Podcast.__init__('Python')

By Tobias Macey

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Description

The podcast about Python and the people who make it great

Episode Date
The Masonite Web Framework With Joe Mancuso
00:43:20
Masonite is an ambitious new web framework that draws inspiration from many other successful projects in other languages. In this episode Joe Mancuso, the primary author and maintainer, explains his goal of unseating Django from its position of prominence in the Python community. He also discusses his motivation for building it, how it is architected, and how you can start using it for your own projects.
Aug 13, 2018
Helping Teacher's Bring Python Into The Classroom With Nicholas Tollervey
00:59:19
There are a number of resources available for teaching beginners to code in Python and many other languages, and numerous endeavors to introduce programming to educational environments. Sometimes those efforts yield success and others can simply lead to frustration on the part of the teacher and the student. In this episode Nicholas Tollervey discusses his work as a teacher and a programmer, his work on the micro:bit project and the PyCon UK education summit, as well as his thoughts on the place that Python holds in educational programs for teaching the next generation.
Aug 06, 2018
Continuous Delivery For Complex Systems Using Zuul with Monty Taylor
01:07:01
Continuous integration systems are important for ensuring that you don't release broken software. Some projects can benefit from simple, standardized platforms, but as you grow or factor in additional projects the complexity of checking your deployments grows. Zuul is a deployment automation and gating system that was built to power the complexities of OpenStack so it will grow and scale with you. In this episode Monty Taylor explains how he helped start Zuul, how it is designed for scale, and how you can start using it for your continuous delivery systems. He also discusses how Zuul has evolved and the directions it will take in the future.
Jul 30, 2018
Michael Foord On Testing, Mock, TDD, And The Python Community
00:55:11
Michael Foord has been working on building and testing software in Python for over a decade. One of his most notable and widely used contributions to the community is the Mock library, which has been incorporated into the standard library. In this episode he explains how he got involved in the community, why testing has been such a strong focus throughout his career, the uses and hazards of mocked objects, and how he is transitioning to freelancing full time.
Jul 23, 2018
The Past, Present, and Future of Twisted with Moshe Zadka
00:34:42
Twisted is one of the earliest frameworks for developing asynchronous applications in Python and it has yet to fulfill its original purpose. It can be used to build network servers that integrate a multitude of protocols, increase the performance of your I/O bound applications, serve as the full web stack for your WSGI projects, and anything else that needs a battle tested and performant foundation. In this episode long time maintainer Moshe Zadka discusses the history of Twisted, how it has evolved over the years, the transition to Python 3, some of its myriad use cases, and where it is headed in the future. Try it out today and then send some thanks to all of the people who have dedicated their time to building it.
Jul 16, 2018
Mike Driscoll And His Career In Python
00:23:31
Mike Driscoll has been writing blogs and books for the Python community for years, including his popular series on the Python Module Of The Week. In his daily work he uses Python to test graphical interfaces written in C++ and QT for embedded platforms. In this episode he explains his work, how he got involved in writing as a regular exercise, and an overview of his recent books.
Jul 08, 2018
The Pulp Artifact Repository with Bihan Zhang and Austin Macdonald
00:30:43
Hosting your own artifact repositories can have a huge impact on the reliability of your production systems. It reduces your reliance on the availability of external services during deployments and ensures that you have access to a consistent set of dependencies with known versions. Many repositories only support one type of package, thereby requiring multiple systems to be maintained, but Pulp is a platform that handles multiple content types and is easily extendable to manage everything you need for running your applications. In this episode maintainers Bihan Zhang and Austin Macdonald explain how the Pulp project works, the exciting new changes coming in version 3, and how you can get it set up to use for your deployments today.
Jul 02, 2018
Bringing Africa Online At Ascoderu with Clemens Wolff
00:42:33
The future is here, it's just not evenly distributed. One of the places where this is especially true is in sub-Saharan Africa which is a vast region with little to no reliable internet connectivity. To help communities in this region leapfrog infrastructure challenges and gain access to opportunities for education and market information the Ascoderu non-profit has built Lokole. In this episode one of the lead engineers on the project, Clemens Wolff, explains what it is, how it is built, and how the venerable e-mail protocols can continue to provide access cheaply and reliably.
Jun 25, 2018
Understanding Machine Learning Through Visualizations with Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro
00:55:13
Machine learning models are often inscrutable and it can be difficult to know whether you are making progress. To improve feedback and speed up iteration cycles Benjamin Bengfort and Rebecca Bilbro built Yellowbrick to easily generate visualizations of model performance. In this episode they explain how to use Yellowbrick in the process of building a machine learning project, how it aids in understanding how different parameters impact the outcome, and the improved understanding among teammates that it creates. They also explain how it integrates with the scikit-learn API, the difficulty of producing effective visualizations, and future plans for improvement and new features.
Jun 17, 2018
Modern Database Clients On The Command Line with Amjith Ramanujam
00:30:39
The command line is a powerful and resilient interface for getting work done, but the user experience is often lacking. This can be especially pronounced in database clients because of the amount of information being transferred and examined. To help improve the utility of these interfaces Amjith Ramanujam built PGCLI, quickly followed by MyCLI with the Prompt Toolkit library. In this episode he describes his motivation for building these projects, how their popularity led him to create even more clients, and how these tools can help you in your command line adventures.
Jun 11, 2018
Pandas Extension Arrays with Tom Augspurger
00:33:26
Pandas is a swiss army knife for data processing in Python but it has long been difficult to customize. In the latest release there is now an extension interface for adding custom data types with namespaced APIs. This allows for building and combining domain specific use cases and alternative storage mechanisms. In this episode Tom Augspurger describes how the new ExtensionArray works, how it came to be, and how you can start building your own extensions today.
Jun 04, 2018
Making A Difference Through Software With Eric Schles
00:00:00
Software development is a skill that can create value and reduce drudgery in a wide variety of contexts. Sometimes the causes that are most in need of software expertise are also the least able to pay for it. By volunteering our time and abilities to causes that we believe in, we can help make a tangible difference in the world. In this episode Eric Schles describes his experiences working on social justice initiatives and the types of work that proved to be the most helpful to the groups that he was working with.
May 27, 2018
Asking Questions From Data Using Active Learning with Tivadar Danka
00:27:51
One of the challenges of machine learning is obtaining large enough volumes of well labelled data. An approach to mitigate the effort required for labelling data sets is active learning, in which outliers are identified and labelled by domain experts. In this episode Tivadar Danka describes how he built modAL to bring active learning to bioinformatics. He is using it for doing human in the loop training of models to detect cell phenotypes with massive unlabelled datasets. He explains how the library works, how he designed it to be modular for a broad set of use cases, and how you can use it for training models of your own.
May 21, 2018
Great Expectations For Your Data Pipelines with Abe Gong and James Campbell
00:50:42
Testing is a critical activity in all software projects, but one that is often neglected in data pipelines. The complexities introduced by the inherent statefulness of the problem domain and the interdependencies between systems contribute to make pipeline testing difficult to manage. To make this endeavor more manageable Abe Gong and James Campbell have created Great Expectations. In this episode they discuss how you can use the project to create tests in the exploratory phase of building a pipeline and leverage those to monitor your systems in production. They also discussed how Great Expectations works, the difficulties associated with pipeline testing and managing associated technical debt, and their future plans for the project.
May 13, 2018
Exploring Color Theory In Python With Thomas Mansencal
00:57:40
We take it for granted every day, but creating and displaying vivid colors in our digital media is a complicated and often difficult process. There are different ways to represent color, the ways in which they are displayed can cause them to look different, and translating between systems can cause losses of information. To simplify the process of working with color information in code Thomas Mansencal wrote the Colour project. In this episode we discuss his motiviation for creating and sharing his library, how it works to translate and manage color representations, and how it can be used in your projects.
May 06, 2018
Destroy All Software With Gary Bernhardt
00:52:06
Many developers enter the market from backgrounds that don't involve a computer science degree, which can lead to blind spots of how to approach certain types of problems. Gary Bernhardt produces screen casts and articles that aim to teach these principles with code to make them approachable and easy to understand. In this episode Gary discusses his views on the state of software education, both in academia and bootcamps, the theoretical concepts that he finds most useful in his work, and some thoughts on how to build better software.
Apr 30, 2018
Scaling Deep Learning Using Polyaxon with Mourad Mourafiq
00:35:59
With libraries such as Tensorflow, PyTorch, scikit-learn, and MXNet being released it is easier than ever to start a deep learning project. Unfortunately, it is still difficult to manage scaling and reproduction of training for these projects. Mourad Mourafiq built Polyaxon on top of Kubernetes to address this shortcoming. In this episode he shares his reasons for starting the project, how it works, and how you can start using it today.
Apr 23, 2018
Electricity Map: Real Time Visibility of Power Generation with Olivier Corradi
00:47:53
One of the biggest issues facing us is the availability of sustainable energy sources. As individuals and energy consumers it is often difficult to understand how we can make informed choices about energy use to reduce our impact on the environment. Electricity Map is a project that provides up to date and historical information about the balance of how the energy we are using is being produced. In this episode Olivier Corradi discusses his motivation for creating Electricity Map, how it is built, and his goals for the project and his other work at Tomorrow Co.
Apr 15, 2018
Building And Growing Nylas with Christine Spang
00:43:29
Email is one of the oldest methods of communication that is still in use on the internet today. Despite many attempts at building a replacement and predictions of its demise we are sending more email now than ever. Recognizing that the venerable inbox is still an important repository of information, Christine Spang co-founded Nylas to integrate your mail with the rest of your tools, rather than just replacing it. In this episode Christine discusses how Nylas is built, how it is being used, and how she has helped to grow a successful business with a strong focus on diversity and inclusion.
Apr 08, 2018
Synthetic Data Generation Using Mimesis with Nikita Sobolev
00:32:37
Most applications require data to operate on in order to function, but sometimes that data is hard to come by, so why not just make it up? Mimesis is a library for randomly generating data of different types, such as names, addresses, and credit card numbers, so that you can use it for testing, anonymizing real data, or for placeholders. This week Nikita Sobolev discusses how the project got started, the challenges that it has posed, and how you can use it in your applications.
Apr 01, 2018
Luminoth: AI Powered Computer Vision for Python with Joaquin Alori
00:21:27
Making computers identify and understand what they are looking at in digital images is an ongoing challenge. Recent years have seen notable increases in the accuracy and speed of object detection due to deep learning and new applications of neural networks. In order to make it easier for developers to take advantage of these techniques Tryo Labs built Luminoth. In this interview Joaquin Alori explains how how Luminoth works, how it can be used in your projects, and how it compares to API oriented services for computer vision.
Mar 25, 2018
Thonny: The IDE For Beginning Programmers with Aivar Annamaa
00:29:50
Learning to program is a rewarding pursuit, but is often challenging. One of the roadblocks on the way to proficiency is getting a development environment installed and configured. In order to simplify that process Aivar Annamaa built Thonny, a Python IDE designed for beginning programmers. In this episode he discusses his initial motivations for starting Thonny and how it helps newcomers to Python learn and understand how to write software.
Mar 18, 2018
Keeping The Beets with Adrian Sampson
00:39:23
Maintaining a consistent taxonomy for your music library is a challenging and time consuming endeavor. Eventually you end up with a mess of folders and files with inconsistent names and missing metadata. Beets is built to solve this problem by programmatically managing the tags and directory structure for all of your music files and providing a fast lookup when you are trying to find that perfect song to play. Adrian Sampson began the project because he was trying to clean up his own music collection and in this episode he discusses how the project was built, how streaming media is affecting our relationship to digital music, and how he envisions Beets position in the ecosystem in the future.
Mar 12, 2018
Salabim: Logistics Simulation with Ruud van der Ham
00:51:38
Determining the best way to manage the capacity and flow of goods through a system is a complicated issue and can be exceedingly expensive to get wrong. Rather than experimenting with the physical objects to determine the optimal algorithm for managing the logistics of everything from global shipping lanes to your local bank, it is better to do that analysis in a simulation. Ruud van der Ham has been working in this area for the majority of his professional life at the Dutch port of Rotterdam. Using his acquired domain knowledge he wrote Salabim as a library to assist others in writing detailed simulations of their own and make logistical analysis of real world systems accessible to anyone with a Python interpreter.
Mar 04, 2018
Laboratory: Safer Refactoring with Joe Alcorn
00:21:53
Every piece of software that has been around long enough ends up with some piece of it that needs to be redesigned and refactored. Often the code that needs to be updated is part of the critical path through the system, increasing the risks associated with any change. One way around this problem is to compare the results of the new code against the existing logic to ensure that you aren't introducing regressions. This week Joe Alcorn shares his work on Laboratory, how the engineers at GitHub inspired him to create it as an analog to the Scientist gem, and how he is using it for his day job.
Feb 26, 2018
Software Architecture For Developers with Neal Ford
00:50:28
Whether it is intentional or accidental, every piece of software has an existing architecture. In this episode Neal Ford discusses the role of a software architect, methods for improving the design of your projects, pitfalls to avoid, and provides some resources for continuing to learn about how to design and build successful systems.
Feb 18, 2018
ZimboPy
00:29:20
Learning to code is one of the most effective ways to be successful in the modern economy. To that end, Marlene Mhangami and Ronald Maravanyika created the ZimboPy organization to teach women and girls in Zimbabwe how to program in Python. In this episode they are joined by Mike Place to discuss how ZimboPy got started, the projects that their students have worked on, and how the community can get involved.
Feb 11, 2018
PyRay: Pure Python 3D Rendering with Rohit Pandey
00:42:41
Using a rendering library can be a difficult task due to dependency issues and complicated APIs. Rohit Pandey wrote PyRay to address these issues in a pure Python library. In this episode he explains how he uses it to gain a more thorough understanding of mathematical models, how it compares to other options, and how you can use it for creating your own videos and GIFs.
Feb 05, 2018
MonkeyType with Carl Meyer and Matt Page
00:48:25
One of the draws of Python is how dynamic and flexible the language can be. Sometimes, that flexibility can be problematic if the format of variables at various parts of your program is unclear or the descriptions are inaccurate. The growing middle ground is to use type annotations as a way of providing some verification of the format of data as it flows through your application and enforcing gradual typing. To make it simpler to get started with type hinting, Carl Meyer and Matt Page, along with other engineers at Instagram, created MonkeyType to analyze your code as it runs and generate the type annotations. In this episode they explain how that process works, how it has helped them reduce bugs in their code, and how you can start using it today.
Jan 28, 2018
Learn Leap Fly: Using Python To Promote Global Literacy with Kjell Wooding
00:43:07
Learning how to read is one of the most important steps in empowering someone to build a successful future. In developing nations, access to teachers and classrooms is not universally available so the Global Learning XPRIZE serves to incentivize the creation of technology that provides children with the tools necessary to teach themselves literacy. Kjell Wooding helped create Learn Leap Fly in order to participate in the competition and used Python and Kivy to build a platform for children to develop their reading skills in a fun and engaging environment. In this episode he discusses his experience participating in the XPRIZE competition, how he and his team built what is now Kasuku Stories, and how Python and its ecosystem helped make it possible.
Jan 21, 2018
Healthchecks.io: Open Source Alerting For Your Cron Jobs with Pēteris Caune
00:27:24
Your backups are running every day, right? Are you sure? What about that daily report job? We all have scripts that need to be run on a periodic basis and it is easy to forget about them, assuming that they are working properly. Sometimes they fail and in order to know when that happens you need a tool that will let you know so that you can find and fix the problem. Pēteris Caune wrote Healthchecks to be that tool and made it available both as an open source project and a hosted version. In this episode he discusses his motivation for starting the project, the lessons he has learned while managing the hosting for it, and how you can start using it today.
Jan 14, 2018
Bonobo: Lightweight ETL Toolkit for Python 3 with Romain Dorgueil
00:53:57
A majority of the work that we do as programmers involves data manipulation in some manner. This can range from large scale collection, aggregation, and statistical analysis across distrbuted systems, or it can be as simple as making a graph in a spreadsheet. In the middle of that range is the general task of ETL (Extract, Transform, and Load) which has its own range of scale. In this episode Romain Dorgueil discusses his experiences building ETL systems and the problems that he routinely encountered that led him to creating Bonobo, a lightweight, easy to use toolkit for data processing in Python 3. He also explains how the system works under the hood, how you can use it for your projects, and what he has planned for the future.
Jan 07, 2018
Orange: Visual Data Mining Toolkit with Janez Demšar and Blaž Zupan
00:49:05
Data mining and visualization are important skills to have in the modern era, regardless of your job responsibilities. In order to make it easier to learn and use these techniques and technologies Blaž Zupan and Janez Demšar, along with many others, have created Orange. In this episode they explain how they built a visual programming interface for creating data analysis and machine learning workflows to simplify the work of gaining insights from the myriad data sources that are available. They discuss the history of the project, how it is built, the challenges that they have faced, and how they plan on growing and improving it in the future.
Dec 31, 2017
Dramatiq: Distributed Task Queue For Python 3 with Bogdan Popa
00:38:13
A majority of projects will eventually need some way of managing periodic or long-running tasks outside of the context of the main application. This is where a distributed task queue becomes useful. For many in the Python community the standard option is Celery, though there are other projects to choose from. This week Bogdan Popa explains why he was dissatisfied with the current landscape of task queues and the features that he decided to focus on while building Dramatiq, a new, opinionated distributed task queue for Python 3. He also describes how it is designed, how you can start using it, and what he has planned for the future.
Dec 24, 2017
Jake Vanderplas: Data Science For Academic Research
00:49:27
Jake Vanderplas is an astronomer by training and a prolific contributor to the Python data science ecosystem. His current role is using Python to teach principles of data analysis and data visualization to students and researchers at the University of Washington. In this episode he discusses how he got started with Python, the challenges of teaching best practices for software engineering and reproducible analysis, and how easy to use tools for data visualization can help democratize access to, and understanding of, data.
Dec 17, 2017
Kenneth Reitz
00:42:49
Kenneth Reitz has contributed many things to the Python community, including projects such as Requests, Pipenv, and Maya. He also started the community written Hitchhiker's Guide to Python, and serves on the board of the Python Software Foundation. This week he talks about his career in the Python community and digs into some of his current work.
Dec 10, 2017
Asphalt: A Framework For Asynchronous Network Applications with Alex Grönholm
00:34:44
As we rely more on small, distributed processes for building our applications, being able to take advantage of asynchronous I/O is increasingly important for performance. This week Alex Grönholm explains how the Asphalt Framework was created to make it easier to build these network oriented software stacks and the technical challenges that he faced in the process.
Dec 03, 2017
Golem: End-To-End Test Automation Framework with Luciano Puccio
00:54:03
The importance of testing your software is widely talked about and well understood. What is not as often discussed is the different types of testing, and how end-to-end tests can benefit your team to ensure proper functioning of your application when it gets released to production. This week Luciano Puccio shares the work that he has done on Golem, a framework for building and executing an automation suite to exercise the entire system from the perspective of the user. He discusses his reasons for creating the project, how he things about testing, and where he plans on taking Golem in the future. Give it a listen and then take it for a test drive.
Nov 25, 2017
Graphite Metrics Stack with Jason Dixon and Dan Cech
01:14:17
Do you know what is happening in your production systems right now? If you have a comprehensive metrics platform then the answer is yes. If your answer is no, then this episode is for you. Jason Dixon and Dan Cech, core maintainers of the Graphite project, talk about how graphite is architected to capture your time series data and give you the ability to use it for answering questions. They cover the challenges that have been faced in evolving the project, the strengths that have let it stand the tests of time, and the features that will be coming in future releases.
Nov 19, 2017
Surprise! Recommendation Algorithms with Nicolas Hug
00:30:22
A relevant and timely recommendation can be a pleasant surprise that will delight your users. Unfortunately it can be difficult to build a system that will produce useful suggestions, which is why this week's guest, Nicolas Hug, built a library to help with developing and testing collaborative recommendation algorithms. He explains how he took the code he wrote for his PhD thesis and cleaned it up to release as an open source library and his plans for future development on it.
Nov 11, 2017
Rasa: Build Your Own AI Chatbot with Joey Faulkner
00:49:00
With the proliferation of messaging applications, there has been a growing demand for bots that can understand our wishes and perform our bidding. The rise of artificial intelligence has brought the capacity for understanding human language. Combining these two trends gives us chatbots that can be used as a new interface to the software and services that we depend on. This week Joey Faulkner shares his work with Rasa Technologies and their open sourced libraries for understanding natural language and how to conduct a conversation. We talked about how the Rasa Core and Rasa NLU libraries work and how you can use them to replace your dependence on API services and own your data.
Nov 04, 2017
Eliot: Effective Logging with Itamar Turner-Trauring
00:49:48
Understanding what is happening in a software system can be difficult, especially when you have inconsistent log messages. Itamar Turner-Trauring created Eliot to make it possible for your project to tell you a story about how transactions flow through your program. In this week's episode we go deep on proper logging practices, anti patterns, and how to improve your ability to debug your software with log messages.
Oct 29, 2017
Donkey: Building Self Driving Cars with Will Roscoe
00:33:49
Do you wish that you had a self-driving car of your own? With Donkey you can make that dream a reality. This week Will Roscoe shares the story of how he got involved in the arena of self-driving car hobbyists and ended up building a Python library to act as his pilot. We talked about the hardware involved, how he has evolved the code to meet unexpected challenges, and how he plans to improve it in the future. So go build your own self driving car and take it for a spin!
Oct 22, 2017
Event Sourcing with John Bywater
01:08:26
The way that your application handles data and the way that it is represented in your database don't always match, leading to a lot of brittle abstractions to reconcile the two. In order to reduce that friction, instead of overwriting the state of your application on every change you can log all of the events that take place and then render the current state from that sequence of events. John Bywater joins me this week to discuss his work on the Event Sourcing library, why you might want to use it in your applications, and how it can change the way that you think about your data.
Oct 15, 2017
Kalliope with Nicolas Marcq and Thibaud Buffet
00:32:33
Wouldn't it be nice to have a personal assistant to answer your questions, help you remember important tasks, and control your environment? Meet Kalliope, a Python powered, modular, voice controlled automation platform. This week Nicolas Marcq and Thibaud Buffet explain how they started the project, what makes it stand out from other open source and commercial options, and how you can start using it today.
Oct 08, 2017
Modoboa with Antoine Nguyen
00:33:18
Email has long been the most commonly used means of communication on the internet. This week Antoine Nguyen talks about his work on the Modoboa project to make hosting your own mail server easier to manage. He discusses how the project got started, the tools that it ties together, and how he used Django to build a webmail and admin interface to make it more approachable.
Oct 01, 2017
QuTiP with Paul Nation
00:36:31
The future of computation and our understanding of the world around us is driven by the quantum world. This week Paul Nation explains how the Quantum Toolbox in Python (QuTiP) is being used in research projects that are expanding our knowledge of the physical universe.
Sep 24, 2017
Lego Robotics with David Lechner and Denis Demidov
00:44:01
Do you like Legos, robots, and Python? This week I am joined by David Lechner and Denis Demidov to talk about the ev3dev project and how you can program your Lego Mindstorms with Python!
Sep 17, 2017
Cloud-Init with Scott Moser
00:49:50
Server administration is a complex endeavor, but there are some tools that can make life easier. If you are running your workload in a cloud environment then cloud-init is here to help. This week Scott Moser explains what cloud-init is, how it works, and how it became the de-facto tool for configuring your Linux servers at boot.
Sep 10, 2017
Biopython with Peter Cock, Wibowo Arindrarto, and Tiago Antão
00:45:29
Advances in the techniques used for genome sequencing are providing us with more information to unlock the secrets of biology. But how does that data get processed and analyzed? With Python of course! This week I am joined by some of the core maintainers of Biopython to discuss what bioinformatics is, how Python is used to help power the research in the field, and how Biopython helps to tie everything together.
Sep 03, 2017
opsdroid with Jacob Tomlinson
00:45:40
Server administration is an activity that often happens in an isolated context in a terminal. ChatOps is a way of bringing that work into a shared environment and unlocking more collaboration. This week Jacob Tomlinson talks about the work he has done on opsdroid, a new bot framework targeted at tying together the various services and environments that modern production systems rely on.
Aug 26, 2017
Ergonomica with Liam Schumm
00:42:04
As developers we spend a lot of our work day in a terminal window, using shells that were designed 30 years ago. This week Liam Schumm joins me to explain why he decided to write a new, more ergonomic shell environment to simplify his workflow.
Aug 20, 2017
Data Retriever with Henry Senyondo
00:17:55
Analyzing and interpreting data is a large portion of the work involved in scientific research. Getting to that point can be a lot of work on its own because of all of the steps required to download, clean, and organize the data prior to analysis. This week Henry Senyondo talks about the work he is doing with Data Retriever to make data preparation as easy as "retriever install" .
Aug 12, 2017
Coverage.py with Ned Batchelder
00:51:54
We write tests to make sure that our code is correct, but how do you make sure the tests are correct? This week Ned Batchelder explains how coverage.py fills that need, how he became the maintainer, and how it works under the hood.
Aug 06, 2017
Yosai with Darin Gordon
00:41:59
For any program that is used by more than one person you need a way to control identity and permissions. There are myriad solutions to that problem, but most of them are tied to a specific framework. Yosai is a flexible, general purpose framework for managing role-based access to your applications that has been decoupled from the underlying platform. This week the author of Yosai, Darin Gordon, joins us to talk about why he started it, his experience porting it from Java, and where he hopes to take it in the future.
Jul 30, 2017
Moving to MongoDB with Michael Kennedy
00:47:58
There are dozens of decisions that need to be made when building an application. Sometimes this can lead to analysis paralysis and prevent you from making progress, so don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good. This week Michael Kennedy shares his experience with evolving his application architecture when his business needs outgrew his initial designs.
Jul 22, 2017
Zulip Chat with Tim Abbott
01:00:39
In modern work environments the email is being edged out by group chat as the preferred method of communication. The majority of the platforms used are commercial and closed source, but there is one project that is working to change that. Zulip is a project that aims to redefine how effective teams communicate and it is already gaining ground. This week Tim Abbott shares the story of how Zulip got started, how it is built, and why you might want to start using it.
Jul 16, 2017
NAPALM with David Barroso and Mircea Ulinic
00:58:09
Routers and switches are the stitches in the invisible fabric of the internet which we all rely on. Managing that hardware has traditionally been a very manual process, but the NAPALM (Network Automation and Programmability Abstraction Layer with Multivendor support) is helping to change that. This week David Barroso and Mircea Ulinic explain how Python is being used to make sure that you can watch those cat videos.
Jul 09, 2017
Automat State Machines with Glyph Lefkowitz
00:49:27
The venerable 'if' statement is a cornerstone of program flow and busines logic, but sometimes it can grow unwieldy and lead to unmaintainable software. One alternative that can result in cleaner and easier to understand code is a state machine. This week Glyph explains how Automat was created and how it has been used to upgrade portions of the Twisted project.
Jul 02, 2017
Nuclear Engineering with Dr. Katy Huff
00:38:15
Access to affordable and consistent electricity is one of the big challenges facing our modern society. Nuclear energy is one answer because of its reliable output and carbon-free operation. To make this energy accessible to a larger portion of the global population further reasearch and innovation in reactor design and fuel sources is necessary, and that is where Python can help. This week Dr. Katy Huff talks about the research that she is doing, the problems facing the nuclear industry, and how she uses Python to make it happen.
Jun 24, 2017
Industrial Automation with Jonas Neubert
01:02:06
We all use items that are produced in factories, but do you ever stop to think about the code that powers that production? This week Jonas Neubert takes us behind the scenes and talks about the systems and software that power modern facilities, the development workflows, and how Python gets used to tie everything together.
Jun 18, 2017
Jedi Code Completion with David Halter
00:42:55
When you're writing python code and your editor offers some suggestions, where does that suggestion come from? The most likely answer is Jedi! This week David Halter explains the history of how the Jedi auto completion library was created, how it works under the hood, and where he plans on taking it.
Jun 11, 2017
Coconut with Evan Hubinger
00:33:31
Functional programming is gaining in popularity as we move to an increasingly parallel world. Sometimes you want access to purely functional syntax and capabilities but you don't want to have to learn an entirely new language. Coconut is here to help! This week Evan Hubinger explains how Coconut is a functional language that compiles to Python and can be mixed and matched with the rest of your program.
Jun 04, 2017
Cauldron with Scott Ernst
00:37:51
The notebook format that has been exemplified by the IPython/Jupyter project has gained in popularity among data scientists. While the existing formats have proven their value, they are still susceptible with difficulties in collaboration and maintainability. Scott Ernst created the Cauldron notebook to be testable, production ready, and friendly to version control. This week we explore the capabilities, use cases, and architecture of Cauldron and how you can start using it today!
May 28, 2017
Tech Debt and Refactoring at Yelp! with Andrew Mason
00:34:26
Tech Debt and Refactoring at Yelp! with Andrew Mason - Episode 110
May 20, 2017
LBRY with Jeremy Kauffman
00:39:39
Content discovery and delivery and how it works in the digital realm is one of the most critical pieces of our modern economy. The blockchain is one of the most disruptive and transformative technologies to arrive in recent years. This week Jeremy Kauffman explains how the company and platform of LBRY are combining the two in an attempt to redefine how content creators and consumers interact by creating a new distributed marketplace for all kinds of media.
May 14, 2017
Python Goes To The Movies with Dhruv Govil
00:41:41
Movies are magic, and Python is part of what makes that magic possible. We go behind the curtain this week with Dhruv Govil to learn about how Python gets used to bring a movie from concept to completion. He shares the story of how he got started in film, the tools that he uses day to day, and some resources for further learning.
May 06, 2017
Scapy with Guillaume Valadon
00:31:58
Network protocols are often inscrutable, but if you have an effective way to experiment with them then they expose a lot of power. This week Guillaume Valadon explains how Scapy can be used to inspect your network traffic, test the security of your systems, and develop brand new protocols, all in Python!
Apr 29, 2017
yt-project with Nathan Goldbaum and John Zuhone
00:38:09
Astrophysics and cosmology are fields that require working with complex multidimensional data to simulate the workings of our universe. The yt project was created to make working with this data and providing useful visualizations easy and fun. This week Nathan Goldbaum and John Zuhone share the story of how yt got started, how it works, and how it is being used right now.
Apr 22, 2017
Scikit-Image with Stefan van der Walt and Juan Nunez-Iglesias
00:41:53
Computer vision is a complex field that spans industries with varying needs and implementations. Scikit-Image is a library that provides tools and techniques for people working in the sciences to process the visual data that is critical to their research. This week Stefan Van der Walt and Juan Nunez-Iglesias, co-authors of Elegant SciPy, talk about how the project got started, how it works, and how they are using it to power their experiments.
Apr 16, 2017
Oscar Ecommerce with David Winterbottom and Michael van Tellingen
00:53:37
If you have a product to sell, whether it is a physical good or a subscription service, then you need a way to manage your transactions. The Oscar ecommerce framework for Django is a flexible, extensible, and well built way for you to add that functionality to your website. This week David Winterbottom and Michael van Tellingen talk about how the project got started, how it works under the covers, and how you can start using it today.
Apr 08, 2017
Duplicity with Kenneth Loafman
00:35:16
Everyone who uses a computer on a regular basis knows the importance of backups. Duplicity is one of the most widely used backup technologies, and it's written in Python! This week Kenneth Loafman shares how Duplicity got started, how it works, and why you should be using it every day.
Apr 01, 2017
Digital Identity, Privacy, and Security with Brian Warner
00:46:43
As the internet and digital technologies continue to infiltrate our way of life, we are forced to consider how our concepts of identity and security are reflected in these spaces. Brian Warner joins me this week to discuss his work on privacy focused projects that he has worked on, including the Tahoe LAFS, Firefox Sync, and Magic Wormhole. He also has some intriguing ideas about how we can replace passwords and what it means to have an online identity.
Mar 25, 2017
Crossbar.io with Tobias Oberstein and Alexander Gödde
00:52:47
As our system architectures and the Internet of Things continue to push us towards distributed logic we need a way to route the traffic between those various components. Crossbar.io is the original implementation of the Web Application Messaging Protocol (WAMP) which combines Remote Procedure Calls (RPC) with Publish/Subscribe (PubSub) communication patterns into a single communication layer. In this episode Tobias Oberstein describes the use cases and design patterns that become possible when you have event-based RPC in a high-throughput and low-latency system.
Mar 18, 2017
MetPy: Taming The Weather With Python
00:52:22
What's the weather tomorrow? That's the question that meteorologists are always trying to get better at answering. This week the developers of MetPy discuss how their project is used in that quest and the challenges that are inherent in atmospheric and weather research. It is a fascinating look at dealing with uncertainty and using messy, multidimensional data to model a massively complex system.
Mar 11, 2017
The Update Framework: Securing Your Software Updates with Justin Cappos
00:37:21
If you write software then there's a good probability that you have had to deal with installing dependencies, but did you stop to ask whether you're installing what you think you are? My guest this week is Professor Justin Cappos from the Secure Systems Lab at New York University and he joined me to discuss his work on The Update Framework which was built to guarantee that you never install a compromised package in your systems.
Mar 04, 2017
Pandas with Jeff Reback
00:49:22
Pandas is one of the most versatile and widely used tools for data manipulation and analysis in the Python ecosystem. This week Jeff Reback explains why that is, how you can use it to make your life easier, and what you can look forward to in the months to come.
Feb 26, 2017
PyTables with Francesc Alted
00:49:15
HDF5 is a file format that supports fast and space efficient analysis of large datasets. PyTables is a project that wraps and expands on the capabilities of HDF5 to make it easy to integrate with the larger Python data ecosystem. Francesc Alted explains how the project got started, how it works, and how it can be used for creating sharable and archivable data sets.
Feb 18, 2017
SKIDL with Dave Vandenbout
00:40:49
As circuits and electronic components become more complex, visual circuit building tools are more difficult to use effectively. If you wish that you could just write your circuits in Python then you're in luck! Dave Vandenbout created a library called SKIDL that brings the power and flexibility of Python to the realm of Electrical Engineering and he tells us all about it in this weeks show.
Feb 11, 2017
Parsing and Parsers with Dave Beazley and Erik Rose
00:50:00
If you have ever found yourself frustrated by a complicated regular expression or wondered how you can build your own dialect of Python then you need a parser. Dave Beazley and Erik Rose talk about what parsers are, how some of them work, and what you can do with them in this episode.
Feb 04, 2017
Home Assistant with Paulus Schoutsen
00:41:46
Don't you wish you could make all of your devices talk to each other? Check out Home Assistant, the Python 3 platform for unified automation. Paulus Schoutsen shares the story of how the project got started, what makes it tick, and how you can use it today!
Jan 28, 2017
Cryptography with Paul Kehrer
00:42:00
Sooner or later you will need to encrypt or hash some data. Thankfully we have the Cryptography library, along with the other projects maintained by the Python Cryptographic Authority, to make sure that your crypto is done right. In this episode Paul Kehrer talks about how the PyCA got started, the projects that they maintain, and how you can start using cryptography in your programs today.
Jan 21, 2017
Translate House with Dwayne Bailey and Ryan Northey
00:58:52
What is internationalization, when should you add it to your program, and how do you get started? This week Dwayne Bailey and Ryan Northey tell us about their work with Translate House and the different projects that they have built to make translating your software easier.
Jan 14, 2017
Morepath with Martijn Faassen
01:06:05
Python has a wide and growing variety of web frameworks to choose from, but if you want one with super powers then you need Morepath. This week Martijn Faassen shares the story of how Morepath was created, how it differentiates itself from the other available options, and how you can use it to power your next project.
Jan 07, 2017
ERPNext with Rushabh Mehta
00:30:33
If you need to track all of the pieces of a business and don’t want to use 15 different tools then you should probably be looking at an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) system. Unfortunately, a lot of them are big, clunky, and difficult to manage, so Rushabh Mehta decided to build one that isn’t. ERPNext is an open-source, web-based, easy to use ERP platform built with Python.
Dec 31, 2016
Jackie Kazil
00:39:47
Jackie Kazil has led a distinguished and varied career with a strong focus on providing information and tools that empower others. This includes her work in data journalism, as a presidential innovation fellow, co-founding 18F, co-authoring a book, and being elected to the board of the Python Software Foundation. In this episode she shares these stories and more with us and how Python has helped her along the way.
Dec 24, 2016
Weblate with Michal Čihař
00:32:34
Adding translations to our projects makes them usable in more places by more people which, ultimately, makes them more valuable. Managing the localization process can be difficult if you don't have the right tools, so this week Michal čihař tells us about the Weblate project and how it simplifies the process of integrating your translations with your source code.
Dec 17, 2016
SpaCy with Matthew Honnibal
00:36:47
As the amount of text available on the internet and in businesses continues to increase, the need for fast and accurate language analysis becomes more prominent. This week Matthew Honnibal, the creator of SpaCy, talks about his experiences researching natural language processing and creating a library to make his findings accessible to industry.
Dec 11, 2016
Kinto with Alexis Metaireau and Mathieu Leplatre
00:56:01
Are you looking for a backend as a service offering where you have full control of your data? Look no further than Kinto! This week Alexis Metaireau and Mathieu Leplatre share the story of how Kinto was created, how it works under the covers, and some of the ways that it is being used at Mozilla and around the web.
Dec 04, 2016
Plone with Eric Steele
00:50:26
Plone is one of the first CMS projects to be built using Python and it is still being actively developed. This week Eric Steele, the release manager for Plone, tells us about how it got started, how it is architected, and how the community is one of its greatest strengths.
Nov 26, 2016
Retrospective
00:37:29
In this episode Chris and I look back at the past 83 episodes of the show and talk about what we learned, what we've enjoyed, and some of the highlights.
Nov 19, 2016
HouseCanary with Travis Jungroth
00:39:45
Housing is something that we all have experience with, but many don't understand the complexities of the market. This week Travis Jungroth talks about how House Canary uses data to make the business of real estate more transparent.
Nov 12, 2016
Mycroft with Steve Penrod
01:05:12
Speech is the most natural interface for communication, and yet we force ourselves to conform to the limitations of our tools in our daily tasks. As computation becomes cheaper and more ubiquitous and artificial intelligence becomes more capable, voice becomes a more practical means of controlling our environments. This week Steve Penrod shares the work that is being done on the Mycroft project and the company of the same name. He explains how he met the other members of the team, how the project got started, what it can do right now, and where they are headed in the future.
Nov 05, 2016
Annapoornima Koppad
00:19:23
Annapoornima Koppad is a director of the PSF, founder of the Bangalore chapter of PyLadies, and is a Python instructor at the Indian Institute of Science. In this week's episode she talks about how she got started with Python, her experience running the PyLadies meetup, and working with the PSF.
Oct 29, 2016
Python for GIS with Sean Gillies
00:37:49
Location is an increasingly relevant aspect of software systems as we have more internet connected devices with GPS capabilities. GIS (Geographic Information Systems) are used for processing and analyzing this data, and fortunately Python has a suite of libraries to facilitate these endeavors. This week Sean Gillies, an author and contributor of many of these tools, shares the story of his career and contributions, and the work that he is doing at MapBox.
Oct 22, 2016
K Lars Lohn
00:37:49
K Lars Lohn has had a long and varied career, spending his most recent years at Mozilla. This week he shares some of his stories about getting involved with Python, his work with Mozilla, and his inspiration for the closing keynote at PyCon US 2016. He also elaborates on the intricate mazes that he draws and his life as an organic farmer in Oregon.
Oct 15, 2016
Lorena Mesa
00:42:22
One of the great strengths of the Python community is the diversity of backgrounds that our practitioners come from. This week Lorena Mesa talks about how her focus on political science and civic engagement led her to a career in software engineering and data analysis. In addition to her professional career she founded the Chicago chapter of PyLadies, helps teach women and kids how to program, and was voted onto the board of the PSF.
Oct 08, 2016
Podbuzzz with Kyle Martin
00:38:36
Podcasts are becoming more popular now than they ever have been. Podbuzzz is a service for helping podcasters to track their reviews and imporove SEO to reach a wider audience. In this episode we spoke with Kyle Martin about his experience using Python to build Podbuzzz and manage it in production.
Oct 01, 2016
PsychoPy with Jonathan Peirce
01:12:10
We’re delving into the complex workings of your mind this week on Podcast.__init__ with Jonathan Peirce. He tells us about how he started the PsychoPy project and how it has grown in utility and popularity over the years. We discussed the ways that it has been put to use in myriad psychological experiments, the inner workings of how to design and execute those experiments, and what is in store for its future.
Sep 25, 2016
Sandstorm.io with Asheesh Laroia
00:00:00
Sandstorm.io is an innovative platform that aims to make self-hosting applications easier and more maintainable for the average individual. This week we spoke with Asheesh Laroia about why running your own services is desirable, how they have made security a first priority, how Sandstorm is architected, and what the installation process looks like.
Sep 17, 2016
Python at Zalando
00:40:26
Episode 74 - Python at Zalando
Sep 10, 2016
Alex Martelli
00:00:00
Episode 73 - Alex Martelli
Sep 03, 2016
Dave Beazley
00:00:00
Episode 72 - Dave Beazley
Aug 27, 2016
GenSim with Radim Řehůřek
00:53:28
Being able to understand the context of a piece of text is generally thought to be the domain of human intelligence. However, topic modeling and semantic analysis can be used to allow a computer to determine whether different messages and articles are about the same thing. This week we spoke with Radim Řehůřek about his work on GenSim, which is a Python library for performing unsupervised analysis of unstructured text and applying machine learning models to the problem of natural language understanding.
Aug 20, 2016
Python on Windows with Steve Dower
00:00:00
Episode 70 - Python on Windows with Steve Dower
Aug 13, 2016
PyCon Canada with Francis Deslauriers and Peter McCormick
00:46:00
Aside from the national Python conferences such as PyCon US and EuroPyCon there are a number of regional conferences that operate at a smaller scale to service their local communities. This week we interviewed Peter McCormick and Francis Deslauriers about their work organizing PyCon Canada to provide a venue for Canadians to talk about how they are using the language. If you happen to be near Toronto in November then you should get a ticket and help contribute to their success!
Aug 06, 2016
Test Engineering with Cris Medina
00:58:09
We all know that testing is an important part of software and systems development. The problem is that as our systems and applications grow, the amount of testing necessary increases at an exponential rate. Cris Medina joins us this week to talk about some of the problems and approaches associated with testing these complex systems and some of the ways that Python can help.
Jul 30, 2016
Crossing The Streams - Talk Python with Michael Kennedy
01:17:47
The same week that we released our first episode of Podcast.__init__, Michael Kennedy was publishing the very first episode of Talk Python To Me. The years long drought of podcasts about Python has been quenched with a veritable flood of quality content as we have both continued to deliver the stories of the wonderful people who make our community such a wonderful place. This week we interviewed Michael about what inspired him to get started, his process and experience as Talk Python continues to evolve, and how that has led him to create online training courses alongside the podcast. He also interviewed us, so check out this weeks episode of Talk Python To Me for a mirror image of this show!
Jul 23, 2016
Zorg with Gunther Cox and Kevin Brown
00:25:18
Everyone loves to imagine what they would do if they had their own robot. This week we spoke with Gunther Cox and Kevin Brown about their work on Zorg, which is a Python library for building a robot of your own! We discussed how the project got started, what platforms it supports, and some of the projects that have been built with it. Give it a listen and then get building!
Jul 17, 2016
Mypy with David Fisher and Greg Price
01:00:20
As Python developers we are fond of the dynamic nature of the language. Sometimes, though, it can get a bit too dynamic and that’s where having some type information would come in handy. Mypy is a project that aims to add that missing level of detail to function and variable definitions so that you don’t have to go hunting 5 levels deep in the stack to understand what shape that data structure is supposed to be. This week we spoke with David Fisher and Greg Price about their work on Mypy and its use within Dropbox and the broader community. They explained how it got started, how it works under the covers, and why you should consider adding it to your projects.
Jul 10, 2016
BeeWare with Russell Keith-Magee
01:10:35
When you have good tools it makes the work you do even more enjoyable. Russel Keith-Magee has been building up a set of tools that are aiming to let you write graphical interfaces in Python and run them across all of your target platforms. Most recently he has been working on a capstone project called Toga that targets the Android and iOS platforms with the same set of code. In this episode we explored his journey through programming and how he has built and designed the Beeware suite. Give it a listen and then try out some or all of his excellent projects!
Jul 02, 2016
Armin Ronacher
01:00:20
Armin Ronacher is a prolific contributor to the Python software ecosystem, creating such widely used projects as Flask and Jinja2. This week we got the opportunity to talk to him about how he got his start with Python and what has inspired him to create the various tools that have made our lives easier. We also discussed his experiences working in Rust and how it can interface with Python.
Jun 26, 2016
Bandit with Tim Kelsey, Travis McPeak, and Eric Brown
00:28:48
Making sure that your code is secure is a difficult task. In this episode we spoke to Eric Brown, Travis McPeak, and Tim Kelsey about their work on the Bandit library, which is a static analysis engine to help you find potential vulnerabilities before your application reaches production. We discussed how it works, how to make it fit your use case, and why it was created. Give the show a listen and then go start scanning your projects!
Jun 18, 2016
Sentry with David Cramer
01:09:27
As developers we all have to deal with bugs sometimes, but we don’t have to make our users deal with them too. Sentry is a project that automatically detects errors in your applications and surfaces the necessary information to help you fix them quickly. In this episode we interviewed David Cramer about the history of Sentry and how he has built a team around it to provide a hosted offering of the open source project. We covered how the Sentry project got started, how it scales, and how to run a company based on open source.
Jun 12, 2016
Mercurial with Augie Fackler
00:55:11
As developers, one of the most important tools that we use daily is our version control system. Mercurial is one such tool that is written in Python, making it eminently flexible, customizable, and incredibly powerful. This week we spoke with Augie Fackler to learn about the history, features, and future of Mercurial.
Jun 05, 2016
Pillow with Alex Clark
00:20:01
If you need to work with images the Pillow is the library to use. The Python Image Libary (PIL) has long been the gold standard for resizing, analyzing, and processing pictures in Python. Pillow is the modern fork that is bringing the PIL into the future so that we can all continue to use it moving forward. This week I spoke with Alex Clark about what first led him to fork the project and his experience maintaining it, including the migration to Python 3.
May 28, 2016
Wagtail with Tom Dyson
00:52:32
If you are operating a website that needs to publish and manage content on a regular basis, a CMS (Content Management System) becomes the obvious choice for reducing your workload. There are a plethora of options available, but if you are looking for a solution that leverages the power of Python and exposes its flexibility then you should take a serious look at Wagtail. In this episode Tom Dyson explains how Wagtail came to be created, what sets it apart from other options, and when you should implement it for your projects.
May 21, 2016
Buildbot with Pierre Tardy
01:25:07
As technology professionals, we need to make sure that the software we write is reliably bug free and the best way to do that is with a continuous integration and continuous deployment pipeline. This week we spoke with Pierre Tardy about Buildbot, which is a Python framework for building and maintaining CI/CD workflows to keep our software projects on track.
May 14, 2016
Onion IoT with Lazar and Zheng
00:35:51
One of the biggest new trends in technology is the Internet of Things and one of the driving forces is the wealth of new sensors and platforms that are being continually introduced. In this episode we spoke with the founder and head engineer of one such platform named Onion. The Omega board is a new hardware platform that runs OpenWRT and lets you configure it using a number of languages, not least of which is Python.
May 07, 2016
LibCloud with Anthony Shaw
01:24:34
More and more of our applications are running in the cloud and there are increasingly more providers to choose from. The LibCloud project is a Python library to help us manage the complexity of our environments from a uniform and pleasant API. In this episode Anthony Shaw joins us to explain how LibCloud works, the community that builds and supports it, and the myriad ways in which it can be used. We also got a peek at some of the plans for the future of the project.
May 01, 2016
Pip and the Python Package Authority with Donald Stufft
00:52:59
As Python developers we have all used pip to install the different libraries and projects that we need for our work, but have you ever wondered about who works on pip and how the package archive we all know and love is maintained? In this episode we interviewed Donald Stufft who is the primary maintainer of pip and the Python Package Index about how he got involved with the projects, what kind of work is involved, and what is on the roadmap. Give it a listen and then give him a big thank you for all of his hard work!
Apr 23, 2016
StackStorm with Tomaž Muraus and Patrick Hoolboom
00:59:22
If you are responsible for managing any amount of servers, then you know that automation is critical for maintaining your sanity. This week we spoke with Tomaž Muraus and Patrick Hoolboom about their work on StackStorm, which is a platform for tracking and reacting to events in your infrastructure. By allowing you to register actions with event triggers it frees you from having to worry about a whole class of concerns so that you can focus on building new capabilities rather than babysitting what you already have.
Apr 16, 2016
Hypothesis with David MacIver
00:47:01
Writing tests is important for the stability of our projects and our confidence when making changes. One issue that we must all contend with when crafting these tests is whether or not we are properly exercising all of the edge cases. Property based testing is a method that attempts to find all of those edge cases by generating randomized inputs to your functions until a failing combination is found. This approach has been popularized by libraries such as Quickcheck in Haskell, but now Python has an offering in this space in the form of Hypothesis. This week, the creator and maintainer of Hypothesis, David MacIver, joins us to tell us about his work on it and how it works to improve our confidence in the stability of our code.
Apr 09, 2016
Pyjion with Dino Viehland and Brett Cannon
00:00:00
Episode 51 - Pyjion with Dino Viehland and Brett Cannon
Apr 01, 2016
Transcrypt with Jacques de Hooge
00:00:00
Episode 50 - Transcrypt with Jacques de Hooge
Mar 26, 2016
VPython with Ruth Chabay and Bruce Sherwood
01:03:02
Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to generate interactive 3D visualizations of physical systems in a declarative manner with Python? In this episode we spoke with Ruth Chabay and Bruce Sherwood about the VPython project which does just that. They tell us about how the use VPython in their classrooms, how the project got started, and the work they have done to bring it into the browser.
Mar 18, 2016
PyData London with Ian Ozsvald and Emlyn Clay
01:03:11
Ian Ozsvald and Emlyn Clay are co-chairs of the London chapter of the PyData organization. In this episode we talked to them about their experience managing the PyData conference and meetup, what the PyData organization does, and their thoughts on using Python for data analytics in their work.
Mar 12, 2016
Efene with Mariano Guerra
00:59:35
Efene is a language that runs on the Erlang Virtual Machine (BEAM) and is inspired by the Zen of Python. It is intended as a bridge language that serves to ease the transition into the Erlang ecosystem for people who are coming from languages like Python. In this episode I spoke with Mariano Guerra, the creator of Efene, about how Python influenced his design choices, why you might want to use it, and when Python is the better tool.
Mar 04, 2016
Functional Python with Matthew Rocklin and Alexander Schepanovsky
01:20:02
What is functional programming, why would you want to use it, and how can you get started with it in Python? Our guests this week, Matthew Rocklin and Alexander Schepanovsky, help us understand all of that and more. Matthew and Alexander have each created their own Python libraries to make it easier to employ functional paradigms in your Python code. In this episode they help us understand the benefits that functional styles can have and the benefits that can be realized by trying them out for yourself.
Feb 29, 2016
Cython with Craig Citro and Robert Bradshaw
00:52:02
Do you find yourself reaching for a different language when you need some extra speed? With Cython you can get the best of both worlds by writing your code in Python and executing it as compiled code. In this episode we were joined by Craig Citro and Robert Bradshaw from the Cython project to discuss how and when you might want to incorporate it into your applications.
Feb 19, 2016
Airflow with Maxime Beauchemin
01:03:17
Are you struggling with trying to manage a series of related, interdependent batch jobs? Then you should check out Airflow. In this episode we spoke with the project’s creator Maxime Beauchemin about what inspired him to create it, how it works, and why you might want to use it. Airflow is a data pipeline management tool that will simplify how you build, deploy, and monitor your complex data processing tasks so that you can focus on getting the insights you need from your data.
Feb 13, 2016
WSGI 2
01:04:46
The Web Server Gateway Interface, or WSGI for short, is a long-standing pillar of the Python ecosystem. It has enabled a vast number of web frameworks to proliferate by not having to worry about how exactly to interact with the HTTP protocol and focus instead on building a library that is robust, extensible, and easy to use. With recent evolutions to how we interact with the web, it appears that WSGI may be in need of an update and that is what our guests on this episode came to discuss. Cory Benfield is leading an effort to determine what if any modifications should be made to the WSGI standard or if it is time to retire it in favor of something new. Andrew Godwin has been hard at work building the Channels framework for Django to allow for interoperability with websockets. They bring their unique perspectives to bear on how and why we may want to consider bringing WSGI into the current state of the web.
Feb 07, 2016
SymPy With Aaron Meurer
01:03:06
Looking for an open source alternative to Mathematica or MatLab for solving algebraic equations? Look no further than the excellent SymPy project. It is a well built and easy to use Computer Algebra System (CAS) and in this episode we spoke with the current project maintainer Aaron Meurer about its capabilities and when you might want to use it.
Jan 31, 2016
RPython with Maciej Fijalkowski
00:35:34
RPython is a subset of Python that is used for writing high performance interpreters for dynamic languages. The most well-known product of this tooling is the PyPy interpreter. In this episode we had the pleasure of speaking with Maciej Fijalkowski about what RPython is, what it isn’t, what kinds of projects it has been used for, and what makes it so interesting.
Jan 22, 2016
Ben Darnell on Tornado
01:06:27
If you are trying to build a web application in Python that can scale to a high number of concurrent users, or you want to leverage the power of websockets, then Tornado just may be the library you need. In this episode we interview Ben Darnell about his work as the maintainer of the Tornado project and how it can be used in a number of ways to power your next high traffic site.
Jan 16, 2016
Yves Hilpisch on Quantitative Finance
01:10:30
Yves Hilpisch is a founder of The Python Quants, a consultancy that offers services in the space of quantitative financial analysis. In addition, they have created open source libraries to help with that analysis. In this episode we spoke with him about what quantitative finance is, how Python is used in that domain, and what kinds of knowledge are necessary to do these kinds of analysis.
Jan 08, 2016
Scott Sanderson on Algorithmic Trading
01:27:53
Because of its easy learning curve and broad extensibility Python has found its way into the realm of algorithmic trading at Quantopian. In this episode we spoke with Scott Sanderson about what algorithmic trading is, how it differs from high frequency trading, and how they leverage Python for empowering everyone to try their hand at it.
Jan 03, 2016
The PEP Talk
01:45:41
The Python language is built by and for its community. In order to add a new feature, change the specification, or create a new policy the first step is to submit a proposal for consideration. Those proposals are called PEPs, or Python Enhancement Proposals. In this episode we had the great pleasure of speaking with three of the people who act as stewards for this process to learn more about how it got started, how it works, and what impacts it has had.
Dec 27, 2015
Eric Holscher on Documentation and Read The Docs
01:05:33
The first place we all go for learning about new libraries is the documentation. Lack of effective documentation can limit the adoption of an otherwise excellent project. In this episode we spoke with Eric Holscher, co-creator of Read The Docs, about why documentation is important and how we can all work to make it better.
Dec 20, 2015
Sylvain Thénault on ASTroid
00:47:28
The Python AST (Abstract Syntax Tree) is a powerful abstraction that allows for a number of innovative projects. ASTroid is a library that provides additional convenience methods to simplify working with the AST. In this episode we spoke with Sylvain Thénault from Logilab about his work on ASTroid and how it is used to power the popular PyLint static analysis tool.
Dec 12, 2015
Stuart Mumford on SunPy
00:40:38
What is Solar Physics? How does it differ from AstroPhysics? What does this all have to do with Python? In this episode we answer all of those questions when we interview Stuart Mumford about his work on SunPy. So put on your sunglasses and learn about how to use Python to decipher the secrets of our closest star.
Dec 04, 2015
Maneesha Sane on Software and Data Carpentry
00:44:28
The Software and Data Carpentry organizations have a mission of making it easier for scientists and data analysts in academia to replicate and review each others work. In order to achieve this goal they conduct training and workshops that teach modern best practices in software and data engineering, including version control and proper data management. In this episode we had the opportunity to speak with Maneesha Sane, the program coordinator for both organizations, so that we could learn more about how these projects are related and how they approach their mission.
Nov 25, 2015
Erik Tollerud on AstroPy
00:49:18
Erik Tollerud is an astronomer with a background in software engineering. He leverages these backgrounds to help build and maintain the AstroPy framework and its associated modules. AstroPy is a set of Python libraries that provide useful mechanisms for astronomers and astrophysicists to perform analyses on the data that they receive from observational equipment such as the mountain observatory that Erik was preparing to visit when we talked to him about his work. If you like Python and space then you should definitely give this episode a listen!
Nov 20, 2015
Dariusz Suchojad on Zato
00:42:26
Service integration platforms have traditionally been the realm of Java projects. Zato is a project that shows Python is a great choice for systems integration due to its flexibility and wealth of useful libraries. In this episode we had the opportunity to speak with Dariusz Suchojad, the creator of Zato about why he decided to make it and what makes it interesting. Listen to the episode and then take it for a spin.
Nov 13, 2015
Tom Rothamel on Ren’Py
00:58:52
Tom Rothamel is an embedded systems engineer who spends his free time working on Ren’Py, a visual novel engine written in Python. Ren’Py allows you to write interactive fiction experiences and deploy them across desktop and mobile platforms. By creating a purpose-built DSL for describing the interactions, users of Ren’Py can focus on crafting polished experiences without fighting through the vagaries of programming languages, while still providing access to the internals when necessary. Listen to our interview with Tom to learn more about this long-running project and what makes it so interesting.
Nov 06, 2015
Anthony Scopatz on Xonsh
00:57:53
Anthony Scopatz is the creator of the Python shell Xonsh in addition to his work as a professor of nuclear physics. In this episode we talked to him about why he created Xonsh, how it works, and what his goals are for the project. It is definitely worth trying out Xonsh as it greatly simplifies the day-to-day use of your terminal environment by adding easily accessible python interoperability.
Oct 31, 2015
Kay Hayen on Nuitka
01:34:35
Kay Hayen is a systems engineer from Germany who has dedicated his spare time to the creation of Nuitka, a library that will compile your Python project to C++. In this episode we talked to Kay about what inspired him to create the project, how it operates, and some of the challenges he has faced. It is a very interesting project and it has the potential to let you run your Python code in a whole new way!
Oct 24, 2015
Trent Nelson on PyParallel
01:12:43
Trent Nelson is a software engineer working with Continuum Analytics and a core contributor to CPython. He started experimenting with a way to sidestep the restrictions of the Global Interpreter Lock without discarding its benefits and that has become the PyParallel project. We had the privilege of discussing the details around this innovative experiment with Trent and learning more about the challenges he has experienced, what motivated him to start the project, and what it can offer to the community.
Oct 14, 2015
Dag Brattli on RxPy
00:33:01
Dag Brattli is an engineer with Microsoft and in his spare time he created the ported the Reactive Xtensions framework to Python in the form of the RxPy library. In this episode we had the opportunity to speak with Dag and learn more about what ReactiveX is, why it is useful and how you can use it in your Python programs. It is definitely a very powerful programming patern when manipulating data streams which is becoming increasingly common in modern software architectures.
Oct 09, 2015
uWSGI Core Developers
00:34:59
uWSGI is one of the most versatile application servers available. It was originally written for running Python applications and has since gained functionality to support Perl, Ruby, PHP, and more in addition to the incredible feature set. In this episode Tobias got to interview three of the core developers of this project and find out more about how the different pieces of it fit together and what its future holds.
Oct 03, 2015
Griatch on Evennia (Making MUDs with Python)
01:14:03
Griatch is an incredibly talented digital artist, professional astronomer and the maintainer of the Evennia project for creating MUDs in Python. We got the opportunity to speak with him about what MUDs are, why they’re interesting and how Evennia simplifies the process of creating and extending them. If you’re interested in building your own virtual worlds, this episode is a great place to start.
Sep 29, 2015
Hylang Core Developers
00:55:48
We got the chance to talk to some of the core developers of Hylang, which is a Lisp dialect that runs on the Python VM! We talked about how it got started, how it works and why you should try it. Of particular interest is our discussion about using Hylang to backport language features, or create entirely new ones due to the power of Lisp and the Python AST (Abstract Syntax Tree). If you need to level up your Lisp knowledge, they gave us a great list of references to help out.
Sep 19, 2015
Bryan Van de Ven on Bokeh
00:57:18
Bryan Van de Ven is the project maintainer for Bokeh, a plotting and visualization toolkit that allows Python developers to easily create attractive interactive visualizations for the web. We talked about the project’s history, some interesting use cases for it, and what its near future looks like. Bryan also told us about how Bokeh compares to some of the other visualization libraries in both Python and Javascript, as well as how to use Bokeh from other languages such as Scala and Lua.
Sep 08, 2015
Jessica McKellar
00:51:23
We got the chance to talk to Jessica McKellar about her work in the Python community. She told us about her experience as a director for the PSF, working as the diversity outreach manager for PyCon, and being a champion for improving the on-boarding experience for new users of Python. We also discussed perceptions around the performance of Python and some of the work being done to improve concurrency, as well as her work with OpenHatch.
Sep 01, 2015
Static Site Generators with Justin Mayer and Roberto Alsina
01:32:35
In this episode we had the opportunity to discuss the world of static site generators with Roberto Alsina of the Nikola project and Justin Mayer of the Pelican project. They explained what static site generators are and why you might want to use one. We asked about why you should choose a Python based static site generator, theming and markup support as well as metadata formats and documentation. We also debated what makes Pelican and Nikola so popular compared to other projects.
Aug 25, 2015
Al Sweigart on Python for Non-Programmers
00:52:51
We got the opportunity to speak with Al Sweigart about his work on books like ‘Automate The Boring Stuff With Python’ and ‘Invent With Python’. We discussed how Python can be useful to people who don’t work as software engineers, why coding literacy is important for the general populace and how that will affect the ways in which we interact with software.
Aug 16, 2015
Liza Avramenko on CheckIO and Empire of Code
00:48:15
In this episode we talked to Liza Avramenko, the CEO of CheckIO, about Empire of Code and CheckIO. We discussed what differentiates them from each other and from the other coding games that have been spreading on the internet. One of the main differentiators for CheckIO in particular is the strong focus on community. The bottom line is that if you use Python then you should check out CheckIO and Empire of Code as a great way to practice your skills.
Aug 06, 2015
Glyph on Ethics in Software
01:19:23
In this episode we had a nice long conversation with Glyph Lefkowitz of Twisted fame about his views on the need for an established code of ethics in the software industry. Some of the main points that were covered include the need for maintaining a proper scope in the ongoing discussion, the responsibilities of individuals and corporations, and how any such code might compare with those employed by other professions. This is something that every engineer should be thinking about and the material that we cover will give you a good starting point when talking to your compatriots.
Aug 03, 2015
Holger Krekel on Py.Test
01:11:00
In this episode we talked to Holger Krekel about the py.test library. We discussed the various styles of testing that it supports, the plugin system and how it compares to the unittest library. We also reviewed some of the challenges around packaging and releasing Python software and our thoughts on some ways that they can be improved.
Jul 24, 2015
Damien George Talks To Us About MicroPython
00:49:17
We talked to Damien George about his work on the Micro Python interpreter and the PyBoard SOC (Systom On a Chip). The combination of the interpreter and SOC allows Python developers to get involved in hardware hacking, as well as letting electronics afficionados try their hand at development. Damien explained to us where this fits in with the expanding landscape of low cost embedded devices and why you should get one to start playing with it.
Jul 16, 2015
Allen Downey on Teaching Computer Science with Python
00:37:42
Episode 14 - Allen Downey on Teaching Computer Science with Python
Jul 09, 2015
Jacob Kovac on KivEnt
01:08:41
Episode 13 - Jacob Kovac on KivEnt
Jul 03, 2015
Eric Schles on Fighting Human Trafficking with Python
01:13:09
Episode 12 - Eric Schles on Fighting Human Trafficking with Python
Jun 25, 2015
Naomi Ceder, Lynn Root and Tracy Osborn on Diversity in the Python Community
00:49:14
Episode 11 - Naomi Ceder, Lynn Root and Tracy Osborn on Diversity in the Python Community
Jun 18, 2015
Brian Granger and Fernando Perez of the IPython Project
01:21:48
Episode 10 - Brian Granger and Fernando Perez of the IPython Project
Jun 13, 2015
David Baumgold on Flask-Dance, WebhookDB and Open EdX
00:00:00
Episode 9 - David Baumgold on Flask-Dance, WebhookDB and Open EdX
Jun 07, 2015
Mark Baggett on Python for InfoSec
01:14:30
Episode 8 - Mark Baggett on Python for InfoSec
Jun 03, 2015
Jacob Kaplan-Moss on Addressing Cultural Issues in Tech
00:00:00
Episode 7 - Jacob Kaplan-Moss on Addressing Cultural Issues in Tech
May 26, 2015
Jonathan Slenders Talks About Prompt Toolkit
00:00:00
Episode 6 - Jonathan Slenders Talks About Prompt Toolkit
May 19, 2015
Ned Batchelder
01:15:55
Episode 5 - Ned Batchelder
May 12, 2015
Travis Oliphant
00:52:16
Episode 4 - Travis Oliphant
May 04, 2015
Kivy Core Developers
01:30:33
Cross Platform GUI Development in Python
Apr 27, 2015
Reuven Lerner
00:00:00
Episode 2 - Reuven Lerner
Apr 23, 2015
Thomas Hatch
00:00:00
Episode 1 - Thomas Hatch
Apr 11, 2015
Podcast.__init__ - Introduction
00:27:23
Podcast.__init__ - Introduction
Mar 21, 2015