Fresh Air

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Reviews: 7

EB
 Jan 17, 2019
I wish Ms. Gross would talk less and let her guests say more. She injects herself into the conversation too much as she gets older.


 Jan 9, 2019


 Dec 22, 2018


 Dec 20, 2018


 Oct 26, 2018

Description

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.

Episode Date
Best Of: Robert Caro / Christopher Meloni
3000
Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Robert Caro was never interested in only telling the stories of great men. Instead, he says, "I wanted to use their lives to show how political power worked." He talks about his two most famous works — biographies of Lyndon Johnson and New York City planner Robert Moses. His new memoir about his process is called 'Working.'

Also, Ken Tucker reviews The Mekons' new album 'Deserted,' their first in 8 years.

After 12 seasons on 'Law & Order: SVU,' Christopher Meloni plays a disgraced policeman-turned-hit man in the second season of the Syfi Channel series 'Happy!.' Meloni talks about playing tough guys, and life after 'Law & Order.'
Apr 20, 2019
The Remarkable Life Of Frederick Douglass
2977
David Blight's Pulitzer Prize-winning biography describes Frederick Douglass' escape from slavery, his passionate leadership in the abolitionist movement and his gift as a writer and orator. Blight spoke with 'Fresh Air' in December of 2018.

Aretha Franklin has been awarded a posthumous "Special Citation" Pulitzer Prize. We'll hear an excerpt of her 1999 interview with Terry Gross.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Long Day's Journey Into Night,' the second feature from the Chinese writer-director Bi Gan.
Apr 19, 2019
From Fastballs To Greaseballs, A History Of Baseball In 10 Pitches
2886
'New York Times' baseball writer Tyler Kepner spoke to 22 hall-of-fame pitchers about what they throw, and how they get a mental edge over hitters. His new book is 'K: A History of Baseball in Ten Pitches.'

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Lost and Wanted' by Nell Freudenberger, about an MIT physicist who finds her rational understanding of the universe challenged by the death of a friend.
Apr 18, 2019
Actor Christopher Meloni / Tiger Woods' Historic Comeback
2966
After 12 seasons on Law & Order: SVU, Christopher Meloni plays a disgraced policeman-turned-hit man in the second season of the Syfi Channel series Happy!. Meloni talks about being a bouncer before he broke into acting, playing tough guys, and life after 'Law & Order.'

Tiger Woods' recent Masters title follows a 10-year drought of major tournament victories. Jeff Benedict, co-author of the biography 'Tiger Woods,' says the golfer's comeback "transcends sports."
Apr 17, 2019
How Climate Change Threatens Humanity
2856
Bill McKibben, who first warned of climate change 30 years ago, says its effects are now upon us. He talks about heat waves, fires, flooding, drought, and, soon, millions of climate refugees. "The idea that anybody's going to be immune from this anywhere is untrue," he says. His new book is 'Falter.'

Also, Ken Tucker reviews The Mekons' new album 'Deserted,' their first in 8 years.
Apr 16, 2019
Robert Caro
2900
The two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist was never interested in only telling the stories of great men. Instead, he says, "I wanted to use their lives to show how political power worked." He talks about his two most famous works — biographies of Lyndon Johnson and Robert Moses. His new memoir about his process is called 'Working.'

Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album from trumpeter Tom Harrell.
Apr 15, 2019
Best Of: Henry Winkler / Rob Delaney
3004
After wrapping up his role as 'Happy Days' iconic cool guy, The Fonz, in 1985, Winkler struggled with typecasting. Eventually he was able to move on. He plays a self-involved acting teacher on HBO's 'Barry.' He talks with Terry Gross about his early career, his own experience in acting classes, and struggling with dyslexia.

Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Billie Eilish's debut album, 'When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?'

Rob Delaney, the co-creator, co-writer and co-star of the Amazon comedy series 'Catastrophe,' talks about his experience writing the fourth season with Sharon Horgan while grieving the death of his young son. Though working on 'Catastrophe' didn't lessen or distract Delaney from his grief, he says he found grief and work "compatible" in that work gave him the structure he needed to "approximate normal behavior." He spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger.
Apr 13, 2019
Ray Romano / Remembering Seymour Cassel
2874
Ray Romano spoke to Terry Gross in 2016 about life after 'Everybody Loves Raymond,' and how fame has affected him. "Here's what I say: Before I thought my cab driver hated me; now I think my limo driver hates me." His new Netflix special is 'Right Here, Around the Corner.'

Actor Seymour Cassel, who died April 7, performed as a child during matinees of his mom's burlesque shows. He went on to appear in movies directed by John Cassavetes and Wes Anderson. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2006.
Apr 13, 2019
Henry Winkler
2944
After wrapping up his role as 'Happy Days' iconic cool guy, The Fonz, in 1985, Winkler struggled with typecasting. Eventually he was able to move on. He plays a self-involved acting teacher on HBO's 'Barry.' He talks with Terry Gross about his early career, his own experience in acting classes, and struggling with dyslexia.

Also, John Powers reflects on 'Game of Thrones' as it enters its final season.
Apr 11, 2019
American Prosecution & Mass Incarceration
2855
The U.S. prison population is booming; an estimated 2.1 million people were incarcerated in America in 2016, and as many people in the U.S. have criminal records as have graduated from four-year colleges. Journalist and Yale Law lecturer Emily Bazelon attributes America's high incarceration rates to prosecutors more than judges. Bazelon spent 2.5 years reporting on the Brooklyn district attorney's office. Her new book, 'Charged,' examines the power of prosecutors and looks at alternatives to bail, plea bargains and incarceration.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Her Smell,' starring Elisabeth Moss as a out-of-control punk rock musician struggling with substance abuse.
Apr 10, 2019
Congress In The Trump Era
2870
Jake Sherman and Anna Palmer, who cover Congress for 'Politico,' discuss the power dynamics of Capitol Hill during the Trump Presidency. Their new book is 'The Hill To Die On.'

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Normal People' by Sally Rooney.
Apr 09, 2019
How Climate Change Became A Partisan Issue
2893
Journalist Nathaniel Rich talks about the missed opportunities in our recent history that could've halted or slowed climate change. Rich says that from 1979 until 1989, climate change was viewed as a bipartisan problem — then the the oil industry "descended and bared its fangs" and everything changed. His new book is 'Losing Earth.'

Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Billie Eilish's debut album, 'When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?'
Apr 08, 2019
Best Of: Conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin / A Therapist Goes To Therapy
2983
Yannick Nézet-Séguin, who conducts New York's Metropolitan Opera and the Philadelphia Orchestra, spoke with Terry Gross in front of a live audience for a WHYY event about his style of leadership and using his whole body when he conducts.

John Powers reviews a new restoration of the 1970 film 'Wanda,' a classic of women's cinema. It was written and directed by its star, Barbara Loden.

Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist who started seeing a therapist herself after the man she thought she would marry unexpectedly broke up with her. Gottlieb talks about her experiences in therapy — as both a patient and as a therapist. Her new book is 'Maybe You Should Talk to Someone.'
Apr 06, 2019
Dancer Gwen Verdon Of 'Fosse/Verdon'
2961
The new FX series 'Fosse/Verdon' celebrates the professional and romantic relationship between legendary choreographer Bob Fosse and dancer Gwen Verdon. He created the musicals 'Chicago,' 'Damn Yankees,' and 'Sweet Charity' for her. After David Bianculli reviews the new TV series, we'll listen back to Terry Gross' 1993 interview with Verdon, as well as our 1985 interview with choreographer and dancer Merce Cunningham.
Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new sci-fi thriller 'High Life,' starring Robert Pattinson and Juliette Binoche.
Apr 05, 2019
Conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin
2910
Nézet-Séguin, who directs the New York's Metropolitan Opera and the Philadelphia Orchestra, spoke with Terry Gross in front of a live audience for a WHYY event about his style of leadership, using his whole body when he conducts, and being a high-profile gay man.
Apr 04, 2019
Historian Henry Louis Gates Jr. / Rob Delaney Of 'Catastrophe'
2994
Henry Louis Gates Jr. points to post-Civil War Reconstruction as the genesis of white supremacy, as white Southerners looked for ways to roll back the newly acquired rights of African-Americans. His new book is 'Stony the Road.'

Rob Delaney, the co-creator, co-writer and co-star of the Amazon comedy series 'Catastrophe,' talks about his experience writing the fourth season with Sharon Horgan while grieving the death of his young son. Though working on 'Catastrophe' didn't lessen or distract Delaney from his grief, he says he found grief and work "compatible" in that work gave him the structure he needed to "approximate normal behavior." He spoke with 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger.
Apr 03, 2019
The Ongoing Crisis In Venezuela
2954
'New York Times' reporter Nicholas Casey was in Maracaibo, Venezuela, in March 2019 during a six-day power outage that left 30 million people in the dark. "By the fourth day," he says, "you started to hear shots getting fired in the street." Shortages of food, water and medicine have become so extreme that 3 million people, a 10th of the population, have left to escape the chaos. President Nicolás Maduro is holding firm against the opposition leader, Juan Guaidó, with no resolution in sight. Casey talks about the crisis in Venezuela and how the economic collapse began.

Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new recording of a Betty Carter concert from when she was at the top of her game.
Apr 02, 2019
The Motivations & Impact Of SCOTUS Justice John Roberts
2964
CNN legal affairs correspondent Joan Biskupic discusses the roots of Roberts' conservatism and his work for the Reagan and George H.W. Bush administrations. She says he's had a conservative impact on the law, but is also deeply concerned about the court's reputation — something President Trump would be wise to remember. "The more Donald Trump talks about how the court is on his side, the more he's going to drive John Roberts to the left, because the last thing John Roberts wants to do is to appear Donald Trump's notion that judges will automatically rule in the favor of the president who appointed them." Biskupic's new book is 'The Chief.'

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the political novel 'The Other Americans,' by Laila Lalami.
Apr 01, 2019
Best Of: John Mulaney / Natasha Lyonne
2951
John Mulaney was a writer at 'Saturday Night Live' for five years and recently returned to host for the first time. He talks about his 'SNL' audition, writing monologues for famous hosts, and drawing on his Catholic upbringing for stand-up material.

Also, critic David Bianculli reviews 'What We Do In The Shadows' on FX. The series was created by Jemaine Clement ('Flight of the Conchords') and filmmaker Taika Waititi.

Natasha Lyonne's character on the Netflix series 'Russian Doll' keeps dying and coming back to life. It's a premise that strikes a chord with the actor; Lyonne had a near-death experience in 2005. She talks with Terry Gross about how that experience informs her work, her signature raspy voice, and wanting to be a "tough guy."
Mar 30, 2019
Mexican-American Writer Finds Inspiration In Family, Tragedy & Trump
2895
Luis Alberto Urrea's book 'The House of Broken Angels' borrows from the story of his older brother, who died of cancer. He says the book went through a dramatic rewrite after Trump became president. [Originally broadcast March 2018.]

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews Jordan Peele's new 'Twilight Zone' reboot.
Mar 29, 2019
A Therapist Goes To Therapy (And Gets A Taste Of Her Own Medicine)
2808
Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist who started seeing a therapist herself after the man she thought she would marry unexpectedly broke up with her. "I think that therapy at any age, it helps people to relate better to themselves and to the people around them," she says. "It helps them to examine the way that they live their lives and take responsibility for what's not working, and also for what they can change." Her new book is 'Maybe You Should Talk to Someone.'

Also, critic John Powers reviews the new PBS 'Masterpiece' series 'Mrs. Wilson.'
Mar 28, 2019
Natasha Lyonne On 'Russian Doll'
2874
Lyonne's character on the Netflix series 'Russian Doll' keeps dying and coming back to life. It's a premise that strikes a chord with the actor; Lyonne had a near-death experience in 2005. She talks with Terry Gross about how that experience informs her work, her signature raspy voice, and wanting to be a "tough guy."

Also, critic David Bianculli reviews 'What We Do In The Shadows' on FX. The series was created by Jemaine Clement ('Flight of the Conchords') and filmmaker Taika Waititi.
Mar 27, 2019
Comic John Mulaney
2863
Mulaney was a writer at 'Saturday Night Live' for five years and recently returned to host for the first time. "I was absolutely terrified," he says. "To be performing something you've written and trying to listen to the jokes while making sure you're on your mark and looking into the right camera and then being pulled around to do costume fittings — it was scary." He talks about his 'SNL' audition, writing monologues for famous hosts, and drawing on his Catholic upbringing for stand-up material.
Mar 26, 2019
The New Zealand Massacre And The Global Resurgence Of Extremism
2868
J.M. Berger studies the online activity of extremists. He warns that white nationalism is a growing phenomenon worldwide — with many in the movement drawing inspiration from President Trump. "When we do the social media analysis, it comes shouting out at you," he says. "We can count the links that they put out on Twitter and other social media platforms, and what we find is the most common is '#MAGA.' The most common description of somebody that they use in the profile, they use on Twitter, is 'Trump supporter.' "

Also Ken Tucker reviews Robert Forster's album 'Inferno.' Forster was the former co-leader of the Australian band The Go-Betweens.
Mar 25, 2019
Best Of: The Emotional Lives Of Primates / Playwright & Actor Heidi Schreck
2923
Primatologist Frans de Waal has spent 40 years studying the behavior and emotions of primates. He talks about how primates experience jealousy, reconciliation, and empathy — just like humans. "That's a spectrum of behavior that we have, and the same thing is true for many other species." His new book is 'Mama's Last Hug.'

Film critic Justin Chang reviews Jordan Peele's new horror movie, 'Us.'

As a teen, Heidi Schreck debated the Constitution in competitions. Later she realized it had failed to protect four generations of women in her family. "I believed it was perfect. I believed it was a tool of justice. I did not realize as a 15-year-old girl how profoundly I had been left out of it. I didn't realize that it didn't protect me," Schreck says. Her play, 'What the Constitution Means to Me,' is headed to Broadway.
Mar 23, 2019
Remembering Poet W.S. Merwin / 'King Of The Surf Guitar' Dick Dale
2939
W.S. Merwin, the former U.S. poet laureate, died March 15. He was a prolific writer as well as a conservationist and a conscientious objector during World War II. He spoke to 'Fresh Air' in 2008.

Dick Dale, who was known as the "King of the Surf Guitar," died March 16 at 81. He spoke with Terry Gross in 1993 about his distinctive style of guitar playing, inspired by waves.

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new season of the Showtime series 'Billions,' and film critic Justin Chang reviews Jordan Peele's new horror movie, 'Us.'
Mar 22, 2019
Did Russia Influence The Brexit Movement?
2896
'New Yorker' journalist Ed Caesar discusses Arron Banks, the British businessman who funded the most extreme end of the pro-Brexit "Leave" campaign — possibly with help from Russia.

Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews Carsie Blanton's new album 'Buck Up.'
Mar 21, 2019
How Women Have Been 'Profoundly' Left Out Of The Constitution
2842
As a teen, Heidi Schreck debated the Constitution in competitions. Later she realized it had failed to protect four generations of women in her family. "I believed it was perfect. I believed it was a tool of justice. I did not realize as a 15-year-old girl how profoundly I had been left out of it. I didn't realize that it didn't protect me," Schreck says. Her play, 'What the Constitution Means to Me,' is headed to Broadway.

Pianists Lennie Tristano and Herbie Nichols were active on the New York scene in the 1950s. Though worlds apart stylistically, their music demonstrates how the piano accommodates myriad personalities. Kevin Whitehead has an appreciation of the two pianists who were born 100 years ago.
Mar 20, 2019
The Emotional Lives Of Primates
2914
Primatologist Frans de Waal has spent 40 years studying the behavior and emotions of primates. He talks about how primates experience jealousy, reconciliation, and empathy — just like humans. "That's a spectrum of behavior that we have, and the same thing is true for many other species." His new book is 'Mama's Last Hug.'

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Zora and Langston: A Story of Friendship and Betrayal' by Yuval Taylor.
Mar 19, 2019
Exposing The Health Risks Of Incarceration
2967
Dr. Homer Venters spent nine years overseeing the care of thousands of inmates on New York City's Rikers Island. He details horrific cases of inmate deaths from beatings and neglect, and how a new medical record system could be used as a human rights tool. "Jail settings [are] incredibly dehumanizing, and they dehumanize the individuals who pass through them," Dr. Venters says. Security staff and health staff can stop seeing inmates as people. "They look at them as problems. They look at them as liars, as malingerers."

Classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews unusual recordings of familiar pieces by Beethoven and Mozart.
Mar 18, 2019
Best Of: Aidy Bryant / Finding God In The Faith Of Others
3015
'Saturday Night Live' cast member Aidy Bryant mourns the time she lost in her teens and early 20s feeling self-conscious about her weight and living in fear of judgment about her body. "The second I stopped being afraid of someone calling me fat, I was able to start to focus on my goals and my dreams," Bryant says. Now she stars in the Hulu series 'Shrill,' based on Lindy West's memoir about being fat and feminist. The series follows Annie, a journalist struggling with body acceptance. Bryant talks about her own journey to being fat positive and her road to 'SNL' with Terry Gross.

Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews two Ray Charles albums of country music that have just been re-issued.

Barbara Brown Taylor, an ordained Episcopal priest, left her job as rector of a church to become a professor of religion. Her new book, 'Holy Envy,' is about how teaching the religions of the world changed her understanding of her own faith, and how her students, who were mostly Christian, responded when she took them to mosques, synagogues, and Buddhist and Hindu temples.
Mar 16, 2019
Remembering Drummer Hal Blaine / Chef Lidia Bastianich
2908
Hal Blaine, one of the most prolific drummers in rock 'n' roll history, played on recordings with the Beach Boys, Elvis, Sinatra and many others. He died Monday at age 90. Blaine was part of the group of sought-after studio musicians known as "The Wrecking Crew." He spoke with Terry Gross in 2001.

Chef Lidia Bastianich grew up eating farm-to-table meals with her Italian family. After they fled Europe as refugees, she drew on those meals in opening her first restaurant. Her 2018 book, 'My American Dream,' is out in paperback.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Ash is Purest White,' a drama that follows a woman and her gangster boyfriend over the span of 17 years.
Mar 15, 2019
Aidy Bryant On 'SNL' & 'Shrill'
2900
'Saturday Night Live' cast member Aidy Bryant mourns the time she lost in her teens and early 20s feeling self-conscious about her weight and living in fear of judgment about her body. She recalls counting calories, trying diets and hating everything about her body. "The second I stopped being afraid of someone calling me fat, I was able to start to focus on my goals and my dreams," Bryant says. Now she stars in the Hulu series 'Shrill,' based on Lindy West's memoir about being fat and feminist. The series follows Annie, a journalist struggling with body acceptance. Bryant talks about her own journey to being fat positive and her road to 'SNL' with Terry Gross.

John Powers reviews a new restoration of the 1970 film 'Wanda,' a classic of women's cinema. It was written and directed by its star, Barbara Loden.
Mar 14, 2019
Why Emergency Room Visits Cost So Much
2814
How could an ER visit in which a patient receives nothing more than a Band-Aid cost $629? Sarah Kliff, a health policy reporter for 'Vox,' spent over a year reading ER bills and investigating the reasons behind the high costs. Emergency rooms have a facility fee, which can range from the low hundreds to the high thousands, where the patient pays essentially for just walking through the door. Kliff will also talk about the GOP's latest attempts to cut back Obamacare, and what a Medicare-for-all plan would entail.

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews two books about forgotten stories from Hollywood's past, 'The Lady from the Black Lagoon' and 'Giraffes on Horseback Salad.'
Mar 13, 2019
Inside The Fight For Free Press
2855
David McCraw, deputy general counsel for 'The New York Times,' talks about legal issues he's faced on the job — from the president's lawyer threatening to sue for libel to the decision to publish WikiLeaks documents and #MeToo allegations. His book is 'Truth in Our Times.'

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the album 'Take the Neon Lights' from Steph Richards' quartet.
Mar 12, 2019
Finding God In the Faith Of Others
2839
Barbara Brown Taylor, an ordained Episcopal priest, left her job as rector of a church to become a professor of religion. Her new book, 'Holy Envy,' is about how teaching the religions of the world changed her understanding of her own faith, and how her students, who were mostly Christian, responded when she took them to mosques, synagogues, and Buddhist and Hindu temples. "I hoped it would be a way to convince them that they could find things they liked about other traditions, and it would not make them disloyal to their own," Taylor says. "And it worked most of the time."

Also, critic John Powers reviews the British true crime drama series 'Manhunt.'
Mar 11, 2019
Best Of: 'Never Look Away' Asks, Why Make Art? / Inside The Fox News White House
2968
Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's new film, 'Never Look Away,' tells the story of an artist who grows up in Nazi Germany, comes of age in East Germany and travels to the West to find freedom for himself and his art.

Jane Mayer's explosive new 'New Yorker' article reveals that Fox News killed the Stormy Daniels story in 2016 before the election to protect Donald Trump, and that President Trump tried to order the Justice Department to file a lawsuit to stop AT&T from acquiring Time Warner — a deal that would hurt Fox News. Mayer talks about the "revolving door" between Fox News and the Trump White House with Terry Gross.
Mar 09, 2019
50 Years Of 'The Godfather'
2846
We mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Mario Puzo's novel 'The Godfather' by listening back to our '96 interview with Puzo and our '16 interview with director Francis Ford Coppola, who adapted the novel into the iconic film.

Film critic Justin Chang reviews the new 'Captain Marvel,' starring Brie Larson.
Mar 08, 2019
Jane Mayer On The Fox News White House
2914
Past administrations have had favored members of the press, says 'New Yorker' investigative reporter Jane Mayer, "but nothing where someone is so close in that they are coordinating on a daily basis with the president." Mayer's explosive new report reveals that Fox News killed the Stormy Daniels story in 2016 before the election to protect Donald Trump, and that President Trump tried to order the Justice Department to file a lawsuit to stop AT&T from acquiring Time Warner — a deal that would hurt Fox News. Mayer talks about the "revolving door" between Fox News and the Trump White House with Terry Gross.
Mar 07, 2019
'Never Look Away' Asks: Why Make Art? Who Is It For?
2905
The film 'Never Look Away' is about a painter who is first exposed to modern art as child growing up in Nazi Germany. His aunt takes him to an exhibit of modern art curated by Nazis, meant to show what degenerate art looks like — the kind of art the Nazis banned. By the time the boy becomes an art student, Russian communists have taken over East Germany where he lives, and all art is expected to be propaganda, showing images of happy working people. Later, he flees to West Germany and attends an art school known to be avant garde. The artists there consider representational painting—the kind of painting he does—to be obsolete.

Implicit in the movie are questions like: Why make art? And who is it for? The movie is inspired by the life of Gerhard Richter, one of the most famous German painters of his generation. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, who wrote and directed the film, spoke with Terry Gross.
Mar 06, 2019
Living With Gun Violence And Trauma In Chicago
2837
Journalist Alex Kotlowitz spent a summer in Chicago chronicling people whose lives were changed or lost due to gun violence. He likens the trauma of living with gun violence to the PTSD some veterans experience. "Once you've had one act of violence around you it's hard to escape it, and so I just wanted to get at how the violence gets in people's bones," he says. His book is 'An American Summer.'

Also, Ken Tucker reviews Maren Morris' new album 'Girl.'
Mar 05, 2019
The 'Orchid' Vs. 'The Dandelion': The Science Of Sensitive Kids
2886
Pediatrician Thomas Boyce has treated children who seem to be completely unflappable and unfazed by their surroundings — as well as those who are extremely sensitive to their environments. Over the years, he began to liken these two types of children to two very different flowers: dandelions and orchids. He talks about his research and gives advice on how to parent "orchid children." Boyce's book is 'The Orchid and the Dandelion: Why Some Children Struggle and How All Can Thrive.'

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews the true crime story 'Say Nothing' by Patrick Radden Keefe, which takes place during the Troubles in Northern Ireland.
Mar 04, 2019
Best Of: Pamela Adlon / Inside The Real 'Green Book'
2990
Pamela Adlon directs, co-writes and stars in the FX comedy series 'Better Things,' which begins its third season on Thursday. The show centers on a single working mother of three daughters who is also trying to help her elderly mother and keep her acting career alive. Adlon tells Terry Gross about her decision to continue making 'Better Things' after cutting ties with series co-creator Louis C.K.

TV critic David Bianculli reviews the HBO documentary 'Leaving Neverland,' which explores whether Michael Jackson used his fame and money to seduce young boys and their families into enabling a hidden pattern of serial pedophilia.

Filmmaker Yoruba Richen's documentary, 'The Green Book: Guide to Freedom,' tells the story of the manual, first published in 1936, that helped African-Americans find safe places to stay, eat, shop and do business on the road.
Mar 02, 2019
Remembering 'Singin' In The Rain' Co-Director Stanley Donen
2876
"Dance numbers are anything but spontaneous," Donen told Fresh Air in 1996. Donen, who died Feb. 21, also directed 'On the Town,' 'Funny Face' and 'Damn Yankees,' among other films.

Also, we remember 'Philadelphia Daily News' obituary writer Jim Nicholson, who died on Feb. 22, by listening back to a 1987 interview. Plus, 'Philadelphia Inquirer' journalist David Gambacorta reflects on the legendary obit writer with Dave Davies.

TV critic David Bianculli reviews the HBO documentary 'Leaving Neverland,' which explores whether Michael Jackson used his fame and money to seduce young boys and their families into enabling a hidden pattern of serial pedophilia.
Mar 01, 2019
How Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Translates Trump
2853
According to journalist Mattathias Schwartz, a major part of Pompeo's job is traveling the world and cleaning up the president's messes. Schwartz writes about Pompeo in the 'New York Times Magazine.' He says Pompeo was the primary architect of Trump's negotiations with North Korea about its nuclear arsenal—talks which just collapsed.

And jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album from Allison Miller's band Boom Tic Boom.

Critic Justin Chang reviews the German film 'Transit,' about a man who flees Nazi-occupied Paris and assumes the identity of a dead author.
Feb 28, 2019
Why Older Women Are Often The 'Happiest Demographic' In America
2894
Mary Pipher's new book, 'Women Rowing North,' chronicles the positive aspects of transitioning from middle age to old age: "At this life stage, women start granting themselves the power of no," she says.

Jennifer Stockburger runs the "Test Track" for Consumer Reports, where the magazine tests out hundreds of cars, trucks and SUVs. She says there are more than 50 tests that drive each vehicle's rating. She spoke with 'Fresh Air' contributor Sonari Glinton.

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews Valeria Luiselli's latest novel, 'Lost Children Archive' about the so-called crisis at the border.
Feb 27, 2019
Pamela Adlon On 'Better Things'
2802
Adlon directs, co-writes and stars in the FX comedy series 'Better Things,' which begins its third season on Thursday. The show centers on a single working mother of three daughters who is also trying to help her elderly mother and keep her acting career alive. "It's an exaggerated version of my life," Adlon says. Adlon also tells Terry Gross about her decision to continue making 'Better Things' after cutting ties with series co-creator Louis C.K.
Feb 26, 2019
Documentary Chronicles The Real Life 'Green Book'
2885
Filmmaker Yoruba Richen's documentary, 'The Green Book: Guide to Freedom,' tells the story of the manual, first published in 1936, that helped African-Americans find safe places to stay, eat, shop and do business on the road. Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews two Ray Charles albums of country music that have just been re-issued. And John Powers reviews a debut novel titled 'American Spy.'
Feb 25, 2019
Best Of: 'Surviving R. Kelly' Filmmaker dream hampton / Adam Savage Of 'MythBusters'
2995
R. Kelly was charged on Friday with 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse involving four victims. In an interview recorded Wednesday, Feb. 13, activist, filmmaker and writer dream hampton tells Terry Gross about her six-part docuseries 'Surviving R. Kelly,' which chronicles sexual abuse allegations against R. Kelly. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 1960s live recordings featuring singer Jeanne Lee and pianist Ran Blake. Finally, former 'MythBusters' co-host Adam Savage spoke with 'Fresh Air' about working with kids in 'MythBusters Jr.' and a near-death experience he had in a car underwater.
Feb 23, 2019
Rami Malek / Adam McKay
2933
"No one can sing like Freddie Mercury," Malek told Terry Gross in November 2018. The actor has been nominated for an Academy Award for playing Queen's lead singer in the biopic 'Bohemian Rhapsody.' Also, filmmaker Adam McKay spoke to Terry Gross in January 2019 about his efforts to bring former vice president Dick Cheney "to the foreground" in 'Vice.' The film is up for eight Academy Awards.
Feb 22, 2019