Here & Now

By NPR

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: News & Politics

Open in iTunes


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 888
Reviews: 0

Description

NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

Episode Date
New Orleans Health Director; Restarting The Economy After Coronavirus
2567
New Orleans has experienced a surge in new coronavirus cases, and the city expected to run out of hospital beds and ventilators in the coming days. Dr. Jennifer Avegno, director of the New Orleans Health Department, joins us to discuss the city's response. And, economist Mohamed El-Erian says restarting the economy after the coronavirus crisis won't be as easy as flicking a switch. He joins us to discuss what it will take to get the economy going again.
Apr 03, 2020
Covering The Kent State Shootings; Kansas Gov. On Coronavirus Preparation
2602
This May marks 50 years since an anti-war protest in Kent, Ohio, turned deadly. We speak with Robert Giles, the editor of the Akron Beacon Journal during the protest and author of the new book, "When Truth Mattered: The Kent State Shootings 50 Years Later." Also, the coronavirus outbreak hasn't hit most rural areas as hard as urban populations. We talk to Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly about how her state is preparing.
Apr 03, 2020
Cyber Dangers When Working From Home; Faith During A Pandemic
2601
Workers doing their jobs from home may be more vulnerable to hackers than in their offices. One risk factor is porn, a favorite tool of hackers. Porn traffic is up, while supervision is down. Also, writer Bruce Feiler joins us to talk about dealing with the fear and uncertainty of this moment.
Apr 02, 2020
Nurse Recovering From Coronavirus; Remembering Jazz Great Ellis Marsalis
2558
At least 45 employees in one of Louisville's biggest health care systems have tested positive for coronavirus. We speak with Shelley Urquhart, a pulmonary and critical-care nurse practitioner who contracted the virus despite wearing all of the recommended personal protective equipment. Also, jazz pianist Ellis Marsalis passed away Wednesday at age 85. His son told The New York Times that the cause was complications from COVID-19.
Apr 02, 2020
Coronavirus Quarantine Playlist; Fashion Designer Makes Face Masks, Hospital Gowns
2584
Chris Douridas, a DJ at KCRW in Santa Monica, shares some timely hits from Willie Nelson to Diana Ross to help shake the quarantine blues away. Also, fashion designer Brandon Maxwell and his team are creating face masks and hospital gowns for health care workers fighting the coronavirus. We talk to Maxwell about creating protective wear amid the pandemic.
Apr 01, 2020
Researchers Project Coronavirus Deaths; Florida Update
2591
The White House presented data on Tuesday that projects at least 100,000 deaths due to the coronavirus if social distancing measures are continued through the summer. Epidemiologist Dr. Ali Mokdad, who was part of the team who compiled the data, joins us to discuss. And, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis continues to resist calls for a statewide stay-at-home order as the state's coronavirus cases reach nearly 7,000. We get an update from WLRN's Caitie Switalski.
Apr 01, 2020
Atlanta Mayor On COVID-19; Hospital Cancel Elective Surgeries
2600
Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms provides an update on the situation in her city, which is under a stay-at-home order due to the coronavirus outbreak. More than 100 people have died from COVID-19 across the state of Georgia. And, many hospitals are stopping elective surgeries amid the current pandemic. Dr. David Hoyt, executive director of the American College of Surgeons, talks about why canceling these surgeries is important.
Mar 31, 2020
Stranded Americans Overseas Amid Coronavirus; Florida Cruise Ships
2626
The more than 30,000 Americans still stranded overseas because of the coronavirus are getting frustrated as the State Department mounts an unprecedented effort to help get them home. WAMU's Daniella Cheslow reports. Also, more cruise ships are pleading for somewhere to port in Florida, but so far Gov. Ron DeSantis has denied their requests, saying the state's health care resources are already stretched thin. We speak with The Miami Herald's Taylor Dolven.
Mar 31, 2020
Book Recommendations For Social Distancing; Coronavirus And Addiction
2560
To help pass the time during social distancing, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Petra Mayer of NPR Books about what she suggests we read while we're contained in Also, many Americans are feeling isolated these days as we stay home. But what impact is social distancing efforts having on people who are in addiction recovery? Vic Vela, host of new recovery podcast "Back From Broken," joins us to discuss.
Mar 30, 2020
Coronavirus Cripples Cattle Country; New Orleans Becomes Major COVID-19 Hotspot
2555
The cattle industry has its own name for an economic downturn: a wreck — and we are right in the middle of one. As the Texas Standard's Michael Marks reports, the coronavirus injected the cattle market with a big dose of uncertainty at just the wrong time. Also, Louisiana's overall death rate is on par with New York's, though the southern state faces unique challenges. WWNO's Patrick Madden talks to us about the latest in New Orleans.
Mar 30, 2020
Coronavirus Impact On Improv Theaters; Epidemiologist On COVID-19
2553
Comedy theaters are among the many entertainment outlets struggling with the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Charna Halpern, owner of The iO Theater in Chicago. Also, Dr. Larry Brilliant has been on the front lines in the fight against disease for decades. He shares his thoughts on COVID-19.
Mar 27, 2020
Coronavirus Reveals Inter-Generational Conflict; Challenges Truckers Face Due To COVID-19
2564
There's been an outcry on social media: Millenials don't think their boomer parents are taking warnings about coronavirus seriously enough. NPR's Ina Jaffe profiles a father and daughter. Also, we talk to John Lex, a truck driver for Walmart, about some of the challenges he is facing on the road due to the coronavirus, and the newfound respect he feels truckers are finally earning.
Mar 27, 2020
Unemployment Claims Skyrocket; Staying Connected To Loved Ones
2601
Nearly 3.3 million people filed for unemployment last week as the coronavirus pandemic brought many industries to a standstill. We get an expert view from Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton LLP. Also, so many people are worried about family and loved ones right now. WBUR's Anthony Brooks's mother, Esther Brooks, is in Italy — one of the hot spots of the global pandemic.
Mar 26, 2020
Cellist Yo-Yo Ma's #SongsOfComfort; Vaping And Coronavirus
2600
Host Robin Young speaks with cellist Yo-Yo Ma about the music he's been tweeting using the hashtag #SongsOfComfort. Also, some physicians are speculating that vaping could make some young people more susceptible to the worst COVID-19 complications. Cleveland Clinic pulmonologist Dr. Humberto Choi joins us to talk about the issue.
Mar 26, 2020
Is It Safe To Go Outside?; Grocery Store Workers On Front Lines For Coronavirus Pandemic
2557
Parents know how important being outdoors is for their kids. But how safe is it for people to be outside right now? Dr. Anita McElroy has answers. Plus, grocery store employees are some of the workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic — putting their health at risk to keep store shelves stocked and grocery carts full. Noah Glick from KUNR talked to some store workers in Reno, Nevada.
Mar 25, 2020
Is Trump Listening To His Scientists?; Birdwatching While Social Distancing
2568
Washington Post's Yasmeen Abutaleb joins us to discuss concerns that Trump is sidelining his scientific advisers during the coronavirus crisis. Also, cooped up at home? Try birdwatching! Houston Audubon ornithologist Richard Gibbons reminds us that many birds migrating this week, many who are experiencing "zugunruhe," a German word meaning migratory restlessness. So are all of us, it seems.
Mar 25, 2020
Jesse Eisenberg's 2 New Films; Amazon Employees Call For Coronavirus Protections
2567
Actor Jesse Eisenberg has two films coming on digital and video on demand on Friday: "Vivarium" and "Resistance." We speak to him about both movies opening during this turbulent time. Also, warehouse workers are calling on Amazon to do more to defend against the spread of coronavirus after the company confirmed its first case of COVID-19 at a warehouse in New York last week. We get the latest from Elizabeth Dwoskin of The Washington Post.
Mar 24, 2020
Sen. Jeanne Shaheen Discusses Coronavirus; Asymptomatic Carriers Of COVID-19
2568
The Senate is getting closer to a deal on an economic relief package to deal with the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Democrat Sen. Jeanne Shaheen joins us to discuss. And, the reason why the coronavirus spreads so quickly is because many people don't even know they have it. Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School, explains how asymptomatic carriers spread COVID-19.
Mar 24, 2020
Good Food For Hard Times; New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy On COVID-19
2642
New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy ordered the state's residents to stay home, except for essential trips, in order to help reduce the spread of coronavirus. He joins us to discuss how he plans to enforce the order. And, resident chef Kathy Gunst shares some recipes for cooking at home while isolated.
Mar 23, 2020
Balancing Human Rights With Public Welfare; Potential Ventilator Shortage
2616
As COVID-19 spreads in this country, people are struggling to adjust to the new rules: stand six feet apart, work from home, don't get a haircut, home school your children. Lawrence Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown University, joins us to discuss the balance between personal freedom and public health. Also, some medical professionals are warning of a potential shortage of life-saving ventilators as the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.S. tops 35,000. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Dr. Lewis Kaplan.
Mar 23, 2020
Faux-mencement Ceremonies For College Seniors; FCC Chair On Expanding Internet Access
2573
At a few colleges, the answer to closed campuses has been the 'faux-memcement' — a quickly cobbled together ceremony, where garbage bags take the place of gowns, but the emotions and the sentiment are real. We talk to a senior at Olin College in Massachusetts and the dean of faculty. Also, access to broadband internet connection is vital for most Americans. Host Jeremy Hobson talks to Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai about how to shrink the digital divide during the pandemic.
Mar 20, 2020
Making Face Masks Is Surprising Difficult; Movie Recommendations
2580
A pandemic of a novel coronavirus is causing a global shortage of masks. It turns out that a simple face mask is surprisingly hard to make. NPR's Emily Feng reports. And John Horn, host of the KPCC show 'The Frame," joins host Tonya Mosley to share his film favorites for folks looking for something to stream.
Mar 19, 2020
Congress Considers Stimulus Package; CDC Director Criticized
2538
Congress is considering a $1 trillion rescue package designed to provide some relief for Americans grappling with the deepening coronavirus crisis. NPR's Susan Davis joins us to discuss what would be the third major bill passed to deal with the pandemic. And, CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield is facing criticism for the slow pace of testing for the coronavirus in the U.S., a charge that echoes controversy Redfield faced as an infectious disease specialist for the military during the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s.
Mar 19, 2020
China Expels U.S. Journalists; COVID-19 Military Preparedness
2612
Dr. Jonathan Woodson, former assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, joins us, to discuss how the U.S. military is keeping its forces safe overseas and the role it could play in keeping Americans safe at home. And, at least 13 American journalists stand to be expelled from China in retaliation for a new limit imposed by the Trump administration on visas for Chinese state-owned media operating in the U.S. NPR's Jackie Northam joins us with the latest.
Mar 18, 2020
Chinese Comedian Living Under Quarantine; COVID-19 Impact On Business
2611
Comedian Jesse Appell's visit back to the United States from China has been prolonged indefinitely by the COVID-19 epidemic. Back in China, his comedian friend Storm Xu has been quarantined in China for the last three months — so long that he now fears going outside. Also, we talk with business owners and employees from across the country about how the coronavirus is impacting their place of work: the owner of a Pennsylvania toy store, co-founder of a California cannabis dispensary and a Seattle hotel worker.
Mar 17, 2020
Canada Scientists Isolate Coronavirus; California Counties Shelter In Place
2567
Researchers in Canada are working to develop treatments for COVID-19 by isolating the virus responsible for the pandemic. Arinjay Banerjee, a fellow at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, joins us to discuss. And, several California counties have ordered residents to shelter in place, except for essential travel, such as grocery shopping. KQED's Marisa Lagos breaks down the state's response to the spread of coronavirus.
Mar 17, 2020
School Districts Close As COVID-19 Spreads; Riverdance: Then And Now
2610
In an effort to slow the rate of transmission of COVID-19, many public school districts have made the decision to shut down for many weeks, including New York City, Boston and Los Angeles. Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent Austin Beutner discusses his decision to close the nation's second-largest school district, and what it's doing to support students, teachers and parents. Also, New York Times dance critic and former dancer in Riverdance Siobhan Burke shares why she thinks the dancing in the new 25th-anniversary show is "spectacular."
Mar 16, 2020
Vaccine Expert On Coronavirus; New York Hospital CEO On Outbreak
2561
Researchers are working to quickly develop a vaccine for the coronavirus. One of them is Dr. Dan Barouch, director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. And, a New York hospital CEO says the group's 23 hospitals in the state are bracing for an influx of coronavirus patients.
Mar 16, 2020
Debunking Coronavirus Myths; Living With Parkinson's Disease
2524
As speculation and misinformation about coronavirus continue to spread online, host Tonya Mosely debunks some of the top myths spreading about COVID-19 with Stanford University's Dr. Seema Yasmin. Also, Parkinson's disease eventually robs its patients of their ability to move. About a million Americans have the neurological disease, and it might surprise you to hear that one of the most effective treatments of Parkinson's is exercise. WBUR's Cloe Axelson has the story.
Mar 13, 2020
Nonpartisan Redistricting To Limit Gerrymandering; Understanding The 'Aspirational' Class
2528
This year's census will help determine how states redraw their electoral maps. At least 17 states have committed to using nonpartisan commissions or other nontraditional methods in their redistricting this year in an effort to prevent partisan gerrymandering. We talk to Jessika Shipley of Colorado's Legislative Council. Also, we explore the growth of the so-called "aspirational class" and what our consumer habits can tell us about the current state of social class and cultural cohesion in the U.S.
Mar 13, 2020
Detroit Restores Water To Thousands Over Coronavirus; Risk To Home Caregivers
2517
The city of Detroit will temporarily restore running water to thousands of households who have been disconnected due to unpaid bills. This action comes on the heels of public outcry that lack of water poses a serious public health threat amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We talk with Dr. Abdul El-Sayed. Also, health care has become a high-risk job in the wake of the coronavirus. We look at the impact on home care workers with Ai-jen Poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance.
Mar 12, 2020
White House Coronavirus Response; 2020 Census Begins
2497
NPR White House Correspondent Tamara Keith joins us to discuss the Trump administration's coronavirus response, including a temporary travel ban on some travelers from parts of Europe. And, the 2020 census ramps up Wednesday as the first invitations to respond online arrive in the mail. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang joins us to discuss the unique challenges to this year's census.
Mar 12, 2020
JetBlue CEO On Combating Coronavirus; Italian Hospitals Overwhelmed
2535
JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes joins us to discuss the impact of the spread of the coronavirus on the airline industry and what steps the company is taking to overcome this latest challenge. And, with more than 10,000 cases, Italy has been hit harder by coronavirus than any country but China. Doctors in the country's northern provinces say that hospitals are overwhelmed.
Mar 11, 2020
Barry Sonnenfeld Pens New Memoir; 3 Airlines Cut Back Flights Over COVID-19 Fears
2539
We speak with "Men in Black" and "Addams Family" filmmaker and writer Barry Sonnenfeld about his new memoir, "Barry Sonnenfeld Call Your Mother." Also, three major domestic airlines are cutting back on domestic and international flights as fears over the coronavirus cause bookings to plummet. Here & Now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan explains how the airline industry is fairing.
Mar 11, 2020
Duane Allman's Guitar; Gentrification In Raleigh, North Carolina
2528
When Duane Allman, the late lead guitarist of the Allman Brothers, played the iconic song "Layla," his Les Paul Gold Top guitar licks were the highlight. As Grant Blankenship reports, that guitar will be on stage at the 50th Allman Brothers reunion. Also, like many cities across the country, Raleigh has experienced tremendous growth. And with that growth has come gentrification which threatens to change the fabric of the historically black communities. Jason deBruyn of WUNC reports.
Mar 10, 2020
U.S. Economic Response To Coronavirus; Mapping Philadelphia's Jazz History
2521
U.S. stock markets jumped on Tuesday morning after President Trump announced his proposed economic stimulus package to deal with the effects of coronavirus. NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley joins us for the latest. And, the public history project "All That Philly Jazz" seeks to document and preserve the jazz history of Philadelphia.
Mar 10, 2020
Marc Rebillet's Viral Musical Performances; History Of Pandemics
2542
Host Tonya Mosley talks with musical artist and social media sensation Marc Rebillet about his creative process and how his growing fanbase influences in the music he makes. Also, as the world reacts to the coronavirus, we take a look back at the history of pandemics and epidemics — beginning with the devastating Black Plague, through the HIV/AIDs epidemic.
Mar 09, 2020
Reexamining Gifted Education Programs; New Book Details Case That Made 'Climate History'
2505
Prep for Prep, a nonprofit education program in New York City, helps students of color attend private schools but some argue that it fails to mitigate segregation in the city's public schools. We reexamine these types of programs with The New Yorker's Vinson Cunningham. Also, a new book tells the story of Massachusetts v. EPA, a watershed case for environmental law that was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2007. We talk with author Richard J. Lazarus.
Mar 09, 2020
Spring Break And Coronavirus; Women Outnumber Men In Non-Farm Payroll Jobs
2585
Colleges, universities and boarding schools are trying to figure out how to best manage student travel for upcoming spring breaks. We talk to Brad Seifers, who handles emergency management at Indiana University, which is going on spring break. Also, since December, women have held slightly more non-farm payroll jobs than men. It's only the second time in history this has happened. Professor Betsey Stevenson talks about the changing workforce.
Mar 06, 2020
Climate Change Impact On Beaches; Spending Weeks In Coronavirus Quarantine
2553
Climate change is accelerating the erosion of beaches around the world, according to a recent study. We talk with the lead author of the study, which found that as many as half of the world's sandy shorelines could disappear by the end of the century. Also, the U.S. now has more than 200 cases of COVID-19, public health officials confirmed on Friday. We speak with Carl Goldman, who is in quarantine after testing positive for the novel coronavirus.
Mar 06, 2020
'Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist' Star; Lincoln's 2nd Inauguration
2538
New show "Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist" airs Sunday nights on NBC. Host Robin Young speaks with creator Austin Winsberg and star Jane Levy. Also, on March 4, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln tried to bind up the nation's wounds after four years of bloody civil war in his Second Inaugural Address. Edward Achorn's new book "Every Drop Of Blood: The Momentous Second Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln" looks back at what Lincoln said that day and the other historical figures were there.
Mar 05, 2020
Tropical Forests Are Absorbing Less Carbon; What Is Democratic Socialism?
3105
The journal Nature reports that a key bulwark against runaway climate change is breaking down. The study finds that tropical forests are losing their ability to absorb carbon dioxide. Daniel Grossman, supported by the Pultizer Center, has our story. Also, Bernie Sanders calls himself a democratic socialist. We talk to professor Sheri Berman about what democratic socialism is and how it compares to socialism more broadly.
Mar 05, 2020
Super Tuesday Results Narrow Democratic Race; COVID-19 Affects Airlines
2530
Joe Biden won Super Tuesday primaries in nine of 14 states, including delegate-rich Texas, while Bernie Sanders won just four of those states, but picked up California. Michael Bloomberg quit the presidential race after winning only American Samoa. And, there are signs that Chinese airlines may be rebounding after canceling thousands of flights due to coronavirus. Here & Now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan joins us to talk about the toll the outbreak is taking on airlines.
Mar 04, 2020
How Did Bloomberg Get His Riches?; Alaska Copper Mine Threatens Fishing
2560
Michael Bloomberg is using part of his $65 billion fortune to run for president. He started making his money betting on the power and future of computers. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, it transformed Wall Street. Also, a long-time battle against a proposed copper mine in southwestern Alaska has divided communities. As KUOW's John Ryan reports, the potential move has locals split on what's best for the sockeye salmon ecosystem.
Mar 03, 2020
Why Rep. Khanna Supports Sanders; 1st Cheetah Cubs Born By IVF
2575
Sen. Bernie Sanders is expected to take home the most delegates of any candidate on Super Tuesday. We speak with Sanders surrogate Rep. Ro Khanna. Also, for the first time, cheetah cubs have been born by in vitro fertilization to a surrogate mother. Researchers see this as a promising step forward for the future of cheetahs. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Adrienne Crosier, a cheetah biologist who helped perform the procedure.
Mar 02, 2020
Kids On Planes; Answering Your Questions About Coronavirus
2577
Some airlines no longer allow economy passengers to choose their seats in advance. In some cases, passengers are being told they can't sit next to their children who are older than 2 years old. The Consumer Reports will be testifying before the House Subcommittee on Aviation in an attempt to change the rule. Also, Here & Now has asked listeners for questions about COVID-19. We answer them with Dr. William Schaffner.
Mar 02, 2020
U.S. Schools Prepare For COVID-19; Undecided South Carolina Voters
2492
The federal government has warned schools to start preparing for a possible U.S. COVID-19 outbreak. What does that mean for public school districts across the country? We ask Melinda Landau, who runs health programs at the San Jose Unified School District in California. Also, the spotlight is on South Carolina ahead of Saturday's primary. We talk to undecided voters in Charleston and Columbia as they weigh their options and their values.
Feb 28, 2020
Earth's New Mini-Moon; London Airport Climate Change Impact
2495
Earth has a mini-moon that has been orbiting our planet since 2017. Astronomers in Arizona first observed the object earlier this month, giving it the provisional name 2020 CD3. Also, a court in the U.K. has ruled that plans for a third runway at London's Heathrow airport are illegal because they don't address the impact of climate change. The ruling could influence decisions on infrastructure projects around the world.
Feb 28, 2020
Tom Steyer Talks South Carolina; COVID-19 Traps Chinese Comedy Star In U.S.
2532
Two days ahead of the South Carolina primary, host Tonya Mosley talks with presidential candidate Tom Steyer about his campaign in the state and what defines a successful campaign in such a crowded Democratic field. Also, American Jesse Appell studied comedy in China as a disciple of Chinese Xiangsheng master Ding Guangquan. Appell returned to the United States over the Chinese New Year to visit his family in Massachusetts and has been unable to return because of the COVID-19 outbreak.
Feb 27, 2020
5 Years After AME Church Massacre; Flooding In Charleston
2538
This year will mark the 5th anniversary of the tragic death of nine black churchgoers at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. As the state grapples with how to stop hate-motivated violence, the church and grieving family members seek to heal through the radical act of forgiveness. Also, we talk with Betty Bonwell, a Charleston voter, about an issue that's important to her: flooding. In 2019, Charleston flooded an average of one of nearly every five days.
Feb 27, 2020