?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Apr 14, 2016
PODCAST – 10 Cloverfield Lane: Everything Possible Must Happen
24:01
<p>Where we want to be looking is inside the content of the screenplay itself. We want to be looking inside of what we’ve already written to figure out where we need to go.</p> <p>All of the answers for where we need to go in your story already exist in the initial pages of your screenplay. The structure of your movie can grow organically simply by looking at the things that exist in your story, and saying, “If this is true, what else must also be true? And if this is true, what else must also be true? And if this is true, what else must also be true?”</p> <p>In this context, by the time we make it to the end of the movie, in some way, everything possible must happen…</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-10-cloverfield-lane-everything-possible/">PODCAST – 10 Cloverfield Lane: Everything Possible Must Happen</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Mar 18, 2016
PODCAST – ROOM: What’s On The Other Side Of Your Wall?
26:06
<p>It’s interesting that we’re looking at Room because, as screenwriters, we often lock ourselves in our own little rooms. Like the main characters of Room, we get bound up by other people’s rules, by our own comfort zone as screenwriters, by the movies that we have seen before. And we forget that every wall has another side, that there is actually something out there bigger than the story we know how to tell, than the movie that we’ve seen before, than the structure that we’ve been handed down, than the rules that have been imposed upon us...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-room-what-on-the-other-side-of-your-wall/">PODCAST – ROOM: What’s On The Other Side Of Your Wall?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Mar 10, 2016
PODCAST – Spotlight & The Big Short: The Difference Between Plot & Structure
18:41
<p>The concepts of plot and structure are ideas that get mixed up all the time. They are words that are often used interchangeably, but that in my opinion actually mean very different things.</p> <p>I like to think of plot as the crap that happens in your movie, or for that matter in your life. And I like to think of structure as the choices a character makes in relation to that plot. The choices that change their lives forever. Plot is the stuff that happens, but structure is your character’s change...</p> <p>And if you think about your own life, you’ll probably realize that the difference between plot and structure matters to you as well. You’ve probably met the person who gets a hangnail and it destroys their whole day. And you’ve probably also met the person who gets cancer and gets a whole new lease on life.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-plot-structure-difference/">PODCAST – Spotlight & The Big Short: The Difference Between Plot & Structure</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Mar 05, 2016
PODCAST – DEADPOOL: Breaking The Rules
21:54
<p>The first rule of superhero movies that every single person knows is that your super hero is supposed to be a super good guy.</p> <p>Superman: yeah, he’s a good guy. Spiderman: sweet kid, good guy. Batman: a little dark, good guy. Thor: a very good guy. The Incredible Hulk may have a problem with anger, but deep down he’s a really good guy. And Ironman may have a bit of an ego problem, but at the end of the day he’s a good guy, too. The world of superheroes is populated by good guys facing down pure evil villains.</p> <p>And what’s wonderful about Deadpool is that its main character gives the big ole’ finger to the entire notion of the superhero as the perfect good guy character. And, in doing so, Deadpool hopefully puts the last nail in the coffin of the whole Save the Cat formula: this notion that if the audience is going to love your main character he/she needs to be saving kitty cats out of trees and doing nice things for people...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-deadpool-breaking-the-rules/">PODCAST – DEADPOOL: Breaking The Rules</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Feb 19, 2016
PODCAST – How To Write a TV Bible
21:18
<p>Most TV Bibles include a series logline, character bios for all the main characters, episode summaries for the first season, and often summaries of the future seasons as well. But the truth is, if that’s all you deliver, your TV Bible’s not going to take you very far.</p> <p>Because producers are never really asking for a bunch of boring information about your TV series. What they’re really asking is proof that you know what you’re doing, and that your series pilot not only has a fabulous premise and collection of castable characters we’d want to spend our time binge watching, but also has the kind of ENGINE required to run for at least 5 years.</p> <p>They don’t want you to tell them it’s going to run for 5 years. They want you to show them. By putting together your loglines, characters, and episodes into a short sweet document that they can’t say no to!</p> <p>So what should that document contain? And how exactly do you write it?</p> <p>Well, you're going to start off with a killer logline. But how do you know if your logline is actually killer?</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-how-to-write-tv-bible/">PODCAST – How To Write a TV Bible</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Feb 11, 2016
PODCAST – DIY Film Making: One Man’s Journey
1:01:15
<p>Adam shot a feature film, New Low, for $2000 and ended up a official selection of the Sundance Film Festival in 2010. He then managed to parlay that success into Paperback, a second feature at a much higher budget, which premiered at the Austin Film Festival this year.</p> <p>If you are a film student here at Jacob Krueger Studio, you know it’s an extraordinarily exciting time to be a filmmaker. We are seeing more and more people like Adam, who are making their own material. These writers have stopped waiting for people to say “yes” to them, and instead started saying “yes” to themselves, developing great screenplays and going out and shooting them.</p> <p>Chris sat down with Adam and asked him a bunch of questions about his process, about what it means to be an indie filmmaker, and how he managed to shoot a film on $2000. He got some very interesting responses, particularly about some unexpected benefits of shooting micro budget, compared to his experience with a higher budget production...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-diy-filmmaking/">PODCAST – DIY Film Making: One Man’s Journey</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jan 21, 2016
PODCAST – Star Wars: The Rewrite Awakens
22:52
<p>Whether you are one of the many that loved Star Wars: The Force Awakens and saw it again and again, or one of the disappointed few who were frustrated with the rehashed scenes and safe choices of the film, there is no doubt that there is a ton that you can learn from this movie as a screenwriter, particularly when it comes to rewriting your screenplay.</p> <p>As I was watching Star Wars: The Force Awakens, it occurred to me that in many ways, this movie is just a rewrite of Star Wars: A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back with a little spattering of Return of the Jedi splashed in there.Star_Wars_Trilogy</p> <p>And like any effective rewrite, the structure and the approach of Star Wars: The Force Awakens focuses on two vital concepts: Compression and Amplification...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-star-wars-rewrite/">PODCAST – Star Wars: The Rewrite Awakens</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jan 15, 2016
PODCAST – Does Your Show Need A Bible
16:54
<p>The truth is, the idea of a Show Bible, as many people talk about it today, is total fiction.But like many fictional ideas, it’s become a reality that we now need to deal with as TV writers.</p> <p>If you ask Jerry Perzigian, who teaches our TV Comedy Classes, he’ll tell you that in his entire thirty-some year career as a show runner on The Jeffersons, The Golden Girls, Married With Children, and about a dozen other hit shows, he never once made a bible.</p> <p>Wondering if it’s different in TV Drama? Ask former Showtime Executive and Pulitzer Prize nominated writer Steve Molton, who teaches our TV Drama classes, and he’ll tell you the same thing.</p> <p>In fact, on these shows the bible's weren’t made by the writers at all. The show bibles were made by the assistants. And only after the show was up and running for a good long time, when the old staff writers were moving on, and the new staff writers started coming in to replace them.</p> <p>Since new writers joining the writers room likely wouldn’t have had a chance to see every episode, and even if they had, they certainly wouldn’t know them in the same detail as the original staff who wrote them,the assistants would compile old episodes into a document which could be given to new writers on the staff. It was a quick way to acquaint them with what had already been done, what will never be done, the kinds of things that generally happen in an episode, and the rules of the show that make the show’s engine run. They called this document The Show Bible...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-show-bible/">PODCAST – Does Your Show Need A Bible</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Dec 17, 2015
PODCAST – Buildout Your Script, part 2: A Decision Every Moment
28:34
<p>When every possibility starts to feel possible, it becomes incredibly difficult to make decisions.</p> <p>Which brings me back to my wiring conundrum. Because ultimately my decision was to spend a little bit of extra money, and run some extra wires, even though they might turn out to be redundant or unnecessary. Because I don't know exactly what the purpose is yet, or exactly what’s going to work yet, or exactly what these rooms are going to become over the next ten years.</p> <p>But I know this is important to me. That it’s something worth exploring. And that even if I don’t know what to do with every wire at the moment, I’ll figure it out eventually.</p> <p>Sometimes that's the process of writing as well. They're all good wires, but some of them are leading to places they need to lead and some will hang there and never be used.</p> <p>In a screenplay, those wires need to be removed, because we only have 95-105 pages, and we don't want to distract from the things that are actually important...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-buildout-script-2-decision/">PODCAST – Buildout Your Script, part 2: A Decision Every Moment</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Dec 10, 2015
PODCAST – Developing Your Brand As A Writer
45:18
<p>I recently had a student ask me a pretty interesting question: “What do you do when you realize that even though you think you’re writing all these different projects, you’re really just writing the same script over and over again?”</p> <p>And this made me think about a couple of different questions facing writers as they move into their professional careers.</p> <p>The first is an artistic question: What do you do when you’re following the same cycle again and again and again? What do you do when all your scripts seem to be converging around the same idea or the same themes?</p> <p>The second is a question about branding: How do you brand yourself as a writer? How do you figure out what box to put yourself in? How do you figure out whether you should write a script that’s very different from the ones you’ve written before, or whether you should build a brand around scripts that are similar?...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/develop-your-brand/">PODCAST – Developing Your Brand As A Writer</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Nov 19, 2015
PODCAST – Build Out Your Script: Choosing The Right Idea To Write
17:10
<p>There's a famous story about M. Knight Shyamalan in the process of writing The Sixth Sense. Somewhere around Shyamalan’s fourth draft of The Sixth Sense, a movie called Casper came out, and Shyamalan famously threw out his draft, called his agent, and said "Well, Casper the Friendly Ghost came out so there goes that."</p> <p>Fortunately, he had good people around him who forced him to keep writing. But what's really interesting is that it wasn't until somewhere around the tenth draft of The Sixth Sense that Shyamalan realized what the idea really was.</p> <p>You see, in that early draft, the truth was, Shyamalan was right. All he was really doing at that point was a live action update of Casper the Friendly Ghost. Because, at that point, Shyamalan had not yet realized that Bruce Willis's character was dead...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-build-out-your-script-choosing-the-right-idea-to-write/">PODCAST – Build Out Your Script: Choosing The Right Idea To Write</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Nov 05, 2015
PODCAST – The Craft of Writing: Externalizing the Internal, Part 2
14:42
<p>The idea of externalizing the internal is great, but what the heck happens when you sit down and you're actually working on a scene and suddenly you write something like, 'John is sad.' It’s easy to fall into the trap of writing a character’s emotion rather than their action into your script, because emotion is so vital for us to understand our character's journey. We have to know what they're feeling. The audience has to be able to see that.</p> <p>But sometimes we get so trapped in writing the emotion of a character to the extent that we lose track of what the character is actually doing, and how to capture that in a visually compelling way. Instead of writing “Her eyes go wide” and facial expressions or emotions, we want to find the actions a character takes that reveals those emotions.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-externalizing-the-internal-2/">PODCAST – The Craft of Writing: Externalizing the Internal, Part 2</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Oct 21, 2015
PODCAST – The Martian: Bring Your Script Home
22:47
<p>The success of The Martian is extremely exciting if you're a screenwriter, especially because it breaks so much of the traditional Hollywood dogma. Often, as screenwriters, we think that our movies have to exist within some kind of orthodoxy: that there are certain things that you are just not allowed to do, and if you do them somehow you have no chance of writing a movie that's a hit. And yet, The Martian seems to throw all of those cares to the wind.</p> <p>If you’ve taken the average Screenwriting 101 class you’ve probably been taught a couple of concepts that are supposed to be the rules for all movies.</p> <p>You've probably been taught that structure is always built on characters' change. Yet, here is a character who doesn't change at all.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-the-martian-bring-your-script-home/">PODCAST – The Martian: Bring Your Script Home</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Oct 08, 2015
PODCAST – Black Mass, The Departed & The Art of Revision
27:23
<p>Today we're going to be looking at the new Johnny Depp movie, Black Mass.</p> <p>Now this is a really extraordinary true story, based on the life of Whitey Bulger, and featuring one of Johnny Depp's all time best performances. And we're going to be discussing some of its most compelling scenes and the elements that made them work in this podcast.</p> <p>And yet, at the same time, despite the power of Johnny Depp's and the supporting cast's stellar performances, there is something about Black Mass that just leaves you (or at least left me) a little hollow-- a little bit unsatisfied.</p> <p>So I also want to talk about what got in the way with Black Mass, and how you can learn from both its strengths and failures in your own screenwriting, particularly when it comes to revision.</p> <p>If you haven't seen Black Mass yet, please be aware that there are spoilers ahead...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-black-mass-revision/">PODCAST – Black Mass, The Departed & The Art of Revision</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 24, 2015
PODCAST – The Magic of Tone: Diary of a Teenage Girl
23:00
<p>Tone, in fact, is something that is layered on top of truth. So, our first step as writers is about getting our own personal truth on the page. In order to do that, sometimes we need to let go of our desire to control the tone. Sometimes we need to write the scene in our comedy that makes us cry, or makes us disturbed, or goes to that incredibly dark place that we don't want to go to. Sometimes we have to write the scene in our drama that gets experimental or playful, or oddly, inappropriately funny.</p> <p>In acting there is actually a technique for this. If you've ever been in a play or in a film rehearsal there is often a period where the performance starts to get really tight. Usually at the first reading everything seems great: the actors haven't figured out the character yet and they're just playing. They're just having a good time. And everything is filled with energy and excitement and fun. They seem to be hitting all the right notes, flying free and using their instincts.</p> <p>But there then comes a point where they've started to figure out the piece. They've started to figure out their character. They've started the figure out what's really going on, the structure of the character's arc, how things are changing, who the character really is and how to play them.</p> <p>And at that time, a strange thing happens...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-diary-of-a-teenage-girl-tone-of-voice/">PODCAST – The Magic of Tone: Diary of a Teenage Girl</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 17, 2015
PODCAST – Show Me A Hero: Do You Need An Active Main Character?
19:23
<p>Show Me A Hero broke the most profound rule of screenwriting, the first commandment: Thou shalt have an active main character.</p> <p>If Show Me A Hero didn't work for you, there is a good chance that this is the reason. And if it did work for you, there is a good chance that this is the reason as well.</p> <p>The choice to have an inactive protagonist is related directly to the theme and the ironic title of Show Me A Hero.</p> <p>What is brilliant about the journey of Nick Wasicsko, its main character, played by Oscar Issac is precisely that he is not the hero we are longing for...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-show-me-a-hero-active-main-character/">PODCAST – Show Me A Hero: Do You Need An Active Main Character?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 10, 2015
PODCAST – The Tree Of Life: Alternative Forms of Structure
25:46
<p>There’s a mistake that we often make when we think about structure. We think that a movie has one inciting incident. But the truth of the matter is that many movies are comprised of many different threads, woven together from the different journeys our characters are taking, just like your life in comprised of the many different threads of your own journey. You may have a thread that follows you at work, at home, in your relationship, in your art, in your writing.</p> <p>And though these threads weave together they often have different inciting incidents...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-tree-of-life-alternative-forms-of-structure/">PODCAST – The Tree Of Life: Alternative Forms of Structure</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 27, 2015
PODCAST – The Craft of Writing: Externalizing the Internal, Part 1
14:51
<p>We work in this really exciting medium called film. What’s the exciting thing about working in film? We tell stories with images. And the challenging thing about working in film is that half of the things that exist in the world, we can't see. We can't see thoughts and we can't see feelings.</p> <p>And that means, as screenwriters, our job is to externalize these internal things. To take them outside of the mind and put them into the body and the action of our screenplay. To translate the emotional language of our writing into action...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-there-will-be-blood-externalizing-the-internal/">PODCAST – The Craft of Writing: Externalizing the Internal, Part 1</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 24, 2015
PODCAST – Tangerine: All You Need is a Want and an iPhone!
22:24
<p>Tangerine is a brilliant illustration of just how little you need to actually succeed as a screenwriter or a filmmaker. To make a successful film you do not need millions of dollars. To make a successful film you do not need years and years and years of experience. To make a successful film you do not need to follow the rules or follow a formula. To make a successful film there are really only two things you need: You need a Want, and you need an iPhone.</p> <p>Tangerine was shot entirely on an iPhone 5s. And not only does it look beautiful, but it also tells a compelling story, taking two characters on a profound journey of change. And, though it doesn't have the most complicated plot in the world, the simplicity and the drive of its main characters' wants provide it with a rock solid structure...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-tangerine-want-and-iphone/">PODCAST – Tangerine: All You Need is a Want and an iPhone!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 20, 2015
PODCAST – Formatting: Isolating Visual Moments of Action
14:07
<p>Often times we think of formatting as the grammar of the screenwriting. We think of it as this very simple, basic, elemental set of rules that you go and look up in The Hollywood Standard in order to do it properly.</p> <p>But the truth of the matter is: formatting is like grammar. If you actually spoke proper grammar you’d most likely have no friends. “To whom should I direct this email?” You’d just sound too darn formal. And the same is true for “proper” formatting. It’s just not going to work for you.</p> <p>And, at the same time, we all know bad grammar when we hear it! And just like bad grammar, when we see bad formatting in a screenplay, we make instant judgements that can really end up leaving your script at the bottom of the pile.</p> <p>So, today I want to talk about formatting. But I want to talk about formatting in a creative way. Because I feel like a lot of writers at all different levels are really stuck on this idea of formatting. And instead of looking at it as a creative tool of their craft they’re looking at it as something that gets in the way of their creativity.</p> <p>I want you to understand that formatting only exists for one purpose. The whole purpose of formatting is to isolate visual moments of action.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-formatting-isolating-visual-moments-action/">PODCAST – Formatting: Isolating Visual Moments of Action</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 13, 2015
PODCAST – Trainwreck: The Game of the Scene
28:48
<p>The thing that makes Trainwreck different is a very specific thing going on called voice. It’s Amy Schumer's very specific voice and Judd Apatow's very specific voice that translate this drama into comedy.</p> <p>If you're interested in writing a comedy, this is something that you should definitely think about. Some of the best comedies do not come from trying to be funny. The best comedies come from trying to be real, saying the things we don't want to say and looking at the things that we don't want to look at.</p> <p>You can see this in Amy Schumer's sketch work, just as you can see it in Trainwreck. You can see it in shows like Louie. As a wiser man than me once said: comedy is just unrequited want. And in that way comedy and drama are exactly the same thing. Comedy is just a way of executing unrequited want.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-trainwreck-the-game-of-the-scene/">PODCAST – Trainwreck: The Game of the Scene</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 06, 2015
PODCAST – Me and Earl and the Dying Girl: Two Levels of Structure
23:47
<p>Every single thing about how this movie was constructed is basically telling you that this girl is going to die. And there's an interesting thing that happens to an audience when they know they're watching a movie that's going to hurt them: they start to put a little cocoon around themselves to protect themselves from getting hurt.</p> <p>Whether you loved or hated Me and Earl and the Dying Girl-- whether you were part of the crowd that was ready to stand up and cheer at the Sundance premiere (after which the film was immediately snagged up after a fierce bidding war) or whether you're one of the more skeptical audience members who have accused the film of being cliché in its depiction of Earl and of its self-aware film references-- one thing that you have to admit about Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is that, for all its humor and all its fun, ultimately the movie is devastating.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-me-earl-and-the-dying-girl-two-levels-of-structure/">PODCAST – Me and Earl and the Dying Girl: Two Levels of Structure</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 26, 2015
PODCAST – Writing The Horror Movie: The Inner Psychology of Se7en, Drag Me To Hell & Dawn of the Dead
27:16
<p>There are two kinds of horror movies. There's the basic gross-out horror movie where it's really just about creating a progression of increasingly horrible images and getting a high body count. These movies have a very simple formula: establish a bunch of characters and a bunch of relationships and then, one by one, kill those characters off with the greatest efficiency and bloodiness. All the creative work in those movies really just goes into creating the most horrible of horrors. It’s about making the most disgusting, horrible, frightening “this is going to haunt me in my dreams, I can't un-see that” kind of moment.</p> <p>But the best horror movies try to do something much bigger. The best horror movies are either psychological commentaries or political commentaries or sometimes both...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-writing-the-horror-movie-the-inner-psychology-of-se7en-drag-me-to-hell-dawn-of-the-dead/">PODCAST – Writing The Horror Movie: The Inner Psychology of Se7en, Drag Me To Hell & Dawn of the Dead</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 16, 2015
PODCAST – INSIDE OUT: Character, Archetypes and The Psychology of Revision
16:44
<p>If you're willing to surrender some degree of control and write from the subconscious mind, rather than the conscious mind, you have the ability to tap into the Collective Unconscious. And if you can actually tap into it, you don't need to know what a Threshold Guardian or a Terrible Father is or, to use Blake Snyder's terminology, what a “Monster in the House” movie actually is.</p> <p>If you can tap into The Collective Unconscious, then all you need to do is to write the archetypes that you find there. And you will know that those archetypes are the archetypes that anyone can connect to.</p> <p>This is an approach to writing that says, instead of trying to name, categorize, or follow the formula, what we can actually do is go inside our own minds, surrender a little bit of control, and bring our own personal archetypes to the surface...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-inside-out/">PODCAST – INSIDE OUT: Character, Archetypes and The Psychology of Revision</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 11, 2015
PODCAST – ADAPTATION: The Rhythm of Rewriting
23:50
<p>What he's really proving to you is that any idea can work. And any idea can not work. You can have Robert McKee give a half page long speech and it can work. And you can have Robert McKee give a half page long speech and it can not work. You can use voice over and it can work. You can use voice over and it can not work. You can have multiple characters and it can work. You can have multiple characters and it can not work. This only works and not works in relation to that one true thing - that one thing that you're truly passionate about.</p> <p>So, what we're doing in each revision is we're trying to whittle it down. And there are really only two ways we can whittle things down: The first is that we cut stuff that has nothing to do with it. And, actually, if you read this draft, you'll see a lot of stuff that was good but it didn't really build the main thrust...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-adaptation-rewriting/">PODCAST – ADAPTATION: The Rhythm of Rewriting</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jun 24, 2015
PODCAST – MAD MAX: FURY ROAD & The Engine of Structure
22:39
<p>The reason that Mad Max: Fury Road works is not because of it's plot. It works because of its structure. And that structure begins with the primal needs driving its main characters. Interestingly, Furiosa really is the main character in Mad Max. </p> <p>She is the character who drives the story. At the center of Furiosa's drive or struggle in this movie is a desperate need to hope. A desperate need to believe in a better place. And desperate need to build that better place, not only for herself, but for the five concubines/wives of the evil, tyrannical, cultish dictator by whom she was taken captive. She is driven by a primal need to find that green place that was taken away from her when she was a child. That green place in the desert - that personal symbol of hope. And underneath that need is a need for justice. A need that we can all connect to, whether we have ever been trapped in a desert wasteland, chased by Cirque du Soleil performers or not. We all know what it's like to feel injustice. </p> <p>We all know what it feels like to feel like the world is not fair. And we all know what it's like to hope against hope to somehow, in some way, return to that better place.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-mad-max/">PODCAST – MAD MAX: FURY ROAD & The Engine of Structure</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 21, 2015
PODCAST – THE LEGO MOVIE & The Dance of Creativity
22:13
<p>There are two right ways to build with Legos and there are also two right ways to build a film...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/lego-movie/">PODCAST – THE LEGO MOVIE & The Dance of Creativity</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 07, 2015
PODCAST – FURIOUS 7: Feeding The Genre Monster
28:01
<p>Today we are going to be talking about the genre of movies that I affectionately like to call “The Big Dumb Action Movie,” with the latest installment of The Fast and the Furious franchise, Furious 7.</p> <p>And, hopefully, we’re going to be looking at Furious 7 in a way that's valuable not only if you’re a big action movie writer, but also if you are a writer in any other genre: if you are writing a thriller, if you are writing a comedy, if you are writing a drama, if you are writing an independent film or even if you are writing an art film.</p> <p>In an odd way, “big dumb action movies” and super experimental art films actually have a lot in common. That’s because they both exist in a world of expressionism...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/furious-7/">PODCAST – FURIOUS 7: Feeding The Genre Monster</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Apr 13, 2015
PODCAST – BIRDMAN: Writing A Screenplay Is Like Writing a Poem
26:33
<p>In writing a screenplay, every line matters in the same way that every line matters when you are writing a poem. Every single word can not only affect the experience of reading or watching a movie, but every single word can also affect your budget when it comes time to shoot your movie. So, as screenwriters we need to be as exacting with our words as a poet.</p> <p>Screenwriting is also like poetry in that we are working within a form - an existing form. And we are finding our creativity inside of a form, or inside of a structure, just like a poet finds the form inside of a sonnet or a villanelle.</p> <p>Screenwriting is like poetry because screenwriting is a field in which form equals function...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-birdman-writing-a-screenplay-is-like-writing-a-poem/">PODCAST – BIRDMAN: Writing A Screenplay Is Like Writing a Poem</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Mar 25, 2015
PODCAST – 50 Shades of Grey: Could It Have Been a Great Script?
29:04
<p>Sometimes, even a flawed script can give you tremendous insights as a writer, not only as to what makes a screenplay succeed or fail, but also about the strengths and weaknesses of your own writing.</p> <p>So, as we talk about 50 Shades of Grey, we're going to be setting aside the question of whether or not it is a good movie, whether or not you enjoyed 50 Shades of Grey or found it sexy, or even if you thought it was a reliable adaptation.</p> <p>Instead, I want to look at 50 Shades of Grey and think about what could have made it a great script. And how those lessons can apply to your own writing...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/50-shades-of-grey/">PODCAST – 50 Shades of Grey: Could It Have Been a Great Script?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Mar 04, 2015
PODCAST – American Sniper: Is Your Adaptation Running Toward The Truth?
35:40
<p>I’m not the kind of person who believes, as Chris Kyle says at the beginning of the movie, that there are three types of people in the world: sheep, wolves and sheepdogs. I’m not a person like Chris Kyle who believes that things are purely black and white, and that there’s very little grey. Watching a movie that cuts directly from planes crashing into the World Trade Center to the war of Iraq and makes that argument all over again, linking Iraq to the September 11th attacks, politically - that’s hard for me to watch.</p> <p>That said, those are the politics of the main character, Chris Kyle. Those are the politics of a lot of people like him who went into this war, believing they are the heroes. Believing that the people they are fighting are savages, and as Americans, they are purely a force of good in the world.</p> <p>There is something to be said about directing and writing a movie that looks at the world through the eyes of your protagonist. The hope of course, as you work on such an adaptation, is that even as you’re looking at the world through their eyes, you’re also maybe revealing something to the audience, and to yourself, that is even more complicated than the main character can see.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-american-sniper-is-your-adaptation-running-toward-the-truth/">PODCAST – American Sniper: Is Your Adaptation Running Toward The Truth?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Feb 21, 2015
PODCAST – Into The Woods: Navigating The Development Process
29:53
<p>Adapting a stage musical to the screen is never easy. On stage, musicals work because of their theatricality—the feeling of pretend, play, magic, and performance. Whereas in the relatively naturalistic world of film, those elements are very hard to pull off. Which makes the surprisingly successful film adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s and James Lapine’s stage musical Into The Woods even more worthy of study.</p> <p>That's because successfully adapting Into The Woods as a musical for Disney might just be one of the most challenging projects ever.</p> <p>For all its hilarity and fun, Into the Woods is one of the saddest, darkest fairytales ever. It’s essentially structured like The Wrestler, where by the halfway point everything is perfect, everyone’s gotten their wish, and then, basically, everybody dies...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/into-the-woods-navigating-the-development-process/">PODCAST – Into The Woods: Navigating The Development Process</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Dec 24, 2014
PODCAST – Nightcrawler: Writing The Issue-Based Movie
23:38
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-nightcrawler-writing-issue-based-movie/">PODCAST – Nightcrawler: Writing The Issue-Based Movie</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Nov 27, 2014
PODCAST – TV Series Writing: What You Need To Break In
58:27
<p>Learn the elements of a successful series and what every network and series producer is looking for when they read a spec script or an original pilot.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/podcast-talkin-tv-expert-panel-discussion/">PODCAST – TV Series Writing: What You Need To Break In</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Sep 18, 2014
PODCAST – Guardians of The Galaxy: It’s a Metaphor!
15:54
<p>You don’t see that often in an action movie; a dramatic scene played for drama at the very start of a hilarious story. It works because of the theme.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/guardians-of-the-galaxy-metaphor/">PODCAST – Guardians of The Galaxy: It’s a Metaphor!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Aug 05, 2014
PODCAST – What Is Meditative Writing?
24:34
<p>What is Meditative Writing? How is it used? And how can it forever change the way you view writing?</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/what-is-meditative-writing/">PODCAST – What Is Meditative Writing?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jul 11, 2014
PODCAST – What’s The Worst Thing That Can Happen?: BLUE RUIN, THE BOURNE ULTIMATUM & ALIEN
18:47
<p>Blue Ruin's a nice little indie film by Jeremy Saulnier. For those of you who haven’t seen it, the main character, Dwight, is a deeply troubled man who became homeless after the brutal murder of his parents.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/blue-ruin-bourne-ultimatum-alien/">PODCAST – What’s The Worst Thing That Can Happen?: BLUE RUIN, THE BOURNE ULTIMATUM & ALIEN</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Jun 08, 2014
PODCAST – Writing the Action Movie: How “Amazing” is SPIDERMAN 2?
36:05
<p>Writing the Action Movie: How “Amazing” is Spiderman 2? An Interview with Jacob Krueger and George Strayton Setting aside whether you loved or hated The Amazing Spiderman 2, discover what you can learn from the script. Note: includes spoilers! PODCAST TRANSCRIPT Jacob Krueger: I’m Jacob Krueger and this is the Write Your Screenplay podcast. I’m here with a special guest today this is […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/writing-action-movie-amazing-spiderman-2/">PODCAST – Writing the Action Movie: How “Amazing” is SPIDERMAN 2?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
May 18, 2014
PODCAST – Frozen: Do You Want To Build A Screenplay?
11:13
<p>Frozen: Do You Want To Build A Screenplay? By Jacob Krueger Listen to the podcast of this article The structure for Disney’s Frozen begins with a piece of terrible advice. Confronted with a child with an extraordinary talent, the Grand Pabbie of the trolls tells her that until she learns to control her gift, she must hide it from the […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com/disney-frozen-do-you-want-to-write-a-screenplay/">PODCAST – Frozen: Do You Want To Build A Screenplay?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.writeyourscreenplay.com">Write Your Screenplay</a>.</p>
Apr 29, 2014