Here & Now

By NPR

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: News & Politics

Open in iTunes


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 699
Reviews: 0

Description

NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

Episode Date
Oct. 17, 2019: 'Looking For Alaska' On Hulu; Decommissioning Chemical Weapons
2610
John Green's young adult novel "Looking for Alaska" is now a limited TV series on Hulu. Host Robin Young speaks with Green and Josh Schwartz, the show's co-executive producer and showrunner. Also, hundreds of thousands of chemical weapons at an Army depot in Colorado must be destroyed under an international treaty, but environmental concerns have delayed that until now. Michael de Yoanna with member station KUNC has the story.
Oct 17, 2019
Oct. 16, 2019: Excessive Police Force; Coroners And Mass Shootings
2577
The shooting and death of Atatiana Jefferson at the hands of a police officer in Fort Worth — mere weeks after Amber Guyger's murder conviction for killing Botham Jean in Dallas — is highlighting the role fear and racial stereotypes often play in police officers' decision to use lethal force. Also, two years have passed since the mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip left 58 people dead and hundreds wounded. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with head coroner for Clark County, Nevada, about how coroners face the trauma of mass shootings.
Oct 16, 2019
Oct. 16, 2019: Zombie Homes Haunt Cleveland; Pulse Nightclub Memorial Controversy
2607
A decade after the nationwide housing collapse, thousands of "zombie homes" are still vacant, abandoned and crumbling in the suburbs outside of Cleveland. Host Robin Young toured one east Cleveland neighborhood with a city councilman to find out why. Also, three years after a gunman killed 49 people in the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, plans to build a memorial and museum are moving forward — but not without controversy. Danielle Prieur from WMFE reports.
Oct 16, 2019
Oct. 15, 2019: Climate Change Insurance; California's Homeless Crisis
2510
Last year, insurance payouts caused by climate-related events totaled $2.4 trillion worldwide. The Economist reporter Matthieu Favas recently wrote about the issue and joins host Robin Young to discuss. Also, a quarter of the nation's homeless population is in California, with many cities struggling to deal with the problem. The city of Bakersfield has seen a 50% increase in homelessness in the last year. Host Tonya Mosley has the report.
Oct 15, 2019
Oct. 14, 2019: Living Funerals; Drug Resistance Technology
2515
Living funerals are held for those who are still alive but nearing death. Author Mary-Elizabeth Williams speaks about her experience attending her friend's living funeral. Also, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 2 million Americans get drug-resistant infections every year. Of those, about 23,000 die. A new diagnostic tool that identifies bacteria quickly, at a genetic level, might help patients and fight antibiotic resistance.
Oct 14, 2019
Oct. 14, 2019: The Economics Of Climate Change; Latino Voters In Texas
2467
The Latino vote is still up for grabs by both parties in Texas, and it could play a decisive role in the 2020 presidential election. We talk with the lead author of a new report from the University of Houston that takes on some common misconceptions about Latino Republican voters in Texas. Also, climate activist and journalist Naomi Klein says the real inconvenient truth is that fixing climate change requires major economic change. Host Robin Young speaks with Klein about her new book "On Fire: The Burning Case for a ...
Oct 14, 2019
Oct. 11, 2019: Former U.S.-Ukraine Ambassador Testifies; Cloud Appreciation
2510
Former ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch is testifying on Capitol Hill Friday as part of the impeachment inquiry after the White House blocked another official from testifying earlier this week. We get the latest from NPR's Susan Davis. And, host Peter O'Dowd takes a tour of the sky with Gavin Pretor-Pinney, founder of the Cloud Appreciate Society.
Oct 11, 2019
Oct. 11, 2019: Mashrou Leila; 'South Park' Provokes China
2517
Lebanese indie-pop band Mashrou Leila challenges the status quo in the Middle East. We speak with lead singer and lyricist Hamed Sinno and drummer Carl Gerges about their music and why they're banned in parts of the Arab world. Also, "South Park" marked its 300th episode on Thursday. NPR's Eric Deggans joins host Jeremy Hobson to discuss the show's criticism of Chinese censorship and political prisoner camps in the country.
Oct 11, 2019
Oct. 10, 2019: Giuliani Associates Arrested; Surge In STD Cases
2382
Two associates of President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani have been arrested on campaign finance charges. The associates reportedly aided Giuliani's efforts to have Ukraine launch an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden. We get the latest from NPR's Ryan Lucas. Also, a new CDC report reveals a rise in the number of STD cases in the U.S. in 2018 compared to the year before. We speak with an epidemiologist at the CDC who worked on the report.
Oct 10, 2019
Oct 10, 2019: Turkey's Offensive In Syria; Jimmy Fallon On Kids And Comedy
2618
Turkish ground troops are continuing their advance against Kurdish fighters in northern Syria. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with former ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee Jane Harman about the invasion that has been condemned around the world. Also, on top of a 20-year career in comedy as late-night television host and cast member on Saturday Night Live, Jimmy Fallon is also an author. We speak with Fallon about comedy, having kids and his new children's book, "This is Baby."
Oct 10, 2019
Oct 9, 2019: California Power Outages; Psychedelic Substances Research
2609
In California, the utility PG&E has begun shutting off electricity because of concerns of high winds and the potential for wildfires. Host Peter O'Dowd speaks with KQED's Brian Watt about power outages that are expected to impact hundreds of thousands of people across the state. Also, Johns Hopkins University has launched a center for psychedelic research with $17 million in donations from private donors. We talk with William Richards, a psychologist at Johns Hopkins, about his decades-long research into how psychedelic substances can treat mental illnesses.
Oct 09, 2019
Oct. 9, 2019: Denmark Climate Summit; Enforcing Subpoenas
2566
World mayors are gathered in Copenhagen, Denmark, this week to discuss how their cities can fight climate change. We speak with one of the organizers of the summit, Mark Watts, executive director of C40 Cities. Also, the Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to the three scientists who, over decades, developed lithium-ion batteries and created a portable technology revolution. And, Lisa Kern Griffin, former federal prosecutor and Duke University law professor, joins us to discuss if Congress can enforce subpoenas in the impeachment inquiry.
Oct 09, 2019
Oct. 8, 2019: How Schools Teach Impeachment; Drive-Thrus Slowing Down
2562
How are high school students learning about the impeachment as the politics play out in Washington? We speak with John Speicher, a government teacher at Putnam City High School in Oklahoma City. Also, a new report finds that drive-thrus in the U.S. are getting slower. But some say that's not necessarily a bad thing. Host Jeremy Hobson talks about the state of fast food with Sam Oches, editor of QSR Magazine.
Oct 08, 2019
Oct. 7, 2019: Sen. King On Syria; Party Like A Federal Official
2604
On Sunday, the White House announced U.S. forces will stand aside while Turkey prepares to launch an offensive in Northern Syria. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks about the news with Maine Sen. Angus King, who is on the Senate Armed Services Committee. Also, Bryan Rafanelli founded one of the country's premier event planners, Rafanelli Events. His new book "A Great Party: Designing the Perfect Celebration" highlights some of his event successes from weddings in Istanbul to celebrations at the White House.
Oct 08, 2019
Oct. 8, 2019: Sondland Blocked From Testifying; China Versus NBA
2566
The State Department has blocked Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, from appearing in front of House committees on Tuesday with hours to spare. We speak with NPR's Claudia Grisales to answer the question: Who is Gordon Sondland? Also, China's state broadcaster canceled plans to show a pair of preseason NBA games in that country later this week after Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey tweeted support for anti-government protesters in Hong Kong. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks Here & Now's sports analyst Mike Pesca for the ...
Oct 08, 2019
Oct. 7, 2019: David Byrne's 'American Utopia'; Rural Chronic Disease
2571
David Byrne, the beloved Talking Heads frontman, debuts his show "American Utopia" this month. Byrne joins host Robin Young to talk about the unusual show, which features new songs, as well as Talking Heads favorites. Also, Americans who live in rural parts of the U.S. have much higher rates of death than the rest of the country. The causes are not only diseases but their side effects — depression, anxiety and suicide. Some experts are recommending ways to prevent these premature deaths. Lisa Gillespie of Louisville Public Media reports.
Oct 07, 2019
Oct. 4, 2019: Rep. Engel On Impeachment Inquiry; Vape Shops Shutter
2568
The inspector general of the intelligence community is on Capitol Hill Friday addressing questions surrounding the president's July phone call with Ukraine's president. We speak with Congressman Eliot Engel, Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, about the future of the impeachment inquiry. Also, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker announced a four-month ban on the sale of all vaping products last week in a response to the growing public health crisis that has injured more than 1,080 people across the country. Host Peter O'Dowd visited one shop near Boston with $80,000 ...
Oct 04, 2019
Oct. 4, 2019: 'City Of Women' Map; Bayou Steel Layoffs
2606
Hundreds of employees of the Bayou Steel plant in LaPlace, Louisiana, learned this week that they will be losing their jobs because the plant is closing at the end of November. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said the company was "particularly vulnerable to tariffs" because it relies on mostly imported, recycled scrap metal. Also, in 2016, the first "City of Women" map was designed to reimagine public space by naming each subway stop after a famous woman. Host Tonya Mosley talks to one of the creators about the map's new ...
Oct 04, 2019
Oct. 3, 2019: Pence's Role In Ukraine Affair; CBD Arthritis Guidelines
2608
The Washington Post reports that President Trump used Vice President Mike Pence in his efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate the Bidens. Washington Post national security reporter Greg Jaffee joins us to discuss. And, the Arthritis Foundation released guidelines for patients who want to use CBD to manage their pain. Plus, a look at the wife of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, Cilia Flores, who some say may be more powerful than her husband.
Oct 03, 2019
Oct. 3, 2019: A Look Into The Tobacco Industry; Florida Climate Migrant
2566
A recent study compares vaping-related lung injuries to severe chemical burns, based on lung tissue samples from 17 patients. The Trump administration has moved to ban the sale of most flavored e-cigs, but vaping is still largely unregulated. We look at the history of regulatory fights over tobacco products in the U.S. with Sarah Milov, author of "The Cigarette: A Political History." Also, more than two years after Hurricane Irma struck Florida, one woman is still trying to get the state to buy her damaged home and knock it ...
Oct 03, 2019
Oct. 2, 2019: 'Talk Radio's America;' Best Tortillas In Phoenix
2594
Since the launch of The Rush Limbaugh Show in 1988, conservative talk radio has taken over airways across the country and pushed the GOP further to the right. We speak with Brian Rosenwald, author of "Talk Radio's America: How an Industry Took Over a Political Party That Took Over the United States." And, an unassuming Mexican restaurant in South Phoenix has been serving up 13-inch flour tortillas since 1968. Here & Now's Tonya Mosely visited the restaurant during a busy lunch rush and spoke with one of the sisters who runs the ...
Oct 02, 2019
Oct. 2, 2019: Deepfakes Near Perfection; PM's 'Final' Brexit Offer
2571
Experts used to think convincing deep fake technology was years away, but now it could be less than a year before copycat media becomes indistinguishable from reality. We speak to professor Hao Lin about the rapid evolution of deepfakes. Also, audiences have loved Henry Winkler from his iconic role as The Fonz on "Happy Days" to the Bluth's family attorney Barry Zuckerkorn on "Arrested Development." Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Winkler and co-author Lin Oliver about their new kids' book "Alien Superstar."
Oct 02, 2019
Oct. 1, 2019: 70 Years Of Communism In China; Remembering Jessye Norman
2586
The People's Republic of China celebrated its 70th anniversary with a military parade in Bejing on Tuesday, while protests against the capital city's influence in Hong Kong persist. We speak with NPR's Bejing correspondent about the day's events. Also, host Robin Young talks with James Risen of The Intercept about Hunter Biden, Joe Biden's son who Republicans are focusing on to detract from President Trump's phone call with Ukraine's president. Plus, we remember Grammy award-winning soprano Jessye Norman, who the Metropolitan Opera calls "one of the great sopranos of ...
Oct 01, 2019
Oct. 1, 2019: Hillary Clinton On Impeachment; Carbon Capture
2522
Host Tonya Mosley speaks with Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton about the Trump impeachment inquiry and their new book, "The Book of Gutsy Women: Favorite Stories of Courage and Resilience." Also, as the world gets closer to burning through its carbon budget, one old idea is getting a new look: carbon capture. Several Democratic presidential candidates have included the idea in their climate plans, but some climate activists say support for carbon capture can be a smokescreen for fossil fuel interests. We speak with the cofounder and managing ...
Oct 01, 2019
Sept. 30, 2019: Afghanistan Election; Quick And Easy Dinners
2608
Now that presidential elections are over, Afghanistan faces a period of political uncertainty. We get the latest from the BBC on an election day filled with violence. Also, fall is a busy season but that's no excuse for making a habit of ordering takeout. Our resident chef Kathy Gunst has three recipes for when there's no time to cook.
Sep 30, 2019
Sept. 30, 2019: Ibtihaj Muhammad's Children's Book; How America Lost Religion
2586
Host Tonya Mosley speaks with Olympic medalist Ibtihaj Muhammad about her new children's book "The Proudest Blue: A Story of Hijab and Family." Also, Americans have become increasingly disassociated with religion since the 1990s. Host Robin Young speaks with Derek Thompson, senior editor at the Atlantic, about why. And, House Democrats are planning hearings this week as they move forward with their impeachment inquiry. We get the latest from NPR's Tamara Keith.
Sep 30, 2019
Sept. 27, 2019: Juul's New CEO; China Turns 70 Amid Protests
2532
Juul has a new CEO who is joining the company with two decades of experience in Big Tobacco. We talk with Bloomberg's Michael Regan about K.C. Crosthwaite and the challenges ahead amid a public health dilemma fueled by vaping. Also, Tuesday, Oct. 1, will mark the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Emily Feng, NPR's Beijing correspondent, about how Hong Kong protests and celebration festivities in Bejing could collide.
Sep 27, 2019
Sept. 27, 2019: Mont Blanc Glacier Melts; Grizzly Bear Attacks
2570
Italy's Mont Blanc glacier is at risk of collapsing due to melting ice linked to climate change. Some roads in a nearby town have been closed as a precaution. Host Peter O'Dowd speaks with a glaciologist who was in the region last year about what the main concerns are for scientists. Also, in Montana, a fourth person has been injured in a grizzly bear attack according to local officials. We get the latest from a wildlife coordinator in the area about the recent attacks.
Sep 27, 2019
Sept. 26, 2019: Leon Panetta On Ukraine Affair; Deadly Mosquito-Borne Virus
2535
The whistleblower complaint detailing President Trump's call with Ukraine's president was released to the public on Thursday. Former Defense Secretary and CIA Director Leon Panetta weighs in on the contents of the complaint. And, a rare mosquito-borne virus has killed at least 10 people in the U.S. STAT's Helen Branswell joins Here & Now to discuss the deadly Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's September 26, 2019 full broadcast.
Sep 26, 2019
Sept 26, 2019: Whistleblower Complaint Released; Desert Water Conservation
2523
The whistleblower complaint about a phone call where President Trump asks Ukraine's president to investigate his political rival Joe Biden has been released. NPR's Tim Mak explains Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire's appearance before Congress on Thursday. Also, Arizona Republican Rep. Debbie Lesko told us the official White House memo is "a total nothing burger." Plus, researchers at Arizona State University are testing a new technology on soccer fields that could conserve millions of gallons of irrigation water in the desert state.
Sep 26, 2019
Sept 25, 2019: Ukraine Call Memo Released; School Opioid Program
2534
Trump is anticipated to speak more about the call to the Ukrainian president Wednesday afternoon as the House moves closer to impeachment. NPR's Claudia Grisale has the latest on the House Democrats' impeachment inquiry. Also, in 2017, the state of Ohio was second only to West Virginia in its rate of overdose deaths. One Ohio school district has started a program for children affected by the emotional, behavioral and physical consequences of their families' addictions. Host Robin Young talks to two school officials about their work.
Sep 25, 2019
Sept 25, 2019: Impeachment Inquiry; NATO On US-Taliban Peace Talks
2551
On Tuesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced that the House is moving forward with a formal impeachment inquiry into President Trump. A key part of the investigation will focus on Trump's request of Ukraine's president to investigate the Biden family. NPR's Tamara Keith has the latest. Also, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with the NATO secretary general about Trump's address at the U.N. General Assembly, the threat of Iran, the war in Afghanistan, and the state of international alliances.
Sep 25, 2019
Sept. 24, 2019: Trump Impeachment Momentum; Studying Wyoming's Frogs
2536
A growing majority of Democrats are calling for the impeachment of President Trump, saying he abused the power of his office in order to sway the 2020 election. NPR's Domenico Montanaro explains. Also, scientists in Wyoming have organized a two-season project to survey where frogs live and how many are out there. One of the goals is to have a database for land managers to make informed decisions about habitat.
Sep 24, 2019
Sept. 24, 2019: Demi Moore's 'Inside Out'; NYC Repeals Gay Conversion Ban
2573
Demi Moore chronicles her high-profile relationships and roles in iconic films in her new memoir. She joins us to talk about "Inside Out," which you can find on shelves Tuesday. Also, we speak with one of the seven first-term Democrats calling for impeachment over allegations Trump withheld military aid to Ukraine if leaders there didn't investigate political rival Biden. Plus, host Jeremy Hobson talks with Corey Johnson, the openly gay speaker of the New York City Council, about the council's decision to repeal its ban on gay conversion therapy.
Sep 24, 2019
Sept. 23, 2019: Changes In Legal Immigration; UN General Assembly
2538
Trump has used executive power to make changes to immigration policy that have affected would-be immigrants, students, entrepreneurs and refugees. We look at the effect of the administration's policies and rhetoric on legal travel and migration to the U.S. Also, Trump meets with other world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly on Monday. But whistleblower reports about an interaction with the leader of Ukraine looms over the event. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks to NPR's Ron Elving about the latest.
Sep 23, 2019
Sept. 23, 2019: Marriott To Cut Mini Plastic Bottles; Trouble At WeWork
2545
Marriott International, the world's largest hotel chain, says it will eliminate small plastic bottles of shampoo, conditioner and bath gel from its hotel rooms around the world by the end of next year. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Arne Sorenson, CEO of Marriott International. Also, the Board of Directors at WeWork could meet as soon as this week to possibly oust CEO Adam Neumann over concerns regarding the office rental company's finances. Derek Thompson, senior editor at The Atlantic, explains.
Sep 23, 2019
Sept. 20, 2019: White House On California Emissions; Soil Degradation
2544
The Trump administration is revoking a waiver that allowed California to set its own standards for automobile emissions. Host Jeremy Hobson talks with Russ Vought, acting director of the Office of Management and Budget, about the change. And, the health of the world's soil is crucial to storing carbon. But a recent UN report finds that the Earth's soil is being lost 10 to 100 times faster than it is forming. We speak with scientist Louis Verchot.
Sep 20, 2019
Sept. 19, 2019: Environmental Impact Of Oil Attacks; 'They/Them' Pronouns And Equality
2562
The attacks on the Saudi oil plant last weekend were not the first time a country's oil industry or infrastructure has been targeted. One Dutch researcher says attacks on oil facilities can have disastrous environmental consequences. Also, a study looked into what impact the use of gender-neutral pronouns like 'they' is having in Sweden. Here & Now's Tonya Mosley spoke with one of the researchers about the impact pronouns have on equality.
Sep 19, 2019
Sept. 19, 2019: Speaker John Bercow; Kids And Plant-Based Milk
2566
John Bercow, speaker of Britain's House of Commons, is famous for his calls for "order, order!" when he chairs debates. Lately, the main issue has been Brexit. He joins Jeremy Hobson for a conversation. Also, new guidance from a panel of leading public and private health organizations says that kids under age of five should avoid drinks that are high in sugar. That includes juice and popular plant-based milks, such as rice or coconut milk.
Sep 19, 2019
Sept. 18, 2019: Strategists On 2020 Race; 'Downton Abbey' Creator On New Film
2572
The 2020 presidential race is heating up. We spoke with political strategists from the left and right about the latest from the presidential campaign trail. Also, Here & Now's Robin Young talks with "Downton Abbey" creator Julian Fellowes about writing the screenplay for a new film based on the TV series.
Sep 18, 2019
Sept. 18, 2019: New National Security Adviser; 1619 Project
2564
Trump has named Robert C. O'Brien as national security adviser. O'Brien had served as presidential envoy for hostage affairs and has a long background in diplomacy. NPR's Greg Myre joins us to discuss. Also, this year marks 400 years since the first enslaved Africans arrived on America's shores. Tonya Mosley speaks New York Times journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, who spearheaded the 1619 Project, a collection of essays dedicated to chronicling slavery and revealing its ties to America's modern systems and cultural norms.
Sep 18, 2019
Sept. 17, 2019: Remembering Cokie Roberts; Climate Change And Religion
2541
Veteran journalist Cokie Roberts has died at 75. According to a family statement, Roberts died Tuesday due to complications from breast cancer. We take a look at her legendary career as an NPR and ABC News journalist. Also, a growing number of churches are taking an active roll in fighting against climate change. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with Reverend Michael Malcolm in Birmingham, Alabama, about his faith-based approach to environmental activism.
Sep 17, 2019
Sept. 17, 2019: Climate Change Reporting; Frank Bruni Talks Blindness
2531
Journalists reporting on climate change say there are nuances and intersectional issues in covering the "climate emergency." We speak with three reporters covering the issue throughout the country. Also, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni woke up one morning without sight in one eye and now he has a 20% chance of going blind entirely. Here & Now's Robin Young talks with Bruni about blindness, writing and empathy.
Sep 17, 2019
Sept. 16, 2019: NRA Board Meeting; 'Motherhood So White' Author
2571
Leaders of the National Rifle Association met over the weekend near the nation's capital. Rob Pincus, a member of the NRA who is pushing for reform inside the organization, talks about the meeting. Also, a climate change advice column from Yale Climate Connections aims to help people navigate conversations on the topic. Here & Now's Robin Young talks with the author of the "Ask Sara" column, Sara Peach. And, host Tonya Mosley speaks with Nefertiti Austin, author of "Motherhood So White: A Memoir of Race, Gender, and Parenting In America."
Sep 16, 2019
Sept 16, 2019: A Migrant's Journey; General Motors Strike
2584
Correspondents from KJZZ's Fronteras Desk were deployed across North and Central America to document key stops along a migrant's journey to the United States. KJZZ's Michel Marizco explains how shifting policies from the Trump Administration are affecting people and governments across the hemisphere. Also, Here & Now's Tonya Mosley gets the latest on the strike involving more than 49,000 General Motors plant workers across the country from Michigan Radio reporter Steve Carmody.
Sep 16, 2019
Sept. 13, 2019: Vape Cartridge Bust; China's Data Centers
2420
Two Wisconsin brothers have been charged in a massive counterfeit vape cartridge operation. Authorities say they produced between 3,000 to 5,000 counterfeit THC cartridges with a team of 10 employees. Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reporter Raquel Rutledge has the latest. And, Here & Now tech analyst Ben Brock Johnson joins us to discuss the carbon footprint of China's data centers, which are still mostly powered by coal. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's September 13, 2019 full broadcast.
Sep 13, 2019
Sept 13, 2019: Mexico Reacts To Asylum Changes; Waterways Rule Rollback
2467
Mexico is pushing back against a new rule from the Trump administration that the Supreme Court allowed to proceed this week. The rule effectively bars most Central American migrants from seeking asylum in the U.S., unless they have already sought asylum in another country they passed through. Also, the Trump administration is celebrating the repeal of another Obama-era environmental rule, one that aims to protect wetlands and waterways. We speak with E&E News reporter Ariel Wittenberg.
Sep 13, 2019
Sept. 12, 2019: CEOs Demand Action On Gun Violence; The Elaine Massacre
2500
In a letter to Congress, 145 CEOs called for expanded background checks and strengthened "red flag" laws. Host Robin Young speaks with Ambition CEO Travis Truett, who signed the letter. Also, 100 years ago this month, hundreds of black residents of rural Arkansas were murdered by their white neighbors, in what became known as the Elaine Massacre.
Sep 12, 2019
Sept. 12, 2019: 3rd Democratic Debate; Irish Ambassador On Brexit
2506
Elizabeth Warren will share a stage with Joe Biden for the first time Thursday night in Houston, as she's surged in polls among Democratic voters. We spoke with NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid, who will be in Houston covering the debate. Also, Irish Ambassador to the U.S. Daniel Mulhall dives into what UK's impending exit from the EU means for Ireland.
Sep 12, 2019
Sept. 11, 2019: 'The Story Of 9/11'; John Bolton's Departure
2515
Republican strategist Alice Stewart and Democratic strategist Bill Press join hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson discuss the departure of Trump national security adviser John Bolton and the upcoming Democratic presidential debate. Also, to mark the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, we revisit part of our conversation with Mitchell Zuckoff, author of "Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11."
Sep 11, 2019