Here & Now

By NPR

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NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

Episode Date
Ohio Epidemiologist; Gail Caldwell's 'Bright Precious Thing' Memoir
2500
Ohio is one of several states seeing an uptick in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations after remaining fairly steady in May and June. Dr. Tara Smith, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Kent State University, joins us to discuss what's behind the recent surge in cases. And, Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Gail Caldwell talks about her new memoir "Bright Precious Thing," which explores feminism, friendship and what she learned from her 5-year-old neighbor.
Jul 08, 2020
Gen Z Talks Protests, Pandemic; Stargazing Without A Telescope
2510
Americans have been grappling with the emergence of a deadly pandemic and a nationwide protest movement forcing a reckoning on police violence and racial injustice. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with three young people about how they've been handling it all. Looking for something to do this summer? Astronomer Dean Regas says, "Look up!" Regas joins us to describe some of the brightest stars and constellations visible throughout the summer, and how to find them without a telescope.
Jul 08, 2020
Blackout Day Economic Protest; How Newt Gingrich Shaped The GOP
2471
Tuesday marks #BlackoutDayt2020, a day when Black Americans and their allies are being encouraged to spend their money at minority-owned stores exclusively to highlight the consumer power of minorities. Roben Farzad, host of Public Radio's "Full Disclosure," explains who is organizing the event and why. When President Trump uses phrases like "radical left" he's pulling from a playbook Newt Gingrich helped write. Historian Julian Zelizer makes that case in his new book about Gingrich's rise from a young and unknown congressman to shaping the Republican Party in ways still ...
Jul 07, 2020
COVID-19 Medical Flights On The Rise; Live Music Venues Struggle
2465
In Imperial County, one of Southern California's remote coronavirus hot spots, medical crews have been flying out hundreds of sick people after two local hospitals ran low on intensive care beds. We speak with the program director for Reach Air Medical Services. Also, as states slowly reopen, the live music industry remains mostly dormant. Many music venues are hoping the government will offer support but, in the meantime, are considering other ways to survive. WAMU's Mikaela Lefrak reports.
Jul 07, 2020
Arizona Lessons On COVID-19; College Admissions In A Pandemic
2476
Arizona reported thousands of new coronavirus infections over the weekend, with young adults leading the growth. University of Arizona epidemiologist Dr. Saskia Popescu joins us to discuss the lessons learned from Arizona, which was one of the first states to ease coronavirus restrictions. And, high school students are facing uncertainty about applying to college next year due to the pandemic. One college counselor joins us to discuss some of the challenges.
Jul 06, 2020
Mysterious Elephant Deaths; Wearing Masks Could Help GDP
2448
More than 350 elephants have mysteriously died in Botswana over the past few months. We talk with the Director of National Park Service Dr. Niall McCann about what could be causing these deaths and what's at stake for the larger ecosystem. Also, Goldman Sachs says if a mandatory mask order were imposed nationally, it could help the economy avoid a 5% hit to GDP. The study assumes that if everyone wore a mask, states would not have to impose mandatory lockdowns which are disrupting the economy.
Jul 06, 2020
Native Americans Occupied Mount Rushmore 50 Years Ago; Best TV Of 2020
2537
Fifty years ago this summer, a group of Native American activists scaled the top of the Mount Rushmore and occupied the area for months to demand the land be returned to the Sioux. We look back on the significance of this event with the son of one of the original protesters, Executive Director of United Native Americans Quanah Parker Brightman. Also, while much TV production has halted across the world, there's still quality programming to catch up on. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans shares some of his favorites to ...
Jul 03, 2020
Texas Restaurant Owner; Americans Share What Freedom Means To Them
2554
As restaurants in some states begin to shut down again due to spikes in coronavirus infections, some owners are considering whether to close for good. Houston restaurant owner Bill Loveday joins us to discuss how his restaurant is handling the pandemic and the rapidly changing public health restrictions in Texas. And, we asked several Americans from across the country to explain what freedom means to them this Independence Day.
Jul 03, 2020
Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon; Miami-Dade Police Officer Relieved Of Duty
2534
Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon joins us to discuss the state's massive budget shortfall as it also faces rising coronavirus cases. And, a Miami-Dade police officer was relieved of duty after widely circulated body cam footage revealed a dispute he had with a Black woman at the Miami International Airport. Miami Herald reporter David Ovalle has the details.
Jul 02, 2020
#OscarsSoWhite Creator On White Actors Voicing Non-White Characters; Protest Songs
2519
Several animated TV series including long-running hits like "The Simpsons" and "Family Guy" have made a decision to no longer use white actors for the voices of characters from other ethnic groups. Host Lisa Mullins speaks to April Reign, the creator of #OscarsSoWhite, about criticism regarding minority characters played by white actors. Also, from "Yankee Doodle" to viral Tik Tok remixes, protest music is American music. Oregon Public Broadcasting's Claudia Meza takes us through the history of protest songs in this country.
Jul 02, 2020
Northern California COVID-19 Spikes; Mount Rushmore History
2521
California Gov. Gavin Newsom says he plans to further scale back the state's reopening plans due to a new surge in coronavirus cases, including a cluster at San Quentin State Prison. And, author John Taliaferro joins us to discuss the complicated history of Mount Rushmore ahead of Trump's visit this week at a time of heated debate over monuments slinked to racism and discrimination.
Jul 01, 2020
Teacher Calls For Anti-Racism Curriculum; COVID-19 Pool Testing
2534
Sixth-grade English teacher Zakia Jarrett was temporarily placed on administrative paid leave for telling students that "most cops are racist" during a class discussion on race and racism. We speak to Jarrett about her suspension regarding anti-racism education in Milton, Massachusetts. Also, public health officials are scrambling to increase the country's capacity for testing. One solution could be to test multiple people at once using a method known as pool testing.
Jul 01, 2020
WNBA's Renee Montgomery Fights For Social Justice; Clint Black's New Album
2546
WNBA veteran and Atlanta Dream star Renee Montgomery has announced she's leaving the league in order to seize this moment of change to fight for social and racial justice. We talk to her about the move. Also, we speak with Grammy-winning country musician Clint Black, who has just released a new studio album called "Out of Sane."
Jun 30, 2020
Princeton Drops Woodrow Wilson's Name; College Students On Edge About Fall
2543
Citing his racism and racist policies, Princeton University will remove Woodrow Wilson's name from its school of international and public affairs. The move comes amid ongoing efforts to take down statues and monuments that honor the Confederacy around the U.S. We speak with historian Julian Zelizer. Also, college students are wrestling with whether or not to enroll for the fall — or try to defer enrollment until they can be sure to have a full college experience. KUOW's Eilís O'Neill has more.
Jun 30, 2020
Family Of Woman Who Portrayed Aunt Jemima Speaks Out; COVID Toe Mystery
2494
Quaker Oats announced it's rebranding Aunt Jemima pancake mix and syrup because of its racist history. While descendants of Lillian Richard, who portrayed Aunt Jemima for years, support the company's decision to rename the brand, they want to ensure her legacy lives on. We speak to Vera Harris, a family historian for the Richard family of Hawkins. Also, one of the weird symptoms we've heard about when it comes to the coronavirus is something called COVID toe. KUOW's David Hyde reports.
Jun 29, 2020
Boston Artist Calls To Remove Lincoln Statue; COVID-19 Puts Kids Behind In School
2553
When Boston artist Tory Bullock looks at the Emancipation Memorial in Boston's Park Square, he sees subservience instead of freedom. Bullock says it's time to remove the statue, so he's circulating an online petition to achieve his goal. We talk to Bullock about the statue's history and why he believes it would be better situated in a museum. Also, Robin Lake, director of the Center for Reinventing Public Education, says the average student may be one full year behind in math when school starts in the fall.
Jun 29, 2020
NASA's Lunar Loo Challenge; Racism And The Culture Of NASCAR
2498
NASA has announced the "Lunar Loo Challenge," a contest for designs for a toilet that could be used in a future expedition to the moon. We speak with Mike Interbartolo, project manager for the challenge. Also, the culture of NASCAR is shifting thanks to the only full-time Black driver in the cup series, Bubba Wallace. We talk to Maya Jones of "The Undefeated" who covers NASCAR.
Jun 26, 2020
Colorado Gov. On Killing Of Elijah McClain; Firefighters Battle COVID-19
2467
This year's fire season is unlike anything we've ever seen with firefighters battling both flames and COVID-19. We talk with Jim Whittington, an Oregon-based wildland fire expert. Also, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis says the state will investigate the police killing of a 23-year-old Black man, Elijah McClain, last year. We talk to Polis about McClain, policing in Colorado and how the state has avoided a COVID-19 spike as it reopens.
Jun 26, 2020
Remembering Stonewall; Koreas Mark War's 70th Anniversary
2493
The LGBTQ community celebrates Pride month in June to honor the Stonewall riots. We revisit Jeremy Hobson's conversation with Paul Glass and Charles Evans who were both at the 1969 riot at New York's Stonewall Inn which sparked the gay rights movement. Also, the Korean War, which killed and injured millions, started 70 years ago on June 25, 1950. We speak to Samuel Wells, Cold War Fellow at the Wilson Center, about the Korean War, which ended with an armistice but no peace treaty.
Jun 25, 2020
Smart Thermometer Data Predicts New COVID-19 Spikes; Renaming Military Bases
2524
The Kinsa smart thermometer began mapping out coronavirus hotspots in mid-March with accuracy that caught the eye of public health experts around the country. We spoke to Kinsa CEO Inder Singh at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. We check in again about where COVID-19 is heading and how Kinsa data is helping prevent its spread. Also, the call for changing the names of 10 Southern military bases gaining momentum in Washington raises the question of what names might replace those of the Confederate generals. Jay Price from member station ...
Jun 25, 2020
Biographer Robert Caro; Mountaineer Explores Mariana Trench
2510
Robert Caro is the two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "The Power Broker" and "The Years of Lyndon Johnson." Host Robin Young talks to him about "Working," his latest book. Also, Vanessa O'Brien has climbed the tallest mountains on the earth and she's just gone into the deepest place on the planet: the Challenger Deep in the Pacific Ocean's Mariana Trench. Jeremy Hobson speaks with her.
Jun 24, 2020
Chef Paola Velez On Uplifting Chefs Of Color; A Nurse's Anti-Bias Plan
2504
Rising Star Chef Nominee Paola Velez is one of the founders of Bakers Against Racism, which raises money for organizations that support Black lives. Velez talks about her career and how the restaurant industry has been shaken by the pandemic. Also, health care professionals are speaking out against bias and discrimination. CEO of the Kentucky Nurses Association Delanor Manson wrote in a recent editorial that she condemns "the tentacles of racism" that systematically endanger people of color.
Jun 24, 2020
Do Cops Need Guns?; Algorithmic Bias In Policing, Surveillance Technology
2474
Ongoing protests against police violence and racism have prompted a reexamination of the role guns play in law enforcement. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Tracey Meares, professor and founding director of the Justice Collaboratory at Yale Law School. Also, as more Americans call for police reform, the next step in the conversation is taking a closer look at policing technology. Princeton University professor Ruha Benjamin discusses the algorithmic bias embedded within many policing and surveillance tools.
Jun 23, 2020
Black And Latinx Renters At Risk; Brands Boycott Facebook
2469
With more than 46 million people unemployed and housing protections expiring in many states, housing experts anticipate a nationwide evictions crisis that will hit Black and Latinx renters the hardest. Also, Patagonia, REI and The North Face are among the companies pulling their advertising from Facebook and Instagram, citing what they called the company's "repeated failure to meaningfully address the vast proliferation of hate on its platforms."
Jun 23, 2020
California Surgeon General; Summer Grilling Favorites
2450
California Surgeon General Dr. Nadine Burke Harris joins us to discuss the state's continuing efforts to battle COVID-19 and systemic racism, which she argues are intimately connected. And, resident chef Kathy Gunst offers some tips for grilling fish and shares a couple of other favorite summer dishes.
Jun 22, 2020
Mitch Albom Pens Free, Online Book; Are American Institutions Failing?
2502
Award-winning author Mitch Albom discusses his free, online book, "Human Touch," which he released to raise money for COVID-19 relief efforts in Detroit. He talks with host Tonya Mosley about the importance of human connection and touch amidst these unprecedented times. Also, senior editor at the Atlantic Derek Thompson argues that the protests over police violence and the pandemic show that American institutions are failing right now. That's because the country is focused on threats of the past, he says.
Jun 22, 2020
Angela Davis On Anti-Racism Protests; Drive-In Graduations
2631
Host Tonya Mosley speaks to legendary activist Angela Davis about her life in activism, the role of police and the current anti-racism protests across the globe. Also, there are about 300 drive-in movie theatres left in the U.S. One in Port Townsend, Washington, came to the rescue of the city's graduating high school seniors by hosting their virus-safe graduation. Tom Banse from the Northwest News Network reports.
Jun 19, 2020
DACA Advocate On SCOTUS Ruling; Fashion Week Goes Digital
2546
The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Thursday against the Trump administration's immigration actions on the Obama-era DACA program. We talk to Reyna Montoya, a DACA recipient and founder and CEO of Aliento, an immigrant aid group in Phoenix. Also, due to COVID-19, fashion weeks in Milan, Paris and London are going virtual this summer. We speak to Hannah Marriott, fashion editor at the Guardian, about the future of the fashion industry.
Jun 18, 2020
No, COVID-19 Is Not Saving The Environment; Athletes Speak Out
2525
A recent article co-authored by Colorado State University professor Edward Barbier is titled "The COVID-19 pandemic is not a break for nature – let's make sure there is one after the crisis." He joins host Robin Young to discuss how land grabs, illegal mining and lack of funding are devastating natural environments around the globe. Also, as sports resume in some places, members of one high school baseball team in Iowa knelt during the National Anthem to support the protests against racial injustice. And on Wednesday, England's Premier League ...
Jun 18, 2020
Black American Economic History; Georgia NAACP Reacts To Rayshard Brooks Killing
2556
Duke University Professor William Darity joins us to discuss the historic events that have set Black Americans back economically. And, prosecutors in Atlanta have yet to decide whether to file charges against the former police officer who shot Rayshard Brooks. Rev. James Woodall, who is head of the NAACP in Georgia, joins us to discuss.
Jun 17, 2020
Pandemic Hits Black-Owned Businesses; Fact Checking George Floyd Death Rumors
2578
According to new research, the COVID-19 shutdown has disproportionately impacted black-owned businesses. We talk with Ron Busby, president of U.S. Black Chambers, Inc. Also, the police killing of George Floyd sparked hundreds of rumors and conspiracy theories, many circulated over social media. We speak with Snopes.com editor Bond Huberman about the various myths she and her colleagues have been dispelling.
Jun 17, 2020
#SayHerName Campaign; The State Of The Coronavirus Pandemic
2562
A new model out Tuesday from the University of Washington predicts that 200,000 Americans will die from COVID-19 by October 1. Pulitzer Prize-winning author and emerging disease expert Laurie Garrett joins us to discuss the latest developments on the coronavirus. And, the killings of Black men at the hands of law enforcement have sparked national outrage, but the killings of Black women don't tend to evoke the same response. The #SayHerName campaign works to bring awareness to these women.
Jun 16, 2020
Cuckoo Bird Migration Stuns Scientists; Daycares Face Reopening Challenges
2588
Scientists have logged one of the longest animal migrations ever recorded. British ornithologists tracked cuckoo birds on a migration more than 7,500 miles, spanning southern Africa and East Asia. Chris Hewson, a senior research ecologist at the British Trust for Ornithology. Also, Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd is like a lot of other parents around the country, wondering when it's safe to send his daughter back to daycare. Meanwhile, childcare centers will reopen to a world of new restrictions that will affect their economic viability.
Jun 16, 2020
Black Clarinetist Anthony McGill; How Colleges Plan To Reopen
2545
In a viral YouTube video, New York Philharmonic clarinetist Anthony McGill plays a mournful rendition of "America the Beautiful," then drops to both knees and holds his clarinet behind his back. Now the hashtag #TakeTwoKnees is spreading through the classical world. And, colleges across the country have announced plans for their fall reopenings. We hear about what next year will look like at The University of Texas at Austin with Professor Art Markman.
Jun 15, 2020
Calculating COVID-19 Health Risks; How 'Unbundling The Police' Would Work
2579
Also, Derek Thompson, senior editor at The Atlantic, writes that the police are being asked to do many functions. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Thompson about how unbundling some of those functions from the police may improve policing. At least 22 states are now seeing spikes in COVID-19 cases. Yet in most cities, officials continue to ease restrictions despite warnings from some physicians that it might be happening too quickly. Host Robin Young talks to University of Massachusetts Dartmouth biology professor Erin Bromage about calculating risk.
Jun 15, 2020
How Black Lives Matter Resonates In Africa; Changing The Definition Of Racism
2496
Countries across Africa are joining global protests in response to the death of George Floyd. Moky Makrua, executive director of nonprofit Africa No Filter, explains why the Black Lives Matter movement is especially taking off in South Africa, where parallels of racism can be drawn with that in the U.S. Also, Merriam-Webster Dictionary will change its definition of racism after receiving a letter from Kennedy Mitchum, a recent graduate, who suggested that the definition should include a reference to systemic oppression.
Jun 12, 2020
NBA Legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar On Protests; Some Troops Reconsider Service
2521
Long before Colin Kaepernick took a knee in protest of police brutality, retired NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar boycotted the 1968 Olympic Games to protest injustice against Black Americans. We talk to Abdul-Jabbar about his continued legacy of social activism. Also, when the National Guard was deployed during protests over the killing of George Floyd, some troops refused to go. Now, they may face disciplinary action. Others are reconsidering service.
Jun 12, 2020
Understanding Antifa; 'The Last Kings Of Shanghai' Book
2475
A new book called "The Last Kings Of Shanghai" looks at the history of China's development and the important role played by two Jewish families with massive business empires. Author Jonathan Kaufman joins us to discuss. And, NBC News reporter Brandy Zadrozny joins us to discuss her reporting into the threat of Antifa.
Jun 11, 2020
Child Vaccinations Drop During Pandemic; Violence As Form Of Protest
2481
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting in a dip in the number of children who are getting routine vaccines during the pandemic, and there's concern about what this could mean for public health. Also, some have argued that violence has no place in the struggle for social change. Historian and author Kellie Carter Jackson says violence has long been a part of the movement for racial justice.
Jun 11, 2020
Future Of Policing; Oil Executive Criticizes Trump
2457
Cities across the country are debating defunding police departments in the wake of protests over police brutality and the killing of George Floyd. Professor Lorenzo Boyd, director of the Center for Advanced Policing at the University of New Haven, joins us to discuss what the police department of the future could look like in practice. And, a longtime Republican donor and oil executive is calling out President Trump for his response to the pandemic and protests.
Jun 10, 2020
How To Talk About Race With Kids; Nurses Demand Congress Address Lack Of PPE
2511
Protests across the country over the death of George Floyd are forcing parents to have conversations with their children about racism. Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, child psychologist and author of "Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together? And Other Conversations About Race," discusses how parents can talk to their kids. Also, the largest union of registered nurses in the country is testifying Wednesday to the House Oversight and Reform committee about the need for more PPE for medical workers on the frontlines. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with Zenei ...
Jun 10, 2020
New York Passes Bill Banning Police Chokeholds; Talking About Race
2496
The New York state legislature passed the Eric Garner Anti-Chokehold Act to ban police chokehold. Democratic State Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie joins us to discuss. And, the National Museum of African American History and Culture has a new online exhibition called "Talking About Race." Museum educators Candra Flanagan and Anna Hindley join us.
Jun 09, 2020
Black Birder On Central Park Video; Administrators Rethink Police In Schools
2510
Most people have seen the viral video that shows Amy Cooper falsely accusing birder Christian Cooper of threatening her life. South Bronx native and birder Jason Ward explains that black birders have to take precautions to stay safe. Also, members of the Denver Board of Education are debating a resolution that would curtail the role of police officers in schools. School administrators in Minneapolis and Portland, Oregon, have already gone a step further by moving to end or limit the use of police at schools. Host Tonya Mosley speaks ...
Jun 09, 2020
Sarah Cooper On Comedy In Trying Times; New YA Book 'A Song Below Water'
2469
Comedian Sarah Cooper says her career was just gaining momentum as venues closed their doors to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Then a short clip of her lip-syncing to President Trump went viral. Cooper joins host Robin Young to talk about her comedy and her role as a black woman comedian during this historical moment. Also, host Tonya Mosley speaks with author Bethany C. Morrow about her new young adult book "A Song Below Water," which tells the story of two black girls with magical powers living in Portland, ...
Jun 08, 2020
Unemployment Rate Falls To 13.3%; Payday Loan Lenders Target The Poor
2555
For the first time in months, the unemployment rate fell in May to 13.3% following record unemployment numbers sparked by the coronavirus pandemic. NPR's Scott Horsley joins us to discuss the surprisingly strong jobs report. And, some experts worry the millions of Americans who are unemployed will turn to high interest loans. Payday loan lenders have been aggressively targeting advertising to vulnerable communities during COVID-19.
Jun 05, 2020
How Protests Can Change Policy; New Book Recommendations
2597
The protests sweeping the country for more than a week are calling for an end to racism and discrimination by police and in the law. Guy-Uriel Charles, professor of law at Duke School of Law, about how protests can lead to legislation and political change. Also, NPR Books editor Petra Mayer joins host Jeremy Hobson to talk about the new "Hunger Games" prequel, "The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes," and a few other book suggestions.
Jun 05, 2020
Athletes Join Protests; 'Be Water' Explores Bruce Lee's Life, Legacy
2533
New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees is apologizing for saying players who kneel in protest when the NFL season starts would be "disrespecting the flag." Brees was asked Wednesday how the league should react if more players kneel in protest during the national anthem, as Colin Kaepernick did in 2016. We get the latest from Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca. Also, we speak with Bao Nguyen, the director of "Be Water," the new ESPN documentary about the life of the late film star Bruce Lee.
Jun 04, 2020
Protest Music From 2Pac To Terrace Martin; Poet On Systemic Oppression
2530
Branden Peters and Maurice Garland, co-hosts of the podcast Day 1 Radio, share four rap songs that speak to this historic moment following the death of George Floyd. And, award-winning poet and author Claudia Rankine joins us to discuss how we might understand systemic oppression through the lens of daily personal exchanges.
Jun 04, 2020
Black Lives Matter Co-Founder; Black Police Officers
2550
Co-founder of Black Lives Matter Movement Patrisse Cullors at the United State of Women Summit in 2018. (Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images)
Jun 03, 2020
Addressing Kids' Grief During Pandemic, Protests; University Of California Drops SAT, ACT
2512
We talk with Corinne Edwards, a child therapist specializing in trauma, on how adults can recognize and address children's stress due to life changes during the pandemic and now nationwide protests. Also, we discuss the University of California's recent decision to phase out the SAT and ACT test and what it could mean for the future of college admissions nationwide.
Jun 03, 2020
Protests As 'Acts Of Rebellion'; US Takes Aim At Huawei's Supply Chain
2489
As protests continue across the country, Marc Lamont Hill, political commentator and professor at Temple University, explains why he believes its important to understand them as acts of rebellion instead of riots. Also, We talk to Ben Brock Johnson, who covers tech for Here & Now, about the U.S.'s latest attempt to handicap Chinese telecom rival Huawei by disrupting its silicon chip supply chain.
Jun 02, 2020
Protesting Amid A Pandemic; Houston Pastor Honors His Friend, George Floyd
2537
Some public health officials are concerned that we could see an increase in coronavirus cases as a result of the protests over the death of George Floyd. We speak with Dr. Seema Yasmin. Also, Floyd's family is planning to march with community leaders in Houston, Texas, Tuesday afternoon to honor him. Floyd was a Christian and involved in mentoring young men in the city before moving to Minnesota. Patrick "P.T." Ngwolo, lead pastor of the church Resurrection Houston, plans to march to honor his friend.
Jun 02, 2020
Hawaii's Food Supply; Carvell Wallace On Protests
2549
The coronavirus pandemic is having a huge impact on Hawaii's food supply and agriculture. Albie Miles, assistant professor of Sustainability Community Food Systems at the University of Hawaii West Ohau, joins us to discuss how the state is working to rebuild its agriculture system. And, author and podcaster Carvell Wallace argues that the cries for justice and the destruction of property in 1967 and today are an inevitable reaction to the weight of racism and white supremacy.
Jun 01, 2020
Perfume Genius's New Album; Americans Struggle To Pay For Air Conditioning
2542
Perfume Genius is out with a new album titled "Set My Heart On Fire Immediately." Lead singer Mike Hadreas explains the music and what it's like to release an album in the midst of a pandemic. Also, as we head into the hot summer months, many Americans will struggle to pay for utilities, like air conditioning, which in parts of the country is not a luxury but a necessity. We speak with Mark Wolfe of the National Energy Assistance Directors' Association, which represents state directors who are participating in ...
Jun 01, 2020
Racial Bias In Policing; California Fire Threat
2506
The deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor have raised questions about the future of policing and the role bias plays in police work. Dr. Jennifer Eberhardt joins us to discuss her extensive work with police officers on racial bias. And, a heat wave in parts of California could bring the threat of fire. It's a reminder that this could be a busy summer ahead for fire crews battling wildfires while they also juggle new challenges posed by COVID-19.
May 29, 2020
Biden's Vice President Search; 'The Wedge' By Scott Carney
2485
Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee for president, says he hopes to announce his pick for vice president by August. Democratic strategist Jamal Simmons joins us to discuss the factors Biden will have to consider in choosing his running mate. And, journalist and author Scott Carney joins us to discuss his new book, "The Wedge: Evolution, Consciousness, Stress, and the Key to Human Resilience."
May 28, 2020
The Future Of Theater; Training Guide Dogs During A Pandemic
2491
On Monday, New York's Public Theater heads in a new direction with a star-studded, free, one-night-only virtual gala performance. Hosts Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Oskar Eustis join us to talk about the event and the future of theater in a post-coronavirus world. Also, many of the 90 accredited schools around the world that train guide dogs for the blind have been closed by the coronavirus pandemic. Journalist Jon Kalish reports on how one school in New Jersey is coping with the pandemic.
May 28, 2020
Etiquette In The Age Of COVID-19; North Carolina Inmates File Suit
2484
Is there a nice way to say, "You're standing too close to me?" Judith Martin aka "Miss Manners" has written a new book about etiquette in the COVID-19 age. She joins us to discuss her new e-book that she co-authored with her adult children. And, attorneys have filed a class-action lawsuit on behalf of inmates at a federal prison in Butner, North Carolina. The prison houses inmates with special health needs and at least 10 have died of COVID-19.
May 28, 2020
Food Waste Made Worse By Pandemic; 'Death Care' Industry
2458
According to the USDA, 30% to 40% of the food goes to waste in the U.S., and the coronavirus pandemic has made this problem worse. We talk to ReFED's executive director about how to reduce waste by food producers and in our own kitchens. Also, the pandemic has strained the capacity of funeral homes and cemeteries. In New Jersey, which has the second-highest rate of COVID-19 deaths, it's having a big impact on workers in the so-called "death care" industry.
May 27, 2020
QVC, HSN Viewership Rises; Missing Sounds Of New York
2456
Retail sales have dropped significantly since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, but viewership has gone up for QVC and HSN. Mike George, president and CEO of the networks' parent company Qurate, joins us to discuss how the retail landscape has changed. And, Carrie Welch of the New York Public Library joins us to discuss the library's new release, "Missing Sounds of New York: An Auditory Love Letter to New Yorkers."
May 26, 2020
3 Recipes To Make Multiple Meals; The Politics Of Face Masks
2515
If you're getting bored in the kitchen, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares ideas about stretching one dish over several meals without having it taste like leftovers. Also, Fox News analyst Brit Hume tweeted a photo mocking Joe Biden for wearing a face mask. President Trump retweeted it. Host Robin Young speaks with NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro about the political benefit of mocking face masks.
May 26, 2020
Remembering A Husband, Father On Memorial Day; Grand Canyon Geology
2459
Army Maj. Paul Voelke was killed in Afghanistan in 2012. His wife Traci Voelke's and their son Ben Voelke join us to remember him. Also, the Grand Canyon in Arizona is among the world's most amazing natural wonders. We talk with geologist and author Wayne Ranney about the geology of the Grand Canyon, how it formed and how it's changing.
May 25, 2020
Rising Voices Of Black And Latino Boys; COVID-19 Toll On 'Death Care' Industry
2502
Scholastic's Rising Voices Library is a collection of fiction and nonfiction books dedicated to black and Latino boys. We speak to the curators about the new collection. Also, the pandemic has strained the capacity of funeral homes and cemeteries. In New Jersey, which has the second-highest rate of COVID-19 deaths, it's having a big impact on workers in the so-called "death care" industry. Nick Pugliese of WHYY reports.
May 25, 2020
Global COVID-19 Cases Surpass 5 Million; Poet's Advice For Graduates
2544
The number of COVID-19 cases worldwide surpassed 5 million this week, with most of the new cases coming from just four countries: the U.S., Russia, Brazil and India. Dr. Wafaa El-Sadr, professor at Columbia University, joins us to discuss the state of the coronavirus pandemic. And, commencement speeches this year have taken on additional weight as graduates try to imagine what the future holds. Poet and author Sonya Renee Taylor joins us with some inspiring words for the graduating class of 2020.
May 22, 2020
Telemedicine During Pandemic; 3rd Grader Says Online Learning Is Technological Disaster
2537
Addiction experts are turning to telemedicine to offer their services to patients amid the pandemic. We speak to Stephen Loyd, Chief Medical Officer of Cedar Recovery in Mount Juliet, Tennessee, about the role of telemedicine in addiction treatment. Also, we've heard a lot from adults about the struggles of online learning, but how are kids feeling? Well, New York third-grader Ginger Lidskey thinks homeschooling desperately needs a redesign. She tells us what she's thinking.
May 21, 2020
Dentists Begin Reopening; Animal Habitat Destruction
2527
Dentist offices in some states are beginning to reopen for non-emergency services this week. Dr. Romesh Nalliah, clinical professor of dentistry at the University of Michigan, joins us to discuss the challenges dentists and hygienists are facing in the era of coronavirus. And, there's growing consensus that human destruction of pristine habitats is driving animals into new environments where they can spread viruses and incubate new ones.
May 20, 2020
Disney Issues Warning To Visitors; Newspaper Unions Push Back On Tribune
2512
Disney is putting rules in place like requiring visitors to wear face masks and undergo temperature checks. The company has also issued a warning — saying come at your own risk. Martin Lewison, known as Professor Roller Coaster, joins us. Also, newspapers owned by Tribune Publishing have been forced to accept furloughs and pay cuts that will last beyond the economic crisis caused by the pandemic. Newsroom unions are pushing back, fearful of the investment firm about to take over the company. NPR's David Folkenflik reports.
May 20, 2020
Hydroxycholoroquine Shortages; Reopening Offices
2531
Nearly 1.5 million lupus patients depend on hydroxycholoroquine, but since the coronavirus pandemic caught fire in March, the drug has been hard to come by. Lupus patient Stacie Beland joins us to discuss how she has been affected by the shortages. And, SalesForce executive Elizabeth Pinkham joins us to discuss the ways that offices and office culture at the software and cloud computing company are being reshaped by the coronavirus.
May 19, 2020
Science Teachers Get Creative; Air Conditioning During COVID-19
2577
As students of all ages adjust to online classes during the pandemic, one course that can be hard to teach virtually is science. But for some teachers, where there's a will, there's a way. WBEZ's Kate McGee reports. Also, some increasingly popular air conditioning systems don't bring in enough fresh air. University of Maryland environmental health professor Donald Milton joins host Robin Young to discuss one type of ultraviolent light system that disinfects inside air called upper-room UV.
May 19, 2020
Lifeguard On Beaches Reopening; Nursing Home Staff Live In On-Site RVs
2580
In mid-March, nursing home owner Tyson Belanger decided to take a unique approach to prevent the spread of COVID-19: offering staff up to $20,000 a month to move into RVs he rented and placed on site. Belanger talks to host Robin Young about his plan and how other facilities could make it work. Also, beaches in Los Angeles reopened after closing to the public for social distancing. As Memorial Day draws closer, beaches are looking at how to reopen. We talk with retired lifeguard Gus Avila, who serves as president ...
May 18, 2020
Mother On Pediatric Inflammatory Syndrome; Rats Adapt To New Reality
2539
At least 150 children in the U.S. are now believed to have contracted pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome, a new illness thought to be connected to COVID-19. Amber Dean, a Hornell, New York, mother of three joins us to discuss her 9-year-old son Bobby who is recovering from the illness. And, we hear from an exterminator about how rats have adapted to life during the pandemic.
May 18, 2020
WHO Warns Coronavirus 'May Never Go Away;' How Much Salt Is Too Much?
2477
The World Health Organization warned this week that the coronavirus "may never go away," even after there is a vaccine. We analyze this and other news with Lawrence Gostin, professor of law at Georgetown University and director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. And, most Americans eat far more salt that they should and it's in all kinds of food products. But how much is too much? Dr. Dariush Mozzafarian, a cardiologist at Tufts, joins us to discuss how people can reduce their sodium intake.
May 15, 2020
Kirk Franklin's Message Of Hope; EU Official Promises Summer Travel Season
2472
Grammy award-winning gospel artist Kirk Franklin is flooding social media with at home concerts and entertaining videos to uplift people in these difficult times. We chat with him about his message of hope, expansive career and activism. Also, an official from the European Union is proposing a gradual lifting of border restrictions to kick start summer tourism after the industry's been hit hard by the pandemic.
May 15, 2020
Americans Report Mental Health Concerns; Social Justice In A Pandemic
2503
A recent poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation found more than 4 in 10 Americans say stress from the pandemic has negatively impacted their mental health. Ken Duckworth of the National Alliance on Mental Illness joins us to discuss growing concerns over the nation's mental health. And, social justice organizations are assessing how to mobilize while adhering to the constraints of the pandemic in the wake of Ahmaud Arbery's death. Opal Tometi, one of the co-founders of #BlackLivesMatter, joins us.
May 14, 2020
'80s Music Made For Quarantine; Housing Market Stalls
2490
From "U Can't Touch This" to "Don't Stand So Close To Me," husband and wife DJ duo John and Heidi Small from South Dakota share the perfect '80s songs for the moment. Also, spring is supposed to be a busy time for the U.S. housing market. But the coronavirus has upended plans for buyers and sellers across the country. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports.
May 14, 2020
Gaming In Isolation; Coronavirus Antibody Drugs
2530
Several pharmaceutical companies hope to harness the power of antibodies in a drug that could help treat and prevent COVID-19 in the general population. We hear about one such possible treatment from the drug maker Regeneron. And, while much of the real world remains shut down, the virtual world is thriving. Ben Brock Johnson, who covers tech for Here & Now, reports that video gaming companies are releasing more immersive features that go beyond your typical virtual adventure.
May 13, 2020
Uber In Talks To Buy Grubhub; South Korea Sees New Spike In COVID-19 Cases
2475
Uber is in talks to acquire rival Grubhub. The consolidation of the two food delivery operations would give the company a 55% market share at a time when demand for food delivery is exploding. Also, authorities in South Korea say they have no immediate plans to revive strict social distancing rules despite a spike in cases linked to nightclubs in Seoul.
May 13, 2020
Gender And Coronavirus; Photojournalist Documents COVID-19 Patients
2485
Globally, women who contracted COVID-19 have been less likely than infected men to get really sick or die. Researchers in Los Angeles have begun giving male patients the hormone progesterone, mainly found in women, to see if that helps them recover. One of those researchers joins us to discuss the study. And, photojournalist Jeff Rhode takes us inside Holy Name Medical Center, an independent hospital in Teaneck, New Jersey, where he is documenting the coronavirus pandemic.
May 12, 2020
New Flavors for Spring Cooking; Elon Musk Defies COVID-19 Shutdown Order
2499
Chef Kathy Gunt joins us to talk about ways to liven up the menu with new flavors and repurposed ingredients. Also, Tesla is making cars at its California factory again in defiance of a shutdown order from local public health officials. CEO Elon Musk sued Alameda County, where the plant is located, and even threatened to move Tesla out of California in light of the coronavirus restrictions
May 12, 2020
Running While Black; Lockdown Lessons From Refugees
2509
Ahmaud Arbery's killing has united runners across the country, but it has also caused black runners to reflect on fears of being attacked or racially profiled while running. We hear from James Ravenell II, co-founder of Black Runners Connection, about what it means to run as a black person in the U.S. And, Americans across the country are grappling with limited movements and a lot more time at home. For many refugees, this is something they're quite familiar with.
May 11, 2020
Kawasaki Disease In Children; Seattle Record Store To Close
2556
Doctors in several countries around the world are warning of children being sickened with what might be Kawasaki disease, which causes inflammation, fevers, rashes, and damage to blood vessels. Some say it could be linked to the coronavirus. We speak with a doctor who has treated half a dozen patients with the syndrome at a hospital on Long Island, New York. And, Seattle's Bop Street Records, one of the top five record stores in the nation, is closing at the end of June after more than 30 years in business.
May 08, 2020
75 Years Since V-E Day; Researchers Scramble For COVID-19 Vaccine
2523
There are nearly 80 coronavirus vaccines under development — and that's a good thing because the world will need more than one to work to vaccinate the entire planet. KUOW's David Hyde has a story of three people in the Seattle area who are leading that effort. Also, this week marks 75 years since Victory in Europe Day, the end of World War II in Europe. We speak with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Rick Atkinson, who wrote a three-volume history of the war.
May 08, 2020
Advice For Couples In Quarantine; Honolulu Florist Reopens For Mother's Day
2493
Psychologists talk about the stresses of isolating alone. But sometimes, quarantining with partners is even more stressful. In her new podcast, "Couples Under Lockdown," author and therapist Esther Perel shares her advice. And, some florists in Hawaii are reopening just in time for Mother's Day. A florist in Honolulu joins us to discuss the challenges of reopening during the pandemic.
May 07, 2020
Georgia Shooting Video; Contact Tracer Day In The Life
2503
A new graphic video of a shooting of an unarmed black man by a white former police officer and his son is fueling protests in Georgia. Reporter Emily Jones of Georgia Public Broadcasting joins us to discuss the latest in the investigation. And, Oscar Baez was working as a foreign service officer in Jerusalem when the State Department called him home in March because of the coronavirus. Now, he works as a contact tracer in the Boston area.
May 06, 2020
'The Last Archive' Podcast Explores Truth; Coronavirus's Impact On Art
2529
Historian Jill Lepore sees herself as a detective of sorts and in her new podcast, "The Last Archive." She joins us to discuss her journey toward a larger question — who killed truth? Also, artists find inspiration to create in all kinds of circumstances and art can help us understand crises and loss. Host Jeremy Hobson talks about how artists create and how the art world is being affected by the coronavirus pandemic with Jonathan Fineberg, an art historian and critic.
May 06, 2020
A Bunch Of Banana Recipes; Wendy's Removes Burgers From Menu At Some Locations
2509
The coronavirus crisis had many people searching the internet for banana bread recipes. Resident chef Kathy Gunst shares hers, as well a couple more uses for the fruit. Also, Wendy's is no longer selling burgers at select locations in California, South Carolina and Kentucky, among others, citing disruptions to the beef supply.
May 05, 2020
Possible COVID-19 Futures; Moving The Elderly Home
2529
Researchers at the University of Minnesota project multiples waves of COVID-19 could be extended through the summer if the virus isn't contained. Sharon Begley, senior science writer for STAT, joins us to discuss the research. And, Dr. Thomas Cornwell, executive chairman of the not-for-profit Home Centered Care Institute, discusses the pros and cons of moving the elderly out of nursing homes amid the coronavirus crisis.
May 05, 2020
Chicago Nurse On Caring For COVID-19 Patients; Ethical Issues Raised In A Pandemic
2574
Chicago nurse Dominique Pirotte recently lost two patients to COVID-19 in less than an hour. She joins us to talk about that day, and also about the pain and frustration she feels when people deny the gravity of the coronavirus crisis. Arthur Caplan, head of the division of medical ethics at NYU School of Medicine, joins us to discuss some of the ethical issues arising during this pandemic.
May 04, 2020
Irish Designers Take Architecture's Top Prize; Hemingway In Quarantine
2588
The highest honor in architecture has gone to two designers from Ireland. The 2020 Pritzker Architecture Prize was awarded in March to Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara, co-founders of the Dublin design firm Grafton Architects. We speak with Farrell and McNamara. Also, Ernest Hemingway quarantined with both his Wife and his mistress. Host Robin Young speaks to Lesley Blume about her article "How Hemingway Quarantined (Hint: It Was with his Wife, his Mistress, his Son and the Nanny)."
May 04, 2020
Randy Newman's 'Stay Away'; Parenting Study On Stress
2532
Oscar winning composer Randy Newman joins us to talk about his new song,"Stay Away." It's a humorous take on social distancing and good hygiene during the coronavirus crisis. And, parenting has gotten a lot more complicated during the pandemic. We speak to the lead author of a recent study on the stresses to parents in this crisis.
May 01, 2020
Buying A Car During A Pandemic; Volunteering For An Experimental COVID-19 Vaccine
2573
Vehicle sales plummeted in April after dealerships were closed around the country. We talk to Michelle Krebs, executive analyst for Cox Automotive, about how auto sales are happening and who's buying cars right now. Also, we speak with Neal Browning, who is voluntarily taking part in a trial of a potential coronavirus vaccine from the biotech company Moderna.
May 01, 2020
Housing Insecurity In A Pandemic; Richmond COVID-19 Deaths
2568
In Richmond, Virginia, health officials say most of the deaths from COVID-19 have been in the black community. Dr. Danny Avula joins us to discuss why. And, some states have issued a moratorium on evictions and foreclosures during the pandemic, but others are offering little to no protection at all. We take a big picture view at what states are doing to tackle housing insecurity during the pandemic with Columbia Law School's Emily Benfer.
Apr 30, 2020
History Of Black Cowboys; Getting On The Ballot During Coronavirus
2546
Here & Now takes you to Compton, California, for a chat with author Walter Thompson-Hernández about the Compton Cowboys and their ranch culture. We also talk with cowboy Randy Hook about the history of black cowboys in the U.S. Also, the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted elections across the country. Now, some candidates running for office are encountering another barrier: ballot access. VPM's Roberto Roldan reports.
Apr 30, 2020
Works Progress Administration History; Weather Data Reduction
2491
Ohio State University art history professor Jody Patterson joins us to discuss lessons learned from President Franklin D. Roosevelt's artist employment programs such as the Works Progress Administration. And, commercial aircraft are gathering much less weather data because of the huge reduction in air travel. We find out what that might mean for forecasting hurricanes and other storms this summer.
Apr 29, 2020
Where Is Kim Jon Un?; Unemployment Backups
2556
North Korea hasn't reported a single case of COVID-19. But the pandemic coincides with the absence of the country's leader, Kim Jon Un, who hasn't been seen in nearly three weeks. Also, in states where unemployment programs were already stretched thin, few workers are able to get their hands on benefits during the coronavirus pandemic. We speak with unemployment expert Michele Evermore about the country's unemployment system.
Apr 29, 2020
Ohio Prison Coronavirus Outbreak; Long-Term Effects Of COVID-19
2557
Marion County is a small central Ohio county with one of the highest per capita infection rates of the coronavirus in the U.S. An outbreak at a county prison is now spreading into the rest of the community. Marion County Public Health Commissioner Traci Kinsler joins us to discuss the latest. And, doctors now know that COVID-19 attacks every body system from the lungs to the heart to the liver to the kidneys. Yale cardiologist Dr. Harlan Krumholz says Americans might face mental and physical challenges in the ...
Apr 28, 2020
Hairstylist On The Future Of Salons; Pandemic Impact On Rural Health Care
2609
Under the federal relief package rolled out during the pandemic, self-employed people — such as stylists and barbers — can now collect unemployment. Kristin Snyder, a hairstylist in Ann Arbor, Michigan, started an online petition to raise awareness and funds for people in her industry who are out of work. Also, we look at what the pandemic means for rural hospitals, many of which were already struggling financially before the coronavirus.
Apr 28, 2020
Georgia Gym Owner On Reopening Business; Musician Brian McKnight
2590
The state of Georgia started reopening businesses on Friday. A gym owner talks about what it's been like allowing customers into the gym. And, musician Brian McKnight speaks about the Instagram concert he held earlier this month to support the World Health Organization and Global Citizen.
Apr 27, 2020
China's Disinformation Echoes Russian Strategies; The Future Of American Colleges
2572
China has evolved its disinformation strategy into an outward-facing pageant that borrows many elements from Russia's playbook from 2016 and before. NPR's Miles Parks reports. Also, uncertainty about the coronavirus pandemic's future course is leaving universities and students with more questions than answers. We hear one point of view about the post-pandemic future of American colleges.
Apr 27, 2020
Alabama Governor On Reopening State; Grocery Shopping In A Pandemic
2577
Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey says she is still considering whether to extend the state's stay-at-home order past April 30. She joins us to discuss the state's reopening strategy. And, the coronavirus pandemic has dramatically changed the way in which we grocery shop. One expert says it may be for the better.
Apr 24, 2020
How A 'Hidden Outbreak' Spread Undetected; Coronavirus Inside Nursing Homes
2578
New research suggests the coronavirus was spreading in the U.S. weeks before public officials previously thought. Modeling from Northeastern University suggests thousands of cases may have spread undetected throughout several major cities in January and February, long before an official case was reported. Also, in Tennessee, the Gallatin Center for Rehabilitation and Healing is being sued after more than 161 residents caught the coronavirus and 19 people died. Debbie Bolton lost her 89-year-old mother, Clara Ruth Summers. She shares her story.
Apr 24, 2020
Detroit Finds Strength In Community; European Countries And Unemployment
2586
By now, many of us know someone that's battling the virus or we've lost someone to it. Tonya Mosley is a native of Detroit, which is a hotspot, and she dreads opening up her Facebook to see who in her community has passed away. We go to Detroit for the latest. And, Europe isn't seeing anywhere near as many job losses as the U.S., even though it's economy has also collapsed in recent weeks. NPR's Jim Zarroli reports on how European countries deal with unemployment.
Apr 23, 2020
Jason Mraz On 'Look For The Good'; Older People Grapple With Technology
2562
Singer-songwriter Jason Mraz has just released "Look for the Good," the title track off his upcoming album. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks to Mraz. Also, to avoid going out in public, things like banking and grocery shopping can be done online. But older people don't always embrace this kind of new technology easily. MIT AgeLab Director Joseph Coughlin explains why this is and how seniors can learn to use technology better.
Apr 23, 2020
Pennsylvania Paramedic; Addressing Racial Disparities In COVID-19 Spread
2579
Emergency medical technicians and paramedics are on the frontlines of the nation's response to the COVID-19 pandemic. David Goroff, a paramedic in Lower Merion, Pennsylvania, joins us to discuss his experience. And, black Americans are contracting and dying from COVID-19 at disproportionately high rates. ProPublica's Akilah Johnson joins us to discuss places across the U.S. where people are trying to address these disparities in real-time.
Apr 22, 2020
What's Behind Anti-Quarantine Protests; Teachers Tackle Online Learning
2553
"Astroturfing" could explain some of the anti-quarantine protests happening around the country. We talk to Ben Brock Johnson about the protests and the conservative groups mobilizing them behind the scenes. Also, with students out of school for the rest of the year, teachers are finding ways to maintain the same quality of education teaching from home. Host Tonya Mosley speaks to 4th-grade teacher Amber McCoy, and middle and high school teacher Jim Parry on how to navigate digital learning.
Apr 22, 2020
Child Care Provider Talks Coronavirus Challenges; Farmers Forced To Dump Milk
2592
The coronavirus pandemic has led dairy farmers to have to dump their milk. Yet, a trip to the grocery store will often find milk shelves bare. David Sommerstein of NCPR explains why. Also, host Tonya Mosley talks with a Washington D.C.-based child care provider about the challenges she's facing during the COVID-19 crisis.
Apr 21, 2020
Remembering A Friend's Mom Who Died From COVID-19; Coronavirus Clears Copacabana
2567
Host Jeremy Hobson recently shared that his friend's mother died in New York. Daryl Doeschner comes on the show to speak about how he thinks his mother Annette Doeschner's death was preventable. Also, Brazil's Copacabana beach, where the sands are normally a magnet for millions who come to relax, celebrate and make money, is cleared from beachgoers. NPR's Philip Reeves reports.
Apr 21, 2020
Pennsylvania State Sen. Scott Martin; Child Welfare Agencies Strained
2578
Protests continue around the country against stay-at-home orders amid the coronavirus crisis. In Pennsylvania, Republican state senators are backing a bill to reopen non-essential businesss in the state. State Sen. Scott Martin joins us to discuss why he is supporting the bill, even though the governor has said he will veto it. And, the coronavirus pandemic has made the work of child welfare agencies more challenging by limiting in-person home visits by social workers.
Apr 20, 2020
State Marijuana Laws And Coronavirus; Kids' Books To Read In Isolation
2590
The legal cannabis industry is undergoing drastic changes during the COVID-19 outbreak. Sales are up and the pandemic is forcing red and blue states alike to adopt new laws in the era of social distancing. NPR's Brakkton Booker reports. Also, host Tonya Mosley gets a few reading suggestions for kids' books from Juanita Giles, founder and executive director of the Virginia Children's Book Festival.
Apr 20, 2020
Shortage Of TV Entertainment; A Restaurateur's Grim Outlook For The Industry
2594
Nearly all television production has stopped because of the pandemic, even as demand from homebound viewers has skyrocketed. Networks, cable and streaming services are adapting to the new reality, even as the pipeline for new shows stops. NPR's Eric Deggans explains. Also, in addition to closing his restaurants, chef Tom Colicchio says he's also had to lay off many employees. He describes how difficult it will be for independent restaurants to bounce back.
Apr 17, 2020
Hunting Stuffed Bears; Coronavirus Challenges The Supreme Court
2559
Stuffed animals are crowding the windows of homes as part of a game some call "A Bear Hunt." Mose Buchele from member station KUT in Austin, Texas, took his kids out on their wagon for a hunt and came back with tips. Also, the Supreme Court will hear arguments by telephone beginning in May, after arguments were canceled in March and April due to the coronavirus. NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg shares how the coronavirus has altered the court.
Apr 16, 2020
Small Businesses Frustrated; New Jersey Nursing Homes And Coronavirus
2564
Under the Paycheck Protection Program, business owners applied for loans to cover payroll that would become outright grants as long as they keep their staff employed for eight weeks. But some small businesses worry they will not have a business left after eight weeks. Also, in the small town of Andover, New Jersey, there are reports of 17 bodies found hidden away in a morgue meant for 4 people at a nursing home. We find out the latest.
Apr 16, 2020
Families Face Diaper Shortage; Diagnosing COVID-19 With Patient's Cough
2555
The National Diaper Bank says the combination of diaper hoarding and income insecurity is creating a nation-wide diaper crisis. National Diaper Bank CEO Joanne Goldblum joins host Robin Young to discuss the situation. Also, scientists say they can distinguish the sound of a COVID-19 cough in patients exhibiting symptoms from people with other diseases. One group of researchers is developing a diagnostic COVID-19 test that anyone could download on a smartphone that listens to the user's cough. We talk with a research assistant on the project.
Apr 15, 2020
Patient Advocacy During Coronavirus Pandemic; Working From Home With Kids
2575
Navigating the medical system during the pandemic has been a nightmare for families who can't visit loved ones in hospitals or care facilities. So how do you advocate for and remain a part of their care? We hear some advice from an expert. Also, millions of Americans have lost their jobs, and many others are working from home right now, often balancing childcare. We check in with Amy Ragsdale, who is working from home while trying to balance childcare with her husband.
Apr 15, 2020
Business Booms For Netflix, Amazon; Are Coronavirus Tests Accurate?
2586
Netflix is now worth $175 billion. Amazon is on a hiring spree. Roben Farzad of Public Radio's "Full Disclosure" joins us to discuss which companies are doing well because of the coronavirus. Also, as more Americans are tested for coronavirus, there is growing concern about the accuracy of those tests. Omai Garner, who directs clinical microbiology testing for UCLA Health, explains why some tests deliver false negatives.
Apr 14, 2020
Work From Home Tech Support; How To Talk About End Of Life
2585
Internet connectivity and other technology issues are frustrating millions of Americans as many settle into new routines working from home during the coronavirus pandemic. Brian Chen, lead consumer technology writer for The New York Times, shares his advice. Also, we find out why everyone at risk from the coronavirus should fill out an advance health care directive to get the best possible end of life care.
Apr 14, 2020
New Orleans' Homeless Population; Tuberculosis Vaccine And COVID-19
2598
New Orleans has one of the highest coronavirus death rates per capita in the country, and the city's homeless population is especially vulnerable. Martha Kegel, executive director of Unity of Greater New Orleans, talks about efforts to house New Orleans' homeless during the outbreak. And, there is scientific evidence that an existing vaccine for tuberculosis could be somewhat effective against the coronavirus. We get some answers from Dr. Denise Faustman.
Apr 13, 2020
Zuni Farmer Shares Lessons In Coping; Technology Could Help Reopen The US
2594
In a time of fear and pandemic, one Zuni farmer says lessons from his great-grandparents help him cope. Host Peter O'Dowd spoke with Zuni farmer Jim Enote about the lessons his great-grandparents taught him about the natural world. Also, we look at some of the technology that could help the U.S. safely reopen in the age of COVID-19 with Derek Thompson, senior editor at the Atlantic.
Apr 13, 2020
Life As A Single Mom During A Pandemic; TV Recommendations For Quarantine
2563
Two single moms in the Bay Area made a sound diary of their lives during the coronavirus pandemic. NPR contributor Aarti Shahani shares what we can learn from their experience. Also, TV-watching has skyrocketed in the age of quarantine. NPR's Eric Deggans tells host Jeremy Hobson which of these shows quarantiners should keep an eye on.
Apr 10, 2020
Food Banks See Surge In Demand; Channeling Kids' Creativity During Coronavirus
2568
Food banks across the country are reporting a surge in demand from families impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. At the same time the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, commonly known as food stamps, has also seen a spike in applications as millions of Americans find themselves out of work. We talk with Kate Leone, chief government relations officer for Feeding America. Also, host Tonya Mosley speaks with author Kelly Yang about her Instagram class that teaches creative writing to kids.
Apr 09, 2020
Pet Adoption During Coronavirus; Frontline Nurses Protest For Better Protections
2576
Since many states have instituted stay-at-home orders, animal rescue organizations are reporting a significant uptick in people interested in adopting a pet. We chat with Hillary Rosen, founder of A Purposeful Rescue in Los Angeles. Also, nurses from around the country have been protesting a lack of protections for treating patients with COVID-19. We speak with Zenei Cortez, co-president of National Nurses United, the largest union of registered nurses in the country.
Apr 09, 2020
Hitchhiking Through America; Reports Of Domestic Violence Rise
2525
Jack Reid talks to us about a method of travel that was already fading, even before the pandemic. He's the author of "Roadside Americans: The Rise and Fall of Hitchhiking in a Changing Nation." And, reports of domestic violence are rising during the pandemic, with the pervasive stay-at-home recommendations.
Apr 08, 2020
Music To Lift Your Spirits; Living With Disabilities During Coronavirus Outbreak
2555
Alice Wong, a disability activist living in San Francisco, helps us understand how her life has changed during the pandemic. She relies on caretakers and a noninvasive ventilator to live. Also, classical music journalist Fran Hoepfner joins us to discuss the music that lifts her spirit during the coronavirus crisis.
Apr 08, 2020
Ousted Navy Commander Controversy; Racial Inequality And COVID-19
2551
Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly is facing calls to resign after he criticized now-ousted USS Theodore Roosevelt Commander Brett Crozier, who was removed from his post after raising concerns about the spread of the coronavirus on his ship. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman joins us to discuss the latest. And, Dr. Uché Blackstock, an urgent care doctor in clinics in Brooklyn, joins us to discuss why the coronavirus is disproportionately affecting black Americans.
Apr 07, 2020
Why Masks Are Effective; Passover And Easter Recipes
2558
The federal government now recommends that people wear masks in public during the coronavirus pandemic. Researcher Jeremy Howard joins us to discuss why he's been pushing for Americans to wear masks for weeks. And, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares recipes for Passover and Easter amid the pandemic.
Apr 06, 2020
Grieving During A Pandemic; Shakespeare And The Plague
2581
Every day, people are dying from COVID-19. They are our family members, our friends, our neighbors and community members. For most, there will be no traditional funerals, memorials or burials. So how do we begin to grieve and make sense of this new reality? Also, professor and author James Shapiro tells us how Shakespeare's life and works were shaped by waves of plague contagion, and how he kept working through it all.
Apr 06, 2020
New Orleans Health Director; Restarting The Economy After Coronavirus
2567
New Orleans has experienced a surge in new coronavirus cases, and the city expected to run out of hospital beds and ventilators in the coming days. Dr. Jennifer Avegno, director of the New Orleans Health Department, joins us to discuss the city's response. And, economist Mohamed El-Erian says restarting the economy after the coronavirus crisis won't be as easy as flicking a switch. He joins us to discuss what it will take to get the economy going again.
Apr 03, 2020
Covering The Kent State Shootings; Kansas Gov. On Coronavirus Preparation
2602
This May marks 50 years since an anti-war protest in Kent, Ohio, turned deadly. We speak with Robert Giles, the editor of the Akron Beacon Journal during the protest and author of the new book, "When Truth Mattered: The Kent State Shootings 50 Years Later." Also, the coronavirus outbreak hasn't hit most rural areas as hard as urban populations. We talk to Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly about how her state is preparing.
Apr 03, 2020
Cyber Dangers When Working From Home; Faith During A Pandemic
2601
Workers doing their jobs from home may be more vulnerable to hackers than in their offices. One risk factor is porn, a favorite tool of hackers. Porn traffic is up, while supervision is down. Also, writer Bruce Feiler joins us to talk about dealing with the fear and uncertainty of this moment.
Apr 02, 2020
Nurse Recovering From Coronavirus; Remembering Jazz Great Ellis Marsalis
2558
At least 45 employees in one of Louisville's biggest health care systems have tested positive for coronavirus. We speak with Shelley Urquhart, a pulmonary and critical-care nurse practitioner who contracted the virus despite wearing all of the recommended personal protective equipment. Also, jazz pianist Ellis Marsalis passed away Wednesday at age 85. His son told The New York Times that the cause was complications from COVID-19.
Apr 02, 2020
Coronavirus Quarantine Playlist; Fashion Designer Makes Face Masks, Hospital Gowns
2584
Chris Douridas, a DJ at KCRW in Santa Monica, shares some timely hits from Willie Nelson to Diana Ross to help shake the quarantine blues away. Also, fashion designer Brandon Maxwell and his team are creating face masks and hospital gowns for health care workers fighting the coronavirus. We talk to Maxwell about creating protective wear amid the pandemic.
Apr 01, 2020
Researchers Project Coronavirus Deaths; Florida Update
2591
The White House presented data on Tuesday that projects at least 100,000 deaths due to the coronavirus if social distancing measures are continued through the summer. Epidemiologist Dr. Ali Mokdad, who was part of the team who compiled the data, joins us to discuss. And, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis continues to resist calls for a statewide stay-at-home order as the state's coronavirus cases reach nearly 7,000. We get an update from WLRN's Caitie Switalski.
Apr 01, 2020
Atlanta Mayor On COVID-19; Hospital Cancel Elective Surgeries
2600
Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms provides an update on the situation in her city, which is under a stay-at-home order due to the coronavirus outbreak. More than 100 people have died from COVID-19 across the state of Georgia. And, many hospitals are stopping elective surgeries amid the current pandemic. Dr. David Hoyt, executive director of the American College of Surgeons, talks about why canceling these surgeries is important.
Mar 31, 2020
Stranded Americans Overseas Amid Coronavirus; Florida Cruise Ships
2626
The more than 30,000 Americans still stranded overseas because of the coronavirus are getting frustrated as the State Department mounts an unprecedented effort to help get them home. WAMU's Daniella Cheslow reports. Also, more cruise ships are pleading for somewhere to port in Florida, but so far Gov. Ron DeSantis has denied their requests, saying the state's health care resources are already stretched thin. We speak with The Miami Herald's Taylor Dolven.
Mar 31, 2020
Book Recommendations For Social Distancing; Coronavirus And Addiction
2560
To help pass the time during social distancing, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Petra Mayer of NPR Books about what she suggests we read while we're contained in Also, many Americans are feeling isolated these days as we stay home. But what impact is social distancing efforts having on people who are in addiction recovery? Vic Vela, host of new recovery podcast "Back From Broken," joins us to discuss.
Mar 30, 2020
Coronavirus Cripples Cattle Country; New Orleans Becomes Major COVID-19 Hotspot
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The cattle industry has its own name for an economic downturn: a wreck — and we are right in the middle of one. As the Texas Standard's Michael Marks reports, the coronavirus injected the cattle market with a big dose of uncertainty at just the wrong time. Also, Louisiana's overall death rate is on par with New York's, though the southern state faces unique challenges. WWNO's Patrick Madden talks to us about the latest in New Orleans.
Mar 30, 2020
Coronavirus Impact On Improv Theaters; Epidemiologist On COVID-19
2553
Comedy theaters are among the many entertainment outlets struggling with the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Charna Halpern, owner of The iO Theater in Chicago. Also, Dr. Larry Brilliant has been on the front lines in the fight against disease for decades. He shares his thoughts on COVID-19.
Mar 27, 2020
Coronavirus Reveals Inter-Generational Conflict; Challenges Truckers Face Due To COVID-19
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There's been an outcry on social media: Millenials don't think their boomer parents are taking warnings about coronavirus seriously enough. NPR's Ina Jaffe profiles a father and daughter. Also, we talk to John Lex, a truck driver for Walmart, about some of the challenges he is facing on the road due to the coronavirus, and the newfound respect he feels truckers are finally earning.
Mar 27, 2020
Unemployment Claims Skyrocket; Staying Connected To Loved Ones
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Nearly 3.3 million people filed for unemployment last week as the coronavirus pandemic brought many industries to a standstill. We get an expert view from Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton LLP. Also, so many people are worried about family and loved ones right now. WBUR's Anthony Brooks's mother, Esther Brooks, is in Italy — one of the hot spots of the global pandemic.
Mar 26, 2020
Cellist Yo-Yo Ma's #SongsOfComfort; Vaping And Coronavirus
2600
Host Robin Young speaks with cellist Yo-Yo Ma about the music he's been tweeting using the hashtag #SongsOfComfort. Also, some physicians are speculating that vaping could make some young people more susceptible to the worst COVID-19 complications. Cleveland Clinic pulmonologist Dr. Humberto Choi joins us to talk about the issue.
Mar 26, 2020
Is It Safe To Go Outside?; Grocery Store Workers On Front Lines For Coronavirus Pandemic
2557
Parents know how important being outdoors is for their kids. But how safe is it for people to be outside right now? Dr. Anita McElroy has answers. Plus, grocery store employees are some of the workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic — putting their health at risk to keep store shelves stocked and grocery carts full. Noah Glick from KUNR talked to some store workers in Reno, Nevada.
Mar 25, 2020
Is Trump Listening To His Scientists?; Birdwatching While Social Distancing
2568
Washington Post's Yasmeen Abutaleb joins us to discuss concerns that Trump is sidelining his scientific advisers during the coronavirus crisis. Also, cooped up at home? Try birdwatching! Houston Audubon ornithologist Richard Gibbons reminds us that many birds migrating this week, many who are experiencing "zugunruhe," a German word meaning migratory restlessness. So are all of us, it seems.
Mar 25, 2020
Jesse Eisenberg's 2 New Films; Amazon Employees Call For Coronavirus Protections
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Actor Jesse Eisenberg has two films coming on digital and video on demand on Friday: "Vivarium" and "Resistance." We speak to him about both movies opening during this turbulent time. Also, warehouse workers are calling on Amazon to do more to defend against the spread of coronavirus after the company confirmed its first case of COVID-19 at a warehouse in New York last week. We get the latest from Elizabeth Dwoskin of The Washington Post.
Mar 24, 2020
Sen. Jeanne Shaheen Discusses Coronavirus; Asymptomatic Carriers Of COVID-19
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The Senate is getting closer to a deal on an economic relief package to deal with the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Democrat Sen. Jeanne Shaheen joins us to discuss. And, the reason why the coronavirus spreads so quickly is because many people don't even know they have it. Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School, explains how asymptomatic carriers spread COVID-19.
Mar 24, 2020
Good Food For Hard Times; New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy On COVID-19
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New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy ordered the state's residents to stay home, except for essential trips, in order to help reduce the spread of coronavirus. He joins us to discuss how he plans to enforce the order. And, resident chef Kathy Gunst shares some recipes for cooking at home while isolated.
Mar 23, 2020
Balancing Human Rights With Public Welfare; Potential Ventilator Shortage
2616
As COVID-19 spreads in this country, people are struggling to adjust to the new rules: stand six feet apart, work from home, don't get a haircut, home school your children. Lawrence Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown University, joins us to discuss the balance between personal freedom and public health. Also, some medical professionals are warning of a potential shortage of life-saving ventilators as the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.S. tops 35,000. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Dr. Lewis Kaplan.
Mar 23, 2020
Faux-mencement Ceremonies For College Seniors; FCC Chair On Expanding Internet Access
2573
At a few colleges, the answer to closed campuses has been the 'faux-memcement' — a quickly cobbled together ceremony, where garbage bags take the place of gowns, but the emotions and the sentiment are real. We talk to a senior at Olin College in Massachusetts and the dean of faculty. Also, access to broadband internet connection is vital for most Americans. Host Jeremy Hobson talks to Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai about how to shrink the digital divide during the pandemic.
Mar 20, 2020
Making Face Masks Is Surprising Difficult; Movie Recommendations
2580
A pandemic of a novel coronavirus is causing a global shortage of masks. It turns out that a simple face mask is surprisingly hard to make. NPR's Emily Feng reports. And John Horn, host of the KPCC show 'The Frame," joins host Tonya Mosley to share his film favorites for folks looking for something to stream.
Mar 19, 2020
Congress Considers Stimulus Package; CDC Director Criticized
2538
Congress is considering a $1 trillion rescue package designed to provide some relief for Americans grappling with the deepening coronavirus crisis. NPR's Susan Davis joins us to discuss what would be the third major bill passed to deal with the pandemic. And, CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield is facing criticism for the slow pace of testing for the coronavirus in the U.S., a charge that echoes controversy Redfield faced as an infectious disease specialist for the military during the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s.
Mar 19, 2020
China Expels U.S. Journalists; COVID-19 Military Preparedness
2612
Dr. Jonathan Woodson, former assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, joins us, to discuss how the U.S. military is keeping its forces safe overseas and the role it could play in keeping Americans safe at home. And, at least 13 American journalists stand to be expelled from China in retaliation for a new limit imposed by the Trump administration on visas for Chinese state-owned media operating in the U.S. NPR's Jackie Northam joins us with the latest.
Mar 18, 2020
Chinese Comedian Living Under Quarantine; COVID-19 Impact On Business
2611
Comedian Jesse Appell's visit back to the United States from China has been prolonged indefinitely by the COVID-19 epidemic. Back in China, his comedian friend Storm Xu has been quarantined in China for the last three months — so long that he now fears going outside. Also, we talk with business owners and employees from across the country about how the coronavirus is impacting their place of work: the owner of a Pennsylvania toy store, co-founder of a California cannabis dispensary and a Seattle hotel worker.
Mar 17, 2020
Canada Scientists Isolate Coronavirus; California Counties Shelter In Place
2567
Researchers in Canada are working to develop treatments for COVID-19 by isolating the virus responsible for the pandemic. Arinjay Banerjee, a fellow at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, joins us to discuss. And, several California counties have ordered residents to shelter in place, except for essential travel, such as grocery shopping. KQED's Marisa Lagos breaks down the state's response to the spread of coronavirus.
Mar 17, 2020
School Districts Close As COVID-19 Spreads; Riverdance: Then And Now
2610
In an effort to slow the rate of transmission of COVID-19, many public school districts have made the decision to shut down for many weeks, including New York City, Boston and Los Angeles. Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent Austin Beutner discusses his decision to close the nation's second-largest school district, and what it's doing to support students, teachers and parents. Also, New York Times dance critic and former dancer in Riverdance Siobhan Burke shares why she thinks the dancing in the new 25th-anniversary show is "spectacular."
Mar 16, 2020
Vaccine Expert On Coronavirus; New York Hospital CEO On Outbreak
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Researchers are working to quickly develop a vaccine for the coronavirus. One of them is Dr. Dan Barouch, director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. And, a New York hospital CEO says the group's 23 hospitals in the state are bracing for an influx of coronavirus patients.
Mar 16, 2020
Debunking Coronavirus Myths; Living With Parkinson's Disease
2524
As speculation and misinformation about coronavirus continue to spread online, host Tonya Mosely debunks some of the top myths spreading about COVID-19 with Stanford University's Dr. Seema Yasmin. Also, Parkinson's disease eventually robs its patients of their ability to move. About a million Americans have the neurological disease, and it might surprise you to hear that one of the most effective treatments of Parkinson's is exercise. WBUR's Cloe Axelson has the story.
Mar 13, 2020
Nonpartisan Redistricting To Limit Gerrymandering; Understanding The 'Aspirational' Class
2528
This year's census will help determine how states redraw their electoral maps. At least 17 states have committed to using nonpartisan commissions or other nontraditional methods in their redistricting this year in an effort to prevent partisan gerrymandering. We talk to Jessika Shipley of Colorado's Legislative Council. Also, we explore the growth of the so-called "aspirational class" and what our consumer habits can tell us about the current state of social class and cultural cohesion in the U.S.
Mar 13, 2020
Detroit Restores Water To Thousands Over Coronavirus; Risk To Home Caregivers
2517
The city of Detroit will temporarily restore running water to thousands of households who have been disconnected due to unpaid bills. This action comes on the heels of public outcry that lack of water poses a serious public health threat amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We talk with Dr. Abdul El-Sayed. Also, health care has become a high-risk job in the wake of the coronavirus. We look at the impact on home care workers with Ai-jen Poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance.
Mar 12, 2020
White House Coronavirus Response; 2020 Census Begins
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NPR White House Correspondent Tamara Keith joins us to discuss the Trump administration's coronavirus response, including a temporary travel ban on some travelers from parts of Europe. And, the 2020 census ramps up Wednesday as the first invitations to respond online arrive in the mail. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang joins us to discuss the unique challenges to this year's census.
Mar 12, 2020
JetBlue CEO On Combating Coronavirus; Italian Hospitals Overwhelmed
2535
JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes joins us to discuss the impact of the spread of the coronavirus on the airline industry and what steps the company is taking to overcome this latest challenge. And, with more than 10,000 cases, Italy has been hit harder by coronavirus than any country but China. Doctors in the country's northern provinces say that hospitals are overwhelmed.
Mar 11, 2020
Barry Sonnenfeld Pens New Memoir; 3 Airlines Cut Back Flights Over COVID-19 Fears
2539
We speak with "Men in Black" and "Addams Family" filmmaker and writer Barry Sonnenfeld about his new memoir, "Barry Sonnenfeld Call Your Mother." Also, three major domestic airlines are cutting back on domestic and international flights as fears over the coronavirus cause bookings to plummet. Here & Now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan explains how the airline industry is fairing.
Mar 11, 2020
Duane Allman's Guitar; Gentrification In Raleigh, North Carolina
2528
When Duane Allman, the late lead guitarist of the Allman Brothers, played the iconic song "Layla," his Les Paul Gold Top guitar licks were the highlight. As Grant Blankenship reports, that guitar will be on stage at the 50th Allman Brothers reunion. Also, like many cities across the country, Raleigh has experienced tremendous growth. And with that growth has come gentrification which threatens to change the fabric of the historically black communities. Jason deBruyn of WUNC reports.
Mar 10, 2020
U.S. Economic Response To Coronavirus; Mapping Philadelphia's Jazz History
2521
U.S. stock markets jumped on Tuesday morning after President Trump announced his proposed economic stimulus package to deal with the effects of coronavirus. NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley joins us for the latest. And, the public history project "All That Philly Jazz" seeks to document and preserve the jazz history of Philadelphia.
Mar 10, 2020
Marc Rebillet's Viral Musical Performances; History Of Pandemics
2542
Host Tonya Mosley talks with musical artist and social media sensation Marc Rebillet about his creative process and how his growing fanbase influences in the music he makes. Also, as the world reacts to the coronavirus, we take a look back at the history of pandemics and epidemics — beginning with the devastating Black Plague, through the HIV/AIDs epidemic.
Mar 09, 2020
Reexamining Gifted Education Programs; New Book Details Case That Made 'Climate History'
2505
Prep for Prep, a nonprofit education program in New York City, helps students of color attend private schools but some argue that it fails to mitigate segregation in the city's public schools. We reexamine these types of programs with The New Yorker's Vinson Cunningham. Also, a new book tells the story of Massachusetts v. EPA, a watershed case for environmental law that was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2007. We talk with author Richard J. Lazarus.
Mar 09, 2020
Spring Break And Coronavirus; Women Outnumber Men In Non-Farm Payroll Jobs
2585
Colleges, universities and boarding schools are trying to figure out how to best manage student travel for upcoming spring breaks. We talk to Brad Seifers, who handles emergency management at Indiana University, which is going on spring break. Also, since December, women have held slightly more non-farm payroll jobs than men. It's only the second time in history this has happened. Professor Betsey Stevenson talks about the changing workforce.
Mar 06, 2020
Climate Change Impact On Beaches; Spending Weeks In Coronavirus Quarantine
2553
Climate change is accelerating the erosion of beaches around the world, according to a recent study. We talk with the lead author of the study, which found that as many as half of the world's sandy shorelines could disappear by the end of the century. Also, the U.S. now has more than 200 cases of COVID-19, public health officials confirmed on Friday. We speak with Carl Goldman, who is in quarantine after testing positive for the novel coronavirus.
Mar 06, 2020
'Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist' Star; Lincoln's 2nd Inauguration
2538
New show "Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist" airs Sunday nights on NBC. Host Robin Young speaks with creator Austin Winsberg and star Jane Levy. Also, on March 4, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln tried to bind up the nation's wounds after four years of bloody civil war in his Second Inaugural Address. Edward Achorn's new book "Every Drop Of Blood: The Momentous Second Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln" looks back at what Lincoln said that day and the other historical figures were there.
Mar 05, 2020
Tropical Forests Are Absorbing Less Carbon; What Is Democratic Socialism?
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The journal Nature reports that a key bulwark against runaway climate change is breaking down. The study finds that tropical forests are losing their ability to absorb carbon dioxide. Daniel Grossman, supported by the Pultizer Center, has our story. Also, Bernie Sanders calls himself a democratic socialist. We talk to professor Sheri Berman about what democratic socialism is and how it compares to socialism more broadly.
Mar 05, 2020
Super Tuesday Results Narrow Democratic Race; COVID-19 Affects Airlines
2530
Joe Biden won Super Tuesday primaries in nine of 14 states, including delegate-rich Texas, while Bernie Sanders won just four of those states, but picked up California. Michael Bloomberg quit the presidential race after winning only American Samoa. And, there are signs that Chinese airlines may be rebounding after canceling thousands of flights due to coronavirus. Here & Now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan joins us to talk about the toll the outbreak is taking on airlines.
Mar 04, 2020
How Did Bloomberg Get His Riches?; Alaska Copper Mine Threatens Fishing
2560
Michael Bloomberg is using part of his $65 billion fortune to run for president. He started making his money betting on the power and future of computers. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, it transformed Wall Street. Also, a long-time battle against a proposed copper mine in southwestern Alaska has divided communities. As KUOW's John Ryan reports, the potential move has locals split on what's best for the sockeye salmon ecosystem.
Mar 03, 2020
Why Rep. Khanna Supports Sanders; 1st Cheetah Cubs Born By IVF
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Sen. Bernie Sanders is expected to take home the most delegates of any candidate on Super Tuesday. We speak with Sanders surrogate Rep. Ro Khanna. Also, for the first time, cheetah cubs have been born by in vitro fertilization to a surrogate mother. Researchers see this as a promising step forward for the future of cheetahs. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Adrienne Crosier, a cheetah biologist who helped perform the procedure.
Mar 02, 2020
Kids On Planes; Answering Your Questions About Coronavirus
2577
Some airlines no longer allow economy passengers to choose their seats in advance. In some cases, passengers are being told they can't sit next to their children who are older than 2 years old. The Consumer Reports will be testifying before the House Subcommittee on Aviation in an attempt to change the rule. Also, Here & Now has asked listeners for questions about COVID-19. We answer them with Dr. William Schaffner.
Mar 02, 2020
U.S. Schools Prepare For COVID-19; Undecided South Carolina Voters
2492
The federal government has warned schools to start preparing for a possible U.S. COVID-19 outbreak. What does that mean for public school districts across the country? We ask Melinda Landau, who runs health programs at the San Jose Unified School District in California. Also, the spotlight is on South Carolina ahead of Saturday's primary. We talk to undecided voters in Charleston and Columbia as they weigh their options and their values.
Feb 28, 2020
Earth's New Mini-Moon; London Airport Climate Change Impact
2495
Earth has a mini-moon that has been orbiting our planet since 2017. Astronomers in Arizona first observed the object earlier this month, giving it the provisional name 2020 CD3. Also, a court in the U.K. has ruled that plans for a third runway at London's Heathrow airport are illegal because they don't address the impact of climate change. The ruling could influence decisions on infrastructure projects around the world.
Feb 28, 2020
Tom Steyer Talks South Carolina; COVID-19 Traps Chinese Comedy Star In U.S.
2532
Two days ahead of the South Carolina primary, host Tonya Mosley talks with presidential candidate Tom Steyer about his campaign in the state and what defines a successful campaign in such a crowded Democratic field. Also, American Jesse Appell studied comedy in China as a disciple of Chinese Xiangsheng master Ding Guangquan. Appell returned to the United States over the Chinese New Year to visit his family in Massachusetts and has been unable to return because of the COVID-19 outbreak.
Feb 27, 2020
5 Years After AME Church Massacre; Flooding In Charleston
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This year will mark the 5th anniversary of the tragic death of nine black churchgoers at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. As the state grapples with how to stop hate-motivated violence, the church and grieving family members seek to heal through the radical act of forgiveness. Also, we talk with Betty Bonwell, a Charleston voter, about an issue that's important to her: flooding. In 2019, Charleston flooded an average of one of nearly every five days.
Feb 27, 2020
U.S. Coronavirus Response; Utah Lawmaker On Polygamy Decriminalization
2548
Federal health officials are warning Americans about the potential spread of the new coronavirus in the U.S. Mark Harvey, former senior director for resilience policy at the National Security Council, talks about how the U.S. is responding. And, lawmakers in Utah are considering a bill that would decriminalize polygamy, or multiple marriages, among consenting adults. We speak with V. Lowry Snow, a Republican in Utah's State House of Representatives who is sponsoring the bill.
Feb 26, 2020
Tame Impala Takes On Time In 'The Slow Rush'; COVID-19 Economic Impact
2582
Fans of Tame Impala, the genre-defying brainchild of multi-instrumentalist Kevin Parker, held their breath for half a decade waiting for his newest album, "The Slow Rush." We talk to Parker about themes throughout his album. Also, the new coronavirus outbreak is turning into an economic pandemic as well as a global health crisis. Jeremy Hobson talks with Grant Thornton's chief economist about the economic impacts.
Feb 26, 2020
Uighur Human Rights Crisis In China; The Legacy Of Ida B. Wells
2565
China has been detaining and surveilling its Uighur Muslim minority. We talk to Harvard professor Bill Kirby about the long-standing human rights crisis in the country. Also, in celebration of Black History Month, we honor trailblazer Ida B. Wells. She was a dogged investigative reporter and publisher who stood up against racism and violence toward black Americans. David Freudberg, executive producer of Human Media, reports.
Feb 25, 2020
World Health Organization On COVID-19; PBS Documentary 'Always In Season'
2526
The World Health Organization says officials don't consider the spread of COVID-19 a pandemic yet. We can an update from Larry Gostin, director of the WHO Center on Global Health. And, the new PBS documentary "Always In Season" explores the death of 17-year-old Lennon Lacy, which was ruled a suicide, though some suspected it was a lynching.
Feb 24, 2020
Has VR Gaming Lived Up To Its Promise?; COVID-19 Home Quarantines
2512
Host Peter O'Dowd tries out a new virtual reality game — called Orion13 — to find out if 2020 really is the year VR gaming will live up to the hype. Also, cities around the world are hoping home quarantine will help contain the spread of COVID-19. In Seattle, public health workers are trying to help some of the highest-risk people in isolation by getting their groceries. We speak with a medical epidemiologist who is leading containment efforts for Seattle and King County, Washington.
Feb 24, 2020
Using Psychedelics To Treat PTSD; Are Playgrounds Too Safe?
2528
Should playgrounds be a little less safe? That's what some play specialists are advocating. We talk to Rebecca Faulkner, who runs the nonprofit play:ground NYC. Also, the federal government is allowing a small number of people with treatment-resistant post-traumatic stress disorder to use psychedelics as part of their therapy. KQED's Laura Klivans has the story.
Feb 21, 2020
Diverse Electorate Builds Power In Nevada's Labor Unions; Grieving Celebrities
2587
The death of Kobe Bryant has had a profound impact on the public despite most not knowing him personally. We speak with a clinical psychologist about why we grieve celebrities when they die. Also, the Nevada caucuses are Saturday and the winner will likely appeal to the most diverse electorate yet in the nominating process. Many of those voters are also active in Nevada's powerful labor unions. Host Peter O'Dowd reports from Las Vegas.
Feb 21, 2020
Couple Under COVID-19 Quarantine; Las Vegas Debate Party
2534
Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg took the debate stage for the first time in the 2020 Democratic campaign. The debate in Las Vegas comes ahead of Saturday's Nevada caucuses. Host Peter O'Dowd went to a debate watch party with a group of Las Vegas Democrats. Also, Tyler and Rachel Torres were on their honeymoon on the Diamond Princess when COVID-19 hit. After nearly two weeks of quarantine on the ship, they're now in another quarantine in Texas. They tell us about their experience.
Feb 20, 2020
'Ordinary Love' Film; Australian Government Moves To Protect Wildlife
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Actors Lesley Manville and Liam Neeson join us to talk about their new film "Ordinary Love," which explores a couple's relationship when the wife is diagnosed with breast cancer. Also, the Australian government is working alongside scientists to help wildlife recover from habitat loss after massive bushfires burned tens of millions of acres of land and killed an estimated 1 billion animals.
Feb 20, 2020
Alison Brie On Her New Film 'Horse Girl'; The NBA's 'Greek Freak'
2636
Alison Brie co-wrote and stars in the new Netflix film "Horse Girl." We talk with Brie about the film, which centers around a young woman who experiences a series of disturbing incidents that lead her to believe she's being abducted. Also, 25-year-old Giannis Antetokounmpo has taken the NBA by storm. The forward has one particularly dedicated fanbase: American Greeks who are inspired by his rise and his family's immigration story. WBEZ's Dan Mihalopoulos reports.
Feb 19, 2020
Boy Scouts Bankruptcy; New Poll Shows Sanders Leading Nationally
2536
The Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy Tuesday amid several expensive sex-abuse lawsuits. We talk with lawyer Michael Pfau, whose firm represents nearly 300 people who report being abused as Scouts. Also, a new NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist poll shows Bernie Sanders leading by double digits nationally, with Michael Bloomberg polling second.
Feb 18, 2020
Colorado Cannabis Degree; Nevada Democratic Debate
2556
Michael Bloomberg has qualified to join Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren in Wednesday night's Democratic debate in Nevada. Democratic strategist Maria Cardona discusses what to expect from the candidates. And, Colorado Colorado State University Pueblo will soon offer a cannabis-focused bachelor's degree.
Feb 18, 2020
Paid Internship Movement; LAPD Alleged Misuse Of Gang Database
2506
Many interns are still not paid in the U.S., and students often struggle trying to balance the opportunity while also going to class, paying off student loans and working part-time jobs. We talk to Carlos Mark Vera, who is working to change experiences for interns. Also, the California attorney general is looking into an allegation that the LAPD misused a state-wide gang database and added innocent people to the list.
Feb 17, 2020
Fire Disrupts Vinyl Record Production; Utah Sends Employees To Mexico To Save On Medications
2539
People in the vinyl business are warning of a global bottleneck in the record industry after a fire last week destroyed Apollo Masters Corp. in Banning, California. We talk with a vinyl-production consultant about how a critical component of vinyl production will now be in short supply. Also, in Utah, some public workers are able to fly to Canada or Mexico to buy costly prescription drugs at a steep discount.
Feb 14, 2020
Roger Stone Sentencing Fallout; Architecture And Federal Buildings
2540
Attorney General William Barr agreed to testify in the House next month after furor over the sentencing of President Trump ally Roger Stone. Democrats have accused Barr of using the Justice Department to do Trump's bidding. And, some architects are criticizing reports of a draft executive order requiring most new federal buildings to be designed in the classical style. Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin explains why federal rules on style are bad for democracy.
Feb 13, 2020
Americans Agree Health Care Needs Fixing; Congress Presses NCAA On Paying Athletes
2545
Americans are divided on lots of issues. But a new survey shows that people across partisan lines agree that the U.S. health care system needs fixing. Christine Herman of Side Effects Public Media and America Amplified reports. Also, Congress is stepping into the debate over compensating college athletes. Sports analyst Mike Pesca has the latest on lawmakers pressing the NCAA to move quickly.
Feb 13, 2020
N.H. Democratic Primary; American Airlines Suspends Flights To China
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Democratic strategist Bill Press and Republican strategist Alice Stewart join us to discuss the results of Tuesday night's New Hampshire presidential primary. And, American Airlines has suspended direct flights to China and Hong Kong through the end of April due to the spread of COVID-19. Several other airlines have also suspended flights from major U.S. hubs to China.
Feb 12, 2020
Airbnb CEO On IPO Plans; New Particle Accelerator In New York
2548
Airbnb was valued at $31 billion in its last funding round in 2017 and said last year it plans to go public in 2020. We speak with the company's co-founder and CEO. Also, the U.S. could soon have its first new particle collider in decades. Last month, the Department of Energy announced Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, will be home to The Electron-Ion Collider.
Feb 12, 2020
Guns In New Hampshire; African Countries Prepare For Coronavirus
2534
The issue of guns — whether to protect our right to have them or protect ourselves from them — remains a divisive one in the United States. On New Hampshire's primary day, we check in with Josh Rogers about the importance of guns to voters and the state's recent attempts to enact new, stricter laws. Also, fears are mounting in Africa around coronavirus, where there has yet to be one confirmed case. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with the head of the emergency response for the World Health Organization in Africa, about ...
Feb 11, 2020
N.H. Governor Talks Primaries; Coronavirus Impact On Tech
2529
It's primary day in New Hampshire. Gov. Chris Sununu recently told viewers of "Fox & Friends" to "grab their popcorn" because "it's going to be fun to watch." Sununu joins us to discuss the New Hampshire primary. Also, due to the coronavirus, many offices and factories in China have been closed for the time being as a precaution and the tech industry is starting to feel the impact. We talk with Ben Brock Johnson, who covers tech for Here & Now.
Feb 11, 2020
Helping Black Smokers Quit; Art Galleries Opening Restaurants
2505
As vaping news makes headlines, black smokers in Cleveland still struggle to quit cigarettes. Ideastream's Anne Glausser reports on a texting program that might help some of those smokers. Also, art galleries are opening their own restaurants. What does that tell us about the art market? We talk to an expert about this relatively new phenomenon.
Feb 10, 2020
New Hampshire Debate Watchers; Coronavirus Treatment
2557
The New Hampshire primary is Tuesday, but many voters there say they still haven't made up their minds. And that was evident in Durham, New Hampshire, this weekend when five neighbors gathered to watch the Democratic candidates debate. We hear what they have to say. Also, we talk to Dr. Amesh Adalji of John Hopkins Center for Health Security about how to treat the coronavirus.
Feb 10, 2020
100 Years After Prohibition; Arizona Utility Sets Carbon Free Goal
2584
It's been 100 years since the end of Prohibition. We look back at the 13-year-ban on alcohol and how it shaped American drinking culture with William Rorabaugh, author of "Prohibition: A Concise History." Also, Arizona Public Service, the state's largest utility company, recently announced plans to be carbon free by 2050. Host Peter O'Dowd speaks with APS CEO Jeff Guldner about how the company plans to reach its goals.
Feb 07, 2020
New Hampshire Debate; Intimacy Coordinators In #MeToo Era
2489
Democratic presidential candidates are set to debate Friday night in New Hampshire ahead of the state's primary on Tuesday. The primary looms as the results of the Iowa caucuses are still unknown. And in the #MeToo era, the demand for intimacy coordinators, professionals who work with actors and production staff to ensure safe and consensual sex scenes, is on the rise.
Feb 07, 2020
Trump Touts His Acquittal; Coronavirus Could Affect U.S.-China Trade Truce
2553
President Trump touted his acquittal in his impeachment trial Thursday when he brandished the front page of USA Today at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington. And, China's plan to cut $75 billion in tariffs on American-made goods is a sign the trade truce with the U.S. is working. But the new coronavirus outbreak could throw a wrench in the agreement.
Feb 06, 2020
Universal Cancer Treatment Research; Global Impacts Of Australia FIres
2562
Scientists are still a long way off of finding a cure for cancer, but researchers in the U.K. have recently made a significant step toward the creation of a universal treatment for cancer. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with one of the researchers. Also, atmospheric scientist Neil Lareau from the University of Nevada joins us to discuss some of the long-term environmental impacts of the Australia fires, from fire-generated thunderstorms to plumes of smoke and chemicals that penetrate the troposphere.
Feb 06, 2020
Body Temperature Changes; Coronavirus Stirs Sinophobia
2593
You may not be as hot as you think. Scientists now say the normal human body temperature is 97.5 degrees, slightly cooler than the once-accepted 98.6 degrees. Also, as quickly as the new coronavirus is spreading globally, so is anti-China sentiment. Some restaurants and bars in Italy are turning away Chinese customers and a recent issue of a German weekly news magazine featured a headline on its cover that read "Coronavirus. Made in China."
Feb 05, 2020
Iowa's App Problems; 'Brain Drain' At The Department Of Agriculture
2558
Iowa's state Democratic party said there were inconsistencies in precinct results from Monday night's caucuses. A technical glitch with a new app to report results appears to be at the root of the problem. Also, we talk to a historian at Rutgers about the USDA's Economic Research Service and how the Trump administration's decision to move the ERS last year resulted in about 60% of its employees quitting.
Feb 04, 2020
Google's Super Bowl Commercial; Bill Kristol On The GOP
2531
A Super Bowl commercial from Google depicted an elderly widower asking Google Voice Assistant to help him remember his late wife, Loretta. We discuss the ad and the technology behind it. Also, conservative thinker Bill Kristol has been critical of President Trump for years, even while many on the right who were once critical came to support the president. Host Robin Young speaks with Kristol.
Feb 04, 2020
German Town Goes 100% Renewable Energy; Mississippi Prisons Deaths Hit 15
2510
One model for the transition to carbon neutrality can be found in the town of Wolfhagen, Germany, which already gets 100% of its electricity from renewable energy sources. Host Tonya Mosley speaks a member of the city parliament in Wolfhagen. Also, we talk to Jerry Mitchell, founder of the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting, about the state's policy failures that he says contributed to 15 inmate deaths inside Missippi prisons since Dec. 29.
Feb 03, 2020
Younger Voters Energized In Iowa; Nigerian Travel Ban Expansion
2552
The Iowa caucuses are Monday night, and recent polls suggest young voters could swing the outcome. They propelled Bernie Sanders to a virtual tie with Hillary Clinton in Iowa in 2016. What role will the youth vote play in 2020? Also, the president of the Nigerian American Multicultural Council responds to the recent expansion of the Trump administration's travel ban.
Feb 03, 2020
Special Coverage: Iowa Caucuses
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This week, Jeremy Hobson hosted Here & Now from Iowa to cover the state's first-in-the-nation caucuses.
Jan 31, 2020
Senate Impeachment Trial Latest; U.K. Ambassador On Brexit
2514
Senators are set to vote Friday on whether to call witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Trump. Republicans believe they have enough votes to block witnesses and acquit the president. For more, we're joined by NPR's Ayesha Rascoe. And, the United Kingdom officially leaves the European Union on Friday. But the U.K. Ambassador to the U.S. Michael Tatham says he's not feeling so "starry-eyed" about Brexit.
Jan 31, 2020
Caucusing 101; Questions About Native Appropriation In Super Bowl
2532
The Iowa caucuses are first, which is why they matter. We look at the history of how and why Iowa became home to the first-in-the-nation presidential contest. Also, with the Kansas City Chiefs taking the field at this year's Super Bowl, the big game will reopen an ongoing conversation over Native American imagery and appropriation in U.S. sports.
Jan 31, 2020
Latest From Iowa; Coronavirus Impacts On China's Economy
2500
The Iowa caucuses are just a few days away, and many of the Democratic presidential candidates are stuck in Washington for the impeachment trial of President Trump. Iowa Public Radio lead political reporter Clay Masters joins us to discuss the latest from the campaign trail. And the spread of coronavirus in China is shutting down cities, shops and factories, and disrupting travel, business and manufacturing. For more on the economic impacts of the virus, we're joined by MSNBC anchor and correspondent Ali Velshi.
Jan 30, 2020
Pete Buttigieg Talks Iowa; Howard Dean's Message To 2020 Candidates
2509
When he ran for president in 2004, Howard Dean finished third in the Iowa Democratic caucus — but what most people remember about that night is what became known as the "Dean Scream" in his speech to supporters. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Dean about the 2020 race. Also, Pete Buttigieg is crisscrossing the key state of Iowa while several of his competitors are stuck in Washington for the impeachment trial of President Trump. We catch up with Buttigieg in Iowa.
Jan 30, 2020
White House May Ban Travel To China; Amy Klobuchar On Iowa
2509
We talk to Here & Now's transportation analyst Seth Kaplan about the White House's warning to airlines it may shut down air travel to China. Meanwhile, Boeing posted its first annual loss since 1997 over fallout from the 737 Max. Also, we talk to Sen. Amy Klobuchar about the 2020 race, including the upcoming Iowa caucuses.
Jan 29, 2020
Impeachment Questions Answered; Space Debris Could Collide Above Pittsburgh
2457
Now that the impeachment trial of President Trump has moved to the Senate, questions have been raised by our listeners. NPR's Ron Elving answers questions about the process and potential outcome. Also, an old NASA space telescope and a retired Air Force satellite will pass each other 600 miles above earth on Wednesday night. We ask an expert about the odds of a collision and the danger of space debris.
Jan 29, 2020
Wearing Face Masks To Prevent Coronavirus; Finneas Wins 5 Grammys
2514
Since the coronavirus outbreak started in China, people in disposable face masks have become a defining image of the outbreak. We talk with an infectious disease expert about whether face masks make a difference. Also, Finneas O'Connell has produced all of his sister Billie Eilish's music. We revisit our conversation with him about synesthesia, his need for control and what it feels like to step out on his own.
Jan 28, 2020
Tribes File Climate Change Complaint; Taco Bell Increases Manager Pay
2517
Louisiana has lost an average of a football field of land every hour over the past 25 years due to coastal erosion. Five tribes have filed a formal climate change complaint with the United Nations. Also, Taco Bell will begin a test to raise the salaries of some general managers in top-performing locations to $100,000 a year. We talk to Sam Oches, editorial director for Food News Media.
Jan 28, 2020
Remembering Kobe Bryant; Vacancy Taxes In U.S. Cities
2529
Host Tonya Mosley talks with KPCC reporter Erick Galindo about Kobe Bryant's legacy and what he meant to the people of Los Angeles. Also, in 2019, approximately 12% of the nation's housing stock was vacant. Vacancy taxes are a new tool cities are implementing to ensure all available housing is used. But do they work? We discuss.
Jan 27, 2020
Avoid Making 'Dumb' Money Mistakes; Haiti's Parliament Dissolved
2516
Taking on too much student loan debt is just one of the common mistakes seen by Jill Schlesinger, a certified financial planner. Schlesinger shares how to avoid the "dumb things" people do with money. Also, Haiti is now under one-man rule after its Parliament dissolved earlier this month — a result of failed elections last October. Host Tonya Mosley speaks to Jacqueline Charles of the Miami Herald.
Jan 27, 2020
Trump Floats Entitlement Cuts; Wetlands Protection Rollbacks
2542
Trump floated possible budget cuts to social programs in an interview at the World Economic Forum in Davos this week. NPR's Jim Zarroli discusses the implications of those statements and what cuts to benefit programs, including Social Security, would mean. And, the Trump administration is rolling back federal protections for the nation's waterways, which could have a huge impact on more than half of the nation's wetlands.
Jan 24, 2020
Inside A U.S. Clothing Factory; Protests Against American Troops In Iraq
2581
More than 95% of all American apparel is made overseas before it is sold in the U.S. As consumers demand more accountability, that number is starting to slowly change. But making clothes in America is still hard work. We go inside a Massachusetts factory to see how it's done. Also, thousands rallied in Iraq Friday to demand that U.S. troops leave the country. We get the latest from NPR's Jane Arraf in Baghdad.
Jan 24, 2020
Election Security Ahead Of 2020; New Hampshire Primary Poll
2499
Election security experts say a wider range of aggressors could interfere in the 2020 election. NPR election security editor Phil Ewing joins us to discuss how federal and state governments are working to combat election interference. And, a new poll shows Bernie Sanders peaking ahead of the New Hampshire primary. WBUR's Anthony Brooks reports.
Jan 23, 2020
Vietnam War Movie 'The Last Full Measure'; Primaries Primer
2602
The new film "The Last Full Measure" tells the story of the effort to upgrade the posthumous honors awarded to U.S. Air Force pararescue medic William Pitsenbarger to the Congressional Medal of Honor. Also, you may have questions about how preliminary elections work. What's the difference between primaries and caucuses? What's Super Tuesday? We discuss.
Jan 23, 2020
Counting Calories To Lose Weight; Coronavirus Impacts Airlines
2546
What if we've got it all wrong, and counting calories is not the way to lose weight? That could be the case and according to one Economist writer, "it's time to bury the world's most misleading measure." Also, as the number of deaths from the coronavirus in China rises to 17, the new outbreak is impacting airline travel.
Jan 22, 2020
Watching The Impeachment Trial In Person; Fish Recipes For Winter
2584
Members of the public can watch the impeachment trial of President Trump in person if they are able to get tickets from their senator. Host Robin Young talks to Mary Finn and Aidan Hollinger-Miles, who received tickets to watch the first day of the trial from the office of Oregon Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley. Also, chef Kathy Gunst shares three fish dishes that use smoked, frozen and canned fish.
Jan 22, 2020
Social Mobility Better In Canada; Media Access To Impeachment Trial
2548
The World Economic Forum published a new report on social mobility that ranks countries on how easy it is for a person born to a poor family to reach the middle class. Also, the media is pushing back against restrictions on covering the Senate impeachment trial. What does limited access for reporters mean for the public? We talk to NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik.
Jan 21, 2020
2020 Census Starts In Remote Alaskan Villages; VA Smoking Ban
2541
The 2020 U.S. census officially starts Tuesday in the remote villages of Alaska. NPR's census reporter, Hansi Lo Wang, is there and speaks with Robin Young about the day's events. Also, the recent smoking ban at all Veteran Administration medical facilities has been lauded for creating a healthier environment for veterans and federal employees. But the new smoke-free policy has been difficult for some veterans and staff, Stephanie Colombini of WUSF reports for the American Homefront Project.
Jan 21, 2020
Secular Spirituality And Education; Historic Carousel Ride
2559
What does spirituality look like in the classroom? Hundreds of educators, philanthropists and nonprofits recently convened at Columbia University Teachers College's "Spirituality in Education" conference to answer that question. Also, Sharon Langley was the first African American to ride the carousel at the Gwynn Oak Amusement Park in Maryland on the day the park was formally integrated. Langley has now co-written a new children's book about it.
Jan 20, 2020
Miscarrying During Australia Fires; Why Cannabis Stocks Fell
2590
Wildfires in Australia have killed at least 28 people and destroyed thousands of homes. Gemma Carey, a professor at the University of New South Wales, talks to us about having a miscarriage during the fires and whether she still wants to have children. Many cannabis companies saw their stock prices soar in the first few months of 2019, only to see their valuations collapse. We speak with Jeremy Berke, senior reporter for Business Insider.
Jan 20, 2020
Trump's Impeachment Legal Team; Bloomberg Outspends Rivals
2541
Ken Starr and Alan Dershowitz are set to join Trump's impeachment legal team. Barbara McQuade, former U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, joins us to discuss what this means for Trump's legal team. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has spent more on ads in his campaign for president than any of his rivals for the Democratic nomination. Ken Goldstein, a professor at the University of San Francisco, joins us to discuss.
Jan 17, 2020
What It Takes To Make Clothes In The USA; Richmond Gun Rally Concerns
2514
More than 95% of clothing sold in the U.S. is imported. But there are signs that "Made in America" is making a comeback. Host Peter O'Dowd takes a closer look. Also, Virginia's governor has declared a state of emergency in anticipation of a gun rights rally planned in Richmond on Monday. The rally has attracted the attention of militia and extremist groups.
Jan 17, 2020
Disability Policy In 2020 Democratic Primary; Technology And Kindness
2529
Where do the 2020 Democratic candidates stand on disability rights? We talk with the director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress about the major disability policies being discussed this election season. Also, technology and the web can be used to foster empathy, community and even spirituality. As part of our series on secular spirituality, Standford professor Jamil Zaki joins us to discuss the technology of kindness.
Jan 16, 2020
California Gov. Newsom On Homelessness Plan; Illinois' Pot Shortage
2516
California Gov. Gavin Newsom talks to us about his plan to address the state's growing homeless population and housing crisis. He has proposed a $1 billion plan. Also, Illinois residents bought nearly $11 million worth of recreational marijuana in the first five days after it became legal. WBEZ's Mariah Woelfel reports the demand sent dispensaries into a frenzy.
Jan 16, 2020
New Evidence In Impeachment Investigation; Sonos Sues Google
2516
As the House plans to transmit the articles of impeachment against Trump to the Senate, new evidence has surfaced from Lev Parnas, an associate of Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani. Also, Sonos is suing Google, alleging the company stole its intellectual property to develop its own smart speakers. Their case is the latest front in a growing battle for oxygen in a business increasingly dominated by tech giants.
Jan 15, 2020
Great Migration Book; New Hampshire Voters On Democratic Debate
2529
Here & Now's Tonya Mosley speaks with Blair Imani, author of the new illustrated history "Making Our Way Home: The Great Migration and the Black American Dream." The book tells the story of the migration of millions of African Americans to the northern states. And, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with three Democratic voters in Concord, New Hampshire, about last night's Democratic presidential debate.
Jan 15, 2020
'Amazon' Warrior Women; Americans Help Fight Australia Fires
2511
For centuries, scholars assumed that Greek myths about fierce warrior women they called "Amazons" were just that — myths. But new archeology confirms what modern historians like Adrienne Mayor had begun to suspect: Amazons were real, and they were actually Scythian nomads. Also, dozens of Americans have gone to Australia to help battle the wildfires scorching the country. Michelle Moore, a fire program specialist with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, recently returned from work with an aerial fire crew.
Jan 14, 2020
The Swing Voter We Don't Talk About; U.S. Travel Restrictions To Cuba
2502
What if we thought about swing voters not as Democratic to Republican transplants but as voters who stick with one party — or don't vote at all? Ibram Kendi argues in The Atlantic that we should look at young voters, voters of color and especially young voters of color as "the other swing voters" who could make or break a candidate's fortune, but are rarely central to the political conversation. Also, after banning all commercial airline flights to Cuba's provinces, the Trump administration says it's now stopping charter flights.
Jan 14, 2020
Spirituality Without God; Making Smart Financial Decisions In 2020
2493
What does it mean to be spiritual outside the confines of religion? This week, we'll explore that trend. We talk to Krista Tippett, creator and host of the public radio show "On Being." Also, with the near year upon us, Americans have a lot of money decisions to make. We check in with personal finance expert Jill Schlesinger about financial risks and making smart financial decisions.
Jan 13, 2020
Dangers Of Sugar; Overestimating Immigrants' Use Of Public Assistance
2508
Nutrition experts are increasingly sounding the alarm on sugar, with some comparing its adverse health effects to smoking. Host Robin Young speaks with Dr. Robert Lustig about the dangers of sugar. Also, new research from Harvard University looks at perceptions of immigrants and finds that across the U.S. and Europe, people generally overestimate the share of immigrants who are unemployed and on public assistance. We talk with Derek Thompson, senior editor at The Atlantic.
Jan 13, 2020
Puerto Rico Earthquake Recovery; An Oregon Rancher's Wolf Fence
2561
A series of earthquakes has left much of Puerto Rico without power as government authorities still struggle to provide recovery years after hurricanes ravaged the island. Also, one cattle rancher in Oregon has lost eight cows and two dogs to a pack of wolves over the last few years. Now he's putting up a fence to keep them out, and he's even teamed up with the environmentalists that he often clashes with. Jes Burns has the story.
Jan 10, 2020
Bryan Stevenson On 'Just Mercy'; Amazon Vs. FedEx
2550
The new film, "Just Mercy," tells the story of an American lawyer's need for hope in the pursuit of justice. It's based on the real life of Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, and he joins us to discuss the new movie. And, Amazon has blocked third-party sellers from using FedEx for deliveries, which one New York University professor says could spell the end of FedEx. Scott Galloway joins us to discuss.
Jan 10, 2020
Mother Of American Prisoner In Iran; Australia's Fires Raise Health Concerns
2543
Joanne White has been anxiously watching the crisis in Iran, wondering what it means for her son. Michael White, a navy veteran, was arrested in 2018 in Iran and later sentenced to 10 years in prison on charges of insulting the country's leader and posting a private photo online. Also, doctors are warning that the fires in Australia are having serious impacts on public health. One cardiologist in Canberra, Australia, explains.
Jan 09, 2020
Study Links Social Media To Teen Anxiety, Depression; Remembering Kay Evans
2558
A new study found that social media use, television viewing and computer use over a four-year period predicted more severe symptoms of anxiety and depression among adolescents. We talk with study author Patricia Conrod about the research. Also, host Jeremy Hobson remembers his friend Kay Evans, who took care of him when he was a little kid growing up in Urbana, Illinois. Evans died last week at the age of 77 after a battle with cancer.
Jan 09, 2020
Cancer Death Rates Fall; Plane Crash In Iran Kills All Aboard
2503
A new study by the American Cancer Society shows a 29% decrease in cancer deaths between 1991 and 2017. The study's lead author joins us to discuss. Also, a Ukrainian plane bound for Kyiv crashed shortly after taking off in Tehran, Iran, killing all on board. The crash happened hours after Iran launched a missile strike against U.S. interests in Iraq.
Jan 08, 2020
Australia Fires Highlight Coal's Role In Climate Crisis; Philadelphia's Juvenile Justice Reforms
2519
The devastating fire season in Australia is highlighting how climate change is speeding up the spread of fires and how coal has had a part to play in this. We speak with Ian Dunlop, former chair of the Australian Coal Association, who now focuses on advocating for urgent action on climate change. Also, in Philadelphia, a shift from arresting students for minor offenses to offering diversion programs is being looked at as a model for other cities. YR Media's Zari Tarazona reports.
Jan 08, 2020
California Firefighters Head To Australia; Layoffs At Pier 1 Imports
2571
A group of 20 seasoned California firefighters, many of who battled the Saddleridge Fire in Southern California, left on Monday night to help fight the fires in Australia. Fire Chief Robert Garcia discusses this global firefighting effort. Also, Pier 1 Imports announced it's closing about 450 stores and laying off about 40% of its headquarters staff. MSNBC's Ali Velshi reports.
Jan 07, 2020
Facebook Bans Deepfake Videos But Disinformation Remains Rampant Online
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The move comes as the company is under increasing pressure to crack down on disinformation ahead of the 2020 election.
Jan 07, 2020
Significance Of Iran's Cultural Sites; Facebook Bans Deepfakes
2566
Trump's warned of bombing Iranian cultural sites, though U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper says the U.S. military does not plan to do so. We talk with a professor of Islamic Art and Architecture at Yale University about the significance of these historic sites. Also, Facebook says it's banning deepfakes, or videos manipulated with the intention to mislead. The move has already drawn criticism for not going far enough to combat the spread of disinformation.
Jan 07, 2020
'Life-Changing' Brain Implants; Australia's Wildlife Impacted By Fires
2508
It's estimated that nearly half a billion animals have been killed in the fires in Australia since September. But the researcher who came up with that figure says the situation could turn much worse as fires there continue to burn. We talk with an ecologist at the University of Sydney. Also, some patients have had success treating movement disorders like Parkinson's disease with neurostimulators — devices implanted in the brain during a procedure called deep brain stimulation surgery. Chemistry and biology teacher Cheryl Sansone had the surgery in 2015 and describes ...
Jan 06, 2020
Former U.S. Defense Secretary On Iran; Why We're So Busy
2518
Chuck Hagel, former Obama administration Defense Secretary and former Republican senator to Nebraska, speaks with us about developments in the confrontation with Iran. Also, has technology saved us time? The Atlantic's Derek Thompson asks why everyone is so busy, despite the proliferation of technologies meant to make our lives easier.
Jan 06, 2020
Racial Bias In Prescribing Opioids; New Policy On Flavored Vaping
2519
A new analysis concludes an estimated 14,000 black Americans would have died from the opioid crisis had they been prescribed the drugs at the same rate as their white counterparts. Also, vaping product manufacturers have 30 days to take fruit-, candy- and mint-flavored vaping cartridges off the market. The Trump administration announced a partial and temporary ban on the sales of those products. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports.
Jan 03, 2020
State Minimum Wages Increase; Top Iranian General Killed In U.S. Airstrike
2516
While the federal minimum wage has not changed in a decade, the minimum wage did increase in 21 states at the start of the new year. Four other states are also set to increase their baseline pay later this year. Also, the U.S. killing of the top Iranian general, Qassem Soleimani, in Baghdad is expected to have major repercussions. Here & Now security analyst Jim Walsh joins us to discuss.
Jan 03, 2020
Fairfax Students Can Skip School For Protests; World's 1st Synthetic Frog
2512
Students in cities nationwide have been skipping classes to attend protests. And for the first time, Fairfax School District announced that students will have one excused absence every year for a protest they want to attend starting January 21. Also, instead of real frogs, students at one high school in Florida dissected the world's first-ever SynDaver synthetic frog.
Jan 02, 2020
Mysteries Of Chronic Pain; Julián Castro Drops Out Of 2020 Race
2513
Nearly 50 million people in the U.S. live with chronic pain, which is when a person's pain lasts longer than three months. National Geographic contributing writer Yudhijit Bhattacharjee joins us to discuss his reporting on the latest in pain research. And, Texas Democrat Julián Castro dropped out of the 2020 presidential race on Thursday. NPR's Scott Detrow joins us to discuss the latest from the campaign trail.
Jan 02, 2020
Justice Roberts In Impeachment Trial; 2020 Travel Trips
2534
The timing of the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump is still up in the air, but one thing is certain: Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts will be presiding over the trial. CNN legal analyst Joan Biskupic joins us to discuss the role and other areas of the trial. And, Here & Now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan shares his tips for travel in the new year. He says stay away from Japan in summer, but you might want to consider Canada or Hawaii.
Jan 01, 2020
2020 National Security Challenges; Vegan Pilot
2528
Expressing deep frustration over stalled nuclear talks, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is warning today of unspecified "shocking" action. Here & Now security analyst Jim Walsh with MIT's Security Studies Program joins us to discuss. And, pilot Matthew Ayers knows how difficult it can be to eat healthy on the road, especially for vegan travelers. He hosts a website called the Vegan Pilot where he gives tips to vegan and vegetarian travelers.
Jan 01, 2020
U.S. Population Growth Slows; 'Hair' 40th Anniversary
2583
New Census numbers show the U.S. population is growing at its slowest pace in decades. William Frey, a demographer and senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, joins us to discuss why. And, the cast of "Hair" got together for a reunion in New York earlier this year to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the film. The movie was first a hit Broadway musical that debuted in 1968.
Dec 31, 2019
2020 Economic Outlook; Former Obama Speechwriter Embraces Judaism
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The S&P 500, Nasdaq and Dow all reached record highs in 2019. Grant Thornton Chief Economist Diane Swonk joins us to discuss the state of the economy and whether strong U.S. markets will continue into 2020. A former speechwriter for Michelle and Barack Obama recently dove back into centuries of Jewish texts that gave her a new moral compass. Sarah Hurwitz joins us to discuss the experience, which she wrote about in her new book, "Here All Along."
Dec 30, 2019
Environmental Impact Of Touring; Best Films Of 2019
2558
The rock band Coldplay recently announced it will pause touring because of environmental reasons. Another British band, Massive Attack, has teamed up with the University of Manchester's Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research to look at how to limit carbon emissions on tour. We speak with Tyndall's director, Carly McLaughlan. Also, host Robin Young speaks with Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr about his picks for best films of 2019, topped by the French film "Portrait of a Lady On Fire."
Dec 30, 2019
Deaf DJ Feels The Beat; What 'Blue Zones' Can Teach Us About Health
2502
Although he can't hear, Nico DiMarco has always loved music and feeling the vibrations through his body. DiMarco is now a popular DJ with a large following. Mikaela Lefrak of WAMU reports. Also, as the start of 2020 nears, many of us are thinking about New Year's resolutions. One of the most common is to get healthier. People living in "Blue Zones," some of the oldest groups of people in the world, have a particular approach to living a long and happy life. Host Peter O'Dowd speaks with Dan Buettner.
Dec 27, 2019
Year In Climate Change; FDA Raises Smoking Age To 21
2465
Climate change-linked floods, storms and wildfires battered countries across the world in 2019. Environmental journalist Zoe Schlanger joins us to talk about how climate change affected us this year. Also, the FDA has officially raised the legal age of purchase for all tobacco products from 18 to 21. The new regulation was part of a spending package Trump signed. We talk to Jeffrey Hardesty of Johns Hopkins University about the change.
Dec 27, 2019
Farmers Fight Climate Change With Biochar; Bringing '1917' To Life
2595
Biochar is made from natural materials such as straw and shells, and it can sequester carbon. Jon Kalish reports on New England entrepreneurs, farmers and gardeners turning to biochar to improve soil. Also, host Peter O'Dowd speaks with cinematographer Roger Deakins and editor Lee Smith about their work in the new film "1917."
Dec 26, 2019
Science Stories Of The Decade; Housing Affordability Crisis
2592
The first clear image of a black hole and a revolutionary method for modifying genes were among the top advancements in science in this decade. NPR science correspondent Joe Palca reviews the top science stories. Also, the median home price in Santa Fe, New Mexico, hit a record high last year. The state is one of many places in the country facing a growing crisis of housing affordability.
Dec 26, 2019
Americans Are Driving Less; Best Foods Of 2019
2617
The American Public Transportation Associated clocked a 2.2% national increase in public ridership for the third quarter of 2019. We discuss why more Americans are choosing public transportation, despite the fact that the economy is strong. Also, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst talks about her standout foods (and one organizational tool) of the year.
Dec 25, 2019
Tanesha Bannister's 1st Christmas Out Of Prison; What Makes People Happy
2569
This holiday season marks Tanesha Bannister's first Christmas with her family in 16 years. In 2004, Bannister received a life sentence for conspiring to sell crack and cocaine. Her second chance came this year when she was freed along with some 3,000 former federal inmates under the First Step Act. Also, new research looks at available data to find what makes people happy around the world, and what life events tend to have the biggest impact on overall happiness.
Dec 25, 2019
Trump Criticizes Environmental Regulations; Top Songs Of The Decade
2548
President Trump railed against wind turbines and other environmental regulations over the weekend. We take a look at his attacks with Washington Post reporter Toluse Olorunnipa. And, Billboard's senior director of charts Gary Trust joins us to discuss the top songs of the decade from Maroon 5 to Bruno Mars.
Dec 24, 2019
Elf School In Iceland; Poverty Rate Increase In U.S. Counties
2541
Surveys in Iceland show most of the country's residents believe elves exist. Yes, elves. Host Robin Young visits Reykjavik's The Elf School to find out more about the country's "Hidden People." Also, the poverty rate across all counties in the U.S. fell from 2016 to 2018. But the numbers aren't evenly distributed. One-third of counties saw the rate of poverty increase.
Dec 24, 2019
Baking Icelandic Lava Bread; A Jolly Good Year For Christmas Tree Farmers
2473
Iceland's lava bread is a sweet rye loaf baked in metal pots that are buried in volcanic sand. Here & Now visited a baker to learn how the bread is baked. Also, Chal Landgren, a Christmas tree expert, tells us why 2019 has been a particularly good year for Christmas tree growers, and he answers other questions related to the holiday tradition.
Dec 23, 2019
North Korea Warns Of 'Christmas Gift'; Christmas A Cappella
2588
A new satellite image of a factory where North Korea makes military equipment has renewed concern that Kim Jong Un could launch a rocket or missile test in the coming days. Host Robin Young talks with Joel Wit, senior fellow at the Henry Stimson Center, about how such a test could further damage stalled nuclear talks with the U.S. Also, host Robin Young's high school choir director Ron Cohen joins us to share some of his favorite Christmas a cappella tunes.
Dec 23, 2019
Georgia Reinstates Voters After Massive Purge; Generation Z Voters
2577
Georgia's secretary of state reinstated 22,000 of the more than 300,000 voters who were purged from the rolls earlier this week. Voting rights organization Fair Fight sued to block the purge and fighting for 100,000 more voters to be reinstated. Reporter Emil Moffatt of WABE in Atlanta joins us for the latest. And, one in 10 eligible voters in the 2020 election with be part of Generation Z. Here & Now talks with three young California voters about what matters to them in the upcoming election.
Dec 20, 2019
12 Trump Judicial Nominees Confirmed; Meals On Wheels Funding
2581
The Senate confirmed 12 of President Trump's judicial nominees on Thursday. According to Slate's Mark Joseph Stern, Trump has now appointed nearly one-fifth of all district court judges. Also, Meals On Wheels helps millions of seniors who are food insecure. But the program is serving 21 million fewer meals than in 2005 because of relatively flat funding from Congress. We speak with the Meals on Wheels America CEO.
Dec 20, 2019
Protecting Packages From Porch Theft; Gaby Moreno Talks '¡Spangled!'
2511
Nearly 2 million packages are stolen or go missing every day across the country, according to an analysis by The New York Times. The Denver Police Department started tracking package theft since 2015 and has seen a 68% uptick in reported thefts. We talk with Denver Police Officer Bob Anderson about what we can do this holiday season to avoid getting packages stolen. Also, we speak with singer-songwriter Gaby Moreno about her new album, "¡Spangled!."
Dec 19, 2019
Increased Subway Policing In NYC; 'Bombshell' The Movie
2563
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority in New York City has approved a plan to hire 500 additional transit officers to patrol the city's subways. Protests against increased police presence in the subway began in early November. Also, "Bombshell" tells the story of the sexual harassment scandal that brought down Roger Ailes, the late CEO of Fox News. We speak with the movie's screenwriter.
Dec 19, 2019
Independent Bookstore Takes On Amazon; The Bakersfield Sound
2567
Amazon has opened a brick-and-mortar bookstore across the street from one of Nashville's beloved independent bookstores. But co-owner of Parnassus Books Ann Patchett says her bookstore is here to stay, Rachel Iacovone of WPLN reports. Also, Bakersfield, California, is known as Nashville West. The city has a rich country music history, and a massive new box set documents that legacy. We talk with the author of the book "The Bakersfield Sound."
Dec 18, 2019
Chicago's The Second City Turns 60; .Org Domain Sale Fight
2557
Monday marked 60 years in business for Chicago's legendary comedy institution, The Second City. The improvisational comedy enterprise calls itself the world's premier comedy club, comedy theater and school of improvisation. Also, the nonprofit that manages internet domain names ending in ".org" has hit pause on a controversial decision to sell itself to the private equity fund. We get the latest.
Dec 18, 2019
Going Green In The Kitchen; Wyoming Buffalo Restoration
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Here & Now's resident chef Kathy Gunst's resolution for 2020 is to reduce plastic and overall waste in the kitchen. She joins us with some items that can help other cooks who might want to do the same. Also, for over a century, there was no buffalo herd for the Northern Arapaho tribe in Wyoming. A new restoration project has brought buffalo back but some tribal ranchers are concerned about them.
Dec 17, 2019
Decline Of The Death Penalty; Hairstylists Learn To Detect Melanoma
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A report released Tuesday highlights a continuing decline in the use of the death penalty. Host Tonya Mosely speaks with the lead author of the report. Also, hairstylists can be lifesavers in early melanoma detection. We talk with a former hairstylist and a dermatologist about the important role hairstylists play in detecting skin cancer.
Dec 17, 2019
Ghana's 'Year Of Return'; Silicon Valley Tax Loopholes
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The president of Ghana has called 2019 the "Year of Return." The year-long campaign has welcomed members of the African diaspora to Ghana to reconnect with their roots and invest in the country. Also, loopholes allowed six of the biggest Silicon Valley companies to avoid paying billions in taxes since 2010, according to an analysis by the British group Fair Tax Mark.
Dec 16, 2019
'My Dad Wrote A Porno' Podcast; Marketing Infant Formula To Black Women
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The British comedy podcast "My Dad Wrote A Porno" has been downloaded more than 200 million times. We talk with its three co-hosts about "Belinda Blinked," the amateur erotic novel that host Jamie Morton's dad wrote. Also, host Tonya Mosley speaks with Andrea Freeman — whose book "Skimmed: Breastfeeding, Race, and Injustice" looks at how infant formula was marketed to African American women in the late 20th century.
Dec 16, 2019
Tucson Elects 1st Latina Mayor; Access To Tongass National Forest
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History was made this month in Tucson, Arizona, when Regina Romero was sworn in as mayor. She's the city's first woman and the first Latina mayor. Host Peter O'Dowd talks to her about her plans to address immigration issues in Tucson. Also, the Trump administration is proposing to loosen rules protecting the Tongass National Forest by allowing new road building that will likely lead to logging the Tongass. The Pulitzer Center sent Daniel Grossman to Prince of Wales Island in Alaska to talk to residents there.
Dec 13, 2019
Soccer Star Megan Rapinoe; Kentucky Felon Voting Rights
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Sports Illustrated named soccer star Megan Rapinoe sportsperson of the year this week, making her only the fourth woman to receive the award. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd spoke with Rapinoe on the sidelines of the Massachusetts Conference for Women. And, Kentucky Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear joins us to discuss his decision to restore voting rights to some 140,000 non violent felons in the state.
Dec 13, 2019
UK Voters Decide Brexit's Fate; AG William Barr's Role
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It's election day in the U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson called the early election hoping the results will give him enough support to get his Brexit deal passed. We get the latest from NPR's Frank Langfitt in London. Also, Andrew Rice, contributing editor of New York Magazine, takes a deep look at Attorney General William Barr and his role in the Trump administration.
Dec 12, 2019
First Wave Of Black Flight Attendants; Da Vinci's Flying Machines
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Half a century ago, Sheila Nutt was part of the first wave of African American women Pan American World Airways hired as stewardesses. Host Lisa Mullins talks with Nutt, Newton resident and former Pan Am flight attendant. Also, this year marks the 500th anniversary of Leonardo da Vinci's death. Reporter Anna Bensted climbed windswept Monte Ceceri near Florence, Italy, to find the spot where the original Renaissance man is said to have tested his flying machines.
Dec 12, 2019
Best Cookbooks Of 2019; Icelandic Environmentalist On Climate Change
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Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst joins hosts Robin Young and Tonya Mosley with her list of favorite cookbooks of 2019. Also, scientists are armed with the facts about climate change, but too often they're not equipped with the words to express the gravity. That's where Andri Magnason, one of Iceland's premiere environmentalists, shines. Here & Now visited him and attended one of his performances.
Dec 11, 2019
Iceland Fishery Prioritizes Environmentalism; Afghanistan Papers
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One of Iceland's largest fisheries is proving it's possible to prioritize environmental friendly practices and remain profitable. Host Robin Young visited Brim Fisheries, one of Iceland's largest, to find out how they're doing it. And, Afghanistan veteran Jason Dempsey responds to The Washington Post's reporting that revealed the U.S. government lied to the American people about the war in Afghanistan.
Dec 11, 2019
Turning CO2 To Rock In Iceland; Emotional Learning In School
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In Iceland, scientists are using new technology to capture carbon emissions and inject them into basalt deposits. Some scientists are calling it a potential solution to the global climate crisis. Also, the Millennium School in San Francisco not only emphasizes subjects like math and language arts, but also students' emotional well-being. David Freudberg of Humankind reports.
Dec 10, 2019
Iceland's Melting Glaciers; A Historical Look At Impeachment
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Our climate change series from Iceland begins with a look at the connection between tourism and the climate crisis. A tourism boom on the island nation has increased carbon emissions and environmental degradation. Also, House investigators unveiled articles of impeachment against Trump, charging the president with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Historian Julian Zelizer joins us to talk about this moment in history.
Dec 10, 2019
Dollar General Plans Expansion; Report On Russia Investigation
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Despite the hot economy, Dollar General continues to thrive due to a loyal customer base and an expansion strategy focused on rural areas that lack other retail options. We're joined by Jill Schlesinger, a business analyst for CBS News. Also, a report is expected to be released on Monday about the origin of the Russia investigation into the Trump administration. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with NPR's Ryan Lucas.
Dec 09, 2019
Remembering Caroll Spinney; How To Be An Adult Classes
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Puppeteer Caroll Spinney died Sunday at the age of 85. For almost half a century Spinney played both Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch on "Sesame Street." We revisit Robin Young's conversation with Spinney from 2003. Also, many young people are going to college without the basic tools to be an adult. Now, some schools are offering "adulting" classes to fill the gap. Kansas News Service's Stephan Bisaha reports.
Dec 09, 2019
Hemp's First Year; The Jeremy Corbyn Phenomenon
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It's been nearly one year since Trump signed the 2018 farm bill, making it legal to grow industrial hemp in the U.S. for the first time in more than 50 years. Also, with just under a week to the U.K. elections, Jeremy Corbyn's Labour party falls short in the polls behind Boris Johnson's Conservatives. Corbyn is the most unpopular opposition leader since the 1970s. Why despite the popularity of his ideas? We speak with a professor of British politics.
Dec 06, 2019
History Of Gentrification; Remembering Teen Transit Advocate Alejandra Agredo
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Gentrification has touched almost every major city in the U.S., often arriving hand-in-hand with the displacement of longtime residents. We speak with WNYC's Matthew Schuerman, author of "Newcomers: Gentrification And Its Discontents" about the history of gentrification and the role that race plays. Also, in Miami, public transit activists are remembering a leading young voice to their cause who tragically ended her own life last week after stepping in front of a train. Founder of the nonprofit Miani Riders Alliance, Alejandra Agredo was only 17. We speak with the ...
Dec 06, 2019
A Budget-Friendly Holiday Meal; Utah's Affordable Housing Crisis
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If you're hosting a party this holiday season, Chef Kathy Gunst recommends impressing your guests with a festive meal of white bean and herb dip, lasagna and Prosecco poached pears with cranberries. This meal is totally satisfying, fully celebratory — and won't cost you an arm and a leg. Also, across the country, home prices are rising faster than the rate of wage growth. Utah is considering a plan to help people pay their rent, as the cost of housing in that state soars.
Dec 05, 2019
Pelosi Directs Impeachment Articles; Eddie Redmayne In 'The Aeronauts'
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced on Thursday that Democrats would begin drafting articles of impeachment against President Trump. NPR's Tim Mak joins us for the latest on what this means and the White House response. And, Oscar-winning actor Eddie Redmayne talks about his new film, "The Aeronauts," which tells the true story of scientist James Glaisher who in 1862 set out to break the altitude record in a gas balloon.
Dec 05, 2019
Trump Targets Trudeau At NATO; OxyContin Marketing Strategy
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Trump called Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau "two-faced" after the Canadian leader was caught on video seeming to make fun of Trump at the NATO summit. Jane Harman, president and CEO of the Wilson Center, joins us to discuss. And, new documents obtained by our partners at STAT show that Purdue Pharma employees expressed concern over the company's marketing strategy for OxyContin. For more, we're joined by STAT reporter Casey Ross.
Dec 04, 2019
State Of The U.S. Economy; Why Airlines Cancel Flights
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Stocks tumbled, then partially rebounded, this week after once-promising trade talks with China stalled. Strong holiday spending has buoyed the economy while other lackluster indicators portend an uncertain future. NPR's Scott Horsley takes a close look at the economy. Also, we talk to Here & Now's transportation analyst Seth Kaplan about the "tarmac rule," a regulation that has unintentionally led to an increased number of flight cancellations.
Dec 04, 2019
Google Restricts Political Ads; Karamo Brown's 'I Am Perfectly Designed'
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Google is no longer allowing political campaigns to target specific people with their ads ahead of the 2020 election. For more on the change, we're joined by Vox reporter Emily Stewart. And, Queer Eye's Karamo Brown is kicking off a holiday fundraiser aimed at increasing access to diverse children's books. He joins us to discuss the program and his new children's book that he co-authored with his son, "I Am Perfectly Designed."
Dec 03, 2019
Brett Kavanaugh's 'Supreme Ambition'; Environmental Cost Of Fast Fashion
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Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation was a bruising and dramatic partisan battle. In Ruth Marcus' new book, she describes how Kavanaugh ended up as the nominee when Justice Kennedy announced his retirement. Also, the rise of cheaply-produced clothing is adding to the global carbon footprint. About 60% of synthetic fabrics are made from fossil fuels.
Dec 03, 2019
The Perils Of Animals Caught In Storms; Trisha Yearwood's 'Every Girl'
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As storms disrupt travel plans for millions of Americans after Thanksgiving, we take a look at how our furry (and scaly) friends react to storms, natural disasters and climate change with Steve Rinella, host of the Netflix show "MeatEater." And, Grammy-winning country star Trisha Yearwood talks about her new album, "Every Girl."
Dec 02, 2019
Why Child Care Costs So Much; Rape Kit Testing Backlog
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American parents spend an average of $16,000 on child care annually, according to Brookings Institution research in 2017. We speak with The Atlantic's Derek Thompson about why child care costs are so high. Also, Washington state has vowed to speed up the testing of rape kit evidence. But after the testing, the backlog moves downstream to the police and courts. KUOW's Anna Boiko-Weyrauch has the report.
Dec 02, 2019
World Is Getting Windier; How Much Should You Spend On Holiday Shopping?
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The world is getting windier, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed decades of weather data and determined global wind speeds have risen dramatically over the past 10 years. The study says windfarm operators are likely to benefit from the uptick in wind speeds since faster wind means more efficient wind turbines. Also, host Jeremy Hobson talks to personal finance guru Jill Schlesinger about how much should you spend this holiday season and other personal finance tips.
Nov 29, 2019
Gardening Tips For Fall And Winter; Improving Care For Older Adults
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If you find yourself hanging around the house this holiday weekend, it might be a good time to catch up on chores around the garden. Host Jeremy Hobson gets some fall and winter garden tips from Debra Knapke, a garden consultant in Columbus, Ohio. Also, in 2018, people over 65 made about 20 million visits to hospital emergency rooms. But few medical professionals are trained to meet the needs of older adults. There are efforts to change that, Kathy Ritchie of KJZZ reports.
Nov 28, 2019
A Community Lends A Hand; Thanksgiving Visit To The Snow Geese
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Sometimes life takes unexpected turns. That was the case for Lynn Schutzman who, despite an abusive childhood, became a pharmacist and had a happy marriage. But a string of disasters left her on her own and homeless. Then, her community stepped in. Yasmin Amer of WBUR's Kind World reports. Also, we revisit host Robin Young's expedition to see the snow geese in Vermont with her late uncle Lachlan Maclachlan Field.
Nov 28, 2019
Thanksgiving Diet Culture; How To Spot Russian Trolls
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Diet culture starts to ramp up around Thanksgiving, bringing anxiety to not gain weight and change our habits in the new year. Here & Now's Tonya Mosley talks with author and fat studies scholar Virgie Tovar about the misogynistic and capitalist underpinnings of fatphobia and how to survive diet culture during the holidays. And, many of those inspirational messages you see during the holidays may be an attempt by Russia to sow discord among Americans ahead of the 2020 presidential elections. Darren Linvill and Patrick Warren, two associate professors at Clemson ...
Nov 27, 2019
Domestic Abuse And Technology; Composer Louise Farrenc's 3rd Symphony
2527
Domestic abusers are using in-home technology and smart-home apps to do everything from watching their victims to stopping and starting their cars. We talk with a researcher about the intersection between intimate partner violence and digital technology. Also, WQXR music writer Fran Hoepfner joins host Robin Young to talk about the daring third symphony of Louise Farrenc — a 19th-century French composer who made her mark then but is little known now.
Nov 27, 2019
Airport USB Port Warning; Erin Morgenstern On 'The Starless Sea'
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As we gear up for holiday travel, cybersecurity experts advise us away from USB charging ports in airports and other public spaces, which could steal data from an unlocked device or even install malware. But Engin Kirda, professor of computer science at Northeastern University, says it's easy to take precautions. Also, host Robin Young speaks with Erin Morgenstern about her new novel "The Starless Sea." Morgenstern is also the best selling author of "The Night Circus."
Nov 26, 2019
Journalist Anthony Shadid's Legacy; Storm Threatens Thanksgiving Travel
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Two time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Anthony Shadid was perhaps the most admired of his day. He died of a fatal asthma attack in the middle of the Syrian Civil War. Now, journalist Rami Khouri is teaching a course on the writings of Shadid at Harvard. Also, a snow system the Weather Channel has dubbed "Winter Storm Dorothy" has already dumped a foot of snow on the Rocky Mountains and is heading East.
Nov 26, 2019
Phasing Out Coal In Germany; Thanksgiving Questions Answered
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We asked for your toughest Thanksgiving questions. Now, resident Chef Kathy Gunst is back with delicious tips, tricks and dairy-free recipes for the upcoming holiday. Also, Germany is one of the world's largest coal consumers. There's an effort to close the country's coal-fired power plants as part of a goal to be emissions neutral by 2050. Host Robin Young speaks with a German professor of energy and sustainability.
Nov 25, 2019
Democracy Wins In Hong Kong Election; History Of Violence Against Latinos
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Pro-democracy candidates won big in Sunday's election in Hong Kong. It was the first election since the wave of anti-Beijing protests began. NPR's Emily Feng joins us from Hong Kong with the latest. And, a recent FBI report found that violence against Latinos reached its highest rate in nearly a decade in 2018. We take a closer look at the history of violence against Latinos in America.
Nov 25, 2019
A$AP Rocky's Congressional Name Drop; Children Criminally Charged As Adults
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The name A$AP Rocky, a rapper whose real name is Rakim Mayers, was repeatedly mentioned in this week's public hearings in the House impeachment inquiry. Slate reporter Aaron Mak explains why. Also, In Mississippi, 5,000 children have been criminally charged as adults for crimes they've committed over the past 25 years. Three out of four of those children were black, according to reporting from Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX.
Nov 22, 2019
Black Violin's 'Take The Stairs;' Rhode Island Civil Death Law
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Florida duo Black Violin are out with a new album called "Take The Stairs." Kev Marcus and Wil B join Here & Now's Lisa Mullins to discuss the album and how their music embraces both hip-hop and classical music. And, inmates in Rhode Island are challenging the state's civil death law, which declares those serving life sentences as legally dead.
Nov 22, 2019
Black Voters Take Center Stage In Democratic Debate; Podcast On Prison Life
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Podcasts have opened up the world of prison life to the public. In Colorado, people serving time are producing one that tackles the complexity of life behind bars. Colorado Public Radio's Stephanie Wolf reports. Also, in Wednesday's Democratic debate, one of the key issues discussed and squabbled over by candidates was the party and their personal ability to connect with black voters. We look at the significance of securing the black vote in the 2020 election.
Nov 21, 2019
Colin Kaepernick Is A 'Victim,' Congressman Says; Crisis In Bolivia
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Georgia Rep. Hank Johnson told TMZ Sports this week that free-agent quarterback Colin Kaepernick is a "victim" and suggested that Congress could take action against the NFL because he doesn't have a job in the league. Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca weighs in on his comments. Also, in Bolivia, more than 30 people have died in clashes between supporters of former President Evo Morales and security forces since October's disputed elections. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with NPR's Philip Reeves about the crisis.
Nov 21, 2019
An Environmental Benefit Of Flying; Helping Kids Addicted To Vaping
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An op-ed in The New York Times on Wednesday argues tourism is essential to protecting many vulnerable habitats. We talk about that idea with Here & Now's transportation analyst Seth Kaplan. Also, some cities and states have taken steps to ban flavored vaping products that are popular with children. But the policies don't directly help children who are already addicted. One school district in Fairfax County, Virginia is trying to address that issue, WAMU's Kavitha Cardoza reports.
Nov 20, 2019
Apollo 12 Anniversary; Treatment For Dwarfism
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Fifty years ago this week, Apollo 12 landed on the surface of the moon. But it seems this moon mission is overshadowed by the more famous Apollo 11 and Apollo 13 landings. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports. Also, researchers at BioMarin Pharmaceutical have created a controversial drug that helps regulate bone development in children with the most common type of dwarfism. But some argue it's a profit-driven solution in search of a problem.
Nov 20, 2019
Apple Removes Vaping Apps; Gannett And GateHouse Media Merge
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Apple has taken down nearly 200 apps related to vaping, citing "a public health crisis and a youth epidemic." The move raises questions about how Apple decides what is allowed in the App Store, and what is not. Host Tonya Mosley talks with Kara Swisher, editor-at-large at Recode. Also, Gannett and GateHouse Media have agreed to merge in a deal aimed at cutting costs and pursuing a digital transformation. We talk with media analyst John Carroll about the new deal.
Nov 19, 2019
Shooter Training At School; The Story Of The Unknown Soldier
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Now that school shootings are a common occurrence in the U.S., schools are training students on how to respond. One of the first lessons of the year at a school in Northern Colorado focused on three actions: evacuate, barricade, and fight. Leigh Paterson reports. Also, after World War I, nations that had lost millions of soldiers were looking for a way to honor those dead. They found a simple concept: The remains of one unidentified soldier, buried with honor, to recognize the sacrifice of the many. Here & Now's ...
Nov 19, 2019
Coral Reef Bleaching In Hawaii; Dog Aging Project
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Record-breaking temperatures in Hawaii this past summer may lead to unprecedented coral bleaching. It's caused by changes in water temperature, light or nutrients and it can kill coral. Scientists on an island in Oahu are taking underwater photos to create a one-of-a-kind, time-lapsed documentation of bleaching. And, the Dog Aging Project is seeking canine participants in what could be the largest study on aging ever conducted. The goal is to discover more about human aging by studying dogs, which share many of the same genetic markers with humans.
Nov 18, 2019
Marching With The Emperor Penguins; Opioid Treatment In Jails
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Wildlife filmmaker Lindsay McCrae spent time filming emperor penguins raising chicks in Antarctica. He talks with us about his new book, "My Penguin Year: Life Among the Emperors," which chronicles his experience. Also, the barriers to offering drug-based treatment for opioid abuse in jails are two-fold: There aren't enough prescribing doctors and opioids can be abused in jail. But KUOW's Amy Radil reports a program in Washington state has created a pilot to address these issues. So far, it's working.
Nov 18, 2019
How Mercenaries Are Used; German Far-Right Extremism
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Private military contractors have been involved in modern conflicts from the Middle East to Africa. A former military contractor explains how mercenaries are used and what impact they can have on warfare. Also, Germany is looking for ways to stop the rise of far-right extremism. A member of the German Parliament responds.
Nov 15, 2019
1st Week Of Public Impeachment Hearings; Taylor Swift Controversy
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The former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch, is testifying on Capitol Hill Friday as part of the House impeachment inquiry. ABC political director Rick Klein and "Washington Journal" host Jesse Holland discuss. And, Taylor Swift is accusing her former record company of blocking her from performing her old songs at the upcoming American Music Awards. The latest controversy involving the artist is highlighting what can happen when artists don't own the master rights to their songs.
Nov 15, 2019
New Prince Phillip Talks 'The Crown'; Ski Resorts Entice Workers
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Tobias Menzies takes over the role of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh in season three of the Netflix show "The Crown." We talk with him about the news season that premieres this Sunday. Also, there's already some snow on the ground in Vermont, which means the state is gearing up for ski season. Vermont Public Radio's Henry Epp reports that some resorts are offering generous benefits, even for entry-level positions like lift operators and parking attendants.
Nov 14, 2019
State Of Fur Industry; Impeachment Inquiry And U.S. Foreign Policy
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Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Kitty Block, CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, about the current state of the fur industry after Queen Elizabeth II vowed not to wear real fur anymore. Also, the impeachment hearings continue on Thursday with the testimony of former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch. Aaron David Miller, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, joins us to discuss what the hearings might reveal about U.S. foreign policy under President Trump.
Nov 14, 2019
Climate Change In Australia; U.S.'s Largest Dairy Producer Files For Bankruptcy
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In Australia, dozens of fires are burning out of control in New South Wales, the country's most populous state and the conditions have sparked a fresh debate among government leaders about the role of climate change. Also, dairy producer Dean Foods has filed for bankruptcy, citing challenges amid increasing consumer demand for plant-based milk alternatives. Journalist Dom DiFurio of the Dallas Morning News has the latest.
Nov 13, 2019
Trade War's Impact On Pennsylvania Farmers; The Next Big Radio Hits
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The agricultural industry is one of the hardest-hit sectors in the United States' trade war with China. Amid new hopes of a trade deal, Emily Pontecorvo reports on how Pennsylvania farmers are faring as they bring in their second harvest of the season. Also, KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez shares five artists he thinks will be huge in 2020.
Nov 13, 2019
Helping Asylum-Seekers At U.S.-Mexico Border; 'The Bakersfield Sound'
2527
An encampment in Matamoros, Mexico, is a stopping point for asylum-seekers who are waiting for a chance at legal entry into the United States. The conditions at the encampment are poor but a group of U.S. volunteers called Team Brownsville is crossing the border daily to help. Also, Bakersfield, California, has a rich country music history, and a massive new box set documents that legacy. Scott B. Bomar, author of "The Bakersfield Sound," joins us.
Nov 12, 2019
Judd Apatow On Garry Shandling; DREAMer On Supreme Court DACA Case
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The Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday on the Trump administration's decision to end DACA. The Obama-era policy gives young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally as children permission to live and work in the U.S. A DACA advocate explains the significance of the proceeding. Also, Judd Apatow has edited a collection of the late comedian Garry Shandling's work. We talk to him about "It's Garry Shandling's Book."
Nov 12, 2019
Kanye West's Gospel Crossover; China's Singles Day Retail Record
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Kanye West's new gospel album "Jesus Is King" is making history on the Billboard charts, but former music executive Naima Cochrane writes that West isn't the first hip-hop artist to go gospel. And, Chinese online retailer Alibaba recorded a record $31 billion in sales on Singles Day. The Chinese holiday was created by students in the 1990s as an alternative to Valentine's Day.
Nov 11, 2019
How To Be Resilient; A Look At Trump's 'Remain In Mexico' Policy
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Author Neil Pasricha says we live in the best time ever to be alive, but we're not resilient. He tells us how to handle failure and boost our creativity by taking "untouchable days." Also, more than 1,500 asylum seekers are living in tent cities close to the U.S.-Mexico border as they await their asylum cases to enter the U.S. Host Tonya Mosley talks to Amnesty International USA's executive director about the conditions there.
Nov 11, 2019
High Schoolers Talk Trump And 2020; Fed Meets On Climate Change
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What are high schoolers saying about the impeachment inquiry and the 2020 election? We hear from three new and soon-to-be voters at Putnam City High School in Oklahoma City. Also, for the first time ever, the Federal Reserve is meeting on climate change. The conference is already so overcrowded a special webcast has been set up to meet demand. We get the latest from Bloomberg's Mike Regan.
Nov 08, 2019
Berlin Wall's Legacy; Camp Fire Survivors Don't Want To Be Forgotten
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Thirty years ago Saturday, the Berlin Wall came down, leading to the reunification of East and West Germany. Host Peter O'Dowd reports. Also, one year after the deadly Camp Fire in northern California, Here & Now's Tonya Mosley reports from Paradise about the townspeople determined to rebuild their community.
Nov 08, 2019
One Mom's Path To Advocacy For Trans Son; Vegas Bans Homeless Camping
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At a young age, the child Mimi Lemay thought was her middle daughter was showing signs of depression and declaring "I am a boy." Her poignant new memoir tells the story of giving their 5-year-old child the choice to live as a boy. Also, the Las Vegas city council recently voted to approve a controversial ban on homeless camping. The rule means people cannot legally sleep on the streets in the downtown area if there are shelter beds available.
Nov 07, 2019
Detroit Students Sue Over Right To Literacy; 1 Year After Camp Fire
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Six students from Detroit's worst-performing public schools allege lack of books, classrooms without teachers and extreme temperatures deprived them of their right to access literacy in their public schools. We're joined by Jamarria Hall, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit filed against city officials. A year ago this Friday, the so-called Camp Fire ravaged the Northern California town of Paradise and claimed the lives of 85 people. Host Tonya Mosley is on the ground to bring us the stories of the people who have left and those who still ...
Nov 07, 2019
Dallas' Dark KKK History; Squash Your Brussels Sprouts Doubt
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Historian Michael Phillips at Collin College outside of Dallas recalls a period in the city's history when the Ku Klux Klan dominated civic life. He says it was a dark chapter that Dallas has never fully examined. Also, 'tis the season for Brussels sprouts. They are highly adaptable — perfect to sautée, fry, roast, pickle, or thinly slice and eat raw in salads. Chef Kathy Gunst shares three recipes that show their range.
Nov 06, 2019
Protecting Birds From Cats; Mississippi's 4th Graders Make History
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For decades, bird and cat organizations have struggled to protect birds and other wildlife from cats that freely roam outside. In Portland, OPB reporter Monica Samayoa tells us how a unique partnership created a new movement that's taken off nationwide. Also, the National Assessment of Educational Progress results are in, and one bright spot in the data is Mississippi. We talk with an education reporter about a controversial state law for third graders that might explain the gains in fourth grade reading.
Nov 06, 2019
Hundreds Of Oklahoma Inmates Freed; Apollonia Poilâne's New Cookbook
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When Apollonia Poilâne was 18 years old, she took over her father's world-renowned bakery within hours of learning he and her mother were killed in a helicopter accident. Poilâne joins us to discuss her new cookbook and legacy. And, hundreds of inmates in Oklahoma were freed Monday morning in the country's largest single-day commutation. Steve Bickley, executive director of the state's Pardon and Parole Board, joins us to discuss the release.
Nov 05, 2019
Meet Billie Eilish's Brother; Restaurants Sour On GrubHub, Uber Eats
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Finneas O'Connell has produced all of his sister Billie Eilish's music. Now fresh of his first solo tour, he talks with us about synesthesia, his need for control and what it feels like to step out on his own. Also, there are reports that some restaurant owners are growing resentful of the fees companies like GrubHub and Uber Eats charge them to list and deliver their food to customers.
Nov 05, 2019
Impeachment Inquiry Latest; Prince Memoir 'The Beautiful Ones'
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Four White House officials declined to appear for closed-door depositions on Capitol Hill Monday in the impeachment inquiry. Among them is John Eisenberg, the top lawyer on the National Security Council. NPR's Ayesha Rascoe joins us to discuss the latest from Washington. And, author Dan Piepenbring talks about working with Prince on the musician's memoir, "The Beautiful Ones." Piepenbring finished the book from archival material and Prince's writings after the rock star's death in 2016.
Nov 04, 2019
Florida Ex-Felon Voting Rights; Nick Offerman Is Not Ron Swanson
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In June, Florida enacted a law that requires all former felons to pay their fines and fees to be eligible to vote. We speak with a former felon in Florida who is fighting for his voting rights. Also, Nick Offerman is not Ron Swanson — but he is a comedian actor, musician and carpenter. Host Jeremy Hobson talks with Offerman about his touring stand-up show "All Rise.
Nov 04, 2019
Maria Fire Engulfs Ventura County, California; Brits Flee To Germany After Brexit
2615
Another brush fire in Southern California has engulfed more than 8,000 acres in Ventura County. The Maria Fire is the second major fire to ignite in the county this week. For more on the firefighting efforts, we're joined by Lance Orozco, news director at KCLU. And, thousands of Brits fled to Germany after the 2016 Brexit referendum. Now, they are racing to obtain citizenship before a deal goes through. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports from Berlin.
Nov 01, 2019
'Thoughts And Prayers' Author; In-Studio With BBC's Rob Watson
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Alissa Quart, author of "Thoughts and Prayers", talks about how to recover the true meaning of words that we use again and again in the news and in our culture. Also, BBC political correspondent Rob Watson has been a frequent guest on Here & Now since the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union in 2016. He's become a familiar voice to our listeners, but he and host Jeremy Hobson had never met in person — until now.
Nov 01, 2019
Halloween Spending Averages $86 Per Person; Celebrating The Theremin
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People spent $86 on average for Halloween this year, including for their dogs. We talk to Full Disclosure host Roben Farzad about how Halloween became such a staple of consumer — and now Instagram — culture. Also, the name Theremin might conjure the eerie sounds of horror films or sci-fi movies like 1951's "The Day the Earth Stood Still." WBUR's Andrea Shea talked to some contemporary artists collaborating on a performance to celebrate the early electronic instrument's upcoming 100th birthday.
Oct 31, 2019
Bernie Sanders On 2020 Race; Jeremy Hobson's Grandmother On Brexit
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Sen. Bernie Sanders is running for president on a platform pushing for "Medicare for All," the Green New Deal, tuition-free public colleges, legalizing marijuana and increasing taxes on wealthy Americans. We speak to him about his campaign thus far. Also, host Jeremy Hobson is reporting from London on Brexit. And he visits his 93-year-old grandmother, who supports leaving the EU, to hear how she and their extended family feel about the referendum.
Oct 31, 2019
The Growth Of Virtual Doctor Visits; A Brexiteer Makes His Case
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Virtual doctor visits are becoming more popular. But questions remain as to whether telemedicine will actually be able to deliver. NHPR's Jason Moon reports. Also, after months of Brexit deadlock, the House of Commons approved a Dec. 12 vote. We speak with Conservative Party MP Mike Wood, who supports the U.K. leaving the EU.
Oct 30, 2019
What Constitutes Coerced Suicide?; How Germans See Brexit
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Some Massachusetts lawmakers have introduced a bill that would make it illegal to coerce someone to commit suicide. We speak with former federal Judge Nancy Gertner about what constitutes coerced suicide. And in Berlin, there are questions about who might leave the European Union next. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports on how Germans are viewing Brexit.
Oct 30, 2019
Calif. Blackouts Impact People With Disabilities; Twyla Tharp's New Book
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California's largest utility PG&E announced planned power outages as wildfires rage across the state. While the intention is to prevent wildfires and save lives, not having power can be life-threatening for residents with disabilities. And, dancer and choreographer Twyla Tharp joins us to discuss her new book, "Keep It Moving: Lessons for the Rest of Your Life."
Oct 29, 2019
Teaching Kids Nutritious Cooking; Who Is Buying Guns Online?
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UNICEF reports one in three kids under five is either undernourished or overweight. Some say one glaring issue in the U.S. is a general lack of nutrition education. We talk with the founder of New Leaf Kitchen, a nonprofit that teaches kids how to cook nutritious, affordable meals in Cincinnati. Also, every year, millions of private gun sales are made with no background check requirement. WABE's Lisa Hagen reports on how much we know about where those guns end up for the public media project Guns & America.
Oct 29, 2019
Pregnant Women Using Pot Increases; Ronan Farrow On Media Corruption
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Expectant women are increasingly using marijuana products during pregnancy, according to new research from Kaiser Permanente. We talk with Kelly Young-Wolff about what's driving this increase in pot use amongst pregnant women. Also, "Catch and Kill" is journalist Ronan Farrow's harrowing account of systemic power, sexual abuse and cover-ups in the media and entertainment industries. Farrow speaks with us about his work of journalism that reads like a thriller.
Oct 28, 2019
Tipping In The U.S. Is Broken; Remembering Rep. John Conyers Jr.
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Recently published data from Uber shows drivers were tipped in just 16% of all rides. The Atlantic's Derek Thompson discusses what the Uber study tells us about tipping in general and the myth of meritocracy. Also, former Rep. John Conyers Jr., the longest-serving African American lawmaker in congressional history, died on Sunday. We remember his life and legacy.
Oct 28, 2019
California Fires Force Evacuations; Iowans Divided Over Democratic Candidates
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The Kincade Fire continues to burn in Sonoma County, California, and now there are other fires across the region that firefighters are working to put out. Here & Now's Tonya Mosley checks in with KPCC reporter Sharon McNary for the latest. And in Iowa, Democrats are split over which candidate is best equipped to beat President Trump.
Oct 25, 2019
Human Trafficking Worldwide; Tree Of Life Synagogue Rebuilds
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The Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh has been closed since last year when a gunman shot and killed 11 Jewish worshippers. But, like many other houses of worship that have experienced similar violence, Tree of Life leadership has vowed to rebuild. WESA's Liz Red reports. Also, police discovered the bodies of 39 people in the back of a trailer in Essex this week. The case has sparked discussion over human trafficking, although the details of this case are not yet known.
Oct 25, 2019
TikTok Explained; Eddie Murphy As Rudy Ray Moore In New 'Dolemite'
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TikTok was the most downloaded app globally for both Apple and Android in September. Here & Now technology analyst Ben Brock Johnson explains why the app is so popular. Also, Eddie Murphy's new film "Dolemite Is My Name" documents the career of Rudy Ray Moore, a Cleveland entertainer who did standup comedy and developed the persona of a street hustler. WCPN's David C. Barnett reports.
Oct 24, 2019
A Scholarly Look At The Rolling Stones; Tennis Star Bianca Andreescu
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The Rolling Stones are still touring more than 50 years after they got together in England. A new book takes an academic look at their music and their legacy. We speak with one of the book's editors. Also, host Tonya Mosley speaks with 19-year-old Canadian tennis player Bianca Andreescu, who is preparing for the WTA finals in China following her U.S. Open win.
Oct 24, 2019
Black Teen Suicide Attempts Rise; Google Makes A Quantum Leap
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A new Journal of Pediatrics study finds that black high schoolers are attempting suicide at rates higher than most of their peers. We speak with one of the study's authors who says we're missing the data that would help tackle that rise. Also, Google researchers announced Wednesday that their supercomputer Sycamore has reached "quantum supremacy," or the ability to do calculations at speeds once unimaginable. We talk with Yale University professor Steven Girvin about what this quantum breakthrough means for the future of computing and our daily lives.
Oct 23, 2019
Possible Alzheimer's Drug Advancements; Bernard-Henri Lévy On Syria
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Biotech company Biogen has announced plans to seek experimental approval for an Alzheimer's drug that appeared to fail in clinical trials earlier this year. STAT reporter Sharon Begley has the latest. Also, French philosopher Bernard-Henri Lévy, a vocal advocate for the Kurds, discusses the recent developments in Syria.
Oct 23, 2019
How Dogs Can Mend A Broken Heart; Republican Iowans On Trump
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Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. Even with the evolution of new drugs and minimally-invasive procedures, American hearts could still be at risk because of loneliness and work-related stress. One solution? Dog ownership. Cardiologist Sandeep Jauhar explains. And, in Iowa, 31 counties flipped from Obama to Trump in 2016, more than any other state. Maintaining those counties will be key to Trump's reelection bid. We look at how that support is holding up.
Oct 22, 2019
Mysterious Apple Tree Killer; 'Freestyle Love Supreme' On Broadway
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There's a new threat to the U.S.'s annual $4 billion apple industry. Researchers call it Rapid Apple Decline and are trying to figure out what's causing it, The Allegheny Front's Julie Grant reports. Also, "Freestyle Love Supreme" is now a Broadway show. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with three cast members of the hip-hop improvisational show.
Oct 22, 2019
Unilever Pledges To Reduce Plastic Use; Preparing For A Recession
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Unilever, the world's third-largest consumer packaged goods company, is pledging to cut in half its use of non-recyclable plastics by 2025. We talk with the man behind the bold pledge, Unilever's chief of research and development, Richard Slater. Also, CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger joins us to discuss what you should do with your money if you're spooked about the economy. And, former Sen. Heidi Heitkamp takes a look at the impeachment inquiry from her perch in North Dakota.
Oct 21, 2019
Are We Headed For A Tech Bubble Burst?; Obamacare Isn't Dead, Yet
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It has been a rocky time for high profile tech startups trying to go public. Many have seen their initial valuations drop. That has lead to comparisons to the tech bubble burst of 2000. But Derek Thompson says what's happening now is actually the opposite of what happened then. Also, as the U.S. awaits a federal court ruling on whether the Affordable Care Act is constitutional, opponents of the legislation have mostly stopped calling for a complete overhaul. Reporter Julie Rovner tells us how the Trump administration has weakened, ...
Oct 21, 2019
Oct. 18, 2019: Nicotine In E-Cigarettes; Venezuela Update
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Juul announced it will stop selling its fruity flavored e-cigarettes, but high nicotine levels are also why they are so addictive. Dr. Anne Melzer joins us to discuss what doctors are saying about a proposed cap on nicotine in e-cigarettes. And, nine months after political turmoil began in Venezuela, crippling U.S. sanctions have been impacting the lives of people in the country. Host Tonya Mosley talks with journalist Emiliana Duarte who is on the ground there.
Oct 18, 2019
Oct. 18, 2019: Tax On Menstrual Products; 'The Cave' Syria Documentary
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