Here & Now

By NPR

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NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

Episode Date
Trump's Impeachment Legal Team; Bloomberg Outspends Rivals
2541
Ken Starr and Alan Dershowitz are set to join Trump's impeachment legal team. Barbara McQuade, former U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, joins us to discuss what this means for Trump's legal team. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has spent more on ads in his campaign for president than any of his rivals for the Democratic nomination. Ken Goldstein, a professor at the University of San Francisco, joins us to discuss.
Jan 17, 2020
What It Takes To Make Clothes In The USA; Richmond Gun Rally Concerns
2514
More than 95% of clothing sold in the U.S. is imported. But there are signs that "Made in America" is making a comeback. Host Peter O'Dowd takes a closer look. Also, Virginia's governor has declared a state of emergency in anticipation of a gun rights rally planned in Richmond on Monday. The rally has attracted the attention of militia and extremist groups.
Jan 17, 2020
Disability Policy In 2020 Democratic Primary; Technology And Kindness
2529
Where do the 2020 Democratic candidates stand on disability rights? We talk with the director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress about the major disability policies being discussed this election season. Also, technology and the web can be used to foster empathy, community and even spirituality. As part of our series on secular spirituality, Standford professor Jamil Zaki joins us to discuss the technology of kindness.
Jan 16, 2020
California Gov. Newsom On Homelessness Plan; Illinois' Pot Shortage
2516
California Gov. Gavin Newsom talks to us about his plan to address the state's growing homeless population and housing crisis. He has proposed a $1 billion plan. Also, Illinois residents bought nearly $11 million worth of recreational marijuana in the first five days after it became legal. WBEZ's Mariah Woelfel reports the demand sent dispensaries into a frenzy.
Jan 16, 2020
New Evidence In Impeachment Investigation; Sonos Sues Google
2516
As the House plans to transmit the articles of impeachment against Trump to the Senate, new evidence has surfaced from Lev Parnas, an associate of Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani. Also, Sonos is suing Google, alleging the company stole its intellectual property to develop its own smart speakers. Their case is the latest front in a growing battle for oxygen in a business increasingly dominated by tech giants.
Jan 15, 2020
Great Migration Book; New Hampshire Voters On Democratic Debate
2529
Here & Now's Tonya Mosley speaks with Blair Imani, author of the new illustrated history "Making Our Way Home: The Great Migration and the Black American Dream." The book tells the story of the migration of millions of African Americans to the northern states. And, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with three Democratic voters in Concord, New Hampshire, about last night's Democratic presidential debate.
Jan 15, 2020
'Amazon' Warrior Women; Americans Help Fight Australia Fires
2511
For centuries, scholars assumed that Greek myths about fierce warrior women they called "Amazons" were just that — myths. But new archeology confirms what modern historians like Adrienne Mayor had begun to suspect: Amazons were real, and they were actually Scythian nomads. Also, dozens of Americans have gone to Australia to help battle the wildfires scorching the country. Michelle Moore, a fire program specialist with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, recently returned from work with an aerial fire crew.
Jan 14, 2020
The Swing Voter We Don't Talk About; U.S. Travel Restrictions To Cuba
2502
What if we thought about swing voters not as Democratic to Republican transplants but as voters who stick with one party — or don't vote at all? Ibram Kendi argues in The Atlantic that we should look at young voters, voters of color and especially young voters of color as "the other swing voters" who could make or break a candidate's fortune, but are rarely central to the political conversation. Also, after banning all commercial airline flights to Cuba's provinces, the Trump administration says it's now stopping charter flights.
Jan 14, 2020
Spirituality Without God; Making Smart Financial Decisions In 2020
2493
What does it mean to be spiritual outside the confines of religion? This week, we'll explore that trend. We talk to Krista Tippett, creator and host of the public radio show "On Being." Also, with the near year upon us, Americans have a lot of money decisions to make. We check in with personal finance expert Jill Schlesinger about financial risks and making smart financial decisions.
Jan 13, 2020
Dangers Of Sugar; Overestimating Immigrants' Use Of Public Assistance
2508
Nutrition experts are increasingly sounding the alarm on sugar, with some comparing its adverse health effects to smoking. Host Robin Young speaks with Dr. Robert Lustig about the dangers of sugar. Also, new research from Harvard University looks at perceptions of immigrants and finds that across the U.S. and Europe, people generally overestimate the share of immigrants who are unemployed and on public assistance. We talk with Derek Thompson, senior editor at The Atlantic.
Jan 13, 2020
Puerto Rico Earthquake Recovery; An Oregon Rancher's Wolf Fence
2561
A series of earthquakes has left much of Puerto Rico without power as government authorities still struggle to provide recovery years after hurricanes ravaged the island. Also, one cattle rancher in Oregon has lost eight cows and two dogs to a pack of wolves over the last few years. Now he's putting up a fence to keep them out, and he's even teamed up with the environmentalists that he often clashes with. Jes Burns has the story.
Jan 10, 2020
Bryan Stevenson On 'Just Mercy'; Amazon Vs. FedEx
2550
The new film, "Just Mercy," tells the story of an American lawyer's need for hope in the pursuit of justice. It's based on the real life of Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, and he joins us to discuss the new movie. And, Amazon has blocked third-party sellers from using FedEx for deliveries, which one New York University professor says could spell the end of FedEx. Scott Galloway joins us to discuss.
Jan 10, 2020
Mother Of American Prisoner In Iran; Australia's Fires Raise Health Concerns
2543
Joanne White has been anxiously watching the crisis in Iran, wondering what it means for her son. Michael White, a navy veteran, was arrested in 2018 in Iran and later sentenced to 10 years in prison on charges of insulting the country's leader and posting a private photo online. Also, doctors are warning that the fires in Australia are having serious impacts on public health. One cardiologist in Canberra, Australia, explains.
Jan 09, 2020
Study Links Social Media To Teen Anxiety, Depression; Remembering Kay Evans
2558
A new study found that social media use, television viewing and computer use over a four-year period predicted more severe symptoms of anxiety and depression among adolescents. We talk with study author Patricia Conrod about the research. Also, host Jeremy Hobson remembers his friend Kay Evans, who took care of him when he was a little kid growing up in Urbana, Illinois. Evans died last week at the age of 77 after a battle with cancer.
Jan 09, 2020
Cancer Death Rates Fall; Plane Crash In Iran Kills All Aboard
2503
A new study by the American Cancer Society shows a 29% decrease in cancer deaths between 1991 and 2017. The study's lead author joins us to discuss. Also, a Ukrainian plane bound for Kyiv crashed shortly after taking off in Tehran, Iran, killing all on board. The crash happened hours after Iran launched a missile strike against U.S. interests in Iraq.
Jan 08, 2020
Australia Fires Highlight Coal's Role In Climate Crisis; Philadelphia's Juvenile Justice Reforms
2519
The devastating fire season in Australia is highlighting how climate change is speeding up the spread of fires and how coal has had a part to play in this. We speak with Ian Dunlop, former chair of the Australian Coal Association, who now focuses on advocating for urgent action on climate change. Also, in Philadelphia, a shift from arresting students for minor offenses to offering diversion programs is being looked at as a model for other cities. YR Media's Zari Tarazona reports.
Jan 08, 2020
California Firefighters Head To Australia; Layoffs At Pier 1 Imports
2571
A group of 20 seasoned California firefighters, many of who battled the Saddleridge Fire in Southern California, left on Monday night to help fight the fires in Australia. Fire Chief Robert Garcia discusses this global firefighting effort. Also, Pier 1 Imports announced it's closing about 450 stores and laying off about 40% of its headquarters staff. MSNBC's Ali Velshi reports.
Jan 07, 2020
Facebook Bans Deepfake Videos But Disinformation Remains Rampant Online
295
The move comes as the company is under increasing pressure to crack down on disinformation ahead of the 2020 election.
Jan 07, 2020
Significance Of Iran's Cultural Sites; Facebook Bans Deepfakes
2566
Trump's warned of bombing Iranian cultural sites, though U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper says the U.S. military does not plan to do so. We talk with a professor of Islamic Art and Architecture at Yale University about the significance of these historic sites. Also, Facebook says it's banning deepfakes, or videos manipulated with the intention to mislead. The move has already drawn criticism for not going far enough to combat the spread of disinformation.
Jan 07, 2020
'Life-Changing' Brain Implants; Australia's Wildlife Impacted By Fires
2508
It's estimated that nearly half a billion animals have been killed in the fires in Australia since September. But the researcher who came up with that figure says the situation could turn much worse as fires there continue to burn. We talk with an ecologist at the University of Sydney. Also, some patients have had success treating movement disorders like Parkinson's disease with neurostimulators — devices implanted in the brain during a procedure called deep brain stimulation surgery. Chemistry and biology teacher Cheryl Sansone had the surgery in 2015 and describes ...
Jan 06, 2020
Former U.S. Defense Secretary On Iran; Why We're So Busy
2518
Chuck Hagel, former Obama administration Defense Secretary and former Republican senator to Nebraska, speaks with us about developments in the confrontation with Iran. Also, has technology saved us time? The Atlantic's Derek Thompson asks why everyone is so busy, despite the proliferation of technologies meant to make our lives easier.
Jan 06, 2020
Racial Bias In Prescribing Opioids; New Policy On Flavored Vaping
2519
A new analysis concludes an estimated 14,000 black Americans would have died from the opioid crisis had they been prescribed the drugs at the same rate as their white counterparts. Also, vaping product manufacturers have 30 days to take fruit-, candy- and mint-flavored vaping cartridges off the market. The Trump administration announced a partial and temporary ban on the sales of those products. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports.
Jan 03, 2020
State Minimum Wages Increase; Top Iranian General Killed In U.S. Airstrike
2516
While the federal minimum wage has not changed in a decade, the minimum wage did increase in 21 states at the start of the new year. Four other states are also set to increase their baseline pay later this year. Also, the U.S. killing of the top Iranian general, Qassem Soleimani, in Baghdad is expected to have major repercussions. Here & Now security analyst Jim Walsh joins us to discuss.
Jan 03, 2020
Fairfax Students Can Skip School For Protests; World's 1st Synthetic Frog
2512
Students in cities nationwide have been skipping classes to attend protests. And for the first time, Fairfax School District announced that students will have one excused absence every year for a protest they want to attend starting January 21. Also, instead of real frogs, students at one high school in Florida dissected the world's first-ever SynDaver synthetic frog.
Jan 02, 2020
Mysteries Of Chronic Pain; Julián Castro Drops Out Of 2020 Race
2513
Nearly 50 million people in the U.S. live with chronic pain, which is when a person's pain lasts longer than three months. National Geographic contributing writer Yudhijit Bhattacharjee joins us to discuss his reporting on the latest in pain research. And, Texas Democrat Julián Castro dropped out of the 2020 presidential race on Thursday. NPR's Scott Detrow joins us to discuss the latest from the campaign trail.
Jan 02, 2020
Justice Roberts In Impeachment Trial; 2020 Travel Trips
2534
The timing of the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump is still up in the air, but one thing is certain: Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts will be presiding over the trial. CNN legal analyst Joan Biskupic joins us to discuss the role and other areas of the trial. And, Here & Now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan shares his tips for travel in the new year. He says stay away from Japan in summer, but you might want to consider Canada or Hawaii.
Jan 01, 2020
2020 National Security Challenges; Vegan Pilot
2528
Expressing deep frustration over stalled nuclear talks, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is warning today of unspecified "shocking" action. Here & Now security analyst Jim Walsh with MIT's Security Studies Program joins us to discuss. And, pilot Matthew Ayers knows how difficult it can be to eat healthy on the road, especially for vegan travelers. He hosts a website called the Vegan Pilot where he gives tips to vegan and vegetarian travelers.
Jan 01, 2020
U.S. Population Growth Slows; 'Hair' 40th Anniversary
2583
New Census numbers show the U.S. population is growing at its slowest pace in decades. William Frey, a demographer and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, joins us to discuss why. And, the cast of "Hair" got together for a reunion in New York earlier this year to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the film. The movie was first a hit Broadway musical that debuted in 1968.
Dec 31, 2019
2020 Economic Outlook; Former Obama Speechwriter Embraces Judaism
2564
The S&P 500, Nasdaq and Dow all reached record highs in 2019. Grant Thornton Chief Economist Diane Swonk joins us to discuss the state of the economy and whether strong U.S. markets will continue into 2020. A former speechwriter for Michelle and Barack Obama recently dove back into centuries of Jewish texts that gave her a new moral compass. Sarah Hurwitz joins us to discuss the experience, which she wrote about in her new book, "Here All Along."
Dec 30, 2019
Environmental Impact Of Touring; Best Films Of 2019
2558
The rock band Coldplay recently announced it will pause touring because of environmental reasons. Another British band, Massive Attack, has teamed up with the University of Manchester's Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research to look at how to limit carbon emissions on tour. We speak with Tyndall's director, Carly McLaughlan. Also, host Robin Young speaks with Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr about his picks for best films of 2019, topped by the French film "Portrait of a Lady On Fire."
Dec 30, 2019
Deaf DJ Feels The Beat; What 'Blue Zones' Can Teach Us About Health
2502
Although he can't hear, Nico DiMarco has always loved music and feeling the vibrations through his body. DiMarco is now a popular DJ with a large following. Mikaela Lefrak of WAMU reports. Also, as the start of 2020 nears, many of us are thinking about New Year's resolutions. One of the most common is to get healthier. People living in "Blue Zones," some of the oldest groups of people in the world, have a particular approach to living a long and happy life. Host Peter O'Dowd speaks with Dan Buettner.
Dec 27, 2019
Year In Climate Change; FDA Raises Smoking Age To 21
2465
Climate change-linked floods, storms and wildfires battered countries across the world in 2019. Environmental journalist Zoe Schlanger joins us to talk about how climate change affected us this year. Also, the FDA has officially raised the legal age of purchase for all tobacco products from 18 to 21. The new regulation was part of a spending package Trump signed. We talk to Jeffrey Hardesty of Johns Hopkins University about the change.
Dec 27, 2019
Farmers Fight Climate Change With Biochar; Bringing '1917' To Life
2595
Biochar is made from natural materials such as straw and shells, and it can sequester carbon. Jon Kalish reports on New England entrepreneurs, farmers and gardeners turning to biochar to improve soil. Also, host Peter O'Dowd speaks with cinematographer Roger Deakins and editor Lee Smith about their work in the new film "1917."
Dec 26, 2019
Science Stories Of The Decade; Housing Affordability Crisis
2592
The first clear image of a black hole and a revolutionary method for modifying genes were among the top advancements in science in this decade. NPR science correspondent Joe Palca reviews the top science stories. Also, the median home price in Santa Fe, New Mexico, hit a record high last year. The state is one of many places in the country facing a growing crisis of housing affordability.
Dec 26, 2019
Americans Are Driving Less; Best Foods Of 2019
2617
The American Public Transportation Associated clocked a 2.2% national increase in public ridership for the third quarter of 2019. We discuss why more Americans are choosing public transportation, despite the fact that the economy is strong. Also, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst talks about her standout foods (and one organizational tool) of the year.
Dec 25, 2019
Tanesha Bannister's 1st Christmas Out Of Prison; What Makes People Happy
2569
This holiday season marks Tanesha Bannister's first Christmas with her family in 16 years. In 2004, Bannister received a life sentence for conspiring to sell crack and cocaine. Her second chance came this year when she was freed along with some 3,000 former federal inmates under the First Step Act. Also, new research looks at available data to find what makes people happy around the world, and what life events tend to have the biggest impact on overall happiness.
Dec 25, 2019
Trump Criticizes Environmental Regulations; Top Songs Of The Decade
2548
President Trump railed against wind turbines and other environmental regulations over the weekend. We take a look at his attacks with Washington Post reporter Toluse Olorunnipa. And, Billboard's senior director of charts Gary Trust joins us to discuss the top songs of the decade from Maroon 5 to Bruno Mars.
Dec 24, 2019
Elf School In Iceland; Poverty Rate Increase In U.S. Counties
2541
Surveys in Iceland show most of the country's residents believe elves exist. Yes, elves. Host Robin Young visits Reykjavik's The Elf School to find out more about the country's "Hidden People." Also, the poverty rate across all counties in the U.S. fell from 2016 to 2018. But the numbers aren't evenly distributed. One-third of counties saw the rate of poverty increase.
Dec 24, 2019
Baking Icelandic Lava Bread; A Jolly Good Year For Christmas Tree Farmers
2473
Iceland's lava bread is a sweet rye loaf baked in metal pots that are buried in volcanic sand. Here & Now visited a baker to learn how the bread is baked. Also, Chal Landgren, a Christmas tree expert, tells us why 2019 has been a particularly good year for Christmas tree growers, and he answers other questions related to the holiday tradition.
Dec 23, 2019
North Korea Warns Of 'Christmas Gift'; Christmas A Cappella
2588
A new satellite image of a factory where North Korea makes military equipment has renewed concern that Kim Jong Un could launch a rocket or missile test in the coming days. Host Robin Young talks with Joel Wit, senior fellow at the Henry Stimson Center, about how such a test could further damage stalled nuclear talks with the U.S. Also, host Robin Young's high school choir director Ron Cohen joins us to share some of his favorite Christmas a cappella tunes.
Dec 23, 2019
Georgia Reinstates Voters After Massive Purge; Generation Z Voters
2577
Georgia's secretary of state reinstated 22,000 of the more than 300,000 voters who were purged from the rolls earlier this week. Voting rights organization Fair Fight sued to block the purge and fighting for 100,000 more voters to be reinstated. Reporter Emil Moffatt of WABE in Atlanta joins us for the latest. And, one in 10 eligible voters in the 2020 election with be part of Generation Z. Here & Now talks with three young California voters about what matters to them in the upcoming election.
Dec 20, 2019
12 Trump Judicial Nominees Confirmed; Meals On Wheels Funding
2581
The Senate confirmed 12 of President Trump's judicial nominees on Thursday. According to Slate's Mark Joseph Stern, Trump has now appointed nearly one-fifth of all district court judges. Also, Meals On Wheels helps millions of seniors who are food insecure. But the program is serving 21 million fewer meals than in 2005 because of relatively flat funding from Congress. We speak with the Meals on Wheels America CEO.
Dec 20, 2019
Protecting Packages From Porch Theft; Gaby Moreno Talks '¡Spangled!'
2511
Nearly 2 million packages are stolen or go missing every day across the country, according to an analysis by The New York Times. The Denver Police Department started tracking package theft since 2015 and has seen a 68% uptick in reported thefts. We talk with Denver Police Officer Bob Anderson about what we can do this holiday season to avoid getting packages stolen. Also, we speak with singer-songwriter Gaby Moreno about her new album, "¡Spangled!."
Dec 19, 2019
Increased Subway Policing In NYC; 'Bombshell' The Movie
2563
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority in New York City has approved a plan to hire 500 additional transit officers to patrol the city's subways. Protests against increased police presence in the subway began in early November. Also, "Bombshell" tells the story of the sexual harassment scandal that brought down Roger Ailes, the late CEO of Fox News. We speak with the movie's screenwriter.
Dec 19, 2019
Independent Bookstore Takes On Amazon; The Bakersfield Sound
2567
Amazon has opened a brick-and-mortar bookstore across the street from one of Nashville's beloved independent bookstores. But co-owner of Parnassus Books Ann Patchett says her bookstore is here to stay, Rachel Iacovone of WPLN reports. Also, Bakersfield, California, is known as Nashville West. The city has a rich country music history, and a massive new box set documents that legacy. We talk with the author of the book "The Bakersfield Sound."
Dec 18, 2019
Chicago's The Second City Turns 60; .Org Domain Sale Fight
2557
Monday marked 60 years in business for Chicago's legendary comedy institution, The Second City. The improvisational comedy enterprise calls itself the world's premier comedy club, comedy theater and school of improvisation. Also, the nonprofit that manages internet domain names ending in ".org" has hit pause on a controversial decision to sell itself to the private equity fund. We get the latest.
Dec 18, 2019
Going Green In The Kitchen; Wyoming Buffalo Restoration
2573
Here & Now's resident chef Kathy Gunst's resolution for 2020 is to reduce plastic and overall waste in the kitchen. She joins us with some items that can help other cooks who might want to do the same. Also, for over a century, there was no buffalo herd for the Northern Arapaho tribe in Wyoming. A new restoration project has brought buffalo back but some tribal ranchers are concerned about them.
Dec 17, 2019
Decline Of The Death Penalty; Hairstylists Learn To Detect Melanoma
2546
A report released Tuesday highlights a continuing decline in the use of the death penalty. Host Tonya Mosely speaks with the lead author of the report. Also, hairstylists can be lifesavers in early melanoma detection. We talk with a former hairstylist and a dermatologist about the important role hairstylists play in detecting skin cancer.
Dec 17, 2019
Ghana's 'Year Of Return'; Silicon Valley Tax Loopholes
2558
The president of Ghana has called 2019 the "Year of Return." The year-long campaign has welcomed members of the African diaspora to Ghana to reconnect with their roots and invest in the country. Also, loopholes allowed six of the biggest Silicon Valley companies to avoid paying billions in taxes since 2010, according to an analysis by the British group Fair Tax Mark.
Dec 16, 2019
'My Dad Wrote A Porno' Podcast; Marketing Infant Formula To Black Women
2578
The British comedy podcast "My Dad Wrote A Porno" has been downloaded more than 200 million times. We talk with its three co-hosts about "Belinda Blinked," the amateur erotic novel that host Jamie Morton's dad wrote. Also, host Tonya Mosley speaks with Andrea Freeman — whose book "Skimmed: Breastfeeding, Race, and Injustice" looks at how infant formula was marketed to African American women in the late 20th century.
Dec 16, 2019